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Sample records for hydrate gas-solid reaction

  1. Carbon-14 immobilization via the CO/sub 2/-Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate gas-solid reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Although no restrictions have been placed on the release of carbon-14, it has been identified as a potential health hazard due to the ease in which it may be assimilated into the biosphere. The intent of the Carbon-14 Immobilization Program, funded through the Airborne Waste Program Management Office, is to develop and demonstrate a novel process for restricting off-gas releases of carbon-14 from various nuclear facilities. The process utilizes the CO/sub 2/-Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate gas-solid reaction to directly remove and immobilize carbon-14. The reaction product, BaCO/sub 3/, possesses both the thermal and chemical stability desired for long-term waste disposal. The process is capable of providing decontamination factors in excess of 1000 and reactant utilization of greater than 99% in the treatment of high volumetric, airlike (330 ppM CO/sub 2/) gas streams. For the treatment of an air-based off-gas stream, the use of packed beds of Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O flakes to remove CO/sub 2/ has been demonstrated. However, the operating conditions must be maintained between certain upper and lower limits with respect to the partial pressure of water. If the water vapor pressure in the gas is less than the dissociation vapor pressure of Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O, the bed will deactivate. If the vapor pressure is considerably greater, pressure drop problems will increase with increasing humidity as the particles curl and degrade. Results have indicated that when operated in the proper regime, the bulk of the increase in pressure drop results from the conversion of Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O to BaCO/sub 3/ and not from the hydration of the commercial Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O (i.e. Ba(OH)/sub 2/.7.50H/sub 2/O) to Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O.

  2. Application of the carbon dioxide-barium hydroxide hydrate gas-solid reaction for the treatment of dilute carbon dioxide-bearing gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The removal of trace components from gas streams via irreversible gas-solid reactions in an area of interest to the chemical engineering profession. This research effort addresses the use of fixed beds of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate flakes for the removal of an acid gas, CO/sub 2/, from air that contains approx. 330 ppM/sub v/ CO/sub 2/. Areas of investigation encompassed: (1) an extensive literature review of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate chemistry, (2) microscale studies on 0.150-g samples to develop a better understanding of the reaction, (3) process studies at the macroscale level with 10.2-cm-ID fixed-bed reactors, and (4) the development of a model for predicting fixed-bed performance. Experimental studies indicated fixed beds of commercial Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O flakes at ambient temperatures to be capable of high CO/sub 2/-removal efficiencies (effluent concentrations <100 ppB), high reactant utilization (>99%), and an acceptable pressure drop (1.8 kPa/m at a superficial gas velocity of 13 cm/s). Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O was determined to be more reactive toward CO/sub 2/ than either Ba(OH)/sub 2/.3H/sub 2/O or Ba(OH)/sub 2/.1H/sub 2/O. A key variable in the development of this fixed-bed process was relative humidity. Operation at conditions with effluent relative humidities >60% resulted in significant recrystallization and restructuring of the flake and subsequent pressure-drop problems.

  3. Gas-solid reaction-rate enhancement by pressure cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, H. Y.; Aboukheshem, M. B.

    1992-06-01

    An experimental study and mathematical modeling of the effects of external pressure cycling on gas-solid reactions have been conducted using the reduction of nickel oxide pellets by hy-drogen. Experiments were carried out in two phases: In the first phase, the intrinsic kinetic parameters were measured, and in the second phase, the gas-solid reaction was carried out under a constant or cycling external pressure. The effects of the frequency and amplitude of pressure cycling were studied at various reaction conditions. Pressure cycling substantially increases the overall rate of the reaction. A mathematical model was developed from the first principles to establish the extent of the overall reaction-rate enhancement and subsequently to analyze the experimental observations. The calculated values from the mathematical model are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects are most pronounced when the overall rate under a constant pressure is controlled by diffusion. Depending on the reaction condition, a very large degree of rate enhancement could be achieved. Furthermore, low-amplitude pressure waves, like acoustic waves, could significantly increase the rates of gas-solid reactions.

  4. Process of preparing nitrogen trifluoride by gas-solid reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Aramaki, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, H.; Suenaga, T.

    1985-09-24

    NF3 is prepared with good yields by reaction between fluorine gas and an ammonium complex of a metal fluoride, such as (NH4)3AIF6, in solid phase. The metal flouride ammonium complex may be one additionally containing an alkali metal, such as (NH4)2NaAIF6. The gas-solid reaction is carried out preferably at temperatures above 80 C. and at relatively low partial pressures of fluorine in the gas phase of the reaction system, so that the reaction is easy to control.

  5. A generalized kinetic model for heterogeneous gas-solid reactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2012-08-21

    We present a generalized kinetic model for gas-solid heterogeneous reactions taking place at the interface between two phases. The model studies the reaction kinetics by taking into account the reactions at the interface, as well as the transport process within the product layer. The standard unreacted shrinking core model relies on the assumption of quasi-static diffusion that results in a steady-state concentration profile of gas reactant in the product layer. By relaxing this assumption and resolving the entire problem, general solutions can be obtained for reaction kinetics, including the reaction front velocity and the conversion (volume fraction of reacted solid). The unreacted shrinking core model is shown to be accurate and in agreement with the generalized model for slow reaction (or fast diffusion), low concentration of gas reactant, and small solid size. Otherwise, a generalized kinetic model should be used. PMID:22920132

  6. A generalized kinetic model for heterogeneous gas-solid reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijie; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-08-01

    We present a generalized kinetic model for gas-solid heterogeneous reactions taking place at the interface between two phases. The model studies the reaction kinetics by taking into account the reactions at the interface, as well as the transport process within the product layer. The standard unreacted shrinking core model relies on the assumption of quasi-static diffusion that results in a steady-state concentration profile of gas reactant in the product layer. By relaxing this assumption and resolving the entire problem, general solutions can be obtained for reaction kinetics, including the reaction front velocity and the conversion (volume fraction of reacted solid). The unreacted shrinking core model is shown to be accurate and in agreement with the generalized model for slow reaction (or fast diffusion), low concentration of gas reactant, and small solid size. Otherwise, a generalized kinetic model should be used.

  7. Ultrasonic levitation for the examination of gas/solid reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavouras, A.; Krammer, G.

    2003-10-01

    An experimental setup based on acoustic levitation for the examination of gas/solid reactions is presented. In this setup single particles in the diameter range 1 mm-30 μm can be held against gravity for any wanted time in a defined gas atmosphere at elevated temperatures. The change of particle size, shape, and position can be measured and recorded using an optical device, consisting of a camera and a long range microscope. Basic experiments with inert particles of different shape and solid density have shown that the axial position of a reacting particle can be employed to derive its weight change. A method to evaluate this change of the recorded position for the according weight change is proposed. Exemplary results in the context of dry flue gas cleaning using Ca(OH)2 powder are presented. Single Ca(OH)2 particles are exposed to a well defined gas atmosphere and after some time these particles are retrieved from the ultrasonic field for further analyses. Only an in situ measurement of the particle weight change (i.e., without removing the particle from the well defined reactive atmosphere) brings information regarding the uptake of water by the sorbent, which accompanies SO2 and HCl absorption.

  8. METHOD FOR VARIATION OF GRAIN SIZE IN STUDIES OF GAS-SOLID REACTIONS INVOLVING CAO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a method for varying grain size in studies of gas-solid reactions involving CaO. (Note: Introducing grain size as an independent experimental variable should contribute to improved understanding of reactions in porous solids.) Calcining 1 micrometer CaCO3 part...

  9. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  10. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection in Noble Gas Solids for Measurements of Rare Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep; Bailey, Kevin G.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Xu, Chen-Yu; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Optical detection of single atoms captured in solid noble gas matrices provides an alternative technique to study rare nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics. I will describe the prospects of applying this approach for cross section measurements of the ^22Ne,,),25Mg reaction, which is the crucial neutron source for the weak s process inside of massive stars. Noble gas solids are a promising medium for the capture, detection, and manipulation of atoms and nuclear spins. They provide stable and chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of guest species. Because noble gas solids are transparent at optical wavelengths, the guest atoms can be probed using lasers. We have observed that ytterbium in solid neon exhibits intersystem crossing (ISC) which results in a strong green fluorescence (546 nm) under excitation with blue light (389 nm). Several groups have observed ISC in many other guest-host pairs, notably magnesium in krypton. Because of the large wavelength separation of the excitation light and fluorescence light, optical detection of individual embedded guest atoms is feasible. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  11. Venus volcanism: Rate estimates from laboratory studies of sulfur gas-solid reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.; Prinn, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Thermochemical reactions between sulfur-bearing gases in the atmosphere of Venus and calcium-, iron-, magnesium-, and sulfur-bearing minerals on the surface of Venus are an integral part of a hypothesized cycle of thermochemical and photochemical reactions responsible for the maintenance of the global sulfuric acid cloud cover on Venus. SO2 is continually removed from the Venus atmosphere by reaction with calcium bearing minerals on the planet's surface. The rate of volcanism required to balance SO2 depletion by reactions with calcium bearing minerals on the Venus surface can therefore be deduced from a knowledge of the relevant gas-solid reaction rates combined with reasonable assumptions about the sulfur content of the erupted material (gas + magma). A laboratory program was carried out to measure the rates of reaction between SO2 and possible crustal minerals on Venus. The reaction of CaCO3(calcite) + SO2 yields CaSO4 (anhydrite) + CO was studied. Brief results are given.

  12. Kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions important in the Venus sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The thermochemical net reaction CaCO3 + SO2 yields CaSO4 + CO is predicted to be an important sink for incorporation of SO2 into the Venus crust. The reaction rate law was established to understand the dependence of rate on experimental variables such as temperature and partial pressure of SO2, CO2, and O2. The experimental approach was a variant of the thermogravimetric method often employed to study the kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions. Clear calcite crystals were heated at constant temperature in SO2-bearing gas streams for varying time periods. Reaction rate was determined by three independent methods. A weighted linear least squares fit to all rate data yielded a rate equation. Based on the Venera 13, 14 and Vega 2 observations of CaO content of the Venus atmosphere, SO2 at the calculated rate would be removed from the Venus atmosphere in about 1,900,00 years. The most plausible endogenic source of the sulfur needed to replenish atmospheric SO2 is volcanism. The annual amount of erupted material needed for the replenishment depends on sulfur content; three ratios are used to calculate rates ranging from 0.4 to 11 cu km/year. This geochemically derived volcanism rate can be used to test if geophysically derived rates are correct. The work also suggests that Venus is less volcanically active than the Earth.

