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Sample records for hybrid wave propagation

  1. Hybrid simulation of wave propagation in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, B. H.; Delamere, P. A.; Damiano, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The transmission of waves between Jupiter and Io is an excellent case study of magnetosphere/ionosphere (MI) coupling because the power generated by the interaction at Io and the auroral power emitted at Jupiter can be reasonably estimated. Wave formation begins with mass loading as Io passes through the plasma torus. A ring beam distribution of pickup ions and perturbation of the local flow by the conducting satellite generate electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and Alfven waves. We investigate wave propagation through the torus and to higher latitudes using a hybrid plasma simulation with a physically realistic density gradient, assessing the transmission of Poynting flux and wave dispersion. We also analyze the propagation of kinetic Alfven waves through a density gradient in two dimensions.

  2. Paraxial WKB Method Applied to the Lower Hybrid Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N; Poli, E; Harvey, R; Wright, J C; Bonoli, P T; Phillips, C K; Simov, A P; Valeo, E

    2012-07-12

    The paraxial WKB (pWKB) approximation, also called beam tracing method, has been employed in order to study the propagation of lower hybrid (LH) waves in a tokamak plasma. Analogous to the well-know ray tracing method, this approach reduces Maxwell's equations to a set of ordinary differential equations, while, in addition, retains the effects of the finite beam cross-section, and, thus, the effects of diffraction. A new code, LHBEAM (Lower Hybrid BEAM tracing), is presented, which solves the pWKB equations in tokamak geometry for arbitrary launching conditions and for analytic and experimental plasma equilibria. In addition, LHBEAM includes linear electron Landau damping for the evaluation of the absorbed power density and the reconstruction of the wave electric field in both the physical and Fourier space. Illustrative LHBEAM calculations are presented along with a comparison with the ray tracing code GENRAY and the full wave solver TORIC-LH.

  3. Full-wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Lee, J. P.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wright, J. C.; Ding, B.; Yang, C.

    2015-11-01

    Studies of lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation have been conducted in the EAST tokamak where electron Landau damping (ELD) of the wave is typically weak, resulting in multiple passes of the wave front prior to its being absorbed in the plasma core. Under these conditions it is interesting to investigate full-wave effects that can become important at the plasma cut-off where the wave is reflected at the edge, as well as full-wave effects such as caustic formation in the core. High fidelity LH full-wave simulations were performed for EAST using the TORLH field solver. These simulations used sufficient poloidal mode resolution to resolve the perpendicular wavelengths associated with electron Landau damping of the LH wave at the plasma periphery, thus achieving fully converged electric field solutions at all radii of the plasma. Comparison of these results with ray tracing simulations will also be presented. Work supported by the US DOE under Contract No. DE-SC0010492 and DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  4. Hybrid Metameterials Enable Fast Electrical Modulation Of Freely Propagating Terahertz Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; O' Hara, John F; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate fast electrical modulation of freely propagating THz waves at room temperature using hybrid metamaterial devices. the devices are planar metamaterials fabricated on doped semiconducor epitaxial layers, which form hybrid metamaterial - Schottky diode structures. With an applied ac voltage bias, we show modulation of THz radiation at inferred frequencies over 2 MHz. The modulation speed is limited by the device depletion capacitance which may be reduced for even faster operation.

  5. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of damped guided wave propagation in complex composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave generation, propagation, and interaction with damage in complex composite structures. A local finite element model is deployed to capture the piezoelectric effects and actuation dynamics of the transmitter, while the global domain wave propagation and interaction with structural complexity (structure features and damage) are solved utilizing a local interaction simulation approach (LISA). This hybrid approach allows the accurate modeling of the local dynamics of the transducers and keeping the LISA formulation in an explicit format, which facilitates its readiness for parallel computing. The global LISA framework was extended through the 3D Kelvin–Voigt viscoelasticity theory to include anisotropic damping effects for composite structures, as an improvement over the existing LISA formulation. The global LISA framework was implemented using the compute unified device architecture running on graphic processing units. A commercial preprocessor is integrated seamlessly with the computational framework for grid generation and material property allocation to handle complex structures. The excitability and damping effects are successfully captured by this hybrid model, with experimental validation using the scanning laser doppler vibrometry. To demonstrate the capability of our hybrid approach for complex structures, guided wave propagation and interaction with a delamination in a composite panel with stiffeners is presented.

  6. Hybrid simulations of rotational discontinuities. [Alfven wave propagation in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Cargill, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    1D hybrid simulations of rotational discontinuities (RDs) are presented. When the angle between the discontinuity normal and the magnetic field (theta-BN) is 30 deg, the RD broadens into a quasi-steady state of width 60-80 c/omega-i. The hodogram has a characteristic S-shape. When theta-BN = 60 deg, the RD is much narrower (10 c/omega-i). For right handed rotations, the results are similar to theta-BN = 30 deg. For left handed rotations, the RD does not evolve much from its initial conditions and the S-shape in the hodogram is much less visible. The results can be understood in terms of matching a fast mode wavelike structure upstream of the RD with an intermediate mode one downstream.

  7. Hybrid dispersive media with controllable wave propagation: A new take on smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, Andrea E.; Zündel, Manuel; Flores Parra, Edgar A.; Delpero, Tommaso; Ruzzene, Massimo; Ermanni, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report on the wave transmission characteristics of a hybrid one dimensional (1D) medium. The hybrid characteristic is the result of the coupling between a 1D mechanical waveguide in the form of an elastic beam, supporting the propagation of transverse waves and a discrete electrical transmission line, consisting of a series of inductors connected to ground through capacitors. The capacitors correspond to a periodic array of piezoelectric patches that are bonded to the beam and that couple the two waveguides. The coupling leads to a hybrid medium that is characterized by a coincidence condition for the frequency/wavenumber value corresponding to the intersection of the branches of the two waveguides. In the frequency range centered at coincidence, the hybrid medium features strong attenuation of wave motion as a result of the energy transfer towards the electrical transmission line. This energy transfer, and the ensuing attenuation of wave motion, is alike the one obtained through internal resonating units of the kind commonly used in metamaterials. However, the distinct shape of the dispersion curves suggests how this energy transfer is not the result of a resonance and is therefore fundamentally different. This paper presents the numerical investigation of the wave propagation in the considered media, it illustrates experimental evidence of wave transmission characteristics and compares the performance of the considered configuration with that of internal resonating metamaterials. In addition, the ability to conveniently tune the dispersion properties of the electrical transmission line is exploited to adapt the periodicity of the domain and to investigate diatomic periodic configurations that are characterized by a richer dispersion spectrum and broader bandwidth of wave attenuation at coincidence. The medium consisting of mechanical, piezoelectric, and analog electronic elements can be easily interfaced to digital devices to offer a novel

  8. Hybrid dispersive media with controllable wave propagation: A new take on smart materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bergamini, Andrea E.; Zündel, Manuel; Flores Parra, Edgar A.; Ermanni, Paolo; Delpero, Tommaso; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, we report on the wave transmission characteristics of a hybrid one dimensional (1D) medium. The hybrid characteristic is the result of the coupling between a 1D mechanical waveguide in the form of an elastic beam, supporting the propagation of transverse waves and a discrete electrical transmission line, consisting of a series of inductors connected to ground through capacitors. The capacitors correspond to a periodic array of piezoelectric patches that are bonded to the beam and that couple the two waveguides. The coupling leads to a hybrid medium that is characterized by a coincidence condition for the frequency/wavenumber value corresponding to the intersection of the branches of the two waveguides. In the frequency range centered at coincidence, the hybrid medium features strong attenuation of wave motion as a result of the energy transfer towards the electrical transmission line. This energy transfer, and the ensuing attenuation of wave motion, is alike the one obtained through internal resonating units of the kind commonly used in metamaterials. However, the distinct shape of the dispersion curves suggests how this energy transfer is not the result of a resonance and is therefore fundamentally different. This paper presents the numerical investigation of the wave propagation in the considered media, it illustrates experimental evidence of wave transmission characteristics and compares the performance of the considered configuration with that of internal resonating metamaterials. In addition, the ability to conveniently tune the dispersion properties of the electrical transmission line is exploited to adapt the periodicity of the domain and to investigate diatomic periodic configurations that are characterized by a richer dispersion spectrum and broader bandwidth of wave attenuation at coincidence. The medium consisting of mechanical, piezoelectric, and analog electronic elements can be easily interfaced to digital devices to offer a novel

  9. Global particle simulation of lower hybrid wave propagation and mode conversion in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, J.; Lin, Z.; Kuley, A.

    2015-12-01

    Particle-in-cell simulation of lower hybrid (LH) waves in core plasmas is presented with a realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio in toroidal geometry. Due to the fact that LH waves mainly interact with electrons to drive the current, ion dynamic is described by cold fluid equations for simplicity, while electron dynamic is described by drift kinetic equations. This model could be considered as a new method to study LH waves in tokamak plasmas, which has advantages in nonlinear simulations. The mode conversion between slow and fast waves is observed in the simulation when the accessibility condition is not satisfied, which is consistent with the theory. The poloidal spectrum upshift and broadening effects are observed during LH wave propagation in the toroidal geometry.

  10. Global particle simulation of lower hybrid wave propagation and mode conversion in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, J.; Lin, Z.; Kuley, A.

    2015-12-10

    Particle-in-cell simulation of lower hybrid (LH) waves in core plasmas is presented with a realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio in toroidal geometry. Due to the fact that LH waves mainly interact with electrons to drive the current, ion dynamic is described by cold fluid equations for simplicity, while electron dynamic is described by drift kinetic equations. This model could be considered as a new method to study LH waves in tokamak plasmas, which has advantages in nonlinear simulations. The mode conversion between slow and fast waves is observed in the simulation when the accessibility condition is not satisfied, which is consistent with the theory. The poloidal spectrum upshift and broadening effects are observed during LH wave propagation in the toroidal geometry.

  11. Hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics simulation for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method and lattice Boltzmann method is presented for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas. In this framework, the multicomponent Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model considering both elastic and Coulomb collisions and the multicomponent force model based on the Guo model are introduced, which supply a hyperfine description on the interaction between electromagnetic wave and weakly ionized plasma. Cubic spline interpolation and mean filtering technique are separately introduced to solve the multiscalar problem and enhance the physical quantities, which are polluted by numerical noise. Several simulations have been implemented to validate our model. The numerical results are consistent with a simplified analytical model, which demonstrates that this model can obtain satisfying numerical solutions successfully.

  12. An assessment of full-wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John

    2008-11-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off--axis (r/a˜0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established modeling techniques use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wavenumber evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [1]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full-wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [2] and applied to scenarios at the density and magnetic field characteristic of devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER [B0 5 T, ne 1x10^20 m-3]. We find that retaining full wave effects due to diffraction and focusing has a strong effect on the location of wave absorption. Diffraction occurs at caustic surfaces and in resonance cones resulting in a large upshift of the parallel wavenumber and localized power deposition. For some values of density and magnetic field when the waves are fully accessible to the center of the plasma, the full wave description predicts all power being damped at larger radii (r/a ˜ 0.7) in contrast to ray tracing which shows more central power absorption. By incorporating a Fokker-Planck code for self-consistent treatment of the electron distribution and using an synthetic hard X-ray diagnostic we compare the code predictions by both full wave and ray tracing methods with recent Alcator C-Mod experiments. We will compare full-wave and ray tracing for low and high single pass damping regimes. [0pt] [1] G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32 1091 (1991). [0pt] [2] J. C. Wright, E. J. Valeo, C. K. Phillips and P. T. Bonoli, Comm. in Comput. Physics 4 545 (2008).

  13. An assessment of full wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Brambilla, M. A.

    2009-07-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves ({omega}{sub ci}<<{omega}<<{omega}{sub ce}, where {omega}{sub i,e}{identical_to}Z{sub i,e}eB/m{sub i,e}c) have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons and consequently are well-suited to driving current. Established modeling techniques use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) expansions with self-consistent non-Maxwellian distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wave number evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32, 1091 (1991)]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [J. C. Wright et al., Comm. Comp. Phys. 4, 545 (2008)] and coupled to an electron Fokker-Planck solver CQL3D[R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting, Montreal, 1992 (IAEA Institute of Physics Publishing, Vienna, 1993), USDOC/NTIS Document No. DE93002962, pp. 489-526] in order to self-consistently evolve nonthermal electron distributions characteristic of LH current drive (LHCD) experiments in devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER (B{sub 0}{approx_equal}5 T, n{sub e0}{approx_equal}1x10{sup 20} m{sup -3}). These simulations represent the first ever self-consistent simulations of LHCD utilizing both a full wave and Fokker-Planck calculation in toroidal geometry.

  14. Lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks in weak and strong absorption regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wallace, G. W.; Harvey, R. W.; Valeo, E. J.; Phillips, C. K.

    2011-12-23

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons at (2.5-3)xv{sub te}, where v{sub te} = (2T{sub e}/m{sub e}){sup 1/2}. The velocity at which damping occurs depends on the non-linear balance between quasilinear diffusion and collisions. For high efficiency current drive, a low parallel index of refraction, n{sub ||}, corresponding to a high phase velocity, is chosen. Depending on the plasma electron temperature this may put the wave propagation in a multi-pass regime. In cases of low parallel refractive index, ray tracing with no SOL has been shown to have differences with experiment and collision effects in the scrape off layer may be important. Using a coupled model of the full wave code, TORLH, and the Fokker-Planck code, CQL3D, the importance of full wave effects in weak and strong absorption regimes are studied.

  15. Propagation of the lower hybrid wave in a density fluctuating scrape-off layer (SOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Kabalan, K. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The perturbation of the lower hybrid wave (LH) power spectrum by fluctuations of the plasma in the vicinity of the antenna is investigated by solving the full wave equation in a slab geometry using COMSOL Multiphysics®. The numerical model whose generality allows to study the effect of various types of fluctuations, including those with short characteristic wavelengths is validated against a coupling code in quiescent regimes. When electron density fluctuations along the toroidal direction are incorporated in the dielectric tensor over a thin perturbed layer in front of the grill, the power spectrum may be strongly modified from the antenna mouth to the plasma separatrix as the LH wave propagates. The diffraction effect by density fluctuations leads to the appearance of multiple satellite lobes with randomly varying positions and the averaged perturbation is found to be maximum for the Fourier components of the fluctuating spectrum in the vicinity of the launched LH wavelength. This highlights that fast toroidal inhomogeneities with short characteristics length scales in front of the grill may change significantly the initial LH power spectrum used in coupled ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations.

  16. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of guided wave propagation and interaction with damage in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave propagation and interaction with damage in composite structures. This hybrid approach uses a local finite element model (FEM) to compute the excitability of guided waves generated by piezoelectric transducers, while the global domain wave propagation, wave-damage interaction, and boundary reflections are modeled with the local interaction simulation approach (LISA). A small-size multi-physics FEM with non-reflective boundaries (NRB) was built to obtain the excitability information of guided waves generated by the transmitter. Frequency-domain harmonic analysis was carried out to obtain the solution for all the frequencies of interest. Fourier and inverse Fourier transform and frequency domain convolution techniques are used to obtain the time domain 3-D displacement field underneath the transmitter under an arbitrary excitation. This 3-D displacement field is then fed into the highly efficient time domain LISA simulation module to compute guided wave propagation, interaction with damage, and reflections at structural boundaries. The damping effect of composite materials was considered in the modified LISA formulation. The grids for complex structures were generated using commercial FEM preprocessors and converted to LISA connectivity format. Parallelization of the global LISA solution was achieved through Compute Unified Design Architecture (CUDA) running on Graphical Processing Unit (GPU). The multi-physics local FEM can reliably capture the detailed dimensions and local dynamics of the piezoelectric transducers. The global domain LISA can accurately solve the 3-D elastodynamic wave equations in a highly efficient manner. By combining the local FEM with global LISA, the efficient and accurate simulation of guided wave structural health monitoring procedure is achieved. Two numerical case studies are presented: (1) wave propagation in a unidirectional CFRP composite plate

  17. The Effects Of Finite Electron Temperature And Diffraction On Lowere Hybrid Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    White, J. C.; Bertelli, M.

    2014-02-24

    In this paper we show that the commonly used cold plasma dispersion relation for plasma waves in the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) produces a wave trajectory that is notably different than when thermal corrections to the Hermitian part of the dielectric tensor are retained. This is in contrast to the common implementation in LH simulation codes in which thermal effects are retained only for the anti-Hermitian part of the dielectric tensor used for damping calculations. We show which term is the critical one to retain in the dielectric tensor and discuss implications for modeling of LHRF waves in present day and future devices. We conclude with some observations on the effects of diffraction that may be isolated once thermal effects are retained in both ray tracing and full-wave approaches.

  18. Wave propagation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenenboom, P. H. L.

    The phenomenon of wave propagation is encountered frequently in a variety of engineering disciplines. It has been realized that for a growing number of problems the solution can only be obtained by discretization of the boundary. Advantages of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) over domain-type methods are related to the reduction of the number of space dimensions and of the modelling effort. It is demonstrated how the BEM can be applied to wave propagation phenomena by establishing the fundamental relationships. A numerical solution procedure is also suggested. In connection with a discussion of the retarded potential formulation, it is shown how the wave propagation problem can be cast into a Boundary Integral Formulation (BIF). The wave propagation problem in the BIF can be solved by time-successive evaluation of the boundary integrals. The example of pressure wave propagation following a sodium-water reaction in a Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor steam generator is discussed.

  19. An assessment of full wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid wavesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Brambilla, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves (Ωci≪ω≪Ωce, where Ωi ,e≡Zi ,eeB/mi ,ec) have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons and consequently are well-suited to driving current. Established modeling techniques use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) expansions with self-consistent non-Maxwellian distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wave number evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32, 1091 (1991)]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [J. C. Wright et al., Comm. Comp. Phys. 4, 545 (2008)] and coupled to an electron Fokker-Planck solver CQL3D [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting, Montreal, 1992 (IAEA Institute of Physics Publishing, Vienna, 1993), USDOC/NTIS Document No. DE93002962, pp. 489-526] in order to self-consistently evolve nonthermal electron distributions characteristic of LH current drive (LHCD) experiments in devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER (B0≈5 T, ne0≈1×1020 m-3). These simulations represent the first ever self-consistent simulations of LHCD utilizing both a full wave and Fokker-Planck calculation in toroidal geometry.

  20. Wave Propagation Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  1. A unified formulation for guided-wave propagation in multi-layered mixed anisotropic-isotropic hybrid aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazanchy, Darun; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    A unified approach was formulated to predict guided-wave propagation in a material regardless its degree of anisotropy, thereby having one solution method for both isotropic and anisotropic material. The unified approach was based on the coupled eigenvalue problem derived from Chirstoffels equation for a lamina. The eigenvalue problem yielded a set of eigenvalues, and corresponding eigenvectors that were used to obtain the stress-displacement matrix. The dispersion curves were obtained by applying the traction free boundary conditions to the stress-displacement matrix, and searching for sign changes in the complex determinant of the matrix. To search for sign changes, hence the velocity-wavenumber pairs which yielded a solution to the problem, the real and imaginary part of the complex determinant had to change sign simultaneously. A phase angle approach was, therefore, developed and successfully applied. A refinement algorithm was applied to refine the accuracy of the solution without increasing the computational time significantly. A high accuracy was required to calculated the correct partial-wave participation factors. The obtained partial-wave participation factors were used to calculate the modeshape through the thickness for each velocity-wavenumber pair. To identify the different wave types, A0, S0, SHS0, SHA0, a modeshape identification was applied successfully. The unified approach was evaluated for hybrid aerospace composites. In addition, the two most common solution methods: (i) the global matrix method; and (ii) the transfer matrix method were applied, and a comparative study between the different methods was performed.

  2. Parametric excitation of coupled fast and slow upper hybrid waves by counter-propagating circularly polarized lasers in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kanika; Baliyan, Sweta; Sajal, Vivek; Kumar, Ravindra; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-07-01

    The parametric decay of large amplitude non-resonant beating mode of counter-propagating lasers (having a frequency difference ≥ 2 ω p ) into a pair of upper hybrid waves is studied in magnetized plasma. One of the excited upper hybrid waves (known as fast wave) having phase velocity close to c , can be utilized for electron acceleration. The coupled mode equations of fast and slow upper hybrid waves are modelled by solving equation of motion and continuity equation simultaneously (using the density perturbation technique) to derive the dispersion relation for two plasmon decay process. The growth rate of the present excitation process using right circularly polarized beating lasers is higher as compared with the growth rates of the excitation processes using ordinary and extraordinary beating lasers. However, the growth rate is not significant in the case of left circularly polarized beating lasers. The growth rate ˜ 0.15 ω p s - 1 is achieved for right circularly polarized beating lasers having v 1 , 2 / c = 0.1 for scattering angle θ s ˜ 160 ° and applied magnetic field ˜ 90 T. The growth rate of fast upper hybrid wave was reduced with the applied axial magnetic field in the present case. The present work is not only significant for the electron acceleration by fast upper hybrid wave but also for diagnostic purpose.

  3. Seismic wave propagation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A hybrid, finite-difference technique was developed for modeling nonlinear soil amplification from three-dimensional, finite-fault radiation patters for earthquakes in arbitrary earth models. The method was applied to the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake. Particle velocities were computed on a plane at 5-km depth, immediately above the causative fault. Time-series of the strike-perpendicular, lateral velocities then were propagated vertically in a soil column typical of the San Fernando Valley. Suitable material models were adapted from a suite used to model ground motions at the US Nevada Test Site. The effects of nonlinearity reduced relative spectral amplitudes by about 40% at frequencies above 1.5 Hz but only by 10% at lower frequencies. Runs made with source-depth amplitudes increased by a factor of two showed relative amplitudes above 1.5 Hz reduced by a total of 70% above 1.5 Hz and 20% at lower frequencies. Runs made with elastic-plastic material models showed similar behavior to runs made with Masing-Rule models.

  4. Effects of alpha beam on the parametric decay of a parallel propagating circularly polarized Alfven wave: Hybrid simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Tao, Xin; Hao, Yufei; Wang, Shui

    2013-09-15

    Alfven waves with a finite amplitude are found to be unstable to a parametric decay in low beta plasmas. In this paper, the parametric decay of a circularly polarized Alfven wave in a proton-electron-alpha plasma system is investigated with one-dimensional (1-D) hybrid simulations. In cases without alpha particles, with the increase of the wave number of the pump Alfven wave, the growth rate of the decay instability increases and the saturation amplitude of the density fluctuations slightly decrease. However, when alpha particles with a sufficiently large bulk velocity along the ambient magnetic field are included, at a definite range of the wave numbers of the pump wave, both the growth rate and the saturation amplitude of the parametric decay become much smaller and the parametric decay is heavily suppressed. At these wave numbers, the resonant condition between the alpha particles and the daughter Alfven waves is satisfied, therefore, their resonant interactions might play an important role in the suppression of the parametric decay instability.

  5. Effects of alpha beam on the parametric decay of a parallel propagating circularly polarized Alfven wave: Hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Tao, Xin; Hao, Yufei; Wang, Shui

    2013-09-01

    Alfven waves with a finite amplitude are found to be unstable to a parametric decay in low beta plasmas. In this paper, the parametric decay of a circularly polarized Alfven wave in a proton-electron-alpha plasma system is investigated with one-dimensional (1-D) hybrid simulations. In cases without alpha particles, with the increase of the wave number of the pump Alfven wave, the growth rate of the decay instability increases and the saturation amplitude of the density fluctuations slightly decrease. However, when alpha particles with a sufficiently large bulk velocity along the ambient magnetic field are included, at a definite range of the wave numbers of the pump wave, both the growth rate and the saturation amplitude of the parametric decay become much smaller and the parametric decay is heavily suppressed. At these wave numbers, the resonant condition between the alpha particles and the daughter Alfven waves is satisfied, therefore, their resonant interactions might play an important role in the suppression of the parametric decay instability.

  6. Global effects of transmitted shock wave propagation through the Earth's inner magnetosphere: First results from 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2016-09-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmaspheric particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that shocks cause strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  7. Wave propagation in isogrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Whitney D.; Doyle, Derek; Arritt, Brandon

    2011-04-01

    This work focuses on an analysis of wave propagation in isogrid structures as it relates to Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) methods. Assembly, integration, and testing (AI&T) of satellite structures in preparation for launch includes significant time for testing and reworking any issues that may arise. SHM methods are being investigated as a means to validate the structure during assembly and truncate the number of tests needed to qualify the structure for the launch environment. The most promising of these SHM methods uses an active wave-based method in which an actuator propagates a Lamb wave through the structure; the Lamb wave is then received by a sensor and evaluated over time to detect structural changes. To date this method has proven effective in locating structural defects in a complex satellite panel; however, the attributes associated with the first wave arrival change significantly as the wave travels through ribs and joining features. Previous studies have been conducted in simplified ribbed structures, giving initial insight into the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this work, the study has been extended numerically to the isogrid plate case. Wave propagation was modeled using commercial finite element analysis software. The results of the analyses offer further insight into the complexities of wave propagation in isogrid structures.

  8. Whistlers, helicons, and lower hybrid waves: The physics of radio frequency wave propagation and absorption for current drive via Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.

    2015-09-15

    This introductory-level tutorial article describes the application of plasma waves in the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) for current drive in tokamaks. Wave damping mechanisms in a nearly collisionless hot magnetized plasma are briefly described, and the connections between the properties of the damping mechanisms and the optimal choices of wave properties (mode, frequency, wavelength) are explored. The two wave modes available for current drive in the LHRF are described and compared. The terms applied to these waves in different applications of plasma physics are elucidated. The character of the ray paths of these waves in the LHRF is illustrated in slab and toroidal geometries. Applications of these ideas to experiments in the DIII-D tokamak are discussed.

  9. Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

    2013-04-23

    Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

  10. Wave propagation in solids and fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of mathematical analysis for wave phenomena in gases, solids, and liquids are presented in an introduction for scientists and engineers. Chapters are devoted to oscillatory phenomena, the physics of wave propagation, partial differential equations for wave propagation, transverse vibration of strings, water waves, and sound waves. Consideration is given to the dynamics of viscous and inviscid fluids, wave propagation in elastic media, and variational methods in wave phenomena. 41 refs.

  11. Lower Hybrid to Whistler Wave Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, Dan

    2012-07-16

    In this presentation we discuss recent work concerning the conversion of whistler waves to lower hybrid waves (as well as the inverse process). These efforts have been motivated by the issue of attenuation of upward propagating whistler waves in the ionosphere generated by VLF transmitters on the ground, i.e., the 'Starks 20 db' problem, which affects the lifetimes of energetic electrons trapped in the geomagnetic field at low magnetic altitude (L). We discuss recent fluid and kinetic plasma simulations as well as ongoing experiments at UCLA to quantify linear and nonlinear mode conversion of lower hybrid to whistler waves.

  12. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  13. Wave propagation in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Jan Ø.; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the nonlinear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within general relativity this approximation is valid and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and nonlinearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated with the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that the group velocity is smaller than the speed of light. It is therefore important, within such a framework, to take into account the fact that different parts of a galaxy will see changes in the environment at different times. A full nonstatic analysis may be necessary under those conditions.

  14. A two-dimensional hybrid method for modeling seismic waves propagation in laterally-varying anisotropic media and its application to central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Wen, L.

    2009-12-01

    The shear wave splitting measurements provide important information on mantle flow, deformation and mineralogy. They are now routinely made using the method developed by Silver and Chan (1994). More and more dense regional observations also begin to reveal sharp spatial variations of seismic anisotropy which could not be explained by simplified horizontal homogeneous anisotropic structures. To better constrain the mantle anisotropy beneath those regions, we developed a two-dimensional hybrid method for simulating seismic wave propagation in laterally-varying anisotropic media [Zhao et al., 2008]. In this presentation, we apply the method to study anisotropic structures beneath central Tibet by waveform modeling the teleseismic SKS phases recorded in the International Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalayas project (INDEPTH) III. Using data from two events that were selected such that the stations and sources can be approximated as a two-dimensional profile, we derived an optimal model for the anisotropic structures of the upper mantle beneath the study region: a 50-70 km thick anisotropic layer with a fast direction trending N95°E beneath the Qiangtang block, a 150 km thick and 60 km wide anisotropic segment with an axis trending N95°E beneath the northernmost Lhasa block, and a ~30 km wide transition zone in between within which the fast direction trends N45°E and the depth extent of anisotropy decreases northward sharply. Synthetic waveform modeling further suggests that an anisotropic model with a horizontal symmetry axis can explain the observations better than that with a dipping symmetry, and a low velocity zone possibly underlies or mixes with the anisotropic structures in the northern portion of the region. The optimal model yields synthetic seismograms that are in good agreement with the observations in both amplitudes and relative arrival times of SKS phases. Synthetic tests also indicate that different elastic constants, source parameters and depth

  15. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  16. Wave propagation in bianisotropic metamaterials: angular selective transmission.

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Han; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chern, Ruey-Lin

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the basic features of wave propagation in bianisotropic metamaterials characterized by asymmetric magnetoelectric tensors with zero diagonal elements. The wave propagation is described by a biquadratic dispersion relation with two elliptically polarized eigenwaves. In particular, the bianisotropic media may possess a hybrid character of the elliptic and hyperbolic dispersions. For a wave incident from vacuum onto a bianisotropic medium, there exist an ordinary and an inversion critical angle, leading to angular selective transmission. A standard and a complementary type of angular selective transmissions are illustrated with the incidence of Gaussian beams based on Fourier integral formulation. PMID:25401604

  17. Active Wave Propagation and Sensing in Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Martin, William N.; Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Ferguson, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    Health monitoring of aerospace structures can be done using an active interrogation approach with diagnostic Lamb waves. Piezoelectric patches are often used to generate the waves, and it is helpful to understand how these waves propagate through a structure. To give a basic understanding of the actual physical process of wave propagation, a model is developed to simulate asymmetric wave propagation in a panel and to produce a movie of the wave motion. The waves can be generated using piezoceramic patches of any size or shape. The propagation, reflection, and interference of the waves are represented in the model. Measuring the wave propagation is the second important aspect of damage detection. Continuous sensors are useful for measuring waves because of the distributed nature of the sensor and the wave. Two sensor designs are modeled, and their effectiveness in measuring acoustic waves is studied. The simulation model developed is useful to understand wave propagation and to optimize the type of sensors that might be used for health monitoring of plate-like structures.

  18. Propagation of a fluidization - combustion wave

    SciTech Connect

    Pron, G.P.; Gusachenko, L.K.; Zarko, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    A fluidization-combustion wave propagating through a fixed and initially cool bed was created by igniting coal at the top surface of the bed. The proposed physical interpretation of the phenomenon is in qualitative agreement with the experimental dependences of the characteristics of the process on determining parameters. A kindling regime with forced wave propagation is suggested.

  19. New high-order, semi-implicit Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin - Spectral Element Method (HDG-SEM) for simulation of complex wave propagation involving coupling between seismic, hydro-acoustic and infrasonic waves: numerical analysis and case studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, S.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.

    2015-12-01

    New seismological monitoring networks combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna, providing complementary observation of source-radiated waves. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-media - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound - wave simulation methods, in order to improve our physical understanding of energy exchanges at material interfaces.We present here a new development of a high-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method, for the simulation of coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation, within a unified framework ([1],[2]) allowing for continuous and discontinuous Spectral Element Methods (SEM) to be used in the same simulation, with conforming and non-conforming meshes. The HDG-SEM approximation leads to differential - algebraic equations, which can be solved implicitly using energy-preserving time-schemes.The proposed HDG-SEM is computationally attractive, when compared with classical Discontinuous Galerkin methods, involving only the approximation of the single-valued traces of the velocity field along the element interfaces as globally coupled unknowns. The formulation is based on a variational approximation of the physical fluxes, which are shown to be the explicit solution of an exact Riemann problem at each element boundaries. This leads to a highly parallel and efficient unstructured and high-order accurate method, which can be space-and-time adaptive.A numerical study of the accuracy and convergence of the HDG-SEM is performed through a number of case studies involving elastic-acoustic (infrasound) coupling with geometries of increasing complexity. Finally, the performance of the method is illustrated through realistic case studies involving ground wave propagation associated to topography effects.In conclusion, we outline some on-going extensions of the method.References:[1] Cockburn, B., Gopalakrishnan, J., Lazarov, R., Unified hybridization of discontinuous Galerkin, mixed and

  20. Pulse Wave Propagation in the Arterial Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vosse, Frans N.; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The beating heart creates blood pressure and flow pulsations that propagate as waves through the arterial tree that are reflected at transitions in arterial geometry and elasticity. Waves carry information about the matter in which they propagate. Therefore, modeling of arterial wave propagation extends our knowledge about the functioning of the cardiovascular system and provides a means to diagnose disorders and predict the outcome of medical interventions. In this review we focus on the physical and mathematical modeling of pulse wave propagation, based on general fluid dynamical principles. In addition we present potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. Models of short- and long-term adaptation of the arterial system and methods that deal with uncertainties in personalized model parameters and boundary conditions are briefly discussed, as they are believed to be major topics for further study and will boost the significance of arterial pulse wave modeling even more.

  1. Making and Propagating Elastic Waves: Overview of the new wave propagation code WPP

    SciTech Connect

    McCandless, K P; Petersson, N A; Nilsson, S; Rodgers, A; Sjogreen, B; Blair, S C

    2006-05-09

    We are developing a new parallel 3D wave propagation code at LLNL called WPP (Wave Propagation Program). WPP is being designed to incorporate the latest developments in embedded boundary and mesh refinement technology for finite difference methods, as well as having an efficient portable implementation to run on the latest supercomputers at LLNL. We are currently exploring seismic wave applications, including a recent effort to compute ground motions for the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake. This paper will briefly describe the wave propagation problem, features of our numerical method to model it, implementation of the wave propagation code, and results from the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake simulation.

  2. Propagation of shock waves through petroleum suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuk, K. V.; Makhkamov, S. M.; Azizov, K. K.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous shock wave propagation through petroleum with a high paraffin content was studied in an attempt to confirm the theoretically predicted breakdown of a forward shock wave into oscillating waves and wave packets as well as individual solitons. Tests were performed in a shock tube at 10, 20, and 50 to 60 C, with pure kerosene as reference and with kerosene + 5, 10, 15, and 20% paraffin. The addition of paraffin was found to radically alter the rheodynamic characteristics of the medium and, along with it, the pattern of shock wave propagation. The integro-differential equation describing a one dimensional hydraulic shock process in viscoelastic fluids is reduced to the Burgers-Korteweg-deVries equation, which is solved numerically for given values of the system parameters. The results indicate that the theory of shock wave propagation through such an anomalous suspension must be modified.

  3. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  4. Controls on flood and sediment wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Maarten; Lane, Stuart N.; Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of flood wave propagation - celerity and transformation - through a fluvial system is of generic importance for flood forecasting/mitigation. In association with flood wave propagation, sediment wave propagation may induce local erosion and sedimentation, which will affect infrastructure and riparian natural habitats. Through analysing flood and sediment wave propagation, we gain insight in temporal changes in transport capacity (the flood wave) and sediment availability and transport (the sediment wave) along the river channel. Heidel (1956) was amongst the first to discuss the progressive lag of sediment concentration behind the corresponding flood wave based on field measurements. Since then this type of hysteresis has been characterized in a number of studies, but these were often based on limited amount of floods and measurement sites, giving insufficient insight into associated forcing mechanisms. Here, as part of a project concerned with the hydrological and geomorphic forcing of sediment transfer processes in alpine environments, we model the downstream propagation of short duration, high frequency releases of water and sediment (purges) from a flow intake in the Borgne d'Arolla River in south-west Switzerland. A total of >50 events were measured at 1 minute time intervals using pressure transducers and turbidity probes at a number of sites along the river. We show that flood and sediment wave propagation can be well represented through simple convection diffusion models. The models are calibrated/validated to describe the set of measured waves and used to explain the observed variation in wave celerity and diffusion. In addition we explore the effects of controlling factors including initial flow depth, flood height, flood duration, bed roughness, bed slope and initial sediment concentration, on the wave propagation processes. We show that the effects of forcing mechanisms on flood and sediment wave propagation will lead to different

  5. Overview of near millimeter wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, W. A.

    1981-02-01

    Near millimeter wave (NMMW) propagation problems are divided into three classes: propagation through homogeneous, turbid, and turbulent atmospheres. These classical forms include anomalous water vapor absorption in a homogeneous atmosphere as well as scintillation phenomena associated with propagation through severe weather and 'dirty battlefield' environments. Examples of the existing, inadequate, scintillation data base are given and the lack of supporting meteorological data noted. Carefully designed NMMW scintillation experiments with equally carefully designed micro-meteorological support are needed.

  6. Propagation of waves along an impedance boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the scalar wave field due to a point source above a plane impedance boundary is presented. A surface wave is found to be an essential component of the total wave field. It is shown that, as a result of ducting of energy by the surface wave, the amplitude of the total wave near the boundary can be greater than it would be if the boundary were perfectly reflecting. Asymptotic results, valid near the boundary, are obtained both for the case of finite impedance (the soft-boundary case) and for the limiting case in which the impedance becomes infinite (the hard-boundary case). In the latter, the wave amplitude in the farfield decreases essentially inversely as the horizontal propagation distance; in the former (if the surface-wave term is neglected), it decreases inversely as the square of the horizontal propagation distance.

  7. Longitudinal nonlinear wave propagation through soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Valdez, M; Balachandran, B

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, wave propagation through soft tissue is investigated. A primary aim of this investigation is to gain a fundamental understanding of the influence of soft tissue nonlinear material properties on the propagation characteristics of stress waves generated by transient loadings. Here, for computational modeling purposes, the soft tissue is modeled as a nonlinear visco-hyperelastic material, the geometry is assumed to be one-dimensional rod geometry, and uniaxial propagation of longitudinal waves is considered. By using the linearized model, a basic understanding of the characteristics of wave propagation is developed through the dispersion relation and in terms of the propagation speed and attenuation. In addition, it is illustrated as to how the linear system can be used to predict brain tissue material parameters through the use of available experimental ultrasonic attenuation curves. Furthermore, frequency thresholds for wave propagation along internal structures, such as axons in the white matter of the brain, are obtained through the linear analysis. With the nonlinear material model, the authors analyze cases in which one of the ends of the rods is fixed and the other end is subjected to a loading. Two variants of the nonlinear model are analyzed and the associated predictions are compared with the predictions of the corresponding linear model. The numerical results illustrate that one of the imprints of the nonlinearity on the wave propagation phenomenon is the steepening of the wave front, leading to jump-like variations in the stress wave profiles. This phenomenon is a consequence of the dependence of the local wave speed on the local deformation of the material. As per the predictions of the nonlinear material model, compressive waves in the structure travel faster than tensile waves. Furthermore, it is found that wave pulses with large amplitudes and small elapsed times are attenuated over shorter spans. This feature is due to the elevated

  8. Transport equations for lower hybrid waves in a turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonca, J. T.; Horton, W.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Elskens, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Injection and control of intense lower hybrid (LH) wave spectra is required to achieve steady state tokamak operation in the new WEST tokamak at CEA France. The tungsten [W] environment [E] steadytstate [S] tokamak [T] has two high-power [20 MW] lower hybrid antennas launching 3.7 GHz polarized waves for steady fusion-grade plasmas control. The wave propagation and scattering is described in by ray equations in the presence of the drift wave turbulence. Theory for the wave transport equations for propagation of the wave momentum and energy densities are derived from the Wigner function method of QM. The limits of the diffraction and scattering for ray transport theory are established. Comparisons are made between the wave propagation in WEST and ITER tokamaks. Supported by the University of Texas at Austin; PIIM/CNRS at Aix-Marseille University and University of Sao Paulo.

  9. Electromagnetic wave propagation characteristics in unimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingpeng; Huang, Kama

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reactions have attracted interests because of their benefits for enhancement of reaction rates. However, the problems, such as hot spots and thermal runaway, limit the application of microwaves in the chemical industry. To study the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in a chemical reaction is critical to solve the problems. The research on the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction that is a simple model reaction, can be generalized to the research in a chemical reaction. The approximate expressions of the attenuation and dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction are derived by the nonlinear propagation theory. Specially, when the reaction rate is zero, the derived approximate expressions can be reduced to the formulas in low-loss dispersive media. Moreover, a 1D mold is used to validate the feasibility of the approximate expressions. The influences of the reaction rate and initial reactant concentration on the characteristics are obtained.

  10. Wave propagation into the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirota, I.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observations of various types of waves propagating into the middle atmosphere are reviewed. Emphasis is made on the excitation processes in the lower atmosphere and their vertical propagation through the background flow as a function of the latitude, height and season. The following subjects are discussed: (1) Vertical propagation of quasi-stationary forced Rossby waves into the winter stratosphere in connection with the sudden warming; (2) Spectral distribution and seasonal characteristics of normal mode (free) Rossby waves and the asymmetry of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres; and (3) Seasonal variation of internal gravity waves in the middle atmosphere. Further discussions are presented for future studies based on accumulated observational data during the MAP period.

  11. Faraday Pilot-Waves: Generation and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano-Rios, Carlos; Milewski, Paul; Nachbin, André; Bush, John

    2015-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of drops bouncing on a fluid bath subjected to vertical vibration. We solve a system of linear PDEs to compute the surface wave generation and propagation. Waves are triggered at each bounce, giving rise to the Faraday pilot-wave field. The model captures several of the behaviors observed in the laboratory, including transitions between a variety of bouncing and walking states, the Doppler effect, and droplet-droplet interactions. Thanks to the NSF.

  12. The Propagation of Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, K. G.

    1988-08-01

    Preface; 1. The ionosphere and magnetosphere; 2. The basic equations; 3. The constitutive relations; 4. Magnetoionic theory I. Polarisation and refractive index; 5. Magnetoionic theory II. Rays and group velocity; 6. Stratified media. The booker quartic; 7. Slowly varying medium. The W.K.B. solution; 8. The Airy integral function and the Stokes phenomenon; 9. Integration by steepest descents; 10. Ray tracing in a loss-free stratified medium; 11. Reflection and transmission coefficients; 12. Ray theory results for isotropic ionosphere; 13. Ray theory results for anisotropic plasmas; 14. General ray tracing; 15. Full wave solutions for isotropic ionosphere; 16. Coupled wave eqations; 17. Coalescence of couling points; 18. Full wave methods for anisotropic stratified media; 19. Applications of full wave methods; Answers to problems; Bibliography; Index of definitions of the more important symbols; Subject and name index.

  13. Propagation of polarized waves in inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    A parabolic equation for electromagnetic wave propagation in a random medium is extended to include the depolarization effects in the narrow-angle, forward-scattering setting. Closed-form parabolic equations for propagation of the coherence tensor are derived under a Markov approximation model. For a general partially coherent and partially polarized beam wave, this equation can be reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations, allowing a simple numeric solution. An analytical solution exists for statistically homogeneous waves. Estimates based on the perturbation solution support the common knowledge that the depolarization at the optical frequencies is negligible for atmospheric turbulence propagation. These results indicate that the recently published theory [Opt. Lett.40, 3077 (2015)10.1364/OL.40.003077] is not valid for atmospheric turbulence. PMID:27409697

  14. Propagating precipitation waves: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Mark R; Collison, Darrell; Showalter, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    Traveling precipitation waves, including counterrotating spiral waves, are observed in the precipitation reaction of AlCl3 with NaOH [Volford, A.; et al. Langmuir 2007, 23, 961 - 964]. Experimental and computational studies are carried out to characterize the wave behavior in cross-section configurations. A modified sol-coagulation model is developed that is based on models of Liesegang band and redissolution systems. The dynamics of the propagating waves is characterized in terms of growth and redissolution of a precipitation feature that travels through a migrating band of colloidal precipitate. PMID:24191642

  15. High-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method for wave propagation simulation in complex geophysical media (elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic); an unifying framework to couple continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, Sebastien; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Guillot, Laurent; Mariotti, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  16. High-Order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) Method for Wave Propagation Simulation in Complex Geophysical Media - Elastic, Acoustic and Hydro-Acoustic - an Unifying Framework to Couple Continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sébastien, T.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.; Mariotti, C.

    2014-12-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  17. SH wave propagation in piezoelectric coupled plates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan

    2002-05-01

    The propagation of shear horizontal (SH) wave in a piezoelectric coupled plate is investigated in this paper. Full account is taken of the piezoelectric coupling effect to the isotropic metal core in the mathematical model. One of the applications of this research is in the damage detection of the host metal structure from the wave propagation signal excited by the piezoelectric layer which is surface bonded on the surface of a metal core. This research is distinct from the previous works on SH propagation in piezoelectric structures because the piezoelectric materials were used as the core structure in the previous studies, and the potential of the studies was mainly on time-delay devices. The dispersive characteristics and the mode shapes of the transverse displacement and the electric potential of the piezoelectric layer are theoretically derived. The results from numerical simulations show that the phase velocity of the plate structure tends to the bulk shear wave velocity of the host metal core at high wavenumber when the shear wave velocity of host plate is larger than that of PZT bonded on it. Furthermore, there are three asymptotic solutions of wave propagation when the shear wave velocity of the host plate is smaller than that of PZT. The mode shape of the electric potential of the piezoelectric layer changes from the quadratic shape at lower wavenumber and with thinner piezoelectric layer to the shape with more zero nodes at higher wavenumber and with thicker piezoelectric layer. These findings are significant in the application of wave propagation in piezoelectric coupled structures. PMID:12046935

  18. Propagating waves can explain irregular neural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keane, Adam; Gong, Pulin

    2015-01-28

    Cortical neurons in vivo fire quite irregularly. Previous studies about the origin of such irregular neural dynamics have given rise to two major models: a balanced excitation and inhibition model, and a model of highly synchronized synaptic inputs. To elucidate the network mechanisms underlying synchronized synaptic inputs and account for irregular neural dynamics, we investigate a spatially extended, conductance-based spiking neural network model. We show that propagating wave patterns with complex dynamics emerge from the network model. These waves sweep past neurons, to which they provide highly synchronized synaptic inputs. On the other hand, these patterns only emerge from the network with balanced excitation and inhibition; our model therefore reconciles the two major models of irregular neural dynamics. We further demonstrate that the collective dynamics of propagating wave patterns provides a mechanistic explanation for a range of irregular neural dynamics, including the variability of spike timing, slow firing rate fluctuations, and correlated membrane potential fluctuations. In addition, in our model, the distributions of synaptic conductance and membrane potential are non-Gaussian, consistent with recent experimental data obtained using whole-cell recordings. Our work therefore relates the propagating waves that have been widely observed in the brain to irregular neural dynamics. These results demonstrate that neural firing activity, although appearing highly disordered at the single-neuron level, can form dynamical coherent structures, such as propagating waves at the population level. PMID:25632135

  19. Wave propagation in metamaterial lattice sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Wen, Jihong; Yin, Jianfei; Yu, Dianlong

    2016-04-01

    This paper designed a special acoustic metamaterial 3D Kagome lattice sandwich plate. Dispersion properties and vibration responses of both traditional plate and metamaterial plate are investigated based on FEA methods. The traditional plate does not have low-frequency complete bandgaps, but the metamaterial plate has low-frequency complete bandgap (at 620Hz) coming from the symmetrical local cantilever resonators. The bandgap frequency is approximate to the first-order natural frequency of the oscillator. Complex wave modes are analyzed. The dispersion curves of longitudinal waves exist in the flexural bandgap. The dispersion properties demonstrate the metamaterial design is advantageous to suppress the low-frequency flexural wave propagation in lattice sandwich plate. The flexural vibrations near the bandgap are also suppressed efficiently. The longitudinal excitation stimulates mainly longitudinal waves and lots of low-frequency flexural vibration modes are avoided. Furthermore, the free edge effects in metamaterial plate provide new method for damping optimizations. The influences of damping on vibrations of the metamaterial sandwich plate are studied. Damping has global influence on the wave propagation; stronger damping will induce more vibration attenuation. The results enlighten us damping and metamaterial design approaches can be unite in the sandwich plates to suppress the wave propagations.

  20. Globally propagating waves in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    High-cadence space-based observations, available for over a decade now, have revealed globally propagating wave-like disturbances in the solar corona. These coronal waves have now been imaged in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Still, no consensus on their physical nature has been reached yet. While many findings are consistent with fast-mode MHD waves and/or shocks, other characteristics have given rise to alternative models which involve magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an erupting coronal mass ejection. In this paper, the observational signatures of coronal waves will be reviewed, and the different physical interpretations of coronal waves and how they are motivated by observations will be discussed. Finally, the potential of using coronal waves as a diagnostic tool for the corona will be shown.

  1. Alfven Wave Propagation in Inhomogeneous Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Stephanie

    Damping of Alfven waves is one of the most likely mechanisms for ion heating in the solar corona. Density gradients have significant but poorly-understood effects on energy transfer and Alfven wave propagation in partially ionized plasmas, such as those found in the solar chromosphere. Reflection of Alfven waves at density and magnetic field gradients can give rise to turbulence which sustains particle heating. The density profile in the Hot hELIcon eXperiment (HELIX) varies strongly with radius, giving access to a wide range of Alfven dynamics across the plasma column and providing an ideal environment to observe Alfven wave-driven particle heating. A new internal wave-launching antenna, situated at the edge of the high-density core and the density-gradient region of HELIX has been used to excite low-frequency waves in argon plasma. The propagation behavior of the launched waves was measured with a small-scale (smaller than the ion gyroradius) magnetic sense coil at multiple radial locations across the plasma column (from the high-density core through the density gradient region). Time-resolved laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and Langmuir probe measurements also yield insight into the plasma response to the perturbation. This dissertation presents cross-spectral and wavelet analysis of low-frequency waves in a helicon plasma with a strong density gradient. Building on the work of Houshmandyar, shear Alfven waves were launched in a helicon plasma source with a strong density gradient. Alfven wave turbulence is suggested from phase angle and wavelet analysis of magnetic sense coil probe measurements. The perturbation wavelength derived from phase angle measurements is consistent with predictions from the full Alfven wave dispersion relation (taking electron Landua damping, electron-ion collisions, and finite frequency effects into account). Time-resolved LIF measurements across the plasma column suggest ion heating where the turbulence is strongest. Time

  2. Wave propagation in complex coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, S. A. R.; King, C. G.; Philbin, T. G.

    2016-04-01

    We give an interpretation for the use of complex spatial coordinates in electromagnetism, in terms of a family of closely related inhomogeneous media. Using this understanding we find that the phenomenon of reflection can be related to branch cuts in the wave that originate from poles of ε (z) at complex positions. Demanding that these branch cuts disappear, we derive a new large family of inhomogeneous media that are reflectionless for a single angle of incidence. Extending this property to all angles of incidence leads us to a generalized form of the Pöschl Teller potentials that in general include regions of loss and gain. We conclude by analyzing our findings within the phase integral (WKB) method, and find another very large family of isotropic planar media that from one side have a transmission of unity and reflection of zero, for all angles of incidence.

  3. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  4. Wave propagation analysis using the variance matrix.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Ivan, J Solomon; Narayanamurthy, C S

    2014-10-01

    The propagation of a coherent laser wave-field through a pseudo-random phase plate is studied using the variance matrix estimated from Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor data. The uncertainty principle is used as a tool in discriminating the data obtained from the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Quantities of physical interest such as the twist parameter, and the symplectic eigenvalues, are estimated from the wavefront sensor measurements. A distance measure between two variance matrices is introduced and used to estimate the spatial asymmetry of a wave-field in the experiment. The estimated quantities are then used to compare a distorted wave-field with its undistorted counterpart. PMID:25401243

  5. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  6. Propagation of seismic waves in tall buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    1998-01-01

    A discrete-time wave propagation formulation of the seismic response of tall buildings is introduced. The building is modeled as a layered medium, similar to a layered soil medium, and is subjected to vertically propagating seismic shear waves. Soil layers and the bedrock under the foundation are incorporated in the formulation as additional layers. Seismic response is expressed in terms of the wave travel times between the layers, and the wave reflection and transmission coefficients at the layer interfaces. The equations account for the frequency-dependent filtering effects of the foundation and floor masses. The calculation of seismic response is reduced to a pair of simple finite-difference equations for each layer, which can be solved recursively starting from the bedrock. Compared to the commonly used vibration formulation, the wave propagation formulation provides several advantages, including simplified calculations, better representation of damping, ability to account for the effects of the soil layers under the foundation, and better tools for identification and damage detection from seismic records. Examples presented show the versatility of the method. ?? 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Solitary wave propagation influenced by submerged breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zuo, Qi-hua; Wang, Deng-ting; Shukrieva, Shirin

    2013-10-01

    The form of Boussinesq equation derived by Nwogu (1993) using velocity at an arbitrary distance and surface elevation as variables is used to simulate wave surface elevation changes. In the numerical experiment, water depth was divided into five layers with six layer interfaces to simulate velocity at each layer interface. Besides, a physical experiment was carried out to validate numerical model and study solitary wave propagation. "Water column collapsing" method (WCCM) was used to generate solitary wave. A series of wave gauges around an impervious breakwater were set-up in the flume to measure the solitary wave shoaling, run-up, and breaking processes. The results show that the measured data and simulated data are in good agreement. Moreover, simulated and measured surface elevations were analyzed by the wavelet transform method. It shows that different wave frequencies stratified in the wavelet amplitude spectrum. Finally, horizontal and vertical velocities of each layer interface were analyzed in the process of solitary wave propagation through submerged breakwater.

  8. Propagation characteristics of magnetostatic waves: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews the propagation characteristics of guided magnetostatic waves (MSW's) in a YIG film magnetized beyond saturation. There exist three guided magnetostatic wave-types, viz., magnetostatic surface waves (MSSW's) and magnetostatic forward and backward volume waves (MSFVW's and MSBVW's). The orientation of the internal bias field determines the particular wave-type that can be supported by the YIG film. The frequency spectrum of the volume waves coincides with that over which magnetostatic plane waves are of the homogeneous variety. The frequency spectrum of the MSSW's is located immediately above the MSVW spectrum. MSW's are dispersive, with the dispersion properties alterable through modification in boundary conditions. The most explored dispersion control technique employs the placement of a ground plane somewhat above the YIG film surface. This dispersion control technique, which provides one method of realizing nondispersive MSW propagation, raises the upper bound of the MSSW spectrum but does not affect the bounds of the MSVW spectrum. Numerical computations illustrating the dispersion and polarization characteristics of MSW's are presented.

  9. Ionic wave propagation along actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Tuszyński, J A; Portet, S; Dixon, J M; Luxford, C; Cantiello, H F

    2004-04-01

    We investigate the conditions enabling actin filaments to act as electrical transmission lines for ion flows along their lengths. We propose a model in which each actin monomer is an electric element with a capacitive, inductive, and resistive property due to the molecular structure of the actin filament and viscosity of the solution. Based on Kirchhoff's laws taken in the continuum limit, a nonlinear partial differential equation is derived for the propagation of ionic waves. We solve this equation in two different regimes. In the first, the maximum propagation velocity wave is found in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. In the general case, we analyze the equation in terms of Fisher-Kolmogoroff modes with both localized and extended wave characteristics. We propose a new signaling mechanism in the cell, especially in neurons. PMID:15041636

  10. Speeding up tsunami wave propagation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Romanenko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Trans-oceanic wave propagation is one of the most time/CPU consuming parts of the tsunami modeling process. The so-called Method Of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) software package, developed at PMEL NOAA USA (Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA), is widely used to evaluate the tsunami parameters. However, it takes time to simulate trans-ocean wave propagation, that is up to 5 hours CPU time to "drive" the wave from Chili (epicenter) to the coast of Japan (even using a rather coarse computational mesh). Accurate wave height prediction requires fine meshes which leads to dramatic increase in time for simulation. Computation time is among the critical parameter as it takes only about 20 minutes for tsunami wave to approach the coast of Japan after earthquake at Japan trench or Sagami trench (as it was after the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011). MOST solves numerically the hyperbolic system for three unknown functions, namely velocity vector and wave height (shallow water approximation). The system could be split into two independent systems by orthogonal directions (splitting method). Each system can be treated independently. This calculation scheme is well suited for SIMD architecture and GPUs as well. We performed adaptation of MOST package to GPU. Several numerical tests showed 40x performance gain for NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU vs. single core of Intel i7 processor. Results of numerical experiments were compared with other available simulation data. Calculation results, obtained at GPU, differ from the reference ones by 10^-3 cm of the wave height simulating 24 hours wave propagation. This allows us to speak about possibility to develop real-time system for evaluating tsunami danger.

