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Sample records for hydrate gas-solid reaction

  1. Carbon-14 immobilization via the CO/sub 2/-Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate gas-solid reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Although no restrictions have been placed on the release of carbon-14, it has been identified as a potential health hazard due to the ease in which it may be assimilated into the biosphere. The intent of the Carbon-14 Immobilization Program, funded through the Airborne Waste Program Management Office, is to develop and demonstrate a novel process for restricting off-gas releases of carbon-14 from various nuclear facilities. The process utilizes the CO/sub 2/-Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate gas-solid reaction to directly remove and immobilize carbon-14. The reaction product, BaCO/sub 3/, possesses both the thermal and chemical stability desired for long-term waste disposal. The process is capable of providing decontamination factors in excess of 1000 and reactant utilization of greater than 99% in the treatment of high volumetric, airlike (330 ppM CO/sub 2/) gas streams. For the treatment of an air-based off-gas stream, the use of packed beds of Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O flakes to remove CO/sub 2/ has been demonstrated. However, the operating conditions must be maintained between certain upper and lower limits with respect to the partial pressure of water. If the water vapor pressure in the gas is less than the dissociation vapor pressure of Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O, the bed will deactivate. If the vapor pressure is considerably greater, pressure drop problems will increase with increasing humidity as the particles curl and degrade. Results have indicated that when operated in the proper regime, the bulk of the increase in pressure drop results from the conversion of Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O to BaCO/sub 3/ and not from the hydration of the commercial Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O (i.e. Ba(OH)/sub 2/.7.50H/sub 2/O) to Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O.

  2. Application of the carbon dioxide-barium hydroxide hydrate gas-solid reaction for the treatment of dilute carbon dioxide-bearing gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The removal of trace components from gas streams via irreversible gas-solid reactions in an area of interest to the chemical engineering profession. This research effort addresses the use of fixed beds of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate flakes for the removal of an acid gas, CO/sub 2/, from air that contains approx. 330 ppM/sub v/ CO/sub 2/. Areas of investigation encompassed: (1) an extensive literature review of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate chemistry, (2) microscale studies on 0.150-g samples to develop a better understanding of the reaction, (3) process studies at the macroscale level with 10.2-cm-ID fixed-bed reactors, and (4) the development of a model for predicting fixed-bed performance. Experimental studies indicated fixed beds of commercial Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O flakes at ambient temperatures to be capable of high CO/sub 2/-removal efficiencies (effluent concentrations <100 ppB), high reactant utilization (>99%), and an acceptable pressure drop (1.8 kPa/m at a superficial gas velocity of 13 cm/s). Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O was determined to be more reactive toward CO/sub 2/ than either Ba(OH)/sub 2/.3H/sub 2/O or Ba(OH)/sub 2/.1H/sub 2/O. A key variable in the development of this fixed-bed process was relative humidity. Operation at conditions with effluent relative humidities >60% resulted in significant recrystallization and restructuring of the flake and subsequent pressure-drop problems.

  3. Gas-solid reaction-rate enhancement by pressure cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, H. Y.; Aboukheshem, M. B.

    1992-06-01

    An experimental study and mathematical modeling of the effects of external pressure cycling on gas-solid reactions have been conducted using the reduction of nickel oxide pellets by hy-drogen. Experiments were carried out in two phases: In the first phase, the intrinsic kinetic parameters were measured, and in the second phase, the gas-solid reaction was carried out under a constant or cycling external pressure. The effects of the frequency and amplitude of pressure cycling were studied at various reaction conditions. Pressure cycling substantially increases the overall rate of the reaction. A mathematical model was developed from the first principles to establish the extent of the overall reaction-rate enhancement and subsequently to analyze the experimental observations. The calculated values from the mathematical model are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects are most pronounced when the overall rate under a constant pressure is controlled by diffusion. Depending on the reaction condition, a very large degree of rate enhancement could be achieved. Furthermore, low-amplitude pressure waves, like acoustic waves, could significantly increase the rates of gas-solid reactions.

  4. Process of preparing nitrogen trifluoride by gas-solid reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Aramaki, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, H.; Suenaga, T.

    1985-09-24

    NF3 is prepared with good yields by reaction between fluorine gas and an ammonium complex of a metal fluoride, such as (NH4)3AIF6, in solid phase. The metal flouride ammonium complex may be one additionally containing an alkali metal, such as (NH4)2NaAIF6. The gas-solid reaction is carried out preferably at temperatures above 80 C. and at relatively low partial pressures of fluorine in the gas phase of the reaction system, so that the reaction is easy to control.

  5. A generalized kinetic model for heterogeneous gas-solid reactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2012-08-21

    We present a generalized kinetic model for gas-solid heterogeneous reactions taking place at the interface between two phases. The model studies the reaction kinetics by taking into account the reactions at the interface, as well as the transport process within the product layer. The standard unreacted shrinking core model relies on the assumption of quasi-static diffusion that results in a steady-state concentration profile of gas reactant in the product layer. By relaxing this assumption and resolving the entire problem, general solutions can be obtained for reaction kinetics, including the reaction front velocity and the conversion (volume fraction of reacted solid). The unreacted shrinking core model is shown to be accurate and in agreement with the generalized model for slow reaction (or fast diffusion), low concentration of gas reactant, and small solid size. Otherwise, a generalized kinetic model should be used. PMID:22920132

  6. A generalized kinetic model for heterogeneous gas-solid reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijie; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-08-01

    We present a generalized kinetic model for gas-solid heterogeneous reactions taking place at the interface between two phases. The model studies the reaction kinetics by taking into account the reactions at the interface, as well as the transport process within the product layer. The standard unreacted shrinking core model relies on the assumption of quasi-static diffusion that results in a steady-state concentration profile of gas reactant in the product layer. By relaxing this assumption and resolving the entire problem, general solutions can be obtained for reaction kinetics, including the reaction front velocity and the conversion (volume fraction of reacted solid). The unreacted shrinking core model is shown to be accurate and in agreement with the generalized model for slow reaction (or fast diffusion), low concentration of gas reactant, and small solid size. Otherwise, a generalized kinetic model should be used.

  7. Ultrasonic levitation for the examination of gas/solid reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavouras, A.; Krammer, G.

    2003-10-01

    An experimental setup based on acoustic levitation for the examination of gas/solid reactions is presented. In this setup single particles in the diameter range 1 mm-30 μm can be held against gravity for any wanted time in a defined gas atmosphere at elevated temperatures. The change of particle size, shape, and position can be measured and recorded using an optical device, consisting of a camera and a long range microscope. Basic experiments with inert particles of different shape and solid density have shown that the axial position of a reacting particle can be employed to derive its weight change. A method to evaluate this change of the recorded position for the according weight change is proposed. Exemplary results in the context of dry flue gas cleaning using Ca(OH)2 powder are presented. Single Ca(OH)2 particles are exposed to a well defined gas atmosphere and after some time these particles are retrieved from the ultrasonic field for further analyses. Only an in situ measurement of the particle weight change (i.e., without removing the particle from the well defined reactive atmosphere) brings information regarding the uptake of water by the sorbent, which accompanies SO2 and HCl absorption.

  8. METHOD FOR VARIATION OF GRAIN SIZE IN STUDIES OF GAS-SOLID REACTIONS INVOLVING CAO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a method for varying grain size in studies of gas-solid reactions involving CaO. (Note: Introducing grain size as an independent experimental variable should contribute to improved understanding of reactions in porous solids.) Calcining 1 micrometer CaCO3 part...

  9. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  10. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection in Noble Gas Solids for Measurements of Rare Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep; Bailey, Kevin G.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Xu, Chen-Yu; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Optical detection of single atoms captured in solid noble gas matrices provides an alternative technique to study rare nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics. I will describe the prospects of applying this approach for cross section measurements of the ^22Ne,,),25Mg reaction, which is the crucial neutron source for the weak s process inside of massive stars. Noble gas solids are a promising medium for the capture, detection, and manipulation of atoms and nuclear spins. They provide stable and chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of guest species. Because noble gas solids are transparent at optical wavelengths, the guest atoms can be probed using lasers. We have observed that ytterbium in solid neon exhibits intersystem crossing (ISC) which results in a strong green fluorescence (546 nm) under excitation with blue light (389 nm). Several groups have observed ISC in many other guest-host pairs, notably magnesium in krypton. Because of the large wavelength separation of the excitation light and fluorescence light, optical detection of individual embedded guest atoms is feasible. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  11. Venus volcanism: Rate estimates from laboratory studies of sulfur gas-solid reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.; Prinn, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Thermochemical reactions between sulfur-bearing gases in the atmosphere of Venus and calcium-, iron-, magnesium-, and sulfur-bearing minerals on the surface of Venus are an integral part of a hypothesized cycle of thermochemical and photochemical reactions responsible for the maintenance of the global sulfuric acid cloud cover on Venus. SO2 is continually removed from the Venus atmosphere by reaction with calcium bearing minerals on the planet's surface. The rate of volcanism required to balance SO2 depletion by reactions with calcium bearing minerals on the Venus surface can therefore be deduced from a knowledge of the relevant gas-solid reaction rates combined with reasonable assumptions about the sulfur content of the erupted material (gas + magma). A laboratory program was carried out to measure the rates of reaction between SO2 and possible crustal minerals on Venus. The reaction of CaCO3(calcite) + SO2 yields CaSO4 (anhydrite) + CO was studied. Brief results are given.

  12. Kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions important in the Venus sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The thermochemical net reaction CaCO3 + SO2 yields CaSO4 + CO is predicted to be an important sink for incorporation of SO2 into the Venus crust. The reaction rate law was established to understand the dependence of rate on experimental variables such as temperature and partial pressure of SO2, CO2, and O2. The experimental approach was a variant of the thermogravimetric method often employed to study the kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions. Clear calcite crystals were heated at constant temperature in SO2-bearing gas streams for varying time periods. Reaction rate was determined by three independent methods. A weighted linear least squares fit to all rate data yielded a rate equation. Based on the Venera 13, 14 and Vega 2 observations of CaO content of the Venus atmosphere, SO2 at the calculated rate would be removed from the Venus atmosphere in about 1,900,00 years. The most plausible endogenic source of the sulfur needed to replenish atmospheric SO2 is volcanism. The annual amount of erupted material needed for the replenishment depends on sulfur content; three ratios are used to calculate rates ranging from 0.4 to 11 cu km/year. This geochemically derived volcanism rate can be used to test if geophysically derived rates are correct. The work also suggests that Venus is less volcanically active than the Earth.

  13. Opaque Mineral Assemblages at Chondrule Boundaries in the Vigarano CV Chondrite: Evidence for Gas-Solid Reactions Following Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, Dante S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies of opaque minerals in primitive ordinary chondrites suggest that metal grains exposed at chondrule boundaries were corroded when volatile elements recondensed after the transient heating event responsible for chondrule formation. Metal grains at chondrule boundaries in the Bishunpur (LL3.1) chondrite are rimmed by troilite and fayalite. If these layers formed by gas solid reaction, then the composition of the corrosion products can provide information on the chondrule formation environment. Given the broad similarities among chondrules from different chondrite groups, similar scale layers should occur on chondrules in other primitive meteorite groups. Here I report on metal grains at chondrule boundaries in Vigarano (CV3).

  14. Gas/solid carbon branching ratios in surface-mediated reactions and the incorporation of carbonaceous material into planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Ferguson, Frank T.; Carayon, Alicia

    2016-06-01

    We report the ratio of the initial carbon available as CO that forms gas-phase compounds compared to the fraction that deposits as a carbonaceous solid (the gas/solid branching ratio) as a function of time and temperature for iron, magnetite, and amorphous iron silicate smoke catalysts during surface-mediated reactions in an excess of hydrogen and in the presence of N2. This fraction varies from more than 99% for an amorphous iron silicate smoke at 673 K to less than 40% for a magnetite catalyst at 873 K. The CO not converted into solids primarily forms methane, ethane, water, and CO2, as well as a very wide range of organic molecules at very low concentration. Carbon deposits do not form continuous coatings on the catalytic surfaces, but instead form extremely high surface area per unit volume "filamentous" structures. While these structures will likely form more slowly but over much longer times in protostellar nebulae than in our experiments due to the much lower partial pressure of CO, such fluffy coatings on the surfaces of chondrules or calcium aluminum inclusions could promote grain-grain sticking during low-velocity collisions.

  15. Gas/solid carbon branching ratios in surface-mediated reactions and the incorporation of carbonaceous material into planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Ferguson, Frank T.; Carayon, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    We report the ratio of the initial carbon available as CO that forms gas-phase compounds compared to the fraction that deposits as a carbonaceous solid (the gas/solid branching ratio) as a function of time and temperature for iron, magnetite, and amorphous iron silicate smoke catalysts during surface-mediated reactions in an excess of hydrogen and in the presence of N2. This fraction varies from more than 99% for an amorphous iron silicate smoke at 673 K to less than 40% for a magnetite catalyst at 873 K. The CO not converted into solids primarily forms methane, ethane, water, and CO2, as well as a very wide range of organic molecules at very low concentration. Carbon deposits do not form continuous coatings on the catalytic surfaces, but instead form extremely high surface area per unit volume "filamentous" structures. While these structures will likely form more slowly but over much longer times in protostellar nebulae than in our experiments due to the much lower partial pressure of CO, such fluffy coatings on the surfaces of chondrules or calcium aluminum inclusions could promote grain-grain sticking during low-velocity collisions.

  16. Reaction of disodium cromoglycate with hydrated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, A.J.; Arroyo, C.M.; Cockerham, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    A possible mechanism by which disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) prevents a decrease in regional cerebral blood flow but not hypotension in primates following whole body gamma-irradiation was studied. Several studies have implicated superoxide radicals (O/sub 2//sup -/.) in intestinal and cerebral vascular disorders following ischemia and ionizing radiation, respectively. O/sub 2//sup -/. is formed during radiolysis in the reaction between hydrated electrons (e-aq) and dissolved oxygen. For this reason, the efficiency of DSCG to scavenge e-q and possibly prevent the formation of O/sub 2//sup -/. was studied. Hydrated electrons were produced by photolysis of potassium ferrocyanide solutions. The rate constant, k = 2.92 x 10(10) M-1s-1 for the reaction between e-aq and DSCG was determined in competition experiments using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). This spin trap reacts rapidly with e-aq followed by protonation to yield the ESR observable DMPO-H spin adduct. The results show that DSCG is an efficient e-aq scavenger and may effectively compete with oxygen for e-aq preventing the radiolytic formation of O/sub 2//sup -/..

  17. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  18. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seok-Woo

    2012-11-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  19. Application of noncatalytic gas-solid reactions for a single pellet of changing size to the modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal char containing sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Saxena, S.C.; Land, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A mechanistic model is developed for coal char combustion, with sulfur retention by limestone or dolomite sorbent, in a gas fluidized bed employing noncatalytic single pellet gas-solid reactions. The shrinking core model is employed to describe the kinetics of chemical reactions taking place on a single pellet; changes in pellet size as the reaction proceeds are considered. The solids are assumed to be in back-mix condition whereas the gas flow is regarded to be in plug flow. Most char combustion occurs near the gas distributor plate (at the bottom of the bed), where the bubbles are small and consequently the mass transfer rate is high. For such a case, the analysis is considerably simplified by ignoring the bubble phase since it plays an insignificant role in the overall rate of carbon conversion. Bubble-free operation is also encounterd in the turbulent regime, where the gas flow is quite high and classical bubbles do not exist. Formulation of the model includes setting up heat and mass balance equations pertaining to a single particle (1) exposed to a varying reactant concentration along the height of the bed and (2) whose size changes during reaction. These equations are then solved numerically to account for particles of all sizes in the bed in obtaining the overall carbon conversion efficiency and resultant sulfur retention. In particular, the influence on sorbent requirement of several fluid-bed variables such as oxygen concentration profile, particle size, reaction rate for sulfation reaction, and suflur adsorption efficiency are examined.

  20. MERCURY REACTIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHLORINE SPECIES: HOMOGENOUS GAS PHASE AND HETEROGENOUS GAS-SOLID PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics of mercury chlorination (with HC1) were studied using a flow reactor system with an on-line Hg analyzer and spciation sampling using a set of impingers. Kinetic parameters, such as reaction order (a), activation energy (Eu) and the overall rate constant (k') were es...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of nano-structured molybdenum-iron intermetallics by gas-solid reaction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Geassy, A. A.; Seetheraman, S.

    2016-03-01

    Ammonium molybdate and ferrous oxalate were used for the synthesis of nano-structured Mo-Fe intermetallics. Co-precipitation technique was applied to produce Mo/Fe precursors containing 58/42, 72/28 and 30/70 mass% respectively. The different phases formed were identified by XRD. The macro- and microstructures were microscopically examined by Reflected Light Microscope (RLM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with Electron Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS). TG-DTA-DSC technique was applied to follow up the behavior of precursors up to 900oC (10K/min.). Endothermic peaks were detected at 97.8, 196.9 and 392.7oC due to the decomposition reactions to produce MoO3 and Fe2O3. The exothermic peak resulted at 427.8oC is due to the solid state reaction between these oxides to form Fe2(MoO4)3. Precursors were isothermally reduced at 600-850oC in a flow of purified H2 and the O2-weight loss from the reduction reactions was continuously recorded as a function of time. The isothermal reduction behavior of precursors was investigated. The structures of reduced products and the different phases formed were investigated and correlated with the reduction conditions. At >60% reduction extents, Fe2(MoO4)3] phase was first reduced to Fe2MoO3O8 before the formation of FeMo, while FeMoO4 and MoO2 were reduced to FeMo and Mo. In precursors containing higher content of Fe2O3, FeMo, Fe3Mo and Fe phases were produced. The visual observation of reduced samples showed that the volume was gradually shrinking with rise in temperature up to 800oC and beyond which a measurable swelling was observed reaching about 170% at 900oC.

  2. Gas-Solid Displacement Reactions for Converting Silica Diatom Frustules into MgO and TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Tugba Kalem

    2004-12-19

    Technology for the microfabrication of freely moving parts began with a Bell Labs microgear spun by an air jet, and electrostatic silicon micro motors in the mid-1980s. It continued with development work on micropositioning of optics, miniature heat exchangers, small fluidic devices, and chemical reaction chambers. Recently, there has been a great deal of interest centered on the design and manufacture of devices of nanometer proportions and this speculation has spawned a new industry named, nanotechnology. Despite the technological and economic promise of this technology, current commercial micro/mesofabrication methods have largely been based upon two-dimensional processing principles which is not well suited to the low-cost mass production of three-dimensional micro devices with complex geometries and meso/nanoscale features. Diatoms are three dimensional (3D) microstructures from nature that provide a practical alternative for nanotechnology and microfabrication. Diatoms (Figure 1) are single-celled micro algae that form rigid cell walls (frustules) composed of amorphous silica. Their dimensions can range from less than 1 micron to several hundreds of microns. They are distributed throughout the world in aquatic, semi-aquatic and moist habitats, and extremely abundant in freshwater and marine ecosystems. Diatoms are thought to be responsible for up to 25% of the world's net primary production of organic carbon (by transforming of carbon dioxide and water into sugars by photosynthesis). Approximately 10{sup 5} unique diatom frustule shapes have been claimed to exist in nature. The frustules are composed of two valves that fit together like a petri-dish, connected to each other by one or more girdle bands. The frustule wall consists of a nanoporous assembly of silica nanoparticles. They absorb soluble silica from water even at extremely low concentrations and metabolize and deposit it as an external skeleton. Continued reproduction of a single parent diatom can

  3. Gas-solid reactions of single crystals: A study of the reaction of bromine with single crystals of trans-cinnamic acid and a range of its derivatives by infrared and Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Samantha L; Almond, Matthew J; Hollins, Peter

    2005-05-01

    Single crystals of trans-cinnamic acid and of a range of derivatives of this compound containing halogen substituents on the aromatic ring have been reacted with 165 Torr pressure of bromine vapour in a sealed desiccator at 20 degrees C for 1 week. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopic examination of the crystals shows that bromination of the aliphatic double bond, but not of the aromatic ring, has occurred. It is demonstrated also that the reaction is truly gas solid in nature. A time-dependent study of these reactions shows that they do not follow a smooth diffusion-controlled pathway. Rather the reactions appear to be inhomogeneous and to occur at defects within the crystal. The reaction products are seen to flake from the surface of the crystal. It is shown, therefore, that these are not single crystal to single crystal transitions, as have been observed previously for the photodimerisation of trans-cinnamic acid and several of its derivatives. It is shown that there are no by-products of the reaction and that finely ground samples react to form the same products as single crystals. PMID:19787900

  4. Competitive Oxidation and Hydration During Aqueous Alteration of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.; Mironenko, M. V.; Shock, E. L.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Studies of chondrites show that incorporation of H2O ice during formation of asteroids followed by radioactive heating caused partial oxidation and hydration of primary reduced and anhydrous rocks. Oxidation of kamacite, phosphides, troilite and organic polymers occurred through consumption of water s oxygen and release of H2. Hydration caused formation of serpentine, saponite, chlorite, talc and hydrated salts. Since H2O was the major reactant in oxidation and hydration, these processes could have been competitive. Redox reactions in asteroids should have been closely connected to hydration (dehydration) during aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. For example, dehydration and reduction release H2O that can be consumed in oxidation and hydration, respectively. We model asteroidal processes in order to quantify the fate of H2O and water s oxygen in major redox and hydration/dehydration reactions. Model: Equilibrium compositions in the gas-solid-liquid

  5. Kinetic study of hydrated lime reaction with HCl.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rong; Chin, Terence; Liang, David Tee; Laursen, Karin; Ong, Wan Yean; Yao, Kaiwen; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2003-06-01

    Hydrochloride (HCl) is an acidic pollutant present in the flue gas of most municipal or hazardous waste incinerators. Hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) is often used as a dry sorbent for injection in a spray reactor to remove HCI. However, due to the short residence time encountered, this control method has generally been found to have low conversion efficiencies which results in the high lime usage and generates large amount of fly ash as solid wastes. A fundamental study was carried outto investigate the kinetics of HCl-lime reaction under simulated flue gas conditions in order to better understand the process thereby providing a basis for an optimized lime usage and reduced fly ash production. The initial reaction rate and conversion of three limes were studied using a thermogravimetric analyzer by varying the gas flow rate, temperature (170-400 degrees C), and HCI concentrations (600-1200 mg/m3) as well as the associated particle size and surface area of the limes. The initial lime conversions were found to rely mostly on the residence time, while the ultimate lime conversions were strongly influenced by temperature and the reaction products. CaOHCI was found to be the primary product in most cases, while for one specific lime, CaCl2 was the ultimate conversion product after an extended time period. The true utilization of lime in flue gas cleanup is thus higher when CaOHCl is considered as the final product than those based on CaCl2 as the final product, which has been commonly used in previous studies. The initial reaction was controlled by diffusion of HCl in gas phase and the subsequent reaction by gaseous diffusion through the developing product layer. Increasing the HCI concentration raised the initial rate as well as conversion. However, overloading the lime with excessive HCI caused clogging at its surface and a drop in the ultimate conversion. Limes with smaller particle diameters and higher surface areas were found to be more reactive. The effect of gas

  6. Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2005-03-10

    The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

  7. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid–solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, Mg(OH){sub 2} peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface. - Graphical abstract: There was existence of a peeling-off process in the gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) MgO hydration system. - Highlights: • Magnesium oxide hydration in gas–liquid–solid system was investigated. • The experimental data in three-phase system could be fitted well by two models. • The morphology analysis suggested that there was existence of a peel-off process.

  8. Obsidian hydration profile measurements using a nuclear reaction technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.R.; Leich, D.A.; Tombrello, T.A.; Ericson, J.E.; Friedman, I.

    1974-01-01

    AMBIENT water diffuses into the exposed surfaces of obsidian, forming a hydration layer which increases in thickness with time to a maximum depth of 20-40 ??m (ref. 1), this layer being the basic foundation of obsidian dating2,3. ?? 1974 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas-liquid-solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid-solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH)2 precipitation, Mg(OH)2 peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface.

  10. Thermodynamics of the maleate and citraconate hydration reactions catalysed by malease from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; van den Tweel, W J; Hartmans, S

    1993-11-01

    Malease from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes catalyses the hydration of both maleate and citraconate to D-malate and D-citramalate, respectively. The Kapp for these hydration reactions were 2050 and 104, respectively, under standard biochemical conditions (25 degrees C, pH 7.0, I = 0.1). The influence of the pH (6.0-8.5) on Kapp was determined. The Gibbs-free-energy changes under standard biochemical conditions for the hydration of the dianionic acids were calculated to be -19.28 kJ.mol-1 and -11.65 kJ.mol-1, respectively. From the obtained data together with data from the literature, the Gibbs free energy of formation of maleate2- and citraconate2- were calculated to be -588.91 kJ.mol-1 and -600.56 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The influence of the temperature (10-40 degrees C) on Kapp was determined for both hydration reactions. The enthalpy change (delta H degrees') and entropy change (delta S degrees') under standard biochemical conditions for the maleate2- (delta H degrees' = 18.07 kJ.mol-1, delta S degrees' = 2.94 J.mol-1 x K-1) and citraconate2- (delta H degrees' = -22.55 kJ.mol-1, delta S degrees' = -35.92 kJ.mol-1 x K-1) hydration reactions were calculated. The reaction rate of malease from Ps. pseudoalcaligenes was studied for both hydration reactions as a function of temperature. From these studies, the Gibbs free energies of activation for the maleate and citraconate hydration reactions catalysed by malease from Ps. pseudoalcaligenes were calculated to be 62.21 kJ.mol-1 and 63.43 kJ.mol-1, respectively. PMID:8223624

  11. Reactions of laser-ablated U atoms with HF: infrared spectra and quantum chemical calculations of HUF, UH, and UF in noble gas solids.

    PubMed

    Vent-Schmidt, Thomas; Andrews, Lester; Riedel, Sebastian

    2015-03-19

    Reactions of laser-ablated U atoms with HF produce HUF as the major product and UH and UF as minor products, which are identified from their argon and neon matrix infrared spectra. Our assignment of HUF is confirmed by the observation of DUF and close agreement with observed and calculated vibrational frequencies and deuterium shifts in the vibrational frequencies. Our previous observation of the UH diatomic molecule from argon matrix experiments with H2, HD, and D2 as reagents is confirmed through its present observation with HF and DF, and with recent higher level quantum chemical calculations. The HF reaction provides a lower concentration of F in the system and thus simplifies the fluorine chemistry relative to similar U atom reactions with F2, and the new matrix identification of UF here is consistent with recent high level calculations on UF. In addition, we find evidence for the higher oxidation state secondary reaction products UHF2, UHF3, and UH2F2. PMID:25080179

  12. Overcoming Short-Circuit in Lead-Free CH3NH3SnI3 Perovskite Solar Cells via Kinetically Controlled Gas-Solid Reaction Film Fabrication Process.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takamichi; Cao, Duyen H; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Song, Tze-Bin; Sato, Yoshiharu; Aramaki, Shinji; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-03-01

    The development of Sn-based perovskite solar cells has been challenging because devices often show short-circuit behavior due to poor morphologies and undesired electrical properties of the thin films. A low-temperature vapor-assisted solution process (LT-VASP) has been employed as a novel kinetically controlled gas-solid reaction film fabrication method to prepare lead-free CH3NH3SnI3 thin films. We show that the solid SnI2 substrate temperature is the key parameter in achieving perovskite films with high surface coverage and excellent uniformity. The resulting high-quality CH3NH3SnI3 films allow the successful fabrication of solar cells with drastically improved reproducibility, reaching an efficiency of 1.86%. Furthermore, our Kelvin probe studies show the VASP films have a doping level lower than that of films prepared from the conventional one-step method, effectively lowering the film conductivity. Above all, with (LT)-VASP, the short-circuit behavior often obtained from the conventional one-step-fabricated Sn-based perovskite devices has been overcome. This study facilitates the path to more successful Sn-perovskite photovoltaic research. PMID:26877089

  13. Effect of hydration on the hydrogen abstraction reaction by HO in DMS and its oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Solvejg; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2010-04-15

    The gas-phase hydrogen abstraction reaction between the HO radical and sulfur containing species in the absence and presence of a single water molecule is investigated theoretically. The sulfur containing species dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and dimethyl sulfone are considered. The calculations are carried out with a mixture of density function theory and second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. We find that the energy of the hydrated transition state structures for the hydrogen abstraction reactions is lowered compared to that of the nonhydrated ones. Furthermore, the energy difference between the reaction complex and the transition state is reduced when one water molecule is added. The atmospheric abundance of the different hydrated complexes is estimated in order to assess the relative importance of the possible reaction mechanisms. PMID:20088555

  14. Effect of hydration and dehydration on initiation and dynamics of some physiological reactions in desiccation tolerant cyanobacterium Scytonema geitleri.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, B S; Tripathi, S N

    1998-06-01

    The effect of hydration and dehydration has been studied on extent and recovery of some metabolic reactions in desiccation tolerant terrestrial cyanobacterium Scytonema geitleri. The results show that the energy transducing reactions like photochemical reactions of photosynthesis recover first, followed by increase in ATP pool size. During later phase of hydration, appearance of energy consuming processes such as CO2 fixation and nitrogen fixation have been observed. Sensitivity of reactions during dehydration followed the pattern reverse to recovery processes. PMID:9803667

  15. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Ju-hyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2011-06-15

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (straetlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt volume contraction regardless of the molecular size of the pressure-transmitting media. This volume discontinuity could be associated to a structural transition or to the movement of the weakly bound interlayer water molecules in the AFm structure. The experimental results seem to indicate that the pressure-induced dehydration is the dominant mechanism especially with hygroscopic pressure medium. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state was used to compute the bulk modulus of the minerals. Due to the discontinuity in the pressure-volume diagram, a two stage bulk modulus of each AFm phase was calculated. The abnormal volume compressibility for the AFm phases caused a significant change to their bulk modulus. The reliability of this experiment is verified by comparing the bulk modulus of hydrogarnet with previous studies.

  16. Formation of lithospheric detachments: quantifying the mechanical effect of hydration reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, Benjamin; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Yamato, Philippe; Watremez, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Many authors have published experimentally determined flow laws of rheologically important monophase aggregates and polyphase rocks. These laws provide good first order constraints on lithology-controlled lithospheric strength variations. However, since the whole range of mineralogical and chemical rock compositions cannot be experimentally tested, variations in reaction-controlled rock strength cannot be systematically and fully characterized. We here present the results of a study coupling thermodynamical and Thermomechanical modelling aiming at predicting the mechanical impact of metamorphic reactions on the strength of the mantle during its exhumation in rifted zones. Thermodynamic modelling is used for calculating the mineralogical composition of a typical peridotite as a function of pressure, temperature and water content. For a given P-T condition, the calculated modes and flow laws parameters for each phase constituting the paragenesis are then used as input of the Minimized Power Geometric model for predicting the polyphase aggregate strength. Hence, by considering P-T evolutions characteristic of exhumed mantle, we quantify the strength of the mantle as a function of pressure, temperature and hydration history in a rift zone. The mechanical impact of such metamorphic reactions and hydration is first quantified in 1D for three simplified hydration schemes and then introduced in preliminary 2D models which coupled fluid transfer to the thermodynamically derived rheological parameters. Schemes with limited hydratation are found to keep rocks in condition close to brittle ductile transition for a longer time and to permit more efficient mantle exhumation.

  17. Reaction of diethyl maleate and diethyl fumarate with hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bíró, Á.; Wojnárovits, L.

    1996-03-01

    In dilute aqueous solution diethyl maleate (DEM) and diethyl fumarate (DEF) scavenge hydrated electrons with a rate constant of 2.2·10 10 mol -1 dm 3 s -1. DEM - reversibly protonates with pK a = 5.2. The pK a of DEF - is below 4. The electron adducts decay in second order reactions. The OH radicals add to the double bonds with 5.9·10 9 mol -1 dm 3 s -1. In the reaction α-carboxyalkyl radicals are produced. In disproportionation of radicals oxalacetic acid ethylester forms that in alkaline solution leads to strong permanent absorbency in the UV.

  18. Comparison of Kinetic and Equilibrium Reaction Models inSimulating the Behavior of Gas Hydrates in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

    2006-05-12

    In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrates in porous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulation the importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction models for predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to external stimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we (1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reaction models for production in various geological settings and for the case of depressurization in a core during extraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initial hydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numerical discretization. We find that for systems undergoing thermal stimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for both reaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences are observed at early times. Given these observations, and since the computational demands for the kinetic reaction model far exceed those for the equilibrium reaction model, the use of the equilibrium reaction model often appears to be justified and preferred for simulating the behavior of gas hydrates.

  19. Olivine Hydration and Carbonation Reactions in Porous Open Systems: Insights from Reactive Percolation Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, M.; Peuble, S.; Gouze, P.; Andreani, M.; Luquot, L.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal exchanges between fluids (seawater, hydrothermal and mantle-derived CO2-rich fluids) and mantle-dominated lithosphere at ridges represent a major means of mass exchange between the mantle and the Earth's envelopes. It results from/in a suite of strongly interconnected thermal, mineralogical, and (bio-) chemical processes within the seafloor, that contributes to the Earth's carbon budget through carbonation reactions (dissolution of silicates and precipitation of carbonates) and the production of complex carbon compounds. Recent experimental studies were realized to constrain the chemical parameters controlling these reactions (pH, T, kinetics, catalysis), one of the main applications being the development of techniques for geological storage of excess atmospheric CO2 into ultramafic ophiolitic massifs and in basaltic reservoirs. However, although these reactions will occur only if fluids can flow through the reacting rocks, the mechanisms controlling the hydrodynamic properties of the system during hydration and carbonation reactions remain poorly constrained. We present the results of three sets of percolation-reaction experiments during which CO2-depleted to CO2-saturated fluids were injected into olivine cores, dunitic samples and magmatic olivine with trace basalts. These experiments allowed us to explore the role of the initial mineralogy and structure of rocks, the composition of fluids (pCO2...) and flow rate and their effects on hydrodynamic properties and carbonation/hydration efficiency. The experiments produced broadly similar results, i.e. dissolution of olivine (× mafic minerals and glass when present), precipitation of carbonates and of serpentine type minerals and a steady decrease in permeability with time. In details, differences in the compositions of the fluids and of the reaction products were observed from one set of experiments to the other as well as in the rate at which chemical and permeability changes occurred during the

  20. A novel system for in-situ observations of early hydration reactions in wet conditions in conventional SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.; Bentur, A. . E-mail: bentur@tx.technion.ac.il; Kovler, K.

    2007-01-15

    A novel system enabling wet microscopy in conventional SEM is described and its performance for in-situ study of hydration reactions is demonstrated. The technology is based on a sealed specimen capsule, which is protected from the microscope vacuum by an electron-transparent partition membrane. Thus, the wet sample can be placed and observed in a 'conventional' SEM without the need for drying or employing environmental SEM. Early hydration reactions of gypsum and cement systems were followed during the first 24 h.

  1. Calcic micas in the Allende meteorite - Evidence for hydration reactions in the early solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Buseck, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    Two calcic micas, clintonite and margarite, have been identified in alteration products in a calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) in the Allende meteorite. Clintonite replaces grossular in alteration veins, and margarite occurs as lamellae in anorthite. Their occurrence suggests that, in addition to undergoing high-temperature alteration by a volatile and iron-rich vapor that produced the grossular and anorthite, some CAIs underwent alteration at moderate temperatures (400 K or less). Petrographic evidence suggests that the calcic micas formed before accretion but after the formation of the layered rim sequences that surround the CAI. These calcic micas provide strong evidence that, contrary to theoretical calculations, some hydration reactions occurred in the early solar nebula.

  2. Hydration of periclase at 350 ∘ C to 620 ∘ C and 200 MPa: experimental calibration of reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleci, H.; Schmidt, C.; Rybacki, E.; Petrishcheva, E.; Abart, R.

    2016-02-01

    The hydration of periclase to brucite was investigated experimentally. Single crystals of periclase machined to millimeter sized cubes with (100) surfaces were reacted with distilled water at temperatures of 350 to 620 ∘C and a pressure of 200 MPa for run durations of 5 to 40 minutes. Hydration produced a layer of brucite covering the surface of periclase. While the shrinking periclase largely retained its cube shape a surface roughness developed on the μm scale and eventually outward pointing spikes bounded by (111) faces emerged on the retreating faces of the periclase due to kinetic selection of less reactive (111) and (110) surfaces. The periclase to brucite conversion followed a linear rate law, where the reaction rate increased from 350 to 530 ∘C and then decreased towards higher temperature and finally vanished at about 630 ∘C, where periclase, brucite, and water are in equilibrium at 200 MPa. The overall kinetics of the hydration reaction is conveniently described in terms of a phenomenological interface mobility. Measuring the velocity of the hydration front relative to the lattice of the reactant periclase, the temperature dependence of its mobility is described by an Arrhenius relation with pre-exponential factor 1.7.10-12 m 4/s.J and activation energy of E A =55 kJ/mol.

  3. Radical-based destruction of nitramines in water: kinetics and efficiencies of hydroxyl radical and hydrated electron reactions.

    PubMed

    Mezyk, Stephen P; Razavi, Behnaz; Swancutt, Katy L; Cox, Casandra R; Kiddle, James J

    2012-08-01

    In support of the potential use of advanced oxidation and reduction process technologies for the removal of carcinogenic nitro-containing compounds in water reaction rate constants for the hydroxyl radical and hydrated electron with a series of low molecular weight nitramines (R(1)R(2)-NNO(2)) have been determined using a combination of electron pulse radiolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy. The hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant was fast, ranging from 0.54-4.35 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), and seen to increase with increasing complexity of the nitramine alkyl substituents suggesting that oxidation primarily occurs by hydrogen atom abstraction from the alkyl chains. In contrast, the rate constant for hydrated electron reaction was effectively independent of compound structure, (k(av) = (1.87 ± 0.25) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1)) indicating that the reduction predominately occurred at the common nitramine moiety. Concomitant steady-state irradiation and product measurements under aerated conditions also showed a radical reaction efficiency dependence on compound structure, with the overall radical-based degradation becoming constant for nitramines containing more than four methylene groups. The quantitative evaluation of these efficiency data suggest that some (~40%) hydrated electron reduction also results in quantitative nitramine destruction, in contrast to previously reported electron paramagnetic measurements on these compounds that proposed that this reduction only produced a transient anion adduct that would transfer its excess electron to regenerate the parent molecule. PMID:22788844

  4. Accelerated hydration reaction of an unsymmetrical tolan evidenced by a Hg(ii)-trapped macrocycle and its application as a Hg(ii)-selective indicator.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung-Ho; Kurapati, Sathish; Jo, Yunhee; Shin, June-Ho; Cho, Dong-Gyu

    2016-09-14

    Hg(ii)-mediated hydration reactions of unsymmetrical quinoline type tolans were studied. The observed accelerated reactions of the tolans rely on the additional binding motifs of the tolan, as supported by the X-ray structure of the macrocycle (2b). The analyte-specific reaction allows us to detect Hg(ii) in buffered media. PMID:27510469

  5. PORE STRUCTURE MODEL OF CEMENT HYDRATES CONSIDERING PORE WATER CONTENT AND REACTION PROCESS UNDER ARBITRARY HUMIDITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikura, Yusuke; Oshita, Hideki

    A simulation model to estimate the pore structure of cement hydrates by curing in arbitrary relative humidity is presented. This paper describes procedures for predicting phase compositions based on the classical hydration model of Portland cement, calculating the particle size distribution of constituent phases and evaluating the pore size distribution by stereological and statistical considerations. And to estimate the water content in pore structure under any relative humidity, we proposed the simulation model of adsorption isotherm model based on the pore structure. To evaluate the effectiveness of this model, simulation results were compared with experimental results of the pore size distribution measured by mercury porosimetry. As a result, it was found that the experimental and simulated results were in close agreement, and the simulated results indicated characterization of the po re structure of cement hydrates.

  6. CO2 sequestration using accelerated gas-solid carbonation of pre-treated EAF steel-making bag house dust.

    PubMed

    El-Naas, Muftah H; El Gamal, Maisa; Hameedi, Suhaib; Mohamed, Abdel-Mohsen O

    2015-06-01

    Mineral CO2 sequestration is a promising process for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, alkaline calcium-rich dust particles collected from bag filters of electric arc furnaces (EAF) for steel making were utilized as a viable raw material for mineral CO2 sequestration. The dust particles were pre-treated through hydration, drying and screening. The pre-treated particles were then subjected to direct gas-solid carbonation reaction in a fluidized-bed reactor. The carbonated products were characterized to determine the overall sequestration capacity and the mineralogical structures. Leaching tests were also performed to measure the extracted minerals from the carbonated dust and evaluate the carbonation process on dust stabilization. The experimental results indicated that CO2 could be sequestered using the pre-treated bag house dust. The maximum sequestration of CO2 was 0.657 kg/kg of dust, based on the total calcium content. The highest degree of carbonation achieved was 42.5% and the carbonation efficiency was 69% at room temperature. PMID:25846002

  7. Harmonically Perturbed Gas-Solid Fluidized System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, S. T.; Muller, M. R.

    1996-11-01

    Experiments were performed on a harmonically perturbed gas-solid fluidized system, to determine the extent to which the total system behaved as a liquid in regards to the aspects of resonant frequency, wave shapes, and damping effects. The fluidized system consists of a cylindrical alumina oxide/air fluidized bed which is vertically perturbed in a symmetrical fashion by externally vibrating the entire vessel. The external vibrations were carried out over various flow rates, amplitudes, and frequencies. The results obtained could then be compared to the natural frequencies of water for the same governing parameters by analytical means. The effects of excitations on the formation of voidage disturbances or "gas bubbles" was also investigated. Data acquisition enabled the determination of both the amplitude and frequency of the waves generated in the bath. Results indicate that external vertical vibration caused the mean surface level of the bed to drop. This can be attributed to a closer packing of the particles along with a decrease in the number and size of gas bubbles in the bed.

  8. Early age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in natural zeolite blended cements: Reaction kinetics and products by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, R.; Mertens, G.; Cizer, O.; Elsen, J.

    2010-12-15

    The in situ early-age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in cements blended with natural zeolites were investigated by time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. Chabazite and Na-, K-, and Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite materials were mixed with Portland cement in a 3:7 weight ratio and hydrated in situ at 40 {sup o}C. The evolution of phase contents showed that the addition of natural zeolites accelerates the onset of C{sub 3}S hydration and precipitation of CH and AFt. Kinetic analysis of the consumption of C{sub 3}S indicates that the enveloping C-S-H layer is thinner and/or less dense in the presence of alkali-exchanged clinoptilolite pozzolans. The zeolite pozzolanic activity is interpreted to depend on the zeolite exchangeable cation content and on the crystallinity. The addition of natural zeolites alters the structural evolution of the C-S-H product. Longer silicate chains and a lower C/S ratio are deduced from the evolution of the C-S-H b-cell parameter.

  9. Thermal reaction of ethynylphthalimides and hydration of N-/4-ethynylphenyl/phthalimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Three ethynyl substituted phenylphthalimides were prepared and characterized by high pressure liquid chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, and mass spectroscopy. When the preparation of N-(4-ethynylphenyl)phthalimide was attempted by the thermal cyclodehydration of N-(4-ethynylphenyl)-2-carboxybenzamide, N-(4-acetylphenyl)phthalimide was obtained as the major component. This unusual hydration of an ethynyl group was investigated and a mechanism was proposed to explain it.

  10. Thermochemistry of the Reaction of SF6 with Gas-Phase Hydrated Electrons: A Benchmark for Nanocalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Akhgarnusch, Amou; Höckendorf, Robert F; Beyer, Martin K

    2015-10-01

    The reaction of sulfur hexafluoride with gas-phase hydrated electrons (H2O)n(-), n ≈ 60-130, is investigated at temperatures T = 140-300 K by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. SF6 reacts with a temperature-independent rate of 3.0 ± 1.0 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1) via exclusive formation of the hydrated F(-) anion and the SF5(•) radical, which evaporates from the cluster. Nanocalorimetry yields a reaction enthalpy of ΔHR,298K = 234 ± 24 kJ mol(-1). Combined with literature thermochemical data from bulk aqueous solution, these result in an F5S-F bond dissociation enthalpy of ΔH298K = 455 ± 24 kJ mol(-1), in excellent agreement with all high-level quantum chemical calculations in the literature. A combination with gas-phase literature thermochemistry also yields an experimental value for the electron affinity of SF5(•), EA(SF5(•)) = 4.27 ± 0.25 eV. PMID:26356833

  11. Fictitious domain method for fully resolved reacting gas-solid flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longhui; Liu, Kai; You, Changfu

    2015-10-01

    Fully resolved simulation (FRS) for gas-solid multiphase flow considers solid objects as finite sized regions in flow fields and their behaviours are predicted by solving equations in both fluid and solid regions directly. Fixed mesh numerical methods, such as fictitious domain method, are preferred in solving FRS problems and have been widely researched. However, for reacting gas-solid flows no suitable fictitious domain numerical method has been developed. This work presents a new fictitious domain finite element method for FRS of reacting particulate flows. Low Mach number reacting flow governing equations are solved sequentially on a regular background mesh. Particles are immersed in the mesh and driven by their surface forces and torques integrated on immersed interfaces. Additional treatments on energy and surface reactions are developed. Several numerical test cases validated the method and a burning carbon particles array falling simulation proved the capability for solving moving reacting particle cluster problems.

  12. Reactions of Hexa-aquo Transition Metal Ions with the Hydrated Electron up to 300 °C.

    PubMed

    Kanjana, Kotchaphan; Courtin, Bruce; MacConnell, Ashley; Bartels, David M

    2015-11-12

    Reactions of the hydrated electron with divalent aqueous transition-metal ions, Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), and Mn(2+), were studied using a pulse radiolysis technique. The kinetics study was carried out at a constant pressure of 120 bar with temperatures up to 300 °C. The rate constants at room temperature agree with those reported in the literature. The reaction of Cd(2+) is approximately diffusion-limited, but none of the first-row transition-metal ion reactions are diffusion-controlled at any temperature studied. The activation energies obtained from the Arrhenius plots are in the range 14.5-40.6 kJ/mol. Pre-exponential factors are quite large, between 1 × 10(13) and 7 × 10(15) M(-1) s(-1). There appears to be a large degree of entropy-enthalpy compensation in the activation of Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Cu(2+), as the larger pre-exponential factors strongly correlate with higher activation energy. Saturation of the ionic strength effect suggests that these reactions could be long-range nonadiabatic electron "jumps", but Marcus theory is incompatible with direct formation of ground state (M(+))aq ions. A self-consistent explanation is that electron transfer occurs to excited states derived from the metal 4s orbitals. The ionic strength effect in the Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) reactions suggests that these proceed by short-range adiabatic electron attachment involving breakdown of the water coordination shell. PMID:26530531

  13. Bis(allyl)-ruthenium(iv) complexes with phosphinous acid ligands as catalysts for nitrile hydration reactions.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Mendivil, Eder; Francos, Javier; González-Fernández, Rebeca; González-Liste, Pedro J; Borge, Javier; Cadierno, Victorio

    2016-09-14

    Several mononuclear ruthenium(iv) complexes with phosphinous acid ligands [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2OH)] have been synthesized (78-86% yield) by treatment of the dimeric precursor [{RuCl(μ-Cl)(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)}2] (C10H16 = 2,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1,8-diyl) with 2 equivalents of different aromatic, heteroaromatic and aliphatic secondary phosphine oxides R2P([double bond, length as m-dash]O)H. The compounds [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2OH)] could also be prepared, in similar yields, by hydrolysis of the P-Cl bond in the corresponding chlorophosphine-Ru(iv) derivatives [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2Cl)]. In addition to NMR and IR data, the X-ray crystal structures of representative examples are discussed. Moreover, the catalytic behaviour of complexes [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2OH)] has been investigated for the selective hydration of organonitriles in water. The best results were achieved with the complex [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PMe2OH)], which proved to be active under mild conditions (60 °C), with low metal loadings (1 mol%), and showing good functional group tolerance. PMID:27510460

  14. CO2 sequestration using waste concrete and anorthosite tailings by direct mineral carbonation in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes.