  13. Opaque Mineral Assemblages at Chondrule Boundaries in the Vigarano CV Chondrite: Evidence for Gas-Solid Reactions Following Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, Dante S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies of opaque minerals in primitive ordinary chondrites suggest that metal grains exposed at chondrule boundaries were corroded when volatile elements recondensed after the transient heating event responsible for chondrule formation. Metal grains at chondrule boundaries in the Bishunpur (LL3.1) chondrite are rimmed by troilite and fayalite. If these layers formed by gas solid reaction, then the composition of the corrosion products can provide information on the chondrule formation environment. Given the broad similarities among chondrules from different chondrite groups, similar scale layers should occur on chondrules in other primitive meteorite groups. Here I report on metal grains at chondrule boundaries in Vigarano (CV3).

  14. Gas/solid carbon branching ratios in surface-mediated reactions and the incorporation of carbonaceous material into planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Ferguson, Frank T.; Carayon, Alicia

    2016-06-01

    We report the ratio of the initial carbon available as CO that forms gas-phase compounds compared to the fraction that deposits as a carbonaceous solid (the gas/solid branching ratio) as a function of time and temperature for iron, magnetite, and amorphous iron silicate smoke catalysts during surface-mediated reactions in an excess of hydrogen and in the presence of N2. This fraction varies from more than 99% for an amorphous iron silicate smoke at 673 K to less than 40% for a magnetite catalyst at 873 K. The CO not converted into solids primarily forms methane, ethane, water, and CO2, as well as a very wide range of organic molecules at very low concentration. Carbon deposits do not form continuous coatings on the catalytic surfaces, but instead form extremely high surface area per unit volume "filamentous" structures. While these structures will likely form more slowly but over much longer times in protostellar nebulae than in our experiments due to the much lower partial pressure of CO, such fluffy coatings on the surfaces of chondrules or calcium aluminum inclusions could promote grain-grain sticking during low-velocity collisions.

  15. Gas/solid carbon branching ratios in surface-mediated reactions and the incorporation of carbonaceous material into planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Ferguson, Frank T.; Carayon, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    We report the ratio of the initial carbon available as CO that forms gas-phase compounds compared to the fraction that deposits as a carbonaceous solid (the gas/solid branching ratio) as a function of time and temperature for iron, magnetite, and amorphous iron silicate smoke catalysts during surface-mediated reactions in an excess of hydrogen and in the presence of N2. This fraction varies from more than 99% for an amorphous iron silicate smoke at 673 K to less than 40% for a magnetite catalyst at 873 K. The CO not converted into solids primarily forms methane, ethane, water, and CO2, as well as a very wide range of organic molecules at very low concentration. Carbon deposits do not form continuous coatings on the catalytic surfaces, but instead form extremely high surface area per unit volume "filamentous" structures. While these structures will likely form more slowly but over much longer times in protostellar nebulae than in our experiments due to the much lower partial pressure of CO, such fluffy coatings on the surfaces of chondrules or calcium aluminum inclusions could promote grain-grain sticking during low-velocity collisions.

  16. Reaction of disodium cromoglycate with hydrated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, A.J.; Arroyo, C.M.; Cockerham, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    A possible mechanism by which disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) prevents a decrease in regional cerebral blood flow but not hypotension in primates following whole body gamma-irradiation was studied. Several studies have implicated superoxide radicals (O/sub 2//sup -/.) in intestinal and cerebral vascular disorders following ischemia and ionizing radiation, respectively. O/sub 2//sup -/. is formed during radiolysis in the reaction between hydrated electrons (e-aq) and dissolved oxygen. For this reason, the efficiency of DSCG to scavenge e-q and possibly prevent the formation of O/sub 2//sup -/. was studied. Hydrated electrons were produced by photolysis of potassium ferrocyanide solutions. The rate constant, k = 2.92 x 10(10) M-1s-1 for the reaction between e-aq and DSCG was determined in competition experiments using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). This spin trap reacts rapidly with e-aq followed by protonation to yield the ESR observable DMPO-H spin adduct. The results show that DSCG is an efficient e-aq scavenger and may effectively compete with oxygen for e-aq preventing the radiolytic formation of O/sub 2//sup -/..

  17. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seok-Woo

    2012-11-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  18. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  19. Application of noncatalytic gas-solid reactions for a single pellet of changing size to the modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal char containing sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Saxena, S.C.; Land, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A mechanistic model is developed for coal char combustion, with sulfur retention by limestone or dolomite sorbent, in a gas fluidized bed employing noncatalytic single pellet gas-solid reactions. The shrinking core model is employed to describe the kinetics of chemical reactions taking place on a single pellet; changes in pellet size as the reaction proceeds are considered. The solids are assumed to be in back-mix condition whereas the gas flow is regarded to be in plug flow. Most char combustion occurs near the gas distributor plate (at the bottom of the bed), where the bubbles are small and consequently the mass transfer rate is high. For such a case, the analysis is considerably simplified by ignoring the bubble phase since it plays an insignificant role in the overall rate of carbon conversion. Bubble-free operation is also encounterd in the turbulent regime, where the gas flow is quite high and classical bubbles do not exist. Formulation of the model includes setting up heat and mass balance equations pertaining to a single particle (1) exposed to a varying reactant concentration along the height of the bed and (2) whose size changes during reaction. These equations are then solved numerically to account for particles of all sizes in the bed in obtaining the overall carbon conversion efficiency and resultant sulfur retention. In particular, the influence on sorbent requirement of several fluid-bed variables such as oxygen concentration profile, particle size, reaction rate for sulfation reaction, and suflur adsorption efficiency are examined.

  20. MERCURY REACTIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHLORINE SPECIES: HOMOGENOUS GAS PHASE AND HETEROGENOUS GAS-SOLID PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics of mercury chlorination (with HC1) were studied using a flow reactor system with an on-line Hg analyzer and spciation sampling using a set of impingers. Kinetic parameters, such as reaction order (a), activation energy (Eu) and the overall rate constant (k') were es...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of nano-structured molybdenum-iron intermetallics by gas-solid reaction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Geassy, A. A.; Seetheraman, S.

    2016-03-01

    Ammonium molybdate and ferrous oxalate were used for the synthesis of nano-structured Mo-Fe intermetallics. Co-precipitation technique was applied to produce Mo/Fe precursors containing 58/42, 72/28 and 30/70 mass% respectively. The different phases formed were identified by XRD. The macro- and microstructures were microscopically examined by Reflected Light Microscope (RLM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with Electron Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS). TG-DTA-DSC technique was applied to follow up the behavior of precursors up to 900oC (10K/min.). Endothermic peaks were detected at 97.8, 196.9 and 392.7oC due to the decomposition reactions to produce MoO3 and Fe2O3. The exothermic peak resulted at 427.8oC is due to the solid state reaction between these oxides to form Fe2(MoO4)3. Precursors were isothermally reduced at 600-850oC in a flow of purified H2 and the O2-weight loss from the reduction reactions was continuously recorded as a function of time. The isothermal reduction behavior of precursors was investigated. The structures of reduced products and the different phases formed were investigated and correlated with the reduction conditions. At >60% reduction extents, Fe2(MoO4)3] phase was first reduced to Fe2MoO3O8 before the formation of FeMo, while FeMoO4 and MoO2 were reduced to FeMo and Mo. In precursors containing higher content of Fe2O3, FeMo, Fe3Mo and Fe phases were produced. The visual observation of reduced samples showed that the volume was gradually shrinking with rise in temperature up to 800oC and beyond which a measurable swelling was observed reaching about 170% at 900oC.

  2. Gas-Solid Displacement Reactions for Converting Silica Diatom Frustules into MgO and TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Tugba Kalem

    2004-12-19

    Technology for the microfabrication of freely moving parts began with a Bell Labs microgear spun by an air jet, and electrostatic silicon micro motors in the mid-1980s. It continued with development work on micropositioning of optics, miniature heat exchangers, small fluidic devices, and chemical reaction chambers. Recently, there has been a great deal of interest centered on the design and manufacture of devices of nanometer proportions and this speculation has spawned a new industry named, nanotechnology. Despite the technological and economic promise of this technology, current commercial micro/mesofabrication methods have largely been based upon two-dimensional processing principles which is not well suited to the low-cost mass production of three-dimensional micro devices with complex geometries and meso/nanoscale features. Diatoms are three dimensional (3D) microstructures from nature that provide a practical alternative for nanotechnology and microfabrication. Diatoms (Figure 1) are single-celled micro algae that form rigid cell walls (frustules) composed of amorphous silica. Their dimensions can range from less than 1 micron to several hundreds of microns. They are distributed throughout the world in aquatic, semi-aquatic and moist habitats, and extremely abundant in freshwater and marine ecosystems. Diatoms are thought to be responsible for up to 25% of the world's net primary production of organic carbon (by transforming of carbon dioxide and water into sugars by photosynthesis). Approximately 10{sup 5} unique diatom frustule shapes have been claimed to exist in nature. The frustules are composed of two valves that fit together like a petri-dish, connected to each other by one or more girdle bands. The frustule wall consists of a nanoporous assembly of silica nanoparticles. They absorb soluble silica from water even at extremely low concentrations and metabolize and deposit it as an external skeleton. Continued reproduction of a single parent diatom can

  3. Gas-solid reactions of single crystals: A study of the reaction of bromine with single crystals of trans-cinnamic acid and a range of its derivatives by infrared and Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Samantha L; Almond, Matthew J; Hollins, Peter

    2005-05-01

    Single crystals of trans-cinnamic acid and of a range of derivatives of this compound containing halogen substituents on the aromatic ring have been reacted with 165 Torr pressure of bromine vapour in a sealed desiccator at 20 degrees C for 1 week. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopic examination of the crystals shows that bromination of the aliphatic double bond, but not of the aromatic ring, has occurred. It is demonstrated also that the reaction is truly gas solid in nature. A time-dependent study of these reactions shows that they do not follow a smooth diffusion-controlled pathway. Rather the reactions appear to be inhomogeneous and to occur at defects within the crystal. The reaction products are seen to flake from the surface of the crystal. It is shown, therefore, that these are not single crystal to single crystal transitions, as have been observed previously for the photodimerisation of trans-cinnamic acid and several of its derivatives. It is shown that there are no by-products of the reaction and that finely ground samples react to form the same products as single crystals. PMID:19787900