  11. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  12. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  13. Propagation characteristics of acoustic waves in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Achille; Kapil, Jagdish Chandra; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is a promising technique for monitoring snow slope stability with potential for application in early warning systems for avalanches. Current research efforts focus on identification and localization of acoustic emission features preceding snow failure and avalanches. However, our knowledge of sound propagation characteristics in snow is still limited. A review of previous studies showed that significant gaps exist and that the results of the various studies are partly contradictory. Furthermore, sound velocity and attenuation have been determined for the frequency range below 10 kHz, while recent snow failure experiments suggest that the peak frequency is in the ultrasound range between 30 kHz to 500 kHz. We therefore studied the propagation of pencil lead fracture (PLF) signals through snow in the ultrasound frequency range. This was achieved by performing laboratory experiments with columns of artificially produced snow of varying density and temperature. The attenuation constant was obtained by varying the size of the columns to eliminate possible influences of the snow-sensor coupling. The attenuation constant was measured for the entire PLF burst signal and for single frequency components. The propagation velocity was calculated from the arrival time of the acoustic signal. We then modelled the sound propagation for our experimental setup using Biot's model for wave propagation in porous media. The Model results were in good agreement with our experimental results. For the studied samples, the acoustic signals propagated as fast and slow longitudinal waves, but the main part of the energy was carried by the slow waves. The Young's modulus of our snow samples was determined from the sound velocity. This is highly relevant, as the elastic properties of snow are not well known.

  14. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  15. Nonlinear guided wave propagation in prestressed plates.

    PubMed

    Pau, Annamaria; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of stress in a structure presents considerable interest in many fields of engineering. In this paper, the diagnostic potential of nonlinear elastic guided waves in a prestressed plate is investigated. To do so, an analytical model is formulated accounting for different aspects involved in the phenomenon. The fact that the initial strains can be finite is considered using the Green Lagrange strain tensor, and initial and final configurations are not merged, as it would be assumed in the infinitesimal strain theory. Moreover, an appropriate third-order expression of the strain energy of the hyperelastic body is adopted to account for the material nonlinearities. The model obtained enables to investigate both the linearized case, which gives the variation of phase and group velocity as a function of the initial stress, and the nonlinear case, involving second-harmonic generation as a function of the initial state of stress. The analysis is limited to Rayleigh-Lamb waves propagating in a plate. Three cases of initial prestress are considered, including prestress in the direction of the wave propagation, prestress orthogonal to the direction of wave propagation, and plane isotropic stress. PMID:25786963

  16. Wave propagation in spatially modulated tubes.

    PubMed

    Ziepke, A; Martens, S; Engel, H

    2016-09-01

    We investigate wave propagation in rotationally symmetric tubes with a periodic spatial modulation of cross section. Using an asymptotic perturbation analysis, the governing quasi-two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equation can be reduced into a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-advection equation. Assuming a weak perturbation by the advection term and using projection method, in a second step, an equation of motion for traveling waves within such tubes can be derived. Both methods predict properly the nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the ratio of the modulation period of the geometry to the intrinsic width of the front, or pulse. As a main feature, we observe finite intervals of propagation failure of waves induced by the tube's modulation and derive an analytically tractable condition for their occurrence. For the highly diffusive limit, using the Fick-Jacobs approach, we show that wave velocities within modulated tubes are governed by an effective diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of a single bottleneck on the period of pulse trains. We observe period changes by integer fractions dependent on the bottleneck width and the period of the entering pulse train. PMID:27608990

  17. Surface waves propagating on a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Pablo; Aumaître, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    We study the propagation of monochromatic surface waves on a turbulent flow of liquid metal, when the waves are much less energetic than the background flow. Electromagnetic forcing drives quasi-two-dimensional turbulence with strong vertical vorticity. To isolate the surface-wave field, we remove the surface deformation induced by the background turbulent flow using coherent-phase averaging at the wave frequency. We observe a significant increase in wavelength, when the latter is smaller than the forcing length scale. This phenomenon has not been reported before and can be explained by multiple random wave deflections induced by the turbulent velocity gradients. The shift in wavelength thus provides an estimate of the fluctuations in deflection angle. Local measurements of the wave frequency far from the wavemaker do not reveal such systematic behavior, although a small shift is visible. Finally, we quantify the damping enhancement induced by the turbulent flow and compare it to the existing theoretical predictions. Most of them suggest that the damping increases as the square of the Froude number, whereas our experimental data show a linear increase with the Froude number. We interpret this linear relationship as a balance between the time for a wave to cross a turbulent structure and the turbulent mixing time. The larger the ratio of these two times, the more energy is extracted from the wave. We conclude with possible mechanisms for energy exchange.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann model for wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Yan, Guangwu; Shi, Xiubo

    2009-08-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for two-dimensional wave equation is proposed by using the higher-order moment method. The higher-order moment method is based on the solution of a series of partial differential equations obtained by using multiscale technique and Chapman-Enskog expansion. In order to obtain the lattice Boltzmann model for the wave equation with higher-order accuracy of truncation errors, we removed the second-order dissipation term and the third-order dispersion term by employing the moments up to fourth order. The reversibility in time appears owing to the absence of the second-order dissipation term and the third-order dispersion term. As numerical examples, some classical examples, such as interference, diffraction, and wave passing through a convex lens, are simulated. The numerical results show that this model can be used to simulate wave propagation. PMID:19792280

  19. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin; El Hady, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The action potential (AP) is the basic mechanism by which information is transmitted along neuronal axons. Although the excitable nature of axons is understood to be primarily electrical, many experimental studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane co-propagates with the electrical signal. While the experimental evidence for co-propagating mechanical waves is diverse and compelling, there is no consensus for their physical underpinnings. We present a model in which these mechanical displacements arise from the driving of mechanical surface waves, in which potential energy is stored in elastic deformations of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is stored in the movement of the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. Our model allows us to predict the shape of the displacement that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the well-characterized AP. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology. See Arxiv/1407.7600

  20. Seismic Wave Propagation Along Fracture Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, B.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Knobloch, J.

    2012-12-01

    Past research has shown that fractures support guided-modes such as coupled Rayleigh waves as well as confined modes such as Love waves and leaky-mode compressional waves. We demonstrated experimentally that fracture intersections support a mode that is similar to interface waves but propagates at speeds below the Rayleigh wave for low applied load. In this experimental study, we demonstrated that at low stress, fracture intersections support highly-localized wedge waves whose existence depends on stress and source-receiver polarization. Wedge waves (W.W.) were propagated along the orthogonal edge of aluminum samples. The sample measured 100 x 150 x 150 mm and was machined with two orthogonal fractures, intersecting at the center, such that four independent pieces of aluminum could be measured independently or pieced together. Seismic measurements were performed for two cases: (1) two right angle blocks in contact to examine the stress dependence of two corners in contact and (2) four right angle blocks in contact to study the behavior of four intersecting corners in contact. Seismic transducers with a central frequency of 1MHz were used to propagate shear (S) waves along the corners of the blocks that form an intersection, along the fractures and through the bulk. Measurements were made with the shear transducers polarized at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg. to the direction of loading for a range (0 to 66 kN) of applied normal loads. When only two blocks were in contact, a W.W. was observed traveling at speeds between 2650 m/s and 3000 m/s. This is below the Rayleigh speed (2830 m/s) for low stress. As the applied load was increased, the wave speed increased, indicating a change in the local stiffness. Although an increase in speed was observed for both polarizations, the measured speed was lower for 135 deg. polarization indicating that the local stiffness of the top wedge was dramatically different than the bottom aluminum block. All four blocks were also examined under

  1. Obliquely propagating dust-density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, A.; Arp, O.; Klindworth, M.; Melzer, A.

    2008-02-01

    Self-excited dust-density waves are experimentally studied in a dusty plasma under microgravity. Two types of waves are observed: a mode inside the dust volume propagating in the direction of the ion flow and another mode propagating obliquely at the boundary between the dusty plasma and the space charge sheath. The dominance of oblique modes can be described in the frame of a fluid model. It is shown that the results fom the fluid model agree remarkably well with a kinetic electrostatic model of Rosenberg [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996)]. In the experiment, the instability is quenched by increasing the gas pressure or decreasing the dust density. The critical pressure and dust density are well described by the models.

  2. Solitons in wave propagation and spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutsenko, Igor

    1999-10-01

    This thesis consists of three parts: In the first part, a solution of the restricted Hadamard problem is presented. The classical Hadamard problem consists in determining (up to equivalence) all the second order differential operators which satisfy Huygens' Principle in the narrow sense. Physically, such operators describe systems where the diffusion of waves is absent and where signals propagate with maximal velocity. Unlike the original principle of superposition of secondary waves, which holds for all wave propagation phenomena, Huygens' principle in the narrow sense of Hadamard applies only to a very restricted range of wave processes, with sharp signals. We present a new class of Huygens' operators on Minkowski space-time and establish a new link between Huygens' principle and the solitons of the Korteveg-de Vries equation. In the second part, a new class of exactly solvable models in statistical mechanics is presented. We study the connections between the soliton solutions of certain integrable nonlinear equations (hierarchies of equations) and the thermodynamic quantities of one-dimensional Ising models with different types of interactions between spins. The exact solvability of these models can be traced back to this connection. We consider a model linked to soliton solutions of the Korteveg de Vries and of the B-type Kadomtsev-Petiashvili hierarchies. A connection between these Ising chains and random matrix models is considered as well. In the third part, we study solitonic mechanisms of exciton superfluidity. We provide a theoretical explanation of recent experiments on the propagation of excitons in semiconductors. In these experiments, the excitonic transport under the action of a laser pulse has been studied. It turned out that under certain conditions this transport becomes anomalous and the excitons propagate through the crystal in a wave packet without diffusion. We propose a model for this phenomenon which relies on the presence of an exciton

  3. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  4. Seismic Wave Propagation on the Tablet Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emoto, K.

    2015-12-01

    Tablet computers widely used in recent years. The performance of the tablet computer is improving year by year. Some of them have performance comparable to the personal computer of a few years ago with respect to the calculation speed and the memory size. The convenience and the intuitive operation are the advantage of the tablet computer compared to the desktop PC. I developed the iPad application of the numerical simulation of the seismic wave propagation. The numerical simulation is based on the 2D finite difference method with the staggered-grid scheme. The number of the grid points is 512 x 384 = 196,608. The grid space is 200m in both horizontal and vertical directions. That is the calculation area is 102km x 77km. The time step is 0.01s. In order to reduce the user waiting time, the image of the wave field is drawn simultaneously with the calculation rather than playing the movie after the whole calculation. P and S wave energies are plotted on the screen every 20 steps (0.2s). There is the trade-off between the smooth simulation and the resolution of the wave field image. In the current setting, it takes about 30s to calculate the 10s wave propagation (50 times image updates). The seismogram at the receiver is displayed below of the wave field updated in real time. The default medium structure consists of 3 layers. The layer boundary is defined by 10 movable points with linear interpolation. Users can intuitively change to the arbitrary boundary shape by moving the point. Also users can easily change the source and the receiver positions. The favorite structure can be saved and loaded. For the advance simulation, users can introduce the random velocity fluctuation whose spectrum can be changed to the arbitrary shape. By using this application, everyone can simulate the seismic wave propagation without the special knowledge of the elastic wave equation. So far, the Japanese version of the application is released on the App Store. Now I am preparing the

  5. Shock wave propagation in glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, B. N.

    1998-10-01

    The modification of acoustic shock wave propagation characteristics in a 25 cm long positive column low pressure (10 to 50 Torr), low current density (2 to 10 mA/cm^2) argon and N2 dc discharges have been measured by laser beam deflection technique. The simultaneous multi point shock velocity, dispersion and damping have been measured both inside and outside the glow discharge region. The local shock velocity is found to increase with the increased propagation path length through the discharge; for Mach number greater than 1.7 the upstream velocity exceeded the downstream velocity in contrast to the opposite behavior in neutral gas. The damping and dispersion are also dependent on the propagation distance. The recovery of the shock dispersion and damping in the post discharge region, for a given discharge condition, are functions of the initial Mach number. The optical measurement of the wall and the gas (rotational) temperatures suggest the observed shock features can not be solely explained by the gas heating in a self sustained discharge. The results are similar for both Ar and N2 discharges showing that vibrational excitation and relaxation are not essential^1. The explanation of the observed weak shock propagation properties in a glow discharge appears to require long range cooperative interactions that enhance heavy particle collisional energy transfer rates for the measured discharge conditions. Unlike collisional shock wave propagation in highly ionized plasmas^2,3, the exact energy coupling mechanism between the nonequilibrium weakly ionized plasma and shock is not understood. 1. A.I. Osipov and A.V. Uvarov, Sov. Phys. Usp. 35, 903 (1992) and other references there in. 2. M. Casanova, O. Larroche and J-P Matte, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2143 (1991). 3. M.C.M. van de Sanden, R. van den Bercken and D.C. Schram, Plasma Sources Sci.Technol. 3, 511 (1994).

  6. Modeling anomalous surface - wave propagation across the Southern Caspian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Priestly, K.F.; Patton, H.J.; Schultz, C.A.

    1998-01-09

    The crust of the south Caspian basin consists of 15-25 km of low velocity, highly attenuating sediment overlying high velocity crystalline crust. The Moho depth beneath the basin is about 30 km as compared to about 50 km in the surrounding region. Preliminary modeling of the phase velocity curves shows that this thick sediments of the south Caspian basin are also under-lain by a 30-35 km thick crystalline crust and not by typical oceanic crust. This analysis also suggest that if the effect of the over-pressuring of the sediments is to reduce Poissons` ratio, the over-pressured sediments observed to approximately 5 km do not persist to great depths. It has been shown since 1960`s that the south Caspian basin blocks the regional phase Lg. Intermediate frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) fundamental mode Raleigh waves propagating across the basin are also severely attenuated, but the low frequency surface waves are largely unaffected. This attenuation is observed along the both east-to-west and west-to-east great circle paths across the basin, and therefore it cannot be related to a seismograph site effect. We have modeled the response of surface waves in an idealized rendition of the south Caspian basin model using a hybrid normal mode / 2-D finite difference approach. To gain insight into the features of the basin which cause the anomalous surface wave propagation, we have varied parameters of the basin model and computed synthetic record sections to compare with the observed seismograms. We varied the amount of mantel up-warp, the shape of the boundaries, the thickness and shear wave Q of the sediments and mantle, and the depth of the water layer. Of these parameters, the intermediate frequency surface waves are most severely affected by the sediments thickness and shear wave attenuation. fundamental mode Raleigh wave phase velocities measure for paths crossing the basin are extremely low.

  7. Modeling Propagation of Shock Waves in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Molitoris, J D

    2005-08-19

    We present modeling results for the propagation of strong shock waves in metals. In particular, we use an arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE3D) code to model the propagation of strong pressure waves (P {approx} 300 to 400 kbars) generated with high explosives in contact with aluminum cylinders. The aluminum cylinders are assumed to be both flat-topped and have large-amplitude curved surfaces. We use 3D Lagrange mechanics. For the aluminum we use a rate-independent Steinberg-Guinan model, where the yield strength and shear modulus depend on pressure, density and temperature. The calculation of the melt temperature is based on the Lindermann law. At melt the yield strength and shear modulus is set to zero. The pressure is represented as a seven-term polynomial as a function of density. For the HMX-based high explosive, we use a JWL, with a program burn model that give the correct detonation velocity and C-J pressure (P {approx} 390 kbars). For the case of the large-amplitude curved surface, we discuss the evolving shock structure in terms of the early shock propagation experiments by Sakharov.

  8. Ultrasonic wave propagation in cortical bone mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Simon P.; Cunningham, James L.; Miles, Anthony W.; Humphrey, Victor F.; Gheduzzi, Sabina

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves in cortical bone is important for studies of osteoporosis and fractures. In particular, propagation in free- and water-loaded acrylic plates, with a thickness range of around 1-6 mm, has been widely used to mimic cortical bone behavior. A theoretical investigation of Lamb mode propagation at 200 kHz in free- and water-loaded acrylic plates revealed a marked difference in the form of their velocity and attenuation dispersion curves as a function of frequency thickness product. In experimental studies, this difference between free and loaded plates is not seen. Over short measurement distances, the results for both free and loaded plates are consistent with previous modeling and experimental studies: for thicker plates (above 3-4 mm), the velocity calculated using the first arrival signal is a lateral wave comparable with the longitudinal velocity. As the plate thickness decreases, the velocity approaches the S0 Lamb mode value. WAVE2000 modeling of the experimental setup agrees with experimental data. The data are also used to test a hypothesis that for thin plates the velocity approaches the corresponding S0 Lamb mode velocity at large measurement distances or when different arrival time criteria are used. [Work supported by Action Medical Research.

  9. Wave envelopes method for description of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, J; Nowicki, A; Lewin, P A; Bloomfield, P E; Kujawska, T; Filipczyński, L

    2006-07-01

    A novel, free from paraxial approximation and computationally efficient numerical algorithm capable of predicting 4D acoustic fields in lossy and nonlinear media from arbitrary shaped sources (relevant to probes used in medical ultrasonic imaging and therapeutic systems) is described. The new WE (wave envelopes) approach to nonlinear propagation modeling is based on the solution of the second order nonlinear differential wave equation reported in [J. Wójcik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104 (1998) 2654-2663; V.P. Kuznetsov, Akust. Zh. 16 (1970) 548-553]. An incremental stepping scheme allows for forward wave propagation. The operator-splitting method accounts independently for the effects of full diffraction, absorption and nonlinear interactions of harmonics. The WE method represents the propagating pulsed acoustic wave as a superposition of wavelet-like sinusoidal pulses with carrier frequencies being the harmonics of the boundary tone burst disturbance. The model is valid for lossy media, arbitrarily shaped plane and focused sources, accounts for the effects of diffraction and can be applied to continuous as well as to pulsed waves. Depending on the source geometry, level of nonlinearity and frequency bandwidth, in comparison with the conventional approach the Time-Averaged Wave Envelopes (TAWE) method shortens computational time of the full 4D nonlinear field calculation by at least an order of magnitude; thus, predictions of nonlinear beam propagation from complex sources (such as phased arrays) can be available within 30-60 min using only a standard PC. The approximate ratio between the computational time costs obtained by using the TAWE method and the conventional approach in calculations of the nonlinear interactions is proportional to 1/N2, and in memory consumption to 1/N where N is the average bandwidth of the individual wavelets. Numerical computations comparing the spatial field distributions obtained by using both the TAWE method and the conventional approach

  10. Radio wave propagation in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. A.; Lyubarskii, Yu. E.

    Pulsar magnetospheres are known to contain an ultrarelativistic highly magnetized plasma which streams along the open magnetic lines. The radio emission observed from pulsars is believed to originate sufficiently deep in the open field line tube, so that the characteristics of outgoing waves can be influenced by propagation in the magnetospheric plasma. Refraction of radio waves in pulsar magnetospheres appears to be efficient. The effect not only influences the observed pulse width and its frequency dependency. It can alter the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region which can be derived from the observations of pulsar interstellar scintillations. Transverse ray separation versus pulse longitude calculated allowing for magnetospheric refraction appears to be in qualitative agreement with that observed. In particular, the nonmonotonic character of the curve can be attributed to nonmonotonic distribution of the plasma number density across the open field line tube which makes the rays emitted at different spatial locations deviate in the opposite directions. Proceeding from the frequency dependence of refraction some predictions are made about the frequency evolution of the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region. Magnetospheric refraction can also determine the profile shape giving rise to ray grouping into separate components. It will be demonstrated that the salient features of profile morphology can be explained within the frame of a primordial hollow-cone emission model taking into account refraction of rays in pulsar plasma. Then the frequency evolution of profile structure is naturally interpreted as a consequence of frequency dependence of refraction. As the waves propagate in the magnetospheric plasma their polarization also evolves essentially. In the vicinity of the emission region normal waves are linearly polarized and propagate independently, with the polarization plane following the orientation of the local magnetic field. As

  11. Surface wave propagation across the USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, A. E.; Ekstrom, G.; Hjorleifsdottir, V.

    2010-12-01

    We present Love and Rayleigh wave phase-velocity models at discrete periods between 25 and 100 s from the inversion of phase measurements. Phase measurements are made on an updated set of USArray TA data using a two-station method that has been corrected for the estimated wavefront arrival angle. Arrival angles are estimated using a “mini-array” method, which additionally calculates the local phase velocity for each event recorded in a mini array. By minimizing the misfit between observed and predicted phase within the mini array, we find the best-fit local phase velocity, which is then used to predict the phase in a grid search for apparent source locations. The trial sources have fixed epicentral distance but varied arrival angles with respect to the mini array, and the optimal apparent source corresponds to the arrival angle. Correcting the two-station method for the arrival angle produces small (around 1%) changes in phase velocity. In the inversion results, these changes are most significant along the Pacific coast at shorter periods, as a result of refraction at the ocean-continent transition. The local phase-velocity estimates are combined to make independent phase-velocity models for comparison with the inversion results. For Rayleigh waves at all periods, the two models have similar size, location, and strength of anomalies. Higher noise levels in Love wave data are apparent in both models; they show similar velocities and large anomalies, but smaller anomalies are below the noise levels at short periods. Still, the overall quality and quantity of data available allow us to investigate the errors associated with the two-station method, and the effect the duration and complexity of wave propagation has on these errors. We examine the consistency of wave propagation using the estimated arrival angles for multiple events recorded at the same stations. This is repeated with synthetic events, calculated using the spectral element method of Komatitsch and

  12. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    A model problem that simulates an atmospheric acoustic wave propagation situation that is nonlinear is considered. The model is derived from the basic Euler equations for the atmospheric flow and from the regular perturbations for the acoustic part. The nonlinear effects are studied by obtaining two successive linear problems in which the second one involves the solution of the first problem. Well posedness of these problems is discussed and approximations of the radiation boundary conditions that can be used in numerical simulations are presented.

  13. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a model problem is considered that simulates an atmospheric acoustic wave propagation situation that is nonlinear. The model is derived from the basic Euler equations for the atmospheric flow and from the regular perturbations for the acoustic part. The nonlinear effects are studied by obtaining two successive linear problems in which the second one involves the solution of the first problem. Well-posedness of these problems is discussed and approximations of the radiation boundary conditions that can be used in numerical simulations are presented.

  14. Elastic Wave Propagation and Generation in Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, Jonathan M.

    The majority of mature seismologists of my generation were introduced to theoretical seismology via classic textbooks written in the early 1980s. Since this generation has matured and taken the mantle of teaching seismology to a new generation, several new books have been put forward as replacements, or alternatives, to the original classical texts. The target readers of the new texts range from beginner through intermediate to more advanced, although all have been attempts to improve upon what is now considered standard convention in quantitative seismology. To this plethora of choices we now have a new addition by Jose Pujol, titledElastic Wave Propagation and Generation in Seismology.

  15. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lang; Xue, Pu; Chen, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  16. Propagation of gravity waves across the tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, Vera; Spichtinger, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The tropopause region is characterised by strong gradients in various atmospheric quantities that exhibit different properties in the troposphere compared to the stratosphere. The temperature lapse rate typically changes from negative to near-zero values resulting in a strong increase in stability. Accordingly, the buoyancy frequency often undergoes a jump at the tropopause. Analysis of radiosounding data also shows the existence of a strong inversion layer (tropopause inversion layer, TIL) characterised by a strong maximum in buoyancy frequency just above the tropopause, see e.g. Birner et al. (2002). Additionally, the magnitude of the vertical wind shear of the horizontal wind maximizes at the tropopause and the region also exhibits characteristical gradients of trace gases. Vertically propagating gravity waves can be excited in the troposphere by several mechanisms, e.g. by flow over topography (e.g. Durran, 1990), by jets and fronts (for a recent review: Plougonven and Zhang, 1990) or by convection (e.g. Clark et al., 1986). When these waves enter the tropopause region, their properties can be changed drastically by the changing stratification and strong wind shear. Within this work, the EULAG (Eulerian/semi-Lagrangian fluid solver, see e.g. Smolarkiewicz and Margolin, 1997) model is used to investigate the impact of the tropopause on vertically propagating gravity waves excited by flows over topography. The choice of topography (sine-shaped mountains, bell-shaped mountain) along with horizontal wind speed and tropospheric value of buoyancy frequency determine the spectrum of waves (horizontal and vertical wavelengths) that is excited in the tropsphere. In order to analyse how these spectra change for several topographies when a tropopause is present, we investigate different idealized cases in a two-dimensional domain. By varying the vertical profiles of buoyancy frequency (step-wise vs. continuos change, including TIL) and wind shear, the tropopause

  17. Calibration of seismic wave propagation in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Awadhi, J; Endo, E; Fryall, F; Harris, D; Mayeda, K; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S; Sweeney, J

    1999-07-23

    The Kuwait Institute of Scientific Research (KISR), the USGS and LLNL are collaborating to calibrate seismic wave propagation in Kuwait and surrounding regions of the northwest Arabian Gulf using data from the Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN). Our goals are to develop local and regional propagation models for locating and characterizing seismic events in Kuwait and portions of the Zagros mountains close to Kuwait. The KNSN consists of 7 short-period stations and one broadband (STS-2) station. Constraints on the local velocity structure may be derived from joint inversions for hypocenters of local events and the local velocity model, receiver functions from three-component observations of teleseisms, and surface wave phase velocity estimated from differential dispersion measurements made across the network aperture. Data are being collected to calibrate travel-time curves for the principal regional phases for events in the Zagros mountains. The available event observations span the distance range from approximately 2.5 degrees to almost 9 degrees. Additional constraints on structure across the deep sediments of the Arabian Gulf will be obtained from long-period waveform modeling.

  18. Wave propagation in random granular chains.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, Mohith; Awasthi, Amnaya P; Geubelle, Philippe H

    2012-03-01

    The influence of randomness on wave propagation in one-dimensional chains of spherical granular media is investigated. The interaction between the elastic spheres is modeled using the classical Hertzian contact law. Randomness is introduced in the discrete model using random distributions of particle mass, Young's modulus, or radius. Of particular interest in this study is the quantification of the attenuation in the amplitude of the impulse associated with various levels of randomness: two distinct regimes of decay are observed, characterized by an exponential or a power law, respectively. The responses are normalized to represent a vast array of material parameters and impact conditions. The virial theorem is applied to investigate the transfer from potential to kinetic energy components in the system for different levels of randomness. The level of attenuation in the two decay regimes is compared for the three different sources of randomness and it is found that randomness in radius leads to the maximum rate of decay in the exponential regime of wave propagation. PMID:22587093

  19. Local computational strategies for predicting wave propagation in nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leamy, Michael J.; Autrusson, Thibaut B.; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Packo, Pawel

    2014-03-01

    Two local computational strategies for modeling elastic wave propagation, namely the Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) and Cellular Automata for Elastodynamics (CAFE), are compared and contrasted in analyzing bulk waves in two-dimensional nonlinear media. Each strategy formulates the problem from the perspective of a cell and its local interactions with other cells, leading to robust treatments of anisotropy, heterogeneity, and nonlinearity. The local approach also enables straight-forward parallelization on high performance computing clusters. While the two share a common local perspective, they differ in two major respects. The first is that CAFE employs both rectangular and triangular cells, while LISA considers only rectangular. The second is that LISA appeared much earlier than CAFE (early 1990's versus late 2000's), and as such has been developed to a much greater degree with a multitude of material models, cell-to-cell interactions, loading possibilities, and boundary treatments. A hybrid approach which combines the two is of great interest since the non-uniform mesh capability of the CAFE triangular cell can be readily coupled to LISA's rectangular grids, taking advantage of the built-in LISA features on the uniform portion of the domain. For linear material domains, the hybrid implementation appears straight-forward since both methods have been shown to recover the same equations in the rectangular case. For nonlinear material domains, the formulations cannot be put into a one-to-one correspondence, and hybrid implementation may be more problematic. This paper addresses these differences by first presenting the underlying formulations, and then computing results for growth of a second harmonic in an introduced bulk pressure wave. Rectangular cells are used in both LISA and CAFE. Results from both approaches are compared to an approximate, analytical solution based on a two-scale field representation. Differences in the LISA and CAFE computed

  20. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments. PMID:26357093

  1. Calibration of seismic wave propagation in Jordan

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Husien, A; Amrat, A; Harris, D; Mayeda, K; Nakanishi, K; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S; Ryall, F; Skinnell, K; Yazjeen, T

    1999-07-23

    The Natural Resources Authority of Jordan (NRA), the USGS and LLNL have a collaborative project to improve the calibration of seismic propagation in Jordan and surrounding regions. This project serves common goals of CTBT calibration and earthquake hazard assessment in the region. These objectives include accurate location of local and regional earthquakes, calibration of magnitude scales, and the development of local and regional propagation models. In the CTBT context, better propagation models and more accurately located events in the Dead Sea rift region can serve as (potentially GT5) calibration events for generating IMS location corrections. The detection and collection of mining explosions underpins discrimination research. The principal activity of this project is the deployment of two broadband stations at Hittiyah (south Jordan) and Ruweishid (east Jordan). These stations provide additional paths in the region to constrain structure with surface wave and body wave tomography. The Ruweishid station is favorably placed to provide constraints on Arabian platform structure. Waveform modeling with long-period observations of larger earthquakes will provide constraints on 1-D velocity models of the crust and upper mantle. Data from these stations combined with phase observations from the 26 short-period stations of the Jordan National Seismic Network (JNSN) may allow the construction of a more detailed velocity model of Jordan. The Hittiyah station is an excellent source of ground truth information for the six phosphate mines of southern Jordan and Israel. Observations of mining explosions collected by this station have numerous uses: for definition of templates for screening mining explosions, as ground truth events for calibrating travel-time models, and as explosion populations in development and testing discriminants. Following previously established procedures for identifying explosions, we have identified more than 200 explosions from the first 85 days of

  2. Kink Wave Propagation in Thin Isothermal Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I. P.; Nagorny, I. G.; Nippolainen, E.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the propagation of kink waves in thin and isothermal expanding flux tubes in cylindrical geometry. By using the method of radial expansion for fluctuating variables we obtained a new kink wave equation. We show that including the radial component of the tube magnetic field leads to cutoff-free propagation of kink waves along thin flux tubes.

  3. Propagation of Buoyancy Waves Through the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R.; Schutza, A. M.; Toffoletto, F. R.

    2015-12-01

    THEMIS observations analyzed by E. V. Panov and collaborators have shown that, when an earthward-moving plasma-sheet flow burst encounters the quasi-dipolar region of the magnetosphere, the plasma that formed the burst often oscillates a few times before coming to rest. The observed oscillation periods seem in good agreement with the frequency calculated theoretically for a thin filament oscillating in the same region. However, since a thin filament is an extreme idealization of a real flow burst, we have investigated the relationship between thin-filament oscillations and the normal modes of a 2D plasma system that is analogous to the magnetosphere. We have developed an analytic model of the normal modes of an idealized plasma configuration that consists of a wedge with circular field lines. For that system, the low-frequency wave obeys a one-dimensional differential equation that is essentially the same as the equation describing buoyancy oscillations in the neutral atmosphere. An important term in the neutral-atmosphere equation is proportional to the square of ωb, which is called the "buoyancy frequency" or "Brunt-Väisälä frequency", and the corresponding quantity in the plasma equation is exactly the square of the fundamental oscillation frequency of a thin filament. In both cases, a buoyancy wave of frequency ω propagates in the region where ωb>ω, but is evanescent in the region where ωb<ω. A thin-filament code has been used to calculate the buoyancy frequency in different regions of the magnetosphere, as represented by a force-balanced configuration based on a Tsyganenko model. The results suggest that, if the braking of a bursty bulk flow produces an oscillation at the buoyancy frequency at about 10 RE, it may generate a buoyancy wave that can propagate earthward to the plasmapause.

  4. Wave propagation in predator-prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng-Chen; Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study a class of predator-prey systems of reaction-diffusion type. Specifically, we are interested in the dynamical behaviour for the solution with the initial distribution where the prey species is at the level of the carrying capacity, and the density of the predator species has compact support, or exponentially small tails near x=+/- ∞ . Numerical evidence suggests that this will lead to the formation of a pair of diverging waves propagating outwards from the initial zone. Motivated by this phenomenon, we establish the existence of a family of travelling waves with the minimum speed. Unlike the previous studies, we do not use the shooting argument to show this. Instead, we apply an iteration process based on Berestycki et al 2005 (Math Comput. Modelling 50 1385-93) to construct a set of super/sub-solutions. Since the underlying system does not enjoy the comparison principle, such a set of super/sub-solutions is not based on travelling waves, and in fact the super/sub-solutions depend on each other. With the aid of the set of super/sub-solutions, we can construct the solution of the truncated problem on the finite interval, which, via the limiting argument, can in turn generate the wave solution. There are several advantages to this approach. First, it can remove the technical assumptions on the diffusivities of the species in the existing literature. Second, this approach is of PDE type, and hence it can shed some light on the spreading phenomenon indicated by numerical simulation. In fact, we can compute the spreading speed of the predator species for a class of biologically acceptable initial distributions. Third, this approach might be applied to the study of waves in non-cooperative systems (i.e. a system without a comparison principle).

  5. Interactions between two propagating waves in rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Xu, W; Wang, Z; Takagaki, K; Li, B; Wu, J-Y

    2012-08-01

    Sensory-evoked propagating waves are frequently observed in sensory cortex. However, it is largely unknown how an evoked propagating wave affects the activity evoked by subsequent sensory inputs, or how two propagating waves interact when evoked by simultaneous sensory inputs. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we investigated the interactions between two evoked waves in rat visual cortex, and the spatiotemporal patterns of depolarization in the neuronal population due to wave-to-wave interactions. We have found that visually-evoked propagating waves have a refractory period of about 300 ms, within which the response to a subsequent visual stimulus is suppressed. Simultaneous presentation of two visual stimuli at different locations can evoke two waves propagating toward each other, and these two waves fuse. Fusion significantly shortens the latency and half-width of the response, leading to changes in the spatial profile of evoked population activity. The visually-evoked propagating wave may also be suppressed by a preceding spontaneous wave. The refractory period following a propagating wave and the fusion between two waves may contribute to visual sensory processing by modifying the spatiotemporal profile of population neuronal activity evoked by sensory events. PMID:22561730

  6. Propagation of sound waves in drill strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumheller, D. S.; Knudsen, S. D.

    1995-04-01

    Deep wells are commonly drilled while steering the drill bit. The steering process is completely controlled by the drilling-rig operator. A key element of this procedure is the measurement and communication of navigation information from the bottom of the well to the operator. Pressure pulses modulated onto the flow of the drill fluid are now employed in some cases to communicate this information. However, data rates are only a few binary bits per second with this method. This drastically limits the quantity of data available to the operator. As an alternative method, elastic waves generated within the steel drill string can be used as a carrier signal to transmit data. The drill string is commonly assembled from 10-m segments of threaded pipe and forms a periodic structure. The elastic wavelengths of interest are shorter than this periodic length. Consequently, these waves undergo significant dispersion. This paper presents new data for the propagation of elastic waves in a 2-km drill string. The influence of aperiodicity in the drill string, rotation of the drill string, and noise levels are studied in detail. The data verify a method for reducing the attenuation of a carrier signal by a factor of 2.

  7. An investigation into Voigt wave propagation for optical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.

    2013-09-01

    In the nonsingular case of optical propagation in a linear, homogeneous, anisotropic, dielectric material, two independent plane waves, with orthogonal polarizations and different phase speeds, can propagate in a given direction. However, in certain dissipative biaxial materials there are particular directions along which these two waves coalesce to form a single plane wave. This coalescent Voigt wave represents the singular case. Most conspicuously, the amplitude of Voigt waves are linearly dependent upon propagation direction. A porous nanostructured thin film which supports Voigt wave propagation was investigated, with a view to possible optical sensing applications. The directions along which Voigt waves propagate can be highly sensitive to the refractive index of a fluid which infiltrates this porous material. Indeed, in our theoretical studies sensitivities which compare favourably to those of surface-plasmon-polariton-based optical sensors were found.

  8. Regional Wave Propagation in Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemberie, A. L.; Langston, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    Broad band seismograms from the April 29, 2003, M4.6 Fort Payne, Alabama earthquake are analyzed to infer mechanisms of crustal wave propagation, crust and upper mantle velocity structure in southeastern United States, and source parameters of the event. In particular, we are interested in producing deterministic models of the distance attenuation of earthquake ground motions through computation of synthetic seismograms. The method first requires constraining the source parameters of an earthquake and then modeling the amplitude and times of broadband arrivals within the waveforms to infer appropriate layered earth models. A first look at seismograms recorded by stations outside the Mississippi Embayment (ME) show clear body phases such P, sP, Pnl, Sn and Lg. The ME signals are qualitatively different from others because they have longer durations and large surface waves. A straightforward interpretation of P wave arrival times shows a typical upper mantle velocity of 8.18 km/s. However, there is evidence of significantly higher P phase velocities at epicentral distances between 400 and 600km, that may be caused by a high velocity upper mantle anomaly; triplication of P-waves is seen in these seismograms. The arrival time differences between regional P and the depth phase sP at different stations are used to constrain the depth of the earthquake. The source depth lies between 9.5 km and 13km which is somewhat more shallow than the network location that was constrained to 15km depth. The Fort Payne earthquake is the largest earthquake to have occurred within the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone.

  9. Wave propagation in a random medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.; Harp, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    A simple technique is used to derive statistical characterizations of the perturbations imposed upon a wave (plane, spherical or beamed) propagating through a random medium. The method is essentially physical rather than mathematical, and is probably equivalent to the Rytov method. The limitations of the method are discussed in some detail; in general they are restrictive only for optical paths longer than a few hundred meters, and for paths at the lower microwave frequencies. Situations treated include arbitrary path geometries, finite transmitting and receiving apertures, and anisotropic media. Results include, in addition to the usual statistical quantities, time-lagged functions, mixed functions involving amplitude and phase fluctuations, angle-of-arrival covariances, frequency covariances, and other higher-order quantities.

  10. Wave Propagation in Expanding Cell Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utuje, Kazage J. Christophe; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The coordinated migration of groups of cells drives important biological processes, such as wound healing and morphogenesis. In this talk we present a minimal continuum model of an expanding cell monolayer coupling elastic deformations to myosin-based activity in the cells. The myosin-driven contractile activity is quantified by the chemical potential difference for the process of ATP hydrolysis by myosin motors. A new ingredient of the model is a feedback of the local strain rate of the monolayer on contractility that naturally yields a mechanism for viscoelasticity of the cellular medium. By combining analytics and numerics we show that this simple model reproduces qualitatively many experimental findings, including the build-up of contractile stresses at the center of the cell monolayer, and the existence of traveling mechanical waves that control spreading dynamics and stress propagation in the cell monolayer. KJCU and MCM were supported by the NSF through grants DMR-1004789 and DGE-1068780.

  11. Control of propagating spin waves via spin transfer torque in a metallic bilayer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kyongmo; Birt, Daniel R.; Pai, Chi-Feng; Olsson, Kevin; Ralph, Daniel C.; Buhrman, Robert A.; Li, Xiaoqin

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the effect of a direct current on propagating spin waves in a CoFeB/Ta bilayer structure. Using the micro-Brillouin light scattering technique, we observe that the spin-wave damping and amplitude may be attenuated or amplified depending on the direction of the current and the applied magnetic field. Our work suggests an effective approach for electrically controlling the propagation of spin waves in a magnetic waveguide and may be useful in a number of applications such as phase-locked nano-oscillators and hybrid information-processing devices.

  12. A Hybrid Approach for Efficient Modeling of Medium-Frequency Propagation in Coal Mines

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Donovan E.; Sieber, Peter E.; Waynert, Joseph A.; Li, Jingcheng; Werner, Pingjuan L.; Werner, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    An efficient procedure for modeling medium frequency (MF) communications in coal mines is introduced. In particular, a hybrid approach is formulated and demonstrated utilizing ideal transmission line equations to model MF propagation in combination with full-wave sections used for accurate simulation of local antenna-line coupling and other near-field effects. This work confirms that the hybrid method accurately models signal propagation from a source to a load for various system geometries and material compositions, while significantly reducing computation time. With such dramatic improvement to solution times, it becomes feasible to perform large-scale optimizations with the primary motivation of improving communications in coal mines both for daily operations and emergency response. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the hybrid approach is suitable for modeling and optimizing large communication networks in coal mines that may otherwise be intractable to simulate using traditional full-wave techniques such as moment methods or finite-element analysis. PMID:26478686

  13. Spin-wave propagation and transformation in a thermal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obry, Björn; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I.; Chumak, Andrii V.; Serga, Alexander A.; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2012-11-01

    The influence of a thermal gradient on the propagation properties of externally excited dipolar spin waves in a magnetic insulator waveguide is investigated. It is shown that spin waves propagating towards a colder region along the magnetization direction continuously reduce their wavelength. The wavelength increase of a wave propagating into a hotter region was utilized to realize its decomposition in the partial waveguide modes which are reflected at different locations. This influence of temperature on spin-wave properties is mainly caused by a change in the saturation magnetization and yields promising opportunities for the manipulation of spin waves in spin-caloritronic applications.

  14. Full-wave description of the lower hybrid reflection of whistler waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzichev, I. V. Shklyar, D. R.

    2013-10-15

    A quasi-electrostatic whistler wave propagating in the direction of increasing lower hybrid resonance (LHR) frequency experiences reflection from the region in which its frequency becomes lower than the LHR frequency. This phenomenon is usually described in the framework of geometrical optics. For a wave propagating along a magnetospheric trajectory, the LHR reflection frequently takes place in the ionospheric region in which electron-neutral collisions are essential and lead to wave attenuation. In this case, the wave approach to the description of the LHR reflection is most consistent. This work is aimed at developing such an approach. The coefficients of the wave reflection are calculated for different plasma parameters. The relation between the problem under consideration and the problem of exit of whistler-mode waves to the ground is considered.

  15. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  16. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2007-04-01

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  17. Active graphene-silicon hybrid diode for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xueqian; Singh, Ranjan; Du, Liangliang; Gu, Jianqiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-05-01

    Controlling the propagation properties of the terahertz waves in graphene holds great promise in enabling novel technologies for the convergence of electronics and photonics. A diode is a fundamental electronic device that allows the passage of current in just one direction based on the polarity of the applied voltage. With simultaneous optical and electrical excitations, we experimentally demonstrate an active diode for the terahertz waves consisting of a graphene-silicon hybrid film. The diode transmits terahertz waves when biased with a positive voltage while attenuates the wave under a low negative voltage, which can be seen as an analogue of an electronic semiconductor diode. Here, we obtain a large transmission modulation of 83% in the graphene-silicon hybrid film, which exhibits tremendous potential for applications in designing broadband terahertz modulators and switchable terahertz plasmonic and metamaterial devices.

  18. Active graphene-silicon hybrid diode for terahertz waves.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xueqian; Singh, Ranjan; Du, Liangliang; Gu, Jianqiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the propagation properties of the terahertz waves in graphene holds great promise in enabling novel technologies for the convergence of electronics and photonics. A diode is a fundamental electronic device that allows the passage of current in just one direction based on the polarity of the applied voltage. With simultaneous optical and electrical excitations, we experimentally demonstrate an active diode for the terahertz waves consisting of a graphene-silicon hybrid film. The diode transmits terahertz waves when biased with a positive voltage while attenuates the wave under a low negative voltage, which can be seen as an analogue of an electronic semiconductor diode. Here, we obtain a large transmission modulation of 83% in the graphene-silicon hybrid film, which exhibits tremendous potential for applications in designing broadband terahertz modulators and switchable terahertz plasmonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:25959596

  19. Active graphene–silicon hybrid diode for terahertz waves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xueqian; Singh, Ranjan; Du, Liangliang; Gu, Jianqiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the propagation properties of the terahertz waves in graphene holds great promise in enabling novel technologies for the convergence of electronics and photonics. A diode is a fundamental electronic device that allows the passage of current in just one direction based on the polarity of the applied voltage. With simultaneous optical and electrical excitations, we experimentally demonstrate an active diode for the terahertz waves consisting of a graphene–silicon hybrid film. The diode transmits terahertz waves when biased with a positive voltage while attenuates the wave under a low negative voltage, which can be seen as an analogue of an electronic semiconductor diode. Here, we obtain a large transmission modulation of 83% in the graphene–silicon hybrid film, which exhibits tremendous potential for applications in designing broadband terahertz modulators and switchable terahertz plasmonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:25959596

  20. Linear and nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Yu, Ping

    1988-01-01

    The investigation of the acoustic wave propagation theory and numerical implementation for the situation of an isothermal atmosphere is described. A one-dimensional model to validate an asymptotic theory and a 3-D situation to relate to a realistic situation are considered. In addition, nonlinear wave propagation and the numerical treatment are included. It is known that the gravitational effects play a crucial role in the low frequency acoustic wave propagation. They propagate large distances and, as such, the numerical treatment of those problems become difficult in terms of posing boundary conditions which are valid for all frequencies.

  1. Methods in wave propagation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunisch, Henning

    2001-11-01

    Aspects of wave propagation and scattering with an emphasis on specific applications in engineering and physics are examined. Frequency-domain methods prevail. Both forward and inverse problems are considered. Typical applications of the method of moments to rough surface three-dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic scattering require a truncation of the surface considered and call for a tapered incident wave. A proposed special choice of polarization vectors removes an irregularity at the origin of the wavenumber space and leads to a wave that is optimal in a least squared error sense. An analytical solution is presented for the electromagnetic induction problem of magnetic diffusion into and scattering from a permeable, highly but not perfectly conducting prolate spheroid under axial excitation, expressed in terms of an infinite matrix equation. The solution is based on separation of variables and matching boundary conditions where the prolate spheroidal wavefunctions with complex wavenumber parameter are expanded in terms of spherical harmonics. A general broadband rational function approximation technique is developed and demonstrated. We treat special cases and provide numerical reference data for the induced magnetic dipole moment or, equivalently, the magnetic polarizability factor. The magnetoquasistatic response of a distribution of an arbitrary number of interacting small conducting and permeable objects is also investigated. Useful formulations are provided for expressing the magnetic dipole moment of conducting and permeable objects of general shape. An alternative to Tikhonov regularization for deblurring and inverse diffraction, based on a local extrapolation scheme, is described, analyzed, and illustrated numerically for the cases of continuation of fields obeying Laplace and Helmholtz equations. The problem of inferring unknown geometry and material parameters of a wave-guide model from noisy samples of the associated modal dispersion curves is

  2. Wave propagation in damage assessment of ground anchors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, B.; Rucka, M.

    2015-07-01

    The inspection possibilities of ground anchors are limited to destructive test such as pull-out test. Guided wave propagation gives an opportunity to develop an inspection system dedicated to determine the condition of inspected element without violation of their integrity. In this paper the experimental study on wave propagation in laboratory models of ground anchors are presented. Experiments were conducted for different bonding lengths and different frequencies of excitation. Waves were generated by a piezoelectric actuator and the laser vibrometry technique was used to register velocity signals. For all tested anchors it was possible to identify the boundary between steel and concrete based on the registered reflections in wave propagation signals.

  3. Effect of two ion species on the propagation of shear Alfven waves of small transverse scale

    SciTech Connect

    Vincena, S. T.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2010-05-15

    The results of a theoretical modeling study and experimental investigation of the propagation properties of shear Alfven waves of small transverse scale in a plasma with two ion species are reported. In the two ion plasma, depending on the mass of the heavier species, ion kinetic effects can become prominent, and significant parallel electric fields result in electron acceleration. The theory predicts the appearance of frequency propagation gaps at the ion-ion hybrid frequency and between harmonics of the lower cyclotron frequency. Within these frequency bands spatial structures arise that mix the cone-propagation characteristics of Alfven waves with radially expanding ion Bernstein modes. The experiments, performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility (BaPSF) at UCLA, consist of the spatial mapping of shear waves launched by a loop antenna. Although a variety of two ion-species combinations were explored, only results from a helium-neon mix are reported. A clear signature of a shear wave propagation gap, as well as propagation between multiple harmonics, is found for this gas combination. The evanescence of shear waves beyond the reflection point at the ion-ion hybrid frequency in the presence of an axial magnetic field gradient is also documented.

  4. On the propagation of acceleration waves in incompressible hyperelastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültop, T.

    2003-07-01

    The conditions for the propagation of acceleration waves (sound waves) in incompressible elastic media undergoing finite deformation are investigated. The incompressible hyperelastic solid media is considered in accordance with the general constitutive theory of materials subject to internal mechanical constraints. The equation of motion of acceleration waves is obtained using the theory of singular surfaces. A general comparison is made between the magnitudes of the propagation speeds of waves in incompressible and unconstrained solid media by the use of Mandel's inequalities. The magnitudes of the speeds of propagation of acceleration waves in the incompressible hyperelastic material classes of neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin, and St. Venant-Kirchhoff solids are determined. Comparisons are made of the specific results concerning the magnitudes of wave propagation speeds making use of the corresponding material parameters.

  5. Wave-propagation formulation of seismic response of multistory buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a discrete-time wave-propagation method to calculate the seismic response of multistory buildings, founded on layered soil media and subjected to vertically propagating shear waves. Buildings are modeled as an extension of the layered soil media by considering each story as another layer in the wave-propagation path. The seismic response is expressed in terms of wave travel times between the layers and wave reflection and transmission coefficients at layer interfaces. The method accounts for the filtering effects of the concentrated foundation and floor masses. Compared with commonly used vibration formulation, the wave-propagation formulation provides several advantages, including simplicity, improved accuracy, better representation of damping, the ability to incorporate the soil layers under the foundation, and providing better tools for identification and damage detection from seismic records. Examples are presented to show the versatility and the superiority of the method.

  6. Voltage modulation of propagating spin waves in Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Nawaoka, Kohei; Shiota, Yoichi; Miwa, Shinji; Tamura, Eiiti; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Shinjo, Teruya; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2015-05-07

    The effect of a voltage application on propagating spin waves in single-crystalline 5 nm-Fe layer was investigated. Two micro-sized antennas were employed to excite and detect the propagating spin waves. The voltage effect was characterized using AC lock-in technique. As a result, the resonant field of the magnetostatic surface wave in the Fe was clearly modulated by the voltage application. The modulation is attributed to the voltage induced magnetic anisotropy change in ferromagnetic metals.

  7. Superluminal propagation of solitary kinklike waves in amplifying media.

    PubMed

    Janowicz, Maciej; Mostowski, Jan

    2006-04-01

    It is shown that solitary-wave, kinklike structures can propagate superluminally in two- and four-level amplifying media with strongly damped oscillations of coherences. This is done by solving analytically the Maxwell-Bloch equations in the kinetic limit. It is also shown that the true wave fronts--unlike the pseudo wave fronts of the kinks--must propagate with velocity c, so that no violation of special relativity is possible. The conditions of experimental verification are discussed. PMID:16711948

  8. Manipulating Water Wave Propagation via Gradient Index Media

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Pei; Nie, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    It is challenging to realise the perfect manipulation of water waves within a broad range of frequencies. By extending conformal transformation principles to water waves, their propagation can be controlled via gradually varying water depths, permitting the realisation of a desired refractive index profile for linear water surface waves. Wave bending, directional wave emission and wave focusing are analysed experimentally with accompanying simulations. The results demonstrate desired wave manipulations within a broad range of frequencies, confirming the accuracy and effectiveness of conformal transformation for water waves. PMID:26603312

  9. Lower hybrid waves at the shock front: a reassessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. N.; Balikhin, M. A.; Alleyne, H. St. C. K.; Hobara, Y.; André, M.; Dunlop, M. W.

    2008-03-01

    The primary process occurring at a collisionless shock is the redistribution of the bulk upstream energy into other degrees of freedom. One part of this process results in the acceleration of electrons at the shock front. Accelerated electrons are observed at the terrestrial and other planetary shocks, comets, and their effects are observed in astrophysical phenomena such as supernova remnants and jets in the form of X-ray bremsstrahlung radiation. One of the physical models for electron acceleration at supercritical shocks is based on low-hybrid turbulence due to the presence of reflected ions in the foot region. Since lower hybrid waves propagate almost perpendicular to the magnetic field they can be simultaneously in resonance with both the unmagnetised ions (ω=Vik⊥) and magnetised electrons (ω=Vek||). In this paper, Cluster observations of the electric field are used to study the occurrence of lower hybrid waves in the front of the terrestrial bow shock. It is shown that the lower hybrid waves exist as isolated wave packets. However, the very low level of the observed lower hybrid turbulence is too small to impart significant energisation to the electron population.

  10. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.

    2013-11-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

  11. Ion stochastic heating by obliquely propagating magnetosonic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xinliang; Lu Quanming; Wu Mingyu; Wang Shui

    2012-06-15

    The ion motions in obliquely propagating Alfven waves with sufficiently large amplitudes have already been studied by Chen et al.[Phys. Plasmas 8, 4713 (2001)], and it was found that the ion motions are stochastic when the wave frequency is at a fraction of the ion gyro-frequency. In this paper, with test particle simulations, we investigate the ion motions in obliquely propagating magnetosonic waves and find that the ion motions also become stochastic when the amplitude of the magnetosonic waves is sufficiently large due to the resonance at sub-cyclotron frequencies. Similar to the Alfven wave, the increase of the propagating angle, wave frequency, and the number of the wave modes can lower the stochastic threshold of the ion motions. However, because the magnetosonic waves become more and more compressive with the increase of the propagating angle, the decrease of the stochastic threshold with the increase of the propagating angle is more obvious in the magnetosonic waves than that in the Alfven waves.

  12. Millimeter wave propagation measurements from an orbiting earth satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Major results of the millimeter wave propagation measurements conducted with the ATS-5 satellite are reviewed. The impact of these results on millimeter wave communications systems design is outlined. Advanced millimeter wave flight experiments currently under development for the ATS-F satellite are also discussed, and their main characteristics are summarized.

  13. Wave propagation in a medium with cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Pierre; Pazdniakou, Aliaksei

    2016-04-01

    The detection and imaging of cavities is still difficult, but it generates a lot of interest because of its potential applications. We have developed a code based on Lattice Springs and Lattice Boltzmann which can calculate wave propagation through a three dimensional composite medium. The theoretical background of these techniques will only be briefly addressed during the talk. The solid phase may have properties which are variable in space; the solid matrix may contain voids of arbitrary shapes which are filled or not with a mixture of air and water. In addition some of the voids may be empty. The surface of the ground is also arbitrary and it may be hilly. The source may be either a disturbance applied to a region of the solid phase or an overpressure applied to a particular cavity. In both cases, the disturbance and the overpressure can be arbitrary in time. Several sources can be simultaneously employed. Any region can be recorded, but a particular attention is paid to surface signals since they are the ones which are usually measured. The code is parallelized. Systematic applications of this tool have been done in order to analyse the response of a medium containing cavities to various signals. This complete parametric study has analyzed the most important parameters. The shape and the nature of the source have been addressed first; step functions of a limited or of an infinite duration have been studied and they are shown to result in simpler outputs than Ricker functions. The position of the source with respect to the ground surface has been varied. If it is deep, the reflection of the initial signal with the surface complicates the analysis of the surface measurements. The distance between the source and the cavity does not appear to be a critical parameter as long as the signal remains sufficiently large when it interacts with the cavity. Moreover, when this distance is large, the signal is transformed into a plane wave. The influence of the shape of the

  14. Application of a finite difference technique to thermal wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for thermal wave propagation resulting from periodic heat sources. The numerical technique can handle complex problems that might result from variable thermal diffusivity, such as heat flow in the earth with ice and snow layers. In the numerical analysis, the continuous temperature field is represented by a series of grid points at which the temperature is separated into real and imaginary terms. Next, computer routines previously developed for acoustic wave propagation are utilized in the solution for the temperatures. The calculation procedure is illustrated for the case of thermal wave propagation in a uniform property semi-infinite medium.