    PubMed

    Ben Ghacham, Alia; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Mineral carbonation (MC) represents a promising alternative for sequestering CO2. In this work, the CO2 sequestration capacity of the available calcium-bearing materials waste concrete and anorthosite tailings is assessed in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes using 18.2% flue CO2 gas. The objective is to screen for a better potential residue and phase route and as the ultimate purpose to develop a cost-effective process. The results indicate the possibility of removing 66% from inlet CO2 using waste concrete for the aqueous route. However, the results that were obtained with the carbonation of anorthosite were less significant, with 34% as the maximal percentage of CO2 removal. The difference in terms of reactivity could be explained by the accessibility to calcium. In fact, anorthosite presents a framework structure wherein the calcium is trapped, which could slow the calcium dissolution into the aqueous phase compared to the concrete sample, where calcium can more easily leach. In the other part of the study concerning gas-solid carbonation, the results of CO2 removal did not exceed 15%, which is not economically interesting for scaling up the process. The results obtained with waste concrete samples in aqueous phase are interesting. In fact, 34.6% of the introduced CO2 is converted into carbonate after 15 min of contact with the gas without chemical additives and at a relatively low gas pressure. Research on the optimization of the aqueous process using waste concrete should be performed to enhance the reaction rate and to develop a cost-effective process. PMID:26292776

  15. Rate constants measured for hydrated electron reactions with peptides and proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braams, R.

    1968-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation on the amino acids of proteins and the reactivity of the protonated amino group depends upon the pK subscript a of the group. Estimates of the rate constants for reactions involving the amino acid side chains are presented. These rate constants gave an approximate rate constant for three different protein molecules.

  16. Mechanism of maltal hydration catalyzed by. beta. -amylase: Role of protein structure in controlling the steric outcome of reactions catalyzed by a glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahata, Sumio ); Chiba, S. ); Brewer, C.F.; Hehre, E.J. )

    1991-07-09

    Crystalline (monomeric) soybean and (tetrameric) sweet potato {beta}-amylase were shown to catalyze the cis hydration of maltal ({alpha}-D-glucopyranosyl-2-deoxy-D-arabino-hex-1-enitol) to form {beta}-2-deoxymaltose. As reported earlier with the sweet potato enzyme, maltal hydration in D{sub 2}O by soybean {beta}-amylase was found to exhibit an unusually large solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effect (V{sub H}/V{sub D}=6.5), a reaction rate linearly dependent on the mole fraction of deuterium, and 2-deoxy-(2(a)-{sup 2}H)maltose as product. These results indicate (for each {beta}-amylase) that protonation is the rate-limiting step in a reaction involving a nearly symmetric one-proton transition state and that maltal is specifically protonated from above the double bond. That maltal undergoes cis hydration provides evidence in support of a general-acid-catalyzed, carbonium ion mediated reaction. Of fundamental significance is that {beta}-amylase protonates maltal from a direction opposite that assumed for protonating strach, yet creates products of the same anomeric configuration from both. Such stereochemical dichotomy argues for the overriding role of protein structures is dictating the steric outcome of reactions catalyzed by a glycosylase, by limiting the approach and orientation of water or other acceptors to the reaction center.

  17. Turbulence modeling of gas-solid suspension flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose here is to discuss and review advances in two-phase turbulent modeling techniques and their applications in various gas-solid suspension flow situations. In addition to the turbulence closures, heat transfer effect, particle dispersion and wall effects are partially covered.

  18. Reaction of cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase with an Allene Substrate, 2,3-Butadienoate: Hydration Via an Enamine

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Johnson, William H.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Serrano, Hector; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2011-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) catalyzes the hydrolytic dehalogenation of cis-3-haloacrylates to yield malonate semialdehyde. The enzyme processes other substrates including an allene (2,3-butadienoate) to produce acetoacetate. In the course of a stereochemical analysis of the cis-CaaD-catalyzed reaction using this allene, the enzyme was unexpectedly inactivated in the presence of NaBH4 by the reduction of a covalent enzyme-substrate bond. Covalent modification was surprising because the accumulated evidence for cis-CaaD dehalogenation favored a mechanism involving direct substrate hydration mediated by Pro-1. However, the results of subsequent mechanistic, pre-steady state and full progress kinetic experiments are consistent with a mechanism in which an enamine forms between Pro-1 and the allene. Hydrolysis of the enamine or an imine tautomer produces acetoacetate. Reduction of the imine species is likely responsible for the observed enzyme inactivation. This is the first reported observation of a tautomerase superfamily member functioning by covalent catalysis. The result may suggest that some fraction of the cis-CaaD-catalyzed dehalogenation of cis-3-haloacrylates also proceeds by covalent catalysis. PMID:22129074

  19. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  20. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  1. Compact apparatus for photogeneration of hydrated electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, E.; Schmidt, K.

    1970-01-01

    Flash-photolysis instrument generates hydrated electrons and studies their reactions. It has a three-dimensional, multiple-reaction cell and the capacity to produce up to .1 micromole hydrated electron in a single 40 microsec light pulse.

  2. Hydrodynamics of semifluidization in gas-solid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Yau, S.J.; Hopper, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Semifluidized bed hydrodynamics, including minimum semifluidization velocity, packed bed formation and pressure drop across the bed, were studied in gas-solid fluidized beds. Experiments were carried out in beds of 0.203, 0.129 and 0.105 m I.D. Experimental parameters examined included gas velocity, semifluidized particles, static bed height and expansion ratio. Empirical and semi-empirical models were derived. The results were compared with those available in the literature.

  3. Charge transfer reactions between gas-phase hydrated electrons, molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide at temperatures of 80-300 K.

    PubMed

    Akhgarnusch, Amou; Tang, Wai Kit; Zhang, Han; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2016-09-14

    The recombination reactions of gas-phase hydrated electrons (H2O)n˙(-) with CO2 and O2, as well as the charge exchange reaction of CO2˙(-)(H2O)n with O2, were studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry in the temperature range T = 80-300 K. Comparison of the rate constants with collision models shows that CO2 reacts with 50% collision efficiency, while O2 reacts considerably slower. Nanocalorimetry yields internally consistent results for the three reactions. Converted to room temperature condensed phase, this yields hydration enthalpies of CO2˙(-) and O2˙(-), ΔHhyd(CO2˙(-)) = -334 ± 44 kJ mol(-1) and ΔHhyd(O2˙(-)) = -404 ± 28 kJ mol(-1). Quantum chemical calculations show that the charge exchange reaction proceeds via a CO4˙(-) intermediate, which is consistent with a fully ergodic reaction and also with the small efficiency. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations corroborate this picture and indicate that the CO4˙(-) intermediate has a lifetime significantly above the ps regime. PMID:27498686

  4. Comparison of hydration reactions for "piano-stool" RAPTA-B and [Ru(η6-arene)(en)Cl]+ complexes: density functional theory computational study.

    PubMed

    Chval, Zdeněk; Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2011-01-14

    The hydration process for two Ru(II) representative half-sandwich complexes: Ru(arene)(pta)Cl(2) (from the RAPTA family) and [Ru(arene)(en)Cl](+) (further labeled as Ru_en) were compared with analogous reaction of cisplatin. In the study, quantum chemical methods were employed. All the complexes were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level using Conductor Polarizable Continuum Model (CPCM) solvent continuum model and single-point (SP) energy calculations and determination of electronic properties were performed at the B3LYP∕6-311++G(2df,2pd)/CPCM level. It was found that the hydration model works fairly well for the replacement of the first chloride by water where an acceptable agreement for both Gibbs free energies and rate constants was obtained. However, in the second hydration step worse agreement of the experimental and calculated values was achieved. In agreement with experimental values, the rate constants for the first step can be ordered as RAPTA-B > Ru_en > cisplatin. The rate constants correlate well with binding energies (BEs) of the Pt∕Ru-Cl bond in the reactant complexes. Substitution reactions on Ru_en and cisplatin complexes proceed only via pseudoassociative (associative interchange) mechanism. On the other hand in the case of RAPTA there is also possible a competitive dissociation mechanism with metastable pentacoordinated intermediate. The first hydration step is slightly endothermic for all three complexes by 3-5 kcal∕mol. Estimated BEs confirm that the benzene ligand is relatively weakly bonded assuming the fact that it occupies three coordination positions of the Ru(II) cation. PMID:21241133

  5. Comparison of hydration reactions for "piano-stool" RAPTA-B and [Ru(η6- arene)(en)Cl]+ complexes: Density functional theory computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chval, Zdeněk; Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V.

    2011-01-01

    The hydration process for two Ru(II) representative half-sandwich complexes: Ru(arene)(pta)Cl2 (from the RAPTA family) and [Ru(arene)(en)Cl]+ (further labeled as Ru_en) were compared with analogous reaction of cisplatin. In the study, quantum chemical methods were employed. All the complexes were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level using Conductor Polarizable Continuum Model (CPCM) solvent continuum model and single-point (SP) energy calculations and determination of electronic properties were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2pd)/CPCM level. It was found that the hydration model works fairly well for the replacement of the first chloride by water where an acceptable agreement for both Gibbs free energies and rate constants was obtained. However, in the second hydration step worse agreement of the experimental and calculated values was achieved. In agreement with experimental values, the rate constants for the first step can be ordered as RAPTA-B > Ru_en > cisplatin. The rate constants correlate well with binding energies (BEs) of the Pt/Ru-Cl bond in the reactant complexes. Substitution reactions on Ru_en and cisplatin complexes proceed only via pseudoassociative (associative interchange) mechanism. On the other hand in the case of RAPTA there is also possible a competitive dissociation mechanism with metastable pentacoordinated intermediate. The first hydration step is slightly endothermic for all three complexes by 3-5 kcal/mol. Estimated BEs confirm that the benzene ligand is relatively weakly bonded assuming the fact that it occupies three coordination positions of the Ru(II) cation.

  6. Fluidization onset and expansion of gas-solid fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O.C.; Shin, T.S.

    1984-08-01

    A simple, mass conservation-based, kinematic model is presented for accurately predicting both the onset of fluidization and the degree of (limit of) bed expansion in bubbling gas-solid fluidized beds. The model is consistant with inception correlations exisiting in the literature. Since the method has a sound physical basis, it might be expected to provide scaling between laboratory-scale fluidized beds and large-scale systems. This scaling ability, however, remains to be demonstrated as does the application to pressurized systems and where the terminal Reynolds numbers exceed 1000, (Archimedes numbers over about 3.2 x 10/sup 5/).

  7. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  8. Chloral Hydrate

    MedlinePlus

    Chloral hydrate, a sedative, is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia (to help you fall asleep and ... Chloral hydrate comes as a capsule and liquid to take by mouth and as a suppository to insert rectally. ...

  9. Gas-solid flow characteristics in high-density CFB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue-yao; Fan, Bao-guo; Wang, Sheng-dian; Xu, Xiang; Xiao, Yun-han

    2012-08-01

    The gas-solid flow characteristics in the riser of a high density CFB of square (0.27 m×0.27 m×10.4 m) or circular ( ϕ 0.187m×10.4 m) cross section, using Geldart B particles (quartz sand), was investigated experimentally. The influence of riser structure on the hydrodynamic behaviors of a high-density circulating fluidized bed was investigated. The solid circulation rate was up to 321 kg/(m2s) with the circular cross-section under the operating conditions of the main bed air velocity 12.1 m/s and loosen wind and back-feed wind flow 25.1 m3/h. Different operating conditions on realizing high density circulation was analyzed, while both solids circulation rate and particle holdup depended highly on operating conditions. The circulating gas-solid flow was accompanied by an evidently-dense character in the riser's bottom zone and became fully developed in the middle and upper zones.

  10. Bulk-density distributions of solids in the freeboard of a gas-solid fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, B.C.; Fan, L.T.; Walawender, W.P.

    1995-05-01

    The freeboard region above the bubbling zone of a gas-solid fluidized bed provides the space not only for the disengagement of particles but also for additional contact and reaction between the particles and gas. The flow pattern and behavior of particles as well as their bulk-density distribution in the freeboard have a significant impact on the efficiency of fluidization. The results of numerous previous experimental studies indicate that the bulk density of solids essentially decreases exponentially as a function of the height of the freeboard. In the present work, this distribution has been obtained by first derived the Fokker-Planck equation from the linearized equation of motion of a single particle and then transforming this Fokker-Planck equation into that for the bulk-density distribution of solids. Its simplification to the one-dimensional case readily gives rise to an exponential distribution and agrees well with the available experimental data.

  11. A new model for gas/solid pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bangxian; Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new model of particle turbulent dispersion in vertical gas/solid pipe flow is presented in this paper. The essence of the model is to pay more attention to the active and discrete behavior of particles in the dispersion process in non-homogeneous turbulent vertical pipe flows using two-fluid approaches. In the new model, a non-gradient type of diffusion term is included in the expression of radial particle dispersion flux; the transport equation for particle turbulent kinetic energy (PTKE) is developed and solved for its distribution; the effect of intra-particle collision is considered for the generation and dissipation of PTKE; turbulence modulation due to particle presence is taken into account. Preliminary numerical results based on this new model are also presented in this paper.

  12. Sequestration of flue gas CO₂ by direct gas-solid carbonation of air pollution control system residues.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo

    2012-12-18

    Direct gas-solid carbonation reactions of residues from an air pollution control system (APCr) were conducted using different combinations of simulated flue gas to study the impact on CO₂ sequestration. X-ray diffraction analysis of APCr determined the existence of CaClOH, whose maximum theoretical CO₂ sequestration potential of 58.13 g CO₂/kg APCr was calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The reaction mechanism obeyed a model of a fast kinetics-controlled process followed by a slow product layer diffusion-controlled process. Temperature is the key factor in direct gas-solid carbonation and had a notable influence on both the carbonation conversion and the CO₂ sequestration rate. The optimal CO₂ sequestrating temperature of 395 °C was easily obtained for APCr using a continuous heating experiment. CO₂ content in the flue gas had a definite influence on the CO₂ sequestration rate of the kinetics-controlled process, but almost no influence on the final carbonation conversion. Typical concentrations of SO₂ in the flue gas could not only accelerate the carbonation reaction rate of the product layer diffusion-controlled process, but also could improve the final carbonation conversion. Maximum carbonation conversions of between 68.6% and 77.1% were achieved in a typical flue gas. Features of rapid CO₂ sequestration rate, strong impurities resistance, and high capture conversion for direct gas-solid carbonation were proved in this study, which presents a theoretical foundation for the applied use of this encouraging technology on carbon capture and storage. PMID:23181908

  13. Generalized gas-solid adsorption modeling: Single-component equilibria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.

    2015-01-07

    Over the last several decades, modeling of gas–solid adsorption at equilibrium has generally been accomplished through the use of isotherms such as the Freundlich, Langmuir, Tóth, and other similar models. While these models are relatively easy to adapt for describing experimental data, their simplicity limits their generality to be used with many different sets of data. This limitation forces engineers and scientists to test each different model in order to evaluate which one can best describe their data. Additionally, the parameters of these models all have a different physical interpretation, which may have an effect on how they can bemore » further extended into kinetic, thermodynamic, and/or mass transfer models for engineering applications. Therefore, it is paramount to adopt not only a more general isotherm model, but also a concise methodology to reliably optimize for and obtain the parameters of that model. A model of particular interest is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm. The GSTA isotherm has enormous flexibility, which could potentially be used to describe a variety of different adsorption systems, but utilizing this model can be fairly difficult due to that flexibility. To circumvent this complication, a comprehensive methodology and computer code has been developed that can perform a full equilibrium analysis of adsorption data for any gas-solid system using the GSTA model. The code has been developed in C/C++ and utilizes a Levenberg–Marquardt’s algorithm to handle the non-linear optimization of the model parameters. Since the GSTA model has an adjustable number of parameters, the code iteratively goes through all number of plausible parameters for each data set and then returns the best solution based on a set of scrutiny criteria. Data sets at different temperatures are analyzed serially and then linear correlations with temperature are made for the parameters of the model. The end result is a full set

  14. Generalized gas-solid adsorption modeling: Single-component equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.

    2015-01-07

    Over the last several decades, modeling of gas–solid adsorption at equilibrium has generally been accomplished through the use of isotherms such as the Freundlich, Langmuir, Tóth, and other similar models. While these models are relatively easy to adapt for describing experimental data, their simplicity limits their generality to be used with many different sets of data. This limitation forces engineers and scientists to test each different model in order to evaluate which one can best describe their data. Additionally, the parameters of these models all have a different physical interpretation, which may have an effect on how they can be further extended into kinetic, thermodynamic, and/or mass transfer models for engineering applications. Therefore, it is paramount to adopt not only a more general isotherm model, but also a concise methodology to reliably optimize for and obtain the parameters of that model. A model of particular interest is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm. The GSTA isotherm has enormous flexibility, which could potentially be used to describe a variety of different adsorption systems, but utilizing this model can be fairly difficult due to that flexibility. To circumvent this complication, a comprehensive methodology and computer code has been developed that can perform a full equilibrium analysis of adsorption data for any gas-solid system using the GSTA model. The code has been developed in C/C++ and utilizes a Levenberg–Marquardt’s algorithm to handle the non-linear optimization of the model parameters. Since the GSTA model has an adjustable number of parameters, the code iteratively goes through all number of plausible parameters for each data set and then returns the best solution based on a set of scrutiny criteria. Data sets at different temperatures are analyzed serially and then linear correlations with temperature are made for the parameters of the model. The end result is a full set of

  15. A novel electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction based on rational anchoring of cobalt carbonate hydroxide hydrate on multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Xiao, Qingqing; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Xue, Yifei; Jing, Lin; Zhai, Xue; Yan, Yi-Ming; Sun, Kening

    2015-03-01

    Cobalt carbonate hydroxide hydrate (CCHH) nanosheets have been densely and strongly anchored onto mildly oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes with the assistance of diethylenetriamine (DETA). The resulted hybrid (CCHH/MWCNT) is used as high efficient electrocatalyst for water oxidation with an extremely low onset potential of ∼1.47 V vs. RHE and an overpotential of 285 mV to achieve a current density of 10 mA cm-2 in 1.0 mol L-1 KOH. The CCHH/MWCNT electrode affords a Tafel slope of 51 mV/decade and an exchange current density of 2.5 × 10-7 A cm-2. Moreover, the CCHH/MWCNT catalyst delivers a high faradic efficiency of 95% and possesses remarkable stability for long-term electrolysis of water. By contrast, neither MWCNT nor CCHH exhibits apparent catalytical activity towards water oxidation. Importantly, we demonstrate that DETA plays crucial role in determining the morphology, structure of the CCHH/MWCNT, therefore resulting in an enhanced performance for water oxidation. This work not only provides a novel cobalt-based electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution, but also offers a useful and viable approach to deliberately synthesize functional nanocomposites for applications in energy conversion and storage.

  16. A new quantification method based on SEM-EDS to assess fly ash composition and study the reaction of its individual components in hydrating cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Durdziński, Paweł T.; Dunant, Cyrille F.; Haha, Mohsen Ben; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-07-15

    Calcareous fly ashes are high-potential reactive residues for blended cements, but their qualification and use in concrete are hindered by heterogeneity and variability. Current characterization often fails to identify the dominant, most reactive, amorphous fraction of the ashes. We developed an approach to characterize ashes using electron microscopy. EDS element composition of millions of points is plotted in a ternary frequency plot. A visual analysis reveals number and ranges of chemical composition of populations: silicate, calcium-silicate, aluminosilicate, and calcium-rich aluminosilicate. We quantified these populations in four ashes and followed their hydration in two Portland-ash systems. One ash reacted at a moderate rate: it was composed of 70 vol.% of aluminosilicates and calcium-silicates and reached 60% reaction at 90 days. The other reacted faster, reaching 60% at 28 days due to 55 vol.% of calcium-rich aluminosilicates, but further reaction was slower and 15 vol.% of phases, the silica-rich ones, did not react.

  17. Water Nanodroplets as a Reaction Medium: FT-ICR Studies of the Stability, Structure and Reactivity of Hydrated Ions and Ionic Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondybey, Vladimir E.

    2001-03-01

    With the help of a versatile ion source coupling laser vaporization with supersonic expansion, ionic clusters of the type X^±(H_2O)n are easily generated, and if desired, they can be mass selected in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. The central ion, X^± can be for instance H^+ or OH^-, a free electron, or an ionized metal such as Na^+, Ag^+, Mg^+, or Al^+. Such "nanodroplets" solvated with up to 200 molecules of water or other ligands slowly fragment in the collision-free environment of the FT-ICR trap. They lose in a controlled way the solvent molecules, one by one on a millisecond timescale. The products of reactions which occur in the nanodroplet as a result of the loss of the stabilizing ligand can in the high-resolution mass spectrometer be unambiguously identified. In this way, a variety of solution processes such as ionic dissolution, fragmentation, neutralization, precipitation, reduction-oxidation reactions, or acid-base catalyzed reactions can be investigated in molecular, microscopic detail. Small droplets and particles are important for a variety of atmospheric processes and reactions occurring both in the troposphere and the stratosphere. This suggests the possibility of preparing such nano-droplets of suitable composition, and using them as a model system for investigating a large variety of reactions important for atmospheric chemistry. In the present talk, we will describe our apparatus and external source, and discuss a variety of results obtained recently with it in our laboratory. The aldol condensation of acetaldehyde as an example of an acid-base catalyzed reaction and the precipitation of AgCl show that a number of well-known reactions in solution have their counterpart on a single molecule level in the cluster. The competition between electron detachment and water loss of hydrated electrons e^-(H_2O)_n, n=13-36, provides interesting and unexpected insights into the coupling dynamics of the electron to its water

  18. Effects of olivine fabric, melt-rock reaction, and hydration on the seismic properties of peridotites: Insight from the Luobusha ophiolite in the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shengsi; Ji, Shaocheng; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Salisbury, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    In order to constrain the effects of olivine fabric, melt-rock reaction, and hydration on the seismic properties and anisotropy of mantle rocks, we investigated serpentinized peridotites from the Luobusha ophiolite in the Indus-Tsangpo suture of the Tibetan Plateau. A-type and almost random olivine crystal-preferred orientations (CPO) occur in harzburgite and dunite samples, respectively. The dunite resulted from interactions of harzburgite with boninitic melt at ~800-970°C, yielding pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation. The olivine neoblasts formed from the melt-rock reaction show no evidence of dislocation creep and developed almost random CPO. Hence, the melt-rock reaction reduced seismic anisotropy. Our results together with those from the literature indicate that A-, B-, C-, D-, and E-type CPOs of olivine generally induce Vp anisotropy patterns with Vp(X) > Vp(Y) > Vp(Z), Vp(Y) > Vp(X) > Vp(Z), Vp(Z) > Vp(X) > Vp(Y), Vp(X) > Vp(Y) ≈ Vp(Z), and Vp(X) > Vp(Z) > Vp(Y), respectively. The effect of serpentinization was calibrated by the comparison of seismic velocities and anisotropy measured up to 600 MPa with the values calculated from the CPO data. Although the low-temperature (LT, <300°C) serpentinization (lizardite and chrysotile) decreases Vp by ~6-10% and Vs by ~12%, it does not change the anisotropy pattern because the mesh-texture characterized by serpentine veins perpendicular to the principal structural directions (X, Y, and Z) reduces the velocities in these orthogonal directions to almost equal extent. Thus, the magnitude of seismic anisotropy alone cannot be used as an indicator of the degree of LT serpentinization in the mantle rocks. Furthermore, Birch's law is found to hold when peridotites undergo serpentinization.

  19. Formation of ordered gas-solid structures via solidification in metal-hydrogen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalov, V.I. |

    1998-12-31

    This work contains theoretical discussions concerning the large amount of previously published experimental data related to gas eutectic transformations in metal-hydrogen systems. Theories of pore nucleation and growth in these gas-solid materials will be presented and related to observed morphologies and structures. This work is intended to be helpful to theorists that work with metal-hydrogen systems, and experimentalists engaged in manufacturing technology development of these ordered gas-solid structures.

  20. Investigation of Gas Solid Fluidized Bed Dynamics with Non-Spherical Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-06-30

    One of the largest challenges for 21st century is to fulfill global energy demand while also reducing detrimental impacts of energy generation and use on the environment. Gasification is a promising technology to meet the requirement of reduced emissions without compromising performance. Coal gasification is not an incinerating process; rather than burning coal completely a partial combustion takes place in the presence of steam and limited amounts of oxygen. In this controlled environment, a chemical reaction takes place to produce a mixture of clean synthetic gas. Gas-solid fluidized bed is one such type of gasification technology. During gasification, the mixing behavior of solid (coal) and gas and their flow patterns can be very complicated to understand. Many attempts have taken place in laboratory scale to understand bed hydrodynamics with spherical particles though in actual applications with coal, the particles are non-spherical. This issue drove the documented attempt presented here to investigate fluidized bed behavior using different ranges of non-spherical particles, as well as spherical. For this investigation, various parameters are controlled that included particle size, bed height, bed diameter and particle shape. Particles ranged from 355 µm to 1180 µm, bed diameter varied from 2 cm to 7 cm, two fluidized beds with diameters of 3.4 cm and 12.4 cm, for the spherical and non-spherical shaped particles that were taken into consideration. Pressure drop was measured with increasing superficial gas velocity. The velocity required in order to start to fluidize the particle is called the minimum fluidization velocity, which is one of the most important parameters to design and optimize within a gas-solid fluidized bed. This minimum fluidization velocity was monitored during investigation while observing variables factors and their effect on this velocity. From our investigation, it has been found that minimum fluidization velocity is independent of bed

  1. Direct gas-solid carbonation kinetics of steel slag and the contribution to in situ sequestration of flue gas CO(2) in steel-making plants.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Chen, Xuejing; Yan, Feng; Li, Kaimin

    2013-12-01

    Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag under various operational conditions was investigated to determine the sequestration of the flue gas CO2 . X-ray diffraction analysis of steel slag revealed the existence of portlandite, which provided a maximum theoretical CO2 sequestration potential of 159.4 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) as calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The carbonation reaction occurred through a fast kinetically controlled stage with an activation energy of 21.29 kJ mol(-1) , followed by 10(3) orders of magnitude slower diffusion-controlled stage with an activation energy of 49.54 kJ mol(-1) , which could be represented by a first-order reaction kinetic equation and the Ginstling equation, respectively. Temperature, CO2 concentration, and the presence of SO2 impacted on the carbonation conversion of steel slag through their direct and definite influence on the rate constants. Temperature was the most important factor influencing the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag in terms of both the carbonation conversion and reaction rate. CO2 concentration had a definite influence on the carbonation rate during the kinetically controlled stage, and the presence of SO2 at typical flue gas concentrations enhanced the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag. Carbonation conversions between 49.5 % and 55.5 % were achieved in a typical flue gas at 600 °C, with the maximum CO2 sequestration amount generating 88.5 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) . Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag showed a rapid CO2 sequestration rate, high CO2 sequestration amounts, low raw-material costs, and a large potential for waste heat utilization, which is promising for in situ carbon capture and sequestration in the steel industry. PMID:23913597

  2. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of gas-solid adsorption processes at pore scale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Chen, L.; Tao, W. Q.

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) approach was established to implement kinetic concentration boundary conditions in interfacial mass-transfer processes and to simulate the adsorption process in porous media at pore scale and mesoscopic levels. A general treatment was applied to conduct three types of concentration boundary conditions effectively and accurately. Applicability for adsorption was verified by two benchmark examples, which were representative of the interparticle mass transport and intraparticle mass transport in the adsorption system, respectively. The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed porous media at the pore scale level was numerically investigated. Mass-transfer processes of the adsorption reaction were simulated by executing Langmuir adsorption kinetics on surfaces of adsorbent particles. Meanwhile, the homogeneous solid diffusion model (HSDM) was used for mass transport in interior particles. The transient adsorbed amount was obtained in detail, and the impact of flow condition, porosity, and adsorbent particle size on the entire dynamic adsorption performance was investigated. The time needed to approach steady state decreased with increased fluid velocity. Transient adsorption capability and time consumption to equilibrium were nearly independent of porosity, whereas increasing pore size led to a moderating adsorption rate and more time was consumed to approach the saturation adsorption. Benefiting from the advantages of the LB method, both bulk and intraparticle mass transfer performances during adsorption can be obtained using the present pore scale approach. Thus, interparticle mass transfer and intraparticle mass transfer are the two primary segments, and intraparticle diffusion has the dominant role.

  3. Kinetics of the reaction of hydrated lime with SO{sub 2} at low temperatures: effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.F.; Shih, S.M.

    2008-12-15

    The effects of the presence Of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx in the flue gas on the kinetics of the sulfation of hydrated lime at low temperatures were studied using a differential fixed-bed reactor. When O{sub 2} and NOx were not present together the reaction kinetics was about the same as that under gas mixtures containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N2 only. When both O{sub 2} and NOx were present, sulfation of hydrated lime was greatly enhanced, forming a large amount of calcium sulfate in addition to calcium sulfite. Sulfation of hydrated lime was well described by the surface coverage model, despite the gas-phase conditions being different. Relative humidity is the major factor affecting the reaction, and its effect was more marked when both O{sub 2} and NOx were present. The kinetic model equations obtained in this work can be used to describe the sulfation of hydrated lime in the low-temperature dry and semidry flue gas desulfurization processes with or without an upstream NOx removal unit.

  4. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Benkert, A; Blum, M; Meyer, F; Wilks, R G; Yang, W; Bär, M; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600 °C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO2 sample behind a mixture of N2 and He gas at atmospheric pressure. PMID:24517824

  5. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Benkert, A. E-mail: l.weinhardt@kit.edu; Blum, M.; Meyer, F.; Wilks, R. G.; Yang, W.; Bär, M.; and others

    2014-01-15

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600 °C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO{sub 2} sample behind a mixture of N{sub 2} and He gas at atmospheric pressure.

  6. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor. PMID:25940479

  7. CO2 reaction with hydrated class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions: effects of flyash admixtures.

    PubMed

    Kutchko, Barbara G; Strazisar, Brian R; Huerta, Nicolas; Lowry, Gregory V; Dzombak, David A; Thaulow, Niels

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing, wells on CO2 storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolan-cement blends were exposed to supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm for both the CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2 after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO2, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 microD. Analyses of 50: 50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO2, which are consistent with our laboratory findings. PMID:19544912

  8. Chloral hydrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chloral hydrate ; CASRN 302 - 17 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  9. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  10. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  11. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  12. Method and apparatus for the separation of a gas-solids mixture in a circulating fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, WanWang

    2010-08-10

    The system of the present invention includes a centripetal cyclone for separating particulate material from a particulate laden gas solids stream. The cyclone includes a housing defining a conduit extending between an upstream inlet and a downstream outlet. In operation, when a particulate laden gas-solids stream passes through the upstream housing inlet, the particulate laden gas-solids stream is directed through the conduit and at least a portion of the solids in the particulate laden gas-solids stream are subjected to a centripetal force within the conduit.

  13. Strategy for understanding gas-solid riser hydrodynamics and other LANL status items

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, B. A.

    2002-01-01

    The talk presents the status of work in progress in the area of momentum transport theory in turbulent gas-solid multiphase flow. Previous installments have reported details of the theory, and validation results. This talk provides a grand overview of how the details of dynamic simulations in 3D, 2D, 1D and 0D, all fit together to form a consistent strategy for understanding gas-solid riser hydrodynamics. The circulating fluidized bed is the canonical example for showing how the strategy works. Performance of the procedure is shown by comparison to data recently obtained by Sandia National Laboratory. Status of other LANL efforts is also mentioned.

  14. Defect-related relaxation processes in irradiated rare gas solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, E. V.; Grigorashchenko, O. N.; Gumenchuk, G. B.; Ogurtsov, A. N.; Frankowski, M.; Smith-Gicklhorn, A. M.; Bondybey, V. E.

    Electronic and atomic relaxation processes in preirradiated solid Ar doped with N-2 were studied with a focus on the role of radiative electronic transitions in relaxation cascades. Combining methods of activation spectroscopy - thermally stimulated and photon-stimulated exoelectron emission, a new channel of relaxation induced by photon emission from metastable N atoms was detected. It was shown that in insulating materials with a wide conduction band photons of visible range can release electrons from both kinds of traps - shallow (lattice defects) and deep thermally disconnected ones. Correlation in the charge recombination reaction yield and the yield of low temperature desorption - important relaxation channel in a preirradiated solid - clearly demonstrates interconnection between atomic and electronic processes of relaxation.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-DIFFUSION FLUX-SPLITTING METHODS FOR DENSE GAS-SOLID FLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a class of low-diffusion upwinding methods for computing dense gas-solid flows is presented in this work. An artificial compressibility/low-Mach preconditioning strategy is developed for a hyperbolic two-phase flow equation system consisting of separate solids ...

  16. Particle-Resolved Direct Numerical Simulation for Gas-Solid Flow Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Sudheer; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Gas-solid flows in nature and industrial applications are characterized by multiscale and nonlinear interactions that manifest as rich flow physics and pose unique modeling challenges. In this article, we review particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) of the microscale governing equations for understanding gas-solid flow physics and obtaining quantitative information for model development. A clear connection between a microscale realization and meso/macroscale representation is necessary for PR-DNS to be used effectively for model development at the meso- and macroscale. Furthermore, the design of PR-DNS must address the computational challenges of parameterizing models in a high-dimensional parameter space and obtaining accurate statistics of flow properties from a finite number of realizations at acceptable grid resolution. This review also summarizes selected recent insights into the physics of momentum, kinetic energy, and heat transfer in gas-solid flows obtained from PR-DNS. Promising future applications of PR-DNS include the study of the effect of number fluctuations on hydrodynamics, instabilities in gas-solid flow, and wall-bounded flows.

  17. Hydrate habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Whoever said there is nothing new under the sun did not delve deeply enough to the bottom of the ocean. There in the Gulf of Mexico, about 150 miles south of New Orleans, scientists have just discovered what could be a new species of centipede—like worms living on or within gas hydrates— mounds of methane ice— rising from the ocean floor.Scientists have previously recognized an association between some bacteria and these hydrates. However, this is the first discovery of a higher life form there.

  18. Depressurization and electrical heating of hydrate sediment for gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on electrical heating of the hydrate core combined with depressurization for gas production. In-situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary for commercial recovery of natural gas from natural gas hydrate sediment. Thermal stimulation is an effective dissociation method, along with depressurization.To simulate methane gas production from methane hydrate layer, we investigated electrical heating of methane hydrate sediment. A decrease in core temperature due to the endothermic reaction of methane hydrate dissociation was suppressed and the core temperature increased between 1oC and 4oC above the control temperature with electric heating. A current density of 10A/m2 with depressurization would effectively dissociate hydrate. Therefore, depressurization and additional electrode heating of hydrate sediment saturated with electrolyte solution was confirmed to enable higher gas production from sediment with less electric power.

  19. An improved external recycle reactor for determining gas-solid reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Irvin M.; Hoyt, Ronald F.

    1987-01-01

    These improvements in the recycle system effectively eliminate initial concentration variation by two modifications: (1) a vacuum line connection to the recycle loop which permits this loop to be evacuated and then filled with the test gas mixture to slightly above atmospheric pressure; and (2) a bypass line across the reactor which permits the reactor to be held under vacuum while the rest of the recycle loop is filled with test gas. A three-step procedure for bringing the feed gas mixture into contact with the catalyst at time zero is described.

  20. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  1. Study of Parameters Effect on Hydrodynamics of a Gas-Solid Chamber Experimentally and Numerically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzehei, Mahdi; Rahimzadeh, Hassan

    2012-04-01

    In this research, gas velocity, initial static bed height and particle size effect on hydrodynamics of a non-reactive gas-solid fluidized bed chamber were studied experimentally and computationally. A multi fluid Eulerian model incorporating the kinetic theory for solid particles was applied to simulate the unsteady state behavior of this chamber and momentum exchange coefficients were calculated by using the Syamlal- O'Brien drag functions. Simulation results were compared with the experimental data in order to validate the CFD model. Pressure drops predicted by the simulations at different particle sizes and initial static bed height were in good agreement with experimental measurements at superficial gas velocity higher than the minimum fluidization velocity. Simulation results also indicated that small bubbles were produced at the bottom of the bed. These bubbles collided with each other as they moved upwards forming larger bubbles. Furthermore, this comparison showed that the model can predict hydrodynamic behavior of gas solid fluidized bed chambers reasonably well.

  2. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids fluidized bed simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2013-10-01

    Wall boundary conditions for the solids phase have significant effects on numerical predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open literature for numerical modeling of gas-solids flow. In this study, a model for specularity coefficient used in Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions by Li and Benyahia (AIChE Journal, 2012, 58, 2058-2068) is implemented in the open-source CFD code-MFIX. The variable specularity coefficient model provides a physical way to calculate the specularity coefficient needed by the partial-slip boundary conditions for the solids phase. Through a series of 2-D numerical simulations of bubbling fluidized bed and circulating fluidized bed riser, the model predicts qualitatively consistent trends to the previous studies. Furthermore, a quantitative comparison is conducted between numerical results of variable and constant specularity coefficients to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal variations in specularity coefficient.

  3. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of solids - Rare-gas solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    A method presented by Schlosser et al. (1989) for analyzing the pressure dependence of experimental melting-temperature data is applied to rare-gas solids. The plots of the logarithm of the reduced melting temperature vs that of the reduced pressure are straight lines in the absence of phase transitions. The plots of the reduced melting temperatures for Ar, Kr, and Xe are shown to be approximately straight lines.

  4. Magnesium hydroxide extracted from a magnesium-rich mineral for CO{sub 2} sequestration in a gas-solid system

    SciTech Connect

    Pao-Chung Lin; Cheng-Wei Huang; Ching-Ta Hsiao; Hsisheng Teng

    2008-04-15

    Magnesium hydroxide extracted from magnesium-bearing minerals is considered a promising agent for binding CO{sub 2} as a carbonate mineral in a gas-solid reaction. An efficient extraction route consisting of hydrothermal treatment on serpentine in HCl followed by NaOH titration for Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation was demonstrated. The extracted Mg(OH){sub 2} powder had a mean crystal domain size as small as 12 nm and an apparent surface area of 54 m{sup 2}/g. Under one atmosphere of 10 vol% CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, carbonation of the serpentine-derived Mg(OH){sub 2} to 26% of the stoichiometric limit was achieved at 325{sup o}C in 2 h; while carbonation of a commercially available Mg(OH){sub 2}, with a mean crystal domain size of 33 nm and an apparent surface area of 3.5 m{sup 2}/g, reached only 9% of the stoichiometric limit. The amount of CO{sub 2} fixation was found to be inversely proportional to the crystal domain size of the Mg(OH){sub 2} specimens. The experimental data strongly suggested that only a monolayer of carbonates was formed on the crystal domain boundary in the gas-solid reaction, with little penetration of the carbonates into the crystal domain. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Time-resolved study on the reactions of organic selenides with hydroxyl and oxide radicals, hydrated electrons, and H-atoms in aqueous solution, and DFT calculations of transients in comparison with sulfur analogues.

    PubMed

    Tobien, Thomas; Bonifacić, Marija; Naumov, Sergej; Asmus, Klaus-Dieter

    2010-07-01

    A complementary experimental and quantum chemical study has been undertaken on the reactivity, formation and properties of transients generated in the reaction of selected organic selenides with hydroxyl radicals, oxide radical ions, hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms in aqueous solution. A detailed study of the OH and O (-) reactions with Me(2)Se revealed the formation of the respective adduct-radicals as precursors of (Me(2)Se thereforeSeMe(2))(+) radical cations. In case of the neutral adduct radical Me(2)Se (OH) the conversion into the three-electron bonded dimer species proceeds, in part, via the molecular (Me(2)Se thereforeOH(2))(+) radical cation. Absolute rate constants have been determined for all the underlying processes. The respective reactions with hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms indicate that selenides exhibit a higher reactivity towards redox-active species than sulfides. A most interesting finding is that the reaction of Me(2)Se with H atoms is faster (k = 4.1 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) than the reduction by hydrated electrons (k = 2.1 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)), precluding an electron transfer as mechanistic background. The rationale is rather an effective dissociative attack of the hydrogen atom on the selenium. Both, the e(aq)(-)- and H -induced reductions of Me(2)Se and Me(2)S lead, under cleavage of CH(3) radicals, to the direct formation of selenol and thiol, respectively. Complementary quantum chemical studies, performed with Density Functional Theory (DFT) BHandHLYP methods, confirm this mechanism. They also reveal a generally higher thermodynamic stability of the Se-centered radicals relative to the S-centered ones, e.g., for the molecular radical anions (Me(2)Se) (-) (DeltaH-27 kJ mol(-1)) and (Me(2)S) (-) (DeltaH-16 kJ mol(-1)). Despite of these stabilization energies the calculations indicate an instantaneous Se/S-CH(3) bond lengthening in the respective molecular radical anions. The same applies for the reaction of Me(2)S and Me(2)Se with

  6. A study of pneumatic conveying of gas-solid flow for industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khateeb, Khalid A. S.; Tasnim, Rumana; Khan, Sheroz; Mohammod, Musse; Arshad, Atika; Shobaki, Mohammed M.; Haider, Samnan; Saquib, Nazmus; Rahman, Tawfilur

    2013-12-01

    The complicated nature of gas-solids' physical properties have challenged the researchers over past decades who have led their efforts in developing its' flow sensing and measurement methods. The term 'gas-solid flow' signifies dilute- or dense-phase flow with a very little concentration of solids. For conducting such flow measurement, generally velocity profile and volumetric concentration of the flow particles being conveyed are needed to be measured. An important application of gas-solid flow has taken root in the form of biomass flow in pneumatic conveying systems, and its' online measurement has proven to be an exigent research pursuit. Additionally the other applications have been explored in power plants, food, chemical and automobiles industries as well. This paper aims at exploring the evolution of flow measurement methods along with a brief explanation on existing fundamental sensing techniques. Furthermore, the most recent patents developed for such measurements in pneumatic conveying pipelines are scrutinized along with their concomitant pros and cons.

  7. Increasing Gas Hydrate Formation Temperature for Desalination of High Salinity Produced Water with Secondary Guests

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jong-Ho; Seol, Yongkoo

    2013-10-07

    We suggest a new gas hydrate-based desalination process using water-immiscible hydrate formers; cyclopentane (CP) and cyclohexane (CH) as secondary hydrate guests to alleviate temperature requirements for hydrate formation. The hydrate formation reactions were carried out in an isobaric condition of 3.1 MPa to find the upper temperature limit of CO2 hydrate formation. Simulated produced water (8.95 wt % salinity) mixed with the hydrate formers shows an increased upper temperature limit from -2 °C for simple CO2 hydrate to 16 and 7 °C for double (CO2 + CP) and (CO2 + CH) hydrates, respectively. The resulting conversion rate to double hydrate turned out to be similar to that with simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Hydrate formation rates (Rf) for the double hydrates with CP and CH are shown to be 22 and 16 times higher, respectively, than that of the simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Such mild hydrate formation temperature and fast formation kinetics indicate increased energy efficiency of the double hydrate system for the desalination process. Dissociated water from the hydrates shows greater than 90% salt removal efficiency for the hydrates with the secondary guests, which is also improved from about 70% salt removal efficiency for the simple hydrates.

  8. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Hy, Sunny; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; Liu, Zhaoping; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-07-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas-solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high as 301 mAh g-1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g-1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. This study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries.

  9. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Hy, Sunny; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; Liu, Zhaoping; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas-solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high as 301 mAh g(-1) with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g(-1) still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. This study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries. PMID:27363944

  10. Clathrate hydrates in cometary nuclei and porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1988-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of formation and decomposition of CO2-clathrate hydrate in cometary nuclei are discussed. As far as it is known, this is the only clathrate hydrate which is unstable at low temperatures. Calculation shows that, in accord with other evidence, neither volume nor grain boundary diffusion in the clathrate lattice can be responsible for the rate of these reactions and that a surface mechanism with the attendant sensitivity to pressure must play a crucial role. Density changes accompanying CO2-clathrate decomposition and formation can lead to microporosity and enhanced brittleness or even to fracture of cometary nuclei at low temperatures. Other clathrate hydrates and mixed clathrates are also discussed.

  11. Dynamics simulations of photoinduced proton transfer reactions of 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole in the gas phase and its hydrated clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daengngern, Rathawat; Kungwan, Nawee

    2014-08-01

    The excited-state dynamics simulations of 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and hydrated HBO were performed on their lowest energy structures using RI-ADC(2)/SVP-SV(P). For free HBO, only syn-HBO can undergo tautomerization in the excited state. For HBO(H2O), two different pathways (A) the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (PT) and (B) the excited-state intermolecular PT through hydrogen-bonded network occur. PT time of free HBO is ultrafast at 28 fs, whereas, the PT time of HBO(H2O) takes longer with time range of 43-193 fs depending on the initial structure. The slow PT process of HBO(H2O) is caused by competition between formations of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds.

  12. A theoretical study of [Be,(H 2O) n] 2+, [BeOH,(H 2O) n-1 ] + and [Be(OH) 2,(H 2O) n-2 ] aggregates ( n=1-6). Incidence of the first hydration shells on the hydrolysis reactions of Be 2+ and BeOH + systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorge, Pierre; Masella, Michel

    2000-12-01

    Ab initio results regarding the incidence of the first and part of the second hydration shell on the hydrolysis reaction of solvated Be 2+ and BeOH + systems are presented. These results exhibit that the first shells strongly reduce the energy cost of the Be 2+→BeOH ++H + reaction, however, this reaction remains strongly exothermic. For the BeOH +→Be(OH) 2+H + reaction, the first shells have considerably less incidence on it. This reaction is endothermic and its Helmholtz free energy cost is of the same order of magnitude as that experimentally reported in water.

  13. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  14. Clustering Instability in Sedimenting Gas-Solid Suspensions and its Influence on Flow Properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoqi; Yin, Xiaolong; Liu, Guodong

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that sedimentation or fluidization of solid particles through gas is unstable. Instability is usually recognized as particle clusters when the solid fraction is low, or as void `bubbles' when the solid volume fraction is high. Using particle-resolved numerical simulations, we studied cluster formation in gas-solid systems with gas-to-solid density ratio being 0.01 and 0.001. The particles are uniformly sized spheres with a terminal Re of 30. The solid fraction is 0.25. Up to 4808 particles were used such that the clustering phenomena can be adequately examined. In periodic computational domains whose lateral dimension is about eight particle diameters, nucleated particle clusters quickly coalesce and grow into traveling waves that span the entire width of the domain. Consequently, gas-solid drag is significantly increased compared to that in a homogeneous liquid-solid suspension, the lateral velocity variance is suppressed, and the particle velocity distributions are strongly non-Gaussian. When lateral dimension is increased to about thirty particle diameters, particle clusters never turn into width-spanning traveling waves. As results, the drag is similar to that in a homogeneous suspension, the lateral velocity variance is strongly enhanced and the vertical variance reduced, and particle velocity distributions are nearly Gaussian. These results suggest that the effect of particle clusters should be examined in domains with large lateral dimensions.

  15. Role of fluctuations in instability generation in gas-solid suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Kolakaluri, Ravi; Tenneti, Sudheer

    2013-11-01

    Stability analysis of gas-solid suspensions using kinetic theory (Koch, Phys. Fluids, 1990) relies on a number density function (NDF) that is based on the canonical (constant number) ensemble. Euler-Lagrange simulations of a model problem are used to show that this approach does not accurately represent the scale-dependent interphase coupling between different realizations of the gas velocity field and fluctuations in the number of particles naturally occurring in fluidized beds. The grand-canonical (or variable number) ensemble is better suited to representing this coupling, and it is shown how the NDF can be related to this ensemble. The evolution of the grand-canonical NDF then leads to instabilities and growth of spatial fluctuations in the number density of a homogeneous suspension. This analysis leads to a different explanation for the growth of instabilities in homogeneous gas-solid suspensions that does not require perturbations in the average number density. Rather it is shown that the interaction of different realizations of the gas velocity field with individual realizations of the particle field leads to the growth of instabilities due to the dependence of drag on local volume fraction in each realization, that is extracted from particle-resolved DNS data. This work is partially supported by NSF CBET 1134500.