  4. Competitive Oxidation and Hydration During Aqueous Alteration of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.; Mironenko, M. V.; Shock, E. L.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Studies of chondrites show that incorporation of H2O ice during formation of asteroids followed by radioactive heating caused partial oxidation and hydration of primary reduced and anhydrous rocks. Oxidation of kamacite, phosphides, troilite and organic polymers occurred through consumption of water s oxygen and release of H2. Hydration caused formation of serpentine, saponite, chlorite, talc and hydrated salts. Since H2O was the major reactant in oxidation and hydration, these processes could have been competitive. Redox reactions in asteroids should have been closely connected to hydration (dehydration) during aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. For example, dehydration and reduction release H2O that can be consumed in oxidation and hydration, respectively. We model asteroidal processes in order to quantify the fate of H2O and water s oxygen in major redox and hydration/dehydration reactions. Model: Equilibrium compositions in the gas-solid-liquid

  5. Kinetic study of hydrated lime reaction with HCl.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rong; Chin, Terence; Liang, David Tee; Laursen, Karin; Ong, Wan Yean; Yao, Kaiwen; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2003-06-01

    Hydrochloride (HCl) is an acidic pollutant present in the flue gas of most municipal or hazardous waste incinerators. Hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) is often used as a dry sorbent for injection in a spray reactor to remove HCI. However, due to the short residence time encountered, this control method has generally been found to have low conversion efficiencies which results in the high lime usage and generates large amount of fly ash as solid wastes. A fundamental study was carried outto investigate the kinetics of HCl-lime reaction under simulated flue gas conditions in order to better understand the process thereby providing a basis for an optimized lime usage and reduced fly ash production. The initial reaction rate and conversion of three limes were studied using a thermogravimetric analyzer by varying the gas flow rate, temperature (170-400 degrees C), and HCI concentrations (600-1200 mg/m3) as well as the associated particle size and surface area of the limes. The initial lime conversions were found to rely mostly on the residence time, while the ultimate lime conversions were strongly influenced by temperature and the reaction products. CaOHCI was found to be the primary product in most cases, while for one specific lime, CaCl2 was the ultimate conversion product after an extended time period. The true utilization of lime in flue gas cleanup is thus higher when CaOHCl is considered as the final product than those based on CaCl2 as the final product, which has been commonly used in previous studies. The initial reaction was controlled by diffusion of HCl in gas phase and the subsequent reaction by gaseous diffusion through the developing product layer. Increasing the HCI concentration raised the initial rate as well as conversion. However, overloading the lime with excessive HCI caused clogging at its surface and a drop in the ultimate conversion. Limes with smaller particle diameters and higher surface areas were found to be more reactive. The effect of gas

  6. Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2005-03-10

    The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

  7. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid–solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, Mg(OH){sub 2} peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface. - Graphical abstract: There was existence of a peeling-off process in the gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) MgO hydration system. - Highlights: • Magnesium oxide hydration in gas–liquid–solid system was investigated. • The experimental data in three-phase system could be fitted well by two models. • The morphology analysis suggested that there was existence of a peel-off process.

  8. Obsidian hydration profile measurements using a nuclear reaction technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.R.; Leich, D.A.; Tombrello, T.A.; Ericson, J.E.; Friedman, I.

    1974-01-01

    AMBIENT water diffuses into the exposed surfaces of obsidian, forming a hydration layer which increases in thickness with time to a maximum depth of 20-40 ??m (ref. 1), this layer being the basic foundation of obsidian dating2,3. ?? 1974 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas-liquid-solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid-solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH)2 precipitation, Mg(OH)2 peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface.

  10. Thermodynamics of the maleate and citraconate hydration reactions catalysed by malease from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; van den Tweel, W J; Hartmans, S

    1993-11-01

    Malease from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes catalyses the hydration of both maleate and citraconate to D-malate and D-citramalate, respectively. The Kapp for these hydration reactions were 2050 and 104, respectively, under standard biochemical conditions (25 degrees C, pH 7.0, I = 0.1). The influence of the pH (6.0-8.5) on Kapp was determined. The Gibbs-free-energy changes under standard biochemical conditions for the hydration of the dianionic acids were calculated to be -19.28 kJ.mol-1 and -11.65 kJ.mol-1, respectively. From the obtained data together with data from the literature, the Gibbs free energy of formation of maleate2- and citraconate2- were calculated to be -588.91 kJ.mol-1 and -600.56 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The influence of the temperature (10-40 degrees C) on Kapp was determined for both hydration reactions. The enthalpy change (delta H degrees') and entropy change (delta S degrees') under standard biochemical conditions for the maleate2- (delta H degrees' = 18.07 kJ.mol-1, delta S degrees' = 2.94 J.mol-1 x K-1) and citraconate2- (delta H degrees' = -22.55 kJ.mol-1, delta S degrees' = -35.92 kJ.mol-1 x K-1) hydration reactions were calculated. The reaction rate of malease from Ps. pseudoalcaligenes was studied for both hydration reactions as a function of temperature. From these studies, the Gibbs free energies of activation for the maleate and citraconate hydration reactions catalysed by malease from Ps. pseudoalcaligenes were calculated to be 62.21 kJ.mol-1 and 63.43 kJ.mol-1, respectively. PMID:8223624

  11. Reactions of laser-ablated U atoms with HF: infrared spectra and quantum chemical calculations of HUF, UH, and UF in noble gas solids.

    PubMed

    Vent-Schmidt, Thomas; Andrews, Lester; Riedel, Sebastian

    2015-03-19

    Reactions of laser-ablated U atoms with HF produce HUF as the major product and UH and UF as minor products, which are identified from their argon and neon matrix infrared spectra. Our assignment of HUF is confirmed by the observation of DUF and close agreement with observed and calculated vibrational frequencies and deuterium shifts in the vibrational frequencies. Our previous observation of the UH diatomic molecule from argon matrix experiments with H2, HD, and D2 as reagents is confirmed through its present observation with HF and DF, and with recent higher level quantum chemical calculations. The HF reaction provides a lower concentration of F in the system and thus simplifies the fluorine chemistry relative to similar U atom reactions with F2, and the new matrix identification of UF here is consistent with recent high level calculations on UF. In addition, we find evidence for the higher oxidation state secondary reaction products UHF2, UHF3, and UH2F2. PMID:25080179

  12. Overcoming Short-Circuit in Lead-Free CH3NH3SnI3 Perovskite Solar Cells via Kinetically Controlled Gas-Solid Reaction Film Fabrication Process.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takamichi; Cao, Duyen H; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Song, Tze-Bin; Sato, Yoshiharu; Aramaki, Shinji; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-03-01

    The development of Sn-based perovskite solar cells has been challenging because devices often show short-circuit behavior due to poor morphologies and undesired electrical properties of the thin films. A low-temperature vapor-assisted solution process (LT-VASP) has been employed as a novel kinetically controlled gas-solid reaction film fabrication method to prepare lead-free CH3NH3SnI3 thin films. We show that the solid SnI2 substrate temperature is the key parameter in achieving perovskite films with high surface coverage and excellent uniformity. The resulting high-quality CH3NH3SnI3 films allow the successful fabrication of solar cells with drastically improved reproducibility, reaching an efficiency of 1.86%. Furthermore, our Kelvin probe studies show the VASP films have a doping level lower than that of films prepared from the conventional one-step method, effectively lowering the film conductivity. Above all, with (LT)-VASP, the short-circuit behavior often obtained from the conventional one-step-fabricated Sn-based perovskite devices has been overcome. This study facilitates the path to more successful Sn-perovskite photovoltaic research. PMID:26877089

  13. Effect of hydration on the hydrogen abstraction reaction by HO in DMS and its oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Solvejg; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2010-04-15

    The gas-phase hydrogen abstraction reaction between the HO radical and sulfur containing species in the absence and presence of a single water molecule is investigated theoretically. The sulfur containing species dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and dimethyl sulfone are considered. The calculations are carried out with a mixture of density function theory and second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. We find that the energy of the hydrated transition state structures for the hydrogen abstraction reactions is lowered compared to that of the nonhydrated ones. Furthermore, the energy difference between the reaction complex and the transition state is reduced when one water molecule is added. The atmospheric abundance of the different hydrated complexes is estimated in order to assess the relative importance of the possible reaction mechanisms. PMID:20088555

  14. Effect of hydration and dehydration on initiation and dynamics of some physiological reactions in desiccation tolerant cyanobacterium Scytonema geitleri.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, B S; Tripathi, S N

    1998-06-01

    The effect of hydration and dehydration has been studied on extent and recovery of some metabolic reactions in desiccation tolerant terrestrial cyanobacterium Scytonema geitleri. The results show that the energy transducing reactions like photochemical reactions of photosynthesis recover first, followed by increase in ATP pool size. During later phase of hydration, appearance of energy consuming processes such as CO2 fixation and nitrogen fixation have been observed. Sensitivity of reactions during dehydration followed the pattern reverse to recovery processes. PMID:9803667

  15. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Ju-hyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2011-06-15

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (straetlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt volume contraction regardless of the molecular size of the pressure-transmitting media. This volume discontinuity could be associated to a structural transition or to the movement of the weakly bound interlayer water molecules in the AFm structure. The experimental results seem to indicate that the pressure-induced dehydration is the dominant mechanism especially with hygroscopic pressure medium. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state was used to compute the bulk modulus of the minerals. Due to the discontinuity in the pressure-volume diagram, a two stage bulk modulus of each AFm phase was calculated. The abnormal volume compressibility for the AFm phases caused a significant change to their bulk modulus. The reliability of this experiment is verified by comparing the bulk modulus of hydrogarnet with previous studies.

  16. Formation of lithospheric detachments: quantifying the mechanical effect of hydration reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, Benjamin; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Yamato, Philippe; Watremez, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Many authors have published experimentally determined flow laws of rheologically important monophase aggregates and polyphase rocks. These laws provide good first order constraints on lithology-controlled lithospheric strength variations. However, since the whole range of mineralogical and chemical rock compositions cannot be experimentally tested, variations in reaction-controlled rock strength cannot be systematically and fully characterized. We here present the results of a study coupling thermodynamical and Thermomechanical modelling aiming at predicting the mechanical impact of metamorphic reactions on the strength of the mantle during its exhumation in rifted zones. Thermodynamic modelling is used for calculating the mineralogical composition of a typical peridotite as a function of pressure, temperature and water content. For a given P-T condition, the calculated modes and flow laws parameters for each phase constituting the paragenesis are then used as input of the Minimized Power Geometric model for predicting the polyphase aggregate strength. Hence, by considering P-T evolutions characteristic of exhumed mantle, we quantify the strength of the mantle as a function of pressure, temperature and hydration history in a rift zone. The mechanical impact of such metamorphic reactions and hydration is first quantified in 1D for three simplified hydration schemes and then introduced in preliminary 2D models which coupled fluid transfer to the thermodynamically derived rheological parameters. Schemes with limited hydratation are found to keep rocks in condition close to brittle ductile transition for a longer time and to permit more efficient mantle exhumation.