  15. Application of a finite difference technique to thermal wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for thermal wave propagation resulting from periodic heat sources. The numerical technique can handle complex problems that might result from variable thermal diffusivity, such as heat flow in the earth with ice and snow layers. In the numerical analysis, the continuous temperature field is represented by a series of grid points at which the temperature is separated into real and imaginary terms. Computer routines previously developed for acoustic wave propagation are utilized in the solution for the temperatures. The calculation procedure is illustrated for the case of thermal wave propagation in a uniform property semi-infinite medium.

  16. Parametric instabilities of parallel propagating incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nariyuki, Y.; Hada, T.; Tsubouchi, K.

    2007-12-15

    Large amplitude, low-frequency Alfven waves constitute one of the most essential elements of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the fast solar wind. Due to small collisionless dissipation rates, the waves can propagate long distances and efficiently convey such macroscopic quantities as momentum, energy, and helicity. Since loading of such quantities is completed when the waves damp away, it is important to examine how the waves can dissipate in the solar wind. Among various possible dissipation processes of the Alfven waves, parametric instabilities have been believed to be important. In this paper, we numerically discuss the parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma using a one-dimensional hybrid (superparticle ions plus an electron massless fluid) simulation, in order to explain local production of sunward propagating Alfven waves, as suggested by Helios/Ulysses observation results. Parameter studies clarify the dependence of parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves on the ion and electron beta ratio. Parametric instabilities of coherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma are vastly different from those in the cold ions (i.e., MHD and/or Hall-MHD systems), even if the collisionless damping of the Alfven waves are neglected. Further, ''nonlinearly driven'' modulational instability is important for the dissipation of incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma regardless of their polarization, since the ion kinetic effects let both the right-hand and left-hand polarized waves become unstable to the modulational instability. The present results suggest that, although the antisunward propagating dispersive Alfven waves are efficiently dissipated through the parametric instabilities in a finite ion beta plasma, these instabilities hardly produce the sunward propagating waves.

  17. Analysis of guided wave propagation in a tapered composite panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandowski, Tomasz; Malinowski, Pawel; Moll, Jochen; Radzienski, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have been published in recent years on Lamb wave propagation in isotropic and (multi-layered) anisotropic structures. In this paper, adiabatic wave propagation phenomenon in a tapered composite panel made out of glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) will be considered. Such structural elements are often used e.g. in wind turbine blades and aerospace structures. Here, the wave velocity of each wave mode does not only change with frequency and the direction of wave propagation. It further changes locally due to the varying cross-section of the GFRP panel. Elastic waves were excited using a piezoelectric transducer. Full wave-field measurements using scanning Laser Doppler vibrometry have been performed. This approach allows the detailed analysis of elastic wave propagation in composite specimen with linearly changing thickness. It will be demonstrated here experimentally, that the wave velocity changes significantly due to the tapered geometry of the structure. Hence, this work motivates the theoretical and experimental analysis of adiabatic mode propagation for the purpose of Non-Destructive Testing and Structural Health Monitoring.

  18. Propagation Dynamics of Airy Water-Wave Pulses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2015-07-17

    We observe the propagation dynamics of surface gravity water waves, having an Airy function envelope, in both the linear and the nonlinear regimes. In the linear regime, the shape of the envelope is preserved while propagating in an 18-m water tank, despite the inherent dispersion of the wave packet. The Airy wave function can propagate at a velocity that is slower (or faster if the Airy envelope is inverted) than the group velocity. Furthermore, the introduction of the Airy wave packet as surface water waves enables the observation of its position-dependent chirp and cubic-phase offset, predicted more than 35 years ago, for the first time. When increasing the envelope of the input Airy pulse, nonlinear effects become dominant, and are manifested by the generation of water-wave solitons. PMID:26230797

  19. Simulation of guided wave propagation near numerical Brillouin zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Packo, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Attractive properties of guided waves provides very unique potential for characterization of incipient damage, particularly in plate-like structures. Among other properties, guided waves can propagate over long distances and can be used to monitor hidden structural features and components. On the other hand, guided propagation brings substantial challenges for data analysis. Signal processing techniques are frequently supported by numerical simulations in order to facilitate problem solution. When employing numerical models additional sources of errors are introduced. These can play significant role for design and development of a wave-based monitoring strategy. Hence, the paper presents an investigation of numerical models for guided waves generation, propagation and sensing. Numerical dispersion analysis, for guided waves in plates, based on the LISA approach is presented and discussed in the paper. Both dispersion and modal amplitudes characteristics are analysed. It is shown that wave propagation in a numerical model resembles propagation in a periodic medium. Consequently, Lamb wave propagation close to numerical Brillouin zone is investigated and characterized.

  20. Genetic Structure in Aquatic Bladderworts: Clonal Propagation and Hybrid Perpetuation

    PubMed Central

    KAMEYAMA, YOSHIAKI; OHARA, MASASHI

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The free-floating aquatic bladderwort Utricularia australis f. australis is a sterile F1 hybrid of U. australis f. tenuicaulis and U. macrorhiza. However, co-existence of the hybrids and parental species has not been observed. In the present study, the following questions are addressed. (a) Does the capacity of the two parental species to reproduce sexually contribute to higher genotypic diversity than that of sterile F1 hybrid? (b) Are there any populations where two parental species and their hybrid co-exist? (c) If not, where and how do hybrids originate? • Methods The presence and absence of Utricularia was thoroughly investigated in two regions in Japan. An amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was conducted for 397 individuals collected from all populations (33 in total) where Utricularia was observed. • Key Results The mean number of genotypes per population (G) and genotypic diversity (D) were extremely low irrespective of the capacity to reproduce sexually: G was 1·1–1·2 and D was 0·02–0·04. The hybrid rarely co-existed with either parental species, and the co-existence of two parental species was not observed. Several AFLP bands observed in the hybrid are absent in both parental genotypes, and parent and hybrid genotypes in the same region do not show greater genetic similarity than those in distant regions. • Conclusions The capacity to reproduce sexually in parental species plays no role in increasing genotypic diversity within populations. The observed genotypes of the hybrid could not have originated from hybridization between the extant parental genotypes within the study regions. Considering the distribution ranges of three investigated taxa, it is clear that the hybrid originated in the past, and hybrid populations have been maintained exclusively by clonal propagation, which may be ensured by both hybrid vigor and long-distance dispersal of clonal offspring. PMID:16926229

  1. On the Propagation and Interaction of Spherical Blast Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Freeman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics and the scaling laws of isolated spherical blast waves have been briefly reviewed. Both self-similar solutions and numerical solutions of isolated blast waves are discussed. Blast profiles in the near-field (strong shock region) and the far-field (weak shock region) are examined. Particular attention is directed at the blast overpressure and shock propagating speed. Consideration is also given to the interaction of spherical blast waves. Test data for the propagation and interaction of spherical blast waves emanating from explosives placed in the vicinity of a solid propellant stack are presented. These data are discussed with regard to the scaling laws concerning the decay of blast overpressure.

  2. Voltage amplification of thermopower waves via current crowding at high resistances in self-propagating combustion waves.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Taehan; Hwang, Hayoung; Cho, Yonghwan; Shin, Dongjoon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2015-07-31

    Combustion wave propagation in micro/nanostructured materials generates a chemical-thermal-electrical energy conversion, which enables the creation of an unusual source of electrical energy, called a thermopower wave. In this paper, we report that high electrical resistance regimes would significantly amplify the output voltage of thermopower waves, because the current crowding creates a narrow path for charge carrier transport. We show that the structurally defective regions in the hybrid composites of chemical fuels and carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays determine both the resistance levels of the hybrid composites and the corresponding output voltage of thermopower waves. A sudden acceleration of the crowded charges would be induced by the moving reaction front of the combustion wave when the supplied driving force overcomes the potential barrier to cause charge carrier transport over the defective region. This property is investigated experimentally for the locally manipulated defective areas using diverse methods. In this study, thermopower waves in CNT-based hybrid composites are able to control the peak voltages in the range of 10-1000 mV by manipulating the resistance from 10 Ω to 100 kΩ. This controllable voltage generation from thermopower waves may enable applications using the combustion waves in micro/nanostructured materials and better understanding of the underlying physics. PMID:26159116

  3. An Obliquely Propagating Electromagnetic Drift Instability in the Lower Hybrid Frequency Range

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji; Russell Kulsrud; William Fox; Masaaki Yamada

    2005-06-10

    By employing a local two-fluid theory, we investigate an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field current or relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory self-consistently takes into account local cross-field current and accompanying pressure gradients. It is found that the instability is caused by reactive coupling between the backward propagating whistler (fast) waves in the moving electron frame, and the forward propagating sound (slow) waves in the ion frame when the relative drifts are large. The unstable waves we consider propagate obliquely to the unperturbed magnetic field and have mixed polarization with significant electromagnetic components. A physical picture of the instability emerges in the limit of large wave number characteristic of the local approximation. The primary positive feedback mechanism is based on reinforcement of initial electron density perturbations by compression of electron fluid via induced Lorentz force. The resultant waves are qualitatively consistent with the measured electromagnetic fluctuations in reconnecting current sheet in a laboratory plasma.

  4. Modelling two-dimensional global seismic wave propagation in a laterally heterogeneous whole-Moon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin; Takenaka, Hiroshi; Jiang, Xianghua; Lei, Jianshe

    2013-03-01

    The whole-Moon model was recently proposed by re-analyzing of lunar seismic data, which presumes efficient propagation of seismic waves within the Moon. However, common seismic body-wave or surface-wave phases observed for earthquake are absent or very weak in lunar seismic signals characterized by strong reverberations and coda. Hence, the process of seismic wave propagation in the Moon's interior is not well understood from limited lunar seismic data. We present numerical simulations of seismic body wave propagation in the whole Moon based on recently published whole-Moon model. Seismic wave equations are solved in a 2-D cross-section of spherical Moon with a staggered grid pseudospectral and finite difference hybrid method. Our simulation results provide the processes of seismic body wave propagation in the whole Moon for both deep and shallow moonquakes with sequential wavefield snapshots and synthetic waveforms. Effects of lateral heterogeneity on seismic wave propagation were investigated by simulations for a Moon tomographic model. Comparisons with the observed Apollo seismograms show that simulations predicted the arrivals of direct P and S waves and reproduced the reverberating nature of both direct and secondary waves. However, modelling with only the 1-D or tomographic model does not seem to be enough to produce the slow decay of energy in observations if other possible factors, such as scattering, are not considered in the model. Comparisons between different focal mechanisms suggest that great differences can be seen for the direct waves, but the structure model contributes significantly to the overall characteristics of synthetic seismograms. Numerical simulations demonstrated efficient propagation and interactions with various interfaces of seismic body waves within the whole Moon. Seismic energy propagating in the near surface low-velocity layer formed trapped waves, which propagate along the surface and appear as reverberations in the waveforms

  5. Lamb wave propagation in negative Poisson's ratio composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillat, Chrystel; Wilcox, Paul; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2008-03-01

    Lamb wave propagation is evaluated for cross-ply laminate composites exhibiting through-the-thickness negative Poisson's ratio. The laminates are mechanically modeled using the Classical Laminate Theory, while the propagation of Lamb waves is investigated using a combination of semi analytical models and Finite Element time-stepping techniques. The auxetic laminates exhibit well spaced bending, shear and symmetric fundamental modes, while featuring normal stresses for A 0 mode 3 times lower than composite laminates with positive Poisson's ratio.

  6. Spectral solution of acoustic wave-propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriva, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The Chebyshev spectral collocation solution of acoustic wave propagation problems is considered. It is shown that the phase errors decay exponentially fast and that the number of points per wavelength is not sufficient to estimate the phase accuracy. Applications include linear propagation of a sinusoidal acoustic wavetrain in two space dimensions, and the interaction of a sound wave with the bow shock formed by placing a cylinder in a uniform Mach 4 supersonic free stream.

  7. Teaching Wave Propagation and the Emergence of Viete's Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullerne, J. P.; Goekjian, M. C. Dunn

    2012-01-01

    The well-known result for the frequency of a simple spring-mass system may be combined with elementary concepts like speed = wavelength x frequency to obtain wave propagation speeds for an infinite chain of springs and masses (masses "m" held apart at equilibrium distance "a" by springs of stiffness "gamma"). These propagation speeds are dependent…

  8. Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Finnveden, Svante; Barbagallo, Mathias; Arteaga, Ines Lopez

    2014-05-01

    Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core, which is modeled by Biot's theory, is investigated using the waveguide finite element method. A waveguide poroelastic element is developed based on a displacement-pressure weak form. The dispersion curves of the sandwich panel are first identified as propagating or evanescent waves by varying the damping in the panel, and wave characteristics are analyzed by examining their motions. The energy distributions are calculated to identify the dominant motions. Simplified analytical models are also devised to show the main physics of the corresponding waves. This wave propagation analysis provides insight into the vibro-acoustic behavior of sandwich panels lined with elastic porous materials. PMID:24815252

  9. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  10. All electrical propagating spin wave spectroscopy with broadband wavevector capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciubotaru, F.; Devolder, T.; Manfrini, M.; Adelmann, C.; Radu, I. P.

    2016-07-01

    We developed an all electrical experiment to perform the broadband phase-resolved spectroscopy of propagating spin waves in micrometer sized thin magnetic stripes. The magnetostatic surface spin waves are excited and detected by scaled down to 125 nm wide inductive antennas, which award ultra broadband wavevector capability. The wavevector selection can be done by applying an excitation frequency above the ferromagnetic resonance. Wavevector demultiplexing is done at the spin wave detector thanks to the rotation of the spin wave phase upon propagation. A simple model accounts for the main features of the apparatus transfer functions. Our approach opens an avenue for the all electrical study of wavevector-dependent spin wave properties including dispersion spectra or non-reciprocal propagation.

  11. Influence of Plasma Pressure Fluctuation on RF Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Bao, Weimin; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Donglin; Zhou, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Pressure fluctuations in the plasma sheath from spacecraft reentry affect radio-frequency (RF) wave propagation. The influence of these fluctuations on wave propagation and wave properties is studied using methods derived by synthesizing the compressible turbulent flow theory, plasma theory, and electromagnetic wave theory. We study these influences on wave propagation at GPS and Ka frequencies during typical reentry by adopting stratified modeling. We analyzed the variations in reflection and transmission properties induced by pressure fluctuations. Our results show that, at the GPS frequency, if the waves are not totally reflected then the pressure fluctuations can remarkably affect reflection, transmission, and absorption properties. In extreme situations, the fluctuations can even cause blackout. At the Ka frequency, the influences are obvious when the waves are not totally transmitted. The influences are more pronounced at the GPS frequency than at the Ka frequency. This suggests that the latter can mitigate blackout by reducing both the reflection and the absorption of waves, as well as the influences of plasma fluctuations on wave propagation. Given that communication links with the reentry vehicles are susceptible to plasma pressure fluctuations, the influences on link budgets should be taken into consideration. supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB340205) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61301173)

  12. Millimetre-wave propagation in the evaporation duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. F.; Craig, K. H.

    1990-03-01

    Recent developments in propagation modeling based on the Parabolic Equation Method allow the forecasting of two-dimensional antenna coverage diagrams at millimeter wavelengths, in a dispersive atmosphere with arbitrary two-dimensional variation of the refractive index. The model was applied successfully to mm-wave propagation in the evaporation duct. The evaporation duct height is not sufficient to characterize mm-wave propagation, and information on the water vapor content is essential for the correct modeling of atmospheric absorption. Turbulence simulations were carried out, showing marked scintillation, effects in the evaporation duct. The method can be applied to arbitrary refractivity spectra, and gives a complete numerical description of the field statistics.

  13. The propagation of spark-produced N waves through turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipkens, Bart

    1994-01-01

    A model experiment was designed and built to simulate the propagation of sonic booms through atmospheric turbulence. The setup of the model experiment is described briefly. Measurements of the N waves after they propagated across the turbulent velocity field reveal the same waveform distortion and change in rise time as for sonic booms. The data from the model experiment is used to test sonic boom models. Some models yield predictions for the waveform distortion, while others give estimates of the rise time of the sonic booms. A new theoretical model for the propagation of plane N waves through a turbulent medium is described.

  14. Low Frequency Guided Plate Waves Propagation in Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lih, S-S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional destructive techniques for the determination of the elastic stiffness constants of composite materials can be costly and often inaccurate. Reliable nondestructive evaluation methods for monitoring the integrity of composite materials and structures are needed. Guided wave propagation in isotropic plate have been studied. Studies on the low frequency symmetric guide waves are presented.

  15. WAVE PROPAGATION AND JET FORMATION IN THE CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Heggland, L.; Hansteen, V. H.; Carlsson, M.; De Pontieu, B.

    2011-12-20

    We present the results of numerical simulations of wave propagation and jet formation in solar atmosphere models with different magnetic field configurations. The presence in the chromosphere of waves with periods longer than the acoustic cutoff period has been ascribed to either strong inclined magnetic fields, or changes in the radiative relaxation time. Our simulations include a sophisticated treatment of radiative losses, as well as fields with different strengths and inclinations. Using Fourier and wavelet analysis techniques, we investigate the periodicity of the waves that travel through the chromosphere. We find that the velocity signal is dominated by waves with periods around 5 minutes in regions of strong, inclined field, including at the edges of strong flux tubes where the field expands, whereas 3 minute waves dominate in regions of weak or vertically oriented fields. Our results show that the field inclination is very important for long-period wave propagation, whereas variations in the radiative relaxation time have little effect. Furthermore, we find that atmospheric conditions can vary significantly on timescales of a few minutes, meaning that a Fourier analysis of wave propagation can be misleading. Wavelet techniques take variations with time into account and are more suitable analysis tools. Finally, we investigate the properties of jets formed by the propagating waves once they reach the transition region, and find systematic differences between the jets in inclined-field regions and those in vertical field regions, in agreement with observations of dynamic fibrils.

  16. Impact induced solitary wave propagation through a woodpile structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, R.; Waychal, A.; Agarwal, S.; Yadav, P.; Uddin, Ahsan; Sahoo, N.; Shelke, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate solitary wave propagation through a one-dimensional woodpile structure excited by low and high velocity impact. Woodpile structures are a sub-class of granular metamaterial, which supports propagation of nonlinear waves. Hertz contact law governs the behavior of the solitary wave propagation through the granular media. Towards an experimental study, a woodpile structure was fabricated by orthogonally stacking cylindrical rods. A shock tube facility has been developed to launch an impactor on the woodpile structure at a velocity of 30 m s-1. Embedded granular chain sensors were fabricated to study the behavior of the solitary wave. The impact induced stress wave is studied to investigate solitary wave parameters, i.e. contact force, contact time, and solitary wave velocity. With the aid of the experimental setup, numerical simulations, and a theoretical solution based on the long wavelength approximation, formation of the solitary wave in the woodpile structure is validated to a reasonable degree of accuracy. The nondispersive and compact supported solitary waves traveling at sonic wave velocity offer unique properties that could be leveraged for application in nondestructive testing and structural health monitoring.

  17. Seismic wave propagation on heterogeneous systems with CHAPEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhberg, Alexey; Fichtner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Simulations of seismic wave propagation play a key role in the exploration of the Earth's internal structure, the prediction of earthquake-induced ground motion, and numerous other applications. In order to harness modern heterogeneous HPC systems, we implement a spectral-element discretization of the seismic wave equation using the emerging parallel programming language Chapel. High-performance massively parallel computing systems are widely used for solving seismological problems. A recent trend in the evolution of such systems is a transition from homogeneous architectures based on the conventional CPU to faster and more energy-efficient heterogeneous architectures that combine CPU with the special purpose GPU accelerators. These new heterogeneous architectures have much higher hardware complexity and are thus more difficult to program. Therefore transition to heterogeneous computing systems widens the well known gap between the performance of the new hardware and the programmers' productivity. In particular, programming heterogeneous systems typically involves a mix of various programming technologies like MPI, CUDA, or OpenACC. This conventional approach increases complexity of application code, limits its portability and reduces the programmers' productivity. We are approaching this problem by introducing a unified high-level programming model suitable for both conventional and hybrid architectures. Our model is based on the Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) paradigm used by several modern parallel programming languages. We implemented this model by extending Chapel, the emerging parallel programming language created at Cray Inc. In particular, we introduced the language abstractions for GPU-based domain mapping and extended the open source Chapel compiler (version 1.8.0) with facilities designed to translate Chapel high-level parallel programming constructs into CUDA kernels. We used this extended Chapel implementation to re-program the package for the

  18. Relationship between directions of wave and energy propagation for cold plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Zdzislaw E.

    1986-01-01

    The dispersion relation for plasma waves is considered in the 'cold' plasma approximation. General formulas for the dependence of the phase and group velocities on the direction of wave propagation with respect to the local magnetic field are obtained for a cold magnetized plasma. The principal cold plasma resonances and cut-off frequencies are defined for an arbitrary angle and are used to establish basic regimes of frequency where the cold plasma waves can propagate or can be evanescent. The relationship between direction of wave and energy propagation, for cold plasma waves in hydrogen atmosphere, is presented in the form of angle diagrams (angle between group velocity and magnetic field versus angle between phase velocity and magnetic field) and polar diagrams (also referred to as 'Friedrich's diagrams') for different directions of wave propagation. Morphological features of the diagrams as well as some critical angles of propagation are discussed.

  19. Degenerate four-wave mixing in silicon hybrid plasmonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Thorin J; Nielsen, Michael P; Diaz, Fernando; Palomba, Stefano; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-based plasmonic waveguides show high confinement well beyond the diffraction limit. Various devices have been demonstrated to outperform their dielectric counterparts at micrometer scales, such as linear modulators, capable of generating high field confinement and improving device efficiency by increasing access to nonlinear processes, limited by ohmic losses. By using hybridized plasmonic waveguide architectures and nonlinear materials, silicon-based plasmonic waveguides can generate strong nonlinear effects over just a few wavelengths. We have theoretically investigated the nonlinear optical performance of two hybrid plasmonic waveguides (HPWG) with three different nonlinear materials. Based on this analysis, the hybrid gap plasmon waveguide (HGPW), combined with the DDMEBT nonlinear polymer, shows a four-wave mixing (FWM) conversion efficiency of -16.4  dB over a 1 μm propagation length, demonstrating that plasmonic waveguides can be competitive with standard silicon photonics structures over distances three orders of magnitude shorter. PMID:26696182

  20. Propagation and Dissipation of MHD Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.

    2006-11-01

    bholadwivedi@gmail.com In view of the landmark result on the solar wind outflow, starting between 5 Mm and 20 Mm above the photosphere in magnetic funnels, we investigate the propagation and dissipation of MHD waves in coronal holes. We underline the importance of Alfvén wave dissipation in the magnetic funnels through the viscous and resistive plasma. Our results show that Alfvén waves are one of the primary energy sources in the innermost part of coronal holes where the solar wind outflow starts. We also consider compressive viscosity and thermal conductivity to study the propagation and dissipation of long period slow longitudinal MHD waves in polar coronal holes. We discuss their likely role in the line profile narrowing, and in the energy budget for coronal holes and the solar wind. We compare the contribution of longitudinal MHD waves with high frequency Alfvén waves.

  1. Simulation of the elastic wave propagation in anisotropic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryner, Juerg; Vollmann, Jacqueline; Profunser, Dieter M.; Dual, Jurg

    2007-06-01

    For the interpretation of optical Pump-Probe Measurements on microstructures the wave propagation in anisotropic 3-D structures with arbitrary geometries is numerically calculated. The laser acoustic Pump-Probe technique generates bulk waves in structures in a thermo-elastic way. This method is well established for non-destructive measurements of thin films with an indepth resolution in the order of 10 nm. The Pump-Probe technique can also be used for measurements, e.g. for quality inspection of three-dimensional structures with arbitrary geometries, like MEMS components. For the interpretation of the measurements it is necessary that the wave propagation in the specimen to be inspected can be calculated. Here, the wave propagation for various geometries and materials is investigated. In the first part, the wave propagation in isotropic axisymmetric structures is simulated with a 2-D finite difference formulation. The numerical results are verified with measurements of macroscopic specimens. In a second step, the simulations are extended to 3-D structures with orthotopic material properties. The implemented code allows the calculation of the wave propagation for different orientations of the material axes (orientation of the orthotropic axes relative to the geometry of the structure). Limits of the presented algorithm are discussed and future directions of the on-going research project are presented.

  2. Nonlinear propagation and control of acoustic waves in phononic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Mehrem, Ahmed; Picó, Rubén; García-Raffi, Lluís M.; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor J.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of intense acoustic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal is studied. The medium consists in a structured fluid, formed by a periodic array of fluid layers with alternating linear acoustic properties and quadratic nonlinearity coefficient. The spacing between layers is of the order of the wavelength, therefore Bragg effects such as band gaps appear. We show that the interplay between strong dispersion and nonlinearity leads to new scenarios of wave propagation. The classical waveform distortion process typical of intense acoustic waves in homogeneous media can be strongly altered when nonlinearly generated harmonics lie inside or close to band gaps. This allows the possibility of engineer a medium in order to get a particular waveform. Examples of this include the design of media with effective (e.g., cubic) nonlinearities, or extremely linear media (where distortion can be canceled). The presented ideas open a way towards the control of acoustic wave propagation in nonlinear regime. xml:lang="fr"

  3. Finite Element Modeling of Guided Wave Propagation in Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar KM, Manoj; Ramaswamy, Sivaramanivas; Kommareddy, Vamshi; Baskaran, Ganesan; Zongqi, Sun; Kirkire, Gautam

    2006-03-01

    This paper aims at developing a numerical model for guided wave propagation in plates and the interaction of modes with defects using Finite Element Modeling (FEM). Guided waves propagate as extensional, flexural and torsional waves. Theoretically, these modes are infinite in number, but only some of these propagate and the others are attenuated. The dispersion curves for a structure reveal the plausibility of these modes. In this paper, FEM is used to examine interaction of first few symmetric and anti-symmetric modes independently with the cracks of various sizes in a plate. A time-frequency representation of the acquired guided wave mode signals will be discussed to show the mode sensitivity with crack size.

  4. Synaptically Generated Wave Propagation in Excitable Neural Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, P. C.

    1999-04-01

    We study the propagation of solitary waves in a one-dimensional network of excitable integrate-and-fire neurons with axo-dendritic synaptic coupling. We show that for small axonal delays there exists a stable solitary wave, and derive a power scaling law for the velocity as a function of the coupling. In the case of large axonal delays and fast synapses we establish that the solitary wave can destabilize via a Hopf bifurcation in the firing times.

  5. Wave propagation on a random lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlmann, Hanno

    2010-09-15

    Motivated by phenomenological questions in quantum gravity, we consider the propagation of a scalar field on a random lattice. We describe a procedure to calculate the dispersion relation for the field by taking a limit of a periodic lattice. We use this to calculate the lowest order coefficients of the dispersion relation for a specific one-dimensional model.

  6. Mantle compression affects seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-02-01

    To try to understand the direction of motion of the Earth's mantle, which lies hidden beneath tens of kilometers of crust, researchers have relied on the property of seismic anisotropy. When seismic shear waves pass through some types of materials, known as anisotropic materials, the speed of the wave can vary depending on the direction in which it is moving. Traditionally, scientists have assumed that the direction in which waves move more quickly aligns with the direction of mantle motion. For subduction zones, however, this general rule seemed to break down—a discrepancy exists between numerical model simulations and observed seismic data.

  7. Modelling propagation of deflagration waves out of hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2015-06-01

    It is widely accepted that shock initiation and detonation of heterogeneous explosives come about by a two-step process known as ignition and growth. In the first step a shock sweeping an explosive cell (control volume) creates hot spots that become ignition sites. In the second step deflagration waves (or burn waves) propagate out of those hot spots and transform the reactant in the cell into reaction products. The macroscopic (or average) reaction rate of the reactant in a cell depends on the speed of those deflagration waves and on the average distance between neighbouring hot spots. Here we simulate the propagation of deflagration waves out of hot spots on the mesoscale in axial symmetry using a 2D hydrocode, to which we add heat conduction and bulk reaction. The propagation speed of the deflagration wave depends on both pressure and temperature, where pressure dependence is dominant at low shock level, and temperature dependence is dominant at a higher shock level. From the simulation we obtain deflagration (or burn) fronts emanating out of the hot spots. For intermediate shock levels the deflagration waves consume the explosive between hot spots. For higher shock levels the deflagration waves strengthen to become detonation waves on the mesoscale. From the simulation results we extract average deflagration wave speeds and show how they depend on reaction rate and on other material parameters.

  8. Nonlinear electron magnetohydrodynamics physics. II. Wave propagation and wave-wave interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.; Strohmaier, K. D.

    2008-04-15

    The propagation of low-frequency whistler modes with wave magnetic field exceeding the ambient field is investigated experimentally. Such nonlinear waves are excited with magnetic loop antennas whose axial field is aligned with the background magnetic field and greatly exceeds its strength. The oscillatory antenna field excites propagating wave packets with field topologies alternating between whistler spheromaks and mirrors. The propagation speed of spheromaks is observed to decrease with amplitude while that of mirrors increases with amplitude. The field distribution varies with amplitude: Spheromaks contract axially while mirrors spread out compared to linear whistlers. Consequently, the peak magnetic field and current densities in spheromaks exceed that of mirrors. Wave-wave interactions of nonlinear whistler modes is also studied. Counterpropagating spheromaks collide inelastically and form a stationary field-reversed configuration. The radius of the toroidal current ring depends on current and can be larger than that of the loop antenna. A tilted field-reversed configuration precesses in the direction of the electron drift. The free magnetic energy is dissipated in the plasma volume and converted into electron heat.

  9. Impact of gravity waves on long-range infrasound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, François; De La Camara, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study infrasound propagation in acoustic waveguides that support a finite number of propagating modes. We analyze the effects of gravity waves on these acoustic waveguides. Testing sound propagation in such perturbed fields can potentially be used to improve the gravity wave models. A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the forward-scattering approximation. The wave mode structure is determined by the effective sound speed profile which is strongly affected by gravity wave breaking. The random perturbations are described by a stochastic field predicted by a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves, which is operational in the LMDz climate model. The justification for this approach is two fold. On the one hand, the use of a few monochromatic waves mimics the observations of rather narrow-banded gravity wave packets in the lower stratosphere. On the other hand, the stochastic sampling of the gravity wave field and the random choice of wave properties deals with the inherent unpredictability of mesoscale dynamics from large scale conditions provided by the meteorological reanalysis. The transmitted acoustic signals contain a stable front and a small-amplitude incoherent coda. A general expression for the stable front is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. This approach extract the dominant effects in the acoustic - gravity wave interaction. We present results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to a few saddle-points and how the GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. While some of the characteristics of the stable front can be directly related to that of a few individual gravity waves, it is shown that the amount of the launched gravity waves included in climate models can be estimated using

  10. Detection of Electromechanical Wave Propagation Using Synchronized Phasor Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryawanshi, Prakash; Dambhare, Sanjay; Pramanik, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Considering electrical network as a continuum has become popular for electromechanical wave analysis. This paper reviews the concept of electromechanical wave propagation. Analysis of large number of generator ring system will be an easy way to illustrate wave propagation. The property of traveling waves is that the maximum and minimum values do not occur at the same time instants and hence the difference between these time delays can be easily calculated. The homogeneous, isotropic 10 generator ring system is modeled using electromagnetic transient simulation programs. The purpose of this study is to investigate the time delays and wave velocities using Power System Computer Aided Design (PSCAD)/Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The disturbances considered here are generator disconnections and line trips.

  11. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Context. Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Methods: Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued, longitudinal wavenumber k at given real angular frequencies ω. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of ωc, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. Results: In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for ω much lower than ωc. However, while able to direct their energy upward, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping length shows little dependence on the density contrast between the cylinder and its surroundings, and depends only weakly on frequency. This spatial damping length is of the order of the cylinder radius for ω ≲ 1.5vAi/a, where a and vAi are the cylinder radius and the Alfvén speed in the cylinder, respectively. Conclusions: If a coronal cylinder is perturbed by symmetric boundary drivers (e.g., granular motions) with a broadband spectrum, wave leakage efficiently filters out the low-frequency components.

  12. Experiments and Numerical Investigations of Wave Propagation In Thermal Plumes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudenbach, N.; Christensen, U. R.

    In laboratory experiments thermal plumes are created by injecting hot corn syrup into a column of cold syrup. The viscosity contrast is up to a factor of 1000. Solitary waves, that propagate upwards in the plume conduit, are generated by enhancing the injection rate for a few seconds. For the measurement of the thermal structure of the plume we have implemented a method based on the deflection of a laser beam passing through the plume. Continuous scanning provides a new radial temperature profile each second, which allows detailed studies of the thermal structure of solitary waves. A PIV - (particle image volecimetry) method provides the velocity structure of the thermal plume. Measurements were taken for plume heads, conduits and propagating waves. Comparison between experimental results and numerical 2-D axisymmetric simulations shows a good agreement of the temperature profiles and velocity fields in the plume conduit and waves. Because of thermal diffusion, the conduit widens with height, while its central temperature decreases. The solitary waves start with the same temperature as the unperturbed conduit, however, we find that the temperature in the waves decreases less rapide with rising height. This can be explained by the faster upward propagation and the trapping of fluid within the soliton. If solitary waves exists in mantle plumes, this would imply that they arrive at the bottom of the lithosphere with a larger excess temperature than what the plumes normally exhibits. Especially for weak hotspots solitary waves could have strong influence on the variation of melt generation with time.

  13. Electromagnetic Components of Auroral Hiss and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Polar Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.

    1995-01-01

    DE-1 has frequently observed waves in the whistler and lower hybrid frequencies range. Besides the electrostatic components, these waves also exhibit electromagnetic components. It is generally believed that these waves are excited by the electron acoustic instability and the electron-beam-driven lower hybrid instability. Because the electron acoustic and the lower hybrid waves are predominately electrostatic waves, they cannot account for the observed electromagnetic components. In this work, it is suggested that these electromagnetic components can be explained by waves that are generated near the resonance cone and that propagate away from the source. The role that these electromagnetic waves can play in particle acceleration processes at low altitude is discussed.

  14. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in a weakly ionized dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jieshu; Yuan, Chengxun; Gao, Ruilin; Wang, Ying; Liu, Yaoze; Gao, Junying; Zhou, Zhongxiang; Sun, Xiudong; Wu, Jian; Li, Hui; Pu, Shaozhi

    2015-11-01

    Propagation properties of electromagnetic (EM) waves in weakly ionized dusty plasmas are the subject of this study. Dielectric relation for EM waves propagating at a weakly ionized dusty plasma is derived based on the Boltzmann distribution law while considering the collision and charging effects of dust grains. The propagation properties of EM energy in dusty plasma of rocket exhaust are numerically calculated and studied, utilizing the parameters of rocket exhaust plasma. Results indicate that increase of dust radius and density enhance the reflection and absorption coefficient. High dust radius and density make the wave hardly transmit through the dusty plasmas. Interaction enhancements between wave and dusty plasmas are developed through effective collision frequency improvements. Numerical results coincide with observed results by indicating that GHz band wave communication is effected by dusty plasma as the presence of dust grains significantly affect propagation of EM waves in the dusty plasmas. The results are helpful to analyze the effect of dust in plasmas and also provide a theoretical basis for the experiments.

  15. Geometric effects on stress wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K L; Trim, M W; Horstemeyer, M F; Lee, N; Williams, L N; Liao, J; Rhee, H; Prabhu, R

    2014-02-01

    The present study, through finite element simulations, shows the geometric effects of a bioinspired solid on pressure and impulse mitigation for an elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic material. Because of the bioinspired geometries, stress wave mitigation became apparent in a nonintuitive manner such that potential real-world applications in human protective gear designs are realizable. In nature, there are several toroidal designs that are employed for mitigating stress waves; examples include the hyoid bone on the back of a woodpecker's jaw that extends around the skull to its nose and a ram's horn. This study evaluates four different geometries with the same length and same initial cross-sectional diameter at the impact location in three-dimensional finite element analyses. The geometries in increasing complexity were the following: (1) a round cylinder, (2) a round cylinder that was tapered to a point, (3) a round cylinder that was spiraled in a two dimensional plane, and (4) a round cylinder that was tapered and spiraled in a two-dimensional plane. The results show that the tapered spiral geometry mitigated the greatest amount of pressure and impulse (approximately 98% mitigation) when compared to the cylinder regardless of material type (elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic) and regardless of input pressure signature. The specimen taper effectively mitigated the stress wave as a result of uniaxial deformational processes and an induced shear that arose from its geometry. Due to the decreasing cross-sectional area arising from the taper, the local uniaxial and shear stresses increased along the specimen length. The spiral induced even greater shear stresses that help mitigate the stress wave and also induced transverse displacements at the tip such that minimal wave reflections occurred. This phenomenon arose although only longitudinal waves were introduced as the initial boundary condition (BC). In nature, when shearing occurs within or between materials

  16. Control of Propagating Spin Waves via Spin Transfer Torque in a Metallic Bilayer Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kyongmo; Birt, Daniel; Pai, Chi-Feng; Olsson, Kevin; Ralph, Daniel; Buhrman, Robert; Li, Xiaoqin

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the effect of a direct current on propagating spin waves in a CoFeB/Ta bilayer structure. Using the micro-Brillouin light scattering technique, we observe that the spin wave amplitude may be attenuated or amplified depending on the direction of the current and the applied magnetic field. Our work suggests an effective approach for electrically controlling the propagation of spin waves in a magnetic waveguide and may be useful in a number of applications such as phase locked nano-oscillators and hybrid information processing devices. AFOSR FA9550-08-1-0463, AFOSR FA-9550-08-1-0058 and the NSF-IGERT program via grant DGE-0549417.

  17. A propagation method with adaptive mesh grid based on wave characteristics for wave optics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qiuyan; Wang, Jing; Lv, Pin; Sun, Quan

    2015-10-01

    Propagation simulation method and choosing mesh grid are both very important to get the correct propagation results in wave optics simulation. A new angular spectrum propagation method with alterable mesh grid based on the traditional angular spectrum method and the direct FFT method is introduced. With this method, the sampling space after propagation is not limited to propagation methods no more, but freely alterable. However, choosing mesh grid on target board influences the validity of simulation results directly. So an adaptive mesh choosing method based on wave characteristics is proposed with the introduced propagation method. We can calculate appropriate mesh grids on target board to get satisfying results. And for complex initial wave field or propagation through inhomogeneous media, we can also calculate and set the mesh grid rationally according to above method. Finally, though comparing with theoretical results, it's shown that the simulation result with the proposed method coinciding with theory. And by comparing with the traditional angular spectrum method and the direct FFT method, it's known that the proposed method is able to adapt to a wider range of Fresnel number conditions. That is to say, the method can simulate propagation results efficiently and correctly with propagation distance of almost zero to infinity. So it can provide better support for more wave propagation applications such as atmospheric optics, laser propagation and so on.

  18. Amplitude-Preserving Propagator and its Applications in Computational Wave Propagation and Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslaminia, Mehran

    A novel method is developed to approximately solve acoustic wave equation in the frequency domain. The key idea of the method is to partition the domain into smaller subdomains and solve for the wavefield in each subdomain sequentially, which is facilitated by special interface (continuity) conditions. The sequential solution is performed in two steps: First the downward propagating wavefield is computed considering only downward propagation and transmission at the interfaces. The wavefield is then corrected by adding the upward propagating wavefield resulting from reflections and body forces. It is shown that the proposed method results in accurate amplitudes for downward propagation and primary reflections and is hence called the Amplitude-Preserving Propagator. This novel wave propagator leads to three disparate contributions in large scale computational wave modeling and seismic imaging: forward modeling, migration imaging and full waveform inversion. Forward Modeling: The amplitude-preserving propagator is implemented as a preconditioner to iteratively solve the Helmholtz equation. The effectiveness of the proposed preconditioner is studied using various numerical experiments. We show three significant properties of the proposed preconditioner. First, number of iterations grows very slowly with increasing frequency which is a significant advantage compared to other methods, e.g. sweeping preconditioner. Second, the mesh size (i.e. number of elements per wavelength) does not change number of iterations. Third, and the most important one, the computational time is much less than many other preconditioners. Migration Imaging: In the context of migration imaging, the amplitude-preserving propagator is implemented as an efficient forward solver to perform wave propagation simulation in the frequency domain. We show that the propagator results in a new migration algorithm that is almost as accurate as full-wave migration, while being significantly more efficient

  19. Impact of mountain gravity waves on infrasound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiens, Florentin; Lott, François; Millet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Linear theory of acoustic propagation is used to analyze how mountain waves can change the characteristics of infrasound signals. The mountain wave model is based on the integration of the linear inviscid Taylor-Goldstein equation forced by a nonlinear surface boundary condition. For the acoustic propagation we solve the wave equation using the normal mode method together with the effective sound speed approximation. For large-amplitude mountain waves we use direct numerical simulations to compute the interactions between the mountain waves and the infrasound component. It is shown that the mountain waves perturb the low level waveguide, which leads to significant acoustic dispersion. The mountain waves also impact the arrival time and spread of the signals substantially and can produce a strong absorption of the wave signal. To interpret our results we follow each acoustic mode separately and show which mode is impacted and how. We also show that the phase shift between the acoustic modes over the horizontal length of the mountain wave field may yield to destructive interferences in the lee side of the mountain, resulting in a new form of infrasound absorption. The statistical relevance of those results is tested using a stochastic version of the mountain wave model and large enough sample sizes.

  20. Efficient Irregular Wavefront Propagation Algorithms on Hybrid CPU-GPU Machines.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, George; Pan, Tony; Kurc, Tahsin; Kong, Jun; Cooper, Lee; Saltz, Joel

    2013-04-01

    We address the problem of efficient execution of a computation pattern, referred to here as the irregular wavefront propagation pattern (IWPP), on hybrid systems with multiple CPUs and GPUs. The IWPP is common in several image processing operations. In the IWPP, data elements in the wavefront propagate waves to their neighboring elements on a grid if a propagation condition is satisfied. Elements receiving the propagated waves become part of the wavefront. This pattern results in irregular data accesses and computations. We develop and evaluate strategies for efficient computation and propagation of wavefronts using a multi-level queue structure. This queue structure improves the utilization of fast memories in a GPU and reduces synchronization overheads. We also develop a tile-based parallelization strategy to support execution on multiple CPUs and GPUs. We evaluate our approaches on a state-of-the-art GPU accelerated machine (equipped with 3 GPUs and 2 multicore CPUs) using the IWPP implementations of two widely used image processing operations: morphological reconstruction and euclidean distance transform. Our results show significant performance improvements on GPUs. The use of multiple CPUs and GPUs cooperatively attains speedups of 50× and 85× with respect to single core CPU executions for morphological reconstruction and euclidean distance transform, respectively. PMID:23908562

  1. Efficient Irregular Wavefront Propagation Algorithms on Hybrid CPU-GPU Machines

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, George; Pan, Tony; Kurc, Tahsin; Kong, Jun; Cooper, Lee; Saltz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of efficient execution of a computation pattern, referred to here as the irregular wavefront propagation pattern (IWPP), on hybrid systems with multiple CPUs and GPUs. The IWPP is common in several image processing operations. In the IWPP, data elements in the wavefront propagate waves to their neighboring elements on a grid if a propagation condition is satisfied. Elements receiving the propagated waves become part of the wavefront. This pattern results in irregular data accesses and computations. We develop and evaluate strategies for efficient computation and propagation of wavefronts using a multi-level queue structure. This queue structure improves the utilization of fast memories in a GPU and reduces synchronization overheads. We also develop a tile-based parallelization strategy to support execution on multiple CPUs and GPUs. We evaluate our approaches on a state-of-the-art GPU accelerated machine (equipped with 3 GPUs and 2 multicore CPUs) using the IWPP implementations of two widely used image processing operations: morphological reconstruction and euclidean distance transform. Our results show significant performance improvements on GPUs. The use of multiple CPUs and GPUs cooperatively attains speedups of 50× and 85× with respect to single core CPU executions for morphological reconstruction and euclidean distance transform, respectively. PMID:23908562

  2. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation over Oil-Covered Sea Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Jin, Wei; Guo, Li-Xin

    2012-07-01

    An exhaustive analysis of electromagnetic wave propagation over an oil-covered sea surface in an evaporation duct environment is studied in comparison with those of the oil-free sea surface. Instead of using the traditional rms height formula, which only considers the oil-free sea surface, we reduce the rms height of a one-dimensional oil-covered sea surface based on the Pierson-Moskowitz sea spectrum. Then, the electromagnetic wave propagation over the oil-covered sea surface in an evaporation duct environment with different wind speeds and frequencies is discussed by the parabolic equation for a fully oil-covered sea surface. In addition, the influence of the fractional filling factor on the electromagnetic wave propagation over non-fully oil-covered sea surface is also investigated. The results show that the oil film can reduce the sea surface roughness and strengthen the trapping effect in an evaporation duct environment.

  3. Parabolic approximation method for fast magnetosonic wave propagation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Perkins, F.W.; Hwang, D.Q.

    1985-07-01

    Fast magnetosonic wave propagation in a cylindrical tokamak model is studied using a parabolic approximation method in which poloidal variations of the wave field are considered weak in comparison to the radial variations. Diffraction effects, which are ignored by ray tracing mthods, are included self-consistently using the parabolic method since continuous representations for the wave electromagnetic fields are computed directly. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the cylindrical convergence of the launched waves into a diffraction-limited focal spot on the cyclotron absorption layer near the magnetic axis for a wide range of plasma confinement parameters.

  4. Variational principle for nonlinear wave propagation in dissipative systems.

    PubMed

    Dierckx, Hans; Verschelde, Henri

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of many natural systems is dominated by nonlinear waves propagating through the medium. We show that in any extended system that supports nonlinear wave fronts with positive surface tension, the asymptotic wave-front dynamics can be formulated as a gradient system, even when the underlying evolution equations for the field variables cannot be written as a gradient system. The variational potential is simply given by a linear combination of the occupied volume and surface area of the wave front and changes monotonically over time. PMID:26986334

  5. Global propagation of body waves revealed by seismic interferometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, K.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic interferometry has now been applied to the exploration of the Earth's interior at scales ranging from local to global. Most studies have used surface-wave propagation. Recently, some studies have focused on body wave propagation on local and regional scales but not on a global scale. In this study, we succeed in extracting global body wave propagation(of P, PP, PKP, S, SS, ScS, P‧P‧, etc. waves) using seismic hum with frequency-wave number filtering in the range of 5 to 40 mHz. Although the observed body wave propagation is similar to that of the corresponding components of Green's functions, there are two differences between them: the lack of reflection phases in the observation and the dominance of shear-coupled PL waves in the observation. These differences originate from the dominance of shear-traction sources on the Earth's surface, which causes the breakdown of equipartition among modes with different radial orders. To discuss the differences quantitatively, we developed a new method to synthesize cross-spectra between a pair of stations with an assumption of spatially homogeneous distribution of random sources, which are characterized by effective horizontal traction and effective pressure. At first, we estimated power spectra of the effective pressure and the effective shear traction by fitting the synthetic spectra to the observed ones. The results show dominance of random shear traction from 5 to 20 mHz, which is consistent with past studies. Next, we synthesized cross-correlation functions with the source model. The synthetic spectra can reconstruct the two observed features: the lack of reflection phases and the dominance of shear-coupled PL waves. The source characteristics are crucial for the body wave exploration in further studies.

  6. Globally propagating waves in the solar corona -an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    Globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere since the 1960s. These "Moreton waves" were interpreted as the ground tracks of dome-shaped waves that expand through the corona and sweep over the chromosphere. However, only the recent decade has seen detailed analysis of these phenomena, prompted by the availability of coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, most famously SOHO/EIT. Globally propagating coronal waves have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Still, no consensus on their physical nature has been reached. While many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances -fast-mode MHD waves which are propagating in the solar corona and which may be shocked -other characteristics have given rise to alternative models which involve magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of a CME eruption. I will review the different observational signatures of coronal waves, as well as associated phenomena such as metric type II radio bursts. Furthermore, I will discuss the different physical interpretations of coronal waves and how they are supported by observations. Finally, I will consider how some of the lingering controversies might be resolved by observations.

  7. Experiments and numerical investigations of wave propagation in thermal plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudenbach, N.

    2001-12-01

    In laboratory experiments thermal plumes are created by injecting hot corn syrup into a column of cold syrup. The viscosity contrast is up to a factor of 1000. Solitary waves, that propagate upwards in the plume conduit, are generated by enhancing the injection rate for a few seconds. For the measurement of the thermal structure of the plume we have implemented a method based on the deflection of a laser beam passing through the plume. Continuous scanning provides a new radial temperature profile each second, which allows detailed studies of the thermal structure of solitary waves. A PIV - (particle image volecimetry) method provides the velocity structure of the thermal plume. Measurements were taken for plume heads, conduits and propagating waves. Comparison between experimental results and numerical 2-D axisymmetric simulations shows a good agreement of the temperature profiles and velocity fields in the plume conduit and waves. Because of thermal diffusion, the conduit widens with height, while its central temperature decreases. The solitary waves start with the same temperature as the unperturbed conduit, however, we find that the temperature in the waves decreases less rapide with rising height. This can be explained by the faster upward propagation and the trapping of fluid within the soliton. If solitary waves exists in mantle plumes, this would imply that they arrive at the bottom of the lithosphere with a larger excess temperature than what the plumes normally exhibits, which could explain strong variations of melt generation with time.

  8. High Frequency Elastic Wave Propagation in Media with a Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, B.; Aubry, D.; Mouronval, A.-S.; Solas, D.; Thébault, J.; Tian, B.-Y.

    2010-05-01

    This contribution deals with the theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of elastic wave propagation in media with a microstructure. Two kinds of media are considered: polycrystalline material and honeycomb core sandwich shells, in which elastic waves are triggered by transient signals that result in large frequency ranges including high frequencies. Our theoretical and numerical investigations aim at understanding and simulating the interactions between the microstructure of those media and the wave propagation phenomena, when the characteristic lengths of the microstructure and the involved shortest wavelengths have roughly the same scale. In this paper, some key mechanisms of interaction between the considered microstructures and the elastic waves are highlighted. In polycrystalline superalloys, the misorientation distribution and the average grain size are considered, as they can alter pressure/shear wave propagation and also the permeability to ultrasonic waves monitored to perform non-destructive testing. For the flexure behavior of honeycomb core sandwich shells, the fundamental role played by the honeycomb cells, especially in high frequency domain, is analyzed. Relevant numerical modeling that provides a promising way to quantify micro-structure/wave interactions is presented. The important issue of how to take into account these micro-scale interactions in a homogenized macro-scale modeling is also discussed.

  9. Propagation of plate acoustic waves in contact with fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatadi Suraji, Nagaraj

    The characteristics of acoustic waves propagating in thin piezoelectric plates in the presence of a fluid medium contacting one or both of the plate surfaces are investigated. If the velocity of plate wave in the substrate is greater than velocity of bulk wave in the fluid, then a plate acoustic wave (PAW) traveling in the substrate will radiate a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) in the fluid. It is found that, under proper conditions, efficient conversion of energy from plate acoustic waves to bulk acoustic waves and vice versa can be obtained. For example, using the fundamental anti symmetric plate wave mode (A0 mode) propagating in a lithium niobate substrate and water as the fluid, total mode conversion loss (PAW to BAW and back from BAW to PAW) of less than 3 dB has been obtained. This mode conversion principle can be used to realize miniature, high efficiency transducers for use in ultrasonic flow meters. Similar type of transducer based on conversion of energy from surface acoustic wave (SAW) to bulk acoustic wave (BAW) has been developed previously. The use of plate waves has several advantages. Since the energy of plate waves is present on both plate surfaces, the inter digital transducer (IDT) can be on the surface opposite from that which is in contact with the fluid. This protects the IDT from possible damage due to the fluid and also simplifies the job of making electrical connections to the IDT. Another advantage is that one has wider choice of substrate materials with plate waves than is the case with SAWs. Preliminary calculations indicate that the mode conversion principle can also be used to generate and detect ultrasonic waves in air. This has potential applications for realizing transducers for use in non-contact ultrasonic's. The design of an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) chip containing an amplifier and frequency counter for use with ultrasonic transducers is also presented in this thesis.

  10. Propagation of polarized millimeter waves through falling snow.

    PubMed

    Brien, S G; Goedecke, G H

    1988-06-15

    Propagation of coherent linearly polarized waves through falling snow is calculated for two monodisperse and one polydisperse model snowstorms for fixed orientation and for random orientation of the snow crystals, at a 10-mm wavelength, utilizing a theoretical model based on the Foldy-Lax model. Results for linearly polarized waves incident on oriented monodispersions and polydispersions exhibit a marked damped oscillatory behavior as a function of propagation distance for the copolarized and cross-polarized intensities. For the polydispersion, a simple approximation for the dependence of the forward scattering matrix elements on snow crystal size is also obtained. PMID:20531776

  11. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A program for the measurement and analysis of the depolarization and differential attenuation that occur when millimeter wave signals propagate through rain is described. Initial data are taken along a 1.43 km path at 17.65 GHz and a supporting theoretical model is developed to relate the propagation effects to rainfall rate and wind velocity. A block diagram of the overall experiment is included. It consists of: (1) an RF system (millimeter wave transmitter and receiver), (2) transmitting and receiving antennas, (3) a weather system with rain gauges, wind sensors, and drop counters, and (4) a digital control, processing, and data storage system.

  12. Wave propagation in polar elastic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, W. A.; Green, E. Rhian

    1994-08-01

    This paper examines the passband and stop band regions for time-periodic waves travelling normal to the layering through an infinite medium composed of alternating layers of two different elastic materials. The materials are such that the elastic energy density is a function of the strains and the strain gradients and, in consequence, a deformation gives rise to both the usual Cauchy stress and to a hyperstress or couple-stress. Such materials can exhibit a non-uniform wrinkling deformation at a free surface and similar non-uniform deformations can arise at interfaces between two different media. The presence of the strain derivatives in the elastic energy function introduces a natural length scale l into the material and the depth of the non-uniform deformation is of the order of this length scale. This model can give rise to enhanced elastic response when the layer depths are comparable with l and it is of interest as a possible mathematical model of nanolayered structures. The model also includes a non-standard set of continuity conditions at material interfaces. These arise from the elastic interaction energy of the two materials at the boundary and their effect is localized in a boundary layer whose depth is of order l. The periodic layering gives rise to displacements which are periodic with a frequency-dependent wave number, the Floquet wave number. Dispersion curves, relating circular frequency to the Floquet wave number, are obtained for different ratios of the layer depth to the natural length l and for different values of the elastic interface coupling parameters.

  13. Propagation characteristics of waves upstream and downstream of quasi-parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.

    1993-01-01

    The propagation characteristics of waves upstream and downstream of quasi-parallel shocks are investigated by using 2D hybrid simulations. At low Alfven Mach numbers, M(A) below about 2, the shock is initially associated with upstream phase-standing whistlers. At later times, backstreaming ions excite longer-wavelength whistlers via the right-hand resonant ion/ion instability. These waves propagate along the magnetic field at a group velocity no smaller than the upstream flow speed, so that the waves remain in the upstream region. At higher MA (above about 3), these waves are convected back into the shock, causing its reformation and downstream perturbations. Shock transmitted waves mode-convert into Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves which have a wave vector along the shock normal (pointing upstream) and convect downstream. The 2D simulation results confirm our earlier suggestion that the upstream waves should be field aligned, and that their convection into the downstream is associated with linear mode conversion into the Alfven/ion-cyclotron branch.

  14. Propagating spectroscopy of backward volume spin waves in a metallic FeNi film

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, N.; Ishida, N.; Kawakami, T.; Sekiguchi, K.

    2014-01-20

    We report a propagating spin wave spectroscopy for a magnetostatic backward volume spin wave in a metallic Fe{sub 19}Ni{sub 81} film. We show that the mutual-inductance between two independent antennas detects a small but clear propagation signal of backward volume spin waves. All experimental data are consistent with the time-domain propagating spin-wave spectroscopy. The control of propagating backward spin wave enables to realize the miniaturize spin-wave circuit.

  15. Local interaction modeling for acousto-ultrasonic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. C.; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.