  16. Open-source MFIX-DEM software for gas-solids flows: Part II Validation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Garg, Rahul; Galvin, Janine; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2012-01-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware and numerical algorithms, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been increasingly employed as a useful tool for investigating the complex hydrodynamics inherent in multiphase flows. An important step during the development of a CFD model and prior to its application is conducting careful and comprehensive verification and validation studies. Accordingly, efforts to verify and validate the open-source MFIX-DEM software, which can be used for simulating the gas solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles, have been made at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In part I of this paper, extensive verification studies were presented and in this part, detailed validation studies of MFIX-DEM are presented. A series of test cases covering a range of gas solids flow applications were conducted. In particular the numerical results for the random packing of a binary particle mixture, the repose angle of a sandpile formed during a side charge process, velocity, granular temperature, and voidage profiles from a bounded granular shear flow, lateral voidage and velocity profiles from a monodisperse bubbling fluidized bed, lateral velocity profiles from a spouted bed, and the dynamics of segregation of a binary mixture in a bubbling bed were compared with available experimental data, and in some instances with empirical correlations. In addition, sensitivity studies were conducted for various parameters to quantify the error in the numerical simulation.

  17. Quantitative prediction of clustering instabilities in gas-solid homogeneous cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrenya, Christine; Mitrano, Peter; Li, Xiaoqi; Yin, Xiaolong

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic particle clusters are widely documented in gas-solid flow systems, including gasification units for coal or biomass, gravity-driven flow over an array of tubes, pneumatic transport lines, etc. Continuum descriptions based on kinetic theory have been known for over a decade to qualitatively predict the presence of such clustering instabilities. The quantitative ability of such continuum descriptions is relatively unexplored, however, and remains unclear given the low-Knudsen assumption upon which the descriptions are based. In particular, the concentration gradient is relatively large across the boundary between the cluster and the surrounding dilute region, which is counter to the small-gradient assumption inherent in the low-Knudsen-number expansion. In this work, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a gas-solid homogeneous cooling system to determine the critical system size needed for the clustering instability to develop. We then compare the results to the same quantity predicted by a continuum description based on kinetic theory. The agreement is quite good over a wide range of parameters. This finding is reminiscent of molecular fluids, namely the ability of the Navier-Stokes equations to predict well outside the expected range of Knudsen numbers.

  18. Gas hydrate and humans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The potential effects of naturally occurring gas hydrate on humans are not understood with certainty, but enough information has been acquired over the past 30 years to make preliminary assessments possible. Three major issues are gas hydrate as (1) a potential energy resource, (2) a factor in global climate change, and (3) a submarine geohazard. The methane content is estimated to be between 1015 to 1017 m3 at STP and the worldwide distribution in outer continental margins of oceans and in polar regions are significant features of gas hydrate. However, its immediate development as an energy resource is not likely because there are various geological constraints and difficult technological problems that must be solved before economic recovery of methane from hydrate can be achieved. The role of gas hydrate in global climate change is uncertain. For hydrate methane to be an effective greenhouse gas, it must reach the atmosphere. Yet there are many obstacles to the transfer of methane from hydrate to the atmosphere. Rates of gas hydrate dissociation and the integrated rates of release and destruction of the methane in the geo/hydro/atmosphere are not adequately understood. Gas hydrate as a submarine geohazard, however, is of immediate and increasing importance to humans as our industrial society moves to exploit seabed resources at ever-greater depths in the waters of our coastal oceans. Human activities and installations in regions of gas-hydrate occurrence must take into account the presence of gas hydrate and deal with the consequences of its presence.

  19. Understanding gas hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Laura; Chanton, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Ian; Martens, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    In order to understand the role gas hydrates play in climate change or their potential as an energy source, we must first understand their basic behaviors. One such behavior not well understood is their dissolution and the factors that control it. Theoretically, hydrates are stable in areas of high pressure, low temperature, moderate salt concentrations, and saturated methane. Yet in nature, we observe hydrate to outcrop seafloor sediments into overlying water that is under-saturated with respect to methane. How do these hydrates not dissolve away? To address this question, we combine both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, we have collected pore-waters directly surrounding gas hydrate outcrops and measured for in situ methane concentrations. This gives us an understanding of the concentration gradients, and thus methane flux, directly from the hydrate to the surrounding environment. From these samples, we found that methane concentrations decreased further from hydrate yet are always under-saturated with respect to methane hydrate. The resulting low methane gradients were then used to calculate low dissolution rates. This result suggests that hydrates are meta-stable in the environment. What controls their apparent meta-stability? We hypothesize that surrounding oils or microbial slimes help protect the hydrate and slow down their dissolution. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments where hydrate was formed at in situ pressure and temperature and the source gas removed; first with no oils, then with oils. Dissolved methane concentrations were then measured in surrounding fluids over time and dissolution rates calculated. To date, both methane and mixed gas hydrate (methane, ethane, and propane) have similar dissolution rates of 0.12 mM/hr. Future experiments will add oils to determine how different hydrate dissolves with such contaminants. This study will further our understanding of factors that control hydrate

  20. Decomposition reactions of magnesium sulfate hydrates and phase equilibria in the MgSO 4-H 2O and Na +-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O systems with implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiger, Michael; Linnow, Kirsten; Ehrhardt, Dorothee; Rohde, Mandy

    2011-06-01

    We report new measurements of equilibrium relative humidities for stable and metastable hydration-dehydration equilibria involving several magnesium sulfates in the MgSO 4· nH 2O series. We also report a comprehensive thermodynamic treatment of the system including solution properties and experimental data from the published literature, i.e. solubilities, heat capacities and additional decomposition humidities. While for some magnesium sulfate hydrates solubility data in the binary system MgSO 4-H 2O are sparse, there is a reasonable database of solubility measurements of these hydrates in the ternary MgCl 2-MgSO 4-H 2O and the quaternary reciprocal Na +-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O systems. To make these data suitable for the determination of solubility products, we parameterized a Pitzer ion interaction model for the calculation of activity coefficients and water activities in mixed solutions of these systems and report the ion interaction parameters for the Na +-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O system. The model predicted solubilities in the reciprocal system are in very good agreement with experimental data. Using all available experimental data and the solution model an updated phase diagram of the MgSO 4-H 2O system covering the whole temperature range from about 170 to 473 K is established. This treatment includes MgSO 4·H 2O (kieserite), MgSO 4·4H 2O (starkeyite), MgSO 4·5H 2O (pentahydrite), MgSO 4·6H 2O (hexahydrite), MgSO 4·7H 2O (epsomite) and MgSO 4·11H 2O (meridianiite). It is shown that only kieserite, hexahydrite, epsomite and meridianiite show fields of stable existence while starkeyite and pentahydrite are always metastable. Due to sluggish kinetics of kieserite formation, however, there is a rather extended field of metastable existence of starkeyite which makes this solid a major product in dehydration reactions. The model predicted behavior of the magnesium sulfates is in excellent agreement with observations reported in the literature under terrestrial

  1. Origins of hydration lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  2. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  3. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication. PMID:25585501

  4. Characteristics of dilute gas-solids suspensions in drag reducing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. S.; Pfeffer, R.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements were performed on dilute flowing gas-solids suspensions and included data, with particles present, on gas friction factors, velocity profiles, turbulence intensity profiles, turbulent spectra, and particle velocity profiles. Glass beads of 10 to 60 micron diameter were suspended in air at Reynolds numbers of 10,000 to 25,000 and solids loading ratios from 0 to 4. Drag reduction was achieved for all particle sizes in vertical flow and for the smaller particle sizes in horizontal flow. The profile measurements in the vertical tube indicated that the presence of particles thickened the viscous sublayer. A quantitative theory based on particle-eddy interaction and viscous sublayer thickening has been proposed.

  5. Role of distortion in the hcp vs fcc competition in rare-gas solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainyukova, N. V.

    2011-05-01

    As a prototype of an initial or intermediate structure between hcp and fcc lattices we consider a distorted bcc crystal. We calculate the temperature and pressure dependences of the lattice parameters for the heavier rare gas solids Ar, Kr, Xe in a quasiharmonic approximation with Aziz potentials, and confirm earlier predictions that the hcp structure predominates over fcc in the bulk within wide ranges of P and T. The situation is different for confined clusters with up to 105 atoms, where, owing to the specific surface energetics and terminations, structures with five-fold symmetry made up of fcc fragments are dominant. As a next step we consider the free relaxation of differently distorted bcc clusters, and show that two types (monoclinic and orthorhombic) of initial distortion are a driving force for the final hcp vs fcc configurations. Possible energy relationships between the initial and final structures are obtained and analyzed.

  6. Open source development experience with a computational gas-solids flow code

    SciTech Connect

    Syamlal, M; O'Brien, T. J.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Gel, Aytekin; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2008-01-01

    A case study on the use of open source (OS) software development in chemical engineering research and education is presented here. The multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX is the object of the case study. The verification and validation steps required for constructing modern computational software and the advantages of OS development in those steps are discussed. The infrastructure used for enabling the OS development of MFIX is described. The impact of OS development on computational research and education in gas-solids flow and the dissemination of information to other areas such as geotechnical and volcanology research are demonstrated. It is shown that the advantages of OS development methodology were realized: verification by many users, which enhances software quality; the use of software as a means for accumulating and exchanging information; and the facilitation of peer review of the results of computational research.

  7. Abnormal heat liberation triggered by current in a D/Pd gas-solid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Tian, Jian

    2015-08-01

    A relationship was studied among D/Pd gas-solid system current, pressure and producing excess heating in this paper. The results indicated that when the pressure of deuterium is at 9 × 104 Pa, electric current is 8 A and lasting heat is 40 days, the superheating energy is 280 MJ, the maximum superheating power is 80 W and averaging to each palladium atom energy for the superheating energy is 1.7 × 104 eV. Analysis of the sample by SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and EDS (energy dispersive spectrometry) found that after the current triggering the surface of sample was changed and new elements such as Pb, Sn, Ca, and Ag appeared. The results suggested that the superheating appeared come from a nuclear transmutation.

  8. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas-solids transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeleke, Najeem; Adewumi, Michael; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-08-01

    Two-phase gas-solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas-solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe-Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  9. Kinetics of the reaction of iron blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents with SO{sub 2} at low temperatures: effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.F.; Shih, S.M.

    2009-09-15

    The effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx in the flue gas on the kinetics of the sulfation of blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents at low temperatures were studied using a differential fixed-bed reactor. When O{sub 2} and NOx were not present simultaneously, the reaction kinetics was about the same as that under the gas mixtures containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N{sub 2} only, being affected mainly by the relative humidity. The sulfation of sorbents can be described by the surface coverage model and the model equations derived for the latter case. When both O{sub 2} and NOx, were present, the sulfation of sorbents was greatly enhanced, forming a great amount of sulfate in addition to sulfite. The surface coverage model is still valid in this case, but the model equations obtained show a more marked effect of relative humidity and negligible effects of SO{sub 2} concentration and temperature on the reaction. The effect of sorbent composition on the reaction kinetics was entirely represented by the effects of the initial specific surface area (S{sub g0}) and the Ca molar content (M{sup -1}) of sorbent. The initial conversion rate of sorbent increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}, and the ultimate conversion increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}M{sup -1}. The model equations obtained in this work are applicable to describe the kinetics of the sulfation of the sorbents in the low-temperature dry and semidry fine gas desulfurization processes either with an upstream NOx, removal unit or without.111

  10. Terahertz spectroscopy of concrete for evaluating the critical hydration level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Nallappan, Kathirvel; Sasmal, Saptarshi; Pesala, Bala

    2014-03-01

    Concrete, a mixture of cement, coarse aggregate, sand and filler material (if any), is widely used in the construction industry. Cement, mainly composed of Tricalcium Silicate (C3S) and Dicalcium Silicate (C2S) reacts readily with water, a process known as hydration. The hydration process forms a solid material known as hardened cement paste which is mainly composed of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H), Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. To quantify the critical hydration level, an accurate and fast technique is highly desired. However, in conventional XRD technique, the peaks of the constituents of anhydrated and hydrated cement cannot be resolved properly, where as Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy has low penetration depth and hence cannot be used to determine the hydration level of thicker concrete samples easily. Further, MIR spectroscopy cannot be used to effectively track the formation of Calcium Hydroxide, a key by-product during the hydration process. This paper describes a promising approach to quantify the hydration dynamics of cement using Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. This technique has been employed to track the time dependent reaction mechanism of the key constituents of cement that react with water and form the products in the hydrated cement, viz., C-S-H, Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. This study helps in providing an improved understanding on the hydration kinetics of cement and also to optimise the physio-mechanical characteristics of concrete.

  11. TOUGH-Fx/Hydrate

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-02-01

    TOUGH-Fx/HYORATL can model the non-isothermal gas release. phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural gas hydrate deposits in the subsurtace (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. T006H-Fx/HYDRATE vi .0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate Ibmiation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and upmore » to four mass components-- i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dIssociation or formation, phase changes, and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects, and inhibItor-Induced effects.« less

  12. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  13. QUANTUM MECHANICAL STUDY OF THE COMPETITIVE HYDRATION BETWEEN PROTONATED QUINAZOLINE AND LI+, NA+, AND CA2+ IONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydration reactions are fundamental to many biological functions and environmental processes. The energetics of hydration of inorganic and organic chemical species influences their fate and transport behavior in the environment. In this study, gas-phase quantum mechanical calcula...

  14. Henry`s law gas-solid chromatography and correlations of virial coefficients for hydrocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons, ethers, and sulfur hexafluoride adsorbed onto carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Rybolt, T.R.; Epperson, M.T.; Weaver, H.W.; Thomas, H.E.; Clare, S.E.; Manning, B.M.; McClung, J.T.

    1995-07-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to determine the Henry`s law second gas-solid virial coefficients within the temperature range of 314--615 K for ethane, propane, butane, isobutane, pentane, hexane, heptane, chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, tetrachloromethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12), methyl ether, ethyl ether, and sulfur hexafluoride with Carbopack B, a microporous carbon adsorbent. The temperature dependence of the second gas-solid virial coefficients of these adsorbates was used in conjunction with analyses based on a graphical method, a single-surface numeric integration method, a single-surface analytic expression method, and a two-surface analytic expression method to determine the gas-solid interaction energies and other parameters. The interaction energies were correlated with a ratio of the critical temperature divided by the square root of the critical pressure. The four methods were compared in their abilities to successfully calculate second gas-solid virial coefficient values.

  15. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years. PMID:17782901

  16. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  17. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Qu, Z G; Ding, T; Miao, J Y

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems. PMID:27176384

  19. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-01

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ˜0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  20. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    SciTech Connect

    Morishige, Kunimitsu Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  1. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point. PMID:26203042

  2. Real time mass flux measurements of gas-solid suspensions at low velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J H; Chao, B T; Soo, S L

    1981-01-01

    In previous work, measurement of the particulate mass flux was made based upon a novel electrostatic technique. A small conducting wire sensor was inserted in the flow and as each particle hit the sensor an individual pulse of current was identified. Through suitable electronic circuitry, the number of pulses in a given time were counted. This was a direct measure of the number of particle-probe collisions which was related to local particle mass flow. The technique is currently limited to monodisperse suspensions. A primary advantage of the impact counter system is that the output does not depend upon the magnitude of the actual charge transfer. As long as the pulses are sufficiently above the noise level, variations in charge transfer will not affect the measurement. For the current work, the technique was applied to vertical gas-solid flow where the fluid velocity was slightly above the particle terminal velocity. Under these conditions a sufficient signal to noise ratio was not found. The Cheng-Soo charge transfer theory indicated that the low particle-sensor impact velocity was responsible. The probe system was then modified by extracting a particulate sample isokinetically and accelerating the particles to a sufficient velocity by an area reduction in the sampling tube. With this technique the signal to noise ratio was about 12 to 1. Mass flux results are shown to compare favorably with filter collection and weighing.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Ding, T.; Miao, J. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems.

  4. Laser studies of chemical dynamics at the gas-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanagh, Richard R.; King, David S.

    The DOE funded research program Laser Studies of Chemical Dynamics at the Gas-Solid Interface has taken a detailed, microscopic view of molecules desorbed from surfaces in order to gain an understanding of energy flow and interaction potentials and how these control chemical reactivity at interfaces. Successful completion of these experiments required technical expertise both in surface science and laser-based molecular dynamics, a collaborative situation that exists in the NIST center for Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. During the three year period covered by this progress report, our goal was to use state-resolved techniques to examine a single chemisorption system in detail, and to observe how changes in the interaction potential or method of surface excitation are manifest in the desorption dynamics. The system chosen was NO/Pt(111). Studies were undertaken in which the effects on the NO-Pt interaction potential of coadsorbates--both weakly (CO) and strongly (NH(sub 3)) interacting-- could be examined. In addition, attempts were to be made to study non- equilibrium dynamics by using pulsed laser heating.

  5. High-Resolution Simulations of Gas-Solids Jet Penetration Into a High Density Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution simulations of a gas-solids jet in a 0.3 m diameter and 15.9 m tall circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser were conducted with the open source software-MFIX. In the numerical simulations, both gas and solids injected through a 1.6 cm diameter radial-directed tube 4.3 m above the bottom distributor were tracked as tracers, which enable the analysis of the characteristics of a two-phase jet. Two jetting gas velocities of 16.6 and 37.2 m/s were studied with the other operating conditions fixed. Reasonable flow hydrodynamics with respect to overall pressure drop, voidage, and solids velocity distributions were predicted. Due to the different dynamic responses of gas and particles to the crossflow, a significant separation of gas and solids within the jet region was predicted for both cases. In addition, the jet characteristics based on tracer concentration and tracer mass fraction profiles at different downstream levels are discussed. Overall, the numerical predictions compare favorably to the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  6. Research of the gas-solid flow character based on the DEM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueyao; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-12-01

    Numerical simulation of gas-solid flow behaviors in a rectangular fluidized bed is carried out three dimensionally by the discrete element method (DEM). Euler method and Lagrange method are employed to deal with the gas phase and solid phase respectively. The collided force among particles, striking force between particle and wall, drag force, gravity, Magnus lift force and Saffman lift force are considered when establishing the mathematic models. Soft-sphere model is used to describe the collision of particles. In addition, the Euler method is also used for modeling the solid phase to compare with the results of DEM. The flow patterns, particle mean velocities, particles' diffusion and pressure drop of the bed under typical operating conditions are obtained. The results show that the DEM method can describe the detailed information among particles, while the Euler-Euler method cannot capture the micro-scale character. No matter which method is used, the diffusion of particles increases with the increase of gas velocity. But the gathering and crushing of particles cannot be simulated, so the energy loss of particles' collision cannot be calculated and the diffusion by using the Euler-Euler method is larger. In addition, it is shown by DEM method, with strengthening of the carrying capacity, more and more particles can be schlepped upward and the dense suspension upflow pattern can be formed. However, the results given by the Euler-Euler method are not consistent with the real situation.

  7. Numerical simulation of gas-solid two-phase flow in U-beam separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. Y.; Zhang, H. Z.; Chen, X. P.; Ruan, J. M.; Dou, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation is carried out for gas-solid two-phase flow in a U-beam separator. In this study, the U-beam is altered with the inlet fins in order to improve the performance of the separator. The inlet fin angle of the separator are 30°, 35°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55 ° and 60°. The governing equations are the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with the standard k-epsilon model and the discrete phase model (DPM) describing the discrete two - phase flow as well as stochastic tracking model. Results show that the pressure drop deviation with fins is within 3% from those without fins. It is found that there is a maximum separation efficiency at the fin angle of 35°. Fin induces generation of a stagnation region which could collect particles and lead to change of vortical structures. The fin induced flow also causes the turbulent intensity inside the baffle to decrease to facilitate separation.

  8. New Simulator for Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Hydrate Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, B.; Qorbani Nashaqi, K.; Jemai, K.; Vafaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to Gibbs phase rule and combination of first and second law of thermodynamics, hydrate in nature cannot be in equilibrium since they come from different parent phases. In this system hydrate formation and dissociation is affected by local variables such as pressure, temperature and composition with mass and energy transport restrictions. Available simulators have attempted to model hydrate phase transition as an equilibrium reaction. Although those which treated the processes of formation and dissociation as kinetics used model of Kim and Bishnoi based on laboratory PVT experiment, and consequently hard to accept up scaling to real reservoirs condition. Additionally, they merely check equilibrium in terms of pressure and temperature projections and disregard thermodynamic requirements for equilibrium especially along axes of concentrations in phases. Non-equilibrium analysis of hydrate involves putting aside all the phase transitions which are not possible and use kinetic evaluation to measure phase transitions progress in each grid block for each time step. This procedure is Similar to geochemical reservoir simulators logic. As a result RetrasoCodeBright has been chosen as hydrate reservoir simulator and our work involves extension of this code. RetrasoCodeBright (RCB) is able to handle competing processes of formation and dissociation of hydrates as pseudo reactions at each node and each time step according to the temperature, pressure and concentration. Hydrates can therefore be implemented into the structure as pseudo minerals, with appropriate kinetic models. In order to implement competing nature of phase transition kinetics of hydrate formation, we use classical nucleation theory based on Kvamme et al. as a simplified model inside RCB and use advanced theories to fit parameters for the model (PFT). Hydrate formation and dissociation can directly be observed through porosity changes in the specific areas of the porous media. In this work which is in

  9. Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Cancer.gov

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  10. Transformations in methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Chou, I-Ming; Sharma, Anurag; Burruss, Robert C.; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed study of pure methane hydrate in a diamond cell with in situ optical, Raman, and x-ray microprobe techniques reveals two previously unknown structures, structure II and structure H, at high pressures. The structure II methane hydrate at 250 MPa has a cubic unit cell of a = 17.158(2) Å and volume V = 5051.3(13) Å3; structure H at 600 MPa has a hexagonal unit cell of a = 11.980(2) Å, c = 9.992(3) Å, and V = 1241.9(5) Å3. The compositions of these two investigated phases are still not known. With the effects of pressure and the presence of other gases in the structure, the structure II phase is likely to dominate over the known structure I methane hydrate within deep hydrate-bearing sediments underlying continental margins. PMID:11087836

  11. Impact of Compound Hydrate Dynamics on Phase Boundary Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Compound hydrate reactions are affected by the local concentration of hydrate forming materials (HFM). The relationship between HFM composition and the phase boundary is as significant as temperature and pressure. Selective uptake and sequestration of preferred hydrate formers (PF) has wide ranging implications for the state and potential use of natural hydrate formation, including impact on climate. Rising mineralizing fluids of hydrate formers (such as those that occur on Earth and are postulated to exist elsewhere in the solar system) will sequester PF before methane, resulting in a positive relationship between depth and BTU content as ethane and propane are removed before methane. In industrial settings the role of preferred formers can separate gases. When depressurizing gas hydrate to release the stored gas, the hydrate initial composition will set the decomposition phase boundary because the supporting solution takes on the composition of the hydrate phase. In other settings where hydrate is formed, transported, and then dissociated, similar effects can control the process. The behavior of compound hydrate systems can primarily fit into three categories: 1) In classically closed systems, all the material that can form hydrate is isolated, such as in a sealed laboratory vessel. In such systems, formation and decomposition are reversible processes with observed hysteresis related to mass or heat transfer limitations, or the order and magnitude in which individual hydrate forming gases are taken up from the mixture and subsequently released. 2) Kinetically closed systems are exposed to a solution mass flow across a hydrate mass. These systems can have multiple P-T phase boundaries based on the local conditions at each face of the hydrate mass. A portion of hydrate that is exposed to fresh mineralizing solution will contain more preferred hydrate formers than another portion that is exposed to a partially depleted solution. Examples of kinetically closed

  12. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  13. A DFT-based comparative equilibrium study of thermal dehydration and hydrolysis of CaCl₂ hydrates and MgCl₂ hydrates for seasonal heat storage.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Amar Deep; Nedea, Silvia; Zondag, Herbert; Rindt, Camilo; Smeulders, David

    2016-04-21

    Salt hydrates store solar energy in chemical form via a reversible dehydration-hydration reaction. However, as a side reaction to dehydration, hydrolysis (HCl formation) may occur in chloride based salt hydrates (specially in MgCl2 hydrates), affecting the durability of the storage system. The mixture of CaCl2 and MgCl2 hydrates has been shown experimentally to have exceptional cycle stability and improved kinetics. However, the optimal operating conditions for the mixture are unknown. To understand the appropriate balance between dehydration and hydrolysis kinetics in the mixtures, it is essential to gain in-depth insight into the mixture components. We present a GGA-DFT level study to investigate the various gaseous structures of CaCl2 hydrates and to understand the relative stability of their conformers. The hydration strength and relative stability of conformers are dominated by electrostatic interactions. A wide network of intramolecular homonuclear and heteronuclear hydrogen bonds is observed in CaCl2 hydrates. Equilibrium product concentrations are obtained during dehydration and hydrolysis reactions under various temperature and pressure conditions. The trend of the dehydration curve with temperature in CaCl2 hydrates is similar to the experiments. Comparing these results to those of MgCl2 hydrates, we find that CaCl2 hydrates are more resistant towards hydrolysis in the temperature range of 273-800 K. Specifically, the present study reveals that the onset temperatures of HCl formation, a crucial design parameter for MgCl2 hydrates, are lower than for CaCl2 hydrates except for the mono-hydrate. PMID:27004734

  14. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of laboratory-grown gas clathrate hydrates formed from melting ice, and comparison to natural hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Circone, S.; Durham, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate grain texture and pore structure development within various compositions of pure sI and sII gas hydrates synthesized in the laboratory, as well as in natural samples retrieved from marine (Gulf of Mexico) and permafrost (NW Canada) settings. Several samples of methane hydrate were also quenched after various extents of partial reaction for assessment of mid-synthesis textural progression. All laboratory-synthesized hydrates were grown under relatively high-temperature and high-pressure conditions from rounded ice grains with geometrically simple pore shapes, yet all resulting samples displayed extensive recrystallization with complex pore geometry. Growth fronts of mesoporous methane hydrate advancing into dense ice reactant were prevalent in those samples quenched after limited reaction below and at the ice point. As temperatures transgress the ice point, grain surfaces continue to develop a discrete "rind" of hydrate, typically 5 to 30 ??m thick. The cores then commonly melt, with rind microfracturing allowing migration of the melt to adjacent grain boundaries where it also forms hydrate. As the reaction continues under progressively warmer conditions, the hydrate product anneals to form dense and relatively pore-free regions of hydrate grains, in which grain size is typically several tens of micrometers. The prevalence of hollow, spheroidal shells of hydrate, coupled with extensive redistribution of reactant and product phases throughout reaction, implies that a diffusion-controlled shrinking-core model is an inappropriate description of sustained hydrate growth from melting ice. Completion of reaction at peak synthesis conditions then produces exceptional faceting and euhedral crystal growth along exposed pore walls. Further recrystallization or regrowth can then accompany even short-term exposure of synthetic hydrates to natural ocean-floor conditions, such that the final textures may closely mimic

  15. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  16. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  17. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at

  18. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  19. Dynamics of protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water.

  20. Dynamics of protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M; Emmert, S; Gulich, R; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water. PMID:26465518

  1. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of a new structure of gas hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, Christopher A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Ehm, Lars; Klug, Dennis D; Parise, John B; Yang, Ling; Martin, Dave; Ripmeester, John; Moudrakovski, Igor; Ratcliffe, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Atoms and molecules 0.4 0.9 nm in diameter can be incorporated in the cages formed by hydrogen-bonded water molecules making up the crystalline solid clathrate hydrates. There are three structural families of these hydrates , known as sI, sII and sH, and the structure usually depends on the largest guest molecule in the hydrate. Species such as Ar, Kr, Xe and methane form sI or sII hydrate, sH is unique in that it requires both small and large cage guests for stability. All three structures, containing methane, other hydrocarbons, H2S and CO2, O2 and N2 have been found in the geosphere, with sI methane hydrate by far the most abundant. At high pressures (P > 0.7 kbar) small guests (Ar, Kr, Xe, methane) are also known to form sH hydrate with multiple occupancy of the largest cage in the hydrate. The high-pressure methane hydrate of sH has been proposed as playing a role in the outer solar system, including formation models for Titan , and yet another high pressure phase of methane has been reported , although its structure remains unknown. In this study, we report a new and unique hydrate structure that is derived from the high pressure sH hydrate of xenon. After quench recovery at ambient pressure and 77 K it shows considerable stability at low temperatures (T < 160 K) and is compositionally similar to the sI Xe clathrate starting material. This evidence of structural complexity in compositionally similar clathrate compounds indicates that thermodynamic pressure temperature conditions may not be the only important factor in structure determination, but also the reaction path may have an important effect.

  3. Can Satraplatin be hydrated before the reduction process occurs? The DFT computational study.

    PubMed

    Bradáč, Ondřej; Zimmermann, Tomáš; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2013-11-01

    Hydration reactions of two anticancer Pt(IV) complexes JM149 and JM216 (Satraplatin) were studied computationally together with the hydration of the Pt(II) complex JM118, which is a product of the Satraplatin reduction. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the reactions were determined at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2df.2pd)//B3LYP/6-31 + G(d)) level of theory. The water solution was modeled using the COSMO implicit solvation model, with cavities constructed using Klamt's atomic radii. It was found that hydration of the Pt(IV) complexes is an endergonic/endothermic reaction. It follows the (pseudo)associative mechanism is substantially slower (k ≈ 10(-11) s(-1)) than the corresponding reaction of Pt(II) analogues ((k ≈ 10(-5) s(-1)). Such a low value of the reaction constant signifies that the hydration of JM149 and Satraplatin is with high probability a kinetically forbidden reaction. Similarly to JM149 and Satraplatin, the hydration of JM118 is an endothermic/endoergic reaction. On the other hand, the kinetic parameters are similar to those of cisplatin Zimmermann et al. (J Mol Model 17:2385-2393, 2011), allowing the hydration reaction to occur at physiological conditions. These results suggest that in order to become active Satraplatin has to be first reduced to JM118, which may be subsequently hydrated to yield the active species. PMID:22643969

  4. Methane hydrate synthesis from ice: Influence of pressurization and ethanol on optimizing formation rates and hydrate yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Po-Chun.; Huang, Wuu-Liang; Stern, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline methane gas hydrate (MGH) was synthesized using an ice-seeding method to investigate the influence of pressurization and ethanol on the hydrate formation rate and gas yield of the resulting samples. When the reactor is pressurized with CH4 gas without external heating, methane hydrate can be formed from ice grains with yields up to 25% under otherwise static conditions. The rapid temperature rise caused by pressurization partially melts the granular ice, which reacts with methane to form hydrate rinds around the ice grains. The heat generated by the exothermic reaction of methane hydrate formation buffers the sample temperature near the melting point of ice for enough time to allow for continuous hydrate growth at high rates. Surprisingly, faster rates and higher yields of methane hydrate were found in runs with lower initial temperatures, slower rates of pressurization, higher porosity of the granular ice samples, or mixtures with sediments. The addition of ethanol also dramatically enhanced the formation of polycrystalline MGH. This study demonstrates that polycrystalline MGH with varied physical properties suitable for different laboratory tests can be manufactured by controlling synthesis procedures or parameters. Subsequent dissociation experiments using a gas collection apparatus and flowmeter confirmed high methane saturation (CH 4·2O, with n = 5.82 ± 0.03) in the MGH. Dissociation rates of the various samples synthesized at diverse conditions may be fitted to different rate laws, including zero and first order.

  5. Hydration of gas-phase ytterbium ion complexes studied by experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, Philip X; Michelini, Maria C.; Bray, Travis H.; Russo, Nino; Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2011-02-11

    Hydration of ytterbium (III) halide/hydroxide ions produced by electrospray ionization was studied in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and by density functional theory (DFT). Gas-phase YbX{sub 2}{sup +} and YbX(OH){sup +} (X = OH, Cl, Br, or I) were found to coordinate from one to four water molecules, depending on the ion residence time in the trap. From the time dependence of the hydration steps, relative reaction rates were obtained. It was determined that the second hydration was faster than both the first and third hydrations, and the fourth hydration was the slowest; this ordering reflects a combination of insufficient degrees of freedom for cooling the hot monohydrate ion and decreasing binding energies with increasing hydration number. Hydration energetics and hydrate structures were computed using two approaches of DFT. The relativistic scalar ZORA approach was used with the PBE functional and all-electron TZ2P basis sets; the B3LYP functional was used with the Stuttgart relativistic small-core ANO/ECP basis sets. The parallel experimental and computational results illuminate fundamental aspects of hydration of f-element ion complexes. The experimental observations - kinetics and extent of hydration - are discussed in relationship to the computed structures and energetics of the hydrates. The absence of pentahydrates is in accord with the DFT results, which indicate that the lowest energy structures have the fifth water molecule in the second shell.

  6. Electronucleation for Rapid and Controlled Formation of Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Katherine; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    Nucleation of hydrates involves very long induction times (hours to days), which is a challenge for applications requiring rapid hydrate formation. This study introduces and analyzes the use of electric fields to accelerate and control hydrate nucleation. Experiments with tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrates reveal that the induction time can be reduced by 100×, by applying an electrical potential across the precursor solution. The induction time rapidly decreases with increasing voltages and is on the order of a few minutes at 100 V. It is seen that voltage-induced current flow in the solution is responsible for electronucleation. Very low currents (microamperes) are sufficient for electronucleation. Nucleation promotion can be attributed to phenomena associated with bubble formation due to chemical reactions at the electrodes. Overall, this study lays the foundation for the control and promotion of nucleation by electric fields, and enables possibilities for instantaneous nucleation. PMID:27299519

  7. Hydration of C{sub 3}S thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rheinheimer, Vanessa; Casanova, Ignasi

    2012-04-15

    Thin films of C{sub 3}S of a few tens of nanometers were produced by electron beam evaporation. After verification that the chemical composition of the bulk material remained unchanged, the samples were hydrated with water vapor in a reaction chamber under saturated pressure and temperature conditions, and were kept isolated from atmospheric exposure throughout the whole duration of the experiment. Analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at different stages of hydration evidence a shift of the Si peaks to higher energies and a subsequent decrease of the Ca-Si binding energy distance, indicating silicate polymerization expected upon formation of C-S-H. The measured molar Ca/Si ratio evolves from that of a jennite-like material, of about 1.55, at the beginning of the experiment (attributed to pre-hydration of the thin films), to a tobermorite-like ratio of 0.85 after 3 h of hydration.

  8. Feedbacks of Rock Hydration on Hydrothermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, K.; Ruepke, L.

    2009-04-01

    Hydration of the oceanic lithosphere is an important process which alters both the chemical and physical properties of the affected lithologies. Although hydrothermal convection has been extensively researched, little work has been done on the effects of hydration reactions occurring during convection. One of the most important reactions occurring in the oceanic lithosphere is serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. We present a numerical solution for hydrothermal circulation which explores the feedbacks generated during serpentinization of mantle rocks. The model is two dimensional and uses the FEM approach. Three coupled, time-dependent equations are solved: the first equation is mass conserving and is based on Darcy flow. The second equation describes heat transport and accounts for advective and diffusive heat transfer as well as latent heat effects. The final equation describes the serpentinization rate of olivine in ultramafic rocks (Emmanuel and Berkowitz, 2006) and is derived from experimental results (Martin and Fyfe, 1970). Serpentinization is a fluid-consuming process and manifests itself as a sink term in the Darcy flow equation. The exothermic heat of reaction is added as a source term in the heat transport equation. Moreover, serpentinization is associated with a large positive volume change. This large volume change may decrease the porosity of the rock but can also increase permeability by deformation. The rate of serpentinization used in the model is, therefore, also coupled to the porosity and permeability. We investigate the role of hydration in a box model using thermodynamically constrained fluid properties where the lower part is composed of reactive mantle rocks. The effects of serpentinization on the temperatures of the venting fluids and variations in flow pathways are explored. Furthermore, the model is also used in a mid-ocean ridge setting and the amount and depth of serpentinization, in addition to the above mentioned effects, is also

  9. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  10. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivener, Karen L.; Juilland, Patrick; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-12-15

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C{sub 3}A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed.

  11. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  12. CO2 hydrate: Synthesis, composition, structure, dissociation behavior, and a comparison to structure I CH4 hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Structure I (sI) carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrate exhibits markedly different dissociation behavior from sI methane (CH4) hydrate in experiments in which equilibrated samples at 0.1 MPa are heated isobarically at 13 K/h from 210 K through the H2O melting point (273.15 K). The CO2 hydrate samples release only about 3% of their gas content up to temperatures of 240 K, which is 22 K above the hydrate phase boundary. Up to 20% is released by 270 K, and the remaining CO2 is released at 271.0 plusmn; 0.5 K, where the sample temperature is buffered until hydrate dissociation ceases. This reproducible buffering temperature for the dissociation reaction CO2??nH2O = CO2(g) + nH2O(1 to s) is measurably distinct from the pure H2O melting point at 273.15 K, which is reached as gas evolution ceases. In contrast, when si CH4 hydrate is heated at the same rate at 0.1 MPa, >95% of the gas is released within 25 K of the equilibrium temperature (193 K at 0.1 MPa). In conjunction with the dissociation study, a method for efficient and reproducible synthesis of pure polycrystalline CO2 hydrate with suitable characteristics for material properties testing was developed, and the material was characterized. CO2 hydrate was synthesized from CO2 liquid and H2O solid and liquid reactants at pressures between 5 and 25 MPa and temperatures between 250 and 281 K. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicates that the samples consist of dense crystalline hydrate and 50-300 ??m diameter pores that are lined with euhedral cubic hydrate crystals. Deuterated hydrate samples made by this same procedure were analyzed by neutron diffraction at temperatures between 4 and 215 K; results confirm that complete conversion of water to hydrate has occurred and that the measured unit cell parameter and thermal expansion are consistent with previously reported values. On the basis of measured weight gain after synthesis and gas yields from the dissociation experiments, approximately all cages in the

  13. Hydration-dependent dynamic crossover phenomenon in protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Fratini, Emiliano; Li, Mingda; Le, Peisi; Mamontov, Eugene; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2014-10-01

    The characteristic relaxation time τ of protein hydration water exhibits a strong hydration level h dependence. The dynamic crossover is observed when h is higher than the monolayer hydration level hc=0.2-0.25 and becomes more visible as h increases. When h is lower than hc, τ only exhibits Arrhenius behavior in the measured temperature range. The activation energy of the Arrhenius behavior is insensitive to h, indicating a local-like motion. Moreover, the h dependence of the crossover temperature shows that the protein dynamic transition is not directly or solely induced by the dynamic crossover in the hydration water.

  14. Gas hydrate measurements at Hydrate Ridge using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, K. C.; Dunk, R. M.; White, S. N.; Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Sloan, E. D.

    2007-06-01

    Oceanic gas hydrates have been measured near the seafloor for the first time using a seagoing Raman spectrometer at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, where extensive layers of hydrates have been found to occur near the seafloor. All of the hydrates analyzed were liberated from the upper meter of the sediment column near active gas venting sites in water depths of 770-780 m. Hydrate properties, such as structure and composition, were measured with significantly less disturbance to the sample than would be realized with core recovery. The natural hydrates measured were sI, with methane as the predominant guest component, and minor/trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide present in three of the twelve samples measured. Methane large-to-small cage occupancy ratios of the hydrates varied from 1.01 to 1.30, in good agreement with measurements of laboratory synthesized and recovered natural hydrates. Although the samples visually appeared to be solid, varying quantities of free methane gas were detected, indicating the possible presence of occluded gas in a hydrate bubble fabric.

  15. APPARATUS FOR SHORT TIME MEASUREMENTS IN A FIXED-BED, GAS/SOLID REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    An apparatus for exposure of a solid to reactive process gas is described which makes possible short time (≥ 0.3 to 15 s) exposures in a fixed-bed reactor. Operating conditions for differential reaction with respect to the gas concentration and rapid quench for arresting hi...

  16. Clathrate hydrates for ozone preservation.

    PubMed

    Muromachi, Sanehiro; Ohmura, Ryo; Takeya, Satoshi; Mori, Yasuhiko H

    2010-09-01

    We report the experimental evidence for the preservation of ozone (O(3)) encaged in a clathrate hydrate. Although ozone is an unstable substance and is apt to decay to oxygen (O(2)), it may be preserved for a prolonged time if it is encaged in hydrate cavities in the form of isolated molecules. This possibility was assessed using a hydrate formed from an ozone + oxygen gas mixture coexisting with carbon tetrachloride or xenon. Each hydrate sample was stored in an air-filled container at atmospheric pressure and a constant temperature in the range between -20 and 2 degrees C and was continually subjected to iodometric measurements of its fractional ozone content. Such chronological measurements and structure analysis using powder X-ray diffraction have revealed that ozone can be preserved in a hydrate-lattice structure for more than 20 days at a concentration on the order of 0.1% (hydrate-mass basis). PMID:20707330

  17. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  18. Elevating salinity and temperature with hydrate formation at deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Liu, Xiaoli

    2013-04-01

    We study the Ursa vent in ~1070 meters water depth at lease blocks MC852/853 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Elevated salinities and temperatures at the vent shift the base of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the seafloor (Paull et al., 2005; Ruppel et al., 2005). We model the coexistence of high salinities, high temperatures, and an uplifted hydrate phase boundary with a one-dimensional, multicomponent, multiphase, fluid- and heat-flow model of hydrate formation. In this model, free gas supplied from depth migrates vertically through a high-permeability conduit to the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ). Once reaching the base of the RHSZ, gas combines with water to form hydrate, salt is excluded, and heat is released. Hydrate formation continues until water is too warm and saline for further hydrate formation. This process self generates three-phase (gas, liquid, hydrate) equilibrium through the RHSZ and allows gas to vent from the base of the RHSZ to the seafloor. Once the reaction front breaches the seafloor, a pseudo steady state is reached in which a continuous salt flux diffuses from the seafloor, and further hydrate formation occurs at a rate necessary to replace the diffuse salt loss. This continued hydrate formation has the potential to produce large, steady fluxes of salt and heat from the seafloor. Such gas-hydrate and fluid-flow systems are important because they are especially sensitive to global ocean warming due to the large concentrations of hydrate that exist at three-phase equilibrium near the seafloor. References: Paull, C., Ussler, W., Lorenson, T., Winters, W., Dougherty, J., 2005. Geochemical constraints on the distribution of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico. Geo-Marine Letters 25, 273-280. Ruppel, C., Dickens, G.R., Castellini, D.G., Gilhooly, W., Lizarralde, D., 2005. Heat and salt inhibition of gas hydrate formation in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, L04605.

  19. Balancing Accuracy and Computational Efficiency for Ternary Gas Hydrate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic accumulations of natural gas hydrates hold vast organic carbon reserves, which have the potential of meeting global energy needs for decades. Estimates of vast amounts of global natural gas hydrate deposits make them an attractive unconventional energy resource. As with other unconventional energy resources, the challenge is to economically produce the natural gas fuel. The gas hydrate challenge is principally technical. Meeting that challenge will require innovation, but more importantly, scientific research to understand the resource and its characteristics in porous media. Producing natural gas from gas hydrate deposits requires releasing CH4 from solid gas hydrate. The conventional way to release CH4 is to dissociate the hydrate by changing the pressure and temperature conditions to those where the hydrate is unstable. The guest-molecule exchange technology releases CH4 by replacing it with a more thermodynamically stable molecule (e.g., CO2, N2). This technology has three advantageous: 1) it sequesters greenhouse gas, 2) it releases energy via an exothermic reaction, and 3) it retains the hydraulic and mechanical stability of the hydrate reservoir. Numerical simulation of the production of gas hydrates from geologic deposits requires accounting for coupled processes: multifluid flow, mobile and immobile phase appearances and disappearances, heat transfer, and multicomponent thermodynamics. The ternary gas hydrate system comprises five components (i.e., H2O, CH4, CO2, N2, and salt) and the potential for six phases (i.e., aqueous, liquid CO2, gas, hydrate, ice, and precipitated salt). The equation of state for ternary hydrate systems has three requirements: 1) phase occurrence, 2) phase composition, and 3) phase properties. Numerical simulation of the production of geologic accumulations of gas hydrates have historically suffered from relatively slow execution times, compared with other multifluid, porous media systems, due to strong nonlinearities and

  20. Insight on Tricalcium Silicate Hydration and Dissolution Mechanism from Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Hegoi; Durgun, Engin; López-Arbeloa, Iñigo; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2015-07-15

    Hydration of mineral surfaces, a critical process for many technological applications, encompasses multiple coupled chemical reactions and topological changes, challenging both experimental characterization and computational modeling. In this work, we used reactive force field simulations to understand the surface properties, hydration, and dissolution of a model mineral, tricalcium silicate. We show that the computed static quantities, i.e., surface energies and water adsorption energies, do not provide useful insight into predict mineral hydration because they do not account for major structural changes at the interface when dynamic effects are included. Upon hydration, hydrogen atoms from dissociated water molecules penetrate into the crystal, forming a disordered calcium silicate hydrate layer that is similar for most of the surfaces despite wide-ranging static properties. Furthermore, the dynamic picture of hydration reveals the hidden role of surface topology, which can lead to unexpected water tessellation that stabilizes the surface against dissolution. PMID:26107551

  1. The role of water in gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    When raised to temperatures above the ice melting point, gas hydrates release their gas in well-defined, reproducible events that occur within self-maintained temperature ranges slightly below the ice point. This behavior is observed for structure I (carbon dioxide, methane) and structure II gas hydrates (methane-ethane, and propane), including those formed with either H2O- or D2O-host frameworks, and dissociated at either ambient or elevated pressure conditions. We hypothesize that at temperatures above the H2O (or D2O) melting point: (1) hydrate dissociation produces water + gas instead of ice + gas, (2) the endothermic dissociation reaction lowers the temperature of the sample, causing the water product to freeze, (3) this phase transition buffers the sample temperatures within a narrow temperature range just below the ice point until dissociation goes to completion, and (4) the temperature depression below the pure ice melting point correlates with the average rate of dissociation and arises from solution of the hydrate-forming gas, released by dissociation, in the water phase at elevated concentrations. In addition, for hydrate that is partially dissociated to ice + gas at lower temperatures and then heated to temperatures above the ice point, all remaining hydrate dissociates to gas + liquid water as existing barriers to dissociation disappear. The enhanced dissociation rates at warmer temperatures are probably associated with faster gas transport pathways arising from the formation of water product.

  2. Hydration energies of protonated and sodiated thiouracils.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    Hydration reactions of protonated and sodiated thiouracils (2-thiouracil, 6-methyl-2-thiouracil, and 4-thiouracil) generated by electrospray ionization have been studied in a gas phase at 10 mbar using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical data, ΔH(o)n, ΔS(o)n, and ΔG(o)n, for the hydrated systems were obtained by equilibrium measurements. The water binding energies of protonated thiouracils, [2SU]H(+) and [6Me2SU]H(+), were found to be of the order of 51 kJ/mol for the first, and 46 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. For [4SU]H(+), these values are 3-4 kJ/mol lower. For sodiated complexes, these energies are similar for all studied systems, and varied between 62 and 68 kJ/mol for the first and between 48 and 51 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. The structural aspects of the precursors for hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. PMID:25270881

  3. Hydration Energies of Protonated and Sodiated Thiouracils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    Hydration reactions of protonated and sodiated thiouracils (2-thiouracil, 6-methyl-2-thiouracil, and 4-thiouracil) generated by electrospray ionization have been studied in a gas phase at 10 mbar using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical data, ΔH o n, ΔS o n, and ΔG o n, for the hydrated systems were obtained by equilibrium measurements. The water binding energies of protonated thiouracils, [2SU]H+ and [6Me2SU]H+, were found to be of the order of 51 kJ/mol for the first, and 46 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. For [4SU]H+, these values are 3-4 kJ/mol lower. For sodiated complexes, these energies are similar for all studied systems, and varied between 62 and 68 kJ/mol for the first and between 48 and 51 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. The structural aspects of the precursors for hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data.

  4. Propane Clathrate Hydrate Formation Accelerated by Methanol.

    PubMed

    Amtawong, Jaruwan; Guo, Jin; Hale, Jared S; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Fleischer, Everly B; Martin, Rachel W; Janda, Kenneth C

    2016-07-01

    The role of methanol as both an inhibitor and a catalyst for the formation of clathrate hydrates (CHs) has been a topic of intense study. We report a new quantitative study of the kinetics of propane CH formation at 253 K from the reaction of propane gas with <75 μm ice particles that have been doped with varying amounts of methanol. We find that methanol significantly accelerates the formation reaction with quite small doping quantities. Even for only 1 methanol molecule per 10 000 water molecules, the maximum uptake rate of propane into CHs is enhanced and the initiation pressure is reduced. These results enable more efficient production of CHs for gas storage. This remarkable acceleration of the CH formation reaction by small quantities of methanol may place constraints on the mechanism of the inhibition effect observed under other conditions, usually employing much larger quantities of methanol. PMID:27275862

  5. Bubble migration during hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Chiglintseva, A. S.; Rusinov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    A model of the process of migration of methane bubbles in water under thermobaric conditions of hydrate formation is proposed. The peculiarities of the temperature field evolution, migration rate, and changes in the radius and volume fraction of gas hydrate bubbles are studied. It is shown that, with a constant mass flow of gas from the reservoir bottom, for all parameters of the surfacing gas hydrate disperse system, there is a quasistationary pattern in the form of a "step"-like wave. Depending on the relationship of the initial gas bubble density with the average gas density in the hydrate composition determined by the depth from which bubbles rise to the surface, the final radius of hydrate particles may be larger or smaller than the initial gas bubble radii. It is established that the speed at which gas hydrate inclusions rise to the surface decreases by several times due to an increase in their weight during hydrate formation. The influence of the depth of the water reservoir whose bottom is a gas flow source on the dynamics of hydrate formation is studied.