  17. Reaction of diethyl maleate and diethyl fumarate with hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bíró, Á.; Wojnárovits, L.

    1996-03-01

    In dilute aqueous solution diethyl maleate (DEM) and diethyl fumarate (DEF) scavenge hydrated electrons with a rate constant of 2.2·10 10 mol -1 dm 3 s -1. DEM - reversibly protonates with pK a = 5.2. The pK a of DEF - is below 4. The electron adducts decay in second order reactions. The OH radicals add to the double bonds with 5.9·10 9 mol -1 dm 3 s -1. In the reaction α-carboxyalkyl radicals are produced. In disproportionation of radicals oxalacetic acid ethylester forms that in alkaline solution leads to strong permanent absorbency in the UV.

  18. Comparison of Kinetic and Equilibrium Reaction Models inSimulating the Behavior of Gas Hydrates in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

    2006-05-12

    In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrates in porous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulation the importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction models for predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to external stimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we (1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reaction models for production in various geological settings and for the case of depressurization in a core during extraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initial hydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numerical discretization. We find that for systems undergoing thermal stimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for both reaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences are observed at early times. Given these observations, and since the computational demands for the kinetic reaction model far exceed those for the equilibrium reaction model, the use of the equilibrium reaction model often appears to be justified and preferred for simulating the behavior of gas hydrates.

  19. Olivine Hydration and Carbonation Reactions in Porous Open Systems: Insights from Reactive Percolation Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, M.; Peuble, S.; Gouze, P.; Andreani, M.; Luquot, L.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal exchanges between fluids (seawater, hydrothermal and mantle-derived CO2-rich fluids) and mantle-dominated lithosphere at ridges represent a major means of mass exchange between the mantle and the Earth's envelopes. It results from/in a suite of strongly interconnected thermal, mineralogical, and (bio-) chemical processes within the seafloor, that contributes to the Earth's carbon budget through carbonation reactions (dissolution of silicates and precipitation of carbonates) and the production of complex carbon compounds. Recent experimental studies were realized to constrain the chemical parameters controlling these reactions (pH, T, kinetics, catalysis), one of the main applications being the development of techniques for geological storage of excess atmospheric CO2 into ultramafic ophiolitic massifs and in basaltic reservoirs. However, although these reactions will occur only if fluids can flow through the reacting rocks, the mechanisms controlling the hydrodynamic properties of the system during hydration and carbonation reactions remain poorly constrained. We present the results of three sets of percolation-reaction experiments during which CO2-depleted to CO2-saturated fluids were injected into olivine cores, dunitic samples and magmatic olivine with trace basalts. These experiments allowed us to explore the role of the initial mineralogy and structure of rocks, the composition of fluids (pCO2...) and flow rate and their effects on hydrodynamic properties and carbonation/hydration efficiency. The experiments produced broadly similar results, i.e. dissolution of olivine (× mafic minerals and glass when present), precipitation of carbonates and of serpentine type minerals and a steady decrease in permeability with time. In details, differences in the compositions of the fluids and of the reaction products were observed from one set of experiments to the other as well as in the rate at which chemical and permeability changes occurred during the

  20. A novel system for in-situ observations of early hydration reactions in wet conditions in conventional SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.; Bentur, A. . E-mail: bentur@tx.technion.ac.il; Kovler, K.

    2007-01-15

    A novel system enabling wet microscopy in conventional SEM is described and its performance for in-situ study of hydration reactions is demonstrated. The technology is based on a sealed specimen capsule, which is protected from the microscope vacuum by an electron-transparent partition membrane. Thus, the wet sample can be placed and observed in a 'conventional' SEM without the need for drying or employing environmental SEM. Early hydration reactions of gypsum and cement systems were followed during the first 24 h.

  1. Calcic micas in the Allende meteorite - Evidence for hydration reactions in the early solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Buseck, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    Two calcic micas, clintonite and margarite, have been identified in alteration products in a calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) in the Allende meteorite. Clintonite replaces grossular in alteration veins, and margarite occurs as lamellae in anorthite. Their occurrence suggests that, in addition to undergoing high-temperature alteration by a volatile and iron-rich vapor that produced the grossular and anorthite, some CAIs underwent alteration at moderate temperatures (400 K or less). Petrographic evidence suggests that the calcic micas formed before accretion but after the formation of the layered rim sequences that surround the CAI. These calcic micas provide strong evidence that, contrary to theoretical calculations, some hydration reactions occurred in the early solar nebula.

  2. Hydration of periclase at 350 ∘ C to 620 ∘ C and 200 MPa: experimental calibration of reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleci, H.; Schmidt, C.; Rybacki, E.; Petrishcheva, E.; Abart, R.

    2016-02-01

    The hydration of periclase to brucite was investigated experimentally. Single crystals of periclase machined to millimeter sized cubes with (100) surfaces were reacted with distilled water at temperatures of 350 to 620 ∘C and a pressure of 200 MPa for run durations of 5 to 40 minutes. Hydration produced a layer of brucite covering the surface of periclase. While the shrinking periclase largely retained its cube shape a surface roughness developed on the μm scale and eventually outward pointing spikes bounded by (111) faces emerged on the retreating faces of the periclase due to kinetic selection of less reactive (111) and (110) surfaces. The periclase to brucite conversion followed a linear rate law, where the reaction rate increased from 350 to 530 ∘C and then decreased towards higher temperature and finally vanished at about 630 ∘C, where periclase, brucite, and water are in equilibrium at 200 MPa. The overall kinetics of the hydration reaction is conveniently described in terms of a phenomenological interface mobility. Measuring the velocity of the hydration front relative to the lattice of the reactant periclase, the temperature dependence of its mobility is described by an Arrhenius relation with pre-exponential factor 1.7.10-12 m 4/s.J and activation energy of E A =55 kJ/mol.

  3. Radical-based destruction of nitramines in water: kinetics and efficiencies of hydroxyl radical and hydrated electron reactions.

    PubMed

    Mezyk, Stephen P; Razavi, Behnaz; Swancutt, Katy L; Cox, Casandra R; Kiddle, James J

    2012-08-01

    In support of the potential use of advanced oxidation and reduction process technologies for the removal of carcinogenic nitro-containing compounds in water reaction rate constants for the hydroxyl radical and hydrated electron with a series of low molecular weight nitramines (R(1)R(2)-NNO(2)) have been determined using a combination of electron pulse radiolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy. The hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant was fast, ranging from 0.54-4.35 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), and seen to increase with increasing complexity of the nitramine alkyl substituents suggesting that oxidation primarily occurs by hydrogen atom abstraction from the alkyl chains. In contrast, the rate constant for hydrated electron reaction was effectively independent of compound structure, (k(av) = (1.87 ± 0.25) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1)) indicating that the reduction predominately occurred at the common nitramine moiety. Concomitant steady-state irradiation and product measurements under aerated conditions also showed a radical reaction efficiency dependence on compound structure, with the overall radical-based degradation becoming constant for nitramines containing more than four methylene groups. The quantitative evaluation of these efficiency data suggest that some (~40%) hydrated electron reduction also results in quantitative nitramine destruction, in contrast to previously reported electron paramagnetic measurements on these compounds that proposed that this reduction only produced a transient anion adduct that would transfer its excess electron to regenerate the parent molecule. PMID:22788844

  4. Accelerated hydration reaction of an unsymmetrical tolan evidenced by a Hg(ii)-trapped macrocycle and its application as a Hg(ii)-selective indicator.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung-Ho; Kurapati, Sathish; Jo, Yunhee; Shin, June-Ho; Cho, Dong-Gyu

    2016-09-14

    Hg(ii)-mediated hydration reactions of unsymmetrical quinoline type tolans were studied. The observed accelerated reactions of the tolans rely on the additional binding motifs of the tolan, as supported by the X-ray structure of the macrocycle (2b). The analyte-specific reaction allows us to detect Hg(ii) in buffered media. PMID:27510469

  5. PORE STRUCTURE MODEL OF CEMENT HYDRATES CONSIDERING PORE WATER CONTENT AND REACTION PROCESS UNDER ARBITRARY HUMIDITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikura, Yusuke; Oshita, Hideki

    A simulation model to estimate the pore structure of cement hydrates by curing in arbitrary relative humidity is presented. This paper describes procedures for predicting phase compositions based on the classical hydration model of Portland cement, calculating the particle size distribution of constituent phases and evaluating the pore size distribution by stereological and statistical considerations. And to estimate the water content in pore structure under any relative humidity, we proposed the simulation model of adsorption isotherm model based on the pore structure. To evaluate the effectiveness of this model, simulation results were compared with experimental results of the pore size distribution measured by mercury porosimetry. As a result, it was found that the experimental and simulated results were in close agreement, and the simulated results indicated characterization of the po re structure of cement hydrates.

  6. CO2 sequestration using accelerated gas-solid carbonation of pre-treated EAF steel-making bag house dust.

    PubMed

    El-Naas, Muftah H; El Gamal, Maisa; Hameedi, Suhaib; Mohamed, Abdel-Mohsen O

    2015-06-01

    Mineral CO2 sequestration is a promising process for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, alkaline calcium-rich dust particles collected from bag filters of electric arc furnaces (EAF) for steel making were utilized as a viable raw material for mineral CO2 sequestration. The dust particles were pre-treated through hydration, drying and screening. The pre-treated particles were then subjected to direct gas-solid carbonation reaction in a fluidized-bed reactor. The carbonated products were characterized to determine the overall sequestration capacity and the mineralogical structures. Leaching tests were also performed to measure the extracted minerals from the carbonated dust and evaluate the carbonation process on dust stabilization. The experimental results indicated that CO2 could be sequestered using the pre-treated bag house dust. The maximum sequestration of CO2 was 0.657 kg/kg of dust, based on the total calcium content. The highest degree of carbonation achieved was 42.5% and the carbonation efficiency was 69% at room temperature. PMID:25846002

  7. Harmonically Perturbed Gas-Solid Fluidized System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, S. T.; Muller, M. R.