    2002-07-01

    Damage detection in metallic structures has been the subject of many investigations. Recent developments have shown applications of acousto-ultrasonic and Lamb wave testing. Lamb wave inspection is based on theory of longitudinal waves propagating in plates. In general, the principles of acousto-ultrasonic and Lamb wave inspection techniques are similar. Damage in a structure is identified by a change in the output signal. Previous studies show that even simple input signals can lead to complex output waves, which are difficult to interpret. It is clear that knowledge and understanding of wave propagation in analyzed structures can ease the interpretation of damage detection results. The paper reports an application of local interaction modeling of acousto-ultrasonic waves in metallic structures. The focus of the analysis is on one-dimensional interactions between different material boundaries. This includes modeling of acousto-ultrasonic waves in piezoceramic, adhesive glue and copper in an actuator/sensor configuration. The study also involves experimental validation of the simulation results. The method shows the potential for modeling of acousto-ultrasonic waves in complex media for damage detection applications.

  16. Holographic measurement of wave propagation in axi-symmetric shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, D. A.; Aprahamian, R.; Jacoby, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The report deals with the use of pulsed, double-exposure holographic interferometry to record the propagation of transverse waves in thin-walled axi-symmetric shells. The report is subdivided into sections dealing with: (1) wave propagation in circular cylindrical shells, (2) wave propagation past cut-outs and stiffeners, and (3) wave propagation in conical shells. Several interferograms are presented herein which show the waves reflecting from the shell boundaries, from cut-outs, and from stiffening rings. The initial response of the shell was nearly axi-symmetric in all cases, but nonsymmetric modes soon appeared in the radial response. This result suggests that the axi-symmetric response of the shell may be dynamically unstable, and thus may preferentially excite certain circumferential harmonics through parametric excitation. Attempts were made throughout to correlate the experimental data with analysis. For the most part, good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. Occasional differences were attributed primarily to simplifying assumptions used in the analysis. From the standpoint of engineering applications, it is clear that pulsed laser holography can be used to obtain quantitative engineering data. Areas of dynamic stress concentration, stress concentration factors, local anomalies, etc., can be readily determined by holography.

  17. Propagation of sound waves in tubes of noncircular cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Plane-acoustic-wave propagation in small tubes with a cross section in the shape of a flattened oval is described. Theoretical descriptions of a plane wave propagating in a tube with circular cross section and between a pair of infinite parallel plates, including viscous and thermal damping, are expressed in similar form. For a wide range of useful duct sizes, the propagation constant (whose real and imaginary parts are the amplitude attenuation rate and the wave number, respectively) is very nearly the same function of frequency for both cases if the radius of the circular tube is the same as the distance between the parallel plates. This suggests that either a circular-cross-section model or a flat-plate model can be used to calculate wave propagation in flat-oval tubing, or any other shape tubing, if its size is expressed in terms of an equivalent radius, given by g = 2 x (cross-sectional area)/(length of perimeter). Measurements of the frequency response of two sections of flat-oval tubing agree with calculations based on this idea. Flat-plate formulas are derived, the use of transmission-line matrices for calculations of plane waves in compound systems of ducts is described, and examples of computer programs written to carry out the calculations are shown.

  18. Propagation of elastic waves through textured polycrystals: application to ice

    PubMed Central

    Maurel, Agnès; Lund, Fernando; Montagnat, Maurine

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of elastic waves in polycrystals is revisited, with an emphasis on configurations relevant to the study of ice. Randomly oriented hexagonal single crystals are considered with specific, non-uniform, probability distributions for their major axis. Three typical textures or fabrics (i.e. preferred grain orientations) are studied in detail: one cluster fabric and two girdle fabrics, as found in ice recovered from deep ice cores. After computing the averaged elasticity tensor for the considered textures, wave propagation is studied using a wave equation with elastic constants c=〈c〉+δc that are equal to an average plus deviations, presumed small, from that average. This allows for the use of the Voigt average in the wave equation, and velocities are obtained solving the appropriate Christoffel equation. The velocity for vertical propagation, as appropriate to interpret sonic logging measurements, is analysed in more details. Our formulae are shown to be accurate at the 0.5% level and they provide a rationale for previous empirical fits to wave propagation velocities with a quantitative agreement at the 0.07–0.7% level. We conclude that, within the formalism presented here, it is appropriate to use, with confidence, velocity measurements to characterize ice fabrics. PMID:27547099

  19. Alfven Wave Propagation in Young Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humienny, Ray; Fatuzzo, Marco

    Young stellar systems have disks that are threaded by magnetic field lines with an hourglass geometry. These fields funnel ionizing cosmic rays (CRs) into the system. However, the effect is offset by magnetic mirroring. An previous analysis considered how the presence of magnetic turbulence moving outward from the disk would effect the propagation of cosmic-rays, and in turn, change the cosmic-ray ionization fraction occurring within the disk. This work indicated that turbulence reduces the overall flux of cosmic-rays at the disk, which has important consequences for both chemical processes and planet formation that occur within these environments. However, the analysis assumed ideal MHD condition in which the gas is perfectly coupled to the magnetic field. We explore here the validity of this assumption by solving the full equations governing the motion of both ions and neutral within the system.

  20. Skewon field and cosmic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    2014-03-01

    We study the propagation of the Hehl-Obukhov-Rubilar skewon field in weak gravity field/dilute matter or with weak violation of the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP), and further classify it into Type I and Type II skewons. From the dispersion relation we show that no dissipation/no amplification condition implies that the additional skewon field must be of Type II. For Type I skewon field, the dissipation/amplification is proportional to the frequency and the CMB spectrum would deviate from Planck spectrum. From the high precision agreement of the CMB spectrum with 2.755 K Planck spectrum, we constrain the Type I cosmic skewon field |χijkl(SkI)| to ⩽ a few ×10-35. The skewon part of constitutive tensor constructed from asymmetric metric is of Type II, hence it is allowed. This study may also be applied to macroscopic electrodynamics in the case of laser pumped medium or dissipative medium.

  1. Propagation of guided waves through weak penetrable scatterers.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Agnès; Mercier, Jean-François

    2012-03-01

    The scattering of a scalar wave propagating in a waveguide containing weak penetrable scatterers is inspected in the Born approximation. The scatterers are of arbitrary shape and present a contrast both in density and in wavespeed (or bulk modulus), a situation that can be translated in the context of SH waves, water waves, or transverse electric/transverse magnetic polarized electromagnetic waves. For small size inclusions compared to the waveguide height, analytical expressions of the transmission and reflection coefficients are derived, and compared to results of direct numerical simulations. The cases of periodically and randomly distributed inclusions are considered in more detail, and compared with unbounded propagation through inclusions. Comparisons with previous results valid in the low frequency regime are proposed. PMID:22423685

  2. A space-time discretization procedure for wave propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1989-01-01

    Higher order compact algorithms are developed for the numerical simulation of wave propagation by using the concept of a discrete dispersion relation. The dispersion relation is the imprint of any linear operator in space-time. The discrete dispersion relation is derived from the continuous dispersion relation by examining the process by which locally plane waves propagate through a chosen grid. The exponential structure of the discrete dispersion relation suggests an efficient splitting of convective and diffusive terms for dissipative waves. Fourth- and eighth-order convection schemes are examined that involve only three or five spatial grid points. These algorithms are subject to the same restrictions that govern the use of dispersion relations in the constructions of asymptotic expansions to nonlinear evolution equations. A new eighth-order scheme is developed that is exact for Courant numbers of 1, 2, 3, and 4. Examples are given of a pulse and step wave with a small amount of physical diffusion.

  3. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. I - Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagation. II - Sideband instability and satellite growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Crawford, F. W.

    1975-01-01

    A hybrid plasma simulation model is described and applied to the study of electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional Maxwellian plasma with periodic boundary conditions. The model employs a cloud-in-cell scheme which can drastically reduce the fluctuations in particle simulation models and greatly ease the computational difficulties of the Vlasov equation approach. A grid in velocity space is introduced and the particles are represented by points in the x-v phase space. The model is tested first in the absence of an applied signal and then in the presence of a small-amplitude perturbation. The method is also used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories.

  4. Three-wave coupling coefficients for perpendicular wave propagation in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Stenflo, L.

    2015-10-15

    The resonant interaction between three waves in a uniform magnetized plasma is reconsidered. Starting from previous kinetic expressions, we limit our investigation to waves propagating perpendicularly to the external magnetic field. It is shown that reliable results can only be obtained in the two-dimensional case, i.e., when the wave vectors have both x and y components.

  5. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  6. Propagating Stress Waves During Epithelial Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J. C.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Coordinated motion of cell monolayers during epithelial wound healing and tissue morphogenesis involves mechanical stress generation. Here we propose a model for the dynamics of epithelial expansion that couples mechanical deformations in the tissue to contractile activity and polarization in the cells. A new ingredient of our model is a feedback between local strain, polarization, and contractility that naturally yields a mechanism for viscoelasticity and effective inertia in the cell monolayer. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we demonstrate that our model quantitatively reproduces many experimental findings [Nat. Phys. 8, 628 (2012)], including the buildup of intercellular stresses, and the existence of traveling mechanical waves guiding the oscillatory monolayer expansion.

  7. Propagation of acoustic pulses in random gravity wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; de La Camara, Alvaro; Lott, François

    2015-11-01

    A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the normal mode method. The wave mode structure is determined by a sound speed profile that is confining. The environmental uncertainty is described by a stochastic field obtained with a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves (GW). Using the propagating modes of the unperturbed atmosphere, the wave propagation problem is reduced to solving a system of ordinary differential equations. We focus on the asymptotic behavior of the transmitted waves in the weakly heterogeneous regime. In this regime, the coupling between the acoustic pulse and the randomly perturbed waveguides is weak and the propagation distance must be large enough for the wave to experience significant scattering. A general expression for the pressure far-field is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. We present preliminary results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to some eigenvalues and how an ``optimal'' GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. The present model is used to explain the variability of infrasound signals.

  8. Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, Udaya B.; Maser, Kenneth; Kausel, Eduardo

    1989-03-01

    This research develops models which can predict the velocity and attenuation of electromagnetic waves in concrete as a function of frequency, temperature, moisture content, chloride content and concrete mix constituents. These models were proposed to predict the electromagnetic properties of concrete by aggregating the electromagnetic properties of its constituents. Water and the dissolved salt are the constituents having the most prominent effect on the dielectric behavior of concrete. A comparative study of three existing three-phase mixture models was carried out. Numerical results were generated using the most representative Discrete model. These results have shown that the real part of complex concrete permittivity (and therefore the velocity of electromagnetic waves) is independent of salinity or frequency in the 0.6 to 3.0 GHz frequency range. On the other hand, these results show that the attenuation coefficient and dielectric conductivity vary almost linearly with frequency in this same frequency range. The real part of concrete permittivity and the attenuation coefficient also show a linear dependence with respect to the degree of saturation of water in the concrete mixture. This suggests that future research should focus on approximating the complex models presented in this research by simple equations.

  9. Ray Tracing Study of Magnetospheric ULF Wave Propagation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinbo

    1993-01-01

    A semi-empirical plasma density model and Mead -Fairfield magnetic field model are incorporated into a 3-D ray tracing code to study magnetospheric ULF wave propagation from the subsolar magnetopause. The ray-tracing of Pc3 compressional waves from the magnetosheath reveals that the magnetosphere can present a major propagation barrier to the penetration of these waves to the plasmasphere. This barrier is the ion-ion cutoff between the He^+ and O ^+ gyroresonances. As a result of the frequency -dependent location of this cutoff, the magnetosphere behaves like a filter for Pc3 compressional waves, and only the low frequency components can penetrate to the inner magnetosphere. These results are in agreement with previous satellite observations. This 'filter action' strongly depends on the relative concentration of He^+ and O^+ and is, therefore, sensitive to solar and magnetic activity. The study of the propagation characteristics of Pc3 transverse Alfven waves shows that these waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes for wave frequencies above about approximately 0.03 hz. The configuration of the refractive index reveals an O^+-He^+ associated cutoff located between the assumed wave source in the equatorial magnetopause and the Earth. When the O^+ concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barrier no longer exists, and waves with much higher frequencies than 0.03 Hz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 0.03 Hz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to the low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observations at high latitudes. The ray tracing study of Pc 1-2 waves reproduces earlier results (Rauch and Roux, 1982) for an H ^+-He^+ two-ion-species plasma, i.e. Pc 1-2 left hand polarized Alfven mode waves originating at equatorial geostationary orbit, below He ^+ gyrofrequency, are guided to the ground. However, our ray tracing study shows that previous Pc 1-2 ray tracing results are only valid in the absence of O

  10. An experimental investigation of wave propagation in fractured brittle material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Bibhuti Bhusan

    An experimental method for visualizing and analyzing the propagation of plate stress waves in a brittle plate is developed. A procedure has been developed to cast Break-Away glass (a low molecular weight polystyrene material) plate specimens in an open mold. The specimens are loaded with short duration (200 [...]s) stress pulses on one edge by an electromagnetic stress wave generator. The propagating stress waves generate out-of-plane deformations on the specimen surface, which are observed using Twyman-Green interferometry. The fringe patterns created by the propagating stress waves are captured using a high speed camera - pulsing laser combination at 4[...]s intervals.A generalized "Fringe Analysis Procedure" is developed to subtract the reference interferogram from the subsequent interferograms. The "Fringe Analysis Procedure" employs a fringe edge detection algorithm to obtain the sharp edge lines of the fringes in an interferogram. A digitizer is used to extract points on these edge lines and assign them fringe numbers. The "griddata" option in the commercial software "Matlab" is utilized to interpolate the deformation field on to the nodes of a uniform grid. The field values at these nodes in the reference image are then subtracted from corresponding values in the subsequent images to obtain the actual deformation patterns generated by the propagating stress waves. The "Fringe Analysis Procedure" has eliminated the subjective element introduced by human judgment in manual fringe tracing procedures.The developed experimental method and the image analysis technique is used to investigate the propagation of stress waves in Break-Away glass plate specimens.

  11. Multidimensional detonation propagation modeled via nonlinear shock wave superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Andrew; Mehrjoo, Navid

    2010-11-01

    Detonation waves in gases are inherently multidimensional due to their cellular structure, and detonations in liquids and heterogeneous solids are often associated with instabilities and stochastic, localized reaction centers (i.e., hot spots). To explore the statistical nature of detonation dynamics in such systems, a simple model that idealizes detonation propagation as an ensemble of interacting blast waves originating from spatially random point sources has been proposed. Prior results using this model exhibited features that have been observed in real detonating systems, such as anomalous scaling between axisymmetric and two-dimensional geometries. However, those efforts used simple linear superposition of the blast waves. The present work uses a model of blast wave superposition developed for multiple-source explosions (the LAMB approximation) that incorporates the nonlinear interaction of shock waves analytically, permitting the effect of a more physical model of blast wave interaction to be explored. The results are suggestive of a universal behavior in systems of spatially randomized energy sources.

  12. Modification of Spin Wave Propagation by Current Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Teruo

    2010-03-01

    We studied the effect of an electric current on the spin wave propagation in magnetic wires, and found the following two effects. (i) Current injection changes the velocity of spin wave; the velocity is increased or decreased depending on the current polarity. (ii) Current injection modifies the attenuation length of spin wave; the attenuation length of spin wave can increase when the spin waves and electrons move in the same direction. The first finding can be interpreted as the time-domain observation of the spin-wave Doppler shift by current injection [1]. The second effect is thought to be affected by the nonadiabaticity of the spin transfer torque and thus can be used to estimate the nonadiabaticity [2]. [4pt] [1] V. Vlaminck and M. Bailleul, Science 322, (2008) 410. [0pt] [2] S. M. Seo, K. J. Lee, H. Yang, and T. Ono, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, (2009) 147202.

  13. Nonlinear wave propagation in constrained solids subjected to thermal loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucera, Claudio; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The classical mathematical treatment governing nonlinear wave propagation in solids relies on finite strain theory. In this scenario, a system of nonlinear partial differential equations can be derived to mathematically describe nonlinear phenomena such as acoustoelasticity (wave speed dependency on quasi-static stress), wave interaction, wave distortion, and higher-harmonic generation. The present work expands the topic of nonlinear wave propagation to the case of a constrained solid subjected to thermal loads. The origin of nonlinear effects in this case is explained on the basis of the anharmonicity of interatomic potentials, and the absorption of the potential energy corresponding to the (prevented) thermal expansion. Such "residual" energy is, at least, cubic as a function of strain, hence leading to a nonlinear wave equation and higher-harmonic generation. Closed-form solutions are given for the longitudinal wave speed and the second-harmonic nonlinear parameter as a function of interatomic potential parameters and temperature increase. The model predicts a decrease in longitudinal wave speed and a corresponding increase in nonlinear parameter with increasing temperature, as a result of the thermal stresses caused by the prevented thermal expansion of the solid. Experimental measurements of the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter on a steel block under constrained thermal expansion confirm this trend. These results suggest the potential of a nonlinear ultrasonic measurement to quantify thermal stresses from prevented thermal expansion. This knowledge can be extremely useful to prevent thermal buckling of various structures, such as continuous-welded rails in hot weather.

  14. Modeling ocean wave propagation under sea ice covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Shen, Hayley H.; Cheng, Sukun

    2015-02-01

    Operational ocean wave models need to work globally, yet current ocean wave models can only treat ice-covered regions crudely. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of ice effects on wave propagation and different research methodology used in studying these effects. Based on its proximity to land or sea, sea ice can be classified as: landfast ice zone, shear zone, and the marginal ice zone. All ice covers attenuate wave energy. Only long swells can penetrate deep into an ice cover. Being closest to open water, wave propagation in the marginal ice zone is the most complex to model. The physical appearance of sea ice in the marginal ice zone varies. Grease ice, pancake ice, brash ice, floe aggregates, and continuous ice sheet may be found in this zone at different times and locations. These types of ice are formed under different thermal-mechanical forcing. There are three classic models that describe wave propagation through an idealized ice cover: mass loading, thin elastic plate, and viscous layer models. From physical arguments we may conjecture that mass loading model is suitable for disjoint aggregates of ice floes much smaller than the wavelength, thin elastic plate model is suitable for a continuous ice sheet, and the viscous layer model is suitable for grease ice. For different sea ice types we may need different wave ice interaction models. A recently proposed viscoelastic model is able to synthesize all three classic models into one. Under suitable limiting conditions it converges to the three previous models. The complete theoretical framework for evaluating wave propagation through various ice covers need to be implemented in the operational ocean wave models. In this review, we introduce the sea ice types, previous wave ice interaction models, wave attenuation mechanisms, the methods to calculate wave reflection and transmission between different ice covers, and the effect of ice floe breaking on shaping the sea ice morphology

  15. Propagation and generation of waves in solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Swati

    The fact that the temperature increases with height in the solar atmosphere has been known for many years. To maintain this temperature increase, sources of heating must be present in the atmosphere. One of the most important, and still unsolved, problems in solar physics is to identify the basic physical processes that are responsible for this heating, and explain solar activities caused by the heating. It is also observationally well-established that the solar atmosphere shows a broad range of oscillations that are different in magnetic and non-magnetic regions of the atmosphere. The oscillations are driven by propagating waves, which cause the atmosphere to oscillate at its natural (cutoff) frequency. Since different waves have different cutoff frequencies, it is important to have a method that would allow determining such cutoffs for the solar atmosphere. In this PhD dissertation, the concept of cutoff frequency is extended to inhomogeneous atmospheres, and a general method to determine the cutoff frequency is presented. The method leads to new forms of wave equations obtained for all wave variables, and allows deriving the cutoff frequency without formally solving the wave equations. The main result is that the derived cutoff frequency is a local quantity and that its value at a given atmospheric height determines the frequency that waves must have in order to be propagating at this height. The developed method is general enough, so that it can be used to establish theoretical bases for studying the propagation and generation of different waves in the solar atmosphere. Acoustic waves play an important role in the heating of magnetic-free regions of the solar atmosphere. To determine the propagation conditions for these waves in the non-isothermal solar atmosphere, the method is used to obtain the resulting acoustic cutoff frequency. This new cutoff frequency is a local quantity and it generalizes Lamb's acoustic cutoff frequency that was obtained for an

  16. The in vitro propagation of amaryllis (Hippeastrum spp. hybrids).

    PubMed

    Seabrook, J A; Cumming, B G

    1977-01-01

    A new, rapid technique for the propagation of amaryllis (Hippeastrum spp. hybrids) by means of tissue culture is reported. Leaf bases, scapes, peduncles, inner bulb scales and ovaries were cultured successfully in vitro and plantlets were induced readily at various concentrations of growth regulators. Some plantlets also were produced in the absence of growth regulators. The most productive tissues for propagation were inverted scapes and peduncles, cultured in a modified Murashige and Skoog salt solution with added organic constituents and 1 mg per 1 (4.5 micron) 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 1 mg per 1 (4.4 micrometer) 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). Plantlets induced axenically also grew roots on the generalized shoot-inducing medium so that no special rooting medium was required. Although friable callus was obtained from ovary tissue cultured on a medium containing 2 mg per 1 (11 micrometer) naphthaleneacetic acid and 4 mg per 1 (18 micrometer) BAP, it produced shoots after 8 weeks of further subculture on the same medium. An average of 10 rooted plantlets was obtained from each scape or peduncle explant on the shoot-propagating medium. Thus, if 45 explants are obtained from each bulb, 450 rudimentary plantlets could be obtained from each mother bulb in 8 weeks of culture. This is a substantial increase over present propagation methods. PMID:598852

  17. Whistler wave mode conversion to lower hybrid waves at a density striation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamber, J.F.; Gekelman, W.; Maggs, J.E. )

    1994-11-28

    The first observation of mode conversion of whistler waves to lower hybrid waves at a density striation has been made in a laboratory plasma. The observed lower hybrid wavelength is consistent with that predicted by linear mode coupling. The lower hybrid waves have amplitudes up to 20% of the incident whistler waves.

  18. Electromagnetic wave propagation in rain and polarization effects

    PubMed Central

    OKAMURA, Sogo; OGUCHI, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes our study on microwave and millimeter-wave propagation in rain with special emphasis on the effects of polarization. Starting from a recount of our past findings, we will discuss developments with these and how they are connected with subsequent research. PMID:20551593

  19. Corrigendum and addendum. Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan; Christov, C. I.; Jordan, P. M.

    2014-12-18

    This article presents errors, corrections, and additions to the research outlined in the following citation: Christov, I., Christov, C. I., & Jordan, P. M. (2007). Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation. The Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 60(4), 473-495.

  20. A k-Space Method for Moderately Nonlinear Wave Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yun; Wang, Tianren; Clement, Greg T.

    2013-01-01

    A k-space method for moderately nonlinear wave propagation in absorptive media is presented. The Westervelt equation is first transferred into k-space via Fourier transformation, and is solved by a modified wave-vector time-domain scheme. The present approach is not limited to forward propagation or parabolic approximation. One- and two-dimensional problems are investigated to verify the method by comparing results to analytic solutions and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. It is found that to obtain accurate results in homogeneous media, the grid size can be as little as two points per wavelength, and for a moderately nonlinear problem, the Courant–Friedrichs–Lewy number can be as large as 0.4. Through comparisons with the conventional FDTD method, the k-space method for nonlinear wave propagation is shown here to be computationally more efficient and accurate. The k-space method is then employed to study three-dimensional nonlinear wave propagation through the skull, which shows that a relatively accurate focusing can be achieved in the brain at a high frequency by sending a low frequency from the transducer. Finally, implementations of the k-space method using a single graphics processing unit shows that it required about one-seventh the computation time of a single-core CPU calculation. PMID:22899114

  1. A compendium of millimeter wave propagation studies performed by NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, R.; Rogers, D.; Bremer, J.

    1977-01-01

    Key millimeter wave propagation experiments and analytical results were summarized. The experiments were performed with the Ats-5, Ats-6 and Comstar satellites, radars, radiometers and rain gage networks. Analytic models were developed for extrapolation of experimental results to frequencies, locations, and communications systems.

  2. The Propagation of Slow Wave Potentials in Pea Epicotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Stahlberg, R.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Slow wave potentials are considered to be electric long-distance signals specific for plants, although there are conflicting ideas about a chemical, electrical, or hydraulic mode of propagation. These ideas were tested by comparing the propagation of hydraulic and electric signals in epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L). A hydraulic signal in the form of a defined step increase in xylem pressure (Px) was applied to the root of intact seedlings and propagated nearly instantly through the epicotyl axis while its amplitude decreased with distance from the pressure chamber. This decremental propagation was caused by a leaky xylem and created an axial Px gradient in the epicotyl. Simultaneously along the epicotyl surface, depolarizations appeared with lag times that increased acropetally with distance from the pressure chamber from 5 s to 3 min. When measured at a constant distance, the lag times increased as the size of the applied pressure steps decreased. We conclude that the Px gradient in the epicotyl caused local depolarizations with acropetally increasing lag times, which have the appearance of an electric signal propagating with a rate of 20 to 30 mm min-1. This static description of the slow wave potentials challenges its traditional classification as a propagating electric signal. PMID:12223601

  3. Wave Propagation of Myocardial Stretch: Correlation with Myocardial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pislaru, Cristina; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Pislaru, Sorin V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of flow propagation during diastole in the left ventricle (LV) has been well described. Little is known about the associated waves propagating along the heart wall s. These waves may have a mechanism similar to pulse wave propagation in arteries. The major goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of myocardial stiffness and preload on this wave transmission. Methods Longitudinal late diastolic deformation and wave speed (Vp) of myocardial stretch in the anterior LV wall were measured using sonomicrometry in sixteen pigs. Animals with normal and altered myocardial stiffness (acute myocardial infarction) were studied with and without preload alterations. Elastic modulus estimated from Vp (EVP; Moens-Korteweg equation) was compared to incremental elastic modulus obtained from exponential end -diastolic stress-strain relation (ESS). Myocardial distensibility and α-and β-coefficients of stress-strain relations were calculated. Results Vp was higher at reperfusion compared to baseline (2.6±1.3 m/s vs. 1.3±0.4 m/s; p=0.005) and best correlated with ESS (r 2=0.80, p<0.0001), β-coefficient (r2=0.78, p<0.0001), distensibility (r2=0.47, p=0.005), and wall thickness/diameter ratio (r2=0.42, p=0.009). Elastic moduli (EVP and ESS) were strongly correlated (r2=0.83, p<0.0001). Increasing preload increased Vp and EVP and decreased distensibility. At multivariate analysis, ESS, wall thickness, and end-diastolic and systolic LV pressures were independent predictors of Vp (r2model=0.83, p<0.0001). Conclusions The main determinants of wave propagation of longitudinal myocardial stretch were myocardial stiffness and LV geometry and pressure. This local wave speed could potentially be measured noninvasively by echocardiography. PMID:25193091

  4. Anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation modeling using parabolic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, R. I.; Siegmann, W. L.; Jacobson, M. J.; Jacyna, G. M.

    1990-12-01

    A new method for the investigation of anisotropic electromagnetic wave propagation in the atmosphere is developed using parabolic approximations. Model equations for the electric field components are formulated which include the effects of both the inhomogeneous atmosphere and the static magnetic field of the earth. Application of parabolic-type approximations produces different systems of coupled parabolic equations. Each is valid for different relative magnitudes of components of the electric field. All admissible cases are then synthesized into one system which can be numerically examined, yielding solutions without a priori knowledge of electric field ratios. A specific example is presented and examined to understand static magnetic field effects on electromagnetic wave propagation. The influences of the earth's magnetic field are discussed and displayed in terms of electric components and the Poynting vector. Results demonstrate that the geomagnetic field can significantly influence HF atmospheric propagation.

  5. Oblique propagation, wave particle interaction and particle distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmane, Adnane; Hamza, A. M.; Meziane, Karim

    Recent results from the Cluster mission have stimulated theoretical investigations and simulations to explain ion distribution functions observed in the quasi-perp bow shock. High-time resolution observations have revealed distributions of gyrating ions that are gyrophase-bunched. When not produced at the shock, such distributions are believed to be resulting from interactions between field-aligned beams and low frequency beamdriven waves . The Conventional models used to account for such distributions assume that the waves are purely transverse, and that they propagate parallel to the ambient magnetic eld. However observations indicate that these waves are propagating obliquely with respect to the ambient magnetic eld [Meziane et al., 2001]. A theoretical investigation of the non-relativistic wave-particle interaction in a background magnetic eld with the electromagnetic wave propagating obliquely has been addressed previously, resulting in a dynamical system describing the wave interaction with a single ion in the absence of dissipation mechanisms. [Hamza et al., 2005] This dynamical system has been numerically integrated to construct the ion distribution functions by seeding the particles with di erent initial conditions. We compute the particle orbits and simulate the time evolution of the distribution functions based on Liouville's theorem of phase space density conservation. It will be shown that the trapping which is due to the oblique propagation of the wave, gives an explanation for gyrophase-bunching and unstable distributions in velocity space which could trigger instabilities such as firehose and mirror. Therefore this exercise provide insights on the particle dynamics and onset of waves away from the shock. Meziane, K., C. Mazelle, R.P. Lin, D. LeQueau, D.E. Larson, G.K. Parks, R.P. Lepping (2001), Three dimensional observations of gyrating ions distributions far upstream from the Earth's bow shock and their association with low-frequency waves, J

  6. Excitation of propagating spin waves with global uniform microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Y.; Davison, T.; Ahmad, E.; Keatley, P. S.; Hicken, R. J.; Kruglyak, V. V.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate a magnonic architecture that converts global free-space uniform microwaves into spin waves propagating in a stripe magnonic waveguide. The architecture is based upon dispersion mismatch between the narrow magnonic waveguide and a wide "antenna" patch, both patterned from the same magnetic film. The spin waves injected into the waveguide travel to distances as large as several tens of micrometers. The antennas can be placed at multiple positions on a magnonic chip and used to excite mutually coherent multiple spin waves for magnonic logic operations. This demonstration paves way for "magnonics" to become a pervasive technology for information processing.

  7. Effects of D region ionization on radio wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of anomalous D region ionization upon radio wave propagation are described for the main types of disturbances: sudden ionospheric disturbances, relativistic electron events, magnetic storms, auroral disturbances, polar cap events, and stratospheric warmings. Examples of radio wave characteristics for such conditions are given for the frequencies between the extremely low (3-3000 Hz) and high (3-30 MHz) frequency domains. Statistics on the disturbance effects and radio wave data are given in order to contribute towards the evaluation of possibilities for predicting the radio effects.

  8. Wave propagation within some non-homogeneous continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio Tamarasselvame, Nirmal; Buisson, Manuel; Rakotomanana, Lalaonirina R.

    We investigate the elastic wave propagation within a non-homogeneous continuum according to W. Noll. After some preliminaries in geometry approach suggested by E. Cartan, the linear momentum equation of so-called weakly continuous medium is written. A first example illustrates the modal analysis of an axisymmetric non-homogeneous thick tube. The overall solution is the product of an attenuating exponential response with Kummer's functions. The second example deals with a Timoshenko beam involving transversal displacement and angular rotation of section. We observe the presence of various waves with spatial attenuation, either for the displacement or the section rotation, together with the occurring waves at different scale levels.

  9. Wave Propagation in the Vicinities of Rock Fractures Under Obliquely Incident Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yang; Li, Jianchun; He, Lei; laloui, Lyesse; Zhao, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Though obliquely incident plane wave across rock fractures has been extensively investigated by theoretical analysis, the quantitative identification of each wave emerged from fractures has not been achieved either in numerical simulation or laboratory experiment. On the other hand, there are no theoretical results describing the stress/velocity state of the rocks beside a fracture. The superposition of the multiple waves propagating in the media results in the variation of the stress/velocity state. To understand the superposition of the wave components in the adjacent rocks of a facture, based on the geometrical analysis of the wave paths, the lag times among passing waves at an arbitrary point are determined. The normalised critical distances from the fracture to the measuring locations where the corresponding harmonic waves depart from other waves for a certain duration are then derived. Discussion on the correction for an arbitrary incident wave is then carried out considering the changes of the duration of the reflected and transmitted waves. Under the guidance of the analysis, wave superposition is performed for theoretical results and separated waves are obtained from numerical model. They are demonstrated to be consistent with each other. The measurement and the data processing provide an approach for wave separation in a relatively unbounded media. In addition, based on the mechanical analysis on the wave front, an indirect wave separation method is proposed which provides a possibility for laboratory experiments of wave propagation with an arbitrary incident angle.

  10. Steepening of parallel propagating hydromagnetic waves into magnetic pulsations - A simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akimoto, K.; Winske, D.; Onsager, T. G.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gary, S. P.

    1991-01-01

    The steepening mechanism of parallel propagating low-frequency MHD-like waves observed upstream of the earth's quasi-parallel bow shock has been investigated by means of electromagnetic hybrid simulations. It is shown that an ion beam through the resonant electromagnetic ion/ion instability excites large-amplitude waves, which consequently pitch angle scatter, decelerate, and eventually magnetically trap beam ions in regions where the wave amplitudes are largest. As a result, the beam ions become bunched in both space and gyrophase. As these higher-density, nongyrotropic beam segments are formed, the hydromagnetic waves rapidly steepen, resulting in magnetic pulsations, with properties generally in agreement with observations. This steepening process operates on the scale of the linear growth time of the resonant ion/ion instability. Many of the pulsations generated by this mechanism are left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame.

  11. Lightning location with variable radio wave propagation velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Sugier, Jacqueline; Fullekrug, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lightning discharges can be located by triangulation of their broadband electromagnetic pulses in long-baseline (~500 km) radio receiver networks. Here we apply the time of arrival difference (TOA) method to electric field recordings with a low frequency radio receiver array consisting of four stations in western Europe. The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for the TOA calculation and it is normally assumed to be equal to the speed of light. However, the radio wave propagation depends for example on the frequency, ground conductivity and the ionospheric height and small variations can cause location differences from hundreds to thousands of meters, as demonstrated in this study. The radio wave propagation from two VLF transmissions at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz are compared. The results show that the apparent phase velocities are 0.6% slower and 0.5% faster than the speed of light respectively. As a result, a variable velocity is implemented in the TOA method using continuously recorded data on the 8th August 2014, when a mesoscale convective system developed over central France. The lightning locations inferred with a variable wave propagation velocity are more clustered than those using a fixed velocity. The distribution of the lightning velocities in a given geographic area fits a normal distribution that is not centred at the speed of light. As a result, representative velocities can be calculated for smaller regions to generate a velocity map over a larger area of enhanced lightning activity. These results suggest a connection with the ground elevation and/or surface conductivity that might have an impact on the observed wave propagation velocities.

  12. Surface wave propagation in non-ideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. P.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2015-03-01

    The properties of surface waves in a partially ionized, compressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in this work. The waves are affected by the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects which causes finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the magnetic field drift is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the fully ionized ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization as well as on the compressibility of the medium. The phase velocity of the sausage and kink waves increases marginally (by a few per cent) due to the compressibility of the medium in both ideal as well as Hall-diffusion-dominated regimes. However, unlike ideal regime, only waves below certain cut-off frequency can propagate in the medium in Hall dominated regime. This cut-off for a thin slab has a weak dependence on the plasma beta whereas for thick slab no such dependence exists. More importantly, since the cut-off is introduced by the Hall diffusion, the fractional ionization of the medium is more important than the plasma compressibility in determining such a cut-off. Therefore, for both compressible as well incompressible medium, the surface modes of shorter wavelength are permitted with increasing ionization in the medium. We discuss the relevance of these results in the context of solar photosphere-chromosphere.

  13. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics for water wave propagation in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidvar, Pourya; Norouzi, Hossein; Zarghami, Ahad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to simulate the propagation of waves in an intermediate depth water channel. The major advantage of using SPH is that no special treatment of the free surface is required, which is advantageous for simulating highly nonlinear flows with possible wave breaking. The SPH method has an option of different formulations with their own advantages and drawbacks to be implemented. Here, we apply the classical and Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) formulation for wave propagation in a water channel. The classical SPH should come with an artificial viscosity which stabilizes the numerical algorithm and increases the accuracy. Here, we will show that the use of classical SPH with an artificial viscosity may cause the waves in the channel to decay. On the other hand, we will show that using the ALE-SPH algorithm with a Riemann solver is more stable, and in addition to producing the pressure fields with much less numerical noise, the waves propagate in the channel without dissipation.

  14. Seismic Wave Propagation Simulation using Circular Hough Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, K.; Potter, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic data generation by numerically solving a two-way wave equation is an essential part of seismic tomography, especially in full-waveform inversion. Finite-difference and finite-element are the two common methods of seismic wave propagation modeling in heterogeneous media. Either time or frequency domain representation of wave equation is used for these simulations. Hanahara and Hiyane [1] proposed and implemented a circle-detection algorithm based on the Circular Hough transform (CHT) to numerically solve a two-dimensional wave equation. The Hough transform is generally used in image processing applications to identify objects of various shapes in an image [2]. In this abstract, we use the Circular Hough transform to numerically solve an acoustic wave equation, with the purpose to identify and locate primaries and multiples in the transform domain. Relationships between different seismic events and the CHT parameter are also investigated. [1] Hanahara, K. and Hiyane, M., A Circle-Detection Algorithm Simulating Wave Propagation, Machine Vision and Applications, vol. 3, pp. 97-111, 1990. [2 ] Petcher, P. A. and Dixon, S., A modified Hough transform for removal of direct and reflected surface waves from B-scans, NDT & E International, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 139-144, 2011.

  15. Experimental and theoretical study of Rayleigh-Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Datta, Subhendu K.; Ju, T. H.

    1990-01-01

    Many space structures, such as the Space Station Freedom, contain critical thin-walled components. The structural integrity of thin-walled plates and shells can be monitored effectively using acoustic emission and ultrasonic testing in the Rayleigh-Lamb wave frequency range. A new PVDF piezoelectric sensor has been developed that is well suited to remote, inservice nondestructive evaluation of space structures. In the present study the new sensor was used to investigate Rayleigh-Lamb wave propagation in a plate. The experimental apparatus consisted of a glass plate (2.3 m x 25.4 mm x 5.6 mm) with PVDF sensor (3 mm diam.) mounted at various positions along its length. A steel ball impact served as a simulated acoustic emission source, producing surface waves, shear waves and longitudinal waves with dominant frequencies between 1 kHz and 200 kHz. The experimental time domain wave-forms were compared with theoretical predictions of the wave propagation in the plate. The model uses an analytical solution for the Green's function and the measured response at a single position to predict response at any other position in the plate. Close agreement was found between the experimental and theoretical results.

  16. Simulating tsunami propagation in fjords with long-wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvholt, F.; Glimsdal, S.; Lynett, P.; Pedersen, G.

    2015-03-01

    Tsunamis induced by rock slides constitute a severe hazard towards coastal fjord communities. Fjords are narrow and rugged with steep slopes, and modeling the short-frequency and high-amplitude tsunamis in this environment is demanding. In the present paper, our ability (and the lack thereof) to simulate tsunami propagation and run-up in fjords for typical wave characteristics of rock-slide-induced waves is demonstrated. The starting point is a 1 : 500 scale model of the topography and bathymetry of the southern part of Storfjorden fjord system in western Norway. Using measured wave data from the scale model as input to numerical simulations, we find that the leading wave is moderately influenced by nonlinearity and dispersion. For the trailing waves, dispersion and dissipation from the alongshore inundation on the traveling wave become more important. The tsunami inundation was simulated at the two locations of Hellesylt and Geiranger, providing a good match with the measurements in the former location. In Geiranger, the most demanding case of the two, discrepancies are larger. The discrepancies may be explained by a combinations of factors, such as the accumulated errors in the wave propagation along large stretches of the fjord, the coarse grid resolution needed to ensure model stability, and scale effects in the laboratory experiments.

  17. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Vladislav E.; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O.

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics.

  18. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents.

    PubMed

    Demidov, Vladislav E; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics. PMID:26818232

  19. Nonlinear wave propagation in strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Veeresha, B M; Tiwari, S K; Sen, A; Kaw, P K; Das, A

    2010-03-01

    The nonlinear propagation of low-frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is studied theoretically in the framework of the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. A set of simplified model nonlinear equations are derived from the original nonlinear integrodifferential form of the GH model by employing an appropriate physical ansatz. Using standard perturbation techniques characteristic evolution equations for finite small amplitude waves are then obtained in various propagation regimes. The influence of viscoelastic properties arising from dust correlation contributions on the nature of nonlinear solutions is discussed. The modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbation is also examined and it is shown that dust compressibility contributions influenced by the Coulomb coupling effects introduce significant modification in the threshold and range of the instability domain. PMID:20365882

  20. Nonlinear wave propagation in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Veeresha, B. M.; Tiwari, S. K.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.; Das, A.

    2010-03-15

    The nonlinear propagation of low-frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is studied theoretically in the framework of the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. A set of simplified model nonlinear equations are derived from the original nonlinear integrodifferential form of the GH model by employing an appropriate physical ansatz. Using standard perturbation techniques characteristic evolution equations for finite small amplitude waves are then obtained in various propagation regimes. The influence of viscoelastic properties arising from dust correlation contributions on the nature of nonlinear solutions is discussed. The modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbation is also examined and it is shown that dust compressibility contributions influenced by the Coulomb coupling effects introduce significant modification in the threshold and range of the instability domain.

  1. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in P T -symmetric hyperbolic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shramkova, O. V.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate theoretically and numerically the propagation of electromagnetic waves in P T -symmetric periodic stacks composed of hyperbolic metamaterial layers separated by dielectric media with balanced loss and gain. We derive the characteristic frequencies governing the dispersion properties of the eigenwaves of P T -symmetric semiconductor-dielectric stacks. By tuning the loss/gain level and thicknesses of the layers, we study the evolution of the dispersion dependencies. We show that the effective-medium approach does not adequately describe the propagating waves in the P T -symmetric hypercrystals, even for wavelengths that are about 100 times larger than the period of the stack. We demonstrate the existence of anisotropic transmission resonances and above-unity reflection in P T -symmetric hyperbolic systems. The P T -symmetry-breaking transition of the scattering matrix is strongly influenced by the constitutive and geometrical parameters of the layers and the angles of wave incidence.

  2. Attenuation characteristics of nonlinear pressure waves propagating in pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to investigate temporal and spatial velocity distributions of fluid flow in 3-in. open-end pipes of various lengths up to 210 ft, produced by the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves of various intensities. Velocity profiles across each of five sections along the pipes were measured as a function of time with the use of hot-film and hot-wire anemometers for two pressure waves produced by a piston. Peculiar configurations of the velocity profiles across the pipe section were noted, which are uncommon for steady pipe flow. Theoretical consideration was given to this phenomenon of higher velocity near the pipe wall for qualitative confirmation. Experimentally time-dependent velocity distributions along the pipe axis were compared with one-dimensional theoretical results obtained by the method of characteristics with or without diffusion term for the purpose of determining the attenuation characteristics of the nonlinear wave propagation in the pipes.

  3. Simulation of wave propagation in three-dimensional random media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, William A.; Filice, J. P.; Frehlich, R. G.; Yadlowsky, M.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative error analysis for simulation of wave propagation in three dimensional random media assuming narrow angular scattering are presented for the plane wave and spherical wave geometry. This includes the errors resulting from finite grid size, finite simulation dimensions, and the separation of the two-dimensional screens along the propagation direction. Simple error scalings are determined for power-law spectra of the random refractive index of the media. The effects of a finite inner scale are also considered. The spatial spectra of the intensity errors are calculated and compared to the spatial spectra of intensity. The numerical requirements for a simulation of given accuracy are determined for realizations of the field. The numerical requirements for accurate estimation of higher moments of the field are less stringent.

  4. S-Wave Normal Mode Propagation in Aluminum Cylinders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Large amplitude waveform features have been identified in pulse-transmission shear-wave measurements through cylinders that are long relative to the acoustic wavelength. The arrival times and amplitudes of these features do not follow the predicted behavior of well-known bar waves, but instead they appear to propagate with group velocities that increase as the waveform feature's dominant frequency increases. To identify these anomalous features, the wave equation is solved in a cylindrical coordinate system using an infinitely long cylinder with a free surface boundary condition. The solution indicates that large amplitude normal-mode propagations exist. Using the high-frequency approximation of the Bessel function, an approximate dispersion relation is derived. The predicted amplitude and group velocities using the approximate dispersion relation qualitatively agree with measured values at high frequencies, but the exact dispersion relation should be used to analyze normal modes for full ranges of frequency of interest, particularly at lower frequencies.

  5. Wave propagation in square granular crystals with spherical interstitial intruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szelengowicz, I.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Daraio, C.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the propagation and scattering of highly nonlinear waves in granular systems composed of spheres in contact arranged in a square packing, and study how the presence of small and light spherical interstitial defects, also referred to as intruders, affects the wave propagation. The effects of a single defect are investigated experimentally and compared to numerical simulations, showing very good quantitative agreement. Transmitted and scattered waves are formed, whose characteristics depend on the material properties of the defect in relation to the properties of the particles in the lattice. Experiments and numerical simulations reveal that stiffer defects are more efficient at redistributing energy outside the impacted chain and soft defects induce a localization of the energy at the defect. Finally, the effects of the presence of two defects, placed diagonally or aligned in the square packing are also investigated, as well as how their interaction depends on their relative positions.

  6. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, Vladislav E.; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O.

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics. PMID:26818232

  7. Quasinormal modes and classical wave propagation in analogue black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, Jose P.S.

    2004-12-15

    Many properties of black holes can be studied using acoustic analogues in the laboratory through the propagation of sound waves. We investigate in detail sound wave propagation in a rotating acoustic (2+1)-dimensional black hole, which corresponds to the 'draining bathtub' fluid flow. We compute the quasinormal mode frequencies of this system and discuss late-time power-law tails. Because of the presence of an ergoregion, waves in a rotating acoustic black hole can be superradiantly amplified. We also compute superradiant reflection coefficients and instability time scales for the acoustic black hole bomb, the equivalent of the Press-Teukolsky black hole bomb. Finally we discuss quasinormal modes and late-time tails in a nonrotating canonical acoustic black hole, corresponding to an incompressible, spherically symmetric (3+1)-dimensional fluid flow.

  8. Propagation and mode conversion for waves in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stix, T.H.; Swanson, D.G.

    1982-06-01

    The following topics are described: (1) the hybrid resonance, (2) Alfven resonance, (3) the intermediate-frequency electromagnetic wave equation, (4) the standard equation, (5) the tunneling equation, (6) asymptotic solutions of the tunneling equation, (7) localized absorption, and (8) matched asymptotic expansions; the low-frequency Alfven resonance. (MOW)

  9. Obliquely Propagating Electromagnetic Waves in Magnetized Kappa Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaelzer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of velocity distribution functions (VDFs) that exhibit a power-law dependence on the high-energy tail have been the subjectof intense research by the space plasma community. Such functions, known as kappa or superthermal distributions, have beenfound to provide a better fitting to the VDF measured by spacecraft in the solar wind. One of the problems that is being addressed on this new light is the temperature anisotropy of solar wind protons and electrons. An anisotropic kappa VDF contains a large amount of free energy that can excite waves in the solar wind. Conversely, the wave-particle interaction is important to determine the shape of theobserved particle distributions.In the literature, the general treatment for waves excited by (bi-)Maxwellian plasmas is well-established. However, for kappa distributions, either isotropic or anisotropic, the wave characteristics have been studied mostly for the limiting cases of purely parallel or perpendicular propagation. Contributions for the general case of obliquely-propagating electromagnetic waves have been scarcely reported so far. The absence of a general treatment prevents a complete analysis of the wave-particle interaction in kappa plasmas, since some instabilities, such as the firehose, can operate simultaneously both in the parallel and oblique directions.In a recent work [1], we have obtained expressions for the dielectric tensor and dispersion relations for the low-frequency, quasi-perpendicular dispersive Alfvén waves resulting from a kappa VDF. In the present work, we generalize the formalism introduced by [1] for the general case of electrostatic and/or electromagnetic waves propagating in a kappa plasma in any frequency range and for arbitrary angles.We employ an isotropic distribution, but the methods used here can be easily applied to more general anisotropic distributions,such as the bi-kappa or product-bi-kappa. [1] R. Gaelzer and L. F. Ziebell, Journal of Geophysical Research 119, 9334

  10. Wave packet propagation across barriers by semiclassical initial value methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jakob; Kay, Kenneth G.

    2015-07-01

    Semiclassical initial value representation (IVR) formulas for the propagator have difficulty describing tunneling through barriers. A key reason is that these formulas do not automatically reduce, in the classical limit, to the version of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller (VVG) propagator required to treat barrier tunneling, which involves trajectories that have complex initial conditions and that follow paths in complex time. In this work, a simple IVR expression, that has the correct tunneling form in the classical limit, is derived for the propagator in the case of one-dimensional barrier transmission. Similarly, an IVR formula, that reduces to the Generalized Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics (GGWPD) expression [D. Huber, E. J. Heller, and R. Littlejohn, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 2003 (1988)] in the classical limit, is derived for the transmitted wave packet. Uniform semiclassical versions of the IVR formulas are presented and simplified expressions in terms of real trajectories and WKB penetration factors are described. Numerical tests show that the uniform IVR treatment gives good results for wave packet transmission through the Eckart and Gaussian barriers in all cases examined. In contrast, even when applied with the proper complex trajectories, the VVG and GGWPD treatments are inaccurate when the mean energy of the wave packet is near the classical transmission threshold. The IVR expressions for the propagator and wave packet are cast as contour integrals in the complex space of initial conditions and these are generalized to potentially allow treatment of a larger variety of systems. A steepest descent analysis of the contour integral formula for the wave packet in the present cases confirms its relationship to the GGWPD method, verifies its semiclassical validity, and explains results of numerical calculations.

  11. Directed electromagnetic wave propagation in 1D metamaterial: Projecting operators method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampilogov, Dmitrii; Leble, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    We consider a boundary problem for 1D electrodynamics modeling of a pulse propagation in a metamaterial medium. We build and apply projecting operators to a Maxwell system in time domain that allows to split the linear propagation problem to directed waves for a material relations with general dispersion. Matrix elements of the projectors act as convolution integral operators. For a weak nonlinearity we generalize the linear results still for arbitrary dispersion and derive the system of interacting right/left waves with combined (hybrid) amplitudes. The result is specified for the popular metamaterial model with Drude formula for both permittivity and permeability coefficients. We also discuss and investigate stationary solutions of the system related to some boundary regimes.

  12. Generation and propagation of nonlinear internal waves in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scotti, A.; Beardsley, R.C.; Butman, B.

    2007-01-01

    During the summer, nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) are commonly observed propagating in Massachusetts Bay. The topography of the area is unique in the sense that the generation area (over Stellwagen Bank) is only 25 km away from the shoaling area, and thus it represents an excellent natural laboratory to study the life cycle of NLIWs. To assist in the interpretation of the data collected during the 1998 Massachusetts Bay Internal Wave Experiment (MBIWE98), a fully nonlinear and nonhydrostatic model covering the generation/shoaling region was developed, to investigate the response of the system to the range of background and driving conditions observed. Simplified models were also used to elucidate the role of nonlinearity and dispersion in shaping the NLIW field. This paper concentrates on the generation process and the subsequent evolution in the basin. The model was found to reproduce well the range of propagation characteristics observed (arrival time, propagation speed, amplitude), and provided a coherent framework to interpret the observations. Comparison with a fully nonlinear hydrostatic model shows that during the generation and initial evolution of the waves as they move away from Stellwagen Bank, dispersive effects play a negligible role. Thus the problem can be well understood considering the geometry of the characteristics along which the Riemann invariants of the hydrostatic problem propagate. Dispersion plays a role only during the evolution of the undular bore in the middle of Stellwagen Basin. The consequences for modeling NLIWs within hydrostatic models are briefly discussed at the end.

  13. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  14. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  15. Existence and uniqueness of stabilized propagating wave segments in wave front interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jong-Shenq; Ninomiya, Hirokazu; Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2010-02-01

    Recent experimental studies of photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction have revealed the existence of propagating wave segments. The propagating wave segments are unstable, but can be stabilized by using a feedback control to continually adjust the excitability of the medium. Experimental studies also indicate that the locus of the size of a stabilized wave segment as a function of the excitability of the medium gives the excitability boundary for the existence of 2D wave patterns with free ends in excitable media. To study the properties of this boundary curve, we use the wave front interaction model proposed by Zykov and Showalter. This is equivalent to study a first order system of three ordinary differential equations which includes a singular nonlinearity. Using two different reduced first order systems of two ordinary differential equations, we first show the existence of wave segments for any given propagating velocity. Then the wave profiles can be classified into two types, namely, convex and non-convex types. More precisely, when the normalized propagating velocity is small, we show that the wave profile is of convex type, while the wave profile is of non-convex type when the normalized velocity is close to 1.

  16. Numerical investigation of seismic wave propagation in fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weidong

    The geometric features and physical characteristics of fractures in rock masses are often considered major factors controlling the production of oil and gas. Therefore, it is important to detect fractures in oil and gas reservoirs. Of the various geophysical methods, seismic methods are particularly attractive for fracture detection and imaging because of the sensitivity of elastic waves to the mechanical compliance associated with fractures. Based on the effects of fracture on the velocities and amplitudes of seismic waves, several studies have shown the potential for using seismic tomography and vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques to characterize fracture systems in reservoirs. In this thesis, seismic wave propagation through a fracture system is numerically investigated by the finite-difference method. When seismic waves propagate in a medium with single fractures of infinite and finite length, the head wave and the dispersive interface waves (symmetric and antisymmetric modes) along the fracture are strongly excited by the explosion source if the seismic source is moved close to the fracture with low stiffness. In a fracture waveguide, fracture channel waves are supported by the waveguide, even in the absence of a velocity contrast between the fracture waveguide and surrounding host rock. The particular modes generated strongly depend on the polarization of the seismic source. When the seismic source is vertically (horizontally) polarized, antisymmetric (symmetric) modes are excited. In addition, if the thickness of the fracture waveguide increases, a complex particle motion of the fracture channel waves develops because the fracture channel waves partly couple with the interface waves along the fractures. For seismic wave propagation through a multi-fracture system consisting of equally spaced fractures, both an explicit fracture model and an equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium model were used to model the fracture system. In comparison to

  17. Voronoi based microstructure modelling for elastic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaprasad, S.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic assessment of materials and defects are affected by microstructural parameters like grain size and texture. When a beam of ultrasound propagates in a polycrystalline medium, it undergoes extensive scattering by grains, grain boundaries and other microstructural features such as dislocations, voids, micro cracks etc. To understand the role of anisotropy and grain size distribution on an ultrasonic beam, a model system is proposed for carrying out ultrasonic wave propagation in a model characterized by grain size distribution and grain orientation distribution. A 2D polycrystalline medium constructed using Voronoi tessellations with a specific grain size distribution is considered and orientational averaging studies are carried out.

  18. Dynamics and Predictability of Deep Propagating Atmospheric Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J.; Fritts, D. C.; Smith, R.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    An overview will be provided of the first field campaign that attempts to follow deeply propagating gravity waves (GWs) from their tropospheric sources to their mesospheric breakdown. The DEEP propagating gravity WAVE experiment over New Zealand (DEEPWAVE-NZ) is a comprehensive, airborne and ground-based measurement and modeling program focused on providing a new understanding of GW dynamics and impacts from the troposphere through the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This program will employ the new NSF/NCAR GV (NGV) research aircraft from a base in New Zealand in a 6-week field measurement campaign in June-July 2014. The NGV will be equipped with new lidar and airglow instruments for the DEEPWAVE measurement program, providing temperatures and vertical winds spanning altitudes from immediately above the NGV flight altitude (~13 km) to ~100 km. The region near New Zealand is chosen since all the relevant GW sources occur strongly here, and upper-level winds in austral winter permit GWs to propagate to very high altitudes. Given large-amplitude GWs that propagate routinely into the MLT, the New Zealand region offers an ideal natural laboratory for studying these important GW dynamics and effects impacting weather and climate over a much deeper atmospheric layer than previous campaigns have attempted (0-100 km altitude). The logistics of making measurements in the vicinity of New Zealand are potentially easier than from the Andes and Drake Passage region. A suite of GW-focused modeling and predictability tools will be used to guide NGV flight planning to GW events of greatest scientific significance. These models will also drive scientific interpretation of the GW measurements, together providing answers to the key science questions posed by DEEPWAVE about GW dynamics, morphology, predictability and impacts from 0-100 km. Preliminary results will be presented from high-resolution and adjoint models applied over areas featuring deep wave propagation. The high

  19. Constitutive modeling for blast-induced wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumm, E. C.

    1985-03-01

    The description of stress-time history acting on a buried structure is a major source of error in the analysis of underground structures to weapons loadings. The stress wave propagating spherically from the weapon is attenuated as it travels from the source. This attenuation is a function of the inelastic response of the soil, and results in an increase in the loading rise time or decrease in the loading rate. Since the inelastic soil response is a function of the loading rate, a wave propagation analysis should be conducted to determine the stresses on the structure. At the interface between the soil and structure, the stress is modified further by soil-structure interaction effects. Thus, the stress on the structure is a function of both the structural and soil properties as well as the distance traveled by the stress wave. These related phenomena can be included in a numerical analysis, but the accuracy depends on the constitutive representation of the materials. One-dimensional wave propagation experiments and impact tests with various soils are reviewed, and the attenuation as a function of the soil stress-strain response is discussed.