  6. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  7. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  8. Gas Hydrate Petroleum System Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    In a gas hydrate petroleum system, the individual factors that contribute to the formation of gas hydrate accumulations, such as (1) gas hydrate pressure-temperature stability conditions, (2) gas source, (3) gas migration, and (4) the growth of the gas hydrate in suitable host sediment can identified and quantified. The study of know and inferred gas hydrate accumulations reveal the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly controlled by the presence of fractures and/or coarser grained sediments. Field studies have concluded that hydrate grows preferentially in coarse-grained sediments because lower capillary pressures in these sediments permit the migration of gas and nucleation of hydrate. Due to the relatively distal nature of the deep marine geologic settings, the overall abundance of sand within the shallow geologic section is usually low. However, drilling projects in the offshore of Japan, Korea, and in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the occurrence of significant hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The 1999/2000 Japan Nankai Trough drilling confirmed occurrence of hydrate-bearing sand-rich intervals (interpreted as turbidite fan deposits). Gas hydrate was determined to fill the pore spaces in these deposits, reaching saturations up to 80% in some layers. A multi-well drilling program titled "METI Toaki-oki to Kumano-nada" also identified sand-rich reservoirs with pore-filling hydrate. The recovered hydrate-bearing sand layers were described as very-fine- to fine-grained turbidite sand layers measuring from several centimeters up to a meter thick. However, the gross thickness of the hydrate-bearing sand layers were up to 50 m. In 2010, the Republic of Korea conducted the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate (UBGH2) Drilling Expedition. Seismic data clearly showed the development of a thick, potential basin wide, sedimentary sections characterized by mostly debris flows. The downhole LWD logs and core data from Site UBGH2-5 reveal that each debris flows is

  9. Preparation and characterization of a novel strontium-containing calcium phosphate cement with the two-step hydration process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Ye, Jiandong; Wang, Yingjun

    2009-09-01

    A novel Sr-containing calcium phosphate cement (CPC) with excellent compressive strength, good radiopacity and suitable setting time was developed in this work. The two-step hydration reaction resulted in a high compressive strength, with a maximum of up to 74.9MPa. Sr was doped into the calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite as a hydrated product during the hydration reaction of the CPC. Because of the existence of Sr element and the compact microstructure after hydration, the Sr-containing CPC shows good radiopacity. It is expected to be used in orthopedic and maxillofacial surgery for bone defects repairing. PMID:19380262

  10. PARTICLE FLOW, MIXING, AND CHEMICAL REACTION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mixing model has been developed to simulate the particle residence time distribution (RTD) in a circulating fluidized bed absorber (CFBA). Also, a gas/solid reaction model for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by lime has been developed. For the reaction model that considers RTD dis...

  11. Calculation of multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid-liquid systems: Calculation methods, thermochemical data, and applications to studies of high-temperature volcanic gases with examples from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Symonds, R.B. ); Reed, M.H. )

    1993-10-01

    This paper documents the numerical formulations, thermochemical data base, and possible applications of computer programs, SOLVGAS and GASWORKS, for calculating multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid-liquid systems. SOLVGAS and GASWORKS compute simultaneous equilibria by solving simultaneously a set of mass balance and mass action equations written for all gas species and for all gas-solid or gas-liquid equilibria. The programs interface with a thermo-chemical data base, GASTHERM, which contains coefficients for retrieval of the equilibrium constants from 25[degrees] to 1200[degrees]C. The programs and data base model dynamic chemical processes in 30- to 40-component volcanic-gas systems. The authors can model gas evaporation from magma, mixing of magmatic and hydrothermal gases, precipitation of minerals during pressure and temperature decrease, mixing of volcanic gas with air, and reaction of gases with wall rock. Examples are given of the gas-evaporation-from-magma and precipitation-with-cooling calculations for volcanic gases collected from Mt. St. Helens in September 1981. The authors predict: (1) the amounts of trace elements volatilized from shallow magma, deep magma, and wall rock, and (2) the solids that precipitate from the gas upon cooling. The predictions are tested by comparing them with the measured trace-element concentrations in gases and the observed sublimate sequence. This leads to the following conclusions: (1) most of the trace elements in the Mt. St. Helens gases are volatilized from shallow magma as simple chlorides; (2) some elements (for example, Al, Ca) exist dominantly in rock aerosols, not gases, in the gas stream; (3) near-surface cooling of the gases triggers precipitation of oxides, sulfides, halides, tungstates, and native elements; and (4) equilibrium cooling of the gases to 100[degrees]C causes most trace elements, except for Hg, Sb, and Se, to precipitate from the gas. 94 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Gas hydrate dynamics in heterogeneous media - challenges for numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwicz, Ewa; Ruepke, Lars; Wallmann, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    fluids, gas hydrate, and gaseous methane) and several chemical species (particular organic carbon (POC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved methane, dissolved sulfates, free methane gas). Chemical reactions are resolving for the bio- chemical processes in anoxic marine sediments (POC degradation via sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM)). The model has been calibrated to the data derived from well drilling, seismic analyzes, and climate models.

  13. Water, Hydration and Health

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Barry M.; D’Anci, Kristen E.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to provide some sense of our current knowledge of water including overall patterns of intake and some factors linked with intake, the complex mechanisms behind water homeostasis, the effects of variation in water intake on health and energy intake, weight, and human performance and functioning. Water represents a critical nutrient whose absence will be lethal within days. Water’s importance for prevention of nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases has emerged more recently because of the shift toward large proportions of fluids coming from caloric beverages. Nevertheless, there are major gaps in knowledge related to measurement of total fluid intake, hydration status at the population level, and few longer-term systematic interventions and no published random-controlled longer-term trials. We suggest some ways to examine water requirements as a means to encouraging more dialogue on this important topic. PMID:20646222

  14. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  15. Evaluating of scale-up methodologies of gas-solid spouted beds for coating TRISO nuclear fuel particles using advanced measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Neven Y.

    The work focuses on implementing for the first time advanced non-invasive measurement techniques to evaluate the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity that has been reported in the literature based on matching dimensionless groups and the new mechanistic scale up methodology that has been developed in our laboratory based on matching the radial profile of gas holdup since the gas dynamics dictate the hydrodynamics of the gas-solid spouted beds. These techniques are gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) to measure the cross-sectional distribution of the phases' holdups and their radial profiles along the bed height and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) to measure in three-dimension (3D) solids velocity and their turbulent parameters. The measured local parameters and the analysis of the results obtained in this work validate our new methodology of scale up of gas-solid spouted beds by comparing for the similarity the phases' holdups and the dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters that are non-dimensionalized using the minimum spouting superficial gas velocity. However, the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds that is based on matching dimensionless groups has not been validated for hydrodynamics similarity with respect to the local parameters such as phases' holdups and dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters. Unfortunately, this method was validated in the literature by only measuring the global parameters. Thus, this work confirms that validation of the scale-up methods of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity should reside on measuring and analyzing the local hydrodynamics parameters.

  16. A Sea Floor Methane Hydrate Displacement Experiment Using N2 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Hester, K.

    2009-12-01

    The production of free methane gas from solid methane hydrate accumulations presents a considerable challenge. The presently preferred procedure is pressure reduction whereby the relief of pressure to a condition outside the hydrate phase boundary creates a gas phase. The reaction is endothermic and thus a problematic water ice phase can form if the extraction of gas is too rapid, limiting the applicability of this procedure. Additionally, the removal of the formation water in contact with the hydrate phase is required before meaningful pressure reduction can be attained -- and this can take time. An alternate approach that has been suggested is the injection of liquid CO2 into the formation, thereby displacing the formation water. Formation of a solid CO2 hydrate is thermodynamically favored under these conditions. Competition between CH4 and CO2 for the hydrate host water molecules can occur displacing CH4 from the solid to the gas phase with formation of a solid CO2 hydrate. We have investigated another alternate approach with displacement of the surrounding bulk water phase by N2 gas, resulting in rapid release of CH4 gas and complete loss of the solid hydrate phase. Our experiment was carried out at the Southern Summit of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, at 780m depth. There we harvested hydrate fragments from surficial sediments using the robotic arm of the ROV Doc Ricketts. Specimens of the hydrate were collected about 1m above the sediment surface in an inverted funnel with a mesh covered neck as they floated upwards. The accumulated hydrate was transferred to an inverted glass cylinder, and N2 gas was carefully injected into this container. Displacement of the water phase occurred and when the floating hydrate material approached the lower rim the gas injection was stopped and the cylinder placed upon a flat metal plate effectively sealing the system. We returned to this site after 7 days to measure progress, and observed complete loss of the hydrate phase

  17. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane hydrate...

  18. Hydration of lysozyme as observed by infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liltorp, K; Maréchal, Y

    2005-11-01

    Infrared spectra of a film of lysozyme 3 mum thick, immersed in an atmosphere displaying a relative humidity, or hygrometry, which spans the whole range from 0 to 1 at room temperature, are recorded. The evolution of the spectra with this relative humidity is quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a newly proposed method. It allows the precise measurement of the quantity of water that remains embedded inside the dried sample at each stage of hydration, and the definition, in terms of chemical reactions of the three hydration mechanisms that correspond to the three hydration spectra on which all experimental spectra can be decomposed. With respect to preceding similar studies, some refinements are introduced that allow improvement of the interpretation, but that also raise some new questions, which mainly concern the structure of the hydrogen-bond network around the carbonyl peptide groups. PMID:15986502

  19. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David R; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  20. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow. PMID:17806883

  1. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  2. An Improved Pneumatic Nebulization Gas-Solid Microextraction Device Used to Detect Triazine Herbicides in White Spirit.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Fei, Qiang; Shan, Hongyan; Huan, Yanfu; Mi, Hongyu; Zhang, Hanqi; Li, Guanghua; Feng, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    The pneumatic nebulization gas-solid microextraction device fascinating us is because it directly atomized organic samples to cross a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) cartridge without any pretreatment. In this work, both the spray chamber and SPME column of the extraction device were heated. We found that this would significantly improve the extraction efficiency of this method. Then, this method was used to detect seven triazine herbicides (atraton, desmetryn, atrazine, terbumeton, terbuthylazine, terbutryn, and dipropetryn) in drinking alcohol samples. The experimental results indicated that this extraction procedure could conveniently, efficiently and accurately concentrate any triazine herbicides from drinking alcohol samples. The limits of detection (LODs) were from 0.08 to 0.23 μg L(-1), the limits of quantification (LOQs) were from 0.27 to 0.78 μg L(-1). We used this method to detect triazine herbicides in five white spirit samples. Four concentrations were chosen (5, 25, 50 and 100 μg L(-1)) as the amounts of spikes to investigate the recovery and precision of the present PN-GSME method. The recoveries ranged from 95.91 to 106.67%. The relative standard deviations were not more than 6.51%. Also this method matches the requirement of the maximum residue limits of the European Union. PMID:26860563

  3. Effect of placements (horizontal with vertical) on gas-solid flow and particle impact erosion in gate valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhe; Zhu, Linhang; Cui, Baoling; Li, Yi; Ruan, Xiaodong

    2014-12-01

    Gate valve has various placements in the practical usages. Due to the effect of gravity, particle trajectories and erosions are distinct between placements. Thus in this study, gas-solid flow properties and erosion in gate valve for horizontal placement and vertical placement are discussed and compared by using Euler-Lagrange simulation method. The structure of a gate valve and a simplified structure are investigated. The simulation procedure is validated in our published paper by comparing with the experiment data of a pipe and an elbow. The results show that for all investigated open degrees and Stokes numbers (St), there are little difference of gas flow properties and flow coefficients between two placements. It is also found that the trajectories of particles for two placements are mostly identical when St « 1, making the erosion independent of placement. With the increase of St, the distinction of trajectories between placements becomes more obvious, leading to an increasing difference of the erosion distributions. Besides, the total erosion ratio of surface T for horizontal placement is two orders of magnitudes larger than that for vertical placement when the particle diameter is 250μm.

  4. Transport of temperature-velocity covariance in gas-solid flow and its relation to the axial dispersion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Sun, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The presence of solid particles in a steady laminar flow generates velocity fluctuations with respect to the mean fluid velocity that are termed pseudo-turbulence. The level of these pseudo-turbulent velocity fluctuations has been characterized in statistically homogeneous fixed particle assemblies and freely evolving suspensions using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) by Mehrabadi et al. (JFM, 2015), and it is found to be a significant contribution to the total kinetic energy associated with the flow. The correlation of these velocity fluctuations with temperature (or a passive scalar) generates a flux term that appears in the transport equation for the average fluid temperature (or average scalar concentration). The magnitude of this transport of temperature-velocity covariance is quantified using PR-DNS of thermally fully developed flow past a statistically homogeneous fixed assembly of particles, and the budget of the average fluid temperature equation is presented. The relation of this transport term to the axial dispersion coefficient (Brenner, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A, 1980) is established. The simulation results are then interpreted in the context of our understanding of axial dispersion in gas-solid flow. NSF CBET 1336941.

  5. A Study of the Influence of Numerical Diffusion on Gas-Solid Flow Predictions in Fluidized Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandriz, Ronak; Sheikhi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an investigation is made of the influence of numerical diffusion on the accuracy of gas-solid flow predictions in fluidized beds. This is an important issue particularly in bubbling fluidized beds since numerical error greatly affects the dynamics of bubbles and their associated mixing process. A bed of coal (classified as Geldart A) is considered which becomes fluidized as the velocity of nitrogen stream into the reactor is gradually increased. The fluidization process is simulated using various numerical schemes as well as grid resolutions. Simulations involve Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow modeling approach and results are compared with experimental data. It is shown that higher order schemes equipped with flux limiter give favorable prediction of bubble and particle dynamics and hence, the mixing process within the reactor. The excessive numerical diffusion associated with lower order schemes results in unrealistic prediction of bubble shapes and bed height. Comparison is also made of computational efficiency of various schemes. It is shown that the Monotonized Central scheme with down wind factor results in the shortest simulation time because of its efficient parallelization on distributed memory platforms.

  6. Hydrate control in deepwater drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Gas-hydrate formation during deepwater offshore drilling and production is a well-recognized operational hazard. In water depths greater than 1,000 ft, seabed conditions of pressure and temperature become conducive to gas-hydrate formation. In a well-control situation, although the kick fluid leaves the formation at a high temperature, it can cool to seabed temperature with an extended shut-in period. With high enough hydrostatic pressure at the mudline, hydrates could form in the blowout-preventer (BOP) stack and choke and kill lines, as has been observed in field operations. The current practice in deepwater drilling is to suppress the hydrate-formation temperature by use of highly saline drilling fluids formulated from NaCl or other salts. This solution is applicable for the Gulf of Mexico but insufficient for the conditions encountered in Norwegian deep waters. At extreme water depths or extremely low mudline temperatures, this thermodynamic inhibition alone may not be sufficient to prevent hydrate formation. Instead, the use of kinetic inhibitors or crystal modifiers, in conjunction with thermodynamic inhibitors, may allow successful operations in such an environment. The definition of kinetic inhibitors (to distinguish them from the classic thermodynamic inhibitors, such as polar compounds and electrolytes) comes from the effect of the chemicals on the nucleation and growth of natural gas hydrates, both of which are time-dependent, stochastic processes. The paper describes deepwater drilling fluids, polar and surface-active additives, kinetic inhibition and crystal modifiers, laboratory measurements, and test results.

  7. Impacts of Hydrate Pore Habit on Physical Properties of Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Y.; Dai, S.; Choi, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments, to a large extent, are governed by the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. For sediments containing the same amount of hydrates, their overall physical properties may vary several orders of magnitude depending on hydrate pore habit. We investigate the interplay among hydrate formation methods, hydrate pore habits, and fundamental physical properties of hydrate bearing sediments. We have developed a new method to synthesize noncementing hydrate in sands, a multi-properties characterization chamber to test the hydrate bearing sediments, and pore network models to simulate fluid flow processes in hydrate bearing sediments. We have found that (1) the growth pattern of hydrate crystal in the pore spaces of water saturated sediments is dominated by the relative magnitude of the capillary force (between hydrate crystal and pore fluid) and the skeleton force, which will result in pore-filling or grain-displacing type of hydrate pore character; (2) the existing capillary tube models of water permeability in hydrate bearing sediments are sensitive to pore geometry and hydrate pore habit; and (3) preliminary CT results suggest that hydrate nucleation in partially water saturated sands tends to agglomerate in patches, rather than in an uniformly-distributed contact-cementing morphology. Additional CT results with a small amount of fines (5wt%) and visualization via micro-CT of hydrate pore habits in sediments using different hydrate formation methods will be discussed.

  8. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  9. Cross-correlation focus method with an electrostatic sensor array for local particle velocity measurement in dilute gas-solid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jingyu; Gao, Wenbin; Ding, Hongbing; Wu, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    The gas-solid two-phase flow has been widely applied in the power, chemical and metallurgical industries. It is of great significance in the research of gas-solid two-phase flow to measure particle velocity at different locations in the pipeline. Thus, an electrostatic sensor array comprising eight arc-shaped electrodes was designed. The relationship between the cross-correlation (CC) velocity and the distribution of particle velocity, charge density and electrode spatial sensitivity was analysed. Then the CC sensitivity and its calculation method were proposed. According to the distribution of CC sensitivity, it was found that, between different electrode pairs, it had different focus areas. The CC focus method was proposed for particle velocity measurement at different locations and validated by a belt-style electrostatic induction experiment facility. Finally, the particle velocities at different locations with different flow conditions were measured to research the particle velocity distribution in a dilute horizontal pneumatic conveying pipeline.

  10. Production of amylases from rice by solid-state fermentation in a gas-solid spouted-Bed bioreactor

    PubMed

    Silva; Yang

    1998-07-01

    A gas-solid spouted-bed bioreactor was developed to produce amylases from rice in solid-state fermentation by Aspergillus oryzae. The spouted-bed bioreactor was developed to overcome many of the problems inherent to large-scale solid-state fermentation, including mass- and heat-transfer limitations in the conventional tray reactors and solids-handling difficulties seen in packed-bed bioreactors. The solid-state fermentation results from the tray-type reactor with surface aeration were poor because of mass- and heat-transfer problems. A packed-bed bioreactor with continuous aeration through the rice bed produced high protein and enzymes, but the fermented rice was difficult to remove and process due to the formation of large chunks of rice aggregates knitted together with fungal mycelia. Also, the fermentation was not uniform in the packed bed. The spouted-bed bioreactor with intermittent spouting with air achieved high production levels in both total protein and enzymes (alpha-amylase, beta-amylase, and glucoamylase) that were comparable to those found in the packed-bed bioreactor, but without the nonuniformity and solids-handling problems. However, continual spouting was found to be detrimental to this solid-state fermentation, possibly because of shear or impact damage to fungal mycelia during spouting. Increasing spouting frequency from 4-h intervals to 1-h intervals decreased protein and enzyme production. Other operating conditions critical to the fermentation include proper humidification to prevent drying of the substrate and control of reactor wall temperature to prevent excessive condensation, which would interfere with proper spouting. PMID:9694679

  11. Hydration water in dynamics of a hydrated beta-lactoglobulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Longeville, S.

    2007-02-01

    Incoherent spin-echo signals of a hydrated β-lactoglobulin protein were investigated, at 275 and 293 K. The intermediate scattering functions I(Q,t) were divided in two contributions from surface water and protein, respectively. On one hand, the dynamics of the surface water follows a KWW stretched exponential function (the exponent is ~0.5), on the other hand, that of the protein follows a single exponential. The present results are consistent with our previous results of hydrated C-phycocyanin combining elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering and by molecular dynamics simulation.

  12. Dependence of molecular hydrogen formation in water on scavengers of the precursor to the hydrated electron

    SciTech Connect

    Pastina, B. |; LaVerne, J.A.; Pimblott, S.M.

    1999-07-22

    Early studies on the radiolysis of water suggested a wide variety of precursors, and mechanisms, for the formation of the observed yield of molecular hydrogen. Molecular hydrogen yields have been measured in the {gamma} radiolysis of aqueous solutions with a wide variety of scavengers of the hydrated electron and its precursors. A decrease in molecular hydrogen yield with increasing scavenging capacity of the hydrated electron is found with all solutes. Scavengers with particularly high rate coefficients for reaction with the precursors to the hydrated electron compared to the hydrated electron, such as selenate and to a lesser extent molybdate, show a more rapid decrease in hydrogen yields with increasing scavenging capacity than is observed with the other solutes. The yield of molecular hydrogen is better parameterized by the scavenging capacity for the precursors to the hydrated electron than by the scavenging capacity for the hydrated electron. Good scavengers of precursors to the hydrated electrons do not exhibit a nonscavengable hydrogen yield in the high scavenging capacity limit. These results suggest that the previously accepted nonscavengable yield of molecular hydrogen is due to precursors of the hydrated electron and it can be lowered with appropriate scavengers.

  13. Rates and mechanisms of conversion of ice nanocrystals to hydrates of HCl and HBr: acid diffusion in the ionic hydrates.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul; Gulluru, Dheeraj B; Buch, Victoria

    2005-03-01

    This FTIR study focuses on solid-state chemistry associated with formation and interconversion of the ionic HX (X = Cl, Br) hydrates. Kinetic data are reported for conversions of ice nanocrystal arrays exposed to the saturation pressure of the acids in the 110 approximately 125 K range. The product is amorphous acid dihydrate in the case of HBr, and amorphous monohydrate for HCl. The rate-determining step is identified as HX diffusion through the hydrate product crust toward the interfacial reaction zone, rather than diffusion through ice, as commonly believed. Slowing of the conversion process is thus observed with increasing thickness of the crust. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) and activation energy values for HX diffusion through the hydrates were evaluated with the help of the shrinking-core model. Hydrate crystallization occurs as a separate step, upon heating above 130 K. Subsequently, rates of reversible transitions between crystal di- and monohydrates were observed upon exposure to acid vapor and acid evacuation. In conversion from di- to monohydrate, the rate slows after fast formation of several layers; subsequently, diffusion through the product crust appears to be the rate-controlling step. The activation energy for HBr diffusion through crystal dihydrate is found to be significantly higher than that for the amorphous analogue. Conjecture is offered for a molecular mechanism of HX transport through the crystal hydrate, based on (i) spectroscopic/computational evidence for the presence of molecular HX bonded to X(-) in each of the ionic hydrate phases and (ii) the relative E(a) values found for HBr and HCl diffusion. Monte Carlo modeling suggests acid transport to the reaction zone along boundaries between "nanocrystallites" generated by multiple hydrate nucleation events at the particle surfaces. The reverse conversion, of crystalline monohydrate particles to the dihydrate phase, as well as dihydrate to trihydrate, displays nearly constant rate

  14. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  15. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  16. Complex gas hydrate from the Cascadia margin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hailong; Seo, Yu-taek; Lee, Jong-won; Moudrakovski, Igor; Ripmeester, John A; Chapman, N Ross; Coffin, Richard B; Gardner, Graeme; Pohlman, John

    2007-01-18

    Natural gas hydrates are a potential source of energy and may play a role in climate change and geological hazards. Most natural gas hydrate appears to be in the form of 'structure I', with methane as the trapped guest molecule, although 'structure II' hydrate has also been identified, with guest molecules such as isobutane and propane, as well as lighter hydrocarbons. A third hydrate structure, 'structure H', which is capable of trapping larger guest molecules, has been produced in the laboratory, but it has not been confirmed that it occurs in the natural environment. Here we characterize the structure, gas content and composition, and distribution of guest molecules in a complex natural hydrate sample recovered from Barkley canyon, on the northern Cascadia margin. We show that the sample contains structure H hydrate, and thus provides direct evidence for the natural occurrence of this hydrate structure. The structure H hydrate is intimately associated with structure II hydrate, and the two structures contain more than 13 different hydrocarbon guest molecules. We also demonstrate that the stability field of the complex gas hydrate lies between those of structure II and structure H hydrates, indicating that this form of hydrate is more stable than structure I and may thus potentially be found in a wider pressure-temperature regime than can methane hydrate deposits. PMID:17230188

  17. Hydration properties determining the reactivity of nitrite in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Vchirawongkwin, Saowapak; Kritayakornupong, Chinapong; Tongraar, Anan; Vchirawongkwin, Viwat

    2014-08-28

    The knowledge of the hydration properties of the nitrite ion is key to understanding its reaction mechanism controlled by solvent effects. Here, ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics was performed to obtain the structural and dynamical properties of the hydration shell in an aqueous solution of nitrite ions, elucidated by data analysis using a molecular approach and an extended quantitative analysis of all superimposed trajectories with three-dimensional alignment (density map). The pattern of the power spectra corresponded to the experimental data, indicating the suitability of the Hartree-Fock method coupled with double-ζ plus polarization and diffuse functional basis sets to study this system. The density maps revealed the structure of the hydration shell, that presented a higher density in the N-O bond direction than in the axis vertical to the molecular plane, whereas the atomic and molecular radial distribution functions provided vague information. The number of actual contacts indicated 4.6 water molecules interacting with a nitrite ion, and 1.5 extra water molecules located in the molecular hydration shell, forming a H-bonding network with the bulk water. The mean residence times for the water ligands designated the strength of the hydration spheres for the oxygen sites, whilst the results for the nitrogen sites over-estimated the number of water molecules from other sites and indicated a weak structure. These results show the influence of the water molecules surrounding the nitrite ion creating an anisotropic hydration shell, suggesting that the reactive sites are situated above and below the molecular plane with a lower water density. PMID:24840033

  18. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  19. Natural Gas Hydrates Update 1998-2000

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    Significant events have transpired on the natural gas hydrate research and development front since "Future Supply Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates" appeared in Natural Gas 1998 Issues and Trends and in the Potential Gas Committee's 1998 biennial report.

  20. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  1. Leaching of oxidic zinc materials with chlorine and chlorine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. K.; Fray, D. J.

    1981-06-01

    Low grade zinc ores and residues were leached in chlorine water and chlorine hydrate water mixtures. It was found that the rate of leaching Adrar ore and Electric Arc Furnace dust obeyed a shrinking core diffusion model, whereas, the rate of leaching of Turkish ore appeared to be controlled by a surface reaction. In all cases, lead leached with the zinc but the iron oxides remained virtually undissolved.

  2. Why alite stops hydrating below 80% relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Flatt, Robert J.; Scherer, George W.; Bullard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-09-15

    It has been observed that the hydration of cement paste stops when the relative humidity drops below about 80%. A thermodynamic analysis shows that the capillary pressure exerted at that RH shifts the solubility of tricalcium silicate, so that it is in equilibrium with water. This is a reflection of the chemical shrinkage in this system: according to Le Chatelier's principle, since the volume of the products is less than that of the reactants, a negative (capillary) pressure opposes the reaction.

  3. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice... Federal Officer; Welcome by the Chair of the Committee; Committee Business; Update on Prudhoe Bay Testing; FY 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Activities; Update on International Activity; Methane Hydrate...

  4. 76 FR 59667 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice...

  5. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  6. Surface reactions of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.F.

    1986-12-31

    Reactions at natural glass surfaces are important in studies involving nuclear waste transport due to chemical control on ground water in host rocks such as basalt and tuff, to potential diffusion into natural hydrated glass surfaces and as natural analogs for waste glass stability. Dissolution kinetics can be described by linear surface reaction coupled with cation interdiffusion with resulting rates similar to those of synthetic silicate glasses. Rates of Cs diffusion into hydrated obsidian surfaces between 25{sup 0} and 75{sup 0}C were determined by XPS depth profiles and loss rates from aqueous solutions. Calculated diffusion coefficients were ten others of magnitude more rapid than predicted from an Arrhenius extrapolation of high temperature tracer diffusion data due to surface hydration reactions.

  7. Enhanced Photoreduction of Nitro-aromatic Compounds by Hydrated Electrons Derived from Indole on Natural Montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haoting; Guo, Yong; Pan, Bo; Gu, Cheng; Li, Hui; Boyd, Stephen A

    2015-07-01

    A new photoreduction pathway for nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs) and the underlying degradation mechanism are described. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene was reduced to 3-nitroaniline by the widely distributed aromatic molecule indole; the reaction is facilitated by montmorillonite clay mineral under both simulated and natural sunlight irradiation. The novel chemical reaction is strongly affected by the type of exchangeable cation present on montmorillonite. The photoreduction reaction is initiated by the adsorption of 1,3-dinitrobenzene and indole in clay interlayers. Under light irradiation, the excited indole molecule generates a hydrated electron and the indole radical cation. The structural negative charge of montmorillonite plausibly stabilizes the radical cation hence preventing charge recombination. This promotes the release of reactive hydrated electrons for further reductive reactions. Similar results were observed for the photoreduction of nitrobenzene. In situ irradiation time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies provided direct evidence for the generation of hydrated electrons and the indole radical cations, which supported the proposed degradation mechanism. In the photoreduction process, the role of clay mineral is to both enhance the generation of hydrated electrons and to provide a constrained reaction environment in the galley regions, which increases the probability of contact between NACs and hydrated electrons. PMID:26029791

  8. Gas-Solid Interactions During Nonisothermal Heat Treatment of a High-Strength CrMnCN Austenitic Steel Powder: Influence of Atmospheric Conditions and Heating Rate on the Densification Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasokha, Nikolaj; Weber, Sebastian; Huth, Stephan; Zumsande, Kathrin; Theisen, Werner

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with gas-solid interactions between a high-alloyed steel powder and the surrounding atmosphere during continuous heating. It is motivated by the recently developed corrosion-resistant CrMnCN austenitic cast steels. Here, powder metallurgical processing would be desirable to manufacture highly homogeneous parts and/or novel corrosion-resistant metal-matrix composites. However, the successful use of this new production route calls for a comprehensive investigation of interactions between the sintering atmosphere and the metallic powder to prevent undesirable changes to the chemical composition, e.g., degassing of nitrogen or evaporation of manganese. In this study, dilatometric measurements combined with residual gas analysis, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provided detailed information about the influence of different atmospheric conditions on the microstructure, constitution, and densification behavior of a gas-atomized CrMnCN steel powder during continuous heating. Intensive desorption of nitrogen led to the conclusion that a vacuum atmosphere is not suitable for powder metallurgical (PM) processing. Exposure to an N2-containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of nitrides and lattice expansion. Experimental findings have shown that the N content can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, the reduction of surface oxides because of a carbothermal reaction at elevated temperatures and the resulting enhancement of the powder's densification behavior are discussed in this work.

  9. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago. PMID:17768978

  10. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1968-01-01

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  11. Attraction between hydrated hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-08-01

    According to common knowledge, hydrophilic surfaces repel via hydration forces while hydrophobic surfaces attract, but mounting experimental evidence suggests that also hydrophilic surfaces can attract. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations at prescribed water chemical potential we study the crossover from hydration repulsion to hydrophobic attraction for planar polar surfaces of varying stiffness and hydrogen-bonding capability. Rescaling the partial charges of the polar surface groups, we cover the complete spectrum from very hydrophobic surfaces (characterized by contact angles θ ≃ 135°) to hydrophilic surfaces exhibiting complete wetting (θ = 0°). Indeed, for a finite range θadh < θ < 90°, we find a regime where hydrophilic surfaces attract at sub-nanometer separation and stably adhere without intervening water. The adhesive contact angle θadh depends on surface type and lies in the range 65° < θadh < 80°, in good agreement with experiments. Analysis of the total number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed by water and surface groups rationalizes this crossover between hydration repulsion and hydrophilic attraction in terms of a subtle balance: Highly polar surfaces repel because of strongly bound hydration water, less polar hydrophilic surfaces attract because water-water HBs are preferred over surface-water HBs. Such solvent reorganization forces presumably underlie also other important phenomena, such as selective ion adsorption to interfaces as well as ion pair formation.

  12. Polycrystalline methane hydrate: Synthesis from superheated ice, and low-temperature mechanical properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new and efficient technique to grow aggregates of pure methane hydrate in quantities suitable for physical and material properties testing. Test specimens were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with granulated H2O ice, and then warming the reactants to promote the reaction CH4(g) + 6H2O(s???1) ??? CH4??6H2O (methane hydrate). Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface on ice grain surfaces, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above the ice melting point and up to 290 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 h. The resulting material is pure, cohesive, polycrystalline methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random orientation. Synthesis conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature while reaction progressed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the unreacted portions of ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, showed that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting are easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while reacting to form hydrate. Direct observations of the hydrate growth process in a small, high-pressure optical cell verified these conclusions and revealed additional details of the hydrate growth process. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T = 140-200 K, Pc = 50-100 MPa, and ?? = 10-4 10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to an unusually high degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing

  13. Simulation of High-Pressure Methane Hydrate Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Pavel; Sirignano, William

    2015-11-01

    With its prevalence in ocean floor deposits, methane hydrate has recently attracted considerable attention in the combustion community. We present a new scheme for the simulation of methane hydrate combustion at high, near critical pressures. This process features a combination of solid, liquid and gas phases, wherein the solid methane hydrate melts into a bubbly liquid, which then evaporates into a gas phase; methane-air combustion occurs in the gas phase. In addition to its multiphase nature, this problem features the additional challenge of modelling the gas/liquid phase transition at near-critical pressures. A new computational procedure has been developed to simulate this problem, using a detailed chemical mechanism for the simulation of reaction in the gas phase, and featuring a volume-of-fluid (VOF) approach for the simulation of the liquid phase with gas bubbles - a low Stokes number is assumed. This procedure is applied to a laminar shear flow methane hydrate combustion problem. Particular attention is directed to the effects on simulation results of the high-pressure equation of state, liquid/gas phase transition modelling, and the bubbly liquid phase modelling. Simulation results are compared to experimental observations. Supported by AFOSR grant FA9550-12-1-0156, AFOSR scientific manager: Dr. Mitat Birkan.

  14. Physical activity, hydration and health.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ascensión; Manonelles, Pedro; Palacios, Nieves; Wärnberg, Julia; Casajús, José A; Pérez, Margarita; Aznar, Susana; Benito, Pedro J; Martínez-Gomez, David; Ortega, Francisco B; Ortega, Eduardo; Urrialde, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory disea ses and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences. PMID:24972459

  15. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  16. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  17. Formation of porous gas hydrates: Diffraction experiments and multi-stage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staykova, D. K.; Genov, G.; Goreshnik, E.; Salamatin, A. N.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2003-04-01

    Laboratory-grown gas hydrates were examined by cryo scanning electron microscopy and found to have a sub-micron porous structure. This microstructure is undistinguishable from the one observed in natural gas hydrates suggesting similar formation processes. In-situ observations of the formation of synthetic porous methane and carbon dioxide hydrates starting from ice Ih powders with known surfaces areas were made using time-resolved neutron diffraction on the high-flux diffractometer D20 (ILL, Grenoble) at different pressures and temperatures. Some runs were also made going through the ice melting point into liquid water. At similar reduced fugacities, the reaction of carbon dioxide was distinctly faster than that of methane. The transient formation of carbon dioxide hydrate crystal structure II was observed in coexistence with the usual type-I hydrate reaching a maximum of 5% after 5 h of the reaction at 272 K. At lower temperatures a temporary inhibition of formation was observed in the case of carbon dioxide. The rate of methane hydrate growth showed little pressure sensitivity in our experiments at low temperatures ~230 K in contrast to the situation at higher temperatures. A phenomenological model for the kinetics of the gas hydrate formation from ice powders is developed with special account of sample consolidation effects. It describes the initial stage (I) of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface and the two subsequent stages which are limited (II) by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and (III) by the gas and water transport (diffusion) through the hydrate shells surrounding the shrinking ice cores. Comparable activation energies of the CH4-hydrate formation are found in deuterated and hydrogenated systems for the reaction-limited process (stage II) to be 8.1 and 9.5 kcal/mol, respectively. In the case of a diffusion-limited clathration (stage III) the activation energy can be estimated as 14.3 kcal/mol. The relevance of our

  18. Synthesis of polycrystalline methane hydrate, and its phase stability and mechanical properties at elevated pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Test specimens of methane hydrate were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with H2O ice grains, then warming the system to promote the reaction CH4 (g) + 6H2O (s???l) ??? CH4??6H2O. Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above 271.5 K and up to 289 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 hours. The resulting material is pure methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random texture. Fabrication conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature before reaction completed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, verified that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting is easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably at temperatures well above its melting point. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T= 140-200 K, Pc= 50-100 MPa, and ????= 10-4-10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to a higher degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing stoichiometry under pressure during plastic deformation; x-ray analyses showed that methane hydrate undergoes a process of solid-state disproportionation or exsolution during deformation at conditions well within its conventional stability field.

  19. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  20. Experimental hydration studies of natural and synthetic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.; Gerding, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a series of hydration experiments on natural glasses (Hawaiian basalt, obsidian) and the nuclear waste glass WV-44 done to examine laboratory methods of accelerating reaction processes are summarized. The glasses were reacted in hydrothermal solution and in saturated vapor water. It was found that different reaction rates and processes were found using the differing conditions, and that laboratory efforts to accelerate and duplicate natural processes must amount for the physical processes that occur naturally. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Development of Millimeter-Wave Velocimetry and Acoustic Time-of-Flight Tomography for Measurements in Densely Loaded Gas-Solid Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Pfund, David M.; Sheen, David M.; Pappas, Richard A.; Morgen, Gerald P.

    2007-04-01

    The MFDRC was formed in 1998 to advance the state-of-the-art in simulating multiphase turbulent flows by developing advanced computational models for gas-solid flows that are experimentally validated over a wide range of industrially relevant conditions. The goal was to transfer the resulting validated models to interested US commercial CFD software vendors, who would then propagate the models as part of new code versions to their customers in the US chemical industry. Since the lack of detailed data sets at industrially relevant conditions is the major roadblock to developing and validating multiphase turbulence models, a significant component of the work involved flow measurements on an industrial-scale riser contributed by Westinghouse, which was subsequently installed at SNL. Model comparisons were performed against these datasets by LANL. A parallel Office of Industrial Technology (OIT) project within the consortium made similar comparisons between riser measurements and models at NETL. Measured flow quantities of interest included volume fraction, velocity, and velocity-fluctuation profiles for both gas and solid phases at various locations in the riser. Some additional techniques were required for these measurements beyond what was currently available. PNNL’s role on the project was to work with the SNL experimental team to develop and test two new measurement techniques, acoustic tomography and millimeter-wave velocimetry. Acoustic tomography is a promising technique for gas-solid flow measurements in risers and PNNL has substantial related experience in this area. PNNL is also active in developing millimeter wave imaging techniques, and this technology presents an additional approach to make desired measurements. PNNL supported the advanced diagnostics development part of this project by evaluating these techniques and then by adapting and developing the selected technology to bulk gas-solids flows and by implementing them for testing in the SNL riser

  2. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  4. Pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria: Rapid hydrate growth versus slow hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, N.; Bohrmann, G.; Ruffine, L.; Pape, T.; Riboulot, V.; Colliat, J.-L.; De Prunelé, A.; Dennielou, B.; Garziglia, S.; Himmler, T.; Marsset, T.; Peters, C. A.; Rabiu, A.; Wei, J.

    2014-04-01

    In previous works, it has been suggested that dissolution of gas hydrate can be responsible for pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria. It was shown that those pockmarks which are at different stages of maturation are characterized by a common internal architecture associated to gas hydrate dynamics. New results obtained by drilling into gas hydrate-bearing sediments with the MeBo seafloor drill rig in concert with geotechnical in situ measurements and pore water analyses indicate that pockmark formation and evolution in the study area are mainly controlled by rapid hydrate growth opposed to slow hydrate dissolution. On one hand, positive temperature anomalies, free gas trapped in shallow microfractures near the seafloor and coexistence of free gas and gas hydrate indicate rapid hydrate growth. On the other hand, slow hydrate dissolution is evident by low methane concentrations and almost constant sulfate values 2 m above the Gas Hydrate Occurrence Zone.

  5. How Sodium Chloride Salt Inhibits the Formation of CO2 Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Holzammer, Christine; Finckenstein, Agnes; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas S

    2016-03-10

    We present an experimental Raman study on how the addition of sodium chloride to CO2-hydrate-forming systems inhibits the hydrate formation thermodynamically. For this purpose, the molar enthalpy of reaction and the molar entropy of reaction for the reaction of weakly hydrogen-bonded water molecules to strongly hydrogen bonded water molecules are determined for different salinities from the Raman spectrum of the water-stretching vibration. Simultaneously, the influence of the salinity on the solubility of CO2 in the liquid water-rich phase right before the start of hydrate formation is analyzed. The results demonstrate that various mechanisms contribute to the inhibition of gas hydrate formation. For the highest salt concentration of 20 wt % investigated, the temperature of gas hydrate formation is lowered by 12 K. For this concentration the molar enthalpy and entropy of reaction become smaller by 50 and 20%, respectively. Concurrently, the solubility of carbon dioxide is reduced by 70%. These results are compared with data in literature for systems of sodium chloride in water (without carbon dioxide). PMID:26867107

  6. National workshop on gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Michael D.; Dillon, William P.; Malone, Rodney D.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.

    The range of present knowledge on the subject of gas hydrates and related federal research programs was the topic of discussion at the National Workshop on Gas Hydrates, April 23-24. The intention of the meeting was to provide the impetus for an expanded and broader-based national research program in both academia and government. Held at the U.S. Geological Survey National Center, Reston, Va., the workshop was organized by Michael D. Max, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; William P. Dillon, USGS, Woods Hole, Mass.; and Rodney D. Malone, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, W.Va. The 33 attendees represented academia (33%), federal agencies (58%), and industry (9%).

  7. Dynamics of hydrated starch saccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, M.; Deriu, A.; Albanese, G.; Cavatorta, F.

    2003-08-01

    We report here elastic neutron scattering data on glucose and on two of its polymeric forms: amylose and amylopectin. We have covered the hydration range from the dry state to about 0.6 g water/g dry saccharide. The data indicate, in all the analysed systems, the presence of a dynamic glass-like transition similar to that observed in hydrated proteins. The fact that this feature is observed also in a relatively small molecule like glucose confirms the hypothesis already put forward by other authors, that this transition in biomolecular species is essentially triggered and driven by the interaction of the macromolecule with the network of fluctuating H-bond of the solvent.

  8. Uranyl p-toluenesulphonate and its crystal hydrates. Synthesis and dehydration-hydration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, A. V.; Mityakhina, V. S.; Bogachev, S. V.; Suglobova, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    Lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulphonate (UPTS) and anhydrous salt were synthesised. The dehydration-hydration processes were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. It has been established that the hydrate shell of UPTS has a layered structure. The IR spectra of UPTS and its hydrates were recorded. It was found that the IR spectra of UPTS crystal hydrates of the same composition, produced in dehydration-hydration, noticeably differ in the range of water vibrations and are the same in the range corresponding to vibrations of sulphonate groups.

  9. Thermodynamic calculations in the system CH4-H2O and methane hydrate phase equilibria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Using the Gibbs function of reaction, equilibrium pressure, temperature conditions for the formation of methane clathrate hydrate have been calculated from the thermodynamic properties of phases in the system CH4-H 2O. The thermodynamic model accurately reproduces the published phase-equilibria data to within ??2 K of the observed equilibrium boundaries in the range 0.08-117 MPa and 190-307 K. The model also provides an estimate of the third-law entropy of methane hydrate at 273.15 K, 0.1 MPa of 56.2 J mol-1 K-1 for 1/n CH4??H 2O, where n is the hydrate number. Agreement between the calculated and published phase-equilibria data is optimized when the hydrate composition is fixed and independent of the pressure and temperature for the conditions modeled. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  10. Hydrated Electrons in a Quaternary Microemulsion System: A Pulse Radiolysis Study

    PubMed

    Adhikari; Joshi; Gopinathan

    1997-07-01

    Using the technique of pulse radiolysis, hydrated electrons have been produced and studied in quaternary microemulsion (sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS)/water/cyclohexane/1-pentanol) system. Remarkably high lifetimes ( approximately 20 &mgr;s) for hydrated electrons have been obtained. In general, these are two orders of magnitude higher than those reported earlier in reverse micelles. The water droplet sizes and location of the probes have been determined from the decay kinetics of hydrated electrons. The yields and half-lives (t 1/2 ) of the hydrated electrons vary smoothly as the water droplet sizes are changed. We believe that these studies will be useful not only in interpreting electron transfer reactions occurring in small water pockets in biological systems but also in the production of metal nanoclusters by radiation chemical method. PMID:9241228

  11. Identification of the hydrate gel phases present in phosphate-modified calcium aluminate binders

    SciTech Connect

    Chavda, Mehul A.; Bernal, Susan A.; Apperley, David C.; Kinoshita, Hajime; Provis, John L.

    2015-04-15

    The conversion of hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates to cubic phases in hydrated calcium aluminate cements (CAC) can involve undesirable porosity changes and loss of strength. Modification of CAC by phosphate addition avoids conversion, by altering the nature of the reaction products, yielding a stable amorphous gel instead of the usual crystalline hydrate products. Here, details of the environments of aluminium and phosphorus in this gel were elucidated using solid-state NMR and complementary techniques. Aluminium is identified in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination states, and phosphorus is present in hydrous environments with varying, but mostly low, degrees of crosslinking. A {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) experiment showed the existence of aluminium–phosphorus interactions, confirming the formation of a hydrated calcium aluminophosphate gel as a key component of the binding phase. This resolves previous disagreements in the literature regarding the nature of the disordered products forming in this system.

  12. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, Mark P.; Kedl, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a process for formation of a gas hydrate to be used as a cool storage medium using a refrigerant in water. Mixing of the immiscible refrigerant and water is effected by addition of a surfactant and agitation. The difficult problem of subcooling during the process is overcome by using the surfactant and agitation and performance of the process significantly improves and approaches ideal.

  13. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

  14. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means or separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means.

  15. The Development Path for Hydrate Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. H.; Max, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    The question of when gas hydrate will become a commercially viable resource most concerns those nations with the most severe energy deficiencies. With the vast potential attributed to gas hydrate as a new gas play, the interest is understandable. Yet the resource potential of gas hydrate has persistently remained just over the horizon. While technical and economic hurdles have pushed back the timeline for development, considerable progress has been made in the past five years. An important lesson learned is that an analysis of the factors that control the formation of high grade hydrate deposits must be carried out so that both exploration and recovery scenarios can be modeled and engineered. Commercial hydrate development requires high concentrations of hydrate in porous, permeable reservoirs. It is only from such deposits that gas may be recovered in commercial quantities. While it is unrealistic to consider the global potential of gas hydrate to be in the hundreds of thousands of tcfs, there is a strong potential in the hundreds of tcfs or thousands of tcfs. Press releases from several national gas hydrate research programs have reported gas hydrate "discoveries". These are, in fact, hydrate shows that provide proof of the presence of hydrate where it may previously only have been predicted. Except in a few isolated areas, valid resource assessments remain to be accomplished through the identification of suitable hosts for hydrate concentrations such as sandstone reservoirs. A focused exploration effort based on geological and depositional characteristics is needed that addresses hydrate as part of a larger petroleum system. Simply drilling in areas that have identifiable bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) is unlikely to be a viable exploration tool. It is very likely that with drilling on properly identified targets, commercial development could become a reality in less than a decade.

  16. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Micelle Structure and Hydrophobic Hydration.