    1996-11-01

    Experiments were performed on a harmonically perturbed gas-solid fluidized system, to determine the extent to which the total system behaved as a liquid in regards to the aspects of resonant frequency, wave shapes, and damping effects. The fluidized system consists of a cylindrical alumina oxide/air fluidized bed which is vertically perturbed in a symmetrical fashion by externally vibrating the entire vessel. The external vibrations were carried out over various flow rates, amplitudes, and frequencies. The results obtained could then be compared to the natural frequencies of water for the same governing parameters by analytical means. The effects of excitations on the formation of voidage disturbances or "gas bubbles" was also investigated. Data acquisition enabled the determination of both the amplitude and frequency of the waves generated in the bath. Results indicate that external vertical vibration caused the mean surface level of the bed to drop. This can be attributed to a closer packing of the particles along with a decrease in the number and size of gas bubbles in the bed.

  8. Early age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in natural zeolite blended cements: Reaction kinetics and products by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, R.; Mertens, G.; Cizer, O.; Elsen, J.

    2010-12-15

    The in situ early-age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in cements blended with natural zeolites were investigated by time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. Chabazite and Na-, K-, and Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite materials were mixed with Portland cement in a 3:7 weight ratio and hydrated in situ at 40 {sup o}C. The evolution of phase contents showed that the addition of natural zeolites accelerates the onset of C{sub 3}S hydration and precipitation of CH and AFt. Kinetic analysis of the consumption of C{sub 3}S indicates that the enveloping C-S-H layer is thinner and/or less dense in the presence of alkali-exchanged clinoptilolite pozzolans. The zeolite pozzolanic activity is interpreted to depend on the zeolite exchangeable cation content and on the crystallinity. The addition of natural zeolites alters the structural evolution of the C-S-H product. Longer silicate chains and a lower C/S ratio are deduced from the evolution of the C-S-H b-cell parameter.

  9. Thermal reaction of ethynylphthalimides and hydration of N-/4-ethynylphenyl/phthalimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Three ethynyl substituted phenylphthalimides were prepared and characterized by high pressure liquid chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, and mass spectroscopy. When the preparation of N-(4-ethynylphenyl)phthalimide was attempted by the thermal cyclodehydration of N-(4-ethynylphenyl)-2-carboxybenzamide, N-(4-acetylphenyl)phthalimide was obtained as the major component. This unusual hydration of an ethynyl group was investigated and a mechanism was proposed to explain it.

  10. Thermochemistry of the Reaction of SF6 with Gas-Phase Hydrated Electrons: A Benchmark for Nanocalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Akhgarnusch, Amou; Höckendorf, Robert F; Beyer, Martin K

    2015-10-01

    The reaction of sulfur hexafluoride with gas-phase hydrated electrons (H2O)n(-), n ≈ 60-130, is investigated at temperatures T = 140-300 K by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. SF6 reacts with a temperature-independent rate of 3.0 ± 1.0 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1) via exclusive formation of the hydrated F(-) anion and the SF5(•) radical, which evaporates from the cluster. Nanocalorimetry yields a reaction enthalpy of ΔHR,298K = 234 ± 24 kJ mol(-1). Combined with literature thermochemical data from bulk aqueous solution, these result in an F5S-F bond dissociation enthalpy of ΔH298K = 455 ± 24 kJ mol(-1), in excellent agreement with all high-level quantum chemical calculations in the literature. A combination with gas-phase literature thermochemistry also yields an experimental value for the electron affinity of SF5(•), EA(SF5(•)) = 4.27 ± 0.25 eV. PMID:26356833

  11. Fictitious domain method for fully resolved reacting gas-solid flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longhui; Liu, Kai; You, Changfu

    2015-10-01

    Fully resolved simulation (FRS) for gas-solid multiphase flow considers solid objects as finite sized regions in flow fields and their behaviours are predicted by solving equations in both fluid and solid regions directly. Fixed mesh numerical methods, such as fictitious domain method, are preferred in solving FRS problems and have been widely researched. However, for reacting gas-solid flows no suitable fictitious domain numerical method has been developed. This work presents a new fictitious domain finite element method for FRS of reacting particulate flows. Low Mach number reacting flow governing equations are solved sequentially on a regular background mesh. Particles are immersed in the mesh and driven by their surface forces and torques integrated on immersed interfaces. Additional treatments on energy and surface reactions are developed. Several numerical test cases validated the method and a burning carbon particles array falling simulation proved the capability for solving moving reacting particle cluster problems.

  12. Reactions of Hexa-aquo Transition Metal Ions with the Hydrated Electron up to 300 °C.

    PubMed

    Kanjana, Kotchaphan; Courtin, Bruce; MacConnell, Ashley; Bartels, David M

    2015-11-12

    Reactions of the hydrated electron with divalent aqueous transition-metal ions, Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), and Mn(2+), were studied using a pulse radiolysis technique. The kinetics study was carried out at a constant pressure of 120 bar with temperatures up to 300 °C. The rate constants at room temperature agree with those reported in the literature. The reaction of Cd(2+) is approximately diffusion-limited, but none of the first-row transition-metal ion reactions are diffusion-controlled at any temperature studied. The activation energies obtained from the Arrhenius plots are in the range 14.5-40.6 kJ/mol. Pre-exponential factors are quite large, between 1 × 10(13) and 7 × 10(15) M(-1) s(-1). There appears to be a large degree of entropy-enthalpy compensation in the activation of Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Cu(2+), as the larger pre-exponential factors strongly correlate with higher activation energy. Saturation of the ionic strength effect suggests that these reactions could be long-range nonadiabatic electron "jumps", but Marcus theory is incompatible with direct formation of ground state (M(+))aq ions. A self-consistent explanation is that electron transfer occurs to excited states derived from the metal 4s orbitals. The ionic strength effect in the Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) reactions suggests that these proceed by short-range adiabatic electron attachment involving breakdown of the water coordination shell. PMID:26530531

  13. Bis(allyl)-ruthenium(iv) complexes with phosphinous acid ligands as catalysts for nitrile hydration reactions.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Mendivil, Eder; Francos, Javier; González-Fernández, Rebeca; González-Liste, Pedro J; Borge, Javier; Cadierno, Victorio

    2016-09-14

    Several mononuclear ruthenium(iv) complexes with phosphinous acid ligands [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2OH)] have been synthesized (78-86% yield) by treatment of the dimeric precursor [{RuCl(μ-Cl)(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)}2] (C10H16 = 2,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1,8-diyl) with 2 equivalents of different aromatic, heteroaromatic and aliphatic secondary phosphine oxides R2P([double bond, length as m-dash]O)H. The compounds [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2OH)] could also be prepared, in similar yields, by hydrolysis of the P-Cl bond in the corresponding chlorophosphine-Ru(iv) derivatives [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2Cl)]. In addition to NMR and IR data, the X-ray crystal structures of representative examples are discussed. Moreover, the catalytic behaviour of complexes [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2OH)] has been investigated for the selective hydration of organonitriles in water. The best results were achieved with the complex [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PMe2OH)], which proved to be active under mild conditions (60 °C), with low metal loadings (1 mol%), and showing good functional group tolerance. PMID:27510460

  14. Rate constants measured for hydrated electron reactions with peptides and proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braams, R.

    1968-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation on the amino acids of proteins and the reactivity of the protonated amino group depends upon the pK subscript a of the group. Estimates of the rate constants for reactions involving the amino acid side chains are presented. These rate constants gave an approximate rate constant for three different protein molecules.

  15. CO2 sequestration using waste concrete and anorthosite tailings by direct mineral carbonation in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes.

    PubMed

    Ben Ghacham, Alia; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Mineral carbonation (MC) represents a promising alternative for sequestering CO2. In this work, the CO2 sequestration capacity of the available calcium-bearing materials waste concrete and anorthosite tailings is assessed in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes using 18.2% flue CO2 gas. The objective is to screen for a better potential residue and phase route and as the ultimate purpose to develop a cost-effective process. The results indicate the possibility of removing 66% from inlet CO2 using waste concrete for the aqueous route. However, the results that were obtained with the carbonation of anorthosite were less significant, with 34% as the maximal percentage of CO2 removal. The difference in terms of reactivity could be explained by the accessibility to calcium. In fact, anorthosite presents a framework structure wherein the calcium is trapped, which could slow the calcium dissolution into the aqueous phase compared to the concrete sample, where calcium can more easily leach. In the other part of the study concerning gas-solid carbonation, the results of CO2 removal did not exceed 15%, which is not economically interesting for scaling up the process. The results obtained with waste concrete samples in aqueous phase are interesting. In fact, 34.6% of the introduced CO2 is converted into carbonate after 15 min of contact with the gas without chemical additives and at a relatively low gas pressure. Research on the optimization of the aqueous process using waste concrete should be performed to enhance the reaction rate and to develop a cost-effective process. PMID:26292776

  16. Mechanism of maltal hydration catalyzed by. beta. -amylase: Role of protein structure in controlling the steric outcome of reactions catalyzed by a glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahata, Sumio ); Chiba, S. ); Brewer, C.F.; Hehre, E.J. )

    1991-07-09

    Crystalline (monomeric) soybean and (tetrameric) sweet potato {beta}-amylase were shown to catalyze the cis hydration of maltal ({alpha}-D-glucopyranosyl-2-deoxy-D-arabino-hex-1-enitol) to form {beta}-2-deoxymaltose. As reported earlier with the sweet potato enzyme, maltal hydration in D{sub 2}O by soybean {beta}-amylase was found to exhibit an unusually large solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effect (V{sub H}/V{sub D}=6.5), a reaction rate linearly dependent on the mole fraction of deuterium, and 2-deoxy-(2(a)-{sup 2}H)maltose as product. These results indicate (for each {beta}-amylase) that protonation is the rate-limiting step in a reaction involving a nearly symmetric one-proton transition state and that maltal is specifically protonated from above the double bond. That maltal undergoes cis hydration provides evidence in support of a general-acid-catalyzed, carbonium ion mediated reaction. Of fundamental significance is that {beta}-amylase protonates maltal from a direction opposite that assumed for protonating strach, yet creates products of the same anomeric configuration from both. Such stereochemical dichotomy argues for the overriding role of protein structures is dictating the steric outcome of reactions catalyzed by a glycosylase, by limiting the approach and orientation of water or other acceptors to the reaction center.

  17. Turbulence modeling of gas-solid suspension flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose here is to discuss and review advances in two-phase turbulent modeling techniques and their applications in various gas-solid suspension flow situations. In addition to the turbulence closures, heat transfer effect, particle dispersion and wall effects are partially covered.