  20. Propagating wave pattern on a falling liquid curtain.

    PubMed

    Le Grand-Piteira, N; Brunet, P; Lebon, L; Limat, L

    2006-08-01

    A regular pattern of surface waves is observed on a liquid curtain falling from a horizontal, wetted tube, maintained between two vertical wires. Since the upper boundary is not constrained in the transverse direction, the top of the curtain enters a pendulum-like motion, when the flow rate is progressively reduced, coupled to the propagation of curtain undulations, structured as a checkerboard. This structure is formed by two patterns of propagating waves. In some sense, these propagating patterns replace the stationary pattern of liquid columns observed at a lower flow rate. Measurements of phase velocity, frequency, and wavelength are reported. The data are in agreement with a simple dimensional argument suggesting that the wave velocity is proportional to the surface tension divided by the mass flux of liquid per unit length. This scaling is also that followed by the fluid velocity at the so-called transonic point, i.e., the point where the fluid velocity equals that of sinuous waves. We finally discuss the implications of these results for the global stability of liquid curtains. PMID:17025537

  1. An experimental study on the ultrasonic wave propagation in cancellous bone: waveform changes during propagation.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Fuminori; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami

    2013-12-01

    Wave propagation in a trabecular bone was experimentally investigated using an acoustic tube. For the purposes of this study, a cubic sample was gradually filed so the waveform change due to the sample thickness could be observed. The initial sample showed clear two-wave separation. As the sample became thinner, the fast and slow waves gradually overlapped. The apparent frequencies and amplitudes of the fast waves obtained from the time domain data decreased significantly for the smaller thicknesses. This indicates an increase in the apparent attenuation at the initial stage of the propagation. Next the authors investigated the distribution of the ultrasonic field after the transmission through the cancellous bone sample. In addition to a large aperture receiver, a needle-type ultrasonic transducer was used to observe the ultrasonic field. Within an area of the same size of the large transducer, the waveforms retrieved with the needle sensor exhibited high spatial variations; however, the averaged waveform in the plane was similar to the waveform obtained with the large aperture receiver. This indicates that the phase cancellation effect on the surface of the large aperture receiver can be one of the reasons for the strong apparent attenuation observed at the initial stages of the propagation. PMID:25669289

  2. Observations of acoustic surface waves in outdoor sound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Donald G.

    2003-05-01

    Acoustic surface waves have been detected propagating outdoors under natural conditions. Two critical experimental conditions were employed to ensure the conclusive detection of these waves. First, acoustic pulses rather than a continuous wave source allowed an examination of the waveform shape and avoided the masking of wave arrivals. Second, a snow cover provided favorable ground impedance conditions for surface waves to exist. The acoustic pulses were generated by blank pistol shots fired 1 m above the snow. The resultant waveforms were measured using a vertical array of six microphones located 60 m away from the source at heights between 0.1 and 4.75 m. A strong, low frequency ``tail'' following the initial arrival was recorded near the snow surface. This tail, and its exponential decay with height (z) above the surface (~e-αz), are diagnostic features of surface waves. The measured attenuation coefficient α was 0.28 m-1. The identification of the surface wave is confirmed by comparing the measured waveforms with waveforms predicted by the theoretical evaluation of the explicit surface wave pole term using residue theory.

  3. Matter wave propagation using the Fourier optics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, M.; Hematizadeh, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper propagation of matter wave of particles is modeled using the Fourier optics approach. In first step the Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics is used to find the wave function of the particle. In the second step Fourier optics is employed to model the diffraction of the wave function of the particle through single and double slits. The results of the calculations are presented as graphs of diffraction patterns. The results of the presented method are compared to the existing results in the literature (with different methods) to check the validity of the introduced model. It is shown that the Fourier optics approach is applicable to matter wave of particles in diffraction through slits.

  4. Experimental study of wave propagation dynamics of binary distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.L.; Graham, G.K.; Keller, G.E. II; Ting, J.; Helfferich, F.G.

    1996-10-01

    High-purity distillation columns are typically difficult to control because of their severely nonlinear behavior reflected by their sharp composition and temperature profiles. The dynamic behavior of such a column, as characterized by the movement of its sharp profile, was elucidated by a nonlinear wave theory established previously. With binary alcohol mixtures, this study provides an experimental observation of such wave-propagation dynamics of a 40-tray stripping column and a 50-tray fractionation column in response to step disturbances of feed composition, feed flow rate, and reboiler heat supply. These experimental results have verified that the sharp profile in a high-purity column moves as a constant-pattern wave and that the nonlinear wave theory predicts its velocity satisfactorily with very simple mathematics. Results also demonstrate the asymmetric dynamics of the transitions between two steady states.

  5. Propagating spin waves in YIG micro-channel on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jilei; Che, Ping; Tu, Sa; Zhang, Yan; Qin, Jun; Bi, Lei; Liu, Chuanpu; Liao, Zhimin; Yu, Dapeng; Yu, Haiming; Fert Beijing Research Institute Team; University Of Electronic Science; Technology Of China Team; Peking University Collaboration

    Recently the utilization of spin waves in the field of information processing has been widely developed because it is free of Joule heat dissipation and beneficial to miniaturization of the magnon based devices. Here we study spin waves in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) with a low damping property. The YIG film is fabricated on silicon substrate using pulsed laser deposition and the measured FMR linewidth is only a few Gauss. Using ebeam lithography, we are able to pattern the YIG film into a micro-channel and integrate sub-meter waveguides to generate and detect spin waves of wavelength down to 1 μm or below. We show results of propagating spin waves in the YIG micro-channel measured by the S12 parameter of the vector network analyzer.

  6. Obliquely propagating electromagnetic waves in magnetized kappa plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaelzer, R.; Ziebell, L. F.

    2016-02-01

    Velocity distribution functions (VDFs) that exhibit a power-law dependence on the high-energy tail have been the subject of intense research by the plasma physics community. Such functions, known as kappa or superthermal distributions, have been found to provide a better fitting to the VDFs measured by spacecraft in the solar wind. One of the problems that is being addressed on this new light is the temperature anisotropy of solar wind protons and electrons. In the literature, the general treatment for waves excited by (bi-)Maxwellian plasmas is well-established. However, for kappa distributions, the wave characteristics have been studied mostly for the limiting cases of purely parallel or perpendicular propagation, relative to the ambient magnetic field. Contributions to the general case of obliquely propagating electromagnetic waves have been scarcely reported so far. The absence of a general treatment prevents a complete analysis of the wave-particle interaction in kappa plasmas, since some instabilities can operate simultaneously both in the parallel and oblique directions. In a recent work, Gaelzer and Ziebell [J. Geophys. Res. 119, 9334 (2014)] obtained expressions for the dielectric tensor and dispersion relations for the low-frequency, quasi-perpendicular dispersive Alfvén waves resulting from a kappa VDF. In the present work, the formalism is generalized for the general case of electrostatic and/or electromagnetic waves propagating in a kappa plasma in any frequency range and for arbitrary angles. An isotropic distribution is considered, but the methods used here can be easily applied to more general anisotropic distributions such as the bi-kappa or product-bi-kappa.

  7. Seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic axisymmetric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, Martin; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    2014-11-01

    We present a numerical method to compute 3-D elastic waves in fully anisotropic axisymmetric media. This method is based on a decomposition of the wave equation into a series of uncoupled 2-D equations for which the dependence of the wavefield on the azimuth can be solved analytically. Four independent equations up to quadrupole order appear as solutions for moment-tensor sources located on the symmetry axis while single forces can be accommodated by two separate solutions up to dipole order. This decomposition gives rise to an efficient solution of the 3-D wave equation in a 2-D axisymmetric medium. First, we prove the validity of the decomposition of the wavefield in the presence of general anisotropy. Then we use it to derive the reduced 2-D equations of motions and discretize them using the spectral element method. Finally, we benchmark the numerical implementation for global wave propagation at 1 Hz and consider inner core anisotropy as an application for high-frequency wave propagation in anisotropic media at frequencies up to 2 Hz.

  8. High Harmonic Fast Wave Propagation and Heating on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. B.; Phillips, C. K.; Hosea, J. C.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.

    2007-11-01

    Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) show that the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) core heating efficiency depends on the antenna phasing and plasma conditions. [1]. Power losses in the edge due to rf sheath formation or other parasitic absorption processes could occur if the waves propagate nearly parallel to the wall in the edge regions and intersect nearby vessel structures. To investigate this possibility, the 3D HHFW propagation in NSTX has been studied both analytically and numerically with the ray tracing code GENRAY. Initial calculations show that for certain values of the launched parallel wave number and magnetic field, the waves in NSTX are launched at a shallow angle to the vessel wall. In contrast, for ICRF heating in C-Mod or ITER, the initial ray trajectories tend to be more radially oriented. Comparisons of the GENRAY results with 2D TORIC full wave simulations for the power deposition will also be discussed. [1] See invited talk by J. C. Hosea this meeting.

  9. Propagation and attenuation of Rayleigh waves in generalized thermoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the propagation of Rayleigh waves in a generalized thermoelastic half-space with stress-free plane boundary. The boundary has the option of being either isothermal or thermally insulated. In either case, the dispersion equation is obtained in the form of a complex irrational expression due to the presence of radicals. This dispersion equation is rationalized into a polynomial equation, which is solvable, numerically, for exact complex roots. The roots of the dispersion equation are obtained after removing the extraneous zeros of this polynomial equation. Then, these roots are filtered out for the inhomogeneous propagation of waves decaying with depth. Numerical examples are solved to analyze the effects of thermal properties of elastic materials on the dispersion of existing surface waves. For these thermoelastic Rayleigh waves, the behavior of elliptical particle motion is studied inside and at the surface of the medium. Insulation of boundary does play a significant role in changing the speed, amplitude, and polarization of Rayleigh waves in thermoelastic media.

  10. Wave propagation in a quasi-chemical equilibrium plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, T.-M.; Baum, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Wave propagation in a quasi-chemical equilibrium plasma is studied. The plasma is infinite and without external fields. The chemical reactions are assumed to result from the ionization and recombination processes. When the gas is near equilibrium, the dominant role describing the evolution of a reacting plasma is played by the global conservation equations. These equations are first derived and then used to study the small amplitude wave motion for a near-equilibrium situation. Nontrivial damping effects have been obtained by including the conduction current terms.

  11. Propagation of waves in a medium with high radiation pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisnovatyy-Kogan, G. S.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    The propagation and mutual transformation of acoustic and thermal waves are investigated in media with a high radiative pressure. The equations of hydrodynamics for matter and the radiative transfer equations in a moving medium in the Eddington approximation are used in the investigation. Model problems of waves in a homogeneous medium with an abrupt jump in opacity and in a medium of variable opacity are presented. The characteristic and the times of variability are discussed. Amplitude for the brightness fluctuations for very massive stars are discussed.

  12. Backward propagating acoustic waves in single gold nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Cyril; Belliard, Laurent; Becerra, Loïc; Perrin, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy has been carried out on suspended gold nanostructures with a rectangular cross section lithographed on a silicon substrate. With a thickness fixed to 110 nm and a width ranging from 200 nm to 800 nm , size dependent measurements are used to distinguish which confined acoustic modes are detected. Furthermore, in order to avoid any ambiguity due to the measurement uncertainties on both the frequency and size, pump and probe beams are also spatially shifted to detect guided acoustic phonons. This leads us to the observation of backward propagating acoustic phonons in the gigahertz range ( ˜3 GHz ) in such nanostructures. While backward wave propagation in elastic waveguides has been predicted and already observed at the macroscale, very few studies have been done at the nanoscale. Here, we show that these backward waves can be used as the unique signature of the width dilatational acoustic mode.

  13. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto; Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-01

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe's linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  14. Electrostatic wave propagation and trapping near the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a two-dimensional ray tracing computer code, based on Snell's law, for electrostatic wave propagation in a dipole magnetic field are discussed. A survey of possible ray paths varying a wide range of parameters is conducted for low-harmonic Bernstein modes in a high-density plasma. It is shown that the ray paths exhibit similarity with radial distance and that there exists the possibility of two classes of wave statistics of the equator: a broad emission region extending to about + or - 4 deg and a class of events restricted to the smaller region of 1-2 deg about the magnetic equator. The regulating parameter between these two types of events is the transition energy from the isotropic background electrons to the unstable distribution of superthermals. Ray paths for propagation in the magnetic equatorial plane are considered and an explanation is given for ray focusing in the equatorial plane based on electron gyroradius considerations.

  15. Resonance absorption of propagating fast waves in a cold plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of propagating waves impinging on a surface in which the plasma and magnetic field may change is investigated by examining in depth the problem of a combination of cold plasma, uniform magnetic field and a surface density which varies linearly from zero at the left end to some finite value at the right end, beyond which the density is constant. Two cases are considered: one in which the plasma is a vacuum everywhere to the left of the surface (which may correspond to coronal conditions) and one in which the plasma density jumps to a very large value to the left of the surface (which may mimic the magnetosphere with the dense region at the left corresponding to the plasmasphere). A complete discussion of the resonance absorption of propagating fast waves for the case considered by Kiveloson and Southwood (1986) is presented, emphasizing approximate analytical results whenever possible; these results are then compared with exact numerical solutions.

  16. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  17. Wave propagation modeling with non-Markov phase screens.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    A recently introduced [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A30, 479 (2013)10.1364/JOSAA.30.000479JOAOD61084-7529] sparse spectrum (SS) model of statistically homogeneous random fields makes it possible to generate 3D samples of refractive-index fluctuations with prescribed spectral density at a very reasonable computational cost. The SS technique can be used in the framework of the split-step Fourier method for numerical simulation of wave propagation in turbulence. It allows generation of the phase screen samples that are free from the limitations of the Markov approximation, which is commonly used for theoretical description and numerical modeling of optical waves propagation through turbulence. We investigate statistics of these phase screens and present a numerical algorithm for their generation. PMID:27140765

  18. Studies of the propagation of Low Frequency (LF) radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, E. M.; Jones, T. B.

    1993-05-01

    Low frequency (30-300 kHz) radio waves can propagate to great distances with little attenuation in the cavity formed by the earth and the ionosphere. Because of the relatively high frequency at LF, many active propagation modes can occur between the transmitter and receiver. Changes in the ionospheric conductivity or reflection height can influence the phase and amplitude of these modes and, hence, produce mutual interference. Because of these interference effects, the propagation is less stable than at VLF and the received field strength becomes more difficult to predict. In the present investigation, the WAVEHOP program was employed in conjunction with a range of ionospheric models to estimate the receiver field strength over a number of experimental paths. The predicted values were compared with those measured in an attempt to validate the ionospheric models and the method of calculation.

  19. Effect of propagation on pulsed four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisman, P.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Friedmann, H.

    2000-05-01

    We examine the effect of propagation on the resonance Rabi sideband of the four-wave mixing (FWM) spectrum, obtained when short temporally displaced pump and probe pulses interact with an optically thick medium of two-level atoms. We find that the dependence of the time-integrated FWM signal on the pump-probe delay is considerably altered by propagation. In particular, the logarithm of the FWM signal, for the case where the probe precedes the pump, deviates from linearity and may even increase over a range of values. An explanation is given in terms of the overlap of the pump envelope with the coherent response of the atomic system to the probe, both of which are modified on propagation.

  20. Numerical simulation of shock wave propagation in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rénier, Mathieu; Marchiano, Régis; Gaudard, Eric; Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Acoustical shock waves propagate through flows in many situations. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft influenced by winds, or the so-called Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades when rotating at supersonic speeds, are two examples of such a phenomenon. In this work, an original method called FLHOWARD, acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction, is presented. It relies on a scalar nonlinear wave equation, which takes into account propagation in a privileged direction (one-way approach), with diffraction, flow, heterogeneous and nonlinear effects. Theoretical comparison of the dispersion relations between that equation and parabolic equations (standard or wide angle) shows that this approach is more precise than the parabolic approach because there are no restrictions about the angle of propagation. A numerical procedure based on the standard split-step technique is used. It consists in splitting the nonlinear wave equation into simpler equations. Each of these equations is solved thanks to an analytical solution when it is possible, and a finite differences scheme in other cases. The advancement along the propagation direction is done with an implicit scheme. The validity of that numerical procedure is assessed by comparisons with analytical solutions of the Lilley's equation in waveguides for uniform or shear flows in linear regime. Attention is paid to the advantages and drawbacks of that method. Finally, the numerical code is used to simulate the propagation of sonic boom through a piece of atmosphere with flows and heterogeneities. The effects of the various parameters are analysed.

  1. Simplified theory of large-amplitude wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.

    1976-01-01

    An orbit perturbation procedure was applied to the description of monochromatic, large-amplitude, electrostatic plasma wave propagation. In the lowest order approximation, untrapped electrons were assumed to follow constant-velocity orbits and trapped electrons were assumed to execute simple harmonic motion. The deviations of these orbits from the actual orbits were regarded as perturbations. The nonlinear damping rate and frequency shift were then obtained in terms of simple functions. The results are in good agreement with previous less approximate analyses.

  2. Monograph on propagation of sound waves in curved ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    After reviewing and evaluating the existing material on sound propagation in curved ducts without flow, it seems strange that, except for Lord Rayleigh in 1878, no book on acoustics has treated the case of wave motion in bends. This monograph reviews the available analytical and experimental material, nearly 30 papers published on this subject so far, and concisely summarizes what has been learned about the motion of sound in hard-wall and acoustically lined cylindrical bends.

  3. Wave propagation in the chromosphere and transition region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffens, S.; Deubner, F.-L.; Fleck, B.; Wilhelm, K.; Harrison, R.; Gurman, J.

    1997-01-01

    The results from a joint observing program involving the solar ultraviolet measurement of emitted radiation (SUMER), the coronal diagnostic spectrometer (CDS) and the extreme-ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) are presented. These operations were coordinated with ground-based observations at the vacuum tower telescope at Izana (Tenerife). The purpose was to characterize the wave propagation properties in the solar atmosphere, from the photosphere through the chromosphere into the transition region.

  4. Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser; Kliore, Arvydas

    2002-01-01

    This handbook examines the effects of the Martian environment on radio wave propagation on Mars and in the space near the planet. The environmental effects include these from the Martian atmosphere, ionosphere, global dust storms, aerosols, clouds, and geomorphologic features. Relevant Martian environmental parameters were extracted from the measurements of Mars missions during the past 30 years, especially from Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor. The results derived from measurements and analyses have been reviewed through an extensive literature search. The updated parameters have been theoretically analyzed to study their effects on radio propagation. This handbook also provides basic information about the entire telecommunications environment on and around Mars for propagation researchers, system engineers, and link analysts. Based on these original analyses, some important recommendations have been made, including the use of the Martian ionosphere as a reflector for Mars global or trans-horizon communication between future Martian colonies, reducing dust storm scattering effects, etc. These results have extended our wave propagation knowledge to a planet other than Earth; and the tables, models, and graphics included in this handbook will benefit telecommunication system engineers and scientific researchers.

  5. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves: 1: Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matda, Y.; Crawford, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    An economical low noise plasma simulation model is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation, to establish the low noise features and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 0.000,001 of the plasma thermal energy. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories. The additional phenomena of sideband instability and satellite growth, stimulated by large amplitude wave propagation and the resulting particle trapping, are described.

  6. The effect of microscale random Alfven waves on the propagation of large-scale Alfven waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, T.; Hamabata, H.

    1983-04-01

    The ponderomotive force generated by random Alfven waves in a collisionless plasma is evaluated taking into account mean magnetic and velocity shear and is expressed as a series involving spatial derivatives of mean magnetic and velocity fields whose coefficients are associated with the helicity spectrum function of random velocity field. The effect of microscale random Alfven waves through ponderomotive and mean electromotive forces generated by them on the propagation of large-scale Alfven waves is also investigated.

  7. Ion temperature effects on magnetotail Alfvén wave propagation and electron energization: ION TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON ALFVÉN WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Chaston, C. C.

    2015-07-01

    A new 2-D self-consistent hybrid gyrofluid-kinetic electron model in dipolar coordinates is presented and used to simulate dispersive-scale Alfvén wave pulse propagation from the equator to the ionosphere along an L = 10 magnetic field line. The model is an extension of the hybrid MHD-kinetic electron model that incorporates ion Larmor radius corrections via the kinetic fluid model of Cheng and Johnson (1999). It is found that consideration of a realistic ion to electron temperature ratio decreases the propagation time of the wave from the plasma sheet to the ionosphere by several seconds relative to a ρi=0 case (which also implies shorter timing for a substorm onset signal) and leads to significant dispersion of wave energy perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Additionally, ion temperature effects reduce the parallel current and electron energization all along the field line for the same magnitude perpendicular electric field perturbation.

  8. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, O; Antoun, T

    2009-12-11

    This study presents discrete and continuum simulations of shock wave propagating through jointed media. The simulations were performed using the Lagrangian hydrocode GEODYN-L with joints treated explicitly using an advanced contact algorithm. They studied both isotropic and anisotropic joint representations. For an isotropically jointed geologic medium, the results show that the properties of the joints can be combined with the properties of the intact rock to develop an equivalent continuum model suitable for analyzing wave propagation through the jointed medium. For an anisotropically jointed geologic medium, they found it difficult to develop an equivalent continuum (EC) model that matches the response derived from mesoscopic simulation. They also performed simulations of wave propagation through jointed media. Two appraoches are suggested for modeling the rock mass. In one approach, jointed are modeled explicitly in a Lagrangian framework with appropriate contact algorithms used to track motion along the interfaces. In the other approach, the effect of joints is taken into account using a constitutive model derived from mesoscopic simulations.

  9. Instability and Wave Propagation in Structured 3D Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynia, Narges; Fang, Nicholas X.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-03-01

    Many structured composites found in nature possess undulating and wrinkled interfacial layers that regulate mechanical, chemical, acoustic, adhesive, thermal, electrical and optical functions of the material. This research focused on the complex instability and wrinkling pattern arising in 3D structured composites and the effect of the buckling pattern on the overall structural response. The 3D structured composites consisted of stiffer plates supported by soft matrix on both sides. Compression beyond the critical strain led to complex buckling patterns in the initially straight plates. The motivation of our work is to elaborate the formation of a system of prescribed periodic scatterers (metamaterials) due to buckling, and their effect to interfere wave propagation through the metamaterial structures. Such metamaterials made from elastomers enable large reversible deformation and, as a result, significant changes of the wave propagation properties. We developed analytical and finite element models to capture various aspects of the instability mechanism. Mechanical experiments were designed to further explore the modeling results. The ability to actively alter the 3D composite structure can enable on-demand tunability of many different functions, such as active control of wave propagation to create band-gaps and waveguides.

  10. The effect of source's shape for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.; Onishi, K.; Kasahara, J.; Kuroda, T.

    2009-12-01

    In conventional simulation of seismic wave propagation, the source which generates signals is usually given by a point force or by a particle velocity at a point. In practice, seismic wave is generated by signal generators with finite volume and width. Since seismic lines span a distance up to hundreds meter to several kilometers, many people conducted seismic survey and data processing with the assumption that the size of signal generator is negligible compared with survey scale. However, there are no studies that tells how the size of baseplate influences generated seismic waves. Such estimations, therefore, are meaningful to consider the scale of generator. In this sense, current seismic processing might require a theoretical background about the seismic source for further detailed analysis. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of seismic source’s shape to resultant wave properties, and then estimate how effective the consideration about the scale of signal generator is for analyzing the seismic data. To evaluate source’s scale effect, we performed finite element analysis with the 3D model including the baseplate of source and the heterogeneous ground medium. We adopted a finite element method (FEM) and chose the code named “MD Nastran” (MSC Software Ver.2008) to calculate seismic wave propagation. To verify the reliability of calculation, we compared the result of FEM and that of finite-difference method (FDM) with wave propagating simulation of isotropic and homogeneous model with a point source. The amplitude and phase of those two were nearly equal each other. We considered the calculation of FEM is accurate enough and can be performed in the following calculations. As the first step, we developed a simple point source model and a baseplate model. The point source model contains only the ground represented by an elastic medium. The force generating the signal is given at the nodal point of the surface in this case. On the other

  11. Wave propagation in fractal-inspired self-similar beam lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Qi Jian; Wang, Pai; Koh, Soo Jin Adrian; Khoo, Eng Huat; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-11-30

    We combine numerical analysis and experiments to investigate the effect of hierarchy on the propagation of elastic waves in triangular beam lattices. While the response of the triangular lattice is characterized by a locally resonant band gap, both Bragg-type and locally resonant gaps are found for the hierarchical lattice. Therefore, our results demonstrate that structural hierarchy can be exploited to introduce an additional type of band gaps, providing a robust strategy for the design of lattice-based metamaterials with hybrid band gap properties (i.e., possessing band gaps that arises from both Bragg scattering and localized resonance)

  12. Estimation of the propagation characteristics of elastic waves propagating through a partially saturated sand soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, M.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.; Takahashi, N.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, landslides due to heavy rain and/or earthquakes have been increasing and severe damage occurred in Japan in some cases (e.g., Chigira et al., 2013, Geomorph.). One of the principle factors activating landslides is groundwater. Continuous measurements of moisture in soil and/or pore pressure are performed to investigate the groundwater behavior. However, such measurements give information on only local behavior of the groundwater. To monitor the state of target slope, it is better to measure signals affected by the behavior of groundwater in a widely surrounding region. The elastic waves propagating through the medium under the target slope are one of candidates of such signals. In this study, we measure propagating waves through a sand soil made in laboratory, injecting water into it from the bottom. We investigate the characteristics of the propagating waves. We drop sand particles in a container (750 mm long, 300 mm wide and 400 mm high) freely and made a sand soil. The sand soil consists of two layers. One is made of larger sand particles (0.2-0.4 mm in diameter) and the other is made of smaller sand particles (0.05-0.2 mm in diameter). The dry density of these sand layers is about 1.45 g/cm3. We install a shaker for generating elastic waves, accelerometers and pore pressure gauges in the sand soil. We apply small voltage steps repeatedly, and we continuously measure elastic waves propagating through the sand soil at a sampling rate of 51.2 ksps for a period including the water injection period. We estimate the spatio-temporal variation in the maximum cross-correlation coefficients and the corresponding time lags, using template waveforms recorded in the initial period as references. The coefficient for the waveforms recorded at the accelerometer attached to the tip of the shaker is almost stable in high values with a slight decrease down to 0.94 in the period when the sand particles around the shaker are considered to become wet. On the other hand

  13. Propagation of extensional waves in a piezoelectric semiconductor rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Wang, X. Y.; Chen, W. Q.; Yang, J. S.

    2016-04-01

    We studied the propagation of extensional waves in a thin piezoelectric semiconductor rod of ZnO whose c-axis is along the axis of the rod. The macroscopic theory of piezoelectric semiconductors was used which consists of the coupled equations of piezoelectricity and the conservation of charge. The problem is nonlinear because the drift current is the product of the unknown electric field and the unknown carrier density. A perturbation procedure was used which resulted in two one-way coupled linear problems of piezoelectricity and the conservation of charge, respectively. The acoustic wave and the accompanying electric field were obtained from the equations of piezoelectricity. The motion of carriers was then determined from the conservation of charge using a trigonometric series. It was found that while the acoustic wave was approximated by a sinusoidal wave, the motion of carriers deviates from a sinusoidal wave qualitatively because of the contributions of higher harmonics arising from the originally nonlinear terms. The wave crests become higher and sharper while the troughs are shallower and wider. This deviation is more pronounced for acoustic waves with larger amplitudes.

  14. Generation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the near-Earth magnetotail during dipolarization: Two-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhifang; Wu, Mingyu; Du, Aimin

    2016-04-01

    We employ two-dimensional global hybrid simulations to study the generation, propagation, and polarization of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the near-Earth magnetotail (around x = - 10 R E ) during dipolarization. In our simulation, EMIC waves with left-hand polarized signals originate in the low-latitude magnetotail as a result of the ion temperature anisotropy which is due to ion heating by Alfvén waves. Subsequently, EMIC waves can propagate along the ambient magnetic field toward high-latitudes. Our work provides one possible mechanism for the generation of EMIC waves observed in the near-Earth magnetotail.

  15. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Bin; Li, Bo-Wen; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Kong, Fan-Rong

    2016-05-01

    Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM) waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  16. Experiment to Study Alfven Wave Propagation in Plasma Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Mark; Bellan, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Arched plasma-filled twisted magnetic flux tubes are generated in the laboratory using pulsed power techniques (J.F. Hansen, S.K.P. Tripathi, P.M. Bellan, 2004). Their structure and time evolution exhibit similarities with both solar coronal loops and spheromaks. We are now developing a method to excite propagating torsional Alfven wave modes in such plasma loops by superposing a ˜10kA, ˜100ns current pulse upon the ˜50kA, 10μs main discharge current that flows along the ˜20cm long, 2cm diameter arched flux tube. To achieve this high power 100ns pulse, a magnetic pulse compression technique based on saturable reactors is employed. A low power prototype has been successfully tested, and design and construction of a full-power device is nearing completion. The full-power device will compress an initial 2μs pulse by a factor of nearly 20; the final stage utilizes a water-filled transmission line with ultra-low inductance to attain the final timescale. This new pulse device will subsequently be used to investigate interactions between Alfven waves and the larger-scale loop evolution; one goal will be to directly image the wave using high-speed photography. Attention will be paid to wave propagation including dispersion and reflection, as well as dissipation mechanisms and possible energetic particle generation.

  17. Simulation of 3D Seismic Wave Propagation with Volcano Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripperger, J.; Igel, H.; Wassermann, J.

    2001-12-01

    We investigate the possibilities of using three-dimensional finite difference (FD) methods for numerical simulation of the seismic wave field at active volcanoes. We put special emphasis on the implementation of the boundary conditions for free surface topography. We compare two different approaches to solve the free surface boundary conditions. The algorithms are implemented on parallel hardware and have been tested for correctness and stability. We apply them to smooth artificial topographies and to the real topography of Mount Merapi, Indonesia. We conclude, that grid stretching type methods (e.g. Hestholm & Ruud, 1994) are not well suited for realistic volcano topography as they tend to become unstable for large topographic gradients. The representation of topography through staircase shaped grids (Ohminato & Chouet, 1997) results in stable calculations, while demanding very fine gridding. The simulations show the effects of a three-dimensional surface topography on elastic wave propagation. Ground motion at the surface is severely affected by topography. If neglected, this may jeopardize attempts to determine source location by analyzing particle motion. Numerical studies like this can help to understand wave propagation phenomena observed on field recordings in volcano seismology. Future studies will aim at separating the wave effects of internal scattering, topography and sources (tremors, tectonic events, pyroclastic flows).

  18. Control of elastic wave propagation in one-dimensional piezomagnetic phononic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ponge, Marie-Fraise; Croënne, Charles; Vasseur, Jérôme O; Bou Matar, Olivier; Hladky-Hennion, Anne-Christine; Dubus, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    Two ways of controlling the acoustic waves propagation by external inductance or capacitance in a one-dimensional (1-D) piezomagnetic phononic crystal are investigated. The structure is made of identical bars, constituted of a piezomagnetic material, surrounded by a coil and connected to an external impedance. A model of propagation of longitudinal elastic waves through the periodic structure is developed and the dispersion equation is obtained. Reflection and transmission coefficients are derived from a 2 × 2 transfer matrix formalism that also allows for the calculation of elastic effective parameters (density, Young modulus, speed of sound, impedance). The effect of shunting impedances is numerically investigated. The results reveal that a connected external inductance tunes the Bragg band gaps of the 1-D phononic crystal. When the elements are connected via a capacitance, a hybridization gap, due to the resonance of the LC circuit made of the piezomagnetic element and the capacitance, coexists with the Bragg band gap. The value of the external capacitance modifies the boundaries of both gaps. Calculation of the effective characteristics of the phononic crystal leads to an analysis of the physical mechanisms involved in the wave propagation. When periodically connected to external capacitances, a homogeneous piezomagnetic stack behaves as a dispersive tunable metamaterial. PMID:27369153

  19. Full wave simulation of lower hybrid waves in Maxwellian plasma based on the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, O.; Shiraiwa, S.; Parker, R.

    2009-09-15

    A full wave simulation of the lower-hybrid (LH) wave based on the finite element method is presented. For the LH wave, the most important terms of the dielectric tensor are the cold plasma contribution and the electron Landau damping (ELD) term, which depends only on the component of the wave vector parallel to the background magnetic field. The nonlocal hot plasma ELD effect was expressed as a convolution integral along the magnetic field lines and the resultant integro-differential Helmholtz equation was solved iteratively. The LH wave propagation in a Maxwellian tokamak plasma based on the Alcator C experiment was simulated for electron temperatures in the range of 2.5-10 keV. Comparison with ray tracing simulations showed good agreement when the single pass damping is strong. The advantages of the new approach include a significant reduction of computational requirements compared to full wave spectral methods and seamless treatment of the core, the scrape off layer and the launcher regions.

  20. On a method computing transient wave propagation in ionospheric regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, K. G.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    A consequence of an exoatmospheric nuclear burst is an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) radiated from it. In a region far enough away from the burst, where nonlinear effects can be ignored, the EMP can be represented by a large-amplitude narrow-time-width plane-wave pulse. If the ionosphere intervenes the origin and destination of the EMP, frequency dispersion can cause significant changes in the original pulse upon reception. A method of computing these dispersive effects of transient wave propagation is summarized. The method described is different from the standard transform techniques and provides physical insight into the transient wave process. The method, although exact, can be used in approximating the early-time transient response of an ionospheric region by a simple integration with only explicit knowledge of the electron density, electron collision frequency, and electron gyrofrequency required. As an illustration of the method, it is applied to a simple example and contrasted with the corresponding transform solution.

  1. ATS-F Comsat Millimeter Wave Propagation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerlund, L. H.; Levatich, J. L.; Buige, A.

    1973-01-01

    The ATS-F Comsat Millimeter Wave Propagation Experiment has been designed to gather statistical data on the attenuation caused by rain at millimeter wave frequencies. These data will be used to determine system design parameters for future communications satellite systems operating at frequencies above 10 GHz. The experiment has 39 ground terminals transmitting at 13.2 or 17.8 GHz to a transponder on board the ATS-F satellite. The transponder retransmits these signals at 4 GHz to a central earth terminal which records their amplitudes once each second. The data will be analyzed to provide probabilities of attenuation as functions of parameters such as rainfall, location, and time. These probabilities can then be used to determine the required power margins of millimeter wave communications systems. Techniques of overcoming severe attenuation such as site diversity and the use of a spot beam to increase the power level at selected locations will also be evaluated.

  2. Multiscale simulation of 2D elastic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zheng, Hui

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we develop the multiscale method for simulation of elastic wave propagation. Based on the first-order velocity-stress hyperbolic form of 2D elastic wave equation, the particle velocities are solved first ona coarse grid by the finite volume method. Then the stress tensor is solved by using the multiscale basis functions which can represent the fine-scale variation of the wavefield on the coarse grid. The basis functions are computed by solving a local problem with the finite element method. The theoretical formulae and description of the multiscale method for elastic wave equation are given in more detail. The numerical computations for an inhomogeneous model with random scatter are completed. The results show the effectiveness of the multiscale method.

  3. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Large amplitude compression and shear wave propagation in an elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Murri, W. J.; Henley, D.

    1982-04-01

    Experimental techniques have been developed to measure the high strain-rate compression and shear response of Solithane 113. Compression and shear wave profiles have been measured in specimens compressed to 20% (compressive stresses ˜1.2 GPa). The compressive profiles are nearly steady and the compressive stress-strain response is typical of a compliant material. The shear wave profiles are dispersive and show attenuation with propagation. Analyses of these wave profiles will be presented. Shear moduli vary from 0.35 GPa to 0.8 GPa for the compression range examined to date. These values are within a factor of two of the static shear moduli in the glassy state. The data described here have been used to calculate the high strain rate compressive and shear stress-strain curves for Solithane 113.

  5. Lamb wave propagation in vibrating structures for effective health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xubin; Soh, Chee Kiong; Avvari, Panduranga Vittal

    2015-03-01

    Lamb wave based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has received much attention during the past decades for its broad coverage and high sensitivity to damage. Lamb waves can be used to locate and quantify damage in static structures successfully. Nonetheless, structures are usually subjected to various external vibrations or oscillations. Not many studies are reported in the literature concerning the damage detecting ability of Lamb wave in oscillating structures which turns out to be a pivotal issue in the practical application of the SHM technique. For this reason in this study, the propagating capability of Lamb waves in a vibrating thin aluminum plate is examined experimentally. Two circular shaped piezoelectric wafer active transducers are surface-bonded on the aluminum plate where one acted as an actuator and another as a sensor. An arbitrary waveform generator is connected to the actuator for the generation of a windowed tone burst on the aluminum plate. An oscilloscope is connected to the sensor for receiving the traveled waves. An external shaker is used to generate out-of-plane external vibration on the plate structure. Time of flight (TOF) is a crucial parameter in most Lamb wave based SHM studies, which measures wave traveling time from the actuator to sensor. In the present study the influence of the external vibrations on the TOF is investigated. Experiments are performed under different boundary conditions of the plate, such as free-free and fixed by gluing. The effects of external vibrations in the frequency range between 10 Hz to 1000 Hz are analyzed. Comparisons are carried out between the resulting Lamb wave signals from the vibrating plate for different boundary conditions. Experimental results show that the external vibrations in relatively low frequency range do not change the TOF during the application of Lamb wave based SHM.

  6. Phonon wave propagation in ballistic-diffusive regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dao-Sheng; Hua, Yu-Chao; Nie, Ben-Dian; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Wide applications of ultra-short pulse laser technique in micromachining and thermophysical properties' measurements make the study on ultrafast transient thermal transport necessarily essential. When the characteristic time is comparable to the phonon relaxation time, phonons propagate in ballistic-diffusive regime and thermal wave occurs. Here, ultrafast transient phonon transport is systematically investigated based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the Cattaneo-Vernotte (C-V) model, and the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). It is found that remarkable differences exist between the C-V model and the MC simulations when describing the evolution of the thermal wave excited by the ultra-short heat pulse. The C-V model predicts a non-dispersive dissipative thermal wave, while the MC simulation with Lambert emission predicts a dispersive dissipative thermal wave. Besides, different phonon emissions can significantly influence the evolution of the thermal wave in the MC simulations. A modified C-V model with a time- and position-dependent effective thermal conductivity is derived based on the phonon BTE to characterize the evolution of the transport regime from ballistic to diffusive. The integrations on moments of the distribution function cause the loss of the information of the phonon distribution in wave vector space, making the macroscopic quantities incomplete when describing the ballistic transport processes and corresponding boundary conditions. Possible boundary conditions for the phonon BTE in practice are also discussed on different heating methods.

  7. Generation, propagation, and breaking of internal solitary waves.

    PubMed

    Grue, John

    2005-09-01

    Tidal, two-layer flow over topography generates a kink of the interface separating an upstream interfacial elevation from a depression above the topography. Upstream undular bores and solitary waves of large amplitude are generated from the interfacial kink. The waves propagate upstream when the tide turns. Interfacial simulations of this kind of generation process fit with the observations at Knight Inlet in British Columbia, in the Sulu Sea experiment, and undular bores generated by internal tides in the Strait of Gibraltar. Fully nonlinear interfacial computations compare successfully with experimental observations of solitary waves in the laboratory and in the field for wave amplitudes ranging from small to maximal values. The waves exhibit only minor sensitivity to a finite thickness of the pycnocline. Analytical solitary waves are recaptured in the small amplitude limit. Shear-induced breaking appears first in the top part of the pycnocline and is expressed in terms of the Richardson number. Convective breaking in the top part of the water column occurs beyond a threshold amplitude when a pronounced stratification continues all the way to the ocean surface. PMID:16253005

  8. Deep vertical propagation of mountain waves above Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gisinger, Sonja; Rapp, Markus; Witschas, Benjamin; Ehard, Benedikt; Wagner, Johannes; Achtert, Peggy; Stober, Gunter; Kivi, Rigel; Gumbel, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    The project "Investigation of the life cycle of gravity waves (GW-LCYCLE) is part of the German research initiative ROMIC (Role of the Middle atmosphere In Climate) funded by the ministry of research. In close cooperation with Scandinavian partners as the Stockholm University and the Finnish Meteorological Institute a first field phase was conducted in November/December 2013. The field program combined ground-based observations of tropospheric and lower stratospheric flow and stratospheric and mesospheric temperature by lidars and radars at Alomar (N) and at Esrange (S) with airborne and balloonborne observations. Northern Scandinavia was chosen since the westerly flow across the mountains is often aligned with the polar night jet permitting gravity waves (GWs) to propagate into the middle atmosphere. From 2 until 14 December 2013, 24 hours of the DLR Falcon flown in four intensive observing periods (IOPs) provided in-situ and remote-sensing observations of atmospheric wind, temperature, water vapour and other trace gases (e.g. CO, N2O, O3) in the vicinity of the tropopause. During three IOPs, the airborne observations were supported by 3 hourly simultaneous radiosonde launches from Andøya (N), Esrange(S) and Sodankylä (FIN). Additionally, 1.5 hourly high-frequency radiosonde launches were conducted from the Arena Arctica at Kiruna airport with two systems (Väisälä and GRAW)and different balloon fillings to obtain different ascent rates. During GW-LCYCLE, the atmospheric flow above the Scandinavian mountains was observed under distinct meteorological conditions enabling or attenuating the deep vertical propagation of mountain-induced gravity waves. The presentation juxtaposes two different cases and analyses the associated meteorological conditions. The unique combination of airborne tropospheric wind lidar measurements, flight level data, high-frequency radiosonde profiles and the ground-based lidar observations allow a comprehensive study of deeply

  9. The impact of density heterogeneities on seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płonka, Agnieszka; Fichtner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Using 3D numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media, we systematically compare the imprints of heterogeneities of different type (and particularly density heterogeneities) on synthetic seismograms. Lateral density variations are the source of mass transport in the Earth at all scales, acting as drivers of convective motion in the mantle. However, the density structure of the Earth remains largely unknown since classic seismic observables and gravity provide only weak constraints with strong trade-offs. Current density models are therefore often based on velocity scaling, making strong assumptions on the origin of structural heterogeneities, which may not necessarily be true. We propose to develop a seismic tomography technique that directly inverts for density, using complete seismograms rather than arrival times of certain waves only. The first task in this challenge is to systematically study the imprints of density on synthetic seismograms. In this context, our study aims to compare the significance of density heterogeneities relative to velocity heterogeneities, and to design a numerical experiment with a source-receiver configuration particularly sensitive to density. To compute the full seismic wavefield in a 3D heterogeneous medium without making significant approximations, we use numerical wave propagation based on a spectral-element discretization of the seismic wave equation. We consider a 2000 by 1000 km wide and 500 km deep spherical section, with the 1D Earth model ak135 as a background. Onto this we superimpose 3D Gaussian-shaped perturbations of different type (P, SV, SH velocities and density) for depths in the range from 10 km to 70 km. The choice of depth in which the 3D heterogeneities were placed (10 km - 70 km) was dictated by the surface wave sensitivity to density. For each depth we perform 4 wave propagation simulations corresponding to 4 different types of heterogeneities, and calculate surface wave sensitivity

  10. Electrostatic lower hybrid waves excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves scattering from planar magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, T. F.; Ngo, H. D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model for electrostatic lower hybrid waves excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves propagating in regions of the magnetosphere and the topside ionosphere, where small-scale magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities are thought to exist. In this model, the electrostatic waves are excited by linear mode coupling as the incident electromagnetic whistler mode waves scatter from the magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities. Results indicate that high-amplitude short-wavelength (5 to 100 m) quasi-electrostatic whistler mode waves can be excited when electromagnetic whistler mode waves scatter from small-scale planar magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities in the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  11. Modeling of the Lunar Global Seismic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, G.; Takenaka, H.; Ishihara, Y.; Zhao, D.

    2012-12-01

    We calculate global seismic wave propagation on cross sections of the realistic whole Lunar structure models. The U.S. Apollo missions installed five seismometers on the lunar surface. Seismograms obtained during 1969 to 1977 have widely been used for investigation of the lunar interior. For example, many researchers have been working on construction of the 1-D structure models (e.g., Nakamura, 1983, textit{JGR}; Garcia et al., 2011, textit{PEPI}). Zhao et al. (2008, textit{Chinese Sci. Bull.}) further estimated the 3-D velocity structure of the Moon by applying seismic tomography to the moonquake traveltime data. Now the Japanese next lunar mission ``SELENE-II'' is planning installation of broad-band seismometers, which are expected to greatly increase resolution of the lunar interior images. Looking back on investigation history of the Earth's interior, our knowledge has been enhanced by mutual progress of observation and numerical methods. Increased enthusiasm for the Moon exploration in recent years strongly requires developing a method for numerical modeling of global seismic wave propagation based on our current knowledge of the lunar interior. We have been constructing numerical schemes using the finite-difference method (FDM) for accurate and efficient modeling of global seismic wave propagation through realistic Earth models with lateral heterogeneity (e.g., Toyokuni et al., 2005, textit{GRL}; Toyokuni & Takenaka, 2006, textit{EPS}). Our scheme calculates the 3-D equations of seismic waves in spherical coordinates only on a 2-D cross section of the whole Earth including a seismic source and receivers (``spherical 2.5-D FDM''), which enables global waveform modeling with a similar computation time and memory as for 2-D modeling with consideration of full 3-D geometrical spreading. This time we apply it to model global seismic wave propagation in the whole Moon. In the presentation, we will show numerical examples using 1-D models by Nakamura (1983, textit

  12. Hybrid yttrium iron garnet-ferromagnet structures for spin-wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, A.; Porod, W.; Csaba, G.

    2015-05-01

    We study coupled ferromagnetic layers, which could facilitate low loss, sub 100 nm wavelength spin-wave propagation and manipulation. One of the layers is a low-loss garnet film (such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG)) that enables long-distance, coherent spin-wave propagation. The other layer is made of metal-based (Permalloy, Co, and CoFe) magnetoelectronic structures that can be used to generate, manipulate, and detect the spin waves. Using micromagnetic simulations, we analyze the interactions between the spin waves in the YIG and the metallic nanomagnet structures and demonstrate the components of a scalable spin-wave based signal processing device. We argue that such hybrid-metallic ferromagnet structures can be the basis of potentially high-performance, ultra low-power computing devices.

  13. Hybrid yttrium iron garnet-ferromagnet structures for spin-wave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, A.; Porod, W. Csaba, G.

    2015-05-07

    We study coupled ferromagnetic layers, which could facilitate low loss, sub 100 nm wavelength spin-wave propagation and manipulation. One of the layers is a low-loss garnet film (such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG)) that enables long-distance, coherent spin-wave propagation. The other layer is made of metal-based (Permalloy, Co, and CoFe) magnetoelectronic structures that can be used to generate, manipulate, and detect the spin waves. Using micromagnetic simulations, we analyze the interactions between the spin waves in the YIG and the metallic nanomagnet structures and demonstrate the components of a scalable spin-wave based signal processing device. We argue that such hybrid-metallic ferromagnet structures can be the basis of potentially high-performance, ultra low-power computing devices.

  14. Electronically nonadiabatic wave packet propagation using frozen Gaussian scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, Alexey D.; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2015-09-21

    We present an approach, which allows to employ the adiabatic wave packet propagation technique and semiclassical theory to treat the nonadiabatic processes by using trajectory hopping. The approach developed generates a bunch of hopping trajectories and gives all additional information to incorporate the effect of nonadiabatic coupling into the wave packet dynamics. This provides an interface between a general adiabatic frozen Gaussian wave packet propagation method and the trajectory surface hopping technique. The basic idea suggested in [A. D. Kondorskiy and H. Nakamura, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 8937 (2004)] is revisited and complemented in the present work by the elaboration of efficient numerical algorithms. We combine our approach with the adiabatic Herman-Kluk frozen Gaussian approximation. The efficiency and accuracy of the resulting method is demonstrated by applying it to popular benchmark model systems including three Tully’s models and 24D model of pyrazine. It is shown that photoabsorption spectrum is successfully reproduced by using a few hundreds of trajectories. We employ the compact finite difference Hessian update scheme to consider feasibility of the ab initio “on-the-fly” simulations. It is found that this technique allows us to obtain the reliable final results using several Hessian matrix calculations per trajectory.

  15. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    PubMed

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line. PMID:25480048

  16. Poleward propagation of parametric subharmonic instability-induced inertial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaohui; Liu, Qian; Shang, Xiaodong; Chen, Guiying; Wang, Dongxiao

    2016-03-01

    This study presents two sets of current records obtained from the South China Sea and satellite altimeter data, and it suggests that near-inertial waves induced by parametric subharmonic instability (PSI) associated with internal tides can be transported poleward beyond their critical latitude φc by background geostrophic flow (BGF). The two mooring locations were poleward of φc (≈14°N) for diurnal subharmonics (0.5D1; half diurnal frequency D1); however, both of the current records revealed clear signals at 0.5D1. The enhanced subinertial motion at 0.5D1 exhibited a fortnightly spring-neap cycle but did not agree with that of D1, indicating that it may not be generated via PSI associated with the local D1. Observations from the altimeter data and a ray-tracing simulation suggested that these nonlocally generated 0.5D1 waves may be excited near their φc, after which they propagated poleward under the role of the BGF to the observation site with a latitude higher than φc. The poleward propagation of near-inertial waves can produce elevated vertical shears; thus, it may play an important role in enhancing the local turbulent mixing.

  17. A study on compressive shock wave propagation in metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihua; Zhang, Yifen; Ren, Huilan; Zhao, Longmao

    2010-02-01

    Metallic foam can dissipate a large amount of energy due to its relatively long stress plateau, which makes it widely applicable in the design of structural crashworthiness. However, in some experimental studies, stress enhancement has been observed when the specimens are subjected to intense impact loads, leading to severe damage to the objects being protected. This paper studies this phenomenon on a 2D mass-spring-bar model. With the model, a constitutive relationship of metal foam and corresponding loading and unloading criteria are presented; a nonlinear kinematics equilibrium equation is derived, where an explicit integration algorithm is used to calculate the characteristic of the compressive shock wave propagation within the metallic foam; the effect of heterogeneous distribution of foam microstructures on the shock wave features is also included. The results reveal that under low impact pulses, considerable energy is dissipated during the progressive collapse of foam cells, which then reduces the crush of objects. When the pulse is sufficiently high, on the other hand, stress enhancement may take place, especially in the heterogeneous foams, where high peak stresses usually occur. The characteristics of compressive shock wave propagation in the foam and the magnitude and location of the peak stress produced are strongly dependent on the mechanical properties of the foam material, amplitude and period of the pulse, as well as the homogeneity of the microstructures. This research provides valuable insight into the reliability of the metallic foams used as a protective structure.

  18. Electronically nonadiabatic wave packet propagation using frozen Gaussian scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondorskiy, Alexey D.; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2015-09-01

    We present an approach, which allows to employ the adiabatic wave packet propagation technique and semiclassical theory to treat the nonadiabatic processes by using trajectory hopping. The approach developed generates a bunch of hopping trajectories and gives all additional information to incorporate the effect of nonadiabatic coupling into the wave packet dynamics. This provides an interface between a general adiabatic frozen Gaussian wave packet propagation method and the trajectory surface hopping technique. The basic idea suggested in [A. D. Kondorskiy and H. Nakamura, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 8937 (2004)] is revisited and complemented in the present work by the elaboration of efficient numerical algorithms. We combine our approach with the adiabatic Herman-Kluk frozen Gaussian approximation. The efficiency and accuracy of the resulting method is demonstrated by applying it to popular benchmark model systems including three Tully's models and 24D model of pyrazine. It is shown that photoabsorption spectrum is successfully reproduced by using a few hundreds of trajectories. We employ the compact finite difference Hessian update scheme to consider feasibility of the ab initio "on-the-fly" simulations. It is found that this technique allows us to obtain the reliable final results using several Hessian matrix calculations per trajectory.

  19. Double porosity modeling in elastic wave propagation for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J. G., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures behave in an undrained fashion. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown,the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is completely consistent with, Biot`s theory of poroelasticity and is valid for analysis of elastic wave data from highly fractured reservoirs.

  20. Ray Tracing Modeling of Gravity Wave Propagation and Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, Sharon; Crowley, Geoff

    In this paper, we describe a ray trace model which calculates the wavevector, location and phase of a gravity wave (GW) as it propagates in the lower atmosphere and thermosphere. If used for a discreet transient source (such as a deep convective plume), we describe how this model can calculate the body forcing and the heat/cooling that are created when the GWs within a wave packet dissipate in the thermosphere from kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity. Although the body force calculation requires only the divergence of the momentum flux, the heat/cooling calculation requires the reconstructed GW field (e.g., density, velocity perturbations), which in turn requires the GW dissipative polarization relations. We describe these relations. We then describe the results of a recent study involving GWs identified from TIDDBIT HF Doppler sounder data taken at Wallops Island, VI, USA. Using this ray trace model, we determine if the unusual neutral wind profile measured by a rocket experiment at high altitudes (~290-370 km) could have been caused by the propagation and dissipation of several waves observed by TIDDBIT at lower altitudes.

  1. Electromagnetic wave propagation through an overdense magnetized collisional plasma layer

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Rose, D. V.; Miller, C. L.; Clark, R. E.; Hughes, T. P.

    2009-08-15

    The results of investigations into the feasibility of using a magnetic window to propagate electromagnetic waves through a finite-sized overdense plasma slab are described. We theoretically calculate the transmission coefficients for right- and left-handed circularly polarized plane waves through a uniform magnetized plasma slab. Using reasonable estimates for the plasma properties expected to be found in the ionized shock layer surrounding a hypersonic aircraft traveling in the earth's upper atmosphere (radio blackout conditions), and assuming a 1 GHz carrier frequency for the radio communications channel, we find that the required magnetic field for propagation of right-handed circularly polarized, or whistler, waves is on the order of a few hundred gauss. Transmission coefficients are calculated as a function of sheath thickness and are shown to be quite sensitive to the electron collision frequency. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are shown to be in good agreement with the theory. These simulations also demonstrate that Ohmic heating of the electrons can be considerable. Two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using a simplified waveguide and antenna model illustrate the same general transmission behavior as the theory and one-dimensional simulations. In addition, a net focusing effect due to the plasma is also observed in two and three dimensions. These simulations can be extended to design and analyze more realistic waveguide and antenna models.

  2. Propagation of three-dimensional electron-acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, M.; El-Sherif, L. S.; El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.

    2011-06-15

    Theoretical investigation is carried out for understanding the properties of three-dimensional electron-acoustic waves propagating in magnetized plasma whose constituents are cold magnetized electron fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the cold magnetized electron fluid, nonthermal electron density distribution, and the Poisson equation are used to derive the corresponding nonlinear evolution equation, Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, in the small- but finite- amplitude regime. The ZK equation is solved analytically and it is found that it supports both solitary and blow-up solutions. It is found that rarefactive electron-acoustic solitary waves strongly depend on the density and temperature ratios of the hot-to-cold electron species as well as the nonthermal electron parameter. Furthermore, there is a critical value for the nonthermal electron parameter, which decides whether the electron-acoustic solitary wave's amplitude is decreased or increased by changing various plasma parameters. Importantly, the change of the propagation angles leads to miss the balance between the nonlinearity and dispersion; hence, the localized pulses convert to explosive/blow-up pulses. The relevance of this study to the nonlinear electron-acoustic structures in the dayside auroral zone in the light of Viking satellite observations is discussed.