    PubMed

    Long, Joshua A; Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2015-08-26

    Despite the ubiquity and utility of micelles self-assembled from aqueous surfactants, longstanding questions remain regarding their surface structure and interior hydration. Here we combine Raman spectroscopy with multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) to probe the hydrophobic hydration of surfactants with various aliphatic chain lengths, and either anionic (carboxylate) or cationic (trimethylammonium) head groups, both below and above the critical micelle concentration. Our results reveal significant penetration of water into micelle interiors, well beyond the first few carbons adjacent to the headgroup. Moreover, the vibrational C-D frequency shifts of solubilized deuterated n-hexane confirm that it resides in a dry, oil-like environment (while the localization of solubilized benzene is sensitive to headgroup charge). Our findings imply that the hydrophobic core of a micelle is surrounded by a highly corrugated surface containing hydrated non-polar cavities whose depth increases with increasing surfactant chain length, thus bearing a greater resemblance to soluble proteins than previously recognized. PMID:26222042

  18. Energy landscape of clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmedt, A.; Bedouret, L.; Pefoute, E.; Pouvreau, M.; Say-Liang-Fat, S.; Alvarez, M.

    2012-11-01

    Clathrate hydrates are nanoporous crystalline materials made of a network of hydrogen-bonded water molecules (forming host cages) that is stabilized by the presence of foreign (generally hydrophobic) guest molecules. The natural existence of large quantities of hydrocarbon hydrates in deep oceans and permafrost is certainly at the origin of numerous applications in the broad areas of energy and environmental sciences and technologies (e.g. gas storage). At a fundamental level, their nanostructuration confers on these materials specific properties (e.g. their "glass-like" thermal conductivity) for which the host-guest interactions play a key role. These interactions occur on broad timescale and thus require the use of multi-technique approach in which neutron scattering brings unvaluable information. This work reviews the dynamical properties of clathrate hydrates, ranging from intramolecular vibrations to Brownian relaxations; it illustrates the contribution of neutron scattering in the understanding of the underlying factors governing chemical-physics properties specific to these nanoporous systems.

  19. High temperature corrosion studies. A. Iron: based superalloy in SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ atmospheres. B. Gas: solid reaction with formation of volatile species

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.K.

    1980-03-01

    The thermogravimetric method was used to study high temperature corrosion under SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ atmosphere applied to Armco 18SR alloys with different heat treatment histories, Armco T310 and pure chromium between 750 and 1100/sup 0/C. The weight gain follows the parabolic rate law. The volatilization of the protective Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ layer via formation of CrO/sub 3/ was taken into account above 900/sup 0/C for long time runs. The parabolic rate and the volatilization rate, derived from fitting the experimental data to the modified Tedmon's non-linear model, were correlated using the Arrhenius equation. Armco 18SR-C has the best corrosion resistance of the Armco 18SR alloys. Armco T310 is not protective at high temperatures. The available rate data on the oxidation of chromium oxide, chlorination of chromium, oxidation-chlorination of chromium oxide, chlorination of nickel and chlorination of iron were found to be predictable. The calculation of high temperature volatilization rate was performed using the available fluid correlation equations and the Lennard-Jones parameters derived from the molecule with similar structure and from the low temperature viscosity measurement. The lower predicted volatilization rate is due to the use of the Chapman-Enskog equation with the Lennard-Jones parameters mostly derived from the low temperature viscosity measurement. This was substantiated by comparing the reliable high temperature diffusion rate in the literature with the above mentioned calculational method. The experimental volatilization rates of this study are compared with the other related studies and the mass transfer predictions.

  20. Deep-ocean field test of methane hydrate formation from a remotely operated vehicle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, P.G.; Orr, F.M., Jr.; Friederich, G.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Orange, D.L.; McFarlane, J.; Kirkwood, W.

    1997-01-01

    We have observed the process of formation of clathrate hydrates of methane in experiments conducted on the remotely operated vehicle (ROY) Ventana in the deep waters of Monterey Bay. A tank of methane gas, acrylic tubes containing seawater, and seawater plus various types of sediment were carried down on Ventana to a depth of 910 m where methane gas was injected at the base of the acrylic tubes by bubble stream. Prior calculations had shown that the local hydrographic conditions gave an upper limit of 525 m for the P-T boundary defining methane hydrate formation or dissociation at this site, and thus our experiment took place well within the stability range for this reaction to occur. Hydrate formation in free sea-water occurred within minutes as a buoyant mass of translucent hydrate formed at the gas-water interface. In a coarse sand matrix the Filling of the pore spaces with hydrate turned the sand column into a solidified block, which gas pressure soon lifted and ruptured. In a fine-grained black mud the gas flow carved out flow channels, the walls of which became coated and then filled with hydrate in larger discrete masses. Our experiment shows that hydrate formation is rapid in natural seawater, that sediment type strongly influences the patterns of hydrate formation, and that the use of ROV technologies permits the synthesis of large amounts of hydrate material in natural systems under a variety of conditions so that fundamental research on the stability and growth of these substances is possible.

  1. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: Comparison with a Conventional Circular Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Sil; Dyussekenov, Nurzhan; Sohn, H. Y.

    2010-02-01

    The top-blow injection technique of a gas-solid mixture through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One of the inherent problems associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than a circular jet was designed in the laboratory scale. With this new configuration, solid particles leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different than with the circular lance in which the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. The results of cold model tests using an air-sand jet issuing from a circular lance and an annular lance into a water bath showed that the penetration of the annular jet is much less sensitive to the variations in particle feed rate as well as gas velocity than that of the circular jet. Correlation equations for the penetration depth for both circular and annular jets show agreement among the experimentally obtained values.

  2. Dynamics in the methane hydrate system of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienert, Jurgen; Andreassen, Karin; Knies, Jochen; Carroll, JoLynn; Bünz, Stephan; Ferre, Benedicte; Rasmussen, Tine; Panieri, Giuliana; Myhre, Catherine Lund

    2014-05-01

    Methane hydrate formed in abundance in deep permafrost regions but little documentation exists about resource accumulation in shallow Arctic subsea areas and its evolution in time and space. Today's sub-seabed methane hydrate reservoirs remain elusive targets as a natural methane emitter that influences ocean environments and ecosystems. Rising Arctic Ocean temperatures are causing a destabilization of these reservoirs which in turn releases methane leading to geo-hazards, ocean acidification, and marine benthic reaction at unknown rates and response times. CAGE - Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment, and Climate initiates a ten year interdisciplinary research and education program aimed at achieving a quantitative understanding of feedbacks between methane sub-seabed reservoirs, the seabed and the ocean. The Centre addresses how the coupled (reservoirs-seabed-ocean) system in the Arctic reacts and affects the future ocean, its environment and possibly the climate with focus on high resolution geophysics; seabed gas-emissions; environmental reactions; and benthic-response times. The project MOCA (Methane emissions from the Arctic Ocean to the Atmosphere) concentrates on the atmospheric component and present as well as future climate effects. Details on the CAGE research plan and organization will be presented to foster opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaboration. Based in Tromsø, at the world's northernmost University, CAGE establishes the intellectual and infrastructure resources for studying the amount of methane hydrate and magnitude of methane release in Arctic Ocean environments on time scales from the Neogene to the present (www.cage.uit.no). The Centre of Excellence is funded by the Norwegian Research Council ((grant No. 223259) over a period of ten years.

  3. Geomechanical Modeling of Gas Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, M. J.; Gai, X., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution focuses on an advance geomechanical model for methane hydrate-bearing soils based on concepts of elasto-plasticity for strain hardening/softening soils and incorporates bonding and damage effects. The core of the proposed model includes: a hierarchical single surface critical state framework, sub-loading concepts for modeling the plastic strains generally observed inside the yield surface and a hydrate enhancement factor to account for the cementing effects provided by the presence of hydrates in sediments. The proposed framework has been validated against recently published experiments involving both, synthetic and natural hydrate soils, as well as different sediments types (i.e., different hydrate saturations, and different hydrates morphologies) and confinement conditions. The performance of the model in these different case studies was very satisfactory.

  4. Fundamentals and applications of gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Wu, David T

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of gas hydrate formation and decomposition processes is critical in many energy and environmental areas and has special importance in flow assurance for the oil and gas industry. These areas represent the core of gas hydrate applications, which, albeit widely studied, are still developing as growing fields of research. Discovering the molecular pathways and chemical and physical concepts underlying gas hydrate formation potentially can lead us beyond flowline blockage prevention strategies toward advancing new technological solutions for fuel storage and transportation, safely producing a new energy resource from natural deposits of gas hydrates in oceanic and arctic sediments, and potentially facilitating effective desalination of seawater. The state of the art in gas hydrate research is leading us to new understanding of formation and dissociation phenomena that focuses on measurement and modeling of time-dependent properties of gas hydrates on the basis of their well-established thermodynamic properties. PMID:22432618

  5. Structural characteristics of hydration sites in lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kunitsugu; Shimbo, Yudai; Seki, Yasutaka; Taiji, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    A new method is presented for determining the hydration site of proteins, where the effect of structural fluctuations in both protein and hydration water is explicitly considered by using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The whole hydration sites (HS) of lysozyme are composed of 195 single HSs and 38 clustered ones (CHS), and divided into 231 external HSs (EHS) and 2 internal ones (IHS). The largest CHSs, 'Hg' and 'Lβ', are the IHSs having 2.54 and 1.35 mean internal hydration waters respectively. The largest EHS, 'Clft', is located in the cleft region. The real hydration structure of a CHS is an ensemble of multiple structures. The transition between two structures occurs through recombinations of some H-bonds. The number of the experimental X-ray crystal waters is nearly the same as that of the estimated MDS hydration waters for 70% of the HSs, but significantly different for the rest of HSs. PMID:21435773

  6. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  7. In-situ early-age hydration study of sulfobelite cements by synchrotron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez-Pinazo, G.; Cuesta, A.; García-Maté, M.; Santacruz, I.; Losilla, E.R.; Fauth, F.; Aranda, M.A.G.; De la Torre, A.G.

    2014-02-15

    Eco-friendly belite calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement hydration behavior is not yet well understood. Here, we report an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study for the first hours of hydration of BCSA cements. Rietveld quantitative phase analysis has been used to establish the degree of reaction (α). The hydration of a mixture of ye'elimite and gypsum revealed that ettringite formation (α ∼ 70% at 50 h) is limited by ye'elimite dissolution. Two laboratory-prepared BCSA cements were also studied: non-active-BCSA and active-BCSA cements, with β- and α′{sub H}-belite as main phases, respectively. Ye'elimite, in the non-active-BCSA system, dissolves at higher pace (α ∼ 25% at 1 h) than in the active-BCSA one (α ∼ 10% at 1 h), with differences in the crystallization of ettringite (α ∼ 30% and α ∼ 5%, respectively). This behavior has strongly affected subsequent belite and ferrite reactivities, yielding stratlingite and other layered phases in non-active-BCSA. The dissolution and crystallization processes are reported and discussed in detail. -- Highlights: •Belite calcium sulfoaluminate cements early hydration mechanism has been determined. •Belite hydration strongly depends on availability of aluminum hydroxide. •Orthorhombic ye’elimite dissolved at a higher pace than cubic one. •Ye’elimite larger reaction degree yields stratlingite formation by belite reaction. •Rietveld method quantified gypsum, anhydrite and bassanite dissolution rates.

  8. Development of wet environment TEM (wet-ETEM) for in situ studies of liquid-catalyst reactions on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Gai, Pratibha L

    2002-02-01

    We present the development of in situ wet environmental transmission electron microscopy (wet-ETEM) for direct probing of controlled liquid-catalyst reactions at operating temperatures on the nanoscale. The first nanoscale imaging and electron diffraction of dynamic liquid hydrogenation and polymerization reactions in the manufacture of polyamides reported here opens up new opportunities for high resolution studies of a wide range of solution-solid and solution-gas-solid reactions in the chemical and biological sciences. PMID:14710723

  9. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  10. Kinetics of Thermochemical Reactions Important in the Venus Atmospheric Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to experimentally measure the rates of several thermochemical gas-solid reactions between sulfur gases in the Venus atmosphere and reactive minerals on the hot Venus surface. Despite the great importance of these reactions for the maintenance of significant amounts of sulfur gases (and thus for the maintenance of the global cloud cover) in the atmosphere of Venus, essentially no kinetic data are currently available for them.

  11. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gabitto, Jorge F.; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Memore » thane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 10 16   m 3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.« less

  12. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  13. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  14. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  15. Observations related to tetrahydrofuran and methane hydrates for laboratory studies of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.Y.; Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction among water molecules, guest gas molecules, salts, and mineral particles determines the nucleation and growth behavior of gas hydrates in natural sediments. Hydrate of tetrahydrofuran (THF) has long been used for laboratory studies of gas hydrate-bearing sediments to provide close control on hydrate concentrations and to overcome the long formation history of methane hydrate from aqueous phase methane in sediments. Yet differences in the polarizability of THF (polar molecule) compared to methane (nonpolar molecule) raise questions about the suitability of THF as a proxy for methane in the study of hydrate-bearing sediments. From existing data and simple macroscale experiments, we show that despite its polar nature, THF's large molecular size results in low permittivity, prevents it from dissolving precipitated salts, and hinders the solvation of ions on dry mineral surfaces. In addition, the interfacial tension between water and THF hydrate is similar to that between water and methane hydrate. The processes that researchers choose for forming hydrate in sediments in laboratory settings (e.g., from gas, liquid, or ice) and the pore-scale distribution of the hydrate that is produced by each of these processes likely have a more pronounced effect on the measured macroscale properties of hydrate-bearing sediments than do differences between THF and methane hydrates themselves.

  16. Gas hydrate formation in the deep sea: In situ experiments with controlled release of methane, natural gas, and carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, P.G.; Orr, F.M., Jr.; Friederich, G.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Orange, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have utilized a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to initiate a program of research into gas hydrate formation in the deep sea by controlled release of hydrocarbon gases and liquid CO2 into natural sea water and marine sediments. Our objectives were to investigate the formation rates and growth patterns of gas hydrates in natural systems and to assess the geochemical stability of the reaction products over time. The novel experimental procedures used the carrying capacity, imaging capability, and control mechanisms of the ROV to transport gas cylinders to depth and to open valves selectively under desired P-T conditions to release the gas either into contained natural sea water or into sediments. In experiments in Monterey Bay, California, at 910 m depth and 3.9??C water temperature we find hydrate formation to be nearly instantaneous for a variety of gases. In sediments the pattern of hydrate formation is dependent on the pore size, with flooding of the pore spaces in a coarse sand yielding a hydrate cemented mass, and gas channeling in a fine-grained mud creating a veined hydrate structure. In experiments with liquid CO2 the released globules appeared to form a hydrate skin as they slowly rose in the apparatus. An initial attempt to leave the experimental material on the sea floor for an extended period was partially successful; we observed an apparent complete dissolution of the liquid CO2 mass, and an apparent consolidation of the CH4 hydrate, over a period of about 85 days.

  17. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: The Effects of the Density and Size of Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. S.; Sohn, H. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Top-blow injection of a gas-solid jet through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One problem associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than the circular jet was designed in this laboratory. With this new configuration, the solid particles fed through the center tube leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different from that with a circular lance where the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. In previous cold-model investigations in this laboratory, the effects of the gas velocity, particle feed rate, lance height of the annular lance, and the cross-sectional area of the gas jet were studied and compared with the circular lance. This study examined the effect of the density and size of the solid particles on the penetration behavior of the annular gas-solid jet, which yielded some unexpected results. The variation in the penetration depth with the density of the solid particles at the same mass feed rate was opposite for the circular lance and the annular lance. In the case of the circular lance, the penetration depth became shallower as the density of the solid particles increased; on the contrary, for the annular lance, the penetration depth became deeper with the increasing density of particles. However, at the same volumetric feed rate of the particles, the density effect was small for the circular lance, but for the annular lance, the jets with higher density particles penetrated more deeply. The variation in the penetration depth with the particle diameter was also different for the circular and the annular lances. With the circular lance, the penetration depth became deeper as the particle size decreased for all the feed rates, but with the annular lance, the effect of the particle size was

  18. Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Link, D.D.; English, N.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. Five key areas of research that need further investigation have been identified. These five areas, i.e. thermal properties of hydrates in sediments, kinetics of natural hydrate dissociation, hysteresis effects, permeability of sediments to gas flow and capillary pressures within sediments, and hydrate distribution at porous scale, are important to the production models that will be used for producing methane from hydrate deposits. NETL is using both laboratory experiments and computational modeling to address these five key areas. The laboratory and computational research reinforce each other by providing feedback. The laboratory results are used in the computational models and the results from the computational modeling is used to help direct future laboratory research. The data generated at NETL will be used to help fulfill The National Methane Hydrate R&D Program of a “long-term supply of natural gas by developing the knowledge and technology base to allow commercial production of methane from domestic hydrate deposits by the year 2015” as outlined on the NETL Website [NETL Website, 2005. http://www.netl.doe.gov/scngo/Natural%20Gas/hydrates/index.html]. Laboratory research is accomplished in one of the numerous high-pressure hydrate cells available ranging in size from 0.15 mL to 15 L in volume. A dedicated high-pressure view cell within the Raman spectrometer allows for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates. Thermal conductivity of hydrates (synthetic and natural) at a certain temperature and pressure is performed in a NETL-designed cell. Computational modeling studies are investigating the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, modeling methane hydrate reservoirs, molecular dynamics simulations of hydrate formation, dissociation, and thermal properties, and Monte Carlo simulations of hydrate formation and dissociation.

  19. Stochastic Approach to Determine CO2 Hydrate Induction Time in Clay Mineral Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Lee, W.

    2008-12-01

    A large number of induction time data for carbon dioxide hydrate formation were obtained from a batch reactor consisting of four independent reaction cells. Using resistance temperature detector(RTD)s and a digital microscope, we successfully monitored the whole process of hydrate formation (i.e., nucleation and crystal growth) and detected the induction time. The experiments were carried out in kaolinite and montmorillonite suspensions at temperatures between 274 and 277 K and pressures ranging from 3.0 to 4.0 MPa. Each set of data was analyzed beforehand whether to be treated by stochastic manner or not. Geochemical factors potentially influencing the hydrate induction time under different experimental conditions were investigated by stochastic analyses. We observed that clay mineral type, pressure, and temperature significantly affect the stochastic behavior of the induction times for CO2 hydrate formation in this study. The hydrate formation kinetics along with stochastic analyses can provide basic understanding for CO2 hydrate storage in deep-sea sediment and geologic formation, securing its stability under the environments.

  20. Hydration and Nanoconfined Water: Insights from Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Laureano M; Rodríguez Fris, J A; Morini, Marcela A; Sierra, M Belén; Accordino, S A; Montes de Oca, J M; Pedroni, Viviana I; Appignanesi, Gustavo A

    2015-01-01

    The comprehension of the structure and behavior of water at interfaces and under nanoconfinement represents an issue of major concern in several central research areas like hydration, reaction dynamics and biology. From one side, water is known to play a dominant role in the structuring, the dynamics and the functionality of biological molecules, governing main processes like protein folding, protein binding and biological function. In turn, the same principles that rule biological organization at the molecular level are also operative for materials science processes that take place within a water environment, being responsible for the self-assembly of molecular structures to create synthetic supramolecular nanometrically-sized materials. Thus, the understanding of the principles of water hydration, including the development of a theory of hydrophobicity at the nanoscale, is imperative both from a fundamental and an applied standpoint. In this work we present some molecular dynamics studies of the structure and dynamics of water at different interfaces or confinement conditions, ranging from simple model hydrophobic interfaces with different geometrical constraints (in order to single out curvature effects), to self-assembled monolayers, proteins and phospholipid membranes. The tendency of the water molecules to sacrifice the lowest hydrogen bond (HB) coordination as possible at extended interfaces is revealed. This fact makes the first hydration layers to be highly oriented, in some situations even resembling the structure of hexagonal ice. A similar trend to maximize the number of HBs is shown to hold in cavity filling, with small subnanometric hydrophobic cavities remaining empty while larger cavities display an alternation of filled and dry states with a significant inner HB network. We also study interfaces with complex chemical and geometrical nature in order to determine how different conditions affect the local hydration properties. Thus, we show some

  1. X-ray microanalysis of hydrated biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, T.; Ueda, H.; Hirose, H.; Idegomori, T.

    1982-01-01

    Using a wide angle backscattered electron detector (BED), glutaraldehyde fixed or unfixed specimens of biological soft tissues such as hen oviduct, kidney, liver, duodenum of mouse as well as mitochondrial fraction from rat liver were observed under low vacuum (0.3 to 0.5 torr) at magnifications from x300 to 10,000. The backscattered electron images (BEI) of glutaraldehyde fixed hen oviduct were correlated to X-ray microanalysis. Intracellular secretion granules in such unhydrated, uncoated and unstained slices of hen oviduct preserved Ca even after glutaraldehyde fixation. Backscattered electron images of unfixed duodenum and kidney of mice were not satisfactory for observing intracellular structures, though X-ray microanalysis could detect P,S,Cl and K over cut surfaces of such hydrated unfixed tissue. Compared with frozen dehydrated specimen, the hydrated unfixed tissue tends to preserve more potassium and less chlorine. Cytochemical reaction product of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH-ase) activity in isolated mitochondria from rat liver was detectable in hydrated condition. Quick and easy assessment of localized elements in surgical specimens by combination of wet-SEM and X-ray microanalysis will be a new tool for clinical application of SEM. In spite of obvious limitations of this method, especially of its spatial resolution both in backscattered electron image and in bulk specimen X-ray microanalysis, the combination of wet-SEM and X-ray microanalysis provides information which has not been available in the past.

  2. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrated phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, Tayebeh; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out to compute, at human-body temperature, the vibrational modes and lifetimes of pure and hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids. The projected atomic vibrations calculated from the spectral energy density are used to compute the vibrational modes and the lifetimes. All the normal modes of the pure and hydrated DPPC and their frequencies are identified. The computed lifetimes incorporate the full anharmonicity of the atomic interactions. The vibrational modes of the water molecules close to the head group of DPPC are active (possess large projected spectrum amplitudes) in the frequency range 0.5-55 THz, with a peak at 2.80 THz in the energy spectrum. The computed lifetimes for the high-frequency modes agree well with the recent data measured at room temperature where high-order phonon scattering is not negligible. The computed lifetimes of the low-frequency modes can be tested using the current experimental capabilities. Moreover, the approach may be applied to other lipids and biomolecules, in order to predict their vibrational dispersion relations, and to study the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer.

  3. Calculation of multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid- liquid systems: calculation methods, thermochemical data, and applications to studies of high-temperature volcanic gases with examples from Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Reed, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents the numerical formulations, thermochemical data base, and possible applications of computer programs, SOLVGAS and GASWORKS, for calculating multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid-liquid systems. SOLVGAS and GASWORKS compute simultaneous equilibria by solving simultaneously a set of mass balance and mass action equations written for all gas species and for all gas-solid or gas-liquid equilibria. Examples of gas-evaporation-from-magma and precipitation-with-cooling calculations for volcanic gases collected from Mount St. Helens are shown. -from Authors

  4. Gas hydrates in the ocean environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A GAS HYDRATE, also known as a gas clathrate, is a gas-bearing, icelike material. It occurs in abundance in marine sediments and stores immense amounts of methane, with major implications for future energy resources and global climate change. Furthermore, gas hydrate controls some of the physical properties of sedimentary deposits and thereby influences seafloor stability.

  5. Gas-solid difference in charge-changing cross sections for bare and H-like nickel ions at 200 MeV/u

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Sakamoto, N.; Tsuchida, H.; Geissel, H.; Fettouhi, A.; Knoebel, R. K.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Fritzsche, S.; Portillo, M.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Becker, F.; Boutin, D.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Muenzenberg, G.; Stadlmann, J.; Winkler, M.; Yao, N.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2007-02-15

    It is well known that the density of the target can have a crucial impact on charge-changing collisions of partially ionized heavy ions. However, the basic understanding of this experimental observation is hampered by the difficulty in knowing the charge-state evolution of projectiles inside solids. Therefore, the present experiments with 200 MeV/u bare and H-like nickel ions were performed to study charge-changing cross sections in different monatomic and compound gases and solids. The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the electron-loss cross sections in solids increase by about 40% compared to gases. The results support the Bohr-Lindhard model which predicts this gas-solid difference originating from enhanced ionization of excited ions. The experimental results are compared with recent theoretical estimates.

  6. Direct measurement of particle size and 3D velocity of a gas-solid pipe flow with digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchun; Wu, Xuecheng; Yao, Longchao; Gréhan, Gérard; Cen, Kefa

    2015-03-20

    The 3D measurement of the particles in a gas-solid pipe flow is of great interest, but remains challenging due to curved pipe walls in various engineering applications. Because of the astigmatism induced by the pipe, concentric ellipse fringes in the hologram of spherical particles are observed in the experiments. With a theoretical analysis of the particle holography by an ABCD matrix, the in-focus particle image can be reconstructed by the modified convolution method and fractional Fourier transform. Thereafter, the particle size, 3D position, and velocity are simultaneously measured by digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DHPTV). The successful application of DHPTV to the particle size and 3D velocity measurement in a glass pipe's flow can facilitate its 3D diagnostics. PMID:25968543

  7. A Computationally Efficient Equation of State for Ternary Gas Hydrate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The potential energy resource of natural gas hydrates held in geologic accumulations, using lower volumetric estimates, is sufficient to meet the world demand for natural gas for nearly eight decades, at current rates of increase. As with other unconventional energy resources, the challenge is to economically produce the natural gas fuel. The gas hydrate challenge is principally technical. Meeting that challenge will require innovation, but more importantly, scientific research to understand the resource and its characteristics in porous media. The thermodynamic complexity of gas hydrate systems makes numerical simulation a particularly attractive research tool for understanding production strategies and experimental observations. Simply stated, producing natural gas from gas hydrate deposits requires releasing CH4 from solid gas hydrate. The conventional way to release CH4 is to dissociate the hydrate by changing the pressure and temperature conditions to those where the hydrate is unstable. Alternatively, the guest-molecule exchange technology releases CH4 by replacing it with more thermodynamically stable molecules (e.g., CO2, N2). This technology has three advantageous: 1) it sequesters greenhouse gas, 2) it potentially releases energy via an exothermic reaction, and 3) it retains the hydraulic and mechanical stability of the hydrate reservoir. Numerical simulation of the production of gas hydrates from geologic deposits requires accounting for coupled processes: multifluid flow, mobile and immobile phase appearances and disappearances, heat transfer, and multicomponent thermodynamics. The ternary gas hydrate system comprises five components (i.e., H2O, CH4, CO2, N2, and salt) and the potential for six phases (i.e., aqueous, nonaqueous liquid, gas, hydrate, ice, and precipitated salt). The equation of state for ternary hydrate systems has three requirements: 1) phase occurrence, 2) phase composition, and 3) phase properties. Numerical simulations that predict

  8. Hydration of Two Cisplatin Aqua-Derivatives Studied by Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Andrea; Tolazzi, Marilena; Martínez, José Manuel; Pappalardo, Rafael R; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2015-04-14

    The hydration of the cisplatin aqua-derivatives, cis-[PtCl(H2O)(NH3)2](+) (w-cisplatin) and cis-[Pt(H2O)2(NH3)2](2+) (w2-cisplatin), has been studied by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. The new platinum complex-water interaction potential, w-cisplatin-W, has been built on the basis of the already obtained cisplatin-water interaction potential (cisplatin-W) [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013 9, 4562]. That potential has been then transferred to the w2-cisplatin-W potential. The w-cisplatin and w2-cisplatin atomic charges were specifically derived from their solute's wave functions. Bulk solvent effects on the complex-water interactions have been included by means of a continuum model. Classical MD simulations with 1 platinum complex and 1000 SPC/E water molecules have been carried out. Angle-solved radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions have been used to provide detailed pictures of the local hydration structure around the ligands (water, chloride, and ammine) and the axial region. A novel definition of a multisite cavity has been employed to compute the hydration number of complexes in order to provide a consistent definition of their first-hydration shell. Interestingly, the hydration number decreases with the increase of the complex net charge from 27 for cisplatin to 23 and 18 for w-cisplatin and w2-cisplatin, respectively. In parallel to this hydration number behavior, the compactness of the hydration shell increases when going from the neutral complex, i.e. cisplatin, to the doubly charged complex, w2-cisplatin. Quantum mechanics estimation of the hydration energies for the platinum complexes allows the computation of the reaction energy for the first- and second-hydrolysis of cisplatin in water. The agreement with experimental data is satisfactory. PMID:26574384

  9. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new

  10. Natural Gas Hydrates: Occurrence, Distribution, and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, Charles K.; Dillon, William P.

    We publish this volume at a time when there is a growing interest in gas hydrates and major expansion in international research efforts. The first recognition of natural gas hydrate on land in Arctic conditions was in the mid-1960s (by I. Makogon) and in the seabed environment only in the early 1970s, after natural seafloor gas hydrate was drilled on the Blake Ridge during Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 11. Initial scientific investigations were slow to develop because the study of natural gas hydrates is unusually challenging. Gas hydrate exists in nature in conditions of temperature and pressure where human beings cannot survive, and if gas hydrate is transported from its region of stability to normal Earth-surface conditions, it dissociates. Thus, in contrast to most minerals, we cannot depend on drilled samples to provide accurate estimates of the amount of gas hydrate present. Even the heat and changes in chemistry (methane saturation, salinity, etc.) introduced by the drilling process affect the gas hydrate, independent of the changes brought about by moving a sample to the surface. Gas hydrate has been identified in nature generally by inference from indirect evidence in drilling data or by using remotely sensed indications, mostly from seismic data. Obviously, the established techniques ofgeologic analysis, which require direct observation and sampling, do not apply to gas hydrate studies, and controversy has surrounded many interpretations. Pressure/temperature conditions appropriate for the existence of gas hydrate occur over the greater part of the shallow subsurface of the Earth beneath the ocean at water depths exceeding about 500 m (shallower beneath colder Arctic seas) and on land beneath high-latitude permafrost. Gas hydrate actually will be present in such conditions, however, only where methane is present at high concentrations. In the Arctic, these methane concentrations are often associated with petroleum deposits, whereas at continental margins

  11. Kinetic fractionation of carbon and oxygen isotopes during hydration of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, Richard E.

    2014-08-01

    Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) during the inorganic hydration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aqueous solution cause reduced stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios (13C/12C and 18O/16O) in the reaction product carbonic acid (H2CO3) or bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), relative to CO2. While such KIEs are of importance in various physicochemical, geochemical, and biological systems, very few experimental and theoretical studies have attempted to determine the magnitude of the carbon and oxygen kinetic isotope fractionation (KIF) during hydration of CO2. Here I use transition state theory (TST) and quantum chemistry calculations to investigate the reaction rates of isotopic reactants CO2+nH2O (n = 1-8) along the hydration pathway to H2CO3 or HCO3-. Locating transition states is difficult and the quantum chemistry calculations time-consuming at large n. My results suggest that the hydration mechanism for n = 1-3 is unlikely to be the dominant pathway producing KIFs during CO2 hydration in aqueous solution; hydration mechanisms for n ⩾ 4 appear more likely. For n = 4-8, the predicted KIF based on MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations at 25 °C is ∼1.023-1.033 and ∼1.013-1.015, for carbon and oxygen, respectively. However, these values are uncertain and the results of the present study suggest that new experimental work is required to accurately determine the KIF of carbon and oxygen during CO2 hydration.

  12. Hydration forces at solid and fluid biointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Buddha Ratna; Banquy, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    The authors review the different molecular mechanisms giving rise to the repulsive hydration force between biologically relevant surfaces such as lipid bilayers and bioceramics. As the authors will show, the hydration force manifests itself in very different and subtle ways depending on the substrates. Soft, mobile surfaces such as lipid bilayers tend to exhibit monotonic, decaying hydration force, originated from the entropic constriction of the lipid head groups. Solid surfaces, on the other hand, tend to exhibit a periodic oscillatory hydration force, originated from the surface induced polarization of water molecules. In this review, the authors will describe both subtle faces of this important interaction by first describing the early experiments performed on solid surfaces and their interpretation by recent simulation studies. Then, the authors will describe the hydration force between fluid interfaces such as bilayers and explain how experimentally researchers have unraveled the dominant role of the lipid head groups' conformation. PMID:26795057

  13. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Oscar; Giraldo, Carolina; Camargo, Sergio S.

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  14. PRODUCTION OF HYDRATED ELECTRONS FROM PHOTOIONIZATION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under UV irradiation, an important primary photochemical reaction of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is electron ejection, producing hydrated electrons (e-aq). The efficiency of this process has been studied in both fresh and seawater samples with both steady-state scave...

  15. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  19. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  20. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  1. Clathrate hydrate tuning for technological purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Profio, Pietro; Germani, Raimondo; Savelli, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    Gas hydrates are being increasingly considered as convenient media for gas storage and transportation as the knowledge of their properties increases, in particular as relates to methane and hydrogen. Clathrate hydrates may also represent a feasible sequestration technology for carbon dioxide, due to a well defined P/T range of stability, and several research programs are addressing this possibility. Though the understanding of the molecular structure and supramolecular interactions which are responsible of most properties of hydrates have been elucitated in recent years, the underlying theoretical physico-chemical framework is still poor, especially as relates to the role of "conditioners" (inhibitors and promoters) from the molecular/supramolecular point of view. In the present communication we show some results from our research approach which is mainly focused on the supramolecular properties of clathrate hydrate systems - and their conditioners - as a way to get access to a controlled modulation of the formation, dissociation and stabilization of gas hydrates. In particular, this communication will deal with: (a) a novel, compact apparatus for studying the main parameters of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in a one-pot experiment, which can be easily and rapidly carried out on board of a drilling ship;[1] (b) the effects of amphiphile molecules (surfactants) as inhibitors or promoters of gas hydrate formation;[2] (c) a novel nanotechnology for a reliable and quick production of hydrogen hydrates, and its application to fuel cells;[3,4] and (d) the development of a clathrate hydrate tecnology for the sequestration and geological storage of man-made CO2, possibly with concomitant recovery of natural gas from NG hydrate fields. Furthermore, the feasibility of catalyzing the reduction of carbon dioxide to energy-rich species by hydrates is being investigated. [1] Di Profio, P., Germani, R., Savelli, G., International Patent Application PCT/IT2006

  2. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  3. Diffusion of CO2 During Hydrate Formation and Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2002-08-20

    Experiments were performed to measure the rate of diffusion of CO2 through hydrate films. Hydrate films were created in a capillary tube, and the growth of the hydrate film was measured. Difficulties were encountered in creating hydrate repeatedly, and some non-uniform growth of the films was observed. Sufficient observations were obtained to demonstrate that hydrate growth occurs preferentially on the hydrate/water side of the interface, rather than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from observations of the rate of growth of the hydrate film along with estimates of the solubility of CO2 in water and of the concentration gradient across the hydrate layer. The experimental observations indicate that hydrate formation occurs much more rapidly at the hydrate water interface than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Any growth of hydrate at the CO2/hydrate interface was too slow to be observed at the time scale of the experiments. That observation is consistent with the idea that CO2 can move more easily through the hydrate, presumably by hopping between hydrate cages, than water can move through the hydrate, presumably by lattice hopping. Estimated diffusion coefficients were in the range 1-3E-06 cm2/sec. Those values are about an order of magnitude lower than the diffusion coefficient for CO2 in liquid water, but four orders of magnitude larger than the value for diffusion of CO2 in a solid. The rate of diffusion through the hydrate controls both the creation of new hydrate at the hydrate/water interface and the rate at which CO2 dissolves in the liquid water and diffuses away from the hydrate layer. Formation of a hydrate layer reduces the rate at which CO2 dissolves in liquid water.

  4. Hydration-dehydration interactions between glycine and anhydrous salts: Implications for a chemical evolution of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Nakashima, Satoru

    2011-11-01

    Polymerizations of organic monomers including amino acids, nucleotides and monosaccharides are essential processes for chemical evolution of life. Since these reactions proceed with "dehydration" reactions, they are possibly promoted if combined with thermodynamically favorable "hydration" reactions of minerals and salts. To test the possibility, we conducted heating experiments of the simplest amino acid "glycine (Gly)" mixed with four simple anhydrous salts (MgSO 4, SrCl 2, BaCl 2 and Li 2SO 4) at 140 °C up to 20 days. Gly polymerization was strongly promoted by mixing with the salts in the order of MgSO 4 > SrCl 2 > BaCl 2 > Li 2SO 4. Up to 6-mer of Gly polymers were synthesized in the Gly-MgSO 4 mixture, and a total yield of Gly polymers attained about 7% of the initial amount of Gly by the 20 days heating. The total yield was about 200 times larger than that from the heating of Gly alone. XRD measurements of the Gly-MgSO 4 mixture revealed the generation of MgSO 4 monohydrate during Gly polymerization. These observations indicate that Gly polymerization was promoted by the salt hydrations through the hydration-dehydration interactions. Based on the observations, we tried to find a relationship between thermodynamic characteristics of the interactions and the promotion effects of each salt on Gly polymerization. It was found that the salts having lower hydration Δ rG0 (easier to hydrate) promote Gly polymerization more strongly. The relationship was used to estimate promotion effects of simple oxide minerals on Gly polymerization. The estimations were consistent with previous observations about the effects of these minerals on Gly polymerization. The fact suggests that the hydration-dehydration interactions between amino acids and minerals are an important mechanism for amino acids' polymerizations on minerals.

  5. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  6. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand processes

  7. Surface topography dependence of biomolecular hydrophobic hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuen-Kit; Rossky, Peter J.

    1998-04-01

    Many biomolecules are characterized by surfaces containing extended nonpolar regions, and the aggregation and subsequent removal of such surfaces from water is believed to play a critical role in the biomolecular assembly in cells. A better understanding of the hydrophobic hydration of biomolecules may therefore yield new insights into intracellular assembly. Conventional views hold that the hydration shell of small hydrophobic solutes is clathrate-like, characterized by local cage-like hydrogen-bonding structures and a distinct loss in entropy. The hydration of extended nonpolar planar surfaces, however, appears to involve structures that are orientationally inverted relative to clathrate-like hydration shells,, with unsatisfied hydrogen bonds that are directed towards the hydrophobic surface. Here we present computer simulations of the interaction between the polypeptide melittin and water that demonstrate that the two different hydration structures also exist near a biomolecular surface. We find that the two structures are distinguished by a substantial difference in the water-water interaction enthalpy, and that their relative contributions depend strongly on the surface topography of the melittin molecule: clathrate-like structures dominate near convex surface patches, whereas the hydration shell near flat surfaces fluctuates between clathrate-like and less-ordered or inverted structures. The strong influence of surface topography on the structure and free energy of hydrophobic hydration is likely to hold in general, and will be particularly important for the many biomolecules whose surfaces contain convex patches, deep or shallow concave grooves and roughly planar areas.

  8. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  9. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Constable, Steven; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of our DOE-funded proposal to characterize gas hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico using marine electromagnetic methods, a collaboration between SIO, LLNL, and USGS with the goal of measuring the electrical properties of lab-created methane (CH4) hydrate and sediment mixtures was formed. We examined samples with known characteristics to better relate electrical properties measured in the field to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns. Here we discuss first-ever electrical conductivity (σ) measurements on unmixed CH4 hydrate (Du Frane et al., 2011): 6 x 10-5 S/m at 5 °C, which is ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater. This difference allows electromagnetic (EM) techniques to distinguish highly resistive gas hydrate deposits from conductive water saturated sediments in EM field surveys. More recently, we performed measurements on CH4 hydrate mixed with sediment and we also discuss those initial findings here. Our results on samples free of liquid water are important for predicting conductivity of sediments with pores highly saturated with gas hydrate, and are an essential starting point for comprehensive mixing models.

  10. Ab Initio Studies of Calcium Carbonate Hydration.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Berganza, Josue A; Diao, Yijue; Pamidighantam, Sudhakar; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2015-11-25

    Ab initio simulations of large hydrated calcium carbonate clusters are challenging due to the existence of multiple local energy minima. Extensive conformational searches around hydrated calcium carbonate clusters (CaCO3·nH2O for n = 1-18) were performed to find low-energy hydration structures using an efficient combination of Monte Carlo searches, density-functional tight binding (DFTB+) method, and density-functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP level, or Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2 level. This multilevel optimization yields several low-energy structures for hydrated calcium carbonate. Structural and energetics analysis of the hydration of these clusters revealed a first hydration shell composed of 12 water molecules. Bond-length and charge densities were also determined for different cluster sizes. The solvation of calcium carbonate in bulk water was investigated by placing the explicitly solvated CaCO3·nH2O clusters in a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The findings of this study provide new insights into the energetics and structure of hydrated calcium carbonate and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms where calcium carbonate formation or dissolution is of relevance. PMID:26505205

  11. Mechanisms for thermal conduction in hydrogen hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Gorman, Paul D.; MacElroy, J. M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate thermal conduction mechanisms via the Green-Kubo approach for (type II) hydrogen hydrate, at 0.05 kbar and between 30 and 250 K, for both lightly filled H2 hydrates (1s4l) and for more densely filled H2 systems (2s4l), in which four H2 molecules are present in the large cavities, with respective single- and double-occupation of the small cages. The TIP4P water model was used in conjunction with a fully atomistic hydrogen potential along with long-range Ewald electrostatics. It was found that substantially less damping in guest-host energy transfer is present in hydrogen hydrate as is observed in common type I clathrates (e.g., methane hydrate), but more akin in to previous results for type II and H methane hydrate polymorphs. This gives rise to larger thermal conductivities relative to common type I hydrates, and also larger than type II and H methane hydrate polymorphs, and a more crystal-like temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity.

  12. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  13. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2003-12-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the US have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by maurer Technology, noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R and D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. They plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. They also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. They are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. They hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, the goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  15. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Constable, Steven; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Smith, Megan M.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. Toward this goal, we built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. Here we report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. These results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  16. Carbon dioxide hydrate and floods on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ground ice on Mars probably consists largely of carbon dioxide hydrate. This hydrate dissociates upon release of pressure at temperatures between 0 and 10 C. The heat capacity of the ground would be sufficient to produce up to 4% (by volume) of water at a rate equal to that at which it can be drained away. Catastrophic dissociation of carbon dioxide hydrate during some past epoch when the near-surface temperature was in this range would have produced chaotic terrain and flood channels.

  17. Dissociation of Natural and Artificial Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Present work deals with natural and artificial methane hydrate dissociation. The heating of the powder produced due to the temperature difference between the external air and the powder. The dissociation rate was determined by gravimetric method. The range of the partial self-preservation for the natural hydrate is significantly longer than for the artificial one and moved to higher temperatures. The destruction of the natural sample is slower than the artificial one. The time-averaged dissociation rate for the artificial sample is equal to 1,25 %/s and for the natural hydrate corresponds to 0,59 %/s.

  18. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; et al

    2016-07-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas–solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high asmore » 301 mAh g–1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g–1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. Lastly, this study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries.« less

  19. Hydration of C{sub 3}A-gypsum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Quennoz, Alexandra Scrivener, Karen L.

    2012-07-15

    Hydration of C{sub 3}A-gypsum systems with different gypsum additions was investigated in terms of the phase assemblage, kinetics and microstructural development. The second stage of the reaction, which begins after the depletion of gypsum, was of particular interest. From in-situ X-ray diffraction results, it was seen that the dissolution of ettringite and C{sub 3}A to form monosulfoaluminate and/or hydroxy-AFm phases is a rapid reaction that occurs right after the depletion of gypsum. The observation of the calorimetric curves obtained for the different gypsum additions leads us to the conclusion that the mechanism controlling the hydration rate during this period is the nucleation and growth of the AFm phases. The microstructural study showed that the formation of AFm phases occurs in the space between the C{sub 3}A grains but also within the boundaries of the original C{sub 3}A grains. Hydrogarnet was observed growing as a shell around the C{sub 3}A grains.

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of ion hydration free energies

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von

    2009-05-28

    We apply ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) methods in conjunction with the thermodynamic integration or '{lambda}-path' technique to compute the intrinsic hydration free energies of Li{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, and Ag{sup +} ions. Using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional, adapting methods developed for classical force field applications, and with consistent assumptions about surface potential ({phi}) contributions, we obtain absolute AIMD hydration free energies ({Delta}G{sub hyd}) within a few kcal/mol, or better than 4%, of Tissandier et al.'s [J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998)] experimental values augmented with the SPC/E water model {phi} predictions. The sums of Li{sup +}/Cl{sup -} and Ag{sup +}/Cl{sup -} AIMD {Delta}G{sub hyd}, which are not affected by surface potentials, are within 2.6% and 1.2 % of experimental values, respectively. We also report the free energy changes associated with the transition metal ion redox reaction Ag{sup +}+Ni{sup +}{yields}Ag+Ni{sup 2+} in water. The predictions for this reaction suggest that existing estimates of {Delta}G{sub hyd} for unstable radiolysis intermediates such as Ni{sup +} may need to be extensively revised.

  1. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Understanding effect of structure and stability on transformation of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxiang; Yan, Yujie; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Jiafang; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the transformation process of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate is crucial to develop the CH4sbnd CO2 replacement technique for CH4 production and CO2 sequestration. Ab initio calculations show that the transformation will slightly distort the host lattice and decrease the binding strength of guest molecules, but it is a thermodynamically spontaneous process dominated by the entropic contribution. Moreover, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the dynamics of the host lattice is independent on the guest molecules, while CO2 in hydrate exhibits slower translational and rotational motion than CH4 in hydrate.

  3. Testing short-range migration of microbial methane as a hydrate formation mechanism: Results from Andaman Sea and Kumano Basin drill sites and global implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinverno, Alberto; Goldberg, David S.

    2015-07-01

    Methane gas hydrates in marine sediments often concentrate in coarse-grained layers surrounded by fine-grained marine muds that are hydrate-free. Methane in these hydrate deposits is typically microbial, and must have migrated from its source as the coarse-grained sediments contain little or no organic matter. In "long-range" migration, fluid flow through permeable layers transports methane from deeper sources into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). In "short-range" migration, microbial methane is generated within the GHSZ in fine-grained sediments, where small pore sizes inhibit hydrate formation. Dissolved methane can then diffuse into adjacent sand layers, where pore size does not restrict hydrate formation and hydrates can accumulate. Short-range migration has been used to explain hydrate accumulations in sand layers observed in drill sites on the northern Cascadia margin and in the Gulf of Mexico. Here we test the feasibility of short-range migration in two additional locations, where gas hydrates have been found in coarse-grained volcanic ash layers (Site NGHP-01-17, Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean) and turbidite sand beds (Site IODP-C0002, Kumano forearc basin, Nankai Trough, western Pacific). We apply reaction-transport modeling to calculate dissolved methane concentration and gas hydrate amounts resulting from microbial methane generated within the GHSZ. Model results show that short-range migration of microbial methane can explain the overall amounts of methane hydrate observed at the two sites. Short-range migration has been shown to be feasible in diverse margin environments and is likely to be a widespread methane transport mechanism in gas hydrate systems. It only requires a small amount of organic carbon and sediment sequences consisting of thin coarse-grained layers that can concentrate microbial methane generated within thick fine-grained sediment beds; these conditions are common along continental margins around the globe.

  4. Influence of amorphous silica on the hydration in ultra-high performance concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, Tina; Helbig, Uta; Hutter, Frank; Kletti, Holger; Sextl, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silica particles (silica) are used in ultra-high performance concretes to densify the microstructure and accelerate the clinker hydration. It is still unclear whether silica predominantly increases the surface for the nucleation of C–S–H phases or dissolves and reacts pozzolanically. Furthermore, varying types of silica may have different and time dependent effects on the clinker hydration. The effects of different silica types were compared in this study by calorimetric analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in situ X-ray diffraction and compressive strength measurements. The silica component was silica fume, pyrogenic silica or silica synthesized by a wet-chemical route (Stoeber particles). Water-to-cement ratios were 0.23. Differences are observed between the silica for short reaction times (up to 3 days). Results indicate that silica fume and pyrogenic silica accelerate alite hydration by increasing the surface for nucleation of C–S–H phases whereas Stoeber particles show no accelerating effect.

  5. NO{sub 2} removal by hydrated lime with SO{sub 2} present

    SciTech Connect

    Nelli, C.H.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1995-06-01

    At conditions typical of a bag filter in a coal fired flue gas, nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) reacted readily with surface water and sulfite ion (SO{sub 3}{sup =}) on hydrated lime. The adsorption of water and the hydrolysis of SO{sub 2} on hydrated lime provided sufficient water and sulfite to react with NO{sub 2}. The presence of oxygen in the synthesized flue gas reduced NO{sub 2} removal via sulfite oxidation on the hydrated lime surface. In addition, the presence of NO{sub 2} in the system improved total SO{sub 2} removal. A mathematical model developed to predict rates of NO{sub 2} removal by the NO{sub 2}-water and NO{sub 2}-sulfite reactions successfully compared experimental and predicted rates. These results are relevant to technology for removal of NO{sub x} by addition of methanol to dry scrubbing systems for flue gas desulfurization.