  18. Reaction of cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase with an Allene Substrate, 2,3-Butadienoate: Hydration Via an Enamine

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Johnson, William H.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Serrano, Hector; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2011-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) catalyzes the hydrolytic dehalogenation of cis-3-haloacrylates to yield malonate semialdehyde. The enzyme processes other substrates including an allene (2,3-butadienoate) to produce acetoacetate. In the course of a stereochemical analysis of the cis-CaaD-catalyzed reaction using this allene, the enzyme was unexpectedly inactivated in the presence of NaBH4 by the reduction of a covalent enzyme-substrate bond. Covalent modification was surprising because the accumulated evidence for cis-CaaD dehalogenation favored a mechanism involving direct substrate hydration mediated by Pro-1. However, the results of subsequent mechanistic, pre-steady state and full progress kinetic experiments are consistent with a mechanism in which an enamine forms between Pro-1 and the allene. Hydrolysis of the enamine or an imine tautomer produces acetoacetate. Reduction of the imine species is likely responsible for the observed enzyme inactivation. This is the first reported observation of a tautomerase superfamily member functioning by covalent catalysis. The result may suggest that some fraction of the cis-CaaD-catalyzed dehalogenation of cis-3-haloacrylates also proceeds by covalent catalysis. PMID:22129074

  19. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  20. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  1. Compact apparatus for photogeneration of hydrated electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, E.; Schmidt, K.

    1970-01-01

    Flash-photolysis instrument generates hydrated electrons and studies their reactions. It has a three-dimensional, multiple-reaction cell and the capacity to produce up to .1 micromole hydrated electron in a single 40 microsec light pulse.

  2. Hydrodynamics of semifluidization in gas-solid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Yau, S.J.; Hopper, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Semifluidized bed hydrodynamics, including minimum semifluidization velocity, packed bed formation and pressure drop across the bed, were studied in gas-solid fluidized beds. Experiments were carried out in beds of 0.203, 0.129 and 0.105 m I.D. Experimental parameters examined included gas velocity, semifluidized particles, static bed height and expansion ratio. Empirical and semi-empirical models were derived. The results were compared with those available in the literature.

  3. Charge transfer reactions between gas-phase hydrated electrons, molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide at temperatures of 80-300 K.

    PubMed

    Akhgarnusch, Amou; Tang, Wai Kit; Zhang, Han; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2016-09-14

    The recombination reactions of gas-phase hydrated electrons (H2O)n˙(-) with CO2 and O2, as well as the charge exchange reaction of CO2˙(-)(H2O)n with O2, were studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry in the temperature range T = 80-300 K. Comparison of the rate constants with collision models shows that CO2 reacts with 50% collision efficiency, while O2 reacts considerably slower. Nanocalorimetry yields internally consistent results for the three reactions. Converted to room temperature condensed phase, this yields hydration enthalpies of CO2˙(-) and O2˙(-), ΔHhyd(CO2˙(-)) = -334 ± 44 kJ mol(-1) and ΔHhyd(O2˙(-)) = -404 ± 28 kJ mol(-1). Quantum chemical calculations show that the charge exchange reaction proceeds via a CO4˙(-) intermediate, which is consistent with a fully ergodic reaction and also with the small efficiency. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations corroborate this picture and indicate that the CO4˙(-) intermediate has a lifetime significantly above the ps regime. PMID:27498686

  4. Comparison of hydration reactions for "piano-stool" RAPTA-B and [Ru(η6-arene)(en)Cl]+ complexes: density functional theory computational study.

    PubMed

    Chval, Zdeněk; Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2011-01-14

    The hydration process for two Ru(II) representative half-sandwich complexes: Ru(arene)(pta)Cl(2) (from the RAPTA family) and [Ru(arene)(en)Cl](+) (further labeled as Ru_en) were compared with analogous reaction of cisplatin. In the study, quantum chemical methods were employed. All the complexes were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level using Conductor Polarizable Continuum Model (CPCM) solvent continuum model and single-point (SP) energy calculations and determination of electronic properties were performed at the B3LYP∕6-311++G(2df,2pd)/CPCM level. It was found that the hydration model works fairly well for the replacement of the first chloride by water where an acceptable agreement for both Gibbs free energies and rate constants was obtained. However, in the second hydration step worse agreement of the experimental and calculated values was achieved. In agreement with experimental values, the rate constants for the first step can be ordered as RAPTA-B > Ru_en > cisplatin. The rate constants correlate well with binding energies (BEs) of the Pt∕Ru-Cl bond in the reactant complexes. Substitution reactions on Ru_en and cisplatin complexes proceed only via pseudoassociative (associative interchange) mechanism. On the other hand in the case of RAPTA there is also possible a competitive dissociation mechanism with metastable pentacoordinated intermediate. The first hydration step is slightly endothermic for all three complexes by 3-5 kcal∕mol. Estimated BEs confirm that the benzene ligand is relatively weakly bonded assuming the fact that it occupies three coordination positions of the Ru(II) cation. PMID:21241133

  5. Comparison of hydration reactions for "piano-stool" RAPTA-B and [Ru(η6- arene)(en)Cl]+ complexes: Density functional theory computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chval, Zdeněk; Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V.

    2011-01-01

    The hydration process for two Ru(II) representative half-sandwich complexes: Ru(arene)(pta)Cl2 (from the RAPTA family) and [Ru(arene)(en)Cl]+ (further labeled as Ru_en) were compared with analogous reaction of cisplatin. In the study, quantum chemical methods were employed. All the complexes were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level using Conductor Polarizable Continuum Model (CPCM) solvent continuum model and single-point (SP) energy calculations and determination of electronic properties were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2pd)/CPCM level. It was found that the hydration model works fairly well for the replacement of the first chloride by water where an acceptable agreement for both Gibbs free energies and rate constants was obtained. However, in the second hydration step worse agreement of the experimental and calculated values was achieved. In agreement with experimental values, the rate constants for the first step can be ordered as RAPTA-B > Ru_en > cisplatin. The rate constants correlate well with binding energies (BEs) of the Pt/Ru-Cl bond in the reactant complexes. Substitution reactions on Ru_en and cisplatin complexes proceed only via pseudoassociative (associative interchange) mechanism. On the other hand in the case of RAPTA there is also possible a competitive dissociation mechanism with metastable pentacoordinated intermediate. The first hydration step is slightly endothermic for all three complexes by 3-5 kcal/mol. Estimated BEs confirm that the benzene ligand is relatively weakly bonded assuming the fact that it occupies three coordination positions of the Ru(II) cation.

  6. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  7. Fluidization onset and expansion of gas-solid fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O.C.; Shin, T.S.

    1984-08-01

    A simple, mass conservation-based, kinematic model is presented for accurately predicting both the onset of fluidization and the degree of (limit of) bed expansion in bubbling gas-solid fluidized beds. The model is consistant with inception correlations exisiting in the literature. Since the method has a sound physical basis, it might be expected to provide scaling between laboratory-scale fluidized beds and large-scale systems. This scaling ability, however, remains to be demonstrated as does the application to pressurized systems and where the terminal Reynolds numbers exceed 1000, (Archimedes numbers over about 3.2 x 10/sup 5/).

  8. Chloral Hydrate

    MedlinePlus

    Chloral hydrate, a sedative, is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia (to help you fall asleep and ... Chloral hydrate comes as a capsule and liquid to take by mouth and as a suppository to insert rectally. ...

  9. Gas-solid flow characteristics in high-density CFB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue-yao; Fan, Bao-guo; Wang, Sheng-dian; Xu, Xiang; Xiao, Yun-han

    2012-08-01

    The gas-solid flow characteristics in the riser of a high density CFB of square (0.27 m×0.27 m×10.4 m) or circular ( ϕ 0.187m×10.4 m) cross section, using Geldart B particles (quartz sand), was investigated experimentally. The influence of riser structure on the hydrodynamic behaviors of a high-density circulating fluidized bed was investigated. The solid circulation rate was up to 321 kg/(m2s) with the circular cross-section under the operating conditions of the main bed air velocity 12.1 m/s and loosen wind and back-feed wind flow 25.1 m3/h. Different operating conditions on realizing high density circulation was analyzed, while both solids circulation rate and particle holdup depended highly on operating conditions. The circulating gas-solid flow was accompanied by an evidently-dense character in the riser's bottom zone and became fully developed in the middle and upper zones.

  10. Bulk-density distributions of solids in the freeboard of a gas-solid fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, B.C.; Fan, L.T.; Walawender, W.P.

    1995-05-01

    The freeboard region above the bubbling zone of a gas-solid fluidized bed provides the space not only for the disengagement of particles but also for additional contact and reaction between the particles and gas. The flow pattern and behavior of particles as well as their bulk-density distribution in the freeboard have a significant impact on the efficiency of fluidization. The results of numerous previous experimental studies indicate that the bulk density of solids essentially decreases exponentially as a function of the height of the freeboard. In the present work, this distribution has been obtained by first derived the Fokker-Planck equation from the linearized equation of motion of a single particle and then transforming this Fokker-Planck equation into that for the bulk-density distribution of solids. Its simplification to the one-dimensional case readily gives rise to an exponential distribution and agrees well with the available experimental data.

  11. A new model for gas/solid pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bangxian; Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new model of particle turbulent dispersion in vertical gas/solid pipe flow is presented in this paper. The essence of the model is to pay more attention to the active and discrete behavior of particles in the dispersion process in non-homogeneous turbulent vertical pipe flows using two-fluid approaches. In the new model, a non-gradient type of diffusion term is included in the expression of radial particle dispersion flux; the transport equation for particle turbulent kinetic energy (PTKE) is developed and solved for its distribution; the effect of intra-particle collision is considered for the generation and dissipation of PTKE; turbulence modulation due to particle presence is taken into account. Preliminary numerical results based on this new model are also presented in this paper.

  12. Sequestration of flue gas CO₂ by direct gas-solid carbonation of air pollution control system residues.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo

    2012-12-18

    Direct gas-solid carbonation reactions of residues from an air pollution control system (APCr) were conducted using different combinations of simulated flue gas to study the impact on CO₂ sequestration. X-ray diffraction analysis of APCr determined the existence of CaClOH, whose maximum theoretical CO₂ sequestration potential of 58.13 g CO₂/kg APCr was calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The reaction mechanism obeyed a model of a fast kinetics-controlled process followed by a slow product layer diffusion-controlled process. Temperature is the key factor in direct gas-solid carbonation and had a notable influence on both the carbonation conversion and the CO₂ sequestration rate. The optimal CO₂ sequestrating temperature of 395 °C was easily obtained for APCr using a continuous heating experiment. CO₂ content in the flue gas had a definite influence on the CO₂ sequestration rate of the kinetics-controlled process, but almost no influence on the final carbonation conversion. Typical concentrations of SO₂ in the flue gas could not only accelerate the carbonation reaction rate of the product layer diffusion-controlled process, but also could improve the final carbonation conversion. Maximum carbonation conversions of between 68.6% and 77.1% were achieved in a typical flue gas. Features of rapid CO₂ sequestration rate, strong impurities resistance, and high capture conversion for direct gas-solid carbonation were proved in this study, which presents a theoretical foundation for the applied use of this encouraging technology on carbon capture and storage. PMID:23181908

  13. Generalized gas-solid adsorption modeling: Single-component equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.