  3. Electronically nonadiabatic wave packet propagation using frozen Gaussian scattering.

    PubMed

    Kondorskiy, Alexey D; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2015-09-21

    We present an approach, which allows to employ the adiabatic wave packet propagation technique and semiclassical theory to treat the nonadiabatic processes by using trajectory hopping. The approach developed generates a bunch of hopping trajectories and gives all additional information to incorporate the effect of nonadiabatic coupling into the wave packet dynamics. This provides an interface between a general adiabatic frozen Gaussian wave packet propagation method and the trajectory surface hopping technique. The basic idea suggested in [A. D. Kondorskiy and H. Nakamura, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 8937 (2004)] is revisited and complemented in the present work by the elaboration of efficient numerical algorithms. We combine our approach with the adiabatic Herman-Kluk frozen Gaussian approximation. The efficiency and accuracy of the resulting method is demonstrated by applying it to popular benchmark model systems including three Tully's models and 24D model of pyrazine. It is shown that photoabsorption spectrum is successfully reproduced by using a few hundreds of trajectories. We employ the compact finite difference Hessian update scheme to consider feasibility of the ab initio "on-the-fly" simulations. It is found that this technique allows us to obtain the reliable final results using several Hessian matrix calculations per trajectory. PMID:26395683

  4. Synthetic observations of wave propagation in a sunspot umbra

    SciTech Connect

    Felipe, T.; Socas-Navarro, H.; Khomenko, E.

    2014-11-01

    Spectropolarimetric temporal series from Fe I λ6301.5 Å and Ca II infrared triplet lines are obtained by applying the Stokes synthesis code NICOLE to a numerical simulation of wave propagation in a sunspot umbra from MANCHA code. The analysis of the phase difference between Doppler velocity and intensity core oscillations of the Fe I λ6301.5 Å line reveals that variations in the intensity are produced by opacity fluctuations rather than intrinsic temperature oscillations, except for frequencies between 5 and 6.5 mHz. On the other hand, the photospheric magnetic field retrieved from the weak field approximation provides the intrinsic magnetic field oscillations associated to wave propagation. Our results suggest that this is due to the low magnetic field gradient of our sunspot model. The Stokes parameters of the chromospheric Ca II infrared triplet lines show striking variations as shock waves travel through the formation height of the lines, including emission self-reversals in the line core and highly abnormal Stokes V profiles. Magnetic field oscillations inferred from the Ca II infrared lines using the weak field approximation appear to be related with the magnetic field strength variation between the photosphere and the chromosphere.

  5. a New Approach to Bulk Wave Propagation in Anisotropic Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tverdokhlebov, Andrey

    A new approach to a theoretical description of ultrasonic bulk wave propagation through anisotropic media is developed from the retarded potential representation which was obtained for the Green's function of the elastic wave equation in anisotropic media. The general formulation of the problem and the method of solution are presented. On the basis of the theoretical development, a quantitative model was obtained that yields and properly describes all major features of the phenomena of an anisotropic filter influence. A comparison with other contemporary methods and models for the quantitative evaluation of the bulk wave propagation in anisotropic media is outlined and briefly discussed. The experimental proof of principle was established by ultrasonic measurements performed on centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) and unidirectional graphite fiber -epoxy composite specimens. The experimental technique used a skip-distance arrangement of the identical quasi -point probes serving as a sender and a receiver. Consistent experimental results were attained allowing us to consider the suggested experimental arrangements as a basis for the future development of NDE technique for anisotropic material characterization. Three different types of pilot computer software were developed from this generalized retarded potential model. The results of the simulation runs turn out to be self- and mutually consistent and supported by experiments. The phenomena, such as beam skewing, beam splitting, beam focusing, unsymmetrical beams and other anisotropic effects, some of which have been already known from earlier experimental observations, emerge as computational results of the software developed from the model.

  6. PROPAGATION AND STABILITY OF SUPERLUMINAL WAVES IN PULSAR WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Mochol, Iwona; Kirk, John G. E-mail: john.kirk@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2013-07-01

    Nonlinear electromagnetic waves with superluminal phase velocity can propagate in the winds around isolated pulsars, and around some pulsars in binary systems. Using a short-wavelength approximation, we find and analyze an integrable system of equations that govern their evolution in spherical geometry. A confined mode is identified that stagnates to finite pressure at large radius and can form a precursor to the termination shock. Using a simplified criterion, we find this mode is stable for most isolated pulsars, but may be unstable if the external pressure is high, such as in the pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies and in W44. Pulsar winds in eccentric binary systems, such as PSR 1259-63, may go through phases with stable and unstable electromagnetic precursors, as well as phases in which the density is too high for these modes to propagate.

  7. Propagation of spiral waves pinned to circular and rectangular obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutthiopad, Malee; Luengviriya, Jiraporn; Porjai, Porramain; Phantu, Metinee; Kanchanawarin, Jarin; Müller, Stefan C.; Luengviriya, Chaiya

    2015-05-01

    We present an investigation of spiral waves pinned to circular and rectangular obstacles with different circumferences in both thin layers of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and numerical simulations with the Oregonator model. For circular objects, the area always increases with the circumference. In contrast, we varied the circumference of rectangles with equal areas by adjusting their width w and height h . For both obstacle forms, the propagating parameters (i.e., wavelength, wave period, and velocity of pinned spiral waves) increase with the circumference, regardless of the obstacle area. Despite these common features of the parameters, the forms of pinned spiral waves depend on the obstacle shapes. The structures of spiral waves pinned to circles as well as rectangles with the ratio w /h ˜1 are similar to Archimedean spirals. When w /h increases, deformations of the spiral shapes are observed. For extremely thin rectangles with w /h ≫1 , these shapes can be constructed by employing semicircles with different radii which relate to the obstacle width and the core diameter of free spirals.

  8. Micromagnetic calculation of spin wave propagation for magnetologic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bance, Simon; Schrefl, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Goncharov, Alexander; Allwood, Dan A.; Dean, Julian

    2008-04-01

    The propagation of magnetic wave packets in magnetic nanowires was calculated as a function of wire width, field strength, field ramp time, field area size, and geometry of a magnetic nanowire. Spin waves are excited locally by applying a small perturbation in the magnetization in a 20nm wide region. A wave packet is emitted from the input region and travels along the wire with a velocity of 740m/s. The finite element micromagnetic simulations show that wave packets can be guided along a bent nanostructure without losses due to geometry; amplitude and frequency are exactly the same as in a straight wire with equal distance between excitation point and probe. The wave amplitude was found to decrease with increasing rise time of the excitation field with an upper limit of 100ps. For a Permalloy wire with a thickness of 10nm, the frequency peak changes from 10GHz in a wire with 60nm width to 6GHz in a wire with 140nm width.

  9. Fabric dependence of wave propagation in anisotropic porous media

    PubMed Central

    Cowin, Stephen C.; Cardoso, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Current diagnosis of bone loss and osteoporosis is based on the measurement of the Bone Mineral Density (BMD) or the apparent mass density. Unfortunately, in most clinical ultrasound densitometers: 1) measurements are often performed in a single anatomical direction, 2) only the first wave arriving to the ultrasound probe is characterized, and 3) the analysis of bone status is based on empirical relationships between measurable quantities such as Speed of Sound (SOS) and Broadband Ultrasound Attenuation (BUA) and the density of the porous medium. However, the existence of a second wave in cancellous bone has been reported, which is an unequivocal signature of poroelastic media, as predicted by Biot’s poroelastic wave propagation theory. In this paper the governing equations for wave motion in the linear theory of anisotropic poroelastic materials are developed and extended to include the dependence of the constitutive relations upon fabric - a quantitative stereological measure of the degree of structural anisotropy in the pore architecture of a porous medium. This fabric-dependent anisotropic poroelastic approach is a theoretical framework to describe the microarchitectural-dependent relationship between measurable wave properties and the elastic constants of trabecular bone, and thus represents an alternative for bone quality assessment beyond BMD alone. PMID:20461539

  10. Wave propagation, scattering and emission in complex media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ya-Qiu

    I. Polarimetric scattering and SAR imagery. EM wave propagation and scattering in polarimetric SAR interferometry / S. R. Cloude. Terrain topographic inversion from single-pass polarimetric SAR image data by using polarimetric stokes parameters and morphological algorithm / Y. Q. Jin, L. Luo. Road detection in forested area using polarimetric SAR / G. W. Dong ... [et al.]. Research on some problems about SAR radiometric resolution / G. Dong ... [et al.]. A fast image matching algorithm for remote sensing applications / Z. Q. Hou ... [et al.]. A new algorithm of noised remote sensing image fusion based on steerable filters / X. Kang ... [et al.]. Adaptive noise reduction of InSAR data based on anisotropic diffusion models and their applications to phase unwrapping / C. Wang, X. Gao, H. Zhang -- II. Scattering from randomly rough surfaces. Modeling tools for backscattering from rough surfaces / A. K. Fung, K. S. Chen. Pseudo-nondiffracting beams from rough surface scattering / E. R. Méndez, T. A. Leskova, A. A. Maradudin. Surface roughness clutter effects in GPR modeling and detection / C. Rappaport. Scattering from rough surfaces with small slopes / M. Saillard, G. Soriano. Polarization and spectral characteristics of radar signals reflected by sea-surface / V. A. Butko, V. A. Khlusov, L. I. Sharygina. Simulation of microwave scattering from wind-driven ocean surfaces / M. Y. Xia ... [et al.]. HF surface wave radar tests at the Eastern China Sea / X. B. Wu ... [et al.] -- III. Electromagnetics of complex materials. Wave propagation in plane-parallel metamaterial and constitutive relations / A. Ishimaru ... [et al.]. Two dimensional periodic approach for the study of left-handed metamaterials / T. M. Grzegorczyk ... [et al.]. Numerical analysis of the effective constitutive parameters of a random medium containing small chiral spheres / Y. Nanbu, T. Matsuoka, M. Tateiba. Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media: from the Helmholtz to the Ginzburg -Landau equation / M

  11. Gravity Wave Variances and Propagation Derived from AIRS Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    As the first gravity wave (GW) climatology study using nadir-viewing infrared sounders, 50 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance channels are selected to estimate GW variances at pressure levels between 2-100 hPa. The GW variance for each scan in the cross-track direction is derived from radiance perturbations in the scan, independently of adjacent scans along the orbit. Since the scanning swaths are perpendicular to the satellite orbits, which are inclined meridionally at most latitudes, the zonal component of GW propagation can be inferred by differencing the variances derived between the westmost and the eastmost viewing angles. Consistent with previous GW studies using various satellite instruments, monthly mean AIRS variance shows large enhancements over meridionally oriented mountain ranges as well as some islands at winter hemisphere high latitudes. Enhanced wave activities are also found above tropical deep convective regions. GWs prefer to propagate westward above mountain ranges, and eastward above deep convection. AIRS 90 field-of-views (FOVs), ranging from +48 deg. to -48 deg. off nadir, can detect large-amplitude GWs with a phase velocity propagating preferentially at steep angles (e.g., those from orographic and convective sources). The annual cycle dominates the GW variances and the preferred propagation directions for all latitudes. Indication of a weak two-year variation in the tropics is found, which is presumably related to the Quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). AIRS geometry makes its out-tracks capable of detecting GWs with vertical wavelengths substantially shorter than the thickness of instrument weighting functions. The novel discovery of AIRS capability of observing shallow inertia GWs will expand the potential of satellite GW remote sensing and provide further constraints on the GW drag parameterization schemes in the general circulation models (GCMs).

  12. Deep vertical propagation of mountain waves above Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Witschas, B.; Rahm, S.; Gisinger, S.; Rapp, M.; Baumgarten, G.; Stober, G.; Luebken, F. J.; Achtert, P.; Ehard, B.; Gumbel, J.; Kivi, R.; Wagner, J.

    2014-12-01

    The project "Investigation of the life cycle of gravity waves"(GW-LCYCLE) is part of the German research initiative ROMIC (Role of theMiddle atmosphere In Climate) funded by the ministry of research. Inclose cooperation with Scandinavian partners as the Stockholm Universityand the Finnish Meteorological Institute a first field phase wasconducted in November/December 2013. The field program combinedground-based observations of tropospheric and lower stratospheric flowand stratospheric and mesospheric temperature by lidars and radars atAlomar (N) and at Esrange (S) with airborne and balloonborneobservations. Northern Scandinavia was chosen since the westerly flowacross the mountains is often aligned with the polar night jetpermitting gravity waves (GWs) to propagate into the middle atmosphere.From 2 until 14 December 2013, 24 flight hours of the DLR Falcon flownin four intensive observing periods (IOPs) provided in-situ andremote-sensing observations of atmospheric wind, temperature, watervapour and other trace gases (e.g. CO, N2O, O3) in the vicinity of thetropopause. During three IOPs, the airborne observations were supportedby 3 hourly simultaneous radiosonde launches from Andøya (N), Esrange(S) and Sodankylä (FIN). Additionally, 1.5 hourly high-frequencyradiosonde launches were conducted from the Arena Arctica at Kirunaairport with two systems (Väisälä and GRAW)and different balloonfillings to obtain different ascent rates.During GW-LCYCLE, the atmospheric flow above the Scandinavian mountainswas observed under distinct meteorological conditions enabling orattenuating the deep vertical propagation of mountain-induced gravitywaves. The presentation juxtaposes two different cases and analyses theassociated meteorological conditions. The unique combination of airbornetropospheric wind lidar measurements, flight level data, high-frequencyradiosonde profiles and the ground-based lidar observations allow acomprehensive study of deeply propagating gravity waves

  13. Parameter study of ICRH wave propagation in IShTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crombé, K.; van Eester, D.

    2016-04-01

    > A crude first assessment of how waves behave is commonly made relying on decoupled dispersion equation roots. In the low density, low temperature region behind the last closed flux surface in a tokamak - where the density decays exponentially and where the lower hybrid resonance is crossed but where the thermal velocity is small enough to justify dropping kinetic (hot plasma) effects - the study of the wave behaviour requires the roots of the full cold plasma dispersion equation. The IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) device will be adopted in the coming years to shed light on the dynamics of wave-plasma interactions close to radio frequency (RF) launchers and in particular on the impact of the waves on the density and their role in the formation of RF sheaths close to metallic objects. As IShTAR is incapable of mimicking the actual conditions reigning close to launchers in tokamaks; a parameter range needs to be identified for the test stand to permit highlighting of the relevant wave physics. Studying the coupled dispersion equation roots allowed us to find a suitable operation domain for performing experiments.

  14. Wave propagation downstream of a high power helicon in a dipolelike magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Winglee, Robert; Roberson, B. Race

    2010-01-01

    The wave propagating downstream of a high power helicon source in a diverging magnetic field was investigated experimentally. The magnetic field of the wave has been measured both axially and radially. The three-dimensional structure of the propagating wave is observed and its wavelength and phase velocity are determined. The measurements are compared to predictions from helicon theory and that of a freely propagating whistler wave. The implications of this work on the helicon as a thruster are also discussed.

  15. Wave propagation downstream of a high power helicon in a dipolelike magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, James; Winglee, Robert; Roberson, B. Race; Ziemba, Timothy

    2010-01-15

    The wave propagating downstream of a high power helicon source in a diverging magnetic field was investigated experimentally. The magnetic field of the wave has been measured both axially and radially. The three-dimensional structure of the propagating wave is observed and its wavelength and phase velocity are determined. The measurements are compared to predictions from helicon theory and that of a freely propagating whistler wave. The implications of this work on the helicon as a thruster are also discussed.

  16. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    SciTech Connect

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S.

    2014-02-18

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence.

  17. Dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M. X.; Guo, B. Peng, L.; Cai, X.

    2014-11-15

    The dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas are derived using a simplified method and investigated in detail. With the help of the dispersion relations for each eignwave, we explore how the chiral plasmas exhibit negative refraction and investigate the frequency region for negative refraction. The results show that chirality can induce negative refraction in plasmas. Moreover, both the degree of chirality and the external magnetic field have a significant effect on the critical frequency and the bandwidth of the frequency for negative refraction in chiral plasmas. The parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  18. Propagating speed of primordial gravitational waves and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yong; Wang, Yu-Tong; Piao, Yun-Song

    2016-08-01

    We show that if the propagating speed of gravitational waves (GWs) gradually diminishes during inflation, the power spectrum of primordial GWs will be strongly blue, while that of the primordial scalar perturbation may be unaffected. We also illustrate that such a scenario is actually a disformal dual to the superinflation, but it does not have the ghost instability. The blue tilt obtained is 0

  19. Particle velocity non-uniformity and steady-wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, Yu. I.

    2016-05-01

    A constitutive equation grounded in dislocation dynamics is shown to be incapable of describing the propagation of shock fronts in solids. Shock wave experiments and theoretical investigations motivate an additional collective mechanism of stress relaxation that should be incorporated into the model through the standard deviation of the particle velocity, which is found to be proportional to the strain rate. In this case, the governing equation system results in a second-order differential equation of square non-linearity. Solution to this equation and calculations for D16 aluminum alloy show a more precise coincidence of the theoretical and experimental velocity profiles.

  20. Passive models of viscothermal wave propagation in acoustic tubes.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Stefan; Harrison, Reginald; Kergomard, Jean; Lombard, Bruno; Vergez, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    A continued fraction expansion to the immittances defining viscothermal wave propagation in a cylindrical tube has been presented recently in this journal, intended as a starting point for time domain numerical method design. Though the approximation has the great benefit of passivity, or positive realness under truncation, its convergence is slow leading to approximations of high order in practice. Other passive structures, when combined with optimisation methods, can lead to good accuracy over a wide frequency range, and for relatively low order. PMID:26328672

  1. LOCA simulation: analysis of rarefaction waves propagating through geometric singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Crouzet, Fabien; Faucher, Vincent; Galon, Pascal; Piteau, Philippe; Izquierdo, Patrick

    2012-07-01

    The propagation of a transient wave through an orifice is investigated for applications to Loss Of Coolant Accident in nuclear plants. An analytical model is proposed for the response of an orifice plate and implemented in the EUROPLEXUS fast transient dynamics software. It includes an acoustic inertial effect in addition to a quasi-steady dissipation term. The model is experimentally validated on a test rig consisting in a single pipe filled with pressurized water. The test rig is designed to generate a rapid depressurization of the pipe, by means of a bursting disk. The proposed model gives results which compare favourably with experimental data. (authors)

  2. Dynamics of propagating front into sand ripples under regular waves.

    PubMed

    Lebunetel-Levaslot, J; Jarno-Druaux, A; Ezersky, A B; Marin, F

    2010-09-01

    The results of an experimental study of pattern formation on sandy bottom under the action of regular harmonic surface waves are reported. It is found that two modes of pattern formation occur: sand ripples form uniformly on the whole bottom or from localized nucleation sites. In the second regime, the ripples appear in isolated regions (patches) increasing in size, and front propagation speed is measured. A simple dynamical model based on the Ginzburg-Landau equation is proposed to explain the characteristics of patches. PMID:21230122

  3. Light wave propagation through a dilaton-Maxwell domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. R.; Schulze-Halberg, A.

    2015-10-01

    We consider the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a dilaton-Maxwell domain wall of the type introduced by Gibbons and Wells [G. W. Gibbons and C. G. Wells, Classical and Quantum Gravity 11, 2499 (1994)]. It is found that if such a wall exists within our observable Universe, it would be absurdly thick, or else have a magnetic field in its core which is much stronger than observed intergalactic fields. We conclude that it is highly improbable that any such wall is physically realized.

  4. Sources and propagation of atmospherical acoustic shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Sources of aerial shock waves are numerous and produce acoustical signals that propagate in the atmosphere over long ranges, with a wide frequency spectrum ranging from infrasonic to audible, and with a complex human response. They can be of natural origin, like meteors, lightning or volcanoes, or human-made as for explosions, so-called "buzz-saw noise" (BSN) from aircraft engines or sonic booms. Their description, modeling and data analysis within the viewpoint of nonlinear acoustics will be the topic of the present lecture, with focus on two main points: the challenges of the source description, and the main features of nonlinear atmospheric propagation. Inter-disciplinary aspects, with links to atmospheric and geo-sciences will be outlined. Detailed description of the source is very dependent on its nature. Mobile supersonic sources can be rotating (fan blades of aircraft engines) or in translation (meteors, sonic boom). Mach numbers range from transonic to hypersonic. Detailed knowledge of geometry is critical for the processes of boom minimization and audible frequency spectrum of BSN. Sources of geophysical nature are poorly known, and various mechanisms for explaining infrasound recorded from meteors or thunderstorms have been proposed. Comparison between recorded data and modeling may be one way to discriminate between them. Moreover, the nearfield of these sources is frequently beyond the limits of acoustical approximation, or too complex for simple modeling. A proper numerical description hence requires specific matching procedures between nearfield behavior and farfield propagation. Nonlinear propagation in the atmosphere is dominated by temperature and wind stratification. Ray theory is an efficient way to analyze observations, but is invalid in various situations. Nonlinear effects are enhanced locally at caustics, or in case of grazing propagation over a rigid surface. Absorption, which controls mostly the high frequency part of the spectrum contained

  5. Radio wave propagation at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 in the short wave band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkaliyev, Y. F.; Bocharov, V. I.

    1972-01-01

    The results of measurements of field strength and signal/noise ratio on experimental ionospheric-scattering short wave radio links are presented. It is shown that the seasonal and diurnal variations of field strength are determined by features of solar and meteoric activity. The role of the sporadic E-layer in propagation of short radio waves at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 is noted.

  6. Discretizing singular point sources in hyperbolic wave propagation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, N. Anders; O'Reilly, Ossian; Sjögreen, Björn; Bydlon, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    We develop high order accurate source discretizations for hyperbolic wave propagation problems in first order formulation that are discretized by finite difference schemes. By studying the Fourier series expansions of the source discretization and the finite difference operator, we derive sufficient conditions for achieving design accuracy in the numerical solution. Only half of the conditions in Fourier space can be satisfied through moment conditions on the source discretization, and we develop smoothness conditions for satisfying the remaining accuracy conditions. The resulting source discretization has compact support in physical space, and is spread over as many grid points as the number of moment and smoothness conditions. In numerical experiments we demonstrate high order of accuracy in the numerical solution of the 1-D advection equation (both in the interior and near a boundary), the 3-D elastic wave equation, and the 3-D linearized Euler equations.

  7. High-Frequency Wave Propagation by the Segment Projection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engquist, Björn; Runborg, Olof; Tornberg, Anna-Karin

    2002-05-01

    Geometrical optics is a standard technique used for the approximation of high-frequency wave propagation. Computational methods based on partial differential equations instead of the traditional ray tracing have recently been applied to geometrical optics. These new methods have a number of advantages but typically exhibit difficulties with linear superposition of waves. In this paper we introduce a new partial differential technique based on the segment projection method in phase space. The superposition problem is perfectly resolved and so is the problem of computing amplitudes in the neighborhood of caustics. The computational complexity is of the same order as that of ray tracing. The new algorithm is described and a number of computational examples are given, including a simulation of waveguides.

  8. Elastic Wave Propagation in Concrete and Continuous Wavelet Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.-H.; Gi, Y.-F.; Pan, C.-L.; Cheng, C.-C.

    2005-04-09

    Elastic wave methods, such as the ultrasonic pulse velocity and the impact echo, are often subject to multiple reflections at the boundaries of various constituents of concrete. Current study aims to improve the feature identification of elastic wave propagation due to buried objects in concrete slabs and cylinders. Embedded steel reinforcement, steel and PVC tubes, wooden disks, and rubber spheres are tested. The received signals are analyzed using continuous wavelet transform. As a result, signals are decomposed into distinctive frequency bands with transient information preserved. The interpretation of multiple reflections at different boundary conditions thus becomes more straightforward. Features related to reflections from steel bar, PVC tube, and steel tube can be readily identified in the magnitude plot of wavelet coefficients. Vibration modes of the concrete slab corresponding to different buried objects can also be separated based on corresponding time duration.

  9. Elastic Wave Propagation in Concrete and Continuous Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Gi, Yu-Fung; Pan, Chi-Ling; Cheng, Chia-Chi

    2005-04-01

    Elastic wave methods, such as the ultrasonic pulse velocity and the impact echo, are often subject to multiple reflections at the boundaries of various constituents of concrete. Current study aims to improve the feature identification of elastic wave propagation due to buried objects in concrete slabs and cylinders. Embedded steel reinforcement, steel and PVC tubes, wooden disks, and rubber spheres are tested. The received signals are analyzed using continuous wavelet transform. As a result, signals are decomposed into distinctive frequency bands with transient information preserved. The interpretation of multiple reflections at different boundary conditions thus becomes more straightforward. Features related to reflections from steel bar, PVC tube, and steel tube can be readily identified in the magnitude plot of wavelet coefficients. Vibration modes of the concrete slab corresponding to different buried objects can also be separated based on corresponding time duration.

  10. Measurements on wave propagation characteristics of spiraling electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, A.; Getty, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of cyclotron-harmonic waves propagating on a neutralized spiraling electron beam immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field are studied experimentally. The experimental setup consisted of a vacuum system, an electron-gun corkscrew assembly which produces a 110-eV beam with the desired delta-function velocity distribution, a measurement region where a microwave signal is injected onto the beam to measure wavelengths, and a velocity analyzer for measuring the axial electron velocity. Results of wavelength measurements made at beam currents of 0.15, 1.0, and 2.0 mA are compared with calculated values, and undesirable effects produced by increasing the beam current are discussed. It is concluded that a suitable electron beam for studies of cyclotron-harmonic waves can be generated by the corkscrew device.

  11. Numerical solutions of acoustic wave propagation problems using Euler computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports solution procedures for problems arising from the study of engine inlet wave propagation. The first problem is the study of sound waves radiated from cylindrical inlets. The second one is a quasi-one-dimensional problem to study the effect of nonlinearities and the third one is the study of nonlinearities in two dimensions. In all three problems Euler computations are done with a fourth-order explicit scheme. For the first problem results are shown in agreement with experimental data and for the second problem comparisons are made with an existing asymptotic theory. The third problem is part of an ongoing work and preliminary results are presented for this case.

  12. Electromagnetic Effects on Wave Propagation in an Isotropic Micropolar Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S.; Mukhopadhyay, B.

    2015-11-01

    The generalized theory of thermoelasticity is applied to study the propagation of plane harmonic waves in an infinitely long, isotropic, micropolar plate in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The present analysis also includes the thermal relaxation time, electric displacement current, and the coupling of heat transfer and microrotation of the material. To determine the effect of the presence of thermal as well as magnetic fields on the phase velocity, two potential functions are used, and more general dispersive relations are obtained for symmetric and antisymmetric modes. The results for the cases of coupled thermoelasticity, magnetoelasticity, micropolar thermoelasticity, and classical micropolar elasticity as special cases are derived. The changes in the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient with the wave number are shown graphically.

  13. Active elastic metamaterials for subwavelength wave propagation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Huang, G. L.

    2015-06-01

    Recent research activities in elastic metamaterials demonstrate a significant potential for subwavelength wave propagation control owing to their interior locally resonant mechanism. The growing technological developments in electro/magnetomechanical couplings of smart materials have introduced a controlling degree of freedom for passive elastic metamaterials. Active elastic metamaterials could allow for a fine control of material physical behavior and thereby induce new functional properties that cannot be produced by passive approaches. In this paper, two types of active elastic metamaterials with shunted piezoelectric materials and electrorheological elastomers are proposed. Theoretical analyses and numerical validations of the active elastic metamaterials with detailed microstructures are presented for designing adaptive applications in band gap structures and extraordinary waveguides. The active elastic metamaterial could provide a new design methodology for adaptive wave filters, high signal-to-noise sensors, and structural health monitoring applications.

  14. Wave propagation in reconfigurable broadband gain metamaterials at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yifeng; Nagarkoti, Deepak S.; Rajab, Khalid Z.; Hao, Yang; Zhang, Hao Chi; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-05-01

    The wave dispersion characteristics for loop array-based metamaterials were analyzed, based on the general transmission line model of a one-dimensional host medium interacting with a chain of coupled loops. By relating the wave propagation constant and the effective parameters of the coupled host medium, we showed that an active medium embedded with non-Foster loaded loop array can be designed to exhibit broadband negative material parameters with positive gain. Accounting for all interactions, the stability of the active medium was investigated, further yielding necessary design specifications for the non-Foster loads. Subsequently, an experimental demonstration was provided to verify the theoretical analysis, showing that stable reconfigurable broadband gain metamaterials at microwave frequencies can be obtained with proper negative impedance converter design.

  15. Propagation of nonlinear waves over submerged step: wave separation and subharmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Eduardo; Maurel, Agnes; Pagneux, Vincent; Petitjeans, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Water waves can be described in simplified cases by the Helmholtz equation. However, even in these cases, they present a high complexity, among which their dispersive character and their nonlinearities are the subject of the present study. Using Fourier Transform Profilometry, we study experimentally the propagation of waves passing over a submerged step. Because of the small water depth after the step, the wave enters in a nonlinear regime. In the shallow water region, the second harmonic leads to two types of waves: bound waves which are slaves of the fundamental frequency with wavenumber 2 k (ω) , and free waves which propagate according to the usual dispersion relation with wavenumber k (2 ω) . Because of the presence of these two waves, beats are produced at the second harmonic with characteristic beat length. In this work, for the first time we extended this analysis to the third and higher harmonics. Next, the region after the step is limited to a finite size L with a reflecting wall. For certain frequencies and L- values, the spectral component becomes involved, with the appearance of sub harmonics. This regime is analyzed in more details, suggesting a transition to a chaotic and quasi-periodic wave behavior.

  16. Seismic wave propagation effects in the upper volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Montesinos, Beatriz; Bean, Chris; Lokmer, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    A seismogram contains information about the seismic source and the wave path. Understanding the path effect is important for both source inversions and geophysical imagery. In the case of volcanoes, the correct interpretation of the signals helps us to determine their internal state. For instance, long-period events are commonly associated to magma movements in resonant conduits. We present an application of the adjoint methodology proposed in Tromp et al. [2004] to study the seismic wave propagation effects in the upper volcanic edifice. We do this by calculating sensitivity kernels, that is, investigating the sensitivity of different parts of a seismogram to different parts of the velocity model. In particular, we examine the influence of near-surface low-velocity volcanic structure to the recorded signals. We use the SPECFEM 2D software, a two-dimensional elastic wave propagation code based on the spectral-element method, to simulate examples for Mount Etna, Italy. We calculate synthetic seismograms in 2D heterogeneous models with topography, for the sources with different dominant frequency and locations. Then, we calculate the adjoint wavefield by time-reversing the calculated seismograms and "playing" them back into the medium as simultaneous seismic sources at the original receiver positions. In the last step, by combining the forward and adjoint wavefields, we calculate the traveltime sensitivity kernels of Mount Etna. In order to be able to capture a complex wave travel path, we examine the sensitivity of different parts of a seismic wavefield, that is, different time-window on a seimogram to different parts of the structural models. Preliminary results show the importance of the velocity structure at the near surface on the recorded traces. This means that we cannot ignore the heterogeneity of the upper volcanic edifice at the time of the interpretation of the recorded signals.

  17. Lower hybrid wave phenomena associated with density depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seyler, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid description of lower hybrid, whistler and magnetosonic waves is applied to study wave phenomena near the lower hybrid resonance associated with plasma density depletions. The goal is to understand the nature of lower hybrid cavitons and spikelets often associated with transverse ion acceleration events in the auroral ionosphere. Three-dimensional simulations show the ponderomotive force leads to the formation of a density cavity (caviton) in which lower hybrid wave energy is concentrated (spikelet) resulting in a three-dimensional collapse of the configuration. Plasma density depletions of the order of a few percent are shown to greatly modify the homogeneous linear properties of lower hybrid waves and account for many of the observed features of lower hybrid spikelets.

  18. Symmetry issues in the hybridization of multi-mode waves with resonators: an example with Lamb waves metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupin, Matthieu; Roux, Philippe; Lerosey, Geoffroy; Lemoult, Fabrice

    2015-09-01

    Locally resonant metamaterials derive their effective properties from hybridization between their resonant unit cells and the incoming wave. This phenomenon is well understood in the case of plane waves that propagate in media where the unit cell respects the symmetry of the incident field. However, in many systems, several modes with orthogonal symmetries can coexist at a given frequency, while the resonant unit cells themselves can have asymmetric scattering cross-sections. In this paper we are interested in the influence of symmetry breaking on the hybridization of a wave field that includes multiple propagative modes. The A0 and S0 Lamb waves that propagate in a thin plate are good candidates for this study, as they are either anti-symmetric or symmetric. First we designed an experimental setup with an asymmetric metamaterial made of long rods glued to one side of a metallic plate. We show that the flexural resonances of the rods induce a break of the orthogonality between the A0/S0 modes of the free-plate. Finally, based on numerical simulations we show that the orthogonality is preserved in the case of a symmetric metamaterial leading to the presence of two independent polariton curves in the dispersion relation.

  19. Symmetry issues in the hybridization of multi-mode waves with resonators: an example with Lamb waves metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Rupin, Matthieu; Roux, Philippe; Lerosey, Geoffroy; Lemoult, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Locally resonant metamaterials derive their effective properties from hybridization between their resonant unit cells and the incoming wave. This phenomenon is well understood in the case of plane waves that propagate in media where the unit cell respects the symmetry of the incident field. However, in many systems, several modes with orthogonal symmetries can coexist at a given frequency, while the resonant unit cells themselves can have asymmetric scattering cross-sections. In this paper we are interested in the influence of symmetry breaking on the hybridization of a wave field that includes multiple propagative modes. The A0 and S0 Lamb waves that propagate in a thin plate are good candidates for this study, as they are either anti-symmetric or symmetric. First we designed an experimental setup with an asymmetric metamaterial made of long rods glued to one side of a metallic plate. We show that the flexural resonances of the rods induce a break of the orthogonality between the A0/S0 modes of the free-plate. Finally, based on numerical simulations we show that the orthogonality is preserved in the case of a symmetric metamaterial leading to the presence of two independent polariton curves in the dispersion relation. PMID:26333601

  20. Symmetry issues in the hybridization of multi-mode waves with resonators: an example with Lamb waves metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Rupin, Matthieu; Roux, Philippe; Lerosey, Geoffroy; Lemoult, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Locally resonant metamaterials derive their effective properties from hybridization between their resonant unit cells and the incoming wave. This phenomenon is well understood in the case of plane waves that propagate in media where the unit cell respects the symmetry of the incident field. However, in many systems, several modes with orthogonal symmetries can coexist at a given frequency, while the resonant unit cells themselves can have asymmetric scattering cross-sections. In this paper we are interested in the influence of symmetry breaking on the hybridization of a wave field that includes multiple propagative modes. The A0 and S0 Lamb waves that propagate in a thin plate are good candidates for this study, as they are either anti-symmetric or symmetric. First we designed an experimental setup with an asymmetric metamaterial made of long rods glued to one side of a metallic plate. We show that the flexural resonances of the rods induce a break of the orthogonality between the A0/S0 modes of the free-plate. Finally, based on numerical simulations we show that the orthogonality is preserved in the case of a symmetric metamaterial leading to the presence of two independent polariton curves in the dispersion relation. PMID:26333601

  1. Nonlinear upper hybrid waves and the induced density irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-08-15

    Upper hybrid waves are excited parametrically by the O-mode high-frequency heater waves in the ionospheric heating experiments. These waves grow to large amplitudes and self-induced density perturbations provide nonlinear feedback. The lower hybrid resonance modifies the nonlinear feedback driven by the ponderomotive force; the nonlinear equation governing the envelope of the upper hybrid waves is derived. Solutions in symmetric alternating functions, in non-alternating periodic functions, as well as in solitary functions are shown. The impact of lower hybrid resonance on the envelope of the upper hybrid waves is explored; the results show that both the spatial period and amplitude are enlarged. The average fluctuation level of induced density irregularities is also enhanced. In the soliton form, the induced density cavity is widened considerably.

  2. Simulation of seismic wave propagation for reconnaissance in machined tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, L.; Friederich, W.

    2012-04-01

    During machined tunnelling, there is a complex interaction chain of the involved components. For example, on one hand the machine influences the surrounding ground during excavation, on the other hand supporting measures are needed acting on the ground. Furthermore, the different soil conditions are influencing the wearing of tools, the speed of the excavation and the safety of the construction site. In order to get information about the ground along the tunnel track, one can use seismic imaging. To get a better understanding of seismic wave propagation for a tunnel environment, we want to perform numerical simulations. For that, we use the spectral element method (SEM) and the nodal discontinuous galerkin method (NDG). In both methods, elements are the basis to discretize the domain of interest for performing high order elastodynamic simulations. The SEM is a fast and widely used method but the biggest drawback is it's limitation to hexahedral elements. For complex heterogeneous models with a tunnel included, it is a better choice to use the NDG, which needs more computation time but can be adapted to tetrahedral elements. Using this technique, we can perform high resolution simulations of waves initialized by a single force acting either on the front face or the side face of the tunnel. The aim is to produce waves that travel mainly in the direction of the tunnel track and to get as much information as possible from the backscattered part of the wave field.

  3. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechanisms and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-2412. The objective of this project is to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as if flew by Neptune. This study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, ray tracing, and modeling to determine the possible source mechanism(s) and locations of the Neptune radio emissions. We have completed four papers, which are included in the appendix. The paper 'Modeling of Whistler Ray Paths in the Magnetosphere of Neptune' investigated the propagation and dispersion of lighting-generated whistler in the magnetosphere of Neptune by using three dimensional ray tracing. The two papers 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Radio Emissions from Planetary Magnetospheres' and 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Planetary Radio Emissions' employed numerical simulations to investigate an alternate source mechanism of bursty radio emissions in addition to the cyclotron maser instability. We have also studied the possible generation of Z and whistler mode waves by the temperature anisotropic beam instability and the result was published in 'Electron Cyclotron Wave Generation by Relativistic Electrons.' Besides the aforementioned studies, we have also collaborated with members of the PRA team to investigate various aspects of the radio wave data. Two papers have been submitted for publication and the abstracts of these papers are also listed in the appendix.

  4. Propagation of dissolution/precipitation waves in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, C.F.

    1992-01-01

    The transport of a chemically reactive fluid through a permeable medium is governed by many classes of chemical interactions. Dissolution/precipitation (D/P) reactions are among the interactions of primary importance because of their significant influence on the mobility of aqueous ions. In general, D/P reactions lead to the propagation of coherent waves. This paper provides an overview of the types of wave phenomena observed in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) porous media for systems in which mineral D/P is the dominant type of chemical reaction. It is demonstrated that minerals dissolve in sharp waves in 1D advection-dominated transport, and that these waves separate zones of constant chemical compositions in the aqueous and mineral phases. Analytical solutions based on coherence methods are presented for solving 1D advection-dominated transport problems with constant and variable boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of diffusion-dominated transport in porous media show that sharp D/P fronts occur in this system as well. A final example presents a simple dual-porosity system with advection in an idealized fracture and solute diffusion into an adjacent porous matrix. The example illustrates the delay of contaminant release from the 2D domain due to a combination of physical retardation and chemical retardation.

  5. Full wave propagation modelling in view to integrated ICRH wave coupling/RF sheaths modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Bobkov, Volodymyr; Colas, Laurent; Heuraux, Stéphane; Křivská, Alena; Lu, Lingfeng; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2015-12-01

    RF sheaths rectification can be the reason for operational limits for Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating systems via impurity production or excessive heat loads. To simulate this process in realistic geometry, the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating (SSWICH) code is a minimal set of coupled equations that computes self-consistently wave propagation and DC plasma biasing. The present version of its wave propagation module only deals with the Slow Wave assumed to be the source of RF sheath oscillations. However the ICRF power coupling to the plasma is due to the fast wave (FW). This paper proposes to replace this one wave equation module by a full wave module in either 2D or 3D as a first step towards integrated modelling of RF sheaths and wave coupling. Since the FW is propagative in the main plasma, Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) adapted for plasmas were implemented at the inner side of the simulation domain to absorb outgoing waves and tested numerically with tilted B0 in Cartesian geometry, by either rotating the cold magnetized plasma dielectric tensors in 2D or rotating the coordinate vector basis in 3D. The PML was further formulated in cylindrical coordinates to account for for the toroidal curvature of the plasma. Toroidal curvature itself does not seem to change much the coupling. A detailed 3D geometrical description of Tore Supra and ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) antennas was included in the coupling code. The full antenna structure was introduced, since its toroidal symmetry with respect to the septum plane is broken (FS bars, toroidal phasing, non-symmetrical structure). Reliable convergence has been obtained with the density profile up to the leading edge of antenna limiters. Parallel electric field maps have been obtained as an input for the present version of SSWICH.

  6. Role of Hydraulic Geometry in Flood Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, S.

    2010-12-01

    The role of hydraulic geometry in flood wave propagation is investigated by using a diffusion wave model with inertial effects. Power function relationships W = a’Qb’ and kS = r’Qy’ are used to reproduce the at-a-station variations of water-surface width W and Gauckler-Strickler conductance coefficient kS (the inverse of Manning resistance coefficient) with flow discharge Q. Downstream variations of coefficients a’ and r’ are not considered in this study. The considered hydraulic geometry relationships are incorporated into a diffusion wave model in which the term (1 - Ve2), Ve being the Vedernikov number, multiplies the Hayami’s diffusivity Q/(2WS0), S0 being the channel bed slope. This mathematical model is solved numerically by using a matched artificial diffusivity method. Numerical experiments are carried out by evaluating peak attenuation and mean peak celerity of flood waves propagating along channel reaches characterized by coefficients a’ and r’ equal to the average values observed in natural rivers, by all the combinations of exponents b’ and y’ laying in the range 0-0.5, and by values of S0 laying in the range 0.000125-0.032. It is found that: (1) peak attenuation and mean peak celerity display the minimum values for b’ = 0.5 and y’ = 0, (2) for high values of y’, Ve displays values greater than 1 indicating physical instability of flood waves, and (3) around the condition b’ = 0 and y’ = 0, for high values of Q/W and low values of S0, the Peclet number Pe (evaluated over the channel reach length) displays values less than 2 indicating unrealistic hydraulic diffusion (more storage effects than those produced by a reservoir). The region of the plane b’y’ representing relevant flood waves lays therefore between the instability region Ve > 1, where unstable flood waves are physically possible but rarely observed in natural channels and not reproducible with the considered model, and the region of unrealistic diffusion Pe

  7. Association of electron conical distributions with upper hybrid waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Lin, C. S.; Wong, H. K.; Bahnsen, A.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The particle and plasma wave data of the DE 1 and Swedish Viking satellites shows that intense (greater than 1 mV/m) upper hybrid emissions are sometimes present in the midaltitude polar magnetosphere on both the dayside cusp/cleft and the nightside auroral regions and that waves near the upper hybrid frequency are often associated with electron conical distributions. These observations are consistent with the production of at least some electron conical distributions by oblique heating of the electrons by upper hybrid waves. Examination of the wave data to establish the role of parallel heating remains to be performed.

  8. Association of electron conical distributions with upper hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Menietti, J.D.; Lin, C.S.; Wong, H.K. ); Bahnsen, A. ); Gurnett, D.A. )

    1992-02-01

    The particle and plasma wave data of the DE 1 and Swedish Viking satellites shows that intense (> 1 mV/m) upper hybrid emissions are sometimes present in the mid-altitude polar magnetosphere on both the dayside cusp/cleft and the nightside auroral regions and that waves near the upper hybrid frequency are often associated with electron conical distributions. These observations are consistent with the production of at least some electron conical distributions by oblique heating of the electrons by upper hybrid waves. Examination of the wave data to establish the role of parallel heating remains to be performed.

  9. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed. PMID:26518526

  10. Dust-Lower-Hybrid Surface Waves in Classical and Degenerate Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M.; H. A., Shah; M. N. S., Qureshi; Salimullah, M.

    2013-11-01

    The dispersion relation for general dust low frequency electrostatic surface waves propagating on an interface between a magnetized dusty plasma region and a vacuum is derived by using specular reflection boundary conditions both in classical and quantum regimes. The frequency limit ω ≪ ωci ≪ ωce is considered and the dispersion relation for the Dust-Lower-Hybrid Surface Waves (DLHSW's) is derived for both classical and quantum plasma half-space and analyzed numerically. It is shown that the wave behavior changes as the quantum nature of the problem is considered.

  11. Evolution of the derivative skewness for nonlinearly propagating waves.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Brent O; Muhlestein, Michael B; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Thomas, Derek C

    2016-03-01

    The skewness of the first time derivative of a pressure waveform, or derivative skewness, has been used previously to describe the presence of shock-like content in jet and rocket noise. Despite its use, a quantitative understanding of derivative skewness values has been lacking. In this paper, the derivative skewness for nonlinearly propagating waves is investigated using analytical, numerical, and experimental methods. Analytical expressions for the derivative skewness of an initially sinusoidal plane wave are developed and, along with numerical data, are used to describe its behavior in the preshock, sawtooth, and old-age regions. Analyses of common measurement issues show that the derivative skewness is relatively sensitive to the effects of a smaller sampling rate, but less sensitive to the presence of additive noise. In addition, the derivative skewness of nonlinearly propagating noise is found to reach greater values over a shorter length scale relative to sinusoidal signals. A minimum sampling rate is recommended for sinusoidal signals to accurately estimate derivative skewness values up to five, which serves as an approximate threshold indicating significant shock formation. PMID:27036276

  12. Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of inertant acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Prateek P.; Manimala, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of acoustic metamaterials with various inerter configurations are investigated using their representative one-dimensional discrete element lattice models. Inerters are dynamic mass-amplifying mechanical elements that are activated by a difference in acceleration across them. They have a small device mass but can provide a relatively large dynamic mass presence depending on accelerations in systems that employ them. The effect of introducing inerters both in local attachments and in the lattice was examined vis-à-vis the propagation characteristics of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. A simple effective model based on mass, stiffness, or their combined equivalent was used to establish dispersion behavior and quantify attenuation within bandgaps. Depending on inerter configurations in local attachments or in the lattice, both up-shift and down-shift in the bandgap frequency range and their extent are shown to be possible while retaining static mass addition to the host structure to a minimum. Further, frequency-dependent negative and even extreme effective-stiffness regimes are encountered. The feasibility of employing tuned combinations of such mass-delimited inertant configurations to engineer acoustic metamaterials that act as high-pass filters without the use of grounded elements or even as complete longitudinal wave inhibitors is shown. Potential device implications and strategies for practical applications are also discussed.

  13. Numerical Homogenization of Jointed Rock Masses Using Wave Propagation Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasmi, Hatem; Hamdi, Essaïeb; Bouden Romdhane, Nejla

    2014-07-01

    Homogenization in fractured rock analyses is essentially based on the calculation of equivalent elastic parameters. In this paper, a new numerical homogenization method that was programmed by means of a MATLAB code, called HLA-Dissim, is presented. The developed approach simulates a discontinuity network of real rock masses based on the International Society of Rock Mechanics (ISRM) scanline field mapping methodology. Then, it evaluates a series of classic joint parameters to characterize density (RQD, specific length of discontinuities). A pulse wave, characterized by its amplitude, central frequency, and duration, is propagated from a source point to a receiver point of the simulated jointed rock mass using a complex recursive method for evaluating the transmission and reflection coefficient for each simulated discontinuity. The seismic parameters, such as delay, velocity, and attenuation, are then calculated. Finally, the equivalent medium model parameters of the rock mass are computed numerically while taking into account the natural discontinuity distribution. This methodology was applied to 17 bench fronts from six aggregate quarries located in Tunisia, Spain, Austria, and Sweden. It allowed characterizing the rock mass discontinuity network, the resulting seismic performance, and the equivalent medium stiffness. The relationship between the equivalent Young's modulus and rock discontinuity parameters was also analyzed. For these different bench fronts, the proposed numerical approach was also compared to several empirical formulas, based on RQD and fracture density values, published in previous research studies, showing its usefulness and efficiency in estimating rapidly the Young's modulus of equivalent medium for wave propagation analysis.

  14. Damping of lower hybrid waves by low-frequency drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, Nicholas A.

    1989-11-01

    The conditions under which a spectrum of lower hybrid drift waves will decay into low-frequency drift waves (LFD) are calculated. The purpose is to help understand why lower hybrid drift waves are not seen in all field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiments in which they are predicted. It is concluded that if there is in the plasma a LFD wave amplitude above a critical level, lower hybrid waves will decay into low-frequency drift waves. The critical level required to stabilize TRX-2 [Phys. Fluids 30, 1497 (1987)] is calculated and found to be reasonably consistent with theoretical estimates.

  15. Frequency-selective plasmonic wave propagation through the overmoded waveguide with photonic-band-gap slab arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min

    2012-05-15

    Confined propagation of guided waves through the periodically corrugated channel sandwiched between two staggered dielectric photonic-band-gap slab arrays is investigated with the band-response analysis. Numerical simulations show that longitudinally polarized evanescent waves within the band gap propagate with insertion loss of {approx}-0.2 to 1 dB (-0.05 to 0.4 dB/mm at G-band) in the hybrid band filter. This structure significantly suppresses low energy modes and higher-order-modes beyond the band-gap, including background noises, down to {approx}-45 dB. This would enable the single-mode propagation in the heavily over-moded waveguide (TEM-type), minimizing abnormal excitation probability of trapped modes. This band filter could be integrated with active and passive RF components for electron beam and optoelectronic devices.

  16. The parametric decay of Alfven waves into shear Alfven waves and dust lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, M.; Shah, H. A.; Zubia, K.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch.; Salimullah, M.

    2010-07-15

    The parametric decay instability of Alfven wave into low-frequency electrostatic dust-lower-hybrid and electromagnetic shear Alfven waves has been investigated in detail in a dusty plasma in the presence of external/ambient uniform magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations of plasmas have been employed to find the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma particles for this three-wave nonlinear coupling in a dusty magnetoplasma. Here, relatively high frequency electromagnetic Alfven wave has been taken as the pump wave. It couples with other two low-frequency internal possible modes of the dusty magnetoplasma, viz., the dust-lower-hybrid and shear Alfven waves. The nonlinear dispersion relation of the dust-lower-hybrid wave has been solved to obtain the growth rate of the parametric decay instability. The growth rate is maximum for small value of external magnetic field B{sub s}. It is noticed that the growth rate is proportional to the unperturbed electron number density n{sub oe}.

  17. Nonlinear phenomena in RF wave propagation in magnetized plasma: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, Miklos

    2015-12-01

    Nonlinear phenomena in RF wave propagation has been observed from the earliest days in basic laboratory experiments going back to the 1960s [1], followed by observations of parametric instability (PDI) phenomena in large scale RF heating experiments in magnetized fusion plasmas in the 1970s and beyond [2]. Although not discussed here, the importance of PDI phenomena has also been central to understanding anomalous absorption in laser-fusion experiments (ICF) [3]. In this review I shall discuss the fundamentals of nonlinear interactions among waves and particles, and in particular, their role in PDIs. This phenomenon is distinct from quasi-linear phenomena that are often invoked in calculating absorption of RF power in wave heating experiments in the core of magnetically confined plasmas [4]. Indeed, PDIs are most likely to occur in the edge of magnetized fusion plasmas where the electron temperature is modest and hence the oscillating quiver velocity of charged particles can be comparable to their thermal speeds. Specifically, I will review important aspects of PDI theory and give examples from past experiments in the ECH/EBW, lower hybrid (LHCD) and ICRF/IBW frequency regimes. Importantly, PDI is likely to play a fundamental role in determining the so-called "density limit" in lower hybrid experiments that has persisted over the decades and still central to understanding present day experiments [5-7].

  18. Nonlinear phenomena in RF wave propagation in magnetized plasma: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Porkolab, Miklos

    2015-12-10

    Nonlinear phenomena in RF wave propagation has been observed from the earliest days in basic laboratory experiments going back to the 1960s [1], followed by observations of parametric instability (PDI) phenomena in large scale RF heating experiments in magnetized fusion plasmas in the 1970s and beyond [2]. Although not discussed here, the importance of PDI phenomena has also been central to understanding anomalous absorption in laser-fusion experiments (ICF) [3]. In this review I shall discuss the fundamentals of nonlinear interactions among waves and particles, and in particular, their role in PDIs. This phenomenon is distinct from quasi-linear phenomena that are often invoked in calculating absorption of RF power in wave heating experiments in the core of magnetically confined plasmas [4]. Indeed, PDIs are most likely to occur in the edge of magnetized fusion plasmas where the electron temperature is modest and hence the oscillating quiver velocity of charged particles can be comparable to their thermal speeds. Specifically, I will review important aspects of PDI theory and give examples from past experiments in the ECH/EBW, lower hybrid (LHCD) and ICRF/IBW frequency regimes. Importantly, PDI is likely to play a fundamental role in determining the so-called “density limit” in lower hybrid experiments that has persisted over the decades and still central to understanding present day experiments [5-7].

  19. Experimental investigation of the stress wave propagation inside a granular column impacted by a shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, E.; Blachman, M.; Britan, A.; Sadot, O.; Ben-Dor, G.

    2015-11-01

    A simple experimental technique, based on pressure transducers, capable of measuring the stress wave that propagates along the solid phase of a granular column after being hit head-on by a plane shock wave is presented. The technique is based on installing couples of gauges at different cross-sections along the granular column in such a way that one transducer measures the overall pressure acting on it while the other measures only the pressure exerted on it by the gaseous phase of the granular column. By means of the presented experimental technique the time histories of the stresses normal to the shock tube walls and data on the stress wave attenuation as it propagates downstream towards the shock tube end wall were obtained.

  20. Modelling Mechanical Wave Propagation: Guidelines and Experimentation of a Teaching-Learning Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Claudio; Guastella, Ivan; Sperandeo-Mineo, Rosa Maria; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    The present paper reports the design process and the experimentation of a teaching-learning sequence about the concept of mechanical wave propagation and the role played by media where waves are propagating. The sequence focuses on the central issue of the relationships between observable phenomena, like macroscopic behaviours of waves, and their…

  1. A Problem-Based Approach to Elastic Wave Propagation: The Role of Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Claudio; Guastella, Ivan; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    A problem-based approach to the teaching of mechanical wave propagation, focused on observation and measurement of wave properties in solids and on modelling of these properties, is presented. In particular, some experimental results, originally aimed at measuring the propagation speed of sound waves in metallic rods, are used in order to deepen…

  2. Parametric Excitations of Fast Plasma Waves by Counter-propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch

    2001-03-19

    Short- and long-wavelength plasma waves can become strongly coupled in the presence of two counter-propagating laser pump pulses detuned by twice the cold plasma frequency. What makes this four-wave interaction important is that the growth rate of the plasma waves occurs much faster than in the more obvious co-propagating geometry.

  3. Magnonic crystal wave guide with large spin-wave propagation velocity in CoFeB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, T.; Grundler, D.

    2013-06-01

    Propagating spin-wave spectroscopy is reported for two-dimensional CoFeB antidot lattices (ADLs) with perpendicular-to-plane magnetization. The magnonic crystals consist of square lattices of 190 nm diameter holes with different periods p. At p = 600 nm, the velocity vg of long wavelength spin-waves is reduced compared to the unpatterned reference film by up to about 30%. However, a large vg is regained when we leave out a column of nanoholes in the ADLs. Such a magnonic crystal wave guide is found to support faster spin waves than a CoFeB stripe of the same geometrical width, making the finding interesting for spin-wave guiding in integrated magnonics.

  4. Some wave-particle effects on large-scale Alfven wave propagation and damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siregar, E.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Phase mixing can reduce greatly the torsional Alfven wave's dissipation length for propagation in complex magnetic field-line geometries. This phase mixing causes significant energy transfers from large to small scales where a conversion from ordered wave energy into a particle kinetic form occurs. This conversion during its initial stages is an entropy conserving process well described by Vlasov theory, Nonlinear stages of wave-particle resonance, particle trapping, and collisional resistivity are often invoked as processes eventually responsible for converting ordered wave motions into random thermal motion. Strictly speaking, this entropy producing phase cannot be described within Vlasov theory, and the large-scale effects of these microscopic events resides at the difficult frontier between generalized fluid and kinetic theories. We attempt to describe certain aspects of such resonances within the framework of fluid theory focusing on torsional Alfven wave energy transport and deposition within flux tubes.