  6. A composite phase diagram of structure H hydrates using Schreinemakers' geometric approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehta, A.P.; Makogon, T.Y.; Burruss, R.C.; Wendlandt, R.F.; Sloan, E.D.

    1996-01-01

    A composite phase diagram is presented for Structure H (sH) clathrate hydrates. In this work, we derived the reactions occurring among the various phases along each four-phase (Ice/Liquid water, liquid hydrocarbon, vapor, and hydrate) equilibrium line. A powerful method (though seldom used in chemical engineering) for multicomponent equilibria developed by Schreinemakers is applied to determine the relative location of all quadruple (four-phase) lines emanating from three quintuple (five-phase) points. Experimental evidence validating the approximate phase diagram is also provided. The use of Schreinemakers' rules for the development of the phase diagram is novel for hydrates, but these rules may be extended to resolve the phase space of other more complex systems commonly encountered in chemical engineering.

  7. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  8. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrated Nitromethane Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcum, Jesse C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2009-06-01

    The hydration of molecular anions is still not as thoroughly explored as for atomic anions. We present IR spectra and quantum chemical calculations of hydrated nitromethane anions. In the monohydrate, the nitro group of the ion interacts with the water molecule via two hydrogen bonds, one from each O atom. This motif is partially conserved in the dihydrate. Adding the third water molecule results in a ring-like structure of the water ligands, each of which forms one H bond to one of the O atoms of the nitro group and another to a neighboring water ligand, reminiscent of the hydration motif of the heavier halides. Interestingly, while the methyl group is not directly involved in the interaction with the water ligands, its infrared signature is strongly affected by the changes in the intramolecular charge distribution through hydration.

  10. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  11. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  12. Overview: Gas hydrate geology and geography

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Several geological factors which are directly responsible for the presence or absence of gas hydrates have been reviewed and are: tectonic position of the region; sedimentary environments; structural deformation; shale diapirism; hydrocarbon generation and migration; thermal regime in the hydrate formation zone (HFZ); pressure conditions; and hydrocarbon gas supply to the HFZ. Work on gas hydrate formation in the geological environment has made significant advances, but there is still much to be learned. Work is continuing in the deeper offshore areas through the Ocean Drilling Program, Government Agencies, and Industry. The pressure/temperature conditions necessary for formation has been identified for various compositions of natural gas through laboratory investigations and conditions for formation are being advanced through drilling in areas where gas hydrates exist.

  13. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  14. In situ neutron powder diffraction investigation of the hydration of tricalcium aluminate in the presence of gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, M.R. . E-mail: michael.hartman@nist.gov; Berliner, R.

    2005-11-15

    The hydration of a 1:3 molar ratio of tricalcium aluminate, Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}, to gypsum, CaSO{sub 4}.2D{sub 2}O, was investigated at temperatures of 25, 50, and 80 deg. C using time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction combined with multiphase Rietveld structural refinement. It was shown that ettringite, Ca{sub 6}[Al(OD){sub 6}]{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}.{approx}26D{sub 2}O, was the first and only hydration product of the system, in contrast to a prior investigation which suggested the occurrence of a precursor phase prior to the formation of ettringite. Kinetics data showed that the hydration reaction is very sensitive to temperature: hydration at 25 deg. C was characterized by a single kinetic regime while hydration at higher temperatures consisted of two distinct kinetic regimes. The presence of two kinetic regimes was attributed to a change in either the dimensionality of the growth process or a change in the rate controlling mechanism in the hydration reaction.

  15. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; NGHP Expedition Scientists

    2015-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 was designed to study the gas-hydrate occurrences off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. During Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01, dedicated gas-hydrate coring, drilling, and downhole logging operations were conducted from 28 April 2006 to 19 August 2006.

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  20. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  1. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  2. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  3. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  4. Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Steven A. . E-mail: steven.a.grant@usace.army.mil; Boitnott, Ginger E.; Korhonen, Charles J.; Sletten, Ronald S.

    2006-04-15

    Tricalcium silicate was hydrated at 274, 278, 283, 298, and 313 K in stirred suspensions of saturated CaO solutions under a nitrogen-gas atmosphere until the end of deceleratory period. The suspension conductivities and energy flows were measured continuously. The individual reaction rates for tricalcium silicate dissolution, calcium silicate hydrate precipitation, and calcium hydroxide precipitation were calculated from these measurements. The results suggest that the proportion of tricalcium silicate dissolved was determined by the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution and the time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation. The time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation was more sensitive to changes in temperature than was the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution, so that the proportion of tricalcium silicate hydration dissolved by the deceleratory period increased with decreasing temperature. The average chain length of the calcium silicate hydrate ascertained by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy increased with increasing temperature.

  5. Measurement of clathrate hydrates via Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sum, A.K.; Burruss, R.C.; Sloan, E.D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Raman spectra of clathrate hydrate guest molecules are presented for three known structures (I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH)) in the following systems: CH4 (sI), CO2 (sI), C3H8 (sII), CH4 + CO2 (sI), CD4 + C3H8 (sII), CH4 + N2 (sI), CH4 + THF-d8 (sII), and CH4 + C7D14 (sH). Relative occupancy of CH4 in the large and small cavities of sI were determined by deconvoluting the ??1 symmetric bands, resulting in hydration numbers of 6.04 ?? 0.03. The frequency of the ??1 bands for CH4 in structures I, II, and H differ statistically, so that Raman spectroscopy is a potential tool to identify hydrate crystal structure. Hydrate guest compositions were also measured for two vapor compositions of the CH4 + CO2 system, and they compared favorably with predictions. The large cavities were measured to be almost fully occupied by CH4 and CO2, whereas only a small fraction of the small cavities are occupied by CH4. No CO2 was found in the small cavities. Hydration numbers from 7.27 to 7.45 were calculated for the mixed hydrate.

  6. Fe-containing phases in hydrated cements

    SciTech Connect

    Dilnesa, B.Z.; Wieland, E.; Lothenbach, B.; Dähn, R.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-04-01

    In this study synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been applied, an element specific technique which allows Fe-containing phases to be identified in the complex mineral mixture of hydrated cements. Several Fe species contributed to the overall Fe K-edge spectra recorded on the cement samples. In the early stage of cement hydration ferrite was the dominant Fe-containing mineral. Ferrihydrite was detected during the first hours of the hydration process. After 1 day the formation of Al- and Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet was observed, while the amount of ferrihydrite decreased. The latter finding agrees with thermodynamic modeling, which predicts the formation of Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet in Portland cement systems. The presence of Al- and Fe-containing siliceous hydrogarnet was further substantiated in the residue of hydrated cement by performing a selective dissolution procedure. - Highlights: • Fe bound to ferrihydrite at early age hydration • Fe found to be stable in siliceous hydrogarnet at longer term age hydration • Fe-containing AFt and AFm phases are less stable than siliceous hydrogarnet. • The study demonstrates EXAFS used to identify amorphous or poorly crystalline phases.

  7. Electrical properties of polycrystalline methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Frane, W. L.; Stern, L.A.; Weitemeyer, K.A.; Constable, S.; Pinkston, J.C.; Roberts, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) remote-sensing techniques are demonstrated to be sensitive to gas hydrate concentration and distribution and complement other resource assessment techniques, particularly seismic methods. To fully utilize EM results requires knowledge of the electrical properties of individual phases and mixing relations, yet little is known about the electrical properties of gas hydrates. We developed a pressure cell to synthesize gas hydrate while simultaneously measuring in situ frequency-dependent electrical conductivity (σ). Synthesis of methane (CH4) hydrate was verified by thermal monitoring and by post run cryogenic scanning electron microscope imaging. Impedance spectra (20 Hz to 2 MHz) were collected before and after synthesis of polycrystalline CH4 hydrate from polycrystalline ice and used to calculate σ. We determined the σ of CH4 hydrate to be 5 × 10−5 S/m at 0°C with activation energy (Ea) of 30.6 kJ/mol (−15 to 15°C). After dissociation back into ice, σ measurements of samples increased by a factor of ~4 and Ea increased by ~50%, similar to the starting ice samples.

  8. Clathrate hydrates in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds in which an expanded ice lattice forms cages that contain gas molecules. There are two principal hydrate structures. Structure I, with a 12 A cubic unit cell, contains 46 water molecules and 8 cages of two types, giving an ideal formula (for CH4) of CH4.5.75H2O. The actual formula contains somewhat more water as the cages are not completely filled. Other examples that form Structure I hydrates are C2H6, C2H4, C2H2, CO2, SO2, OCS, Xe, H2S. Structure II, with a 17 A cubic unit cell, contains 136 water molecules, and 8 large and 16 small cages. The ideal formula for CHCl3 is CHCL3.17H2O. Other examples of Structure II hydrates include C3H8, C2H5Cl, acetone, and tetrahydrofuran. Small molecules such as Ar, Kr and probably N2 and O2 also form a Structure II hydrate. The small molecules occupy both the large and small cages, giving an ideal formula of Ar.5.67H2O. The conditions of pressure and temperature for hydrate formation are discussed.

  9. [Preoperative oral hydration for pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Rie

    2011-07-01

    Preoperative oral hydration is an important component of "enhanced recovery after surgery" strategies. This was originally developed for patients undergoing colon surgery. The Obstetric Anesthesia Practice Guideline issued by American Society of Anesthesiologists states that intake of minimum amount of clear fluid 2 hours prior to surgery may be safe. However, anesthesiologists have to consider physiological changes that parturients undergo during pregnancy, such as increased risk of aspiration and impaired glucose tolerance. We also have to consider the potential effect of glucose loading on neonates. Mothers are more likely to develop ketosis by glucose loading. It also stimulates insulin release in the fetus, which can result in neonatal hypoglycemia. In addition, sodium overloading may deteriorate intra-vascular dehydration and cause lung edema to mothers. On the other hand, oral hydration can alleviate a sense of thirst and increase maternal satisfaction. Our data showed that maternal urinal ketone body at delivery tended to decrease with oral hydration during labor. Moreover, some articles suggest that oral hydration may improve utero-placental perfusion. Therefore, we have to balance risks and benefits of oral hydration in parturients. Further investigations are needed among this specific subgroup of patients in order to establish the safe application of preoperative oral hydration. PMID:21800658

  10. Pathways through equilibrated states with coexisting phases for gas hydrate formation

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Under ambient conditions, water freezes to either hexagonal ice or a hexagonal/cubic composite ice. The presence of hydrophobic guest molecules introduces a competing pathway: gas hydrate formation, with the guests in clathrate cages. Here, the pathways of the phase transitions are sought as sequences of states with coexisting phases, using a generalized replica exchange algorithm designed to sample them in equilibrium, avoiding nonequilibrium processes. For a dilute solution of methane in water under 200 atm, initializing the simulation with the full set of replicas leads to methane trapped in hexagonal/cubic ice, while gradually adding replicas with decreasing enthalpy produces the initial steps of hydrate growth. Once a small amount of hydrate is formed, water rearranges to form empty cages, eventually transforming the remainder of the system to metastable β ice, a scaffolding for hydrates. It is suggested that configurations with empty cages are reaction intermediates in hydrate formation when more guest molecules are available. Furthermore, free energy profiles show that methane acts as a catalyst reducing the barrier for β ice versus hexagonal/cubic ice formation.

  11. Pathways through Equilibrated States with Coexisting Phases for Gas Hydrate Formation.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-31

    Under ambient conditions, water freezes to either hexagonal ice or a hexagonal/cubic composite ice. The presence of hydrophobic guest molecules introduces a competing pathway: gas hydrate formation, with the guests in clathrate cages. Here, the pathways of the phase transitions are sought as sequences of states with coexisting phases, using a generalized replica exchange algorithm designed to sample them in equilibrium, avoiding nonequilibrium processes. For a dilute solution of methane in water under 200 atm, initializing the simulation with the full set of replicas leads to methane trapped in hexagonal/cubic ice, while gradually adding replicas with decreasing enthalpy produces the initial steps of hydrate growth. Once a small amount of hydrate is formed, water rearranges to form empty cages, eventually transforming the remainder of the system to metastable β ice, a scaffolding for hydrates. It is suggested that configurations with empty cages are reaction intermediates in hydrate formation when more guest molecules are available. Free energy profiles show that methane acts as a catalyst reducing the barrier for β ice versus hexagonal/cubic ice formation. PMID:26624929

  12. Hydration of a low-alkali CEM III/B-SiO{sub 2} cement (LAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Le Saout, Gwenn; Ben Haha, Mohsen; Figi, Renato; Wieland, Erich

    2012-02-15

    The hydration of a low-alkali cement based on CEM III/B blended with 10 wt.% of nanosilica has been studied. The nanosilica reacted within the first days and 90% of the slag reacted within 3.5 years. C-S-H (Ca/Si {approx} 1.2, Al/Si {approx} 0.12), calcite, hydrotalcite, ettringite and possibly straetlingite were the main hydrates. The pore water composition revealed ten times lower alkali concentrations than in Portland cements. Reducing conditions (HS{sup -}) and a pH value of 12.2 were observed. Between 1 month and 3.5 years of hydration more hydrates were formed due to the ongoing slag reaction but no significant differences in the composition of the pore solution or solid phase assemblage were observed. On the basis of thermodynamic calculations it is predicted that siliceous hydrogarnet could form in the long-term and, in the presence of siliceous hydrogarnet, also thaumasite. Nevertheless, even after 3.5 year hydration, neither siliceous hydrogarnet nor thaumasite have been observed.

  13. Pathways through equilibrated states with coexisting phases for gas hydrate formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Under ambient conditions, water freezes to either hexagonal ice or a hexagonal/cubic composite ice. The presence of hydrophobic guest molecules introduces a competing pathway: gas hydrate formation, with the guests in clathrate cages. Here, the pathways of the phase transitions are sought as sequences of states with coexisting phases, using a generalized replica exchange algorithm designed to sample them in equilibrium, avoiding nonequilibrium processes. For a dilute solution of methane in water under 200 atm, initializing the simulation with the full set of replicas leads to methane trapped in hexagonal/cubic ice, while gradually adding replicas with decreasing enthalpy produces themore » initial steps of hydrate growth. Once a small amount of hydrate is formed, water rearranges to form empty cages, eventually transforming the remainder of the system to metastable β ice, a scaffolding for hydrates. It is suggested that configurations with empty cages are reaction intermediates in hydrate formation when more guest molecules are available. Furthermore, free energy profiles show that methane acts as a catalyst reducing the barrier for β ice versus hexagonal/cubic ice formation.« less

  14. Continuous Seafloor Gas Hydrate Monitoring on the Ocean Networks Canada NEPTUNE Cabled Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherwath, M.; Heesemann, M.; Moran, K.; Insua, T. L.; Roemer, M.; Riedel, M.; Spence, G.; Thomsen, L.; Purser, A.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term seafloor experiments provide high-resolution data that allow new kinds of observations on the dynamics and variability of gas hydrates. In the north-east Pacific, Canadian as well as US efforts on building cabled seafloor observatories enable the scientific community to study the Cascadia margin gas hydrates at various locations independent of dedicated ship cruises and unstable weather, without power saving restrictions and with near realtime access to the data and the ability to influence the in-situ data acquisition in reaction to events. We show scientific highlights from Barkley Canyon and Clayoquot Slope off Vancouver Island on of the gas hydrate stability and variability on and below the seafloor as well as gas release into the water column, using some standard measurements from core instruments such as temperature, salinity, bottom pressure, currents, as well as sonar, seismometer and camera image data. Correlations of these various data sets shed light on the dependence of the observed gas hydrate dynamics on various environmental factors, some still subject to debate and longer-term monitoring requirements. Global efforts on cabling the seafloor elsewhere are underway and an exciting future on gas hydrate research lies ahead. Ocean Networks Canada invites the research community to participate, propose experiments, download data and collaborate (www.oceannetworks.ca).

  15. Temperature- and pH-dependent morphology and FT-IR analysis of magnesium carbonate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiping; Zheng, Yajun; Ni, Yuwen; Liu, Zhongmin; Chen, Jiping; Liang, Xinmiao

    2006-07-01

    Various morphologies of magnesium carbonate hydrates have been synthesized by carefully adjusting the reaction temperature and pH value of the initial reaction solution in the precipitation process. At lower temperatures (from room temperature to 328 K) and lower pH values (variation with the reaction temperature), magnesium carbonate hydrates are prone to display needlelike morphology, and the axis diameter of the particles decreases with the increase of reaction temperature and pH value. With the further increase of the reaction temperature (333-368 K) and pH value, the sheetlike crystallites become the preferred morphology, and at higher temperatures and pH values, these crystallites tend to assemble into layerlike structures with diverse morphologies, such as spherical-like particles with rosette-like structure and cakelike particles built from sheetlike structure. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra show that these various morphologies are closely related to their compositions. The needlelike magnesium carbonate hydrate has a formula of MgCO3.xH2O, in which the value x is greatly affected by the experimental conditions, whereas with the morphological transformation from needlelike to sheetlike structure, their corresponding compositions also change from MgCO3.xH2O to Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2.4H2O in the interval of 328-333 K. PMID:16805601

  16. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. PMID:23899752

  17. Phase Transition of Methane Gas Hydrate and Response of Marine Gas Hydrate Systems to Environmental Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2003-12-01

    Gas hydrates, which contain mostly methane as the gas component in marine sediment, are stable under relatively high pressure and low temperature conditions such as those found along continental margins and permafrost regions. Its stability is mostly controlled by in-situ pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid. Environmentally introduced changes in pressure and temperature can affect the stability of gas hydrate in marine sediment. While certain changes may enhance the process of gas hydrate formation, we are much more interested in the resultant dissociation processes, which may contribute to sub-marine slope instability, seafloor sediment failure, formation of mud volcanoes and pock marks, potential vulnerability of engineering structures, and the risk to drilling and production. We have been developing models to quantify phase transition processes of marine gas hydrates and to investigate the response of marine gas hydrate systems to environmental changes. Methane gas hydrate system is considered as a three-component (water, methane, salt) four-phase (liquid, gas, hydrate, halite) system. Pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid constrain the stability of gas hydrate and affect phase transition processes via their effects on methane solubility and fluid density and enthalpy. Compared to the great quantity of studies on its stability in the literature, in-depth research on phase transition of gas hydrate is surprisingly much less. A method, which employs pressure, enthalpy, salinity and methane content as independent variables, is developed to calculate phase transition processes of the three-component four-phase system. Temperature, an intensive thermodynamic parameter, is found not sufficient in describing phase transition of gas hydrate. The extensive thermodynamic parameter enthalpy, on the other hand, is found to be sufficient both in calculation of the phase transition processes and in modeling marine gas hydrate systems. Processes

  18. Extension of Toth function from gas-solid to liquid-solid equilibria and application to reversed-phase liquid chromatography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-03-01

    The extension of the {Psi} function developed by Toth from equilibria taking place at gas-solid interfaces to those taking place at liquid-solid interfaces was investigated. The results were applied to conventional liquid-solid systems used in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). The adsorbents in these systems are made of porous silica having a hydrophobic solid surface obtained by chemically bonding C{sub 18} alkyl chains to a porous silica gel then endcapping the surface with trimethylsilyl groups. The liquid is an aqueous solution of an organic solvent, most often methanol or acetonitrile. The probe compound used here is phenol. Adsorption data of phenol were measured using the dynamic frontal analysis (FA) method. The excess adsorption of the organic solvent was measured using the minor disturbance (MD) method. Activity coefficients in the bulk were estimated through the UNIFAC group contributions. The results show that the {Psi} function predicts 90% of the total free energy of immersion, {Delta}F, of the solid when the concentration of phenol is moderate (typically less than 10 g/L). At higher concentrations, the nonideal behavior of the bulk liquid phase becomes significant and it may contribute up to about 30% of {Delta}F. The high concentration of adsorbed molecules of phenol at the interface decreases the interfacial tension, {sigma}, by about 18 mN/m, independently of the structure of the adsorbed phase and of the nature of the organic solvent.

  19. Orientational ordering, site structure, and dynamics for octahedral molecules in low temperature matrices: SF/sub 6/ and SeF/sub 6/ in rare gas solids

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.H.; Swanson, B.I.

    1983-08-01

    From polarization studies of high resolution IR spectra of SF/sub 6/ and SeF/sub 6/ trapped in noble gas solids we show that much of the structure observed for the stretching mode represents site symmetry split components for low symmetry trapping sites, the triply-degenerate ..nu../sub 3/ mode being split into a doubly- and singly-degenerate mode. Most of the sites showing polarization are orientationally ordered with the singly-degenerate component perpendicular to the substrate. We attribute the driving force for ordering to guest--host interaction potentials which result in registry between the molecules and the (111) growth plane during deposition. The observed orientational ordering combined with high temperature annealing studies has allowed the identification of the symmetry of certain trapping sites and further analysis of vibrational dephasing dynamics. Several sites with the same nominal symmetry and structure can be tracked through the matrices discussed herein. The implications of the ordering of impurity structure in a host lattice formed by vapor deposition are discussed.

  20. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga: some characteristic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrate pingoes were observed on the seafloor during two different remotely operated vehicle (ROV)-dives, conducted by Statoil at complex-pockmark G11, at Nyegga, off Mid-Norway. Confirmation that these structures actually represent hydrate ice-cored sediment mounds (pingoes), was done by other investigators (Ivanov et al., 2006). Because it is expected that hydrate pingoes represent relatively dynamic seafloor topographic structures and that their shape and size most probably will change over relatively short time, it is important to know how to recognise them visually. Hovland and Svensen (2006) highlighted five different characteristic aspects that define hydrate pingoes on the sea floor: 1) They are dome- or disc-shaped features, which may attain any size from ~0.5 m in height and upwards. Inside pockmark G11, they were up to 1 m high. 2) They are circular or oval in plan view and may attain lateral sizes on the seafloor ranging upwards from ~0.5 m. Inside G11 they had lengths of several metres and widths of up to 4 m. 3) They have dense communities of organisms growing on their surfaces. At G11, they were overgrown with small pogonophoran tube-worms. 4) They have patches of white or grey bacterial mats growing on their surface, indicating advection (seepage) of reduced pore-waters. 5) They have small pits and patches of fluidized sediments on their surface, indicating pit corrosion of the sub-surface gas hydrate. Because gas hydrates often form in high-porosity, near-surface sediments, where water is readily available, it is thought that they will build up at locations where gases are actively migrating upwards from depth. However, gas hydrates are not stable in the presence of ambient seawater, as seawater is deficient in guest molecule gases (normally methane). Therefore, they tend to build up below surface above conduits for gas flow from depth. But, the near-surface hydrate ice-lenses will continually be corroded by seawater circulating into the sediments

  1. Factors affecting the process of CO2 replacement of CH4 from methane hydrate in sediments - Constrained from experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Hu, G.; Vanderveen, J.; Liu, C.; Ratcliffe, C.; Ripmeester, J.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 replacement of CH4 from methane hydrate has been proposed as a method to produce gas from natural gas hydrate by taking advantage of both the production of natural gas and the sequestration of CO2. To examine the validity of this method DOE/Conoco-Philips is considering having a field test in Alaska. The reaction of CO2 replacing CH4 from methane hydrate has been confirmed to be thermodynamically feasible, but concern is always raised about the reaction kinetics. Some kinetic studies in the system of methane hydrate and liquid or gaseous CO2 have found that the reaction proceeds at a very low rate. Natural gas hydrate occurs in sediments with multi-components and complex structure, so matters will be even more complicated. Up to now, few investigations have been carried out concerning the factors affecting the reaction process of CO2 replacing CH4 from methane hydrate. Experiments were implemented with sands, which were recovered from Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territory, Canada, sediment that previously contained hydrate although it had been dried completely before our experiments. The water-saturated sands were tightly charged into a plastic bottle (90 mm deep and 60 mm wide), and then this test specimen was sealed in a pressure cell. After methane hydrate was synthesized in the test specimen for 108 days under a pressure of 11 to 8 MPa and a temperature of 3 degrees Celsius, liquid CO2 was introduced into the pressure cell. The conditions under which CO2 was reacted with methane hydrate were ~5.3 MPa and 5 degrees Celsius. After reacting for 15 days, the test specimen was recovered. The test specimen was cut into ~10 mm thick discs, and sub-samples were further taken from each of the discs. In addition to the determination of hydrate saturation and the gas composition, Raman spectroscopic studies were carried out for the sub-samples obtained. The results revealed: 1) less CO2 replacement in the bottom disc of the test specimen as compared

  2. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process. PMID:19168304

  3. Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, J David; Meuler, Adam J; Bralower, Harrison L; Venkatesan, Rama; Subramanian, Sivakumar; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-05-01

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy intensive, comprising chemical, thermal, or flow management techniques. In this paper, we present an alternate approach of using functionalized coatings to reduce hydrate adhesion to surfaces, ideally to a low enough level that hydrodynamic shear stresses can detach deposits and prevent plug formation. Systematic and quantitative studies of hydrate adhesion on smooth substrates with varying solid surface energies reveal a linear trend between hydrate adhesion strength and the practical work of adhesion (γ(total)[1 + cos θ(rec)]) of a suitable probe liquid, that is, one with similar surface energy properties to those of the hydrate. A reduction in hydrate adhesion strength by more than a factor of four when compared to bare steel is achieved on surfaces characterized by low Lewis acid, Lewis base, and van der Waals contributions to surface free energy such that the practical work of adhesion is minimized. These fundamental studies provide a framework for the development of hydrate-phobic surfaces, and could lead to passive enhancement of flow assurance and prevention of blockages in deep-sea oil and gas operations. PMID:22441203

  4. Aqueous phase hydration and hydrate acidity of perfluoroalkyl and n:2 fluorotelomer aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya

    2016-01-01

    The SPARC software program and comparative density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate the aqueous phase hydration equilibrium constants (Khyd) of perfluoroalkyl aldehydes (PFAlds) and n:2 fluorotelomer aldehydes (FTAlds). Both classes are degradation products of known industrial compounds and environmental contaminants such as fluorotelomer alcohols, iodides, acrylates, phosphate esters, and other derivatives, as well as hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Prior studies have generally failed to consider the hydration, and subsequent potential hydrate acidity, of these compounds, resulting in incomplete and erroneous predictions as to their environmental behavior. In the current work, DFT calculations suggest that all PFAlds will be dominantly present as the hydrated form in aqueous solution. Both SPARC and DFT calculations suggest that FTAlds will not likely be substantially hydrated in aquatic systems or in vivo. PFAld hydrates are expected to have pKa values in the range of phenols (ca. 9 to 10), whereas n:2 FTAld hydrates are expected to have pKa values ca. 2 to 3 units higher (ca. 12 to 13). In order to avoid spurious modeling predictions and a fundamental misunderstanding of their fate, the molecular and/or dissociated hydrate forms of PFAlds and FTAlds need to be explicitly considered in environmental, toxicological, and waste treatment investigations. The results of the current study will facilitate a more complete examination of the environmental fate of PFAlds and FTAlds. PMID:26980678

  5. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  6. Properties of equilibrium carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, V. P.; Gorodetskii, E. E.; Podnek, V. E.; Grigoriev, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    Specific heat capacity, dissociation heat and hydration number of carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium are determined by adiabatic calorimetry method. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range 250-290 K and in pressure range 1-5 MPa. The measured specific heat of the hydrate is approximately 2.7 J/(g K), which is significantly larger than the specific heat of methane hydrate. In particular, at heating, larger value of the specific heat of carbon dioxide hydrate is a result of gas emission from the hydrate. The hydration number at the hydrate-gas coexistence changes from 6.2 to 6.9. The dissociation heat of carbon dioxide hydrate varies from the 55 kJ/mol near the upper quadruple point to the 57 kJ/mol near the lower quadruple point.

  7. Probing mechanical properties of fully hydrated gels and biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Constantinides, Georgios; Kalcioglu, Z Ilke; McFarland, Meredith; Smith, James F; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2008-11-14

    A longstanding challenge in accurate mechanical characterization of engineered and biological tissues is maintenance of both stable sample hydration and high instrument signal resolution. Here, we describe the modification of an instrumented indenter to accommodate nanomechanical characterization of biological and synthetic tissues in liquid media, and demonstrate accurate acquisition of force-displacement data that can be used to extract viscoelastoplastic properties of hydrated gels and tissues. We demonstrate the validity of this approach via elastoplastic analysis of relatively stiff, water-insensitive materials of elastic moduli E>1000 kPa (borosilicate glass and polypropylene), and then consider the viscoelastic response and representative mechanical properties of compliant, synthetic polymer hydrogels (polyacrylamide-based hydrogels of varying mol%-bis crosslinker) and biological tissues (porcine skin and liver) of E<500 kPa. Indentation responses obtained via loading/unloading hystereses and contact creep loading were highly repeatable, and the inferred E were in good agreement with available macroscopic data for all samples. As expected, increased chemical crosslinking of polyacrylamide increased stiffness (E40 kPa) and decreased creep compliance. E of porcine liver (760 kPa) and skin (222 kPa) were also within the range of macroscopic measurements reported for a limited subset of species and disease states. These data show that instrumented indentation of fully immersed samples can be reliably applied for materials spanning several orders of magnitude in stiffness (E=kPa-GPa). These capabilities are particularly important to materials design and characterization of macromolecules, cells, explanted tissues, and synthetic extracellular matrices as a function of spatial position, degree of hydration, or hydrolytic/enzymatic/corrosion reaction times. PMID:18922534

  8. Synthesis of New Hydrated Geranylphenols and in Vitro Antifungal Activity against Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Mauricio; Espinoza, Luis; Chávez, María I.; Díaz, Katy; Olea, Andrés F.; Taborga, Lautaro

    2016-01-01

    Geranylated hydroquinones and other geranylated compounds isolated from Aplydium species have shown interesting biological activities. This fact has prompted a number of studies where geranylated phenol derivatives have been synthesized in order to assay their bioactivities. In this work, we report the synthesis of a series of new hydrated geranylphenols using two different synthetic approaches and their inhibitory effects on the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea. Five new hydrated geranylphenols were obtained by direct coupling reaction between geraniol and phenol in dioxane/water and using BF3·Et2O as the catalyst or by the reaction of a geranylated phenol with BF3·Et2O. Two new geranylated quinones were also obtained. The synthesis and structural elucidation of all new compounds is presented. All hydrated geranylphenols efficiently inhibit the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Their activity is higher than that observed for non-hydrated compounds. These results indicate that structural modification on the geranyl chain brings about an enhancement of the inhibition effect of geranylated phenol derivatives. PMID:27271604

  9. Synthesis of New Hydrated Geranylphenols and in Vitro Antifungal Activity against Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Soto, Mauricio; Espinoza, Luis; Chávez, María I; Díaz, Katy; Olea, Andrés F; Taborga, Lautaro

    2016-01-01

    Geranylated hydroquinones and other geranylated compounds isolated from Aplydium species have shown interesting biological activities. This fact has prompted a number of studies where geranylated phenol derivatives have been synthesized in order to assay their bioactivities. In this work, we report the synthesis of a series of new hydrated geranylphenols using two different synthetic approaches and their inhibitory effects on the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea. Five new hydrated geranylphenols were obtained by direct coupling reaction between geraniol and phenol in dioxane/water and using BF₃·Et₂O as the catalyst or by the reaction of a geranylated phenol with BF₃·Et₂O. Two new geranylated quinones were also obtained. The synthesis and structural elucidation of all new compounds is presented. All hydrated geranylphenols efficiently inhibit the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Their activity is higher than that observed for non-hydrated compounds. These results indicate that structural modification on the geranyl chain brings about an enhancement of the inhibition effect of geranylated phenol derivatives. PMID:27271604

  10. High-Altitude Hydration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  11. Very early age concrete hydration characterization monitoring using piezoceramic based smart aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Qingzhao; Hou, Shuang; Ji, Qing; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing

    2013-08-01

    Very early age (0-20 h) concrete hydration is a complicated chemical reaction. During the very early age period, the concrete condition dramatically changes from liquid state to solid state. This paper presents the authors’ recent research on monitoring very early age concrete hydration characterization by using piezoceramic based smart aggregates. The smart aggregate (SA) transducer is designed as a sandwich structure using two marble blocks and a pre-soldered lead zirconate titanate (PZT) patch. Based on the electromechanical property of piezo materials, the PZT patches function as both actuators and sensors. In addition, the marble blocks provide reliable protection to the fragile PZT patch and develop the SA into a robust embedded actuator or sensor in the structure. The active-sensing approach, which involved a pair of smart aggregates with one as an actuator and the other one as a sensor, was applied in this paper’s experimental investigation of concrete hydration characterization monitoring. In order to completely understand the hydration condition of the inhomogeneous, over-cluttering, high-scattering characteristics of concrete (specifically of very early concrete), a swept sine wave and several constant frequency sine waves were chosen and produced by a function generator to excite the embedded actuating smart aggregate. The PZT vibration induced ultrasonic wave propagated through the concrete and was sent to the other smart aggregate sensor. The electrical signal transferred from the smart aggregate sensor was recorded during the test. As the concrete hydration reaction was occurring, the characteristic of the electrical signal continuously changed. This paper describes the successful investigation of the three states (the fluid state, the transition state, and the hardened state) of very early age concrete hydration based on classification of the received electrical signal. Specifically, the amplitude and frequency response of the electrical signal

  12. Mass transfer and trace element redistribution during hydration of granulites in the Bergen Arcs, Norway.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Stephen; Austrheim, Håkon; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The Bergen Arcs located on the Western coast of Norway are characterized by Precambrian granulite facies rocks partially hydrated at amphibolite and eclogite facies conditions. Over an area of ca. 1000 km², relict of granulite facies lenses make up only ca. 10% of the observed outcrops. At Hilland Radöy, granulite displays sharp hydration fronts across which the granulite facies assemblage composed of garnet (55%) and clinopyroxene (45%) is replaced by an amphibolite facies mineralogy defined by chlorite, epidote and amphibole. The major element bulk composition does not change significantly across the hydration front, apart from the volatile components (loss on ignition, LOI) that increases from 0.17 wt.% in the granulite to 2.43 wt.% in the amphibolite (Centrella et al., 2015). The replacements of garnet and clinopyroxene are pseudomorphic indicating a perfect preservation of the parent crystal shape. The textural evolution during the replacement is consistent with the coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism where garnet is replaced by chlorite, epidote and pargasite and clinopyroxene by hornblende and quartz. Based on the observations of an isovolumetric replacement, the mass loss during hydration was estimated at 13%. This study is based on the trace element redistribution during the hydration using the same samples as Centrella et al. (2015). The local mass transfer during the replacement process determined from the major element is also confirmed by the trace element redistribution. The LILE, HFSE and REE losses and gains in replacing the garnet are approximately balanced by the opposite gains and losses associated with the replacement of clinopyroxene. Because the hydration involves reduction of rock density, the volume preservation (isovolumetric reaction), together with the mass balance calculations, requires a significant loss of the mass of the rock to the fluid phase: 13% based on the major element redistribution and around 20% based on the REE

  13. GH-3PAD - a new numerical solver for multiphase transport in porous media - new insights on gas hydrate and free gas co-existence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwicz, E.; Rupke, L.; Wallmann, K.

    2013-12-01

    Gas Hydrate-3 Phase Advanced Dynamics (GH-3PAD) code has been developed to study the geophysical and biochemical processes associated with gas hydrate as well as free methane gas formation and dissolution in marine sediments. Biochemical processes influencing in-situ organic carbon decay and, therefore, gas hydrate formation, such as Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM), sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis have been considered. The new model assumes a Lagrangian reference frame that is attached to the deposited sedimentary layers, which compact according to their individual lithological properties. Differential motion of the pore fluids and free gas is modeled as Darcy flow. Gas hydrate and free gas formation is either controlled by 1) instant gas hydrate crystallization assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium or by a 2) kinetically controlled rate of gas hydrate growth. The thermal evolution is computed from an energy equation that includes contributions from all phases present in the model (sediment grains, saline pore fluids, gas hydrate, and free gas). A first application of the GH-3PAD model has been the Blake Ridge Site, offshore South Carolina. Here seismic and well data points to the out-of-equilibrium co-existence of gas hydrate and free gas. It has been reported that these two distinct phases appear within sediment column with a gaseous phase tending to migrate upwards throughout the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (GHSZ) until it reaches the seafloor despite relatively low gas hydrate content (4 - 7 vol. % after Paull et al., 1996). With the GH-3PAD model we quantify the complex transport- reaction processes that control three phase (gas hydrate, free gas, and dissolved CH4) out-of-equilibrium state. References: Paull C. K., Matsumoto R., Wallace P. J., 1996. 9. Site 997, Shipboard Scientific Party. Proceeding of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports, Vol. 164.

  14. Study on propane-butane gas storage by hydrate technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Wijayanti, Widya; Widhiyanuriyawan, Denny

    2016-03-01

    Different technology has been applied to store and transport gas fuel. In this work the storage of gas mixture of propane-butane by hydrate technology was studied. The investigation was done on the effect of crystallizer rotation speed on the formation of propane-butane hydrate. The hydrates were formed using crystallizer with rotation speed of 100, 200, and 300 rpm. The formation of gas hydrates was done at initial pressure of 3 bar and temperature of 274K. The results indicated that the higher rotation speed was found to increase the formation rate of propane-butane hydrate and improve the hydrates stability.

  15. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  16. Hydrate problems in pipelines: A study from Norwegian continental waters

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, D.; Larsen, R.; Lund, A.; Thomsen, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate and SINTEF to identify hydrate problems occurring in pipelines on the Norwegian continental shelf. A brief review of hydrate dissociation theory is given. Three major techniques for hydrate removal are discussed, as well as hazards related to hydrate plug removal. Questionnaire answers from 15 companies operating in Norwegian waters show three specific occurrences of hydrate plugs in the North Sea. Problems from other geographical areas are also discussed. Hydrate problems are reported for a wide variety of pipe lengths, diameters, profiles, insulations characteristics and fluids. Most problems occur during normal operation.

  17. Gas storage through impermeation of porous media by hydrate formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzikiriakos, S.G.; Englezos, P.

    1994-12-31

    A mathematical model was developed for the simulation of the methane hydrate formation in a homocline. The rate of hydrate growth was computed by calculating the movement of the hydrate-water interface. This movement was found to be very slow (less than 0.01 mm/hr) and strongly dependent on the value of the effective diffusivity of the gas in the hydrate zone. The temperature at the hydrate-water interface was found to remain practically constant. Finally, the simulations indicate that the development of a hydrate barrier in the permeable formation creates favorable gas storage conditions in the homocline.

  18. Nucleation and Growth of Gas Hydrate in Natural Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, S. A.; Osegovic, J. P.; Young, J. C.; Max, M. D.; Ames, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Large-scale nucleation of gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas and seawater are brought together under suitable pressure-temperature conditions or where dissolved hydrate-forming gas in saturated or near-saturated seawater is chilled or brought to higher pressures. Profuse formation of hydrate shells on gas bubbles and nucleation of at least five different forms of gas hydrate have been achieved in fresh natural seawater. Growth of masses of solid gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas reactant dissolved in seawater is brought into the vicinity of the hydrate. The gas concentration of the enriched water in the vicinity of hydrate is higher than the hydrate equilibrium gas concentration. Hydrate growth under these conditions is accelerated due to the chemical potential difference between the enriched water and the hydrate crystals, which induces mass flux of dissolved hydrate forming gas into new hydrate crystals. As long as water enriched in the hydrate-forming gas is circulated into the vicinity of the hydrate, growth proceeds into the water space. Experimental approaches for growth of examples of solid masses of hydrate are presented. Results of these experiments provide an insight into the growth of gas hydrate under natural conditions where interstitial water in marine sediments is captured by burial from open seawater, and where solid gas hydrate forms on the seafloor. By using fresh natural seawater, which is a chemically and materially complex fluid, our experiments in pressurized, refrigerated reactors should closely track the growth history of solid hydrate in the natural environment. In our model for hydrate growth in sediments, nearly complete pore fill by diagenetic hydrate can best be accomplished by nucleation of hydrate at a point source within the pore water or at a particular point on sediment particulate, with growth outward into the water space that is refreshed with ground water having high concentrations of hydrate

  19. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  1. Proton hydrates as soft ion/ion proton transfer reagents for multiply deprotonated biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Jeremiah J.; Hodges, Brittany D. M.; Saad, Ola M.; Leary, Julie A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-10-01

    Ion/ion proton transfer from protonated strong gaseous bases such as pyridine and 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (i.e., the proton sponge), to multiply charged anions derived from a sulfated pentasaccharide drug, Arixtra(TM), gives rise to extensive fragmentation of the oligosaccharide. This drug serves as a model for sulfated glycosaminoglycans, an important class of polymers in glycobiology. The extent of fragmentation appears to correlate with the proton affinity of the molecule used to transfer the proton, which in turn correlates with the reaction exothermicity. Consistent with tandem mass spectrometry results, anions with sodium counter-ions are more stable with respect to fragmentation under ion/ion proton transfer conditions than ions of the same charge state with protons counter-ions. Proton hydrates were found to give rise to much less anion fragmentation and constitute the softest protonation agents thus far identified for manipulating the charge states of multiply charged biopolymer anions. The reaction exothermicities associated with proton hydrates comprised of five or more water molecules are lower than that for protonated proton sponge, which is among the softest reagents thus far examined for ion/ion proton transfer reactions. The partitioning of ion/ion reaction exothermicity among all of the degrees of freedom of the products may also differ for proton hydrates relative to protonated molecules. However, a difference in energy partitioning need not be invoked to rationalize the results reported here.

  2. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Deschner, Florian; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank; Neubauer, Jürgen

    2013-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  3. Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard?

    PubMed

    Maslin, Mark; Owen, Matthew; Betts, Richard; Day, Simon; Dunkley Jones, Tom; Ridgwell, Andrew

    2010-05-28

    Gas hydrates are ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas; the most common gas is methane. Gas hydrates are stable under high pressures and relatively low temperatures and are found underneath the oceans and in permafrost regions. Estimates range from 500 to 10,000 giga tonnes of carbon (best current estimate 1600-2000 GtC) stored in ocean sediments and 400 GtC in Arctic permafrost. Gas hydrates may pose a serious geohazard in the near future owing to the adverse effects of global warming on the stability of gas hydrate deposits both in ocean sediments and in permafrost. It is still unknown whether future ocean warming could lead to significant methane release, as thermal penetration of marine sediments to the clathrate-gas interface could be slow enough to allow a new equilibrium to occur without any gas escaping. Even if methane gas does escape, it is still unclear how much of this could be oxidized in the overlying ocean. Models of the global inventory of hydrates and trapped methane bubbles suggest that a global 3( degrees )C warming could release between 35 and 940 GtC, which could add up to an additional 0.5( degrees )C to global warming. The destabilization of gas hydrate reserves in permafrost areas is more certain as climate models predict that high-latitude regions will be disproportionately affected by global warming with temperature increases of over 12( degrees )C predicted for much of North America and Northern Asia. Our current estimates of gas hydrate storage in the Arctic region are, however, extremely poor and non-existent for Antarctica. The shrinking of both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in response to regional warming may also lead to destabilization of gas hydrates. As ice sheets shrink, the weight removed allows the coastal region and adjacent continental slope to rise through isostacy. This removal of hydrostatic pressure could destabilize gas hydrates, leading to massive slope failure, and may increase the risk of

  4. Characterization of Gas-Hydrate Sediment: In Situ Evaluation of Hydrate Saturation in Pores of Pressured Sedimental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Kida, M.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrate saturation of gas-hydrate bearing sediment is a key of gas production from natural gas-hydrate reservoir. Developable natural gas-hydrates by conventional gas/oil production apparatus almost exist in unconsolidated sedimental layer. Generally, hydrate saturations of sedimental samples are directly estimated by volume of gas generated from dissociation of gas hydrates in pore spaces, porosity data and volume of the sediments. Furthermore, hydrate saturation can be also assessed using velocity of P-wave through sedimental samples. Nevertheless, hydrate saturation would be changed by morphological variations (grain-coating, cementing and pore-filling model) of gas hydrates in pore spaces. Jin et al.[1,2] recently observed the O-H stretching bands of H2O molecules of methane hydrate in porous media using an attenuated total reflection IR (ATR-IR) spectra. They observed in situ hydrate formation/dissociation process in sandy samples (Tohoku Keisya number 8, grain size of ca. 110 μm). In this presentation, we present IR spectroscopy approach to in situ evaluation of hydrate saturation of pressured gas-hydrate sediments. This work was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan. [1] Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J. Energy Fules, 2012, 26, 2242-2247. [2] Jin, Y.; Oyama, H.; Nagao, J. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 48, No. 108001.

  5. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries. PMID:26781172

  6. Novel Hydrogen Hydrate Structures under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Lyakhov, Andriy O.; Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Xiao

    2014-07-01

    Gas hydrates are systems of prime importance. In particular, hydrogen hydrates are potential materials of icy satellites and comets, and may be used for hydrogen storage. We explore the H2O-H2 system at pressures in the range 0-100 GPa with ab initio variable-composition evolutionary simulations. According to our calculation and previous experiments, the H2O-H2 system undergoes a series of transformations with pressure, and adopts the known open-network clathrate structures (sII, C0), dense ``filled ice'' structures (C1, C2) and two novel hydrate phases. One of these is based on the hexagonal ice framework and has the same H2O:H2 ratio (2:1) as the C0 phase at low pressures and similar enthalpy (we name this phase Ih-C0). The other newly predicted hydrate phase has a 1:2 H2O:H2 ratio and structure based on cubic ice. This phase (which we name C3) is predicted to be thermodynamically stable above 38 GPa when including van der Waals interactions and zero-point vibrational energy, and explains previously mysterious experimental X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements. This is the hydrogen-richest hydrate and this phase has a remarkable gravimetric density (18 wt.%) of easily extractable hydrogen.

  7. Dynamical Disorder in the DNA Hydration Shell.

    PubMed

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Fogarty, Aoife C; Hynes, James T; Laage, Damien

    2016-06-22

    The reorientation and hydrogen-bond dynamics of water molecules within the hydration shell of a B-DNA dodecamer, which are of interest for many of its biochemical functions, are investigated via molecular dynamics simulations and an analytic jump model, which provide valuable new molecular level insights into these dynamics. Different sources of heterogeneity in the hydration shell dynamics are determined. First, a pronounced spatial heterogeneity is found at the DNA interface and explained via the jump model by the diversity in local DNA interfacial topographies and DNA-water H-bond interactions. While most of the hydration shell is moderately retarded with respect to the bulk, some water molecules confined in the narrow minor groove exhibit very slow dynamics. An additional source of heterogeneity is found to be caused by the DNA conformational fluctuations, which modulate the water dynamics. The groove widening aids the approach of, and the jump to, a new water H-bond partner. This temporal heterogeneity is especially strong in the minor groove, where groove width fluctuations occur on the same time scale as the water H-bond rearrangements, leading to a strong dynamical disorder. The usual simplifying assumption that hydration shell dynamics is much faster than DNA dynamics is thus not valid; our results show that biomolecular conformational fluctuations are essential to facilitate the water motions and accelerate the hydration dynamics in confined groove sites. PMID:27240107

  8. Fragmentation and hydration of tektites and microtektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, B.P.; Muenow, D.W.; Bohor, B.F.; Meeker, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    An examination of data collected over the last 30 years indicates that the percent of glass fragments vs. whole splash forms in the Cenozoic microtektite strewn fields increases towards the source crater (or source region). We propose that this is due to thermal stress produced when tektites and larger microtektites fall into water near the source crater while still relatively hot (>1150 ??C). We also find evidence (low major oxide totals, frothing when melted) for hydration of most of the North American tektite fragments and microtektites found in marine sediments. High-temperature mass spectrometry indicates that these tektite fragments and microtektites contain up to 3.8 wt% H2O. The H2O-release behavior during the high-temperature mass-spectrometric analysis, plus high Cl abundances (???0.05 wt%), indicate that the North. American tektite fragments and microtektites were hydrated in the marine environment (i.e., the H2O was not trapped solely on quenching from a melt). The younger Ivory Coast and Australasian microtektites do not exhibit much evidence of hydration (at least not in excess of 0.5 wt% H2O); this suggests that the degree of hydration increases with age. In addition, we find that some glass spherules (with 65 wt% SiO2 can undergo simple hydration in the marine environment, while impact glasses (with <65 wt% SiO2) can also undergo palagonitization.