    2015-01-07

    Over the last several decades, modeling of gas–solid adsorption at equilibrium has generally been accomplished through the use of isotherms such as the Freundlich, Langmuir, Tóth, and other similar models. While these models are relatively easy to adapt for describing experimental data, their simplicity limits their generality to be used with many different sets of data. This limitation forces engineers and scientists to test each different model in order to evaluate which one can best describe their data. Additionally, the parameters of these models all have a different physical interpretation, which may have an effect on how they can be further extended into kinetic, thermodynamic, and/or mass transfer models for engineering applications. Therefore, it is paramount to adopt not only a more general isotherm model, but also a concise methodology to reliably optimize for and obtain the parameters of that model. A model of particular interest is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm. The GSTA isotherm has enormous flexibility, which could potentially be used to describe a variety of different adsorption systems, but utilizing this model can be fairly difficult due to that flexibility. To circumvent this complication, a comprehensive methodology and computer code has been developed that can perform a full equilibrium analysis of adsorption data for any gas-solid system using the GSTA model. The code has been developed in C/C++ and utilizes a Levenberg–Marquardt’s algorithm to handle the non-linear optimization of the model parameters. Since the GSTA model has an adjustable number of parameters, the code iteratively goes through all number of plausible parameters for each data set and then returns the best solution based on a set of scrutiny criteria. Data sets at different temperatures are analyzed serially and then linear correlations with temperature are made for the parameters of the model. The end result is a full set of

  14. Generalized gas-solid adsorption modeling: Single-component equilibria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.

    2015-01-07

    Over the last several decades, modeling of gas–solid adsorption at equilibrium has generally been accomplished through the use of isotherms such as the Freundlich, Langmuir, Tóth, and other similar models. While these models are relatively easy to adapt for describing experimental data, their simplicity limits their generality to be used with many different sets of data. This limitation forces engineers and scientists to test each different model in order to evaluate which one can best describe their data. Additionally, the parameters of these models all have a different physical interpretation, which may have an effect on how they can bemore » further extended into kinetic, thermodynamic, and/or mass transfer models for engineering applications. Therefore, it is paramount to adopt not only a more general isotherm model, but also a concise methodology to reliably optimize for and obtain the parameters of that model. A model of particular interest is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm. The GSTA isotherm has enormous flexibility, which could potentially be used to describe a variety of different adsorption systems, but utilizing this model can be fairly difficult due to that flexibility. To circumvent this complication, a comprehensive methodology and computer code has been developed that can perform a full equilibrium analysis of adsorption data for any gas-solid system using the GSTA model. The code has been developed in C/C++ and utilizes a Levenberg–Marquardt’s algorithm to handle the non-linear optimization of the model parameters. Since the GSTA model has an adjustable number of parameters, the code iteratively goes through all number of plausible parameters for each data set and then returns the best solution based on a set of scrutiny criteria. Data sets at different temperatures are analyzed serially and then linear correlations with temperature are made for the parameters of the model. The end result is a full set

  15. A novel electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction based on rational anchoring of cobalt carbonate hydroxide hydrate on multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Xiao, Qingqing; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Xue, Yifei; Jing, Lin; Zhai, Xue; Yan, Yi-Ming; Sun, Kening

    2015-03-01

    Cobalt carbonate hydroxide hydrate (CCHH) nanosheets have been densely and strongly anchored onto mildly oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes with the assistance of diethylenetriamine (DETA). The resulted hybrid (CCHH/MWCNT) is used as high efficient electrocatalyst for water oxidation with an extremely low onset potential of ∼1.47 V vs. RHE and an overpotential of 285 mV to achieve a current density of 10 mA cm-2 in 1.0 mol L-1 KOH. The CCHH/MWCNT electrode affords a Tafel slope of 51 mV/decade and an exchange current density of 2.5 × 10-7 A cm-2. Moreover, the CCHH/MWCNT catalyst delivers a high faradic efficiency of 95% and possesses remarkable stability for long-term electrolysis of water. By contrast, neither MWCNT nor CCHH exhibits apparent catalytical activity towards water oxidation. Importantly, we demonstrate that DETA plays crucial role in determining the morphology, structure of the CCHH/MWCNT, therefore resulting in an enhanced performance for water oxidation. This work not only provides a novel cobalt-based electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution, but also offers a useful and viable approach to deliberately synthesize functional nanocomposites for applications in energy conversion and storage.

  16. A new quantification method based on SEM-EDS to assess fly ash composition and study the reaction of its individual components in hydrating cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Durdziński, Paweł T.; Dunant, Cyrille F.; Haha, Mohsen Ben; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-07-15

    Calcareous fly ashes are high-potential reactive residues for blended cements, but their qualification and use in concrete are hindered by heterogeneity and variability. Current characterization often fails to identify the dominant, most reactive, amorphous fraction of the ashes. We developed an approach to characterize ashes using electron microscopy. EDS element composition of millions of points is plotted in a ternary frequency plot. A visual analysis reveals number and ranges of chemical composition of populations: silicate, calcium-silicate, aluminosilicate, and calcium-rich aluminosilicate. We quantified these populations in four ashes and followed their hydration in two Portland-ash systems. One ash reacted at a moderate rate: it was composed of 70 vol.% of aluminosilicates and calcium-silicates and reached 60% reaction at 90 days. The other reacted faster, reaching 60% at 28 days due to 55 vol.% of calcium-rich aluminosilicates, but further reaction was slower and 15 vol.% of phases, the silica-rich ones, did not react.

  17. Water Nanodroplets as a Reaction Medium: FT-ICR Studies of the Stability, Structure and Reactivity of Hydrated Ions and Ionic Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondybey, Vladimir E.

    2001-03-01

    With the help of a versatile ion source coupling laser vaporization with supersonic expansion, ionic clusters of the type X^±(H_2O)n are easily generated, and if desired, they can be mass selected in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. The central ion, X^± can be for instance H^+ or OH^-, a free electron, or an ionized metal such as Na^+, Ag^+, Mg^+, or Al^+. Such "nanodroplets" solvated with up to 200 molecules of water or other ligands slowly fragment in the collision-free environment of the FT-ICR trap. They lose in a controlled way the solvent molecules, one by one on a millisecond timescale. The products of reactions which occur in the nanodroplet as a result of the loss of the stabilizing ligand can in the high-resolution mass spectrometer be unambiguously identified. In this way, a variety of solution processes such as ionic dissolution, fragmentation, neutralization, precipitation, reduction-oxidation reactions, or acid-base catalyzed reactions can be investigated in molecular, microscopic detail. Small droplets and particles are important for a variety of atmospheric processes and reactions occurring both in the troposphere and the stratosphere. This suggests the possibility of preparing such nano-droplets of suitable composition, and using them as a model system for investigating a large variety of reactions important for atmospheric chemistry. In the present talk, we will describe our apparatus and external source, and discuss a variety of results obtained recently with it in our laboratory. The aldol condensation of acetaldehyde as an example of an acid-base catalyzed reaction and the precipitation of AgCl show that a number of well-known reactions in solution have their counterpart on a single molecule level in the cluster. The competition between electron detachment and water loss of hydrated electrons e^-(H_2O)_n, n=13-36, provides interesting and unexpected insights into the coupling dynamics of the electron to its water

  18. Effects of olivine fabric, melt-rock reaction, and hydration on the seismic properties of peridotites: Insight from the Luobusha ophiolite in the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shengsi; Ji, Shaocheng; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Salisbury, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    In order to constrain the effects of olivine fabric, melt-rock reaction, and hydration on the seismic properties and anisotropy of mantle rocks, we investigated serpentinized peridotites from the Luobusha ophiolite in the Indus-Tsangpo suture of the Tibetan Plateau. A-type and almost random olivine crystal-preferred orientations (CPO) occur in harzburgite and dunite samples, respectively. The dunite resulted from interactions of harzburgite with boninitic melt at ~800-970°C, yielding pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation. The olivine neoblasts formed from the melt-rock reaction show no evidence of dislocation creep and developed almost random CPO. Hence, the melt-rock reaction reduced seismic anisotropy. Our results together with those from the literature indicate that A-, B-, C-, D-, and E-type CPOs of olivine generally induce Vp anisotropy patterns with Vp(X) > Vp(Y) > Vp(Z), Vp(Y) > Vp(X) > Vp(Z), Vp(Z) > Vp(X) > Vp(Y), Vp(X) > Vp(Y) ≈ Vp(Z), and Vp(X) > Vp(Z) > Vp(Y), respectively. The effect of serpentinization was calibrated by the comparison of seismic velocities and anisotropy measured up to 600 MPa with the values calculated from the CPO data. Although the low-temperature (LT, <300°C) serpentinization (lizardite and chrysotile) decreases Vp by ~6-10% and Vs by ~12%, it does not change the anisotropy pattern because the mesh-texture characterized by serpentine veins perpendicular to the principal structural directions (X, Y, and Z) reduces the velocities in these orthogonal directions to almost equal extent. Thus, the magnitude of seismic anisotropy alone cannot be used as an indicator of the degree of LT serpentinization in the mantle rocks. Furthermore, Birch's law is found to hold when peridotites undergo serpentinization.