  5. Coronal Seismology: The Search for Propagating Waves in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Seeley, D.; Keil, S. L.; Tomczyk, S.

    2007-05-01

    We report on Doppler observations of the solar corona obtained in the Fe XeXIII 1074.7nm coronal emission line with the HAO Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter (CoMP) mounted on the NSO Coronal One Shot coronagraph located in the Hilltop Facility of NSO/Sacramento Peak. The COMP is a tunable filtergraph instrument that records the entire corona from the edge of the occulting disk at approximately 1.03 Rsun out to 1.4 Rsun with a spatial resolution of about 4” x 4”. COMP can be rapidly scanned through the spectral line while recording orthogonal states of linear and circular polarization. The two dimensional spatial resolution allows us to correlate temporal fluctuations observed in one part of the corona with those seen at other locations, in particular along coronal loops. Using cross spectral analysis we find that the observations reveal upward propagating waves that are characterized by Doppler shifts with rms velocities of 0.3 km/s, peak wave power in the 3-5 mHz frequency range, and phase speeds 1-3 Mm/s. The wave trajectories are consistent with the direction of the magnetic field inferred from the linear polarization measurements. We discuss the phase and coherence of these waves as a function of height in the corona and relate our findings to previous observations. The observed waves appear to be Alfvenic in character. "Thomas Schad was supported through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) site program, which is co-funded by the Department of Defense in partnership with the National Science Foundation REU Program." Daniel Seeley was supported through the National Solar Observatory Research Experience for Teachers (RET) site program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation RET program.

  6. FDTD Simulation on Terahertz Waves Propagation Through a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Maoyan; Zhang, Meng; Li, Guiping; Jiang, Baojun; Zhang, Xiaochuan; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The frequency dependent permittivity for dusty plasmas is provided by introducing the charging response factor and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles. The field equations that describe the characteristics of Terahertz (THz) waves propagation in a dusty plasma sheath are derived and discretized on the basis of the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) in the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Compared with numerical solutions in reference, the accuracy for the ADE FDTD method is validated. The reflection property of the metal Aluminum interlayer of the sheath at THz frequencies is discussed. The effects of the thickness, effective collision frequency, airborne particle density, and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles on the electromagnetic properties of Terahertz waves through a dusty plasma slab are investigated. Finally, some potential applications for Terahertz waves in information and communication are analyzed. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104097, 11504252, 61201007, 41304119), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Nos. ZYGX2015J039, ZYGX2015J041), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120185120012)

  7. Experimental research on dust lifting by propagating shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żydak, P.; Oleszczak, P.; Klemens, R.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the presented work was to study the dust lifting process from a layer of dust behind a propagating shock wave. The experiments were conducted with the use of a shock tube and a specially constructed, five-channel laser optical device enabling measurements at five positions located in one vertical plane along the height of the tube. The system enabled measurements of the delay in lifting up of the dust from the layer, and the vertical velocity of the dust cloud was calculated from the dust concentration measurements. The research was carried out for various initial conditions and for three fractions of black coal dust. In the presented tests, three shock wave velocities: 450, 490 and 518 m/s and three dust layer thicknesses, equal to 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm, were taken into consideration. On the grounds of the obtained experimental results, it was assumed that the vertical component of the lifted dust velocity is a function of the dust particle diameter, the velocity of the air flow in the channel, the layer thickness and the dust bulk density. It appeared, however, that lifting up of the dust from the thick layers, thicker than 1 mm, is a more complex process than that from thin layers and still requires further research. A possible explanation is that the shock wave action upon the thick layer results in its aggregation in the first stage of the dispersing process, which suppresses the dust lifting process.

  8. The propagation of sound waves in drill strings

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S. ); Knudsen, S.D. )

    1995-04-01

    Deep wells are commonly drilled while steering the drill bit. The steering process is completely controlled by the drilling-rig operator. A key element of this procedure is the measurement and communication of navigation information from the bottom of the well to the operator. Pressure pulses modulated onto the flow of the drill fluid are now employed in some cases to communicate this information. However, data rates are only a few binary bits per second with this method. This drastically limits the quantity of data available to the operator. As an alternative method, elastic waves generated within the steel drill string can be used as a carrier signal to transmit data. The drill string is commonly assembled from 10-m segments of threaded pipe and forms a periodic structure. The elastic wavelengths of interest are shorter than this periodic length. Consequently, these waves undergo significant dispersion. This paper presents new data for the propagation of elastic waves in a 2-km drill string. The influence of aperiodicity in the drill string, rotation of the drill string, and noise levels are studied in detail. The data verify a method for reducing the attenuation of a carrier signal by a factor of 2.

  9. Wave propagation in a dynamic system of soft granular materials.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shusaku; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2003-06-01

    The wave propagation in a dynamic system of soft elastic granules is investigated theoretically and numerically. The perturbation theory for simple fluids is applied to the elastic granular system in order to relate the elastic properties of individual particles with the "thermodynamic" quantities of the system. The properties of a piston-driven shock are derived from the obtained thermodynamic relations and the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The discrete particle simulation of a piston-driven shock wave in a granular system is performed by the discrete element method. From theoretical and numerical results, the effect of the elastic properties of a particle on shock properties is shown quantitatively. Owing to the finite duration of the interparticle contact, the compressibility factor of the elastic granular system decreases in comparison with that of the hard-sphere system. In addition, the relation between the internal energy and the granular temperature changes due to the energy preserved with the elastic deformation of the particle. Consequently, the shock properties in soft particles are considerably different from those in the hard-sphere system. We also show the theoretical prediction of the speed of sound in soft particles and discuss the effect of the elasticity on an acoustic wave. PMID:16241219

  10. CLUSTER observations of lower hybrid waves excited at high altitudes by electromagnetic whistler mode signals from HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. F.; Inan, U. S.; Platino, M.; Pickett, J.; Kossey, P. A.; Kennedy, E. J.

    2003-12-01

    We report new observations from the CLUSTER spacecraft of strong excitation of lower hybrid waves by electromagnetic whistler mode waves at altitudes of roughly 20,000 km outside the plasmasphere. Previous observations of this phenomenon have been limited to altitudes less than 7000 km. The excitation mechanism appears to be linear mode coupling in the presence of small scale plasma density irregularities. The wavelengths of the excited lower hybrid waves, as deduced from their doppler shifts, appear to lie in the 15 - 1500 m range. These observations provide strong evidence that electromagnetic whistler mode waves are continuously transformed into lower hybrid waves as the whistler mode waves propagate at high altitudes beyond L = 4. This finding may explain the lack of lightning generated whistlers observed in this same region of space.

  11. Frequency Domain Modelling of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Felix; Lünenschloss, Peter; Mai, Juliane; Wagner, Norman; Töpfer, Hannes; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The amount of water in porous media such as soils and rocks is a key parameter when water resources are under investigation. Especially the quantitative spatial distribution and temporal evolution of water contents in soil formations are needed. In high frequency electromagnetic applications soil water content is quantitatively derived from the propagation behavior of electromagnetic waves along waveguides embedded in soil formations. The spatial distribution of the dielectric material properties along the waveguide can be estimated by numerical solving of the inverse problem based on the full wave forward model in time or frequency domain. However, current approaches mostly neglect or approximate the frequency dependence of the electromagnetic material properties of transfer function of the waveguide. As a first prove of concept a full two port broadband frequency domain forward model for propagation of transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waves in coaxial waveguide has been implemented. It is based on the propagation matrix approach for layered transmission line sections. Depending on the complexity of the material different models for the frequency dependent complex permittivity were applied. For the validation of the model a broadband frequency domain measurement with network analyzer technique was used. The measurement is based on a 20 cm long 50 Ohm 20/46 coaxial transmission line cell considering inhomogeneous material distributions. This approach allows (i) an increase of the waveguide calibration accuracy in comparison to conventional TDR based technique and (ii) the consideration of the broadband permittivity spectrum of the porous material. In order to systematic analyze the model, theoretical results were compared with measurements as well as 3D broadband finite element modeling of homogeneous and layered media in the coaxial transmission line cell. Defined standards (Teflon, dry glass beads, de-ionized water) were placed inside the line as the dielectric

  12. Frequency Domain Modelling of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Felix; Wagner, Norman; Lünenschloß, Peter; Toepfer, Hannes; Dietrich, Peter; Kaliorias, Andreas; Bumberger, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The amount of water in porous media such as soils and rocks is a key parameter when water resources are under investigation. Especially the quantitative spatial distribution and temporal evolution of water contents in soil formations are needed. In high frequency electromagnetic applications soil water content is quantitatively derived from the propagation behavior of electromagnetic waves along waveguides embedded in soil formations. The spatial distribution of the dielectric material properties along the waveguide can be estimated by numerical solving of the inverse problem based on the full wave forward model in time or frequency domain. However, current approaches mostly neglect or approximate the frequency dependence of the electromagnetic material properties of transfer function of the waveguide. As a first prove of concept a full two port broadband frequency domain forward model for propagation of transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waves in coaxial waveguide has been implemented. It is based on the propagation matrix approach for layered transmission line sections Depending on the complexity of the material different models for the frequency dependent complex permittivity were applied. For the validation of the model a broadband frequency domain measurement with network analyzer technique was used. The measurement is based on a 20 cm long 50 Ohm 20/46 coaxial transmission line cell considering inhomogeneous material distributions. This approach allows (i) an increase of the waveguide calibration accuracy in comparison to conventional TDR based technique and (ii) the consideration of the broadband permittivity spectrum of the porous material. In order to systematic analyze the model, theoretical results were compared with measurements as well as 3D broadband finite element modeling of homogeneous and layered media in the coaxial transmission line cell. Defined standards (Teflon, dry glass beads, de-ionized water) were placed inside the line as the dielectric

  13. The effect of random Alfven waves on the propagation of hydromagnetic waves in a finite-beta plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamabata, Hiromitsu; Namikawa, Tomikazu

    1990-01-01

    Using first-order smoothing theory, Fourier analysis and perturbation methods, the evolution equation of the wave spectrum as well as the nonlinear forces generated by random Alfven waves in a finite-beta plasma with phenomenological Landau-damping effects are obtained. The effect of microscale random Alfven waves on the propagation of large-scale hydromagnetic waves is also investigated by solving the mean-field equations. It is shown that parallel-propagating random Alfven waves are modulationally stable and that obliquely propagating random Alfven waves can be modulationally unstable when the energy of random waves is converted to slow magnetoacoustic waves that can be Landau-damped, providing a dissipation mechanism for the Alfven waves.

  14. DETERMINATION OF TRANSVERSE DENSITY STRUCTURING FROM PROPAGATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2013-06-01

    We present a Bayesian seismology inversion technique for propagating magnetohydrodynamic transverse waves observed in coronal waveguides. The technique uses theoretical predictions for the spatial damping of propagating kink waves in transversely inhomogeneous coronal waveguides. It combines wave amplitude damping length scales along the waveguide with theoretical results for resonantly damped propagating kink waves to infer the plasma density variation across the oscillating structures. Provided that the spatial dependence of the velocity amplitude along the propagation direction is measured and the existence of two different damping regimes is identified, the technique would enable us to fully constrain the transverse density structuring, providing estimates for the density contrast and its transverse inhomogeneity length scale.

  15. A nonlinear model of ionic wave propagation along microtubules.

    PubMed

    Satarić, M V; Ilić, D I; Ralević, N; Tuszynski, Jack Adam

    2009-06-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are important cytoskeletal polymers engaged in a number of specific cellular activities including the traffic of organelles using motor proteins, cellular architecture and motility, cell division and a possible participation in information processing within neuronal functioning. How MTs operate and process electrical information is still largely unknown. In this paper we investigate the conditions enabling MTs to act as electrical transmission lines for ion flows along their lengths. We introduce a model in which each tubulin dimer is viewed as an electric element with a capacitive, inductive and resistive characteristics arising due to polyelectrolyte nature of MTs. Based on Kirchhoff's laws taken in the continuum limit, a nonlinear partial differential equation is derived and analyzed. We demonstrate that it can be used to describe the electrostatic potential coupled to the propagating localized ionic waves. PMID:19259657

  16. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.; Marshall, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain is investigated. The experimental equipment consisted of a 1.43 km line-of-sight path with 4-foot diameter dual-polarized parabolic reflector antennas at each end. Linearly polarized 17.65 GHz signals were transmitted with the electric field vectors at plus 45 degrees and minus 45 degrees from the vertical. These polarizations were initially chosen to maximize the measured depolarization at any given rainfall rate. Later it was discovered that the cross polarization levels measured with plus or minus 45 degree linearly polarized signals are theoretically the least sensitive to variations in drop canting angle and this choice of polarization reduces the scatter in the data.

  17. Wave propagation in granular chains with local resonances.

    PubMed

    Bonanomi, Luca; Theocharis, Georgios; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    We study wave propagation in a chain of spherical particles containing a local resonator. The resonant particles are made of an aluminum outer spherical shell and a steel inner mass connected by a polymeric plastic structure acting as a spring. We characterize the dynamic response of individual particles and the transmitted linear spectra of a chain of particles in contact. A wide band gap is observed both in theoretical and experimental results. We show the ability to tune the acoustic transmission by varying the contact interaction between particles. Higher driving amplitude leads to the generation of nonlinearities both in the response of a single particle and that of the whole chain. For a single resonant particle, we observe experimentally a resonant frequency downshift, which follows a complex nonlinear behavior. In the chain of particles, nonlinearity leads to the generation of nonlinear harmonics and the presence of localized modes inside the band gap. PMID:25871239

  18. An optimized finite-difference scheme for wave propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Lomax, H.; Jurgens, H.

    1993-01-01

    Two fully-discrete finite-difference schemes for wave propagation problems are presented, a maximum-order scheme and an optimized (or spectral-like) scheme. Both combine a seven-point spatial operator and an explicit six-stage time-march method. The maximum-order operator is fifth-order in space and is sixth-order in time for a linear problem with periodic boundary conditions. The phase and amplitude errors of the schemes obtained using Fourier analysis are given and compared with a second-order and a fourth-order method. Numerical experiments are presented which demonstrate the usefulness of the schemes for a range of problems. For some problems, the optimized scheme leads to a reduction in global error compared to the maximum-order scheme with no additional computational expense.

  19. Variational structure of inverse problems in wave propagation and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1995-03-01

    Practical algorithms for solving realistic inverse problems may often be viewed as problems in nonlinear programming with the data serving as constraints. Such problems are most easily analyzed when it is possible to segment the solution space into regions that are feasible (satisfying all the known constraints) and infeasible (violating some of the constraints). Then, if the feasible set is convex or at least compact, the solution to the problem will normally lie on the boundary of the feasible set. A nonlinear program may seek the solution by systematically exploring the boundary while satisfying progressively more constraints. Examples of inverse problems in wave propagation (traveltime tomography) and vibration (modal analysis) will be presented to illustrate how the variational structure of these problems may be used to create nonlinear programs using implicit variational constraints.

  20. Seismoelectric wave propagation numerical modelling in partially saturated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warden, S.; Garambois, S.; Jouniaux, L.; Brito, D.; Sailhac, P.; Bordes, C.

    2013-09-01

    To better understand and interpret seismoelectric measurements acquired over vadose environments, both the existing theory and the wave propagation modelling programmes, available for saturated materials, should be extended to partial saturation conditions. We propose here an extension of Pride's equations aiming to take into account partially saturated materials, in the case of a water-air mixture. This new set of equations was incorporated into an existing seismoelectric wave propagation modelling code, originally designed for stratified saturated media. This extension concerns both the mechanical part, using a generalization of the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the electromagnetic part, for which dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity were expressed against water saturation. The dynamic seismoelectric coupling was written as a function of the streaming potential coefficient, which depends on saturation, using four different relations derived from recent laboratory or theoretical studies. In a second part, this extended programme was used to synthesize the seismoelectric response for a layered medium consisting of a partially saturated sand overburden on top of a saturated sandstone half-space. Subsequent analysis of the modelled amplitudes suggests that the typically very weak interface response (IR) may be best recovered when the shallow layer exhibits low saturation. We also use our programme to compute the seismoelectric response of a capillary fringe between a vadose sand overburden and a saturated sand half-space. Our first modelling results suggest that the study of the seismoelectric IR may help to detect a sharp saturation contrast better than a smooth saturation transition. In our example, a saturation contrast of 50 per cent between a fully saturated sand half-space and a partially saturated shallow sand layer yields a stronger IR than a stepwise decrease in saturation.

  1. A superconducting qubit coupled to propagating acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin V.; Aref, Thomas; Frisk Kockum, Anton; Ekström, Maria K.; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical devices in the quantum regime have so far consisted mainly of suspended resonators, where standing modes can be populated with quanta of vibrational energy. We present a fundamentally different system, where the mechanical excitation is not restricted to a specific mode and location. Instead, we demonstrate strong non-classical coupling between propagating phonons and a superconducting qubit. The qubit is fabricated on a piezoelectric substrate, and is designed to interact with Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) in the gigahertz frequency range. A separate on-chip transducer allows us to launch SAWs toward the qubit from a distance and pick up SAW phonons that the qubit reflects and emits. In a series of experiments where the qubit is addressed both electrically and acoustically, we show that the qubit couples much more strongly to SAWs than to any electrical modes. The low speed of sound sets phonons apart from photons as a medium for transporting quantum information, and should enable real-time manipulation of propagating quanta. The short acoustic wavelength and strong piezoelectric coupling should also allows regimes of interaction to be explored which cannot be reached in photonic systems.

  2. Radio-wave propagation for space communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the effects of Earth's atmosphere on space communications systems is reviewed. The design and reliable operation of satellite systems that provide the many applications in space which rely on the transmission of radio waves for communications and scientific purposes are dependent on the propagation characteristics of the transmission path. The presence of atmospheric gases, clouds, fog, precipitation, and turbulence causes uncontrolled variations in the signal characteristics. These variations can result in a reduction of the quality and reliability of the transmitted information. Models and other techniques are used in the prediction of atmospheric effects as influenced by frequency, geography, elevation angle, and type of transmission. Recent data on performance characteristics obtained from direct measurements on satellite links operating to above 30 GHz have been reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the effects of precipitation on the Earth/space path, including rain attenuation, and ice particle depolarization. Other factors are sky noise, antenna gain degradation, scintillations, and bandwidth coherence. Each of the various propagation factors has an effect on design criteria for communications systems. These criteria include link reliability, power margins, noise contribution, modulation and polarization factors, channel cross talk, error rate, and bandwidth limitations.

  3. Modes in light wave propagating in semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, Margarita A.

    1994-01-01

    The study of semiconductor laser based on an analogy of the Schrodinger equation and an equation describing light wave propagation in nonhomogeneous medium is developed. The active region of semiconductor laser is considered as optical waveguide confining the electromagnetic field in the cross-section (x,y) and allowing waveguide propagation along the laser resonator (z). The mode structure is investigated taking into account the transversal and what is the important part of the suggested consideration longitudinal nonhomogeneity of the optical waveguide. It is shown that the Gaussian modes in the case correspond to spatial squeezing and correlation. Spatially squeezed two-mode structure of nonhomogeneous optical waveguide is given explicitly. Distribution of light among the laser discrete modes is presented. Properties of the spatially squeezed two-mode field are described. The analog of Franck-Condon principle for finding the maxima of the distribution function and the analog of Ramsauer effect for control of spatial distribution of laser emission are discussed.

  4. Novel wave intensity analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation accounting for peripheral reflections

    PubMed Central

    Alastruey, Jordi; Hunt, Anthony A E; Weinberg, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation that combines traditional wave intensity analysis with identification of Windkessel pressures to account for the effect on the pressure waveform of peripheral wave reflections. Using haemodynamic data measured in vivo in the rabbit or generated numerically in models of human compliant vessels, we show that traditional wave intensity analysis identifies the timing, direction and magnitude of the predominant waves that shape aortic pressure and flow waveforms in systole, but fails to identify the effect of peripheral reflections. These reflections persist for several cardiac cycles and make up most of the pressure waveform, especially in diastole and early systole. Ignoring peripheral reflections leads to an erroneous indication of a reflection-free period in early systole and additional error in the estimates of (i) pulse wave velocity at the ascending aorta given by the PU–loop method (9.5% error) and (ii) transit time to a dominant reflection site calculated from the wave intensity profile (27% error). These errors decreased to 1.3% and 10%, respectively, when accounting for peripheral reflections. Using our new analysis, we investigate the effect of vessel compliance and peripheral resistance on wave intensity, peripheral reflections and reflections originating in previous cardiac cycles. PMID:24132888

  5. Guided-wave multichannel acousto-optic devices based on collinear wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proklov, Valery V.; Korablev, E. M.

    1992-11-01

    Recently, there appeared in acousto-optics (AO) a tendency to develop the optical information processing technology based on AO spatial light modulators, which are very promising in relation to very fast analog signal processing and algebraic data processing with digital accuracy. The best widely distinguished way to win many other marketing counterparts lies in the performance of AO interactions in guided wave structures with highly developed planar technology. In contrast to numerous developments devoted to guided wave AO devices the collinear ones facilitate multichannel or 2-D-devices to increase their throughput and processing gain. We discuss general backgrounds of the guided wave AO devices, especially in the case of the collinear wave propagations. Some applications similar to the multichannel collinear AO Bragg cell on LiNbO for 2-D-beam scanning, AO spectrum analysis, 2-D- Fourier signal processing, frequency multiplexing/demultiplexing, and digital vector-matrix multiplication are presented.

  6. Local probing of propagating acoustic waves in a gigahertz echo chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin V.; Santos, Paulo V.; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2012-04-01

    In the same way that micro-mechanical resonators resemble guitar strings and drums, surface acoustic waves resemble the sound these instruments produce, but moving over a solid surface rather than through air. In contrast with oscillations in suspended resonators, such propagating mechanical waves have not before been studied near the quantum mechanical limits. Here, we demonstrate local probing of surface acoustic waves with a displacement sensitivity of 30amRMSHz-1/2 and detection sensitivity on the single-phonon level after averaging, at a frequency of 932MHz. Our probe is a piezoelectrically coupled single-electron transistor, which is sufficiently fast, non-destructive and localized to enable us to track pulses echoing back and forth in a long acoustic cavity, self-interfering and ringing the cavity up and down. We project that strong coupling to quantum circuits will enable new experiments, and hybrids using the unique features of surface acoustic waves. Prospects include quantum investigations of phonon-phonon interactions, and acoustic coupling to superconducting qubits for which we present favourable estimates.

  7. Annual report 1992/93, FOA 38. Radio systems and wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildh, I. M.

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of the division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation is to carry out research and development in the field of secure and robust radio communications for Sweden's national defense. This is the Annual Report for fiscal year 1992/93 of the Division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation. The division is responsible for research and development of secure radio communication for information transmission. We are also responsible for wave propagation research within a frequency range from LF to SHF. We carry out applied research in fields like antijamming systems, modulation, error correcting codes, wave propagation and digital signal processing. The wave propagation research is carried out by basic research so the demands from new techniques and new radio systems for accurate propagation models can be achieved.

  8. Gradient-index meta-surfaces as a bridge linking propagating waves and surface waves.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shulin; He, Qiong; Xiao, Shiyi; Xu, Qin; Li, Xin; Zhou, Lei

    2012-05-01

    The arbitrary control of electromagnetic waves is a key aim of photonic research. Although, for example, the control of freely propagating waves (PWs) and surface waves (SWs) has separately become possible using transformation optics and metamaterials, a bridge linking both propagation types has not yet been found. Such a device has particular relevance given the many schemes of controlling electromagnetic waves at surfaces and interfaces, leading to trapped rainbows, lensing, beam bending, deflection, and even anomalous reflection/refraction. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that a specific gradient-index meta-surface can convert a PW to a SW with nearly 100% efficiency. Distinct from conventional devices such as prism or grating couplers, the momentum mismatch between PW and SW is compensated by the reflection-phase gradient of the meta-surface, and a nearly perfect PW-SW conversion can happen for any incidence angle larger than a critical value. Experiments in the microwave region, including both far-field and near-field characterizations, are in excellent agreement with full-wave simulations. Our findings may pave the way for many applications, including high-efficiency surface plasmon couplers, anti-reflection surfaces, light absorbers, and so on. PMID:22466746

  9. Fidelity of a Finite Element Model for Longitudinal Wave Propagation in Thick Cylindrical Wave Guides

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, A.D.

    2000-09-01

    The ability to model wave propagation in circular cylindrical bars of finite length numerically or analytically has many applications. In this thesis the capability of an explicit finite element method to model longitudinal waves in cylindrical rods with circular cross-sections is explored. Dispersion curves for the first four modes are compared to the analytical solution to determine the accuracy of various element sizes and time steps. Values for the time step and element size are determined that retain accuracy while minimizing computational time. The modeling parameters are validated by calculating a signal propagated with a broadband input force. Limitations on the applicability are considered along with modeling parameters that should be applicable to more general geometries.

  10. On propagation of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain an equation for the propagation time of electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the expanding Universe. The velocity of electromagnetic waves propagation depends on the velocity of the interstellar medium in the observer's frame of reference. Gravitational radiation interacts weakly with the substance, so electromagnetic and gravitational waves propagate from a remote astrophysical object to the terrestrial observer at different time. Gravitational waves registration enables the inverse problem solution - by the difference in arrival time of electromagnetic and gravitational-wave signal, we can determine the characteristics of the emitting area of the astrophysical object.

  11. Modeling of weak blast wave propagation in the lung.

    PubMed

    D'yachenko, A I; Manyuhina, O V

    2006-01-01

    Blast injuries of the lung are the most life-threatening after an explosion. The choice of physical parameters responsible for trauma is important to understand its mechanism. We developed a one-dimensional linear model of an elastic wave propagation in foam-like pulmonary parenchyma to identify the possible cause of edema due to the impact load. The model demonstrates different injury localizations for free and rigid boundary conditions. The following parameters were considered: strain, velocity, pressure in the medium and stresses in structural elements, energy dissipation, parameter of viscous criterion. Maximum underpressure is the most suitable wave parameter to be the criterion for edema formation in a rabbit lung. We supposed that observed scattering of experimental data on edema severity is induced by the physiological variety of rabbit lungs. The criterion and the model explain this scattering. The model outlines the demands for experimental data to make an unambiguous choice of physical parameters responsible for lung trauma due to impact load. PMID:16214154

  12. Reflectometric detection of shock wave propagation within a concrete wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biele, Joachim K.

    2000-04-01

    A reflectometer device was set up in order to observe shock wave propagation in concrete. Reflective elements were comprised of an upper edge of the concrete wall and the front of an embedded conduit which ran through the thickness of the wall. The reflectometer then was completed by two PVDF film sensors. The first one was located directly in the rectangular center of the vertical plane above the conduit center line. Thus, all its four corners were of equal distance, equal to the wall width of 40 cm. The second one was placed on a plug closing the intake area of the conduit in order to take face-on measurement of the blast from a HE charge to initiate shock waves in the concrete material. Measurements were taken after detonating HE face-on in front of the intake area sensor. From the reflectometer geometry and times between shocks, velocities within this type of concrete were deduced. The pulse profile is found to represent detailed material behavior under shock loading.

  13. Analytical theory of wave propagation through stacked fishnet metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Marqués, R; Jelinek, L; Mesa, F; Medina, F

    2009-07-01

    This work analyzes the electromagnetic wave propagation through periodically stacked fishnets from zero frequency to the first Wood's anomaly. It is shown that, apart from Fabry-Perot resonances, these structures support two transmission bands that can be backward under the appropriate conditions. The first band starts at Wood's anomaly and is closely related to the well-known phenomena of extraordinary transmission through a single fishnet. The second band is related to the resonances of the fishnet holes. In both cases, the in-plane periodicity of the fishnet cannot be made electrically small, which prevents any attempt of homogenization of the structure along the fishnet planes. However, along the normal direction, even with very small periodicity transmission is still possible. An homogenization procedure can then be applied along this direction, thus making that the structure can behave as a backward-wave transmission line for such transmission bands. Closed-form design formulas will be provided by the analytical formulation here presented. These formulas have been carefully validated by intensive numerical computations. PMID:19582074

  14. Effective dielectric tensor for electromagnetic wave propagation in random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechtsman, M. C.; Torquato, S.

    2008-04-01

    We derive exact strong-contrast expansions for the effective dielectric tensor ɛe of electromagnetic waves propagating in a two-phase composite random medium with isotropic components explicitly in terms of certain integrals over the n-point correlation functions of the medium. Our focus is the long-wavelength regime, i.e., when the wavelength is much larger than the scale of inhomogeneities in the medium. Lower-order truncations of these expansions lead to approximations for the effective dielectric constant that depend upon whether the medium is below or above the percolation threshold. In particular, we apply two- and three-point approximations for ɛe to a variety of different three-dimensional model microstructures, including dispersions of hard spheres, hard oriented spheroids, and fully penetrable spheres as well as Debye random media, the random checkerboard, and power-law-correlated materials. We demonstrate the importance of employing n-point correlation functions of order higher than two for high dielectric-phase-contrast ratio. We show that disorder in the microstructure results in an imaginary component of the effective dielectric tensor that is directly related to the coarseness of the composite, i.e., local-volume-fraction fluctuations for infinitely large windows. The source of this imaginary component is the attenuation of the coherent homogenized wave due to scattering. We also remark on whether there is such attenuation in the case of a two-phase medium with a quasiperiodic structure.

  15. Ultrasonic wave propagation in two-phase media: Spherical inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S.; Sheu, Y. C.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering theory, recently developed via the extended method of equivalent inclusion, is used to study the propagation of time-harmonic waves in two-phase media of elastic matrix with randomly distributed elastic spherical inclusion materials. The elastic moduli and mass density of the composite medium are determined as functions of frequencies when given properties and concentration of the spheres and the matrix. Velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves in two-phase media are determined for cases of distributed spheres and localized damage. An averaging theorem that requires the equivalence of the strain energy and the kinetic energy between the effective medium and the original matrix with spherical inhomogeneities is employed to derive the effective moduli and mass density. The functional dependency of these quantities upon frequencies and concentration provides a method of data analysis in ultrasonic evaluation of material properties. Numerical results or moduli, velocity and/or attenuation as functions of concentration of inclusion material, or porosity, are graphically displayed.

  16. Simulation of 3D Global Wave Propagation Through Geodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, B.; Piazzoni, A.; Bunge, H.; Igel, H.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2005-12-01

    This project aims at a better understanding of the forward problem of global 3D wave propagation. We use the spectral element program "SPECFEM3D" (Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002a,b) with varying input models of seismic velocities derived from mantle convection simulations (Bunge et al., 2002). The purpose of this approach is to obtain seismic velocity models independently from seismological studies. In this way one can test the effects of varying parameters of the mantle convection models on the seismic wave field. In order to obtain the seismic velocities from the temperature field of the geodynamical simulations we follow a mineral physics approach. Assuming a certain mantle composition (e.g. pyrolite with CMASF composition) we compute the stable phases for each depth (i.e. pressure) and temperature by system Gibbs free energy minimization. Elastic moduli and density are calculated from the equations of state of the stable mineral phases. For this we use a mineral physics database derived from calorimetric experiments (enthalphy and entropy of formation, heat capacity) and EOS parameters.

  17. Ultrasonic wave propagation in two-phase media - Spherical inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S.; Sheu, Y. C.

    1984-01-01

    The scattering theory, recently developed via the extended method of equivalent inclusion, is used to study the propagation of time-harmonic waves in two-phase media of elastic matrix with randomly distributed elastic spherical inclusion materials. The elastic moduli and mass density of the composite medium are determined as functions of frequencies when given properties and concentration of the spheres and the matrix. Velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves in two-phase media are determined for cases of distributed spheres and localized damage. An averaging theorem that requires the equivalence of the strain energy and the kinetic energy between the effective medium and the original matrix with spherical inhomogeneities is employed to derive the effective moduli and mass density. The functional dependency of these quantities upon frequencies and concentration provides a method of data analysis in ultrasonic evaluation of material properties. Numerical results or moduli, velocity and/or attenuation as functions of concentration of inclusion material, or porosity, are graphically displayed.

  18. Gravitational waves from double hybrid inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarides, G.; Panagiotakopoulos, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a two-stage hybrid inflationary scenario in nonminimal supergravity which can predict values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio of the order of a few ×10-2 . For the parameters considered, the underlying supersymmetric particle physics model possesses two inflationary paths, the trivial and the semishifted one. The trivial path is stabilized by supergravity corrections and supports a first stage of inflation with a limited number of e-foldings. The tensor-to-scalar ratio can become appreciable while the value of the scalar spectral index remains acceptable as a result of the competition between the relatively mild supergravity corrections and the strong radiative corrections to the inflationary potential. The additional number of e-foldings required for solving the puzzles of hot big bang cosmology are generated by a second stage of inflation taking place along the semishifted path. This is possible only because the semishifted path is almost perpendicular to the trivial one, and thus not affected by the strong radiative corrections along the trivial path, and also because the supergravity effects remain mild. The requirement that the running of the scalar spectral index remain acceptable limits the possible values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio not to exceed about 5 ×10-2 . Our model predicts the formation of an unstable string-monopole network, which may lead to detectable gravity wave signatures in future space-based laser interferometer observations.

  19. Stationary propagation of a wave segment along an inhomogeneous excitable stripe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Hong; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    We report a numerical and theoretical study of an excitation wave propagating along an inhomogeneous stripe of an excitable medium. The stripe inhomogeneity is due to a jump of the propagation velocity in the direction transverse to the wave motion. Stationary propagating wave segments of rather complicated curved shapes are observed. We demonstrate that the stationary segment shape strongly depends on the initial conditions which are used to initiate the excitation wave. In a certain parameter range, the wave propagation is blocked at the inhomogeneity boundary, although the wave propagation is supported everywhere within the stripe. A free-boundary approach is applied to describe these phenomena which are important for a wide variety of applications from cardiology to information processing.

  20. Re-evaluation of ``;The Propagation of Radiation in the Spherical Wave Form''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.

    2012-03-01

    It is well accepted that radiation propagates in the free space (without obstacles) in a spherical wave form as well as in a plane wave form. Almost all observed phenomena such as interference, diffraction etc are explained satisfactorily on the basis of spherical wave propagation with a slight alteration in the mathematical treatment. However, one of the fundamental aspects, namely the intensity of the radiation as a function of the distance still remains an unsolved problem as the intensity varies with 1/(distance)2 when one represents the propagation in terms of spherical waves while it is independent of the distance if it is considered as a plane wave. In order to understand this puzzle, the propagation by a spherical wave form is reexamined. It is found that conversion of fields into particle (vice versa), via the field quantization process, explains several dilemma related with the radiation propagation.

  1. CLUSTER observations of lower hybrid waves excited at high altitudes by electromagnetic whistler mode signals from the HAARP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. F.; Inan, U. S.; Platino, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Kossey, P. A.; Kennedy, E. J.

    2004-03-01

    We report new observations from the CLUSTER spacecraft of strong excitation of lower hybrid (LH) waves by electromagnetic (EM) whistler mode waves at altitudes >=20,000 km outside the plasmasphere. Previous observations of this phenomenon occurred at altitudes <=7000 km. The excitation mechanism appears to be linear mode coupling in the presence of small scale plasma density irregularities. These observations provide strong evidence that EM whistler mode waves are continuously transformed into LH waves as the whistler mode waves propagate at high altitudes beyond L ~ 4. This may explain the lack of lightning generated whistlers observed in this same region of space.

  2. Stress wave propagation through viscous-elastic jointed rock masses using propagator matrix method (PMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Qi, Shengwen; Liu, Youshan; Zhan, Zhifa

    2014-01-01

    The reflection-transmission coefficients of the stress wave propagating through a jointed rock mass are of great concern in many fields, for example seismology, exploration geophysics and geotechnical engineering. For a natural jointed rock mass, both the rock material and the joints should be treated to be viscous-elastic in the practical dynamic analysis. In this paper, Kelvin viscous-elastic model is adopted to describe the rock deformation behaviour; the viscous-elastic behaviour of the unfilled wet joints is reproduced by the displacement and velocity discontinuity model, which also behaves as Kelvin viscous-elastic deformation behaviour. Based on the propagator matrix method (PMM), the reflection-transmission coefficients after P-wave propagating through the rock masses with a single joint and multiple parallel joints are studied, respectively, taking account for the normalized joint elastic stiffness (K), normalized joint viscous stiffness (η'), the rock quality factor (Q), the incident angle (α), the dimensionless joint spacing (ξ) and the joint number. The results show that the increment of η' has double effect. That is not only can it increase the effective joint stiffness (positive effect), but also can cause energy loss (negative effect). For a certain K, the transmission coefficients first decrease to a minimum, then increase with increase of η', while the reflection coefficients always decrease. There exists a critical value of η' which makes energy loss achieve a maximum value. The change trend of the reflection-transmission coefficients that varies with α is similar to that of pure elastic joints except that the value of η' has an effect on the magnitude of these coefficients. In the case of the multiple parallel joints, only transmission coefficients are studied. Both η' and Q has an important effect on the interlayer multiple reflections, which makes the variation of transmission coefficients very different from the purely elastic results

  3. Attenuation and distortion of compression waves propagating in very long tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shinya; Sasa, Daisuke; Aoki, Toshiyuki

    2011-03-01

    A lot of phenomena related to propagating various waves are seen when the high-speed train goes through the tunnel, the gas pipeline is broken due to an accident or the air brake of the wagon operates. For instance, a compression wave generated ahead of a high-speed train entering a tunnel propagates to the tunnel exit and spouts as a micro pressure wave, which causes an exploding sound. In order to estimate the magnitude correctly, the mechanism of the attenuation and distortion of a compression wave propagating along a very long tunnel must be understood and the experimental information on these phenomena is required. An experimental investigation is carried out to clarify the attenuation and distortion of the propagating compression wave in a very long tube. Experimental results show that the strength of a compression wave decreases with distance. The attenuation and distortion of compression waves are affected by the initial waveform of the compression wave and by the unsteady boundary layer induced by the propagating wave. The shape of a compression wave becomes different with the propagating distance; that is, a shock wave appears just head of a wavefront and an overshoot on pressure distribution is observed behind a shock wave due to the transition of the unsteady boundary layer.

  4. Ca^2+ Dynamics and Propagating Waves in Neural Networks with Excitatory and Inhibitory Neurons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Vladimir E.

    2008-03-01

    Dynamics of neural spikes, intracellular Ca^2+, and Ca^2+ in intracellular stores was investigated both in isolated Chay's neurons and in the neurons coupled in networks. Three types of neural networks were studied: a purely excitatory neural network, with only excitatory (AMPA) synapses; a purely inhibitory neural network with only inhibitory (GABA) synapses; and a hybrid neural network, with both AMPA and GABA synapses. In the hybrid neural network, the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory neurons was 4:1. For each case, we considered two types of connections, ``all-with-all" and 20 connections per neuron. Each neural network contained 100 neurons with randomly distributed connection strengths. In the neural networks with ``all-with-all" connections and AMPA/GABA synapses an increase in average synaptic strength yielded bursting activity with increased/decreased number of spikes per burst. The neural bursts and Ca^2+ transients were synchronous at relatively large connection strengths despite random connection strengths. Simulations of the neural networks with 20 connections per neuron and with only AMPA synapses showed synchronous oscillations, while the neural networks with GABA or hybrid synapses generated propagating waves of membrane potential and Ca^2+ transients.

  5. The impact of crustal density variations on seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plonka, A.; Fichtner, A.

    2014-12-01

    Lateral density variations are the source of mass transport in the Earth at all scales, acting as drivers of convective motion. However, the density structure of the Earth remains largely unknown since classic seismic observables and gravity provide only weak constraints with strong trade-offs. Current density models are therefore often based on velocity scaling, making strong assumptions on the origin of structural heterogeneities, which may not necessarily be correct.We propose to develop a seismic tomography technique that directly inverts for density, using complete seismograms rather than arrival times of certain waves only. The first task in this challenge is to systematically study the imprints of density on synthetic seismograms.To compute the full seismic wavefield in a 3D heterogeneous medium without making significant approximations, we usenumerical wave propagation based on a spectral-element discretization of the seismic wave equation. We consider a 2000 by 1000 km wide and 500 km deep spherical section, with the 1D Earth model PREM (with 40 km crust thickness) as a background. Onto this (in the uppermost 40 km) we superimpose 3D randomly generated velocity and density heterogeneities of various magnitudes and correlation lenghts. We use different random realizations of heterogeneity distribution.We compare the synthetic seismograms for 3D velocity and density structure with 3D velocity structure and with the 1D background, calculating relative amplitude differences and timeshifts as functions of time and frequency.Our analyses indicate that reasonably sized density variations within the crust can leave a strong imprint on both traveltimes and amplitudes. This suggests (1) that crustal tomography can be significantly biased when density heterogeneities are not properly accounted for, and (2) that the solution of the seismic inverse problem for density may become feasible.

  6. Mathematical Analysis of Wave Propagation in Stratified Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravica, David William

    In this thesis we study a class of wave equations of the form (partial_sp{t} {2} + H) Psi = 0, where H = -c(z)^2rho(z)nabla_{z }cdotrho(z)^{-1}nabla _{z}, with z = (x,y), n >=q 2, and Psi, a complex valued function on {bf R}^ {n} times {bf R} (space-time). The functions rho and c are assumed, roughly, to obey rho(x,y) - rho_0(y) to 0, c(x,y) - c_0(y) to 0 as | z|to infty, for some appropriate functions rho_0 and c_0. Here xin {bf R}^{k }, and yin {bf R} ^{m}, k + m = n. Equation (1) with such rho and c describes waves in stratified fluids (m = 1, k = 2), as well as electromagnetic waves in layered dielectric media (m = 1, k = 2), and in optical fibres (m = 2, k = 1, and rho(x,y) = 1). Clearly, understanding of the propagation under equation (1) can be reduced to the description of the spectral properties of H. In this thesis, we show that (a) the spectrum of H is the union of absolutely continuous and pure point components, i.e. it has no singular continuous part; (b) under certain additional conditions, H has no eigenvalues; (c) the resolvent of H considered between suitable weighted spaces is Holder continuous in the spectral parameter up to the real axis (the limiting absorption principle). The last result implies, in particular, the local energy decay (energy in any bounded domain vanishes as an inverse power of time). Using the results above we develop the scattering theory for this equation. The method used is that of positive commutators and is related to the one employed in the modern many-body scattering theory.

  7. Impulsive Wave Propagation within Magmatic Conduits with Axial Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Negri Leiva, R. S.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    We implemented Trefftz's method to simulate wave propagation in a fluid-solid system aimed to represent a magmatic conduit. Assuming axial symmetry, a set of multipoles is used to build a complete system of wave functions for both the solid and the fluid. These functions are solutions of the elastodynamic equations that govern the motions in the fluid and the solid, respectively. The conduit can be closed or open and the exterior elastic domain may be unlimited or with an exterior boundary. In order to find the functions coefficients, boundary conditions (null shear and continuity of pressures and normal velocities) are satisfied in the least squares sense. The impulsive nature of the source is considered using Fourier analysis. Despite the simplicity of the formulation our results display a rich variety of behaviors. In fact, for a uniform infinite cylinder we reproduced the analytical solution. Moreover, this approach allows establishing some important effects of conduit geometry, including changes of sections. Lateral effects and bump resonances are well resolved. We compared our numerical calculations with results obtained from experimental simulations of volcanic explosions in which rapid depressurization induces fragmentation of volcanic rocks. These experiments are performed within a shock-tube apparatus at room temperature and various pressures using Argon (Ar) gas, particles and pumice samples of different porosities, from Popocatepetl volcano. The mechanical system is well characterized and the dynamics of the explosive process is monitored with high precision piezoelectric sensors located at the pipe surface. The combination of analytical and experimental approaches is very useful to understand the seismic wave field of volcanic conduit dynamics.

  8. Seismic wave propagation modeling in porous media for various frequencies: A case study in carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Wardaya, Pongga Dikdya; Adler, John; Siahaan, Kisko R.

    2012-06-01

    Seismic wave parameter plays very important role to characterize reservoir properties whereas pore parameter is one of the most important parameter of reservoir. Therefore, wave propagation phenomena in pore media is important to be studied. By referring this study, in-direct pore measurement method based on seismic wave propagation can be developed. Porosity play important role in reservoir, because the porosity can be as compartment of fluid. Many type of porosity like primary as well as secondary porosity. Carbonate rock consist many type of porosity, i.e.: inter granular porosity, moldic porosity and also fracture porosity. The complexity of pore type in carbonate rocks make the wave propagation in these rocks is more complex than sand reservoir. We have studied numerically wave propagation in carbonate rock by finite difference modeling in time-space domain. The medium of wave propagation was modeled by base on the result of pattern recognition using artificial neural network. The image of thin slice of carbonate rock is then translated into the velocity matrix. Each mineral contents including pore of thin slice image are translated to velocity since mineral has unique velocity. After matrix velocity model has been developed, the seismic wave is propagated numerically in this model. The phenomena diffraction is clearly shown while wave propagates in this complex carbonate medium. The seismic wave is modeled in various frequencies. The result shows dispersive phenomena where high frequency wave tends to propagate in matrix instead pores. In the other hand, the low frequency waves tend to propagate through pore space even though the velocity of pore is very low. Therefore, this dispersive phenomena of seismic wave propagation can be the future indirect measurement technology for predicting the existence or intensity of pore space in reservoir rock. It will be very useful for the future reservoir characterization.

  9. Combination of the discontinuous Galerkin method with finite differences for simulation of seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsa, Vadim; Tcheverda, Vladimir; Botter, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    We present an algorithm for the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation in models with a complex near surface part and free surface topography. The approach is based on the combination of finite differences with the discontinuous Galerkin method. The discontinuous Galerkin method can be used on polyhedral meshes; thus, it is easy to handle the complex surfaces in the models. However, this approach is computationally intense in comparison with finite differences. Finite differences are computationally efficient, but in general, they require rectangular grids, leading to the stair-step approximation of the interfaces, which causes strong diffraction of the wavefield. In this research we present a hybrid algorithm where the discontinuous Galerkin method is used in a relatively small upper part of the model and finite differences are applied to the main part of the model.

  10. Direct observation of a propagating spin wave induced by spin-transfer torque.

    PubMed

    Madami, M; Bonetti, S; Consolo, G; Tacchi, S; Carlotti, G; Gubbiotti, G; Mancoff, F B; Yar, M A; Akerman, J

    2011-10-01

    Spin torque oscillators with nanoscale electrical contacts are able to produce coherent spin waves in extended magnetic films, and offer an attractive combination of electrical and magnetic field control, broadband operation, fast spin-wave frequency modulation, and the possibility of synchronizing multiple spin-wave injection sites. However, many potential applications rely on propagating (as opposed to localized) spin waves, and direct evidence for propagation has been lacking. Here, we directly observe a propagating spin wave launched from a spin torque oscillator with a nanoscale electrical contact into an extended Permalloy (nickel iron) film through the spin transfer torque effect. The data, obtained by wave-vector-resolved micro-focused Brillouin light scattering, show that spin waves with tunable frequencies can propagate for several micrometres. Micromagnetic simulations provide the theoretical support to quantitatively reproduce the results. PMID:21873993

  11. Acoustooptic Effects of Nematic Liquid Crystals Induced by Elastic Wave Propagating in Glass Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritake, Hiroshi; Seike, Tadaaki; Toda, Kohji

    1999-05-01

    An elastic wave delay line with a glass plate as a propagation medium is investigated in relations to acoustooptic effects of nematic liquid crystals. A nematic liquid crystal cell is mounted on the central region of a glass plate for elastic wave propagation. The elastic wave propagating in the glass plate interacts with the liquid crystal in a wide frequency range. Two types of periodical domain structures are observed in the nematic liquid crystal cell under the existence of the elastic wave. One exists in both homeotropically and homogeneously aligned cells, and depends not on the kind of liquid crystal but on the carrier frequency of the elastic wave. The other is recognized only in homogeneously aligned cells and depends on the layer thickness and the kind of liquid crystal, but not on the carrier frequency of the elastic wave. Both periodical domain structures are induced by the elastic wave propagating in the glass plate.

  12. Effect of parallel refraction on magnetospheric upper hybrid waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, J.; Kennel, C. F.

    1984-01-01

    Large amplitude (not less than 10 mV/m) electrostatic plasma waves near the upper hybrid (UH) frequency have been observed from 0 to 50 deg magnetic latitude (MLAT) during satellite plasma-pause crossings. A three-dimensional numerical ray-tracing calculation, based on an electron distribution measured during a GEOS 1 dayside intense upper-hybrid wave event, suggests how UH waves might achieve such large amplitudes away from the geomagnetic equator. Refractive effects largely control the wave amplification and, in particular, the unavoidable refraction due to parallel geomagnetic field gradients restricts growth to levels below those observed. However, a cold electron density gradient parallel to the field can lead to upper hybrid wave growth that can account for the observed emission levels.

  13. Theoretical and experimental studies of space-related plasma wave propagation and resonance phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawford, F. W.

    1975-01-01

    The testing and refinement of various ideas for space plasma experimentation on the spacelab are dealt with. Special attention was given to whistlers and Alfven wave excitation by electron and proton beams. Data also consider nonlinear wave propagation, long delayed echoes, pulse propagation, and ionospheric heating and back scatter.

  14. Microscopic Lagrangian description of warm plasmas. I - Linear wave propagation. II - Nonlinear wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.; Crawford, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    It is pointed out that the conventional iterative analysis of nonlinear plasma wave phenomena, which involves a direct use of Maxwell's equations and the equations describing the particle dynamics, leads to formidable theoretical and algebraic complexities, especially for warm plasmas. As an effective alternative, the Lagrangian method may be applied. It is shown how this method may be used in the microscopic description of small-signal wave propagation and in the study of nonlinear wave interactions. The linear theory is developed for an infinite, homogeneous, collisionless, warm magnetoplasma. A summary is presented of a perturbation expansion scheme described by Galloway and Kim (1971), and Lagrangians to third order in perturbation are considered. Attention is given to the averaged-Lagrangian density, the action-transfer and coupled-mode equations, and the general solution of the coupled-mode equations.

  15. Wave propagation in photonic crystals and metamaterials: Surface waves, nonlinearity and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingnan

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystals and metamaterials, both composed of artificial structures, are two interesting areas in electromagnetism and optics. New phenomena in photonic crystals and metamaterials are being discovered, including some not found in natural materials. This thesis presents my research work in the two areas. Photonic crystals are periodically arranged artificial structures, mostly made from dielectric materials, with period on the same order of the wavelength of the working electromagnetic wave. The wave propagation in photonic crystals is determined by the Bragg scattering of the periodic structure. Photonic band-gaps can be present for a properly designed photonic crystal. Electromagnetic waves with frequency within the range of the band-gap are suppressed from propagating in the photonic crystal. With surface defects, a photonic crystal could support surface modes that are localized on the surface of the crystal, with mode frequencies within the band-gap. With line defects, a photonic crystal could allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves along the channels. The study of surface modes and waveguiding properties of a 2D photonic crystal will be presented in Chapter 1. Metamaterials are generally composed of artificial structures with sizes one order smaller than the wavelength and can be approximated as effective media. Effective macroscopic parameters such as electric permittivity ϵ, magnetic permeability μ are used to characterize the wave propagation in metamaterials. The fundamental structures of the metamaterials affect strongly their macroscopic properties. By designing the fundamental structures of the metamaterials, the effective parameters can be tuned and different electromagnetic properties can be achieved. One important aspect of metamaterial research is to get artificial magnetism. Metallic split-ring resonators (SRRs) and variants are widely used to build magnetic metamaterials with effective μ < 1 or even μ < 0. Varactor based

  16. Seismic wave propagation through an extrusive basalt sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Oliver; Hobbs, Richard; Brown, Richard; Schofield, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Layers of basalt flows within sedimentary successions (e.g. in the Faeroe-Shetland Basin) cause complex scattering and attenuation of seismic waves during seismic exploration surveys. Extrusive basaltic sequences are highly heterogeneous and contain strong impedance contrasts between higher velocity crystalline flow cores (˜6 km s‑1) and the lower velocity fragmented and weathered flow crusts (3-4 km s‑1). Typically, the refracted wave from the basaltic layer is used to build a velocity model by tomography. This velocity model is then used to aid processing of the reflection data where direct determination of velocity is ambiguous, or as a starting point for full waveform inversion, for example. The model may also be used as part of assessing drilling risk of potential wells, as it is believed to constrain the total thickness of the sequence. In heterogeneous media, where the scatter size is of the order of the seismic wavelength or larger, scattering preferentially traps the seismic energy in the low velocity regions. This causes a build-up of energy that is guided along the low velocity layers. This has implications for the interpretation of the observed first arrival of the seismic wave, which may be a biased towards the low velocity regions. This will then lead to an underestimate of the velocity structure and hence the thickness of the basalt, with implications for the drilling of wells hoping to penetrate through the base of the basalts in search of hydrocarbons. Using 2-D acoustic finite difference modelling of the guided wave through a simple layered basalt sequence, we consider the relative importance of different parameters of the basalt on the seismic energy propagating through the layers. These include the proportion of high to low velocity material, the number of layers, their thickness and the roughness of the interfaces between the layers. We observe a non-linear relationship between the ratio of high to low velocity layers and the apparent

  17. A Methodology for Tsunami Wave Propagation Forecast in Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Walsh, D.; Becker, N. C.; Fryer, G. J.

    2009-12-01

    U.S. Tsunami Warning Centers (TWCs) forecast tsunami wave heights using databases of pre-computed tsunami scenarios such as the Standby Inundation Forecasting of Tsunamis (SIFT) model developed by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and the database model of the West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center. These models, however, cannot anticipate all possible earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanisms. We have therefore developed a new wave-height model complimentary to the database approach that uses real-time earthquake parameters to produce a real-time wave propagation forecast, a model we call real-time inundation forecasting of tsunamis (RIFT). Our model employs a mass-conserving second order finite difference method of linear shallow water equations with a leapfrog scheme in time and a staggered grid in space. The model's user may customize its domain by selecting one of twenty predefined ocean basins and marginal seas. The user may also let RIFT choose the computation domain automatically, in which case it will determine its computational domain by calculating tsunami travel time for the earthquake to cover the region specified by the TWCs' warning criteria based on the earthquake's magnitude. For example, the US Tsunami Warning Centers will issue a Tsunami Warning for the region within three hours travel time from the epicenter of a magnitude 7.9 earthquake. We demonstrate that RIFT can produce a tsunami wave-height forecast for this region at 4-arc-minute resolution in less than one minute using a modern 4-CPU Linux workstation, including the time needed to dynamically compute the boundaries of the domain. The user may also use smaller domains to generate a tsunami forecast much more quickly when an earthquake poses only a local tsunami threat, such as a large earthquake in Hawaii. In this case, the model can forecast tsunami wave heights for the entire state of Hawaii in less than five seconds at 1-arc-minute resolution. RIFT needs an earthquake

  18. AxiSEM: Exploiting structural complexity for efficient wave propagation across the scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin; Leng, Kuangdai; Stähler, Simon; Krischer, Lion; Hosseini, Kasra

    2016-04-01

    Our open-source seismic modeling method AxiSEM (www.axisem.info) is presented a backbone for numerous further extensions, including accurate and efficient wave propagation in 3D Earth models, a database mode (www.instaseis.net), local domains, hybrid methods, and waveform sensitivity kernels for tomography. Our general mantra is to enable wave propagation across the observable frequency spectrum in a most efficient manner by adapting the methodology directly to the level of structural complexity, in the vein of Occam's razor. The basic AxiSEM approach relies upon axisymmetric (including spherically symmetric) models, thereby satisfying a large fraction of observable data. The benefit of this method stems from the resultant dimensional collapse to two numerical dimensions, whereby the third azimuthal dimension is tackled analytically. For high-frequency wave propagation, this leads to 3-4 orders of magnitude speedup in computational cost compared to 3D domain discretizations. AxiSEM is highly scalable anywhere between laptops and supercomputers, and includes novel, optimized implementations of viscoelasticity and anisotropy. We present benchmarks, data comparisons, a range of unique applications from inner-core anisotropy to noise modeling and lowermost mantle structures. 1D structures are exploited by instaseis, a methodology to extract full, broadband and accurate waveforms instantaneously from wavefield databases computed with AxiSEM. A webservice built on instaseis ("syngine") has been launched at IRIS (see abstract EGU2016-8190) to generate on-demand synthetics up to 1Hz for prominent Earth models. 3D structures are tackled by our recent extension AxiSEM3D: We expand the wavefield in the azimuthal dimension in Fourier series, leading to a drastic computational cost speedup compared to classic 3D methods (up to a factor of 100), especially in the high-frequency regime. We will show benchmarks for typical global tomographic models and sketch our approach to

  19. Wave Propagation in Exponentially Varying Cross-Section Rods and Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkhah-Bahrami, Mansour; Loghmani, Masih; Pooyanfar, Mostafa

    2008-09-01

    In this paper vibration as propagating waves is used to calculate frequencies of exponentially varying cross-section rods with various boundary conditions. From wave standpoint, vibrations propagate, reflect and transmit in structures. The propagation and reflection matrices are combined to provide a concise and systematic approach to free longitudinal vibration analysis of exponentially varying cross-section rods. The results are compared with another method.