  9. Novel hydrogen hydrate structures under pressure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Lyakhov, Andriy O; Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem R; Dong, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Gas hydrates are systems of prime importance. In particular, hydrogen hydrates are potential materials of icy satellites and comets, and may be used for hydrogen storage. We explore the H₂O-H₂ system at pressures in the range 0-100 GPa with ab initio variable-composition evolutionary simulations. According to our calculation and previous experiments, the H₂O-H₂ system undergoes a series of transformations with pressure, and adopts the known open-network clathrate structures (sII, C₀), dense "filled ice" structures (C₁, C₂) and two novel hydrate phases. One of these is based on the hexagonal ice framework and has the same H₂O:H₂ ratio (2:1) as the C₀ phase at low pressures and similar enthalpy (we name this phase Ih-C₀). The other newly predicted hydrate phase has a 1:2 H₂O:H₂ ratio and structure based on cubic ice. This phase (which we name C₃) is predicted to be thermodynamically stable above 38 GPa when including van der Waals interactions and zero-point vibrational energy, and explains previously mysterious experimental X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements. This is the hydrogen-richest hydrate and this phase has a remarkable gravimetric density (18 wt.%) of easily extractable hydrogen. PMID:25001502

  10. On the structure selectivity of clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2011-06-30

    We propose a strategic method to search for a new clathrate hydrate by investigating the selectivity of its crystalline structure, which has been expected to depend mostly on the guest species and less on the thermodynamic conditions. Relative stability among various morphologies is examined in terms of the chemical potential of water of clathrate hydrates in equilibrium with guest gases. This evaluation is performed by calculating the free energy of cage occupancy according to the standard statistical mechanical theory with the aid of the Yarmolyuk and Kripyakevich's rule on the Frank-Kasper type alloys to estimate the numbers of cages of various types. Thus, a comprehensive interpretation of the selectivity of crystalline structures is successfully made. We explain why two major structures are stable in most of the thermodynamic conditions and establish a relation between polymorphism of clathrate hydrate and the guest size and other parameters, thereby suggesting a way to find a new clathrate hydrate by appropriate choice of the guest species and/or the thermodynamic properties. It is found that there is a small room in the above parameter space for the other structure than the major two to be the most stable, including a new structure. In addition, simple but thorough elucidation is given for preferential formation of TS-I structure in bromine hydrate. PMID:21619053

  11. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  12. Intrinsic Hydration of Uranyl-Hydroxide, -Nitrate and -Acetate Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Winnie Chien; Dorothy Hanna; Victor Anbalagan; Garold Gresham; Gary Groenewold; Michael Van Stipdonk

    2004-06-01

    The intrinsic hydration of three monopositive uranyl-anion complexes (UO2A)+ (where A = acetate, nitrate, or hydroxide) was investigated using ion-trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). The relative rates for the formation of the monohydrates [(UO2A)(H2O)]+, with respect to the anion, followed the trend: Acetate = nitrate >> hydroxide. This finding was rationalized in terms of the donation of electron density by the strongly basic OH- to the uranyl metal center, thereby reducing the Lewis acidity of U and its propensity to react with incoming nucleophiles, viz., H2O. An alternative explanation is that the more complex acetate and nitrate anions provide increased degrees of freedom that could accommodate excess energy from the hydration reaction. The monohydrates also reacted with water, forming dihydrates and then trihydrates. The rates for formation of the nitrate and acetate dihydrates [(UO2A)(H2O)2]+ were very similar to the rates for formation of the monohydrates; the presence of the first H2O ligand had no influence on the addition of the second. In contrast, formation of the [(UO2OH)(H2O)2]+ was nearly three times faster than the formation of the monohydrate.

  13. Methane flux in gas hydrate potential area offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. F.; Hu, C.; Chuang, P.; Chen, N.; Chen, C.; Lin, S.; Wang, Y.; Chung, S.; Chen, P.

    2012-12-01

    The widely distributed BSRs imply the existence of potential gas hydrates in offshore southwestern Taiwan. To better constrain the gas sources in this area, in total 22 cores have been collected from different tectonic environments in offshore SW Taiwan during the r/v Marion Dufresne 178 cruise, including 17 giant piston cores, 4 CASQ box cores, and 1 gravity core. The results show that the major gas is methane with very few ethane and carbon dioxide. It indicates they are mostly biogenic source in origin. However, some gas samples from active margin do also exhibit heavier carbon isotopic compositions, which range from -40 to -60 permil and are similar with the gas composition of inland mud volcanoes of SW Taiwan. It implies that there is also thermogenic gas source in this region. Total changes of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) fluxes (ΔDIC-Prod ) can be used to estimate the methane flux quantitatively, and we confirm that the sulfate depletion is mainly controlled by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) reaction and/or the sedimentary organic matter. Although BSRs are widely distributed both in the active margin and in the passive margin, the methane fluxes in active margin are greater than in passive margin of the coring sites. All the estimated methane fluxes in offshore SW Taiwan are higher than other gas hydrate and upwelling area.

  14. Use of X-ray diffraction to quantify amorphous supplementary cementitious materials in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, R.; Salze, A.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-10-15

    The content of individual amorphous supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements was quantified by the PONKCS [1] X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The analytical precision and accuracy of the method were assessed through comparison to a series of mixes of known phase composition and of increasing complexity. A 2σ precision smaller than 2–3 wt.% and an accuracy better than 2 wt.% were achieved for SCMs in mixes with quartz, anhydrous Portland cement, and hydrated Portland cement. The extent of reaction of SCMs in hydrating binders measured by XRD was 1) internally consistent as confirmed through the standard addition method and 2) showed a linear correlation to the cumulative heat release as measured independently by isothermal conduction calorimetry. The advantages, limitations and applicability of the method are discussed with reference to existing methods that measure the degree of reaction of SCMs in blended cements.

  15. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  16. Quantifying hydrate solidification front advancing using method of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; DiCarlo, David; Flemings, Peter B.

    2015-10-01

    We develop a one-dimensional analytical solution based on the method of characteristics to explore hydrate formation from gas injection into brine-saturated sediments within the hydrate stability zone. Our solution includes fully coupled multiphase and multicomponent flow and the associated advective transport in a homogeneous system. Our solution shows that hydrate saturation is controlled by the initial thermodynamic state of the system and changed by the gas fractional flow. Hydrate saturation in gas-rich systems can be estimated by 1-cl0/cle when Darcy flow dominates, where cl0 is the initial mass fraction of salt in brine, and cle is the mass fraction of salt in brine at three-phase (gas, liquid, and hydrate) equilibrium. Hydrate saturation is constant, gas saturation and gas flux decrease, and liquid saturation and liquid flux increase with the distance from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front. The total gas and liquid flux is constant from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front and decreases abruptly at the hydrate solidification front due to gas inclusion into the hydrate phase. The advancing velocity of the hydrate solidification front decreases with hydrate saturation at a fixed gas inflow rate. This analytical solution illuminates how hydrate is formed by gas injection (methane, CO2, ethane, propane) at both the laboratory and field scales.

  17. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  18. Natural Gas Hydrates as CH4 Source and CO2 Sink - What do SO2 Impurities do?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeskow-Strauch, B.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Erzinger, J.

    2009-04-01

    The large amounts of gas hydrates stored in natural reservoirs are thought to be a promising future energy source. The recently discussed idea of methane extraction from these formations, together with the subsequent storage of CO2 in form of gas hydrates is an elegant approach to bring forward. A number of experiments have been performed on lab scale showing the replacement of CH4 by CO2 and vice versa. For instance, Graue and Kvamme (2006) demonstrated with Magnetic Resonance Images of core plug experiments the possibility of CH4 extraction by using liquid CO2. Laser Raman investigations of Schicks et al. (2007) showed, on the other hand, the ineffectiveness and slowness of the CH4 exchange reaction with gaseous CO2. After 120 hours, only 20% CH4 were exchanged for CO2. Natural methane hydrates which include often higher hydrocarbons tend to be even more stable than pure methane hydrates (Schicks et al., 2006). Contrary to lab conditions, industrial emitted CO2 contains - despite much effort to clean it - traces of impurities. For instance, CO2 emitted from the state-of-the-art Vattenfall Oxyfuel pilot plant in Schwarze Pumpe should reach a quality of >99.7% CO2 but still contains small amounts of N2, Ar, O2, SOx and NOx (pers. comm. Dr. Rolland). Here we present a microscopic and laser Raman study in a p-T range of 1 to 4 MPa and 271 to 280K focussing on CO2 hydrate formation and CH4-exchange reaction in the presence of 1% SO2. The experiments have been performed in a small-scale cryocell. The Raman spectra show that CO2 and SO2 occupy both large and small cages of the hydrate lattice. SO2 occurs strongly enriched in the hydrate clathrate, compared to its concentration in the feed gas which causes a strong acidification of the liquid phase after hydrate dissociation. Our study reveals that the hydrate formation rate from impure CO2 is similar to that of pure CO2 hydrate but that the stability of the CO2-SO2-hydrate exceeds that of pure CO2 hydrate. The improved

  19. Curvature Dependence of Hydrophobic Hydration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, R. Gregor; Heyden, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the solute curvature dependence of water dynamics in the vicinity of hydrophobic spherical solutes using molecular dynamics simulations. For both the lateral and perpendicular diffusivity, as well as for H-bond kinetics of water in the first hydration shell, we find a nonmonotonic solute-size dependence, exhibiting extrema close to the well-known structural crossover length scale for hydrophobic hydration. Additionally, we find an apparent anomalous diffusion for water moving parallel to the surface of small solutes, which, however, can be explained by topology effects. Our findings regarding the intimate connection between solute curvature and water dynamics has implications for our understanding of hydration dynamics at heterogeneous biomolecular surfaces.

  20. Method for production of hydrocarbons from hydrates

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Patrick L.

    1984-01-01

    A method of recovering natural gas entrapped in frozen subsurface gas hydrate formations in arctic regions. A hot supersaturated solution of CaCl.sub.2 or CaBr.sub.2, or a mixture thereof, is pumped under pressure down a wellbore and into a subsurface hydrate formation so as to hydrostatically fracture the formation. The CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 solution dissolves the solid hydrates and thereby releases the gas entrapped therein. Additionally, the solution contains a polymeric viscosifier, which operates to maintain in suspension finely divided crystalline CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 that precipitates from the supersaturated solution as it is cooled during injection into the formation.

  1. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  2. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  3. Relaxation mechanism of the hydrated electron.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Madeline H; Williams, Holly L; Shreve, Alexander T; Neumark, Daniel M

    2013-12-20

    The relaxation dynamics of the photoexcited hydrated electron have been subject to conflicting interpretations. Here, we report time-resolved photoelectron spectra of hydrated electrons in a liquid microjet with the aim of clarifying ambiguities from previous experiments. A sequence of three ultrashort laser pulses (~100 femtosecond duration) successively created hydrated electrons by charge-transfer-to-solvent excitation of dissolved anions, electronically excited these electrons via the s→p transition, and then ejected them into vacuum. Two distinct transient signals were observed. One was assigned to the initially excited p-state with a lifetime of ~75 femtoseconds, and the other, with a lifetime of ~400 femtoseconds, was attributed to s-state electrons just after internal conversion in a nonequilibrated solvent environment. These assignments support the nonadiabatic relaxation model. PMID:24357314

  4. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  5. Aggregation of Calcium Silicate Hydrate Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Delhorme, Maxime; Labbez, Christophe; Turesson, Martin; Lesniewska, Eric; Woodward, Cliff E; Jönsson, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We study the aggregation of calcium silicate hydrate nanoplatelets on a surface by means of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main component formed in cement and is responsible for the strength of the material. The hydrate is formed in early cement paste and grows to form platelets on the nanoscale, which aggregate either on dissolving cement particles or on auxiliary particles. The general result is that the experimentally observed variations in these dynamic processes generically called growth can be rationalized from interaction free energies, that is, from pure thermodynamic arguments. We further show that the surface charge density of the particles determines the aggregate structures formed by C-S-H and thus their growth modes. PMID:26859614

  6. Luminescence and ESR studies of relationships between O(-)-centres and structural iron in natural and synthetically hydrated kaolinites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Costanzo, P. M.; Theng, B. K.

    1989-01-01

    Luminescence, induced by dehydration and by wetting with hydrazine and unsymmetrically substituted hydrazine, and related ESR spectra have been observed from several kaolinites, synthetically hydrated kaolinites, and metahalloysites. The amine-wetting luminescence results suggest that intercalation, not a chemiluminescence reaction, is the luminescence trigger. Correlation between hydration-induced luminescence and g = 2 ESR signals associated with O(-)-centres in several natural halloysites, and concurrent diminution of the intensity of both these signal types as a function of aging in two 8.4 angstroms synthetically hydrated, kaolinites, confirm a previously-reported relationship between the luminescence induced by dehydration and in the presence of O(-)-centres (holes, i.e., electron vacancies) in the tetrahedral sheet. Furthermore, the ESR spectra of the 8.4 angstroms hydrate showed a concurrent change in the line shape of the g = 4 signal from a shape usually associated with structural Fe in an ordered kaolinite, to a simpler one typically observed in more disordered kaolinite, halloysite, and montmorillonite. Either structural Fe centres and the O(-)-centres interact, or both are subject to factors previously associated with degree of order. The results question the long-term stability of the 8.4 angstroms hydrate, although XRD does not indicate interlayer collapse over this period. Complex inter-relationships are shown between intercalation, stored energy, structural Fe, and the degree of hydration which may be reflected in catalytic as well as spectroscopic properties of the clays.

  7. Tuning of crystal phase structure in hydrated WO3 nanoparticles under wet chemical conditions and studies on their photochromic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songara, Sandhya; Gupta, Vatsana; Kumar Patra, Manoj; Singh, Jitendra; Saini, Lokesh; Siddaramana Gowd, Genekehal; Raj Vadera, Sampat; Kumar, Narendra

    2012-07-01

    Hydrated tungsten oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized using a simple wet chemical method while varying the concentration of HCl. XRD studies show that the variation in HCl concentration from 1 M to 6 M in the reaction results into gradual change in crystal structure of hydrated WO3 from hexagonal (WO3·0.33H2O) to pure orthorhombic (WO3·H2O), through a series of samples with mixed phase of the two indifferent ratios. The similar variations in the degree of hydration and phase variations have also been observed from Raman, FTIR and TGA studies. The average crystallite size of the hydrated WO3 particles was estimated to be ∼26 nm from XRD line broadening and AFM studies showed the formation of spherical shaped particles for all the samples. The photochromic studies were carried out on the composite films of these materials in the polymeric matrix of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) while exposing to UV light. The composite films show interesting variations in the photochromic behavior depending on the crystal structure of hydrated WO3 filler. The photochromic behavior has been explained on the basis of EPR spectra of hydrated WO3.

  8. SURFACE REACTIONS OF OXIDES OF SULFUR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface reactions of several sulfur-containing molecules have been studied in order to understand the mechanism by which sulfate ions are formed on atmospheric aerosols. At 25C the heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 by NO2 to sulfuric acid and sulfate ions occurred on hydrated silica...

  9. Mapping the hydration dynamics of ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Nathaniel V; Pometun, Maxim S; Wand, A Joshua

    2011-08-17

    The nature of water's interaction with biomolecules such as proteins has been difficult to examine in detail at atomic resolution. Solution NMR spectroscopy is potentially a powerful method for characterizing both the structural and temporal aspects of protein hydration but has been plagued by artifacts. Encapsulation of the protein of interest within the aqueous core of a reverse micelle particle results in a general slowing of water dynamics, significant reduction in hydrogen exchange chemistry and elimination of contributions from bulk water thereby enabling the use of nuclear Overhauser effects to quantify interactions between the protein surface and hydration water. Here we extend this approach to allow use of dipolar interactions between hydration water and hydrogens bonded to protein carbon atoms. By manipulating the molecular reorientation time of the reverse micelle particle through use of low viscosity liquid propane, the T(1ρ) relaxation time constants of (1)H bonded to (13)C were sufficiently lengthened to allow high quality rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effects to be obtained. These data supplement previous results obtained from dipolar interactions between the protein and hydrogens bonded to nitrogen and in aggregate cover the majority of the molecular surface of the protein. A wide range of hydration dynamics is observed. Clustering of hydration dynamics on the molecular surface is also seen. Regions of long-lived hydration water correspond with regions of the protein that participate in molecular recognition of binding partners suggesting that the contribution of the solvent entropy to the entropy of binding has been maximized through evolution. PMID:21761828

  10. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  11. Experimental Study of Gas Hydrate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandino, O.; Ruffine, L.

    2011-12-01

    Important quantities of methane and other gases are trapped below the seafloor and in the permafrost by an ice-like solid, called gas hydrates or clathrate hydrates. The latter is formed when water is mixing with different gases at high pressures and low temperatures. Due to a their possible use as a source of energy [1] or the problematic related to flow assurance failure in pipelines [2] the understanding of their processes of formation/destabilisation of these structures becomes a goal for many laboratories research as well as industries. In this work we present an experimental study on the stochastic behaviour of hydrate formation from a bulk phase. The method used here for the experiments was to repeat several time the same hydrate formation procedure and to notice the different from one experiment to another. A variable-volume type high-pressure apparatus with two sapphire windows was used. This device, already presented by Ruffine et al.[3], allows us to perform both kinetics and phase equilibrium measurements. Three initial pressure conditions were considered here, 5.0 MPa, 7.5 MPa and 10.0 MPa. Hydrates have been formed, then allowed to dissociate by stepwise heating. The memory effect has also been investigated after complete dissociation. It turned out that, although the thermodynamics conditions of formation and/or destabilization were reproducible. An attempt to determine the influence of pressure on the nucleation induction time will be discussed. References 1. Sum, A. K.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D., Clathrate Hydrates: From Laboratory Science to Engineering Practice. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 2009, 48, 7457-7465. 2. Sloan, E. D., A changing hydrate paradigm-from apprehension to avoidance to risk management. Fluid Phase Equilibria 2005, 228, 67-74. 3. Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Charlou, J. L.; Cremière, A.; Zehnder, B. H., Experimental study of gas hydrate formation and destabilisation using a novel high-pressure apparatus. Marine

  12. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry; Avens, Larry R.; Trujillo, Eddie A.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  13. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  14. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  15. Natural gas: Formation of hydrates -- Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskara Rao, B.K.

    1998-07-01

    The significant growth of Natural gas based industries in India and elsewhere obviously forced the industry to hunt for new fields and sources. This has naturally led to the phenomenal growth of gas networks. The transportation of gas over thousands of kilometers through caprious ambient conditions requires a great effort. Many difficulties such as condensation of light liquids (NGLS), choking of lines due to formation of hydrates, improper distribution of gas into branches are experienced during pipe line transportation of Natural gas. The thermodynamic conditions suitable for formation of solid hydrates have been derived depending upon the constituents of natural gas. Further effects of branching in pipe line transportation have been discussed.

  16. Arctic Gas hydrate, Environment and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienert, Jurgen; Andreassen, Karin; Bünz, Stefan; Carroll, JoLynn; Ferre, Benedicte; Knies, Jochen; Panieri, Giuliana; Rasmussen, Tine; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2015-04-01

    Arctic methane hydrate exists on land beneath permafrost regions and offshore in shelf and continental margins sediments. Methane or gas hydrate, an ice-like substrate, consists mainly of light hydrocarbons (mostly methane from biogenic sources but also ethane and propane from thermogenic sources) entrapped by a rigid cage of water molecules. The pressure created by the overlying water and sediments offshore stabilizes the CH4 in continental margins at a temperature range well above freezing point; consequently CH4 exists as methane ice beneath the seabed. Though the accurate volume of Arctic methane hydrate and thus the methane stored in hydrates throughout the Quaternary is still unknown it must be enormous if one considers the vast regions of Arctic continental shelves and margins as well as permafrost areas offshore and on land. Today's subseabed methane hydrate reservoirs are the remnants from the last ice age and remain elusive targets for both unconventional energy and as a natural methane emitter influencing ocean environments and ecosystems. It is still contentious at what rate Arctic warming may govern hydrate melting, and whether the methane ascending from the ocean floor through the hydrosphere reaches the atmosphere. As indicated by Greenland ice core records, the atmospheric methane concentration rose rapidly from ca. 500 ppb to ca. 750 ppb over a short time period of just 150 years at the termination of the younger Dryas period ca. 11600 years ago, but the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor have not been documented yet (Brook et al., 2014 and references within). But with the major projected warming and sea ice melting trend (Knies et al., 2014) one may ask, for how long will CH4 stay trapped in methane hydrates if surface and deep-ocean water masses will warm and permafrost continuous to melt (Portnov et al. 2014). How much of the Arctic methane will be consumed by the micro- and macrofauna, how much will

  17. Morphology of methane hydrate host sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Eaton, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-01-01

    The morphological features including porosity and grains of methane hydrate host sediments were investigated using synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) technique. The sediment sample was obtained during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 on the Blake Ridge at water depth of 2278.5 m. The CMT experiment was performed at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source facility. The analysis gave ample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity. The method was found to be highly effective for the study of methane hydrate host sediments.

  18. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J H; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  19. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-11-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments.

  20. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  1. Copper-promoted hydration and annulation of 2-fluorophenylacetylene derivatives: from alkynes to benzo[b]furans and benzo[b]thiophenes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Liu, Xiaohang; Li, Bin; Sun, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Summary An efficient copper-promoted hydration reaction and its application in the synthesis of benzo[b]furan and benzo[b]thiophene derivatives is presented starting from readily available 2-fluorophenylacetylene derivatives. The key annulation step involves the hydration of the C–F bond of 2-fluorophenylacetylene derivatives followed by an intramolecular annulation to afford benzo[b]furan and benzo[b]thiophene derivatives. Moreover, structurally important 2,2'-bisbenzofuran scaffolds are provided in good yields. PMID:25550754

  2. Copper-promoted hydration and annulation of 2-fluorophenylacetylene derivatives: from alkynes to benzo[b]furans and benzo[b]thiophenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yibiao; Cheng, Liang; Liu, Xiaohang; Li, Bin; Sun, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An efficient copper-promoted hydration reaction and its application in the synthesis of benzo[b]furan and benzo[b]thiophene derivatives is presented starting from readily available 2-fluorophenylacetylene derivatives. The key annulation step involves the hydration of the C-F bond of 2-fluorophenylacetylene derivatives followed by an intramolecular annulation to afford benzo[b]furan and benzo[b]thiophene derivatives. Moreover, structurally important 2,2'-bisbenzofuran scaffolds are provided in good yields. PMID:25550754

  3. Modeling the Injection of Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen into a Methane Hydrate Reservoir and the Subsequent Production of Methane Gas on the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapati, N.; McGuire, P. C.; Liu, Y.; Anderson, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    injection phase, the injection well is modeled as a fixed-condition boundary maintained as a gas phase (23% CO2+ 77% N2) at 9.65 MPa and 5.5 °C. Initially, there is an increase in the saturation of hydrate indicating the formation of secondary hydrate due to the injected gas and the available free water. There is also a slight increase in the temperature due to the exothermic reaction of hydrate formation. As the hydrate becomes saturated with the injected gases it releases CH4. After the initial 14 days of injection, a mixture of the three gases was produced through depressurization. This was modeled by maintaining the well as a fixed-state boundary at the bottom-hole pressure. The amount of CH4 released from the hydrate phase during the injection and production phases and the amount of CO2 and N2 gases sequestered as hydrates have been examined in this study. A model-based history-matching of the gas flow rates from the ConocoPhillips field test will be conducted to validate the code.

  4. Anodic Oxidation in Aluminum Electrode by Using Hydrated Amorphous Aluminum Oxide Film as Solid Electrolyte under High Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Yao, Manwen; Chen, Jianwen; Su, Zhen; Peng, Yong; Zou, Pei; Yao, Xi

    2016-05-01

    Dense and nonporous amorphous aluminum oxide (AmAO) film was deposited onto platinized silicon substrate by sol-gel and spin coating technology. The evaporated aluminum film was deposited onto the AmAO film as top electrode. The hydrated AmAO film was utilized as a solid electrolyte for anodic oxidation of the aluminum electrode (Al) film under high electric field. The hydrated AmAO film was a high efficiency electrolyte, where a 45 nm thick Al film was anodized completely on a 210 nm thick hydrated AmAO film. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and breakdown phenomena of a dry and hydrated 210 nm thick AmAO film with a 150 nm thick Al electrode pad were studied in this work. Breakdown voltage of the dry and hydrated 210 nm thick AmAO film were 85 ± 3 V (405 ± 14 MV m(-1)) and 160 ± 5 V (762 ± 24 MV m(-1)), respectively. The breakdown voltage of the hydrated AmAO film increased about twice, owing to the self-healing behavior (anodic oxidation reaction). As an intuitive phenomenon of the self-healing behavior, priority anodic oxidation phenomena was observed in a 210 nm thick hydrated AmAO film with a 65 nm thick Al electrode pad. The results suggested that self-healing behavior (anodic oxidation reaction) was occurring nearby the defect regions of the films during I-V test. It was an effective electrical self-healing method, which would be able to extend to many other simple and complex oxide dielectrics and various composite structures. PMID:27070754

  5. Thermal regulation of methane hydrate dissociation: Implications for gas production models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal self-regulation of methane hydrate dissociation at pressure, temperature conditions along phase boundaries, illustrated by experiment in this report, is a significant effect with potential relevance to gas production from gas hydrate. In surroundings maintained at temperatures above the ice melting point, the temperature in the vicinity of dissociating methane hydrate will decrease because heat flow is insufficient to balance the heat absorbed by the endothermic reaction: CH4??nH2O (s) = CH4 (g) + nH2O (l). Temperature decreases until either all of the hydrate dissociates or a phase boundary is reached. At pressures above the quadruple point, the temperature-limiting phase boundary is that of the dissociation reaction itself. At lower pressures, the minimum temperature is limited by the H2O solid/liquid boundary. This change in the temperature-limiting phase boundary constrains the pressure, temperature conditions of the quadruple point for the CH4-H2O system to 2.55 ?? 0.02 MPa and 272.85 ?? 0.03 K. At pressures below the quadruple point, hydrate dissociation proceeds as the liquid H2O produced by dissociation freezes. In the laboratory experiments, dissociation is not impeded by the formation of ice byproduct per se; instead rates are proportional to the heat flow from the surroundings. This is in contrast to the extremely slow dissociation rates observed when surrounding temperatures are below the H2O solid/liquid boundary, where no liquid water is present. This "anomalous" or "self" preservation behavior, most pronounced near 268 K, cannot be accessed when surrounding temperatures are above the H2O solid/liquid boundary. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  6. Elastic properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    Downhole-measured compressional- and shear-wave velocities acquired in the Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, northwestern Canada, reveal that the dominant effect of gas hydrate on the elastic properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments is as a pore-filling constituent. As opposed to high elastic velocities predicted from a cementation theory, whereby a small amount of gas hydrate in the pore space significantly increases the elastic velocities, the velocity increase from gas hydrate saturation in the sediment pore space is small. Both the effective medium theory and a weighted equation predict a slight increase of velocities from gas hydrate concentration, similar to the field-observed velocities; however, the weighted equation more accurately describes the compressional- and shear-wave velocities of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. A decrease of Poisson's ratio with an increase in the gas hydrate concentration is similar to a decrease of Poisson's ratio with a decrease in the sediment porosity. Poisson's ratios greater than 0.33 for gas hydrate-bearing sediments imply the unconsolidated nature of gas hydrate-bearing sediments at this well site. The seismic characteristics of gas hydrate-bearing sediments at this site can be used to compare and evaluate other gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Arctic.

  7. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  8. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  9. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  10. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  11. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium...

  12. Videos of Experiments from ORNL Gas Hydrate Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gas hydrate research performed by the Environmental Sciences Division utilizes the ORNL Seafloor Process Simulator, the Parr Vessel, the Sapphire Cell, a fiber optic distributed sensing system, and Raman spectroscopy. The group studies carbon sequestration in the ocean, desalination, gas hydrates in the solar system, and nucleation and dissociation kinetics. The videos available at the gas hydrates website are very short clips from experiments.

  13. Zirconium tungstate hydroxide hydrate revisited: Crystallization dependence on halide and hydronium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Colin, Julie A. Camper, DeMarco V.; Gates, Stacy D.; Simon, Monty D. Witker, Karen L. Lind, Cora

    2007-12-15

    The formation of zirconium tungstate hydroxide hydrate, a precursor to the negative thermal expansion material cubic zirconium tungstate, shows a strong dependence on hydrothermal reaction conditions. It was found that not only the acid concentration, but also the acid counterion plays a significant role in the crystallization of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. High temperatures, high acid concentrations, and the presence of chloride or bromide ions promote the formation of well-crystallized ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. For low acid concentrations, a new zirconium tungstate hydrate polymorph is observed, which transforms to tetragonal ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O at longer reaction times. A study of crystallization kinetics in hydrochloric acid is presented. - Graphical abstract: The formation of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O shows a strong dependence on reaction conditions. Both acid concentration and acid counterion play a significant role in the crystallization. High temperatures, high acid concentrations, and the presence of chloride or bromide ions promote the formation of well-crystallized ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. For low acid concentrations, a new zirconium tungstate hydrate polymorph is observed.

  14. Formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) cement pastes using sodium hexametaphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tingting; Vandeperre, Luc J.; Cheeseman, Christopher R.

    2014-11-15

    Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel is formed by the reaction of brucite with amorphous silica during sulphate attack in concrete and M-S-H is therefore regarded as having limited cementing properties. The aim of this work was to form M-S-H pastes, characterise the hydration reactions and assess the resulting properties. It is shown that M-S-H pastes can be prepared by reacting magnesium oxide (MgO) and silica fume (SF) at low water to solid ratio using sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP) as a dispersant. Characterisation of the hydration reactions by x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis shows that brucite and M-S-H gel are formed and that for samples containing 60 wt.% SF and 40 wt.% MgO all of the brucites react with SF to form M-S-H gel. These M-S-H cement pastes were found to have compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa.

  15. When proteins are completely hydrated in crystals.

    PubMed

    Carugo, Oliviero

    2016-08-01

    In the crystalline state, protein surface patches that do not form crystal packing contacts are exposed to the solvent and one or more layers of hydration water molecules can be observed. It is well known that these water molecules cannot be observed at very low resolution, when the scarcity of experimental information precludes the observation of several parts of the protein molecule, like for example side-chains at the protein surface. On the contrary, more details are observable at high resolution. Here it is shown that it is necessary to reach a resolution of about 1.5-1.6Å to observe a continuous hydration layer at the protein surface. This contrasts previous estimations, which were more tolerant and according to which a resolution of 2.5Å was sufficient to describe at the atomic level the structure of the hydration layer. These results should prove useful in guiding a more rigorous selection of structural data to study protein hydration and in interpreting new crystal structures. PMID:27112977

  16. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  17. Hydrated Minerals on Asteroids: The Astronomical Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Howell, E. S.; Vilas, F.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the hydrated mineral inventory on the asteroids is important for deducing the origin of Earth's water, interpreting the meteorite record, and unraveling the processes occurring during the earliest times in solar system history. Reflectance spectroscopy shows absorption features in both the 0.6-0.8 and 2.5-3.5 micrometers regions, which are diagnostic of or associated with hydrated minerals. Observations in those regions show that hydrated minerals are common in the mid-asteroid belt, and can be found in unexpected spectral groupings, as well. Asteroid groups formerly associated with mineralogies assumed to have high temperature formation, such as M- and E-class asteroids, have been observed to have hydration features in their reflectance spectra. Some asteroids have apparently been heated to several hundred degrees Celsius, enough to destroy some fraction of their phyllosilicates. Others have rotational variation suggesting that heating was uneven. We summarize this work, and present the astronomical evidence for water- and hydroxyl-bearing minerals on asteroids.

  18. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A.

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific Kr83 nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  19. 78 FR 26337 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open...; Committee Business; FY 2012 Arctic Production test--data and results; Update on the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management's Lower 48 Assessment; Results of Consortium for Ocean Leadership Workshop; Update...

  20. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  1. Hydrated Minerals on Asteroids: The Astronomical Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Howell, E. S.; Vilas, F.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the hydrated mineral inventory on the asteroids is important for deducing the origin of Earth's water, interpreting the meteorite record, and unraveling the processes occurring during the earliest times in solar system history. Reflectance spectroscopy shows absorption features in both the 0.6-0.8 and 2.5-3.5-micron regions, which are diagnostic of or associated with hydrated minerals. Observations in those regions show that hydrated minerals are common in the mid-asteroid belt, and can be found in unexpected spectral groupings as well. Asteroid groups formerly associated with mineralogies assumed to have high-temperature formation, such as M- and E-class steroids, have been observed to have hydration features in their reflectance spectra. Some asteroids have apparently been heated to several hundred degrees Celsius, enough to destroy some fraction of their phyllosilicates. Others have rotational variation suggesting that heating was uneven. We summarize this work, and present the astronomical evidence for water- and Hydroxl-bearing minerals on asteroids.

  2. The phase behavior of hydrated cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Loomis, C R; Shipley, G G; Small, D M

    1979-05-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of cholesterol monohydrate in water was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In contrast to anhydrous cholesterol which undergoes a polymorphic crystalline transition at 39 degrees C and a crystalline to liquid transition at 151 degrees C, the closed system of cholesterol monohydrate and water exhibited three reversible endothermic transitions at 86, 123, and 157 degrees C. At 86 degrees C, cholesterol monohydrate loses its water of hydration, forming the high temperature polymorph of anhydrous cholesterol. At least 24 hours were required for re-hydration of cholesterol and the rate of hydration was dependent on the polymorphic crystalline form of anhydrous cholesterol. At 123 degrees C, anhydrous crystalline cholesterol in the presence of excess water undergoes a sharp transition to a birefringent liquid crystalline phase of smectic texture. The x-ray diffraction pattern obtained from this phase contained two sharp low-angle reflections at 37.4 and 18.7 A and a diffuse wide-angle reflection centered at 5.7 A, indicating a layered smectic type of liquid crystalline structure with each layer being two cholesterol molecules thick. The liquid crystalline phase is stable over the temperature range of 123 to 157 degrees C before melting to a liquid dispersed in water. The observation of a smectic liquid crystalline phase for hydrated cholesterol correlates with its high surface activity and helps to explain its ability to exist in high concentrations in biological membranes. PMID:458269

  3. Cisplatin intrastrand adducts sensitize DNA to base damage by hydrated electrons.

    PubMed

    Behmand, B; Wagner, J R; Sanche, L; Hunting, D J

    2014-05-01

    The oligonucleotide TTTTTGTGTTT with or without a cisplatin adduct was reacted with hydrated electrons generated by ionizing radiation. Hydroxyl radicals were quenched with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the solutions were bubbled with wet nitrogen to eliminate oxygen, a scavenger of hydrated electrons. Prior to irradiation, the structure of the initial cisplatin adduct was identified by mass spectrometry as G-cisplatin-G. Radiation damage to DNA bases was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), after enzymatic digestion of the TTTTTGTGTTT-cisplatin complex to deoxyribonucleosides. The masses of the platinum adducts following digestion and separation by HPLC were measured by mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate that hydrated electrons induce damage to thymines as well as detachment of the cisplatin moiety from both guanines in the oligonucleotide. This detachment regenerates both unmodified guanine and damaged guanine, in equimolar amounts. At 1000 Gy, a net average of 2.5 thymines and 1 guanine are damaged for each platinum lost from the oligonucleotide. Given the extensive base damage that occurs for each cisplatin adduct lost, it is clear that, prior to undergoing detachment, these adducts must catalyze several cycles of reactions of hydrated electrons with DNA bases. It is likely that a single reaction leads to the loss of the cisplatin adduct and the damage observed on the guanine base; however, the damage to the thymine bases must require the continued presence of the cisplatin adduct, acting as a catalyst. To our knowledge, this is the first time that platinum-DNA adducts have been shown to have catalytic activity. We propose two pathways for the interaction of hydrated electrons with TTTTTGTGTTT-cisplatin: (1) the hydrated electron is initially captured by a thymine base and transferred by base to base electron hopping to the guanine site, where the cisplatin moiety detaches from the oligonucleotide via dissociative

  4. Impact of intentionally injected carbon dioxide hydrate on deep-sea benthic foraminiferal survival.

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, Joan M; Barry, James P; Buck, Kurt R; Starczak, Victoria R

    2009-08-01

    Abstract Sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ocean is being considered as a feasible mechanism to mitigate the alarming rate in its atmospheric rise. Little is known, however, about how the resulting hypercapnia and ocean acidification may affect marine fauna. In an effort to understand better the protistan reaction to such an environmental perturbation, the survivorship of benthic foraminifera, which is a prevalent group of protists, was studied in response to deep-sea CO2 release. The survival response of calcareous, agglutinated, and thecate foraminifera was determined in two experiments at ~3.1 and 3.3 km water depth in Monterey Bay (California, USA). Approximately five weeks after initial seafloor CO2 release, in situ incubations of the live-dead indicator CellTracker Green were executed within seafloor-emplaced pushcores. Experimental treatments included direct exposure to CO2 hydrate, two levels of lesser exposure adjacent to CO2 hydrate, and controls, which were far removed from the CO2 hydrate release. Results indicate that survivorship rates of agglutinated and thecate foraminifera were not significantly impacted by direct exposure but the survivorship of calcareous foraminifera was significantly lower in direct exposure treatments compared to controls. Observations suggest that, if large scale CO2 sequestration is enacted on the deep-sea floor, survival of two major groups of this prevalent protistan taxon will likely not be severely impacted, while calcareous foraminifera will face considerable challenges to maintain their benthic populations in areas directly exposed to CO2 hydrate.

  5. Hydration energies of sodiated amino acids from gas-phase equilibria determinations.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2007-07-01

    The sequential hydration of a number of sodiated amino acids is investigated using a high-pressure mass spectrometer. Ions produced continuously by electrospray are injected into the reaction chamber in the pulsed mode where the hydration equilibria, AANa+(H2O)n-1+H2O=AANa+(H2O)n (AA=Val, Pro, Met, Phe, and Gln), and the temperature dependence of the equilibrium constants are measured in the gas phase at 10 mbar (N2 bath gas and known pressure of H2O). The thermochemical properties, DeltaH degrees n, DeltaS degrees n, and DeltaG degrees n, for the hydrated systems are determined and discussed in conjunction with the structural forms. The results show that the binding energies of water to the AANa+ complexes decrease with the increasing number of water molecules. The present results from equilibrium measurements are compared to those from earlier studies obtained by other techniques. A correlation between the free energy changes for the addition of the first and second water molecules to AANa+, and the corresponding sodium ion affinities, is observed. Generally, the hydration free energy becomes weaker as the AA-Na+ bond strength increases. PMID:17559201

  6. Kinetics of methane hydrate decomposition studied via in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Everett, S Michelle; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy J

    2013-05-01

    Gas hydrate is known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Based on results from the decomposition of three nominally similar methane hydrate samples, the kinetics of two regions, 180-200 and 230-260 K, within the overall decomposition range 140-260 K, were studied by in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic rate constants, k(a), and the reaction mechanisms, n, for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region, and activation energies, E(a), were determined by the Arrhenius plot. E(a) determined from the data for 180-200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230-260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher E(a) in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions. PMID:23557375

  7. Hydration, Orientation, and Conformation of Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Wren, Sumi N; Gordon, Brittany P; Valley, Nicholas A; McWilliams, Laura E; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2015-06-18

    Aqueous-phase processing of methylglyoxal (MG) has been suggested to constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected because its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form geminal diols, as well as because MG and its hydration products can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active, but an improved description of its surface behavior is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation. These studies investigate MG adsorption, focusing on its hydration state at the air-water interface, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach that involves vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. Together, the experimental and theoretical data show that MG exists predominantly in a singly hydrated state (diol) at the interface, with a diol-tetrol ratio at the surface higher than that for the bulk. In addition to exhibiting a strong surface activity, we find that MG significantly perturbs the water structure at the interface. The results have implications for understanding the atmospheric fate of methylglyoxal. PMID:25989368

  8. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  9. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: constraints from ODP Leg 204

    SciTech Connect

    Trehu, Ann M.; Long, Philip E.; Torres, M E.; Bohrmann, G; Rack, F R.; Collett, T S.; Goldberg, D S.; Milkov, A V.; Riedel, M; Schultheiss, P; Bangs, N L.; Barr, S R.; Borowski, W S.; Claypool, G E.; Delwiche, Mark E.; Dickens, G R.; Gracia, E; Guerin, G; Holland, M; Johnson, Jerry E.; Lee, Y J.; Liu, C S.; Su, X; Teichert, B; Tomaru, H; Vanneste, M; Watanabe, M; Weinberger, Jill L.

    2004-03-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, the entire gas hydrate stability zone was sampled in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space of 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs.

  10. Characterization of Diffusion-Controlled Growth and Dissolution of Methane Hydrate in Aqueous Solution by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Ye, Y.; Chou, I.; Liu, C.; Burruss, R. C.; Wang, F.; Wang, M.

    2010-12-01

    in methane concentration at the H-Lw interface and the nearby interstitial water. Our results show that the growth and dissolution rates of methane hydrate in the pores of marine sediments is mass-transport limited instead of reaction limited. In the near future, we will focus on other factors that control the growth and dissolution rates of hydrates in the solution (salinity and P), and to enhance our understanding on the evolution of submarine hydrate systems and their effects on climate change and energy resources.

  11. Hydration dependent viscoelastic tensile behavior of cornea.

    PubMed

    Hatami-Marbini, Hamed

    2014-08-01

    The cornea is a protective transparent connective tissue covering the front of the eye. The standard uniaxial tensile experiments are among the most popular techniques for investigating biomechanical properties of the cornea. This experimental method characterizes the stress-strain response of corneal strips immersed in a bathing solution. In the present study, the important roles of corneal hydration on tensile viscoelastic properties were investigated. The thickness was used as a surrogate for hydration and uniaxial tensile experiments were performed on bovine corneal samples with four different average thickness (hydration), i.e., 1100 μm (4.87 mg water/mg dry tissue), 900 μm (4.13 mg water/mg dry tissue), 700 μm (3.20 mg water/mg dry tissue), and 500 μm (1.95 mg water/mg dry tissue). The samples were immersed in mineral oil in order to prevent their swelling during the experiments. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model was used to analyze the experimental measurements and determine viscoelastic material constants. It was observed that both maximum and equilibrium (relaxed) stresses were exponentially increased with decreasing tissue thickness (hydration). Furthermore, the QLV model successfully captured the corneal viscoelastic response with an average R (2) value greater than 0.99. Additional experiments were conducted in OBSS in order to confirm that these significant changes in viscoelastic properties were because of corneal hydration and not the bathing solution. The findings of this study suggest that extra care must be taken in interpreting the results of earlier uniaxial tensile testings and their correspondence to the corneal biomechanical properties. PMID:24668183

  12. Phyllosilicate and Hydrated Sulfate Deposits in Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, S. M.; Avidson, R. E.; Murchie, S.; Poulet, F.; Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Morris, R. V.; Seelos, F. P.

    2008-01-01

    Several phyllosilicate and hydrated sulfate deposits in Meridiani have been mapped in detail with high resolution MRO CRISM [1] data. Previous studies have documented extensive exposures of outcrop in Meridiani (fig 1), or etched terrain (ET), that has been interpreted to be sedimentary in origin [e.g., 2,3]. These deposits have been mapped at a regional scale with OMEGA data and show enhanced hydration (1.9 m absorption) in several areas [4]. However, hydrated sulfate detections were restricted to valley exposures in northern Meridiani ET [5]. New high resolution CRISM images show that hydrated sulfates are present in several spatially isolated exposures throughout the ET (fig 1). The hydrated sulfate deposits in the valley are vertically heterogeneous with layers of mono and polyhydrated sulfates and are morphologically distinct from other areas of the ET. We are currently mapping the detailed spatial distribution of sulfates and searching for distinct geochemical horizons that may be traced back to differential ground water recharge and/or evaporative loss rates. The high resolution CRISM data has allowed us to map out several phyllosilicate deposits within the fluvially dissected Noachian cratered terrain (DCT) to the south and west of the hematite-bearing plains (Ph) and ET (fig 1). In Miyamoto crater, phyllosilicates are located within 30km of the edge of Ph, which is presumably underlain by acid sulfate deposits similar to those explored by Opportunity. The deposits within this crater may record the transition from fluvial conditions which produced and/or preserved phyllosilicates deposits to a progressively acid sulfate dominated groundwater system in which large accumulations of sulfate-rich evaporites were deposited .

  13. Natural Methane and Carbon Dioxide Hydrates in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research Team; Milkereit, B.

    2004-05-01

    Both CH4 and CO2 are abundant volatiles in the earth's crust. Methane hydrates occur in permafrost regions and continental slopes of oceans. It is currently estimated that the energy stored in CH4 hydrate reserves totals more than twice the global reserves of all conventional oil, gas, and coal deposits combined. This means that methane hydrate could prove to be a very important source of energy in the future. Pressure versus temperature phase diagrams for methane and carbon dioxide define characteristic stability fields for gas, fluid and hydrates states. Sequestration of carbon dioxide in the earths crust and production of methane hydrate reservoirs are critically dependent on knowledge of the in situ elastic moduli of natural hydrates. The physical properties of simple methane and carbon dioxide hydrates are similar [1]. Our compilation of experimental data confirms high compressional wave velocities and elastic moduli for CH4 and CO2 hydrates and low compressional wave velocities for the fluid and gas phases. As methane and carbon dioxide hydrates are stable over similar pressure-temperature ranges, the two types of hydrates form in similar settings in the earth's crust. For example, temperature and pressure conditions in deepwater marine environments require both CO2 and CH4 to be in hydrate phase. However, not much is known about the origin, distribution and total volume of natural carbon dioxide hydrates stored in the earth's crust. For a number of tectonic/geological settings, CO2-rich fluids from deep crustal reservoirs must be considered: rifted margins, volcanic arcs, deepwater vents [2], mud volcanoes and mud diapirs [3]. Both methane and carbon dioxide hydrates work to cement sea floors in similar ways. Slope failure, a phenomenon usually taken as a hallmark of the presence of methane hydrate, could also be attributed to the existence of carbon dioxide hydrates. Perhaps most critically, many of the estimations of the amounts of methane hydrates are

  14. Effect of hydration on the structure of caveolae membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Sciubba, Fabio; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-04-13

    In situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to investigate the effect of hydration on the structure of caveolae membranes. The structure of caveolae membrane was found to be strongly dependent on hydration. At low hydration two lamellar phases with distinct repeat spacings were found to coexist with segregated cholesterol crystallites. Upon hydration, the lamellar phases did swell, while diffraction peak of cholesterol crystals disappeared suggesting that cholesterol molecules redistributed homogeneously within the caveolae membrane. At full hydration, unbinding of caveolae membrane occurred. Upon dehydration the system returned to the bound state, demonstrating that the unbinding transition is fully reversible.

  15. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  16. Seismic constraints on the hydration of subducting oceanic crust and mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Rietbrock, A.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that large amounts of water are delivered to the mantle through subduction. Some water is carried in the hydrated minerals in the oceanic crust, and is released to the mantle through dehydration reactions as the slab becomes warmer. It is also thought that the subducting lithospheric mantle is highly hydrated, and carries large amounts of water to the crust. There are however few observational constraints on the depth to which this water is delivered by the hydrated subducting slab, and the amount of water delivered to the mantle. Subduction zone guided waves spend longer interacting with the low velocity hydrous mineral assemblages than any other seismic phase, as so give us a unique opportunity to put new constraints on these features of the subduction zone. We use full waveform seismic modelling techniques to constrain these dispersed arrivals, and so image the velocity structure of the slab. This technique gives an observational constraint on both the hydration of the slab, and the onset of dehydration reactions. We have shown that both low velocity subducted oceanic crust, and low velocity outer rise normal faults that penetrate the lithospheric mantle can act as effective waveguides producing characteristic body wave dispersion. Analysis of the spatial coda decay associated with intermediate depth earthquakes recorded in Northern Japan suggest that these hydrated normal faults may in fact carry the majority of the water transported by the subducting slab to the mantle. Seismic constraints on the dehydration reactions occurring in the subducted oceanic crust also show that full dehydration may occur at much greater depth than predicted by current thermo petrological models, meaning that water may be carried to greater depths than previously thought. Together these methods suggest that much more water is delivered to the mantle by subduction than has previously been suggested, and that water may be carried to greater depths in the mantle

  17. Methane hydrate in the global organic carbon cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    The global occurrence of methane hydrate in outer continental margins and in polar regions, and the magnitude of the amount of methane sequestered in methane hydrate suggest that methane hydrate is an important component in the global organic carbon cycle. Various versions of this cycle have emphasized the importance of methane hydrate, and in the latest version the role of methane hydrate is considered to be analogous to the workings of an electrical circuit. In this circuit the methane hydrate is a condenser and the consequences of methane hydrate dissociation are depicted as a resistor and inductor, reflecting temperature change and changes in earth surface history. These consequences may have implications for global change including global climate change.