  20. Propagation estimates for dispersive wave equations: Application to the stratified wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravica, David W.

    1999-01-01

    The plane-stratified wave equation (∂t2+H)ψ=0 with H=-c(y)2∇z2 is studied, where z=x⊕y, x∈Rk, y∈R1 and |c(y)-c∞|→0 as |y|→∞. Solutions to such an equation are solved for the propagation of waves through a layered medium and can include waves which propagate in the x-directions only (i.e., trapped modes). This leads to a consideration of the pseudo-differential wave equation (∂t2+ω(-Δx))ψ=0 such that the dispersion relation ω(ξ2) is analytic and satisfies c1⩽ω'(ξ2)⩽c2 for c*>0. Uniform propagation estimates like ∫|x|⩽|t|αE(UtP±φ0)dkx⩽Cα,β(1+|t|)-β∫E(φ0)dkx are obtained where Ut is the evolution group, P± are projection operators onto the Hilbert space of initial conditions φ∈H and E(ṡ) is the local energy density. In special cases scattering of trapped modes off a local perturbation satisfies the causality estimate ||P+ρΛjSP-ρΛk||⩽Cνρ-ν for each ν<1/2. Here P+ρΛj (P-ρΛk) are remote outgoing/detector (incoming/transmitter) projections for the jth (kth) trapped mode. Also Λ⋐R+ is compact, so the projections localize onto formally-incoming (eventually-outgoing) states.

  1. Controlling elastic wave propagation in a soft bilayer system via wrinkling-induced stress patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Yang; Zheng, Yang; Cao, Yanping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Zhang, Wanyu

    2016-05-14

    Compression of a film/substrate bilayer system with different surface/interfacial structures can lead to diverse buckling patterns including sinusoidal wrinkles, ridges, folds, creases and tilted sawteeth wrinkles. In this paper, we show that elastic wave band gaps in the film/substrate bilayer system largely depend on the wrinkling patterns. More interestingly, we find that different wrinkling patterns investigated here can coexist and evolve in one bilayer system and the elastic wave propagation behaviors can be controlled by manipulating the hybrid wrinkling patterns. Our analysis also reveals that the periodic stress pattern plays a dominant role in tuning the bandgap structures in comparison to geometrical patterns caused by surface instability. A careful investigation of the transmission spectra of the composite systems has validated the main findings given by the analysis based on the Bloch wave theory. Potential use of the method and materials reported here to gain wide attenuation frequency ranges and the design of nesting Fibonacci superlattices have been demonstrated. PMID:27074161

  2. The imprint of crustal density heterogeneities on seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plonka, A.; Fichtner, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a set of numerical experiments designed to observe the imprint of three-dimensional density heterogeneities on a seismogram. To compute the full seismic wavefield in a three-dimensional heterogeneous medium, we use numerical wave propagation based on a spectral-element discretization of the seismic wave equation. We consider a 2000 by 1000 km wide and 500 km deep spherical section, with the one-dimensional Earth model PREM, altered so that the crust is 40 km thick and all the parameters in the crust are constant, as a background. Onto the uppermost 40 km of the underlying one-dimensional model we superimpose three-dimensional randomly generated velocity and density heterogeneities of various correlation lengths. We use different random realizations of heterogeneity distribution. We compare the synthetic seismograms for three-dimensional velocity and density structure with three-dimensional velocity structure and one-dimensional density kept as PREM, calculating relative amplitude differences and time shifts as functions of time and frequency. The misfits in time shift and amplitude for different frequency bands, epicentral distances and medium complexities are then stacked into histograms and statistically analysed. We observe strong dependency on frequency of density-related amplitude difference. We also conclude potential sensitivity to distant density structures, and that scattering is essential to observe significant density imprint on a seismogram. The possible density-related bias in velocity and attenuation for regional tomographic models is calculated using mean misfit values for given epicentral distances. Whereas the bias in velocity does not exceed 0.5% of the model value, the density-related change in attenuation may be as big as 71% of the model value for the mean amplitude difference in the highest frequency band. The results suggest that density imprint on a seismogram is not negligible and with further theoretical

  3. Intercellular calcium waves are associated with the propagation of vasomotion along arterial strips.

    PubMed

    Seppey, Dominique; Sauser, Roger; Koenigsberger, Michèle; Bény, Jean-Louis; Meister, Jean-Jacques

    2010-02-01

    Vasomotion consists of cyclic arterial diameter variations induced by synchronous contractions and relaxations of smooth muscle cells. However, the arteries do not contract simultaneously on macroscopic distances, and a propagation of the contraction can be observed. In the present study, our aim was to investigate this propagation. We stimulated endothelium-denuded rat mesenteric arterial strips with phenylephrine (PE) to obtain vasomotion and observed that the contraction waves are linked to intercellular calcium waves. A velocity of approximately 100 microm/s was measured for the two kinds of waves. To investigate the calcium wave propagation mechanisms, we used a method allowing a PE stimulation of a small area of the strip. No calcium propagation could be induced by this local stimulation when the strip was in its resting state. However, if a low PE concentration was added on the whole strip, local PE stimulations induced calcium waves, spreading over finite distances. The calcium wave velocity induced by local stimulation was identical to the velocity observed during vasomotion. This suggests that the propagation mechanisms are similar in the two cases. Using inhibitors of gap junctions and of voltage-operated calcium channels, we showed that the locally induced calcium propagation likely depends on the propagation of the smooth muscle cell depolarization. Finally, we proposed a model of the propagation mechanisms underlying these intercellular calcium waves. PMID:19966061

  4. Finite Element Modeling of Impulsive Excitation and Shear Wave Propagation in an Incompressible, Transversely Isotropic Medium

    PubMed Central

    Rouze, Ned C.; Wang, Michael H.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathy R.

    2013-01-01

    Elastic properties of materials can be measured by observing shear wave propagation following localized, impulsive excitations and relating the propagation velocity to a model of the material. However, characterization of anisotropic materials is difficult because of the number of elasticity constants in the material model and the complex dependence of propagation velocity relative to the excitation axis, material symmetries, and propagation directions. In this study, we develop a model of wave propagation following impulsive excitation in an incompressible, transversely isotropic (TI) material such as muscle. Wave motion is described in terms of three propagation modes identified by their polarization relative to the material symmetry axis and propagation direction. Phase velocities for these propagation modes are expressed in terms of five elasticity constants needed to describe a general TI material, and also in terms of three constants after the application of two constraints that hold in the limit of an incompressible material. Group propagation velocities are derived from the phase velocities to describe the propagation of wave packets away from the excitation region following localized excitation. The theoretical model is compared to the results of finite element (FE) simulations performed using a nearly incompressible material model with the five elasticity constants chosen to preserve the essential properties of the material in the incompressible limit. Propagation velocities calculated from the FE displacement data show complex structure that agrees quantitatively with the theoretical model and demonstrates the possibility of measuring all three elasticity constants needed to characterize an incompressible, TI material. PMID:24094454

  5. Instabilities of low frequency, parallel propagating electromagnetic waves in the earth's foreshock region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.; Edmiston, J. P.; Frank, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    An instability analysis is presented for parallel and antiparallel propagating electromagnetic waves generated by reflected and diffuse suprathermal ions upstream of the earth's bow shock. Calculations are performed on the basis of upstream particle observations made by the ISEE 1 Quadrispheric Lepedea instrument and low-energy electron measurements made by the ISEE 1 electron spectrometer for a single period. The electromagnetic dispersion relation is computed and the unstable modes and growth times of the fastest growing waves are determined. It is found that the reflected ions destabilize the plasma most strongly at a wave frequency 0.1 that of the ion gyrofrequency by a resonant ion beam instability for waves propagating upstream and by a nonresonant firehose-like instability for waves propagating downstream. The diffuse ions also destabilize the plasma most strongly at the same frequency by means of resonant instabilities of both right- and left-hand polarized waves propagating away from the bow shock.

  6. Suppression of decay instability of the non-resonant beat wave excited by two counter-propagating x-mode lasers in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kanika; Sajal, Vivek; Kumar, Ravindra; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-01-01

    The decay instability of non-resonant beat mode is investigated in homogeneous, hot, and collision less plasma having transverse static magnetic field. Two counter-propagating X-mode lasers with frequency difference ω1˜ω2≥2 ωp and wave numbers k→ 1 and k→ 2 drive a non-resonant space charge beat wave at phase matching conditions of frequency ω0=ω1˜ω2 and wave numbers k→ 0=k→ 1+k→ 2 . The driven beat wave acts as a pump for decay instability and parametrically excites a pair of lower hybrid wave (ω,k → ) and sideband upper hybrid wave (ω3,k→ 3) propagating in sideward direction so that momentum remains conserved. The sideband wave couples with the driver beat wave to exert ponderomotive force on plasma electrons at frequency ω=ω0+ω3 . The oscillatory motion of plasma electrons due to ponderomotive force and lower hybrid wave causes density perturbation in plasma, which couples with oscillating beat mode by feedback mechanism and gives rise to a sideband wave at resonance. The maximum growth rate is achieved at scattering angels θs˜30 ° and θs˜150 ° . The growth rate becomes half by changing applied magnetic field from ˜90 T to ˜270 T . The suppression of decay instability can be beneficial for parametric excitation of fast plasma wave (coupled with slow plasma wave) by two counter-propagating lasers for electron acceleration.

  7. Propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in lap-shear adhesive joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Marzani, Alessandro

    2004-07-01

    This paper deals with the propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in adhesively-bonded lap-shear joints. The topic is relevant to ultrasonic bond inspection in aerospace components. Specifically, the propagation of the lowest-order, antisymmetric a0 mode through the joint is examined. This mode can be easily generated and detected in the field due to the predominant out-of-plane displacements at the surface of the test piece. An important aspect is the mode conversion at the boundaries between the single-plate adherends and the multilayer overlap. The a0 strength of transmission is studied for three different bond states in aluminum joints, namely a fully cured adhesive bond, a poorly cured adhesive bond, and a slip bond. Theoretical predictions based on the Global Matrix Method indicate that the dispersive behavior of the guided waves in the multilayer overlap is highly dependent on bond state. Experimental tests of the joints are conducted by a hybrid, broadband laser/air-coupled ultrasonic setup in a through-transmission configuration. This system does not require any wet coupling and it can be moved flexibly across the test piece. The Gabor Wavelet transform is employed to extract energy transmission coefficients in the 100 kHz - 1.4 MHz range for the three different bond states examined. The cross-sectional mode shapes of the guided waves are shown to have a substantial role in the energy transfer through the joint. A rationale for the selection of the a0 excitation frequencies highly sensitive to bond state will be given.

  8. Image formation by and wave propagation in a photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimi, Patanjali; Vodo, Plarenta; Wentao, Lu; di Gennaro, Emiliano; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2004-03-01

    Negative refraction and imaging by a flat slab of a material are two of the important consequences of lefthanded electromagnetism. In our recent work we have demonstrated negative refraction and imaging by photonic crystals in the microwave frequency range [1]. The details of image formation are intriguing and urge its investigation. We have carried out microwave measurements in a parallel plate waveguide made of a pair of metallic plates. The Photonic crystal is made of alumina rods arranged on a square lattice such that the electric field is parallel to the axis of the rods. The detector is a dipole antenna which is inserted into the waveguide from outside. HP 8510C network analyzer is used to measure the complex transmission coefficient . The intensity maps of vs. probe position are obtained by scanning the probe using an x-y robot, both inside and outside the crystal. The results suggest Bloch wave propagation inside the crystal and that the image formation requires a better understanding than a simple ray diagram following geometric optics. [1] P. V. Parimi et al., Nature, 426, 404 (2003).

  9. Guided wave propagation and scattering in pipeworks comprising elbows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkali, Marouane El; Lhémery, Alain; Baronian, Vahan; Berthelot, François

    2014-02-01

    Guided waves (GW) are used to inspect pipeworks in various industries. Specific features of pipeworks lead to complex scattering phenomena. Simulations tools able to handle such a complexity must be developed to help interpretation and to optimize testing configurations. They must handle both long range propagation and local scattering phenomena. Here, a modal formulation is derived to deal with pipeworks comprising arbitrarily curved elbows linking otherwise straight pipes. First, the semi-analytic finite element method is extended in curvilinear coordinates to predict guided modes in elbows. Then, GW scattering at the junction of a straight pipe with an elbow is investigated. Modal solutions in both parts being known, the mode matching method is derived to compute modal reflection and transmission coefficients given as elements of a scattering matrix. Further, the global scattering matrix of a pipework comprising an arbitrary number of elbows linking straight pipes is considered. A general formulation presented in this conference series is used which handles multiple scattering phenomena that possibly arise. Interestingly, the computation of both modal solution and the scattering matrix with mode-matching method only requires meshing the pipe section. Examples illustrate the various steps.

  10. An Investigation of Wave Propagations in Discontinuous Galerkin Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Fang Q.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of the discontinuous Galerkin method has been carried out for one- and two-dimensional system of hyperbolic equations. Analytical, as well as numerical, properties of wave propagation in a DGM scheme are derived and verified with direct numerical simulations. In addition to a systematic examination of the dissipation and dispersion errors, behaviours of a DG scheme at an interface of two different grid topologies are also studied. Under the same framework, a quantitative discrete analysis of various artificial boundary conditions is also conducted. Progress has been made in numerical boundary condition treatment that is closely related to the application of DGM in aeroacoustics problems. Finally, Fourier analysis of DGM for the Convective diffusion equation has also be studied in connection with the application of DG schemes for the Navier-Stokes equations. This research has resulted in five(5) publications, plus one additional manuscript in preparation, four(4) conference presentations, and three(3) departmental seminars, as summarized in part II. Abstracts of papers are given in part 111 of this report.

  11. Distributed volume rendering of global models of seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, N.; van Keken, P.; Renambot, L.; Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Johnson, A.; Leigh, J.

    2004-12-01

    Modeling the dynamics and structure of the Earth's interior now routinely involves massively distributed computational techniques, which makes it feasible to study time-dependent processes in the 3D Earth. Accurate, high-resolution models require the use of distributed simulations that run on, at least, moderately large PC clusters and produce large amounts of data on the order of terabytes distributed across the cluster. Visualizing such large data sets efficiently necessitates the use of the same type and magnitude of resources employed by the simulation. Generic, distributed volumetric rendering methods that produce high-quality monoscopic and stereoscopic visualizations currently exist, but rely on a different distributed data layout than is produced during simulation. This presents a challenge during the visualization process because an expensive data gather and redistribution stage is required before the distributed volume visualization algorithm can operate. We will compare different general purpose techniques and tools for visualizing volumetric data sets that are widely used in the field of scientific visualization, and propose a new approach that eliminates the data gather and redistribution stage by working directly on the data as distributed by, e.g., a seismic wave propagation simulation.

  12. Spectral analysis of wave propagation in connected waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gopalakrishnan

    1992-01-01

    The spectral element method combined with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is a powerful and versatile tool for analysis of wave propagation problems in connected structures. They are formulated entirely in the frequency domain and use matrix assembly procedures analogous to the finite element method. This thesis extends the approach to connected structures involving non-uniformities and discontinuities. To handle situations involving deep waveguides, spectral elements are formulated based on the higher order waveguide theories of Timoshenko beam and Mindlin-Herrmann rod. Approximate tapered elements (derived using a frequency domain Ritz method) are formulated to handle situations involving member cross-section variations. For waveguides with embedded discontinuities like cracks and holes, the irregular behavior near the discontinuity is isolated by performing Local/Global analysis via the super spectral element concept. Efficient computation of the super element stiffness is the key to the success of the method and it is addressed directly. The formulated element is verified by comparison with the conventional finite element solution. Some interesting problems involving joints, cracks and holes are solved. One of the distinct advantages of the spectral approach is the capability to perform inverse problems. The concept is demonstrated with some illustrative examples involving multiple boundaries.

  13. Propagation and damping of slow MHD waves in a flowing viscous coronal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Anil; Murawski, K.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the propagation of slow MHD waves in a flowing viscous solar coronal plasma. The compressive viscosity and steady flow along and opposite to the wave propagation are taken into account to study the damping of slow waves. We numerically solve the MHD equations by MacCormack method to examine the effect of steady flow on the damping of slow MHD waves in viscous solar coronal plasma. Amplitude of velocity perturbation and damping time of slow waves decrease with the increase in the value of Mach number. Flow causes a phase shift in the perturbed velocity amplitude and an increase in wave period. The damping of slow waves in flowing viscous plasma is stronger than the damping of waves in viscous plasma. Slow wave in backward flow damps earlier than the wave in forward flow.

  14. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Stavroula Foteinopoulou

    2003-12-12

    In this dissertation, they have undertaken the challenge to understand the unusual propagation properties of the photonic crystal (PC). The photonic crystal is a medium where the dielectric function is periodically modulated. These types of structures are characterized by bands and gaps. In other words, they are characterized by frequency regions where propagation is prohibited (gaps) and regions where propagation is allowed (bands). In this study they focus on two-dimensional photonic crystals, i.e., structures with periodic dielectric patterns on a plane and translational symmetry in the perpendicular direction. They start by studying a two-dimensional photonic crystal system for frequencies inside the band gap. The inclusion of a line defect introduces allowed states in the otherwise prohibited frequency spectrum. The dependence of the defect resonance state on different parameters such as size of the structure, profile of incoming source, etc., is investigated in detail. For this study, they used two popular computational methods in photonic crystal research, the Finite Difference Time Domain method (FDTD) and the Transfer Matrix Method (TMM). The results for the one-dimensional defect system are analyzed, and the two methods, FDTD and TMM, are compared. Then, they shift their attention only to periodic two-dimensional crystals, concentrate on their band properties, and study their unusual refractive behavior. Anomalous refractive phenomena in photonic crystals included cases where the beam refracts on the ''wrong'' side of the surface normal. The latter phenomenon, is known as negative refraction and was previously observed in materials where the wave vector, the electric field, and the magnetic field form a left-handed set of vectors. These materials are generally called left-handed materials (LHM) or negative index materials (NIM). They investigated the possibility that the photonic crystal behaves as a LHM, and how this behavior relates with the observed

  15. Lightning VLF wave propagation from source, through ionosphere to inner magnetosphere using WWLLN and Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Holzworth, R. H.; Brundell, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.; Mozer, F.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Jacobson, A. R.; Hutchins, M. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.

    2013-12-01

    Lightning produces strong broadband radio waves, called "sferics", which propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and are detected thousands kilometers away from their source. Global real-time detection of lightning strokes including their time, location and energy, is conducted with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). In the ionosphere, these sferics couple into very low frequency (VLF) whistler waves which propagate obliquely to the Earth's magnetic field. Lightning generated VLF whistler dispersion in the ionosphere has been previously observed both from thunderstorm rockets and low altitude satellites. Previous studies also show a clear match and related attenuation between sferics detected by WWLLN and VLF whistlers observed by C/NOFS satellite. This global study can now be expanded to the magnetosphere using data from the Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)) with high sampling rates for vector electric and magnetic fields, and extended altitude cover from ~600km to ~5 Re above the ground. In our work, we will show the one-to-one coincidence between WWLLN sferics and RBSP VLF whistlers. This talk will explore the relationship between these one to one lightning whistler waves with stimulated emissions such as lower hybrid waves, and possible energy deposition as the large amplitude lightning whistlers propagate into the outer magnetosphere.

  16. Effect of near-surface topography on high-frequency Rayleigh-wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Limin; Xu, Yixian; Xia, Jianghai; Luo, Yinhe

    2015-05-01

    Rayleigh waves, which are formed due to interference of P- and Sv-waves near the free surface, propagate along the free surface and vanish exponentially in the vertical direction. Their propagation is strongly influenced by surface topography. Due to the high resolution and precision requirements of near-surface investigations, the high-frequency Rayleigh waves are usually used for near-surface structural detecting. Although there are some numerical studies on high-frequency Rayleigh-wave propagation on topographic free surface, detailed analysis of characters of high-frequency Rayleigh-wave propagation on topographic free surface remains untouched. Hence, research of propagation of Rayleigh waves on complex topographic surface becomes critical for Rayleigh-wave methods in near-surface applications. To study the propagation of high-frequency Rayleigh waves on topographic free surface, two main topographic models are designed in this study. One of the models contains a depressed topographic surface, and another contains an uplifted topographic surface. We numerically simulate the propagation of high-frequency Rayleigh waves on these two topographic surfaces by finite-difference method. Soon afterwards, we analyze the propagation character of high-frequency Rayleigh waves on such topographic models, and compare the variations on its energy and frequency before and after passing the topographic region. At last, we discuss the relationship between the variations and topographical steepness of each model. Our numerical results indicate that influence of depressed topography for high-frequency Rayleigh waves is more distinct than influence of uplifted topography. Rayleigh waves produce new scattering body waves during passing the depressed topography with reduction of amplitude and loss of high-frequency components. Moreover, the steeper the depressed topography is, the more energy of Rayleigh waves is lost. The uplifted topography with gentle slope produces similar

  17. Vertically propagating acoustic waves launched by seismic waves visualized in ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    After the magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku (near the east coast of Honshu, Japan), which occurred on 11 March 2011, an unusual multiple-cusp signature (MCS) was observed in ionograms at three ionosonde stations across Japan. Similar MCSs in ionograms were identified in 8 of 43 earthquakes with a seismic magnitude of 8.0 or greater for the period from 1957 to 2011. The appearance of MCSs at different epicentral distances exhibited traveling characteristics at a velocity of ~4.0 km/s, which is in the range of Rayleigh waves. There was a ~7 min offset in delay time at each epicentral distance in the travel-time diagram. This offset is consistent with the propagation time of acoustic waves from the ground to the ionosphere. We analyzed vertical structure of electron density perturbation that caused MCSs. The ionosonde technique is essentially radar-based measurement of a reflection at a height where the plasma frequency is equal to the sounding radio frequency and it is possible to obtain an electron density profile by sweeping the frequency. However, this measured height is not a true height because radio waves do not propagate at the speed of light in the ionosphere. The group velocity of radio waves decreases just below the reflection height where the sounding frequency approaches the plasma frequency. The amount of delay is larger when this region is thicker. The vertically propagating acoustic waves modulate the electron density. The radio wave speed greatly delays and a cusp signature appears in the echo trace at a phase of the periodic perturbation of electron density where the density gradient is most gradual. Simulations were conducted how large amplitude of density perturbation produces cusp signatures as observed. First, the real height density profile was obtained by converting the ionogram trace just before the arrival of coseismic disturbances. The electron density profile was then modified by adding a periodic perturbation and the

  18. The lower hybrid wave cutoff: A case study in eikonal methods

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, A. S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.

    2010-05-15

    Eikonal, or ray tracing, methods are commonly used to estimate the propagation of radio frequency fields in plasmas. While the information gained from the rays is quite useful, an approximate solution for the fields would also be valuable, e.g., for comparison to full wave simulations. Such approximations are often difficult to perform numerically because of the special care which must be taken to correctly reconstruct the fields near reflection and focusing caustics. In this paper, we compare the standard eikonal method for approximating fields to a method based on the dynamics of wave packets. We compare the approximations resulting from these two methods to the analytical solution for a lower hybrid wave reflecting from a cutoff. The algorithm based on wave packets has the advantage that it can correctly deal with caustics, without any special treatment.

  19. Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense Plasma for Efficient X-Ray Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S; Nagai, K; Iwamae, A; Ohnishi, N; Fournier, K B; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Tobin, M; Mima, K

    2008-06-12

    We have observed supersonic heat wave propagation in a low-density aerogel target ({rho} {approx} 3.2 mg/cc) irradiated at the intensity of 4 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The heat wave propagation was measured with a time-resolved x-ray imaging diagnostics, and the results were compared with simulations made with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic code, RAICHO. Propagation velocity of the ionization front gradually decreased as the wave propagates into the target. The reason of decrease is due to increase of laser absorption region as the front propagates and interplay of hydrodynamic motion and reflection of laser propagation. These features are well reported with the simulation.

  20. A critical survey of wave propagation and impact in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    A review of the field of stress waves in composite materials is presented covering the period up to December 1972. The major properties of waves in composites are discussed and a summary is made of the major experimental results in this field. Various theoretical models for analysis of wave propagation in laminated, fiber and particle reinforced composites are surveyed. The anisotropic, dispersive and dissipative properties of stress pulses and shock waves in such materials are reviewed. A review of the behavior of composites under impact loading is presented along with the application of wave propagation concepts to the determination of impact stresses in composite plates.

  1. Seismic wave propagation in thinly-layered media with steep reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.L.

    1992-05-01

    Seismic waves reflected from steep reflectors in the earth`s subsurface spend a significant amount of time travelling more or less horizontally. Therefore, accurate imaging of steep geologic structure requires knowledge of the behavior of these horizontally propagating waves. In particular, the effect of tunneling on seismic waves propagating in thinly-layered media must be understood. I describe a method for modeling seismic waves traveling in thinly-layered media. This method, a frequency-wavenumber finite-difference scheme coupled with the Born approximation, is useful in studying seismic waves reflected from steep geologic structures.

  2. Seismic wave propagation in thinly-layered media with steep reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.L.

    1992-05-01

    Seismic waves reflected from steep reflectors in the earth's subsurface spend a significant amount of time travelling more or less horizontally. Therefore, accurate imaging of steep geologic structure requires knowledge of the behavior of these horizontally propagating waves. In particular, the effect of tunneling on seismic waves propagating in thinly-layered media must be understood. I describe a method for modeling seismic waves traveling in thinly-layered media. This method, a frequency-wavenumber finite-difference scheme coupled with the Born approximation, is useful in studying seismic waves reflected from steep geologic structures.

  3. Studies of the propagation of viscoelastic spherical divergent stress waves based on the generalized Maxwell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Wang, Zhan-jiang

    2016-06-01

    The governing equations for viscoelastic spherical divergent stress waves are formulated, and the solutions for spherical stress waves are analytically given in the Laplace domain. Based on the generalized Maxwell model, the propagation coefficient for viscoelastic spherical stress waves is obtained analytically and the characteristics of the attenuation coefficient and the phase velocity are discussed. Meanwhile, the solutions for viscoelastic spherical stress waves are calculated by using the numerical method of the inverse Laplace transform in the case of cavity explosion. The propagating characteristics for strong discontinuous visco-elastic spherical waves and steady-state values caused by the cavity pressure are discussed using theoretical and numerical methods.

  4. Wave turbulence in integrable systems: nonlinear propagation of incoherent optical waves in single-mode fibers.

    PubMed

    Suret, Pierre; Picozzi, Antonio; Randoux, Stéphane

    2011-08-29

    We study theoretically, numerically and experimentally the nonlinear propagation of partially incoherent optical waves in single mode optical fibers. We revisit the traditional treatment of the wave turbulence theory to provide a statistical kinetic description of the integrable scalar NLS equation. In spite of the formal reversibility and of the integrability of the NLS equation, the weakly nonlinear dynamics reveals the existence of an irreversible evolution toward a statistically stationary state. The evolution of the power spectrum of the field is characterized by the rapid growth of spectral tails that exhibit damped oscillations, until the whole spectrum ultimately reaches a steady state. The kinetic approach allows us to derive an analytical expression of the damped oscillations, which is found in agreement with the numerical simulations of both the NLS and kinetic equations. We report the experimental observation of this peculiar relaxation process of the integrable NLS equation. PMID:21935152

  5. The Suitability of Hybrid Waveforms for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Ilana R.

    The existence of Gravitational Waves from binary black holes is one of the most interesting predictions of General Relativity. These ripples in space-time should be visible to ground-based gravitational wave detectors worldwide in the next few years. One such detector, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) is in the process of being upgraded to its Advanced sensitivity which should make gravitational wave detections routine. Even so, the signals that LIGO will detect will be faint compared to the detector noise, and so accurate waveform templates are crucial. In this thesis, we present a detailed analysis of the accuracy of hybrid gravitational waveforms. Hybrids are created by stitching a long post-Newtonian inspiral to the late inspiral, merger, and ringdown produced by numerical relativity simulations. We begin our investigation with a study of the systematic errors in the numerical waveform, and errors due to hybridization and choice of detector noise. For current NR waveforms, the largest source of error comes from the unknown high-order terms in the post-Newtonian waveform, which we first explore for equal-mass, non-spinning binaries, and also for unequal-mass, non-spinning binaries. We then consider the potential reduction in hybrid errors if these higher-order terms were known. Finally, we investigate the possibility of using hybrid waveforms as a detection template bank and integrating NR+PN hybrids into the LIGO detection pipeline.

  6. The Propagation and Scattering of EM Waves in Electrically Large Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saeed Mahmood

    The electromagnetic scattering from large arbitrarily shaped ducts with complex termination is studied here by a hybrid technique. The propagation of electromagnetic waves in the duct is analyzed in terms of an approximate modal solution. A finite difference technique is employed for computing the reflection characteristics of the complex terminations. Both solutions are combined using the unimoment method. The analysis here is carried out for monostatic RCS and considers only fields backscattered from inside the cavity. Rim-diffraction has been left out. The procedure offers such advantages as in that it is not necessary to find complicated Green's functions, which may not be readily available, when compared with the integral equation method. Hybridization performed by combining an approximate modal technique with a finite difference one makes the scheme numerically efficient. From a computational EM point of view, it brings together a whole spectrum of techniques associated with high frequency modal analysis, Fourier Methods, Radar Cross Section and Scattering, finite difference solution and the Unimoment Method. The practical application of this technique may range from the study of RCS scattered from jet inlets of radar evasive aircraft to submarine communication waveguides.

  7. Propagation of terahertz waves in an atmospheric pressure microplasma with Epstein electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chengxun; Zhou Zhongxiang; Zhang, Jingwen W.; Sun Hongguo; Wang He; Du Yanwei; Xiang Xiaoli

    2011-03-15

    Propagation properties of terahertz (THz) waves in a bounded atmospheric-pressure microplasma (AMP) are analyzed in this study. A modified Epstein profile model is used to simulate the electron density distribution caused by the plasma sheaths. By introducing the dielectric constant of a Drude-Lorentz model and using the method of dividing the plasma into a series of subslabs with uniform electron density, the coefficients of power reflection, transmission, and absorption are derived for a bounded microplasma structure. The effects of size of microplasma, electron density profile, and collision frequency on the propagation of THz waves are analyzed numerically. The results indicate that the propagation of THz waves in AMPs depend greatly on the above three parameters. It is demonstrated that the THz wave can play an important role in AMPs diagnostics; meanwhile, the AMP can be used as a novel potential tool to control THz wave propagation.

  8. Rigorous solution of transient propagation of electromagnetic waves through a medium: causality plus diffraction in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Mufei

    2000-03-01

    We have found the rigorous solution of transient propagation of electronmagnetic waves through a medium. The rogorousness enables the solution to exhibit its apparent consistency with the Einstein causality. Thus, we confirm that faster-than-light or superluminal propagation of electromagnetic waves is not possible. Evanescent transmission gives rise to the diffraction in time, which is the actual reason for deformation of group propagation. Based on the principle of diffraction in time, superluminal group propagation can be understood. The findings are also instructive for understanding the time problem for particle tunneling.

  9. Solitary fast magnetosonic waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field in cold collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichigin, G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Solutions describing solitary fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves (FMS solitons) in cold magnetized plasma are obtained by numerically solving two-fluid hydrodynamic equations. The parameter domain within which steady-state solitary waves can propagate is determined. It is established that the Mach number for rarefaction FMS solitons is always less than unity. The restriction on the propagation velocity leads to the limitation on the amplitudes of the magnetic field components of rarefaction solitons. It is shown that, as the soliton propagates in plasma, the transverse component of its magnetic field rotates and makes a complete turn around the axis along which the soliton propagates.

  10. Characterizing the propagation of gravity waves in 3D nonlinear simulations of solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvan, L.; Strugarek, A.; Brun, A. S.; Mathis, S.; Garcia, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The revolution of helio- and asteroseismology provides access to the detailed properties of stellar interiors by studying the star's oscillation modes. Among them, gravity (g) modes are formed by constructive interferences between progressive internal gravity waves (IGWs), propagating in stellar radiative zones. Our new 3D nonlinear simulations of the interior of a solar-like star allows us to study the excitation, propagation, and dissipation of these waves. Aims: The aim of this article is to clarify our understanding of the behavior of IGWs in a 3D radiative zone and to provide a clear overview of their properties. Methods: We use a method of frequency filtering that reveals the path of individual gravity waves of different frequencies in the radiative zone. Results: We are able to identify the region of propagation of different waves in 2D and 3D, to compare them to the linear raytracing theory and to distinguish between propagative and standing waves (g-modes). We also show that the energy carried by waves is distributed in different planes in the sphere, depending on their azimuthal wave number. Conclusions: We are able to isolate individual IGWs from a complex spectrum and to study their propagation in space and time. In particular, we highlight in this paper the necessity of studying the propagation of waves in 3D spherical geometry, since the distribution of their energy is not equipartitioned in the sphere.

  11. Electromagnetic particle simulation of the effect of toroidicity on linear mode conversion and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, J.; Lin, Z.; Kuley, A.; Wang, Z. X.

    2016-06-01

    Effects of toroidicity on linear mode conversion and absorption of lower hybrid (LH) waves in fusion plasmas have been studied using electromagnetic particle simulation. The simulation confirms that the toroidicity induces an upshift of parallel refractive index when LH waves propagate from the tokamak edge toward the core, which affects the radial position for the mode conversion between slow and fast LH waves. Furthermore, moving LH antenna launch position from low field side toward high field side leads to a larger upshift of the parallel refractive index, which helps the slow LH wave penetration into the tokamak core. The broadening of the poloidal spectrum of the wave-packet due to wave diffraction is also verified in the simulation. Both the upshift and broadening effects of the parallel spectrum of the wave-packet modify the parallel phase velocity and thus the linear absorption of LH waves by electron Landau resonance.

  12. Study on tsunami generation and propagation in a large scale wave flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmels, Stefan; Venkatachalam, Sriram; Didenkulova, Ira

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we study very long, i.e. real tsunami-like wave generation in a large scale wave flume using a piston type wave maker. Waves of periods between 30 s and more than 100 s were generated at 1 m water depth using two different approaches: (i) deriving the wave board motion directly by integration of the water surface elevation, composed of a different number of solitons (sech2 waves) and (ii) using an iterative self correcting method (SCM). The importance of very long wave generation instead of solitary waves and the necessity for long testing facilities is discussed and results from GWK experiments are presented for single pulses (elongated solitons), N-waves and real tsunami records, either approximated as a combination of solitons or applying the SCM to the time series directly. The possibility to study propagation, shoaling and run-up of these waves over a slope in a 300-meter long large wave flume (GWK), Hannover is dicsussed. Experimental data of long wave propagation in the flume are compared with numerical simulations performed within the fully nonlinear potential flow theory and KdV equations. Shoaling and run-up of waves on different mild slopes is studied hypothetically using nonlinear shallow water theory. The paper ends with the conclusions about the feasibility of using large scale experimental facility (GWK) to study tsunami wave propagation and run-up.

  13. Characterization of Heat-Wave Propagation through Laser-Driven Ti-Doped Underdense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Ohnishi, N; Fournier, K B; Fujioka, S; Iwamae, A; Hansen, S B; Nagai, K; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Brebion, D; Mima, K

    2009-02-23

    The propagation of a laser-driven heat-wave into a Ti-doped aerogel target was investigated. The temporal evolution of the electron temperature was derived by means of Ti K-shell x-ray spectroscopy, and compared with two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Reasonable agreement was obtained in the early stage of the heat-wave propagation. In the later phase, laser absorption, the propagation of the heat wave, and hydrodynamic motion interact in a complex manner, and the plasma is mostly re-heated by collision and stagnation at the target central axis.

  14. Computer simulation on the linear and nonlinear propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the dielectric media

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Okuda, H.

    1993-08-01

    In this Letter, we first present a new computer simulation model developed to study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a dielectric medium in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The model is constructed by combining a microscopic model used in the semi-classical approximation for the dielectric media and the particle model developed for the plasma simulations. The model was then used for studying linear and nonlinear wave propagation in the dielectric medium such as an optical fiber. It is shown that the model may be useful for studying nonlinear wave propagation and harmonics generation in the nonlinear dielectric media.

  15. Ultrasonic Pulse Waves Propagating through Cancellous Bone Phantoms with Aligned Pore Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Atsushi

    2006-05-01

    To elucidate the propagation phenomena of ultrasonic waves in cancellous bone related to trabecular structure, pulse waves propagating through three cancellous bone phantoms with different skeletal frames have been experimentally observed using a water-immersion ultrasonic technique. Skeletal frames with regularly aligned pore spaces were formed to imitate the orthotropic trabecular structure, using wire gauzes, punched plates and honeycomb ceramics. The propagations of the fast and slow waves, which were clearly observed in the direction of the trabecular alignment of cancellous bone, were investigated with the frame’s structures of these phantoms.

  16. Wall stress and deformation analysis in a numerical model of pulse wave propagation.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Hua, Lu; Gao, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    To simulate pulse wave propagation, we set up a wave propagation model using blood-wall interaction in previous work. In this paper, our purpose is to investigate wall stress and deformation of the wave propagation model. The finite element method is employed for solving the governing equations of blood and wall. Our results suggest that there are two peaks in the circumferential stress and strain distributions of the normal model. The stress and strain values change with the varieties of different factors, such as wall thickness and vessel diameter. The results indicate that different parameters of fluid and tube wall have remarked impact on wall stress and deformation. PMID:26406044

  17. Unidirectional propagation of magnetostatic surface spin waves at a magnetic film surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kin L.; Bao, Mingqiang E-mail: caross@mit.edu; Lin, Yen-Ting; Wang, Kang L.; Bi, Lei; Wen, Qiye; Zhang, Huaiwu; Chatelon, Jean Pierre; Ross, C. A. E-mail: caross@mit.edu

    2014-12-08

    An analytical expression for the amplitudes of magnetostatic surface spin waves (MSSWs) propagating in opposite directions at a magnetic film surface is presented. This shows that for a given magnetic field H, it is forbidden for an independent MSSW to propagate along the direction of −H{sup →}×n{sup →}, where n{sup →} is the surface normal. This unidirectional propagation property is confirmed by experiments with both permalloy and yttrium iron garnet films of different film thicknesses, and has implications in the design of spin-wave devices such as isolators and spin-wave diodes.

  18. Two-wave propagation in in vitro swine distal ulna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Isao; Horii, Kaoru; Matsukawa, Mami; Otani, Takahiko

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic transmitted waves were obtained in an in vitro swine distal ulna specimen, which mimics a human distal radius, that consists of interconnected cortical bone and cancellous bone. The transmitted waveforms appeared similar to the fast waves, slow waves, and overlapping fast and slow waves measured in the specimen after removing the surface cortical bone (only cancellous bone). In addition, the circumferential waves in the cortical bone and water did not affect the fast and slow waves. This suggests that the fast-and-slow-wave phenomenon can be observed in an in vivo human distal radius.

  19. On the climatological probability of the vertical propagation of stationary planetary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Khalil; Braesicke, Peter; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Versick, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a diagnostic tool to assess a climatological framework of the optimal propagation conditions for stationary planetary waves. Analyzing 50 winters using NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research) reanalysis data we derive probability density functions (PDFs) of positive vertical wave number as a function of zonal and meridional wave numbers. We contrast this quantity with classical climatological means of the vertical wave number. Introducing a membership value function (MVF) based on fuzzy logic, we objectively generate a modified set of PDFs (mPDFs) and demonstrate their superior performance compared to the climatological mean of vertical wave number and the original PDFs. We argue that mPDFs allow an even better understanding of how background conditions impact wave propagation in a climatological sense. As expected, probabilities are decreasing with increasing zonal wave numbers. In addition we discuss the meridional wave number dependency of the PDFs which is usually neglected, highlighting the contribution of meridional wave numbers 2 and 3 in the stratosphere. We also describe how mPDFs change in response to strong vortex regime (SVR) and weak vortex regime (WVR) conditions, with increased probabilities of the wave propagation during WVR than SVR in the stratosphere. We conclude that the mPDFs are a convenient way to summarize climatological information about planetary wave propagation in reanalysis and climate model data.

  20. Stochastic Ion Heating by the Lower-Hybrid Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G.; Tel'nikhin, A.; Krotov, A.

    2011-01-01

    The resonance lower-hybrid wave-ion interaction is described by a group (differentiable map) of transformations of phase space of the system. All solutions to the map belong to a strange attractor, and chaotic motion of the attractor manifests itself in a number of macroscopic effects, such as the energy spectrum and particle heating. The applicability of the model to the problem of ion heating by waves at the front of collisionless shock as well as ion acceleration by a spectrum of waves is discussed. Keywords: plasma; ion-cyclotron heating; shocks; beat-wave accelerator.

  1. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W. H.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  2. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms.

    PubMed

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W H; Yang, Victor X D; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  3. Development of Calculation Software for Guided Wave Propagation In a Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Murase, M.; Song, W.-J.; Park, I. K.

    2006-03-01

    Pipe screening technique with guided waves has become widely applied to pipe inspection in actual industrial plants. In most cases, however, guided wave propagating in a pipe is still difficult for inspection technicians due to its complex characteristics. Authors have developed the fast calculation technique for guided wave propagation using a semi-analytical finite element method (SAFEM). This study is on development of software for guided wave propagation with the SAFE calculation. A parameter input interface was made with Visual C++, and a core execution file was coded with Fortran 90. Visualization of data set obtained by the calculation was carried out with a free visualization tool OPEN DX. Using this software including a preprocessor and a postprocessor, many kinds of guided wave simulation have become feasible even by a non-expert in guided waves.

  4. Defect-controlled hypersound propagation in hybrid superlattices.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dirk; Liaqat, Faroha; El Boudouti, El Houssaine; El Abouti, Ossama; Tremel, Wolfgang; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Fytas, George

    2013-10-18

    We employ spontaneous Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy and detailed theoretical calculations to reveal and identify elastic excitations inside the band gap of hypersonic hybrid superlattices. Surface and cavity modes, their strength and anticrossing are unambiguously documented and fully controlled by layer thickness, elasticity, and sequence design. This new soft matter based superlattice platform allows facile engineering of the density of states and opens new pathways to tunable phoxonic crystals. PMID:24182268

  5. Propagation of shear Alvén waves in two-ion species plasmas confined by a nonuniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 ; Morales, G. J.

    2013-08-15

    Ray tracing calculations are performed for shear Alfvén waves in two-ion species plasmas in which the magnetic field varies with position. Three different magnetic topologies of contemporary interest are explored: a linear magnetic mirror, a pure toroidal field, and a tokamak field. The wave frequency is chosen to lie in the upper propagation band, so that reflection at the ion-ion hybrid frequency can occur for waves originally propagating along the magnetic field direction. Calculations are performed for a magnetic well configuration used in recent experiments [S. T. Vincena et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L11101 (2011) and S. T. Vincena et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 012111 (2013)] in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) related to the ion-ion hybrid resonator. It is found that radial spreading cannot explain the relatively low values of the resonator quality factor (Q) measured in those experiments, even when finite ion temperature is considered. This identifies that a damping mechanism is present that is at least an order of magnitude larger than dissipation due to radial energy loss. Calculations are also performed for a magnetic field with pure toroidal geometry, without a poloidal field, as in experiments being planned for the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device. In this case, the effects of field-line curvature cause radial reflections. A poloidal field is included to explore a tokamak geometry with plasma parameters expected in ITER. When ion temperature is ignored, it is found that the ion-ion hybrid resonator can exist and trap waves for multiples bounces. The effects of finite ion temperature combine with field line curvature to cause the reflection point to move towards the tritium cyclotron frequency when electron temperature is negligible. However, for ITER parameters, it is shown that the electrons must be treated in the adiabatic limit to properly describe resonator phenomena.

  6. DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 observations of lower hybrid waves excited by VLF whistler mode waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, T.F.; Inan, U.S.; Lauben, D.; Sonwalkar, V.S.; Helliwell, R.A.; Sobolev, Ya.P.; Chmyrev, V.M.; Gonzalez, S.

    1994-04-15

    Past work demonstrates that strong lower hybrid (LH) waves can be excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves throughout large regions of the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere. The effects of the excited LH waves upon the suprathermal ion population in the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere depend upon the distribution of LH wave amplitude with wavelength {lambda}. The present work reports plasma wave data from the DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 spacecraft which suggests that the excited LH wave spectrum has components for which {lambda} {le} 3.5 m when excitation occurs at a frequency roughly equal to the lower hybrid resonance frequency. This wavelength limit is a factor of {approximately} 3 below that reported in past work and suggests that the excited LH waves can interact with suprathermal H{sup +} ions with energy {le} 6 eV. This finding supports recent work concerning the heating of suprathermal ions above thunderstorm cells. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  7. DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 observations of lower hybrid waves excited by VLF whistler mode waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, T. F; Inan, U. S.; Lauben, D.; Sonwalkar, V. S.; Helliwell, R. A.; Sobolev, Ya. P.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Gonzalez, S.

    1994-01-01

    Past work demostrates that strong lower hybrid (LH) waves can be excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves throughout large regions of the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere. The effects of the excited LH waves upon the suprathermal ion population in the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere depend upon the distribution of LH wave amplitude with wavelength lambda. The present work reports plasma wave data from the DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 spacecraft which suggests that the excited LH wave spectrum has components for which lambda less than or equal to 3.5 m when excitation occurs at a frequency roughly equal to the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. This wavelength limit is a factor of approximately 3 below that reported in past work and suggests that the excited LH waves can interact with suprathermal H(+) ions with energy less than or equal to 6 eV. This finding supports recent work concerning the heating of suprathermal ions above thunderstorm cells.

  8. Generation of auroral kilometric radiation in upper hybrid wave-lower hybrid soliton interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pottelette, R.; Dubouloz, N. ); Treumann, R.A. )

    1992-08-01

    Sporadic bursts of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) associated with strong bursty electrostatic turbulence in the vicinity of the lower hybrid frequency have been frequently recorded in the AKR source region by the Viking satellite. The variation time scale of these emissions is typically 1 s, long enough for lower hybrid waves to grow to amplitudes of several hundred millivolts per meter and to evolve nonlinearly into solitons. On the basis on these observations it is suggested that formation of lower hybrid solitons may play a role in the generation of AKR. A theoretical model is proposed which is based on the direct acceleration of electrons in the combined lower hybrid soliton and upper hybrid wave fields. The solitons act as sporadic, localized antennas allowing for efficient conversions of the electrostatic energy stored in upper hybrid waves into electromagnetic radiation at a frequency above the X mode cutoff. Excitation of lower hybrid waves is due to the presence of energetic electron beams in the auroral zone found to be associated with steep plasma density gradients. Upper hybrid waves can be excited by a population of energetic electrons with loss cone distributions. The power of the electromagnetic radiation obtained is only noticeable in regions where the plasma frequency is less than the electron gyrofrequency. The theory predicts spectral power densities of the order of 10{sup {minus}11} to 10{sup {minus}9} W m{sup {minus}2} Hz{sup {minus}1} in the source region, in good agreement with the Viking observations. The sporadic nature of the radiation derives from lower hybrid soliton collapses which occur on {approximately}1-s time scales.

  9. Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hayrapetyan, A.G.; Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G.; Fritzsche, S.

    2013-06-15

    The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period τ is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods τ between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

  10. Propagation of Long-Wavelength Nonlinear Slow Sausage Waves in Stratified Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbulescu, M.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of nonlinear, long-wavelength, slow sausage waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube, embedded in a non-magnetic stratified environment, is discussed. The governing equation for surface waves, which is akin to the Leibovich-Roberts equation, is derived using the method of multiple scales. The solitary wave solution of the equation is obtained numerically. The results obtained are illustrative of a solitary wave whose properties are highly dependent on the degree of stratification.

  11. Hybridizing matter-wave and classical accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lautier, J.; Volodimer, L.; Hardin, T.; Merlet, S.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Landragin, A.

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate a hybrid accelerometer that benefits from the advantages of both conventional and atomic sensors in terms of bandwidth (DC to 430 Hz) and long term stability. First, the use of a real time correction of the atom interferometer phase by the signal from the classical accelerometer enables to run it at best performance without any isolation platform. Second, a servo-lock of the DC component of the conventional sensor output signal by the atomic one realizes a hybrid sensor. This method paves the way for applications in geophysics and in inertial navigation as it overcomes the main limitation of atomic accelerometers, namely, the dead times between consecutive measurements.

  12. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for oceanic T-wave generation and propagation from deep seismic sources.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott D; Collis, Jon M; Odom, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Oceanic T-waves are earthquake signals that originate when elastic waves interact with the fluid-elastic interface at the ocean bottom and are converted to acoustic waves in the ocean. These waves propagate long distances in the Sound Fixing and Ranging (SOFAR) channel and tend to be the largest observed arrivals from seismic events. Thus, an understanding of their generation is important for event detection, localization, and source-type discrimination. Recently benchmarked seismic self-starting fields are used to generate elastic parabolic equation solutions that demonstrate generation and propagation of oceanic T-waves in range-dependent underwater acoustic environments. Both downward sloping and abyssal ocean range-dependent environments are considered, and results demonstrate conversion of elastic waves into water-borne oceanic T-waves. Examples demonstrating long-range broadband T-wave propagation in range-dependent environments are shown. These results confirm that elastic parabolic equation solutions are valuable for characterization of the relationships between T-wave propagation and variations in range-dependent bathymetry or elastic material parameters, as well as for modeling T-wave receptions at hydrophone arrays or coastal receiving stations. PMID:26093440

  13. Numerical and experimental study of Lamb wave propagation in a two-dimensional acoustic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shiling; Lomonosov, Alexey M.; Shen, Zhonghua

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of laser-generated Lamb waves in a two-dimensional acoustic black-hole structure was studied numerically and experimentally. The geometrical acoustic theory has been applied to calculate the beam trajectories in the region of the acoustic black hole. The finite element method was also used to study the time evolution of propagating waves. An optical system based on the laser-Doppler vibration method was assembled. The effect of the focusing wave and the reduction in wave speed of the acoustic black hole has been validated.

  14. Parametric instabilities of large amplitude Alfven waves with obliquely propagating sidebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief report on properties of the parametric decay and modulational, filamentation, and magnetoacoustic instabilities of a large amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven wave. We allow the daughter and sideband waves to propagate at an arbitrary angle to the background magnetic field so that the electrostatic and electromagnetic characteristics of these waves are coupled. We investigate the dependance of these instabilities on dispersion, plasma/beta, pump wave amplitude, and propagation angle. Analytical and numerical results are compared with numerical simulations to investigate the full nonlinear evolution of these instabilities.

  15. ANALYTIC APPROXIMATE SEISMOLOGY OF PROPAGATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Soler, R.; Arregui, I.

    2012-12-01

    Observations show that propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. The technique of MHD seismology uses the wave observations combined with MHD wave theory to indirectly infer physical parameters of the solar atmospheric plasma and magnetic field. Here, we present an analytical seismological inversion scheme for propagating MHD waves. This scheme uses the observational information on wavelengths and damping lengths in a consistent manner, along with observed values of periods or phase velocities, and is based on approximate asymptotic expressions for the theoretical values of wavelengths and damping lengths. The applicability of the inversion scheme is discussed and an example is given.

  16. Peculiarities of the Propagation of Supersonic Seismic Waves to the Upper Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Nikolai M.; Kshevetskii, Sergey P.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic waves generated before and after earthquakes produce vertical and horizontal motion of the Earth's surface. The perturbations can propagate upwards and produce variations and oscillations of atmospheric characteristics at different altitudes. One of the mechanisms of such ionospheric perturbations is propagation of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in the atmosphere caused by seismic excitations at the ground surface. The main difficulties in such explanation are high phase speeds of surface seismic waves, much exceeding the sound speed in the atmosphere near the ground. The strongest ground seismic waves are the surface Rayleigh waves, having phase speeds 3 - 4 km/s (sometimes up to 10 km/s). Traditional theory of atmospheric AGWs predicts that such supersonic excitation should produce not propagating, but trapped (or evanescent) gravity wave modes with amplitudes exponentially decaying with altitude. This can raise questions about the importance of seismic-excited supersonic waves in the formation of ionospheric disturbances. In the present study, we use the recently developed nonlinear numerical Whole-altitude Acoustic-Gravity Wave Model (WAGWM) to simulate propagation of supersonic wave modes from the ground to the upper atmosphere. The WAGWM is a three-dimensional model and uses the plain geometry. It calculates atmospheric velocity components and deviations of temperature, pressure, and density from their background values. Gavrilov and Kshevetskii (2014) described the set of used nonlinear three-dimensional equations of continuity, motion and heat balance. At the upper boundary z = 500 km we assume zero vertical velocity and zero vertical gradients of the other wave parameters. In the present research, we made calculations in rectangle region of the atmosphere and assume horizontal periodicity of wave solutions. Variations of vertical velocity produced by propagating seismic waves at the Earth's surface serve to force the waves in the model. Calculations

  17. Conical wave propagation and diffraction in two-dimensional hexagonally packed granular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, C.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Ma, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear mechanisms for conical wave propagation in two-dimensional lattices are explored in the realm of phononic crystals. As a prototypical example, a statically compressed granular lattice of spherical particles arranged in a hexagonal packing configuration is analyzed. Upon identifying the dispersion relation of the underlying linear problem, the resulting diffraction properties are considered. Analysis both via a heuristic argument for the linear propagation of a wave packet and via asymptotic analysis leading to the derivation of a Dirac system suggests the occurrence of conical diffraction. This analysis is valid for strong precompression, i.e., near the linear regime. For weak precompression, conical wave propagation is still possible, but the resulting expanding circular wave front is of a nonoscillatory nature, resulting from the complex interplay among the discreteness, nonlinearity, and geometry of the packing. The transition between these two types of propagation is explored.

  18. Conical wave propagation and diffraction in two-dimensional hexagonally packed granular lattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chong, C.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Ma, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-25

    We explore linear and nonlinear mechanisms for conical wave propagation in two-dimensional lattices in the realm of phononic crystals. As a prototypical example, a statically compressed granular lattice of spherical particles arranged in a hexagonal packing configuration is analyzed. Upon identifying the dispersion relation of the underlying linear problem, the resulting diffraction properties are considered. Analysis both via a heuristic argument for the linear propagation of a wave packet and via asymptotic analysis leading to the derivation of a Dirac system suggests the occurrence of conical diffraction. This analysis is valid for strong precompression, i.e., near the linear regime. Formore » weak precompression, conical wave propagation is still possible, but the resulting expanding circular wave front is of a nonoscillatory nature, resulting from the complex interplay among the discreteness, nonlinearity, and geometry of the packing. Lastly, the transition between these two types of propagation is explored.« less

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies of space-related plasma wave propagation and resonance phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    Active research is reported in the following areas: (1) whistler propagation; (2) whistler triggered VLF emissions; (3) Alfven wave excitation; (4) helical electron beams for whistler generation; and (5) ULF excitation by metallic electric or magnetic dipole antennas.

  20. OPTICAL SOLITONS: Optical solitons appearing during propagation of whispering-gallery waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, S. V.

    2003-10-01

    The properties of solitons appearing during the propagation of whispering-gallery waves in a homogeneous glass cylinder are considered. It is shown that such solitons can be used for the light frequency conversion.