  18. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    SciTech Connect

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  19. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuousmore » formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.« less

  20. Seismic reflections identify finite differences in gas hydrate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, W.; Max, M.

    1999-01-01

    What processes control methane hydrate concentrations? Gas hydrate occurs naturally at the pressure/ temperature/chemical conditions that are present within ocean floor sediments at water depths greater than about 500 meters. The gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) extends from the sea bottom downward to a depth where the natural increase in temperature causes the hydrate to melt (dissociate), even though the downward pressure increase is working to increase gas hydrate stability. Thus, the base of the GHSZ tends to parallel the seafloor at any given water depth (pressure), because the sub-seafloor isotherms (depths of constant temperature) generally parallel the seafloor. The layer at which gas hydrate is stable commonly extends from the sea floor to several hundred meters below it. The gas in most gas hydrates is methane, generated by bacteria in the sediments. In some cases, it can be higher carbon-number, thermogenic hydrocarbon gases that rise from greater depths.

  1. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.

  2. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  3. In-situ kinetics and x-ray computed microtomography imaging studies of methane hydrates in host sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkar, Prasad B.

    Methane hydrates naturally occur in abundance in permafrost and marine environments. Methane hydrates are ice-like inclusion compounds in which water molecules form a framework through hydrogen bonding and encapsulate methane molecules under conditions of low temperature and high pressure. In natural settings, the sediment-hydrate interaction governs the mechanical strength and other geophysical properties of formations containing methane hydrates. In this study, methane hydrate formation/dissociation kinetics was studied with methane/water (both pure water and seawater) hosted in consolidated Ottawa sand-cores at pressure-temperature (PT) conditions (P: 9.2 MPa; T: 4°C) mimicking sub-seafloor settings. The formation study was conducted by charging methane at different pore pressures followed by cooling. The hydrate formation was delayed with increasing pore pressure or consolidation of host sediment. The hydrate dissociation was achieved by incremental step-wise system depressurization during which time, gas output response, sediment cooling due to the reaction endothermicity and post-depressurization PT equilibrium were recorded. The dissociation events due to depressurization were short-lived. During depressurization, thermocouple monitoring showed that the temperature at the center of the core dropped more rapidly than at the middle radius and the boundary. Post-depressurization dissociation was thermally induced where sediments were allowed to warm up to a bath temperature. The post-depressurization PT equilibrium followed theoretical data for methane hydrates on the higher pressure side due to an excess pore pressure generated within confined core. The post-depressurization PT equilibrium was used to calculate the enthalpy of dissociation value as 59.45 kJ/mol. The gas output during depressurization was fit to estimate hydrate dissociation constant. A set of formation/decomposition runs was repeated with seawater. The formation kinetics of hydrates from

  4. Concept of Methane Hydrate System in the eastern Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakubo, S.; Fujii, T.; Noguchi, S.; Kawasaki, T.

    2008-12-01

    By the study of the Phase 1 (FY2001-2008) of the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium), MH21 Research Consortium showed that methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediments had a potential to develop in the future. It is important to clarify the accumulation mechanism and processes of methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediment because it would contribute to explore new methane hydrate field to develop other than the eastern Nankai Trough in the future. Therefore Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC), as a member of MH21 Research Consortium, has been constructing a concept of Methane Hydrate System (methane generation and migration, MH formation and dissociation) with methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediment. We extracted critical elements and executed processes to summarize Methane Hydrate System in the eastern Nankai Trough by reviewing past geochemical analysis, well logs and core analyses, seismic interpretations, and laboratory studies for the eastern Nankai Trough. We also conducted case studies using 1D and 2D numerical simulators developed for the clarification of methane hydrate accumulation mechanism. It was determined that there are still many unsolved issues as listed below though we try to construct a concept of Methane Hydrate System in the eastern Nankai Trough. 1.Methane source and migration -methane-dominant generation depth -methane generation rate. -driving forces of methane migration 2.Occurrences and distribution -occurrences and distribution of methane hydrates other than methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediment. -methane-bearing fluid condition (properties, distribution) below methane hydrate bearing zones. 3.Relation between seafloor phenomena and methane hydrate occurences. 4.Impact of geohistory and sea level (water depth) change to methane hydrate accumulation. New investigation surveys (drilling and geological/geochemical surveys on seafloor) are required to

  5. A new mathematical solution for predicting char activation reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rafsanjani, H.H.; Jamshidi, E.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2002-01-01

    The differential conservation equations that describe typical gas-solid reactions, such as activation of coal chars, yield a set of coupled second-order partial differential equations. The solution of these coupled equations by exact analytical methods is impossible. In addition, an approximate or exact solution only provides predictions for either reaction- or diffusion-controlling cases. A new mathematical solution, the quantize method (QM), was applied to predict the gasification rates of coal char when both chemical reaction and diffusion through the porous char are present. Carbon conversion rates predicted by the QM were in closer agreement with the experimental data than those predicted by the random pore model and the simple particle model. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Hydration Structure at Yttria-Stabilized Cubic Zirconia (110)-Water Interface with Sub-Ångström Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Binyang; Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jongjin; Hong, Seungbum; Bahn, Chi Bum; Park, Changyong; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-06-01

    The interfacial hydration structure of yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia (110) surface in contact with water was determined with ~0.5 Å resolution by high-resolution X-ray reflectivity measurement. The terminal layer shows a reduced electron density compared to the following substrate lattice layers, which indicates there are additional defects generated by metal depletion as well as intrinsic oxygen vacancies, both of which are apparently filled by water species. Above this top surface layer, two additional adsorbed layers are observed forming a characteristic interfacial hydration structure. The first adsorbed layer shows abnormally high density as pure water and likely includes metal species, whereas the second layer consists of pure water. The observed interfacial hydration structure seems responsible for local equilibration of the defective surface in water and eventually regulating the long-term degradation processes. The multitude of water interactions with the zirconia surface results in the complex but highly ordered interfacial structure constituting the reaction front.

  7. Dissolved carbonic anhydrase for enhancing post-combustion carbon dioxide hydration in aqueous ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, James R.; Heck, Robert W.; Zwoster, Andy

    2011-04-01

    Aqueous ammonia solvents that capture CO2 as ionic complexes of carbonates with ammonium have recently been advanced as alternatives to amine-based solvents due to their lower energy requirements for thermal regeneration. In ammonia based solvents, the hydration of CO2 to form bicarbonate may become a rate-limiting step as the CO2 loading increases and the resulting pH level of the solvent decreases. Variants of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase can accelerate the reversible hydration of CO2 to yield bicarbonate by more than 10(6)-fold. The possible benefit of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) addition to solutions of aqueous ammonia to enhance CO2 hydration was investigated in semi-batch reactions within continuously stirred tank reactors or in a bubble column gas-liquid contactor. Adding 154 mg/liter of BCA to 2 M aqueous ammonia provided a 34.1% overall increase in the rate of CO2 hydration (as indicated by the production of [H+]) as the pH declined from 9.6 to 8.6 during sparging with a 15% CO2, 85% N-2 gas at a flow rate of 3 lpm. The benefits of adding BCA to enhance CO2 hydration were only discernable below similar to pH 9. The implications of the apparent pH limitations on the utility of BCA are discussed in the context of absorber unit operation design. Possible embodiments of carbonic anhydrase as either an immobilized catalyst or as a dissolved, recirculating catalyst in potential plant scale aqueous ammonia systems are considered as well. (C) 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Individual and combined effects of chloride, sulfate, and magnesium ions on hydrated Portland-cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, T.S.; Wakeley, L.D.; Young, C.L.

    1994-03-01

    Ground water with a high concentration of magnesium ion is known to cause deterioration to portland cement concretes. A proposed mechanism for this deterioration process published previously involves an approximate 1:1 replacement of Ca ions by Mg ions in the crystalline phases of hydrated cement. The current study was undertaken to determine which ions, among magnesium, chloride, and sulfate, cause deterioration; whether their deleterious action is individual or interdependent; and to relate this mechanism of deterioration to the outlook for a 100-yr service life of concretes used in mass placements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Loss of Ca ion by cement pastes was found to be strongly related to the concentration of Mg ion in simulated ground-water solutions in which the paste samples were aged. This was true of both salt- containing and conventional cement pastes. No other ion in the solutions exerted a strong effect on Ca loss. Ca ion left first from calcium hydroxide in the pastes, depleting all calcium hydroxide by 60 days. Some calcium silicate hydrate remained even after 90 days in the solutions with the highest concentration of Mg ion, while the paste samples deteriorated noticeably. The results indicated a mechanism that involves dissolution of Ca phases and transport of Ca ions to the surface of the sample, followed by formation of Mg-bearing phases at this reaction surface rather than directly by substitution within the microstructure of hydrated cement. Given that calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate are the principal strength-giving phases of hydrated cement, this mechanism indicates the likelihood of significant loss of integrity of a concrete exposed to Mg-bearing ground water at the WIPP. The rate of deterioration ultimately will depend on Mg-ion concentration, the microstructure materials of the concrete exposed to that groundwater, and the availability of brine.

  9. Implications of the band gap problem on oxidation and hydration in acceptor-doped barium zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindman, Anders; Erhart, Paul; Wahnström, Göran

    2015-06-01

    Charge carrier concentrations in acceptor-doped proton-conducting perovskites are to a large extent determined by the hydration and oxidation of oxygen vacancies, which introduce protons and holes, respectively. First-principles modeling of these reactions involves calculation of formation energies of charged defects, which requires an accurate description of the band gap and the position of the band edges. Since density-functional theory (DFT) with local and semilocal exchange-correlation functionals (LDA and GGA) systematically fails to predict these quantities this can have serious implications on the modeling of defect reactions. In this study we investigate how the description of band gap and band-edge positions affects the hydration and oxidation in acceptor-doped BaZrO3. First-principles calculations are performed in combination with thermodynamic modeling in order to obtain equilibrium charge carrier concentrations at different temperatures and partial pressures. Three different methods have been considered: DFT with both semilocal (PBE) and hybrid (PBE0) exchange-correlation functionals, and many-body perturbation theory within the G0W0 approximation. All three methods yield similar results for the hydration reaction, which are consistent with experimental findings. For the oxidation reaction, on the other hand, there is a qualitative difference. PBE predicts the reaction to be exothermic, while the two others predict an endothermic behavior. Results from thermodynamic modeling are compared with available experimental data, such as enthalpies, concentrations, and conductivities, and only the results obtained with PBE0 and G0W0 , with an endothermic oxidation behavior, give a satisfactory agreement with experiments.

  10. Spatial resolution of gas hydrate and permeability changes from ERT data in LARS simulating the Mallik gas hydrate production test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priegnitz, Mike; Thaler, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Abendroth, Sven

    2014-05-01

    The German gas hydrate project SUGAR studies innovative methods and approaches to be applied in the production of methane from hydrate-bearing reservoirs. To enable laboratory studies in pilot scale, a large reservoir simulator (LARS) was realized allowing for the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates under simulated in-situ conditions. LARS is equipped with a series of sensors. This includes a cylindrical electrical resistance tomography (ERT) array composed of 25 electrode rings featuring 15 electrodes each. The high-resolution ERT array is used to monitor the spatial distribution of the electrical resistivity during hydrate formation and dissociation experiments over time. As the present phases of poorly conducting sediment, well conducting pore fluid, non-conducting hydrates, and isolating free gas cover a wide range of electrical properties, ERT measurements enable us to monitor the spatial distribution of these phases during the experiments. In order to investigate the hydrate dissociation and the resulting fluid flow, we simulated a hydrate production test in LARS that was based on the Mallik gas hydrate production test (see abstract Heeschen et al., this volume). At first, a hydrate phase was produced from methane saturated saline water. During the two months of gas hydrate production we measured the electrical properties within the sediment sample every four hours. These data were used to establish a routine estimating both the local degrees of hydrate saturation and the resulting local permeabilities in the sediment's pore space from the measured resistivity data. The final gas hydrate saturation filled 89.5% of the total pore space. During hydrate dissociation, ERT data do not allow for a quantitative determination of free gas and remaining gas hydrates since both phases are electrically isolating. However, changes are resolved in the spatial distribution of the conducting liquid and the isolating phase with gas being the only mobile isolating phase

  11. Hydration of a silica fume blended low-alkali shotcrete cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Rentsch, Daniel; Wieland, Erich

    Ettringite and C-S-H are the main hydrates formed during the hydration of the low-alkali cement “ESDRED” consisting of 60% CEM I, 40% microsilica and 4.8% set accelerator. Small quantities of portlandite and hemicarbonate present as intermediate phases destabilise within a few weeks. The use of a set accelerator leads to massive ettringite precipitation, a moderate decalcification of C-S-H and reduction of pH due to presence of dissolved formate. The slow reaction of the silica fume during hydration decalcifies the C-S-H and decreases the alkali concentration to 30 mM and the pH value of the pore solution to 11.5 after 1 year and longer. The further reaction of the silica fume is expected to be slow and to result in a decrease of pH to 11. Further, the destabilisation of ettringite to thaumasite is expected. The long-term stability of C-S-H and the pH of approximately 11 make ESDRED a good candidate for usage in contact with the clay-based barriers of a repository for radioactive waste.

  12. The effect of sulfate activation on the early age hydration of BFS:PC composite cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N. C.; Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Milestone, N. B.

    2015-09-01

    Blast furnace slag/Portland cement composites are routinely used for immobilising intermediate level nuclear wastes in the UK. Using high cement replacement levels reduces hydration exotherm and lowers pH. Although a lower grout pH will be beneficial in reducing the corrosion of certain encapsulated reactive metals such as aluminium, the degree of slag reaction will also be lower which may result in the formation of less hydration products and which in turn may reduce the capacity to immobilise waste ions. Adding neutral salts such as calcium and sodium sulfate to the composite cement can potentially increase slag activation without significantly altering the pH of the cement matrix. Thus the corrosion of any encapsulated metals would not be affected. This paper describes some of the properties of a hydrated 9:1 blast furnace slag:Portland cement matrix containing added sulfates of calcium and sodium. The findings show that all additives caused an increase in the amount of slag that reacted when cured for up to 28 days. This produced more material able to chemically bind waste ions. Activation with gypsum produced the highest rate of slag reaction.

  13. Methane hydrates and contemporary climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2011-01-01

    As the evidence for warming climate became better established in the latter part of the 20th century (IPCC 2001), some scientists raised the alarm that large quantities of methane (CH4) might be liberated by widespread destabilization of climate-sensitive gas hydrate deposits trapped in marine and permafrost-associated sediments (Bohannon 2008, Krey et al. 2009, Mascarelli 2009). Even if only a fraction of the liberated CH4 were to reach the atmosphere, the potency of CH4 as a greenhouse gas (GHG) and the persistence of its oxidative product (CO2) heightened concerns that gas hydrate dissociation could represent a slow tipping point (Archer et al. 2009) for Earth's contemporary period of climate change.

  14. Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Obradovich, J.

    1981-01-01

    Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events had been compared with ages of the same events determined by the 14C and KAr methods at several localities. The localities, ranging in age from 1200 to over 1 million yr, include Newberry Craters, Oregon; Coso Hot Springs, California; Salton Sea, California; Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming; and Mineral Range, Utah. In most cases the agreement is quite good. A number of factors including volcanic glass composition and exposuretemperature history must be known in order to relate hydration thickness to age. The effect of composition can be determined from chemical analysis or the refractive index of the glass. Exposure-temperature history requires a number of considerations enumerated in this paper. ?? 1981.

  15. The curious case of the hydrated proton.

    PubMed

    Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-01-17

    Understanding the hydrated proton is a critically important problem that continues to engage the research efforts of chemists, physicists, and biologists because of its involvement in a wide array of phenomena. Only recently have several unique properties of the hydrated proton been unraveled through computer simulations. One such process is the detailed molecular mechanism by which protons hop between neighboring water molecules, thus giving rise to the anomalously high diffusion of protons relative to other simple cations. Termed Grotthuss shuttling, this process occurs over multiple time and length scales, presenting unique challenges for computer modeling and simulation. Because the hydrated proton is in reality a dynamical electronic charge defect that spans multiple water molecules, the simulation methodology must be able to dynamically readjust the chemical bonding topology. This reactive nature of the chemical process is automatically captured with ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation methods, where the electronic degrees of freedom are treated explicitly. Unfortunately, these calculations can be prohibitively expensive for more complex proton solvation and transport phenomena in the condensed phase. These AIMD simulations remain extremely valuable, however, in validating empirical models, verifying results, and providing insight into molecular mechanisms. In this Account, we discuss recent progress in understanding the solvation and transport properties of the hydrated excess proton. The advances are based on results obtained from reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) methodology. This approach relies on a dynamic linear combination of chemical bond topologies to model charge delocalization and dynamic bonding environments. When parametrized via a variational force-matching algorithm from AIMD trajectories, the MS-EVB method can be viewed as a multiscale bridging of ab initio simulation

  16. THF water hydrate crystallization: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Surya; Groysman, Alexander; Myerson, Allan S.

    1999-08-01

    Supersaturated solutions of THF-water hydrate system were experimentally studied before and during crystallization, to examine the system's behavior in the metastable zone and observe any anomalies suggesting cluster formation. Nucleation induction time measurements, with and without additives, were performed to screen potential growth inhibitors. Shifts in the onset points of crystallization for water and THF-water mixtures with additives were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Aspartame was among one of the few successfully screened inhibitors. Preliminary on-line crystal size distribution (CSD) measurements were performed on this system to monitor the crystal size during crystallization. The CSD data was also used to compute the hydrate crystal growth rates, which were found to be in the order of 145 μm/h.

  17. Hydrated Minerals in the Martian Southern Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, James J.; Seelos, F. P.; Murchie, S. L.; Squyres, S. W.

    2008-09-01

    Hydrated minerals including sulfates, phyllosilicates, and hydrated silica have been observed on the surface of Mars by the orbital near-infrared spectrometers OMEGA and CRISM [1,2]. Global maps from OMEGA [3,4] show that km-scale and larger exposures of these minerals are scattered widely throughout the planet's low and mid latitudes, but are relatively rare. Yet CRISM has found hundreds to thousands of Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate exposures in the highlands of Terra Tyrrhena alone [2], suggesting that smaller exposures may be much more common. To search for such exposures, we have surveyed the browse products from all PDS-released CRISM targeted observations (as of July 2008) across a large fraction of the Southern highlands, including the Noachis, Cimmeria, and Sirenum regions. Sulfates are observed in Noachian-aged terrains in each of these regions, including as far South as -63º latitude, suggesting that sulfate formation may have occurred locally or regionally throughout a large fraction of Martian history. Some of our strongest phyllosilicate detections occur adjacent to inferred chloride-bearing deposits [5] in Terra Sirenum. Also in Sirenum, the D 100 km Columbus crater contains light-toned, hydrated sulfate-bearing layers overlying materials that contain both a kaolin group clay and Fe/Mg-smectite clay, in different locations. However, phyllosilicates do not appear predominantly associated with impact craters in the regions surveyed, in contrast with Terra Tyrrhena [2]. We are currently searching for additional hydrated mineral exposures using CRISM multispectral data, providing further detail on their global distribution and identifying local areas of interest for future focused studies. [1] Bibring, J.-P. et al. (2005) Science 307, 1576-1581. [2] Mustard, J. F. et al. (2008) Nature 454, 305-309. [3] Bibring, J.-P. et al. (2006) Science 312, 400-404. [4] Poulet, F. et al. (2007) Mars 7, Abs. #3170. [5] Osterloo M. M. et al. (2008) Science 319, 1651-1654.

  18. Mesostructure from hydration gradients in demosponge biosilica.

    PubMed

    Neilson, James R; George, Nathan C; Murr, Meredith M; Seshadri, Ram; Morse, Daniel E

    2014-04-22

    Organisms of the phylum Porifera, that is, sponges, utilize enzymatic hydrolysis to concatenate bioavailable inorganic silicon to produce lightweight, strong, and often flexible skeletal elements called spicules. In their optical transparency, these remarkable biomaterials resemble fused silica, despite having been formed under ambient marine biological conditions. Although previous studies have elucidated the chemical mechanisms of spicule formation and revealed the extensive hydration of these glasses, their precise composition and local and medium-range structures had not been determined. We have employed a combination of compositional analysis, (1) H and (29) Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray total scattering to characterize spicule-derived silica produced by the demosponge Tethya aurantia. These studies indicate that the materials are highly hydrated, but in an inhomogeneous manner. The spicule-derived silica is, on average, perfectly dense for the given extent of hydration and regions of fully condensed and unstrained SiO networks persist throughout each monolithic spicule. To accommodate chemical strain and defects, the extensive hydration is concentrated in distinct regions that give rise to mesostructural features. The chemistry responsible for producing spicule silica resembles hydrolytic sol-gel processing, which offers exceptional control over the precise local atomic arrangement of materials. However, the specific processing involved in forming the sponge spicule silica further results in regions of fully condensed silica coexisting with regions of incomplete condensation. This mesostructure suggests a mechanism for atomistic defect tolerance and strain relief that may account for the unusual mechanical properties of the biogenic spicules. PMID:24633700

  19. Hydrating skin by stimulating biosynthesis of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc; Sadick, Neil S; Noblesse, Emmanuelle; Juan, Milène; Lachmann-Weber, Nadège; Boury-Jamot, Mathieu; Sougrat, Rachid; Verbavatz, Jean Marc; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Bonté, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are proteins that facilitate the transport of water across cell membranes. AQP3 expression is related to the expressions of other epidermal proteins involved in water maintenance (ie, CD44, claudin-1, and filaggrin). The expressions of AQP3 water channels are strongly affected by age and chronic sun exposure, and a defective osmotic equilibrium could occur in the epidermis, which would account for the skin dryness observed in older people and skin areas most exposed to sunlight. We investigated active ingredients that are able to increase AQP3 levels in order to improve hydration in human skin keratinocytes. We selected an ethanolic/water (70/30 v/v) extract of Ajuga turkestanica, a plant from Central Asia, as the hydrating agent. After 17 days of treatment every 2 days with this extract (2.5 microg/mL) in vitro, AQP3 expression measured at the protein level in human reconstructed epidermis was significantly increased. Water transport through both aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins and glycerol transport through aquaglyceroporins alone are important to skin hydration. The distribution and the variability of aquaporins in human skin cells suggest that these channels may have important roles in skin physiology. AQPs appear to be key protein targets to improve the resistance and quality of the skin surface as well as to improve aging and sun exposure-induced dryness as shown by their roles in 1) hydrating the living layers of the epidermis where the keratinocyte differentiation takes place and 2) barrier formation and recovery. PMID:17691206

  20. Bioimpedance in medicine: Measuring hydration influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubik, J.; Hlubik, P.; Lhotska, L.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to present results of our ongoing research focused on the influence of body hydration on the body impedance measurements and also on the influence of the frequency used for the measurement. The question is why to measure human body composition and if these values have beneficial results. First goal of the work deals with a question of measuring human body composition. The performed measurements showed certain influence which must be verified by repeated experiments.

  1. CO₂ processing and hydration of fruit and vegetable tissues by clathrate hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Nakano, Kohei; Thammawong, Manasikan; Umeda, Hiroki; Yoneyama, Akio; Takeda, Tohoru; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Matsuo, Seiji

    2016-08-15

    CO2 hydrate can be used to preserve fresh fruits and vegetables, and its application could contribute to the processing of carbonated frozen food. We investigated water transformation in the frozen tissue of fresh grape samples upon CO2 treatment at 2-3 MPa and 3°C for up to 46 h. Frozen fresh bean, radish, eggplant and cucumber samples were also investigated for comparison. X-ray diffraction indicated that after undergoing CO2 treatment for several hours, structure I CO2 hydrate formed within the grape tissue. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging using the diffraction-enhanced imaging technique revealed the presence of CO2 hydrate within the intercellular spaces of these tissues. The carbonated produce became effervescent because of the dissociation of CO2 hydrate through the intercellular space, especially above the melting point of ice. In addition, suppressed metabolic activity resulting from CO2 hydrate formation, which inhibits water and nutrient transport through intercellular space, can be expected. PMID:27006222

  2. SNCR De-NOx within a moderate temperature range using urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate as reductant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Chen, D Z; Fan, S; Hong, L; Wang, D

    2016-10-01

    In this research, urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions are used as reductants for the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) De-NOx process below 650 °C. The urea concentration in the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions is chosen through experimental and theoretical studies. To determine the mechanism of the De-NOx process, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions and their thermal decomposition in air and nitrogen atmospheres were studied to understand their decomposition behaviours and redox characteristics. Then a plug flow reactor (PFR) model was adopted to simulate the De-NOx processes in a pilot scale tubular reactor, and the calculated De-NOx efficiency vs. temperature profiles were compared with experimental results to support the mechanism and choose the proper reductant and its reaction temperature. Both the experimental and calculated results show that when the urea is spiked into hydrazine hydrate solution to make the urea-N content approximately 16.7%-25% of the total N content in the solution, better De-NOx efficiencies can be obtained in the temperature range of 550-650 °C, under which NH3 is inactive in reducing NOx. And it is also proved that for these urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions, the hydrazine decomposition through the pathway N2H4 + M = N2H3 + H + M is enhanced to provide radical H, which is active to reduce NO. Finally, the reaction routes for SNCR De-NOx process based on urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate at the proper temperature are proposed. PMID:27427778

  3. Coupled THCM Modeling of Gas Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, M. J.; Gai, X., Sr.; Shastri, A.; Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline clathrate compounds made of water and a low molecular gas, like methane. Gas hydrates are generally present in oil-producing areas and in permafrost regions. Methane hydrate deposits can lead to large-scale submarine slope failures, blowouts, platform foundation failures, and borehole instability. Gas hydrates constitute also an attractive source of energy as they are estimated to contain very large reserves of methane. Hydrate formation, dissociation and methane production from hydrate bearing sediments are coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) processes that involve, amongst other, exothermic formation and endothermic dissociation of hydrate and ice phases, mixed fluid flow and large changes in fluid pressure. A comprehensive THM formulation is briefly presented here. Momentum balance, mass balance and energy balance equations take into consideration the interaction among all phases (i.e. solid, liquid, gas, hydrates and ice) and mechanical equilibrium. Constitutive equations describe the intrinsic THM behavior of the sediment. Simulation results conducted for hydrate bearing sediments subjected to boundary conditions highlight the complex interaction among THM processes in hydrate bearing sediments.

  4. Influence of polymer on cement hydration in SBR-modified cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ru . E-mail: wr_irene@163.com; Li Xingui; Wang Peiming

    2006-09-15

    The influence of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) latex on cement hydrates Ca(OH){sub 2}, ettringite, C{sub 4}AH{sub 13} and C-S-H gel and the degree of cement hydration is studied by means of several measure methods. The results of DSC and XRD show that the Ca(OH){sub 2} content in wet-cured SBR-modified cement pastes increases with polymer-cement ratio (P/C) and reaches a maximum when P/C is 5%, 10% and 10% for the pastes hydrated for 3 d, 7 d and 28 d, respectively. With wet cure, appropriate addition of SBR promotes the hydration of cement, while the effect of SBR on the content of Ca(OH){sub 2} and the degree of cement hydration is not remarkable in mixed-cured SBR-modified cement pastes. XRD results illustrate that SBR accelerates the reaction of calcium aluminate with gypsum, and thus enhances the formation and stability of the ettringite and inhibits the formation of C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}. The structure of aluminum-oxide and silicon-oxide polyhedron is characterized by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si solid state NMR spectrum method, which shows that tetrahedron and octahedron are the main forms of aluminum-oxide polyhedrons in SBR-modified cement pastes. There are only [SiO{sub 4}]{sup 4-} tetrahedron monomer and dimer in the modified pastes hydrated for 3 d, but there appears three-tetrahedron polymer in the modified pastes hydrated for 28 d. The effect of low SBR dosage on the structure of aluminum-oxide and silicon-oxide polyhedron is slight. However, the combination of Al{sup 3+} with [SiO{sub 4}]{sup 4-} is restrained when P/C is above 15%, and the structure of Al{sup 3+} is changed obviously. Meantime, the polymerization of the [SiO{sub 4}]{sup 4-} tetrahedron in C-S-H gel is controlled.

  5. Investigation of mechanisms of gas hydrates accumulation in permafrost environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvilin, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    The feature of permafrost sediments is capability to accumulate a quantity of natural gases foremost methane with low admixture of carbon dioxide. In consequence of natural and climatic changes, formation of favorable thermobaric conditions for transformation of intra-permafrost gas accumulations from free state into gas hydrate is possible. In consideration of high gas-saturation of frozen sediments, the active processes of hydrate formation in permafrost during the transgression of arctic seas or under continental glaciations can be expected. A special experimental technique was elaborated to perform physical modeling of hydrate formation conditions in cryogenic ice-containing sediments. The experiments were carried out under constant negative temperatures in interval from -2 oC to -9 oC. Methane (99.98%) was used as hydrate-former gas. During the experiments the kinetics of gas consumption in porous media was investigated and also part of porous water turned into hydrate and hydrate- saturation of sediment samples were estimated. Experiments show that hydrate formation in gas saturated sediments occurs actively not only in freezing sediments (above 0 oC) but also in frozen sediments (below 0 oC). Intensity of hydrate formation in frozen sediments depends on such factors as ice-saturation, thermobaric conditions and gas composition. Experimental data shows that after attenuation of hydrate formation in frozen sediments the considerable activization of hydrate accumulation processes during the increasing of temperature above 0 oC can occur. That leads to the thawing of porous ice, which does not turn into hydrate, and attendant this process structural-textural changes result in appearance of new gas-water contacts. As a result there is second hydrate formation on background of thawing of ice. Based on analysis of geological data and experimental researches possible geological models of gas hydrates formation in shallow permafrost under the sea transgression and

  6. Mechanism Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Ambient Air by Hydration Energy Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Lackner, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydration of neutral and ionic species on solid interfaces plays an important role in a wide range of natural and engineered processes within energy systems as well as biological and environmental systems. Various chemical reactions are significantly enhanced, both in the rate and the extent of the reaction, because of water molecules present or absent at the interface. A novel technology for carbon dioxide capture, driven by the free energy difference between more or less hydrated states of an anionic exchange resin is studied for a new approach to absorb CO2 from ambient air. For these materials the affinity to CO2 is dramatically lowered as the availability of water is increased. This makes it possible to absorb CO2 from air in a dry environment and release it at two orders of magnitude larger partial pressures in a wet environment. While the absorption process and the thermodynamic properties of air capture via ion exchange resins have been demonstrated, the underlying physical mechanisms remain to be understood. In order to rationally design better sorbent materials, the present work elucidates through molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical modeling the energy changes in the carbonate, bicarbonate and hydroxide ions that are induced by hydration, and how these changes affect sorbent properties. A methodology is developed to determine the free energy change during carbonate ion hydrolysis changes with different numbers of water molecules present. This makes it possible to calculate the equilibrium in the reaction CO3--•nH2O ↔ HCO3- • m1H2O + OH- • m2H2O + (n - 1 - m1 - m2)H2O Molecular dynamics models are used to calculate free energies of hydration for the CO32- ion, the HCO3- ion, and the OH- ion as function of the amount of water that is present. A quantum mechanical model is employed to study the equilibrium of the reaction Na2CO3 + H2O ↔ NaHCO3 + NaOHin a vacuum and at room temperature. The computational analysis of the free energy of

  7. Wax and hydrate control with electrical power

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    Electrical heating of subsea flowlines is an effective way to prevent wax and hydrate information, especially for long transportation distances and in low-temperature deep water. Systems are available for use in conjunction with bundles, pipe-in-pipe, and wet-thermal-insulation systems. These systems provide environmentally friendly fluid-temperature control without chemicals or flaring for pipeline depressurizing. Enhanced production is achieved because no time is lost by unnecessary depressurizing, pigging, heating-medium circulation, or removal of hydrate and wax blockages. The seabed temperature at 100-m and greater water depths may range from 7 to {minus}1.5 C, causing a rapid cooling of the hot well streams being transported in subsea flowlines. Under these supercooling conditions, vulnerable crude oils and multiphase compositions will deposit wax and asphalts; also the gas/water phase may freeze solid with hydrate particles. The paper discusses thermal-insulated flowlines, heat-loss compensation with electrical power, electrical power consumption and operation, and subsea electrical-power distribution system.

  8. Ethical issues in artificial nutrition and hydration.

    PubMed

    Fine, Robert L

    2006-04-01

    From the time of Hippocrates, approximately 2500 years ago, medical ethics has been seen as an essential complement to medical science in pursuit of the healing art of medicine. This is no less true today, not only for physicians but also for other essential professionals involved in patient care, including clinical nutrition support practitioners. One aspect of medical ethics that the clinical nutritionist must face involves decisions to provide, withhold, or withdraw artificial nutrition and hydration. Such a decision is not only technical but often has a strong moral component as well. Although it is the physician who writes any such order, the clinical nutritionist as fellow professional should be a part not only of the scientific aspects of the order but of the moral discourse leading to such an order and may certainly be involved in counseling physicians, other healthcare providers, patients, and families alike. This paper is intended to give the clinical nutritionist a familiarity with the discipline of medical ethics and its proper relationship to medical science, politics, and law. This review will then offer a more specific analysis of the ethical aspects of decisions to initiate, withhold, or withdraw artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) and offer particular commentary on the ethically significant pronouncements of Pope John Paul II in March of 2004 related to vegetative patients and artificial or "assisted" nutrition and hydration. PMID:16556921

  9. Intermittent contact hydration scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, G.; Bacci, F.; Carlà, M.; Dolci, D.

    2010-07-01

    Hydration scanning probe microscopy is a technique similar to scanning tunneling microscopy, in which the probe current, sustained by the slight surface conduction of a thin hydration layer covering an insulating support surface, is essentially electrochemical in nature instead of electronic tunneling. Such a technique allows the imaging of a great variety of samples, including insulators, provided that they are hydrophilic, as well as the study of molecular samples of biological interest (such as DNA) fixed on a suitable supporting surface. The main problem to obtain stable and reproducible images comes from the very critical determination of the operating conditions under which the probe-hydration layer interaction does not lead to the formation of a relatively large water meniscus. It has been suggested that this issue can be removed by adding a high frequency oscillation to the probe movement, as in tapping atomic force microscopy. Meniscus formation and breakup have been investigated in order to determine the best values for the amplitude and the frequency of the oscillation. Results obtained in this mode are discussed in comparison with the usual continuous contact mode.

  10. Navigating the Waters of Unconventional Crystalline Hydrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the crystal structures, transformations, and thermodynamics of the two zwitterionic hydrates (Hy2 and HyA) of 3-(4-dibenzo[b,f][1,4]oxepin-11-yl-piperazin-1-yl)-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid (DB7) rationalizes the complex interplay of temperature, water activity, and pH on the solid form stability and transformation pathways to three neutral anhydrate polymorphs (Forms I, II°, and III). HyA contains 1.29 to 1.95 molecules of water per DB7 zwitterion (DB7z). Removal of the essential water stabilizing HyA causes it to collapse to an amorphous phase, frequently concomitantly nucleating the stable anhydrate Forms I and II°. Hy2 is a stoichiometric dihydrate and the only known precursor to Form III, a high energy disordered anhydrate, with the level of disorder depending on the drying conditions. X-ray crystallography, solid state NMR, and H/D exchange experiments on highly crystalline phase pure samples obtained by exquisite control over crystallization, filtration, and drying conditions, along with computational modeling, provided a molecular level understanding of this system. The slow rates of many transformations and sensitivity of equilibria to exact conditions, arising from its varying static and dynamic disorder and water mobility in different phases, meant that characterizing DB7 hydration in terms of simplified hydrate classifications was inappropriate for developing this pharmaceutical. PMID:26075319

  11. Estimating the Aqueous Solubility of Pharmaceutical Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Stephen J; Younis, Usir S; Myrdal, Paul B

    2016-06-01

    Estimation of crystalline solute solubility is well documented throughout the literature. However, the anhydrous crystal form is typically considered with these models, which is not always the most stable crystal form in water. In this study, an equation which predicts the aqueous solubility of a hydrate is presented. This research attempts to extend the utility of the ideal solubility equation by incorporating desolvation energetics of the hydrated crystal. Similar to the ideal solubility equation, which accounts for the energetics of melting, this model approximates the energy of dehydration to the entropy of vaporization for water. Aqueous solubilities, dehydration and melting temperatures, and log P values were collected experimentally and from the literature. The data set includes different hydrate types and a range of log P values. Three models are evaluated, the most accurate model approximates the entropy of dehydration (ΔSd) by the entropy of vaporization (ΔSvap) for water, and utilizes onset dehydration and melting temperatures in combination with log P. With this model, the average absolute error for the prediction of solubility of 14 compounds was 0.32 log units. PMID:27238488

  12. Protein crowding affects hydration structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuhei; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The effect of protein crowding on the structure and dynamics of water was examined from explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of a series of protein G and protein G/villin systems at different protein concentrations. Hydration structure was analyzed in terms of radial distribution functions, three-dimensional hydration sites, and preservation of tetrahedral coordination. Analysis of hydration dynamics focused on self-diffusion rates and dielectric constants as a function of crowding. The results show significant changes in both structure and dynamics of water under highly crowded conditions. The structure of water is altered mostly beyond the first solvation shell. Diffusion rates and dielectric constants are significantly reduced following linear trends as a function of crowding reflecting highly constrained water in crowded environments. The reduced dynamics of diffusion is expected to be strongly related to hydrodynamic properties of crowded cellular environments while the reduced dielectric constant under crowded conditions has implications for the stability of biomolecules in crowded environments. The results from this study suggest a prescription for modeling solvation in simulations of cellular environments. PMID:22352398

  13. Is Iodate a Strongly Hydrated Cation?

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Pham, Thai V.; Fulton, John L.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2011-10-06

    We show, through a combination of density function theory based molecular dynamics simulations (DFTMD) and experimental x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) studies, that the iodate ion (IO3-) is a zwitterion in solution. The local region adjoining the I atom is sufficiently electropositive that three hydrating waters are oriented with their O’s atoms directly interacting with the iodine atom at an I-OH2O distance of 2.95 Å. This is the orientation of water hydrating a cation. Further, approximately 2-3 water molecules hydrate each O of IO3 - through a single H atom in an orientation of the water that is expected for an anion at an IOH2O distance of 3.85 Å. We predict that this structure persists, although to a much lesser degree, for BrO3 -, and ClO3 -. This type of local microstructure profoundly affects the behavior of the "anion" at interfaces and how it interacts with other ionic species in solution.

  14. Navigating the Waters of Unconventional Crystalline Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Braun, Doris E; Koztecki, Lien H; McMahon, Jennifer A; Price, Sarah L; Reutzel-Edens, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    Elucidating the crystal structures, transformations, and thermodynamics of the two zwitterionic hydrates (Hy2 and HyA) of 3-(4-dibenzo[b,f][1,4]oxepin-11-yl-piperazin-1-yl)-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid (DB7) rationalizes the complex interplay of temperature, water activity, and pH on the solid form stability and transformation pathways to three neutral anhydrate polymorphs (Forms I, II°, and III). HyA contains 1.29 to 1.95 molecules of water per DB7 zwitterion (DB7z). Removal of the essential water stabilizing HyA causes it to collapse to an amorphous phase, frequently concomitantly nucleating the stable anhydrate Forms I and II°. Hy2 is a stoichiometric dihydrate and the only known precursor to Form III, a high energy disordered anhydrate, with the level of disorder depending on the drying conditions. X-ray crystallography, solid state NMR, and H/D exchange experiments on highly crystalline phase pure samples obtained by exquisite control over crystallization, filtration, and drying conditions, along with computational modeling, provided a molecular level understanding of this system. The slow rates of many transformations and sensitivity of equilibria to exact conditions, arising from its varying static and dynamic disorder and water mobility in different phases, meant that characterizing DB7 hydration in terms of simplified hydrate classifications was inappropriate for developing this pharmaceutical. PMID:26075319

  15. Combinatorial molecular optimization of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Abdolhosseini Qomi, M.J.; Krakowiak, K.J.; Bauchy, M.; Stewart, K.L.; Shahsavari, R.; Jagannathan, D.; Brommer, D.B.; Baronnet, A.; Buehler, M.J.; Yip, S.; Ulm, F.-J; Van Vliet, K.J.; Pellenq, R.J-.M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous presence in the built environment, concrete’s molecular-level properties are only recently being explored using experimental and simulation studies. Increasing societal concerns about concrete’s environmental footprint have provided strong motivation to develop new concrete with greater specific stiffness or strength (for structures with less material). Herein, a combinatorial approach is described to optimize properties of cement hydrates. The method entails screening a computationally generated database of atomic structures of calcium-silicate-hydrate, the binding phase of concrete, against a set of three defect attributes: calcium-to-silicon ratio as compositional index and two correlation distances describing medium-range silicon-oxygen and calcium-oxygen environments. Although structural and mechanical properties correlate well with calcium-to-silicon ratio, the cross-correlation between all three defect attributes reveals an indentation modulus-to-hardness ratio extremum, analogous to identifying optimum network connectivity in glass rheology. We also comment on implications of the present findings for a novel route to optimize the nanoscale mechanical properties of cement hydrate. PMID:25248305

  16. Mineralogy and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Two C-Rich Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snead, C. J.; McKeegan, K. D.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites reflect mixing between a O-16-rich reservoir and a O-17,O-18-rich reservoir produced via mass-independent fractionation. The composition of the O-16-rich reservoir is reasonably well constrained, but material representing the O-17,O-18-rich end-member is rare. Self-shielding models predict that cometary water, presumed to represent this reservoir, should be enriched in O-17 and O-18 18O by > 200%. Hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) rich in carbonaceous matter may be derived from comets; such particles likely contain the products of reaction between O-16-poor water and anhydrous silicates that formed in the inner solar system. Here we present mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of two C-rich hydrated IDPs, L2083E47 and L2071E35.

  17. Direct observations of gas-hydrate formation in natural porous media on the micro-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouachi, M.; Sell, K.; Falenty, A.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.; Pinzer, B.; Saenger, E. H.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Gas hydrates (GH) are crystalline, inclusion compounds consisting of hydrogen-bonded water network encaging small gas molecules such as methane, ethane, CO2, etc (Sloan and Koh 2008). Natural gas hydrates are found worldwide in marine sediments and permafrost regions as a result of a reaction of biogenic or thermogenic gas with water under elevated pressure. Although a large amount of research on GH has been carried out over the years, the micro-structural aspects of GH growth, and in particular the contacts with the sedimentary matrix as well as the details of the distribution remain largely speculative. The present study was undertaken to shed light onto the well-established but not fully understood seismic anomalies, in particular the unusual attenuation of seismic waves in GH-bearing sediments, which may well be linked to micro-structural features. Observations of in-situ GH growth have been performed in a custom-build pressure cell (operating pressures up to several bar) mounted at the TOMCAT beam line of SLS/ PSI. In order to provide sufficient absorption contrast between phases and reduce pressure requirements for the cell we have used Xe instead of CH4. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first direct observation of GH growth in natural porous media with sub-micron spatial resolution and gives insight into the nucleation location and growth process of GH. The progress of the formation of sI Xe-hydrate in natural quartz sand was observed with a time-resolution of several minutes; the runs were conducted with an excess of a free-gas phase and show that the nucleation starts at the gas-water interface. Initially, a GH film is formed at this interface with a typical thickness of several μm; this film may well be permeable to gas as suggested in the past - which would explain the rapid transport of gas molecules for further conversion of water to hydrate, completed in less than 20 min. Clearly, initially the growth is directed mainly into the

  18. Effects of hydration on laser soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Eric K.; Brown, Dennis T.; Kovach, Ian S.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1997-05-01

    Laser welding with albumin-based tissue solder has been investigated as an alternative to surgical suturing. Many surgical procedures require the soldered tissues to be in a hydrated environment. We have studied the effects of hydration on laser soldered rat dermis and baboon articular cartilage in vitro. The solder is composed of human serum albumin, sodium hyaluronate and indocyanine green. We used a micro-pipette to deposit 2 (mu) l of solder on each tissue specimen. An 808 nm cw laser beam with irradiance of 27 W/cm2 was scanned 4 times over the same solder area at a constant speed of 0.84 mm/sec. After photo-coagulation, each tissue specimen was cut into two halves at the center of the solder, perpendicular to the direction of the scanning laser beam. One half was reserved as control while the other half was soaked in phosphate buffered saline for a designated hydration period. The hydration periods were 1 hr, 1, 2, and 7 days. All tissue specimens were fixed in glutaraldahyde, then prepared for scanning electron microcopy analysis. For most of the specimens, there was non-uniform coagulation across the thickness of the solder. Closer to the laser beam, the upper solder region formed a more dense coagulum. While the region closer to solder-tissue interface, the solder aggregated into small globules. This non-uniform coagulation was likely caused by non-uniform energy distribution during photocoagulation. The protein globules and coagulum seem to be responsible for the solder attachment from the specimen surface. However, we have noted that the solder detached from the cartilage substrate as early as after 1 hr of hydration. On the other hand, the solder attached to the dermis much better than to cartilage. This may be explained by the difference in surface roughness of the two tissue types. The dermal layer of the skin is composed of collagen matrix which may provide a better entrapment of the solder than the smooth surface of articular cartilage.

  19. Hydration of polyethylene glycol-grafted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, O; Barenholz, Y; Katzhendler, J; Priev, A

    1998-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effect of polyethylene glycol of 2000 molecular weight (PEG2000) attached to a dialkylphosphatidic acid (dihexadecylphosphatidyl (DHP)-PEG2000) on the hydration and thermodynamic stability of lipid assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry, densitometry, and ultrasound velocity and absorption measurements were used for thermodynamic and hydrational characterization. Using a differential scanning calorimetry technique we showed that each molecule of PEG2000 binds 136 +/- 4 molecules of water. For PEG2000 covalently attached to the lipid molecules organized in micelles, the water binding increases to 210 +/- 6 water molecules. This demonstrates that the two different structural configurations of the PEG2000, a random coil in the case of the free PEG and a brush in the case of DHP-PEG2000 micelles, differ in their hydration level. Ultrasound absorption changes in liposomes reflect mainly the heterophase fluctuations and packing defects in the lipid bilayer. The PEG-induced excess ultrasound absorption of the lipid bilayer at 7.7 MHz for PEG-lipid concentrations over 5 mol % indicates the increase in the relaxation time of the headgroup rotation due to PEG-PEG interactions. The adiabatic compressibility (calculated from ultrasound velocity and density) of the lipid bilayer of the liposome increases monotonically with PEG-lipid concentration up to approximately 7 mol %, reflecting release of water from the lipid headgroup region. Elimination of this water, induced by grafted PEG, leads to a decrease in bilayer defects and enhanced lateral packing of the phospholipid acyl chains. We assume that the dehydration of the lipid headgroup region in conjunction with the increase of the hydration of the outer layer by grafting PEG in brush configuration are responsible for increasing thermodynamic stability of the liposomes at 5-7 mol % of PEG-lipid. At higher PEG-lipid concentrations, compressibility and partial volume of the lipid phase

  20. Hydrothermal reactions of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    The emphasis of the work done has been to determine the reactivities of two ashes believed to be representative of those generated. A bituminous ash and a lignitic ash have been investigated. The reactions of these ashes undergo when subjected to mild hydrothermal conditions were explored. The nature of the reactions which the ashes undergo when alkaline activators, calcium hydroxide and calcium sulfate are present was also investigated. It was determined that calcium silicate hydrate, calcium aluminate hydrate, and the calcium sulfoaluminate hydrate ettringite form under these conditions. It appears 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}3CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}32H{sub 2}O (ettringite) formation needs to be considered in ashes which contain significant amounts of sulfate. Therefore the stability region for ettringite was established. It was also determined that calcium silicate hydrate, exhibiting a high internal surface area, will readily form with hydrothermal treatment between 50{degrees} and 100{degrees}C. This phase is likely to have a significant capacity to take up heavy metals and oxyanions and this ability is being explored.