  19. Direct gas-solid carbonation kinetics of steel slag and the contribution to in situ sequestration of flue gas CO(2) in steel-making plants.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Chen, Xuejing; Yan, Feng; Li, Kaimin

    2013-12-01

    Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag under various operational conditions was investigated to determine the sequestration of the flue gas CO2 . X-ray diffraction analysis of steel slag revealed the existence of portlandite, which provided a maximum theoretical CO2 sequestration potential of 159.4 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) as calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The carbonation reaction occurred through a fast kinetically controlled stage with an activation energy of 21.29 kJ mol(-1) , followed by 10(3) orders of magnitude slower diffusion-controlled stage with an activation energy of 49.54 kJ mol(-1) , which could be represented by a first-order reaction kinetic equation and the Ginstling equation, respectively. Temperature, CO2 concentration, and the presence of SO2 impacted on the carbonation conversion of steel slag through their direct and definite influence on the rate constants. Temperature was the most important factor influencing the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag in terms of both the carbonation conversion and reaction rate. CO2 concentration had a definite influence on the carbonation rate during the kinetically controlled stage, and the presence of SO2 at typical flue gas concentrations enhanced the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag. Carbonation conversions between 49.5 % and 55.5 % were achieved in a typical flue gas at 600 °C, with the maximum CO2 sequestration amount generating 88.5 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) . Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag showed a rapid CO2 sequestration rate, high CO2 sequestration amounts, low raw-material costs, and a large potential for waste heat utilization, which is promising for in situ carbon capture and sequestration in the steel industry. PMID:23913597

  20. Formation of ordered gas-solid structures via solidification in metal-hydrogen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalov, V.I. |

    1998-12-31

    This work contains theoretical discussions concerning the large amount of previously published experimental data related to gas eutectic transformations in metal-hydrogen systems. Theories of pore nucleation and growth in these gas-solid materials will be presented and related to observed morphologies and structures. This work is intended to be helpful to theorists that work with metal-hydrogen systems, and experimentalists engaged in manufacturing technology development of these ordered gas-solid structures.

  1. Kinetics of the reaction of hydrated lime with SO{sub 2} at low temperatures: effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.F.; Shih, S.M.

    2008-12-15

    The effects of the presence Of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx in the flue gas on the kinetics of the sulfation of hydrated lime at low temperatures were studied using a differential fixed-bed reactor. When O{sub 2} and NOx were not present together the reaction kinetics was about the same as that under gas mixtures containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N2 only. When both O{sub 2} and NOx were present, sulfation of hydrated lime was greatly enhanced, forming a large amount of calcium sulfate in addition to calcium sulfite. Sulfation of hydrated lime was well described by the surface coverage model, despite the gas-phase conditions being different. Relative humidity is the major factor affecting the reaction, and its effect was more marked when both O{sub 2} and NOx were present. The kinetic model equations obtained in this work can be used to describe the sulfation of hydrated lime in the low-temperature dry and semidry flue gas desulfurization processes with or without an upstream NOx removal unit.

  2. Investigation of Gas Solid Fluidized Bed Dynamics with Non-Spherical Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-06-30

    One of the largest challenges for 21st century is to fulfill global energy demand while also reducing detrimental impacts of energy generation and use on the environment. Gasification is a promising technology to meet the requirement of reduced emissions without compromising performance. Coal gasification is not an incinerating process; rather than burning coal completely a partial combustion takes place in the presence of steam and limited amounts of oxygen. In this controlled environment, a chemical reaction takes place to produce a mixture of clean synthetic gas. Gas-solid fluidized bed is one such type of gasification technology. During gasification, the mixing behavior of solid (coal) and gas and their flow patterns can be very complicated to understand. Many attempts have taken place in laboratory scale to understand bed hydrodynamics with spherical particles though in actual applications with coal, the particles are non-spherical. This issue drove the documented attempt presented here to investigate fluidized bed behavior using different ranges of non-spherical particles, as well as spherical. For this investigation, various parameters are controlled that included particle size, bed height, bed diameter and particle shape. Particles ranged from 355 µm to 1180 µm, bed diameter varied from 2 cm to 7 cm, two fluidized beds with diameters of 3.4 cm and 12.4 cm, for the spherical and non-spherical shaped particles that were taken into consideration. Pressure drop was measured with increasing superficial gas velocity. The velocity required in order to start to fluidize the particle is called the minimum fluidization velocity, which is one of the most important parameters to design and optimize within a gas-solid fluidized bed. This minimum fluidization velocity was monitored during investigation while observing variables factors and their effect on this velocity. From our investigation, it has been found that minimum fluidization velocity is independent of bed

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of gas-solid adsorption processes at pore scale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Chen, L.; Tao, W. Q.

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) approach was established to implement kinetic concentration boundary conditions in interfacial mass-transfer processes and to simulate the adsorption process in porous media at pore scale and mesoscopic levels. A general treatment was applied to conduct three types of concentration boundary conditions effectively and accurately. Applicability for adsorption was verified by two benchmark examples, which were representative of the interparticle mass transport and intraparticle mass transport in the adsorption system, respectively. The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed porous media at the pore scale level was numerically investigated. Mass-transfer processes of the adsorption reaction were simulated by executing Langmuir adsorption kinetics on surfaces of adsorbent particles. Meanwhile, the homogeneous solid diffusion model (HSDM) was used for mass transport in interior particles. The transient adsorbed amount was obtained in detail, and the impact of flow condition, porosity, and adsorbent particle size on the entire dynamic adsorption performance was investigated. The time needed to approach steady state decreased with increased fluid velocity. Transient adsorption capability and time consumption to equilibrium were nearly independent of porosity, whereas increasing pore size led to a moderating adsorption rate and more time was consumed to approach the saturation adsorption. Benefiting from the advantages of the LB method, both bulk and intraparticle mass transfer performances during adsorption can be obtained using the present pore scale approach. Thus, interparticle mass transfer and intraparticle mass transfer are the two primary segments, and intraparticle diffusion has the dominant role.

  4. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Benkert, A; Blum, M; Meyer, F; Wilks, R G; Yang, W; Bär, M; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600 °C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO2 sample behind a mixture of N2 and He gas at atmospheric pressure. PMID:24517824

  5. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Benkert, A. E-mail: l.weinhardt@kit.edu; Blum, M.; Meyer, F.; Wilks, R. G.; Yang, W.; Bär, M.; and others

    2014-01-15

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600 °C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO{sub 2} sample behind a mixture of N{sub 2} and He gas at atmospheric pressure.

  6. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor. PMID:25940479

  7. CO2 reaction with hydrated class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions: effects of flyash admixtures.

    PubMed

    Kutchko, Barbara G; Strazisar, Brian R; Huerta, Nicolas; Lowry, Gregory V; Dzombak, David A; Thaulow, Niels

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing, wells on CO2 storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolan-cement blends were exposed to supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm for both the CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2 after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO2, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 microD. Analyses of 50: 50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO2, which are consistent with our laboratory findings. PMID:19544912

  8. Chloral hydrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chloral hydrate ; CASRN 302 - 17 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  9. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  10. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  11. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  12. Method and apparatus for the separation of a gas-solids mixture in a circulating fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, WanWang

    2010-08-10

    The system of the present invention includes a centripetal cyclone for separating particulate material from a particulate laden gas solids stream. The cyclone includes a housing defining a conduit extending between an upstream inlet and a downstream outlet. In operation, when a particulate laden gas-solids stream passes through the upstream housing inlet, the particulate laden gas-solids stream is directed through the conduit and at least a portion of the solids in the particulate laden gas-solids stream are subjected to a centripetal force within the conduit.

  13. Strategy for understanding gas-solid riser hydrodynamics and other LANL status items

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, B. A.

    2002-01-01

    The talk presents the status of work in progress in the area of momentum transport theory in turbulent gas-solid multiphase flow. Previous installments have reported details of the theory, and validation results. This talk provides a grand overview of how the details of dynamic simulations in 3D, 2D, 1D and 0D, all fit together to form a consistent strategy for understanding gas-solid riser hydrodynamics. The circulating fluidized bed is the canonical example for showing how the strategy works. Performance of the procedure is shown by comparison to data recently obtained by Sandia National Laboratory. Status of other LANL efforts is also mentioned.

  14. Hydrate habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Whoever said there is nothing new under the sun did not delve deeply enough to the bottom of the ocean. There in the Gulf of Mexico, about 150 miles south of New Orleans, scientists have just discovered what could be a new species of centipede—like worms living on or within gas hydrates— mounds of methane ice— rising from the ocean floor.Scientists have previously recognized an association between some bacteria and these hydrates. However, this is the first discovery of a higher life form there.

  15. Defect-related relaxation processes in irradiated rare gas solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, E. V.; Grigorashchenko, O. N.; Gumenchuk, G. B.; Ogurtsov, A. N.; Frankowski, M.; Smith-Gicklhorn, A. M.; Bondybey, V. E.

    Electronic and atomic relaxation processes in preirradiated solid Ar doped with N-2 were studied with a focus on the role of radiative electronic transitions in relaxation cascades. Combining methods of activation spectroscopy - thermally stimulated and photon-stimulated exoelectron emission, a new channel of relaxation induced by photon emission from metastable N atoms was detected. It was shown that in insulating materials with a wide conduction band photons of visible range can release electrons from both kinds of traps - shallow (lattice defects) and deep thermally disconnected ones. Correlation in the charge recombination reaction yield and the yield of low temperature desorption - important relaxation channel in a preirradiated solid - clearly demonstrates interconnection between atomic and electronic processes of relaxation.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-DIFFUSION FLUX-SPLITTING METHODS FOR DENSE GAS-SOLID FLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a class of low-diffusion upwinding methods for computing dense gas-solid flows is presented in this work. An artificial compressibility/low-Mach preconditioning strategy is developed for a hyperbolic two-phase flow equation system consisting of separate solids ...

  17. Particle-Resolved Direct Numerical Simulation for Gas-Solid Flow Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Sudheer; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Gas-solid flows in nature and industrial applications are characterized by multiscale and nonlinear interactions that manifest as rich flow physics and pose unique modeling challenges. In this article, we review particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) of the microscale governing equations for understanding gas-solid flow physics and obtaining quantitative information for model development. A clear connection between a microscale realization and meso/macroscale representation is necessary for PR-DNS to be used effectively for model development at the meso- and macroscale. Furthermore, the design of PR-DNS must address the computational challenges of parameterizing models in a high-dimensional parameter space and obtaining accurate statistics of flow properties from a finite number of realizations at acceptable grid resolution. This review also summarizes selected recent insights into the physics of momentum, kinetic energy, and heat transfer in gas-solid flows obtained from PR-DNS. Promising future applications of PR-DNS include the study of the effect of number fluctuations on hydrodynamics, instabilities in gas-solid flow, and wall-bounded flows.

  18. Depressurization and electrical heating of hydrate sediment for gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on electrical heating of the hydrate core combined with depressurization for gas production. In-situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary for commercial recovery of natural gas from natural gas hydrate sediment. Thermal stimulation is an effective dissociation method, along with depressurization.To simulate methane gas production from methane hydrate layer, we investigated electrical heating of methane hydrate sediment. A decrease in core temperature due to the endothermic reaction of methane hydrate dissociation was suppressed and the core temperature increased between 1oC and 4oC above the control temperature with electric heating. A current density of 10A/m2 with depressurization would effectively dissociate hydrate. Therefore, depressurization and additional electrode heating of hydrate sediment saturated with electrolyte solution was confirmed to enable higher gas production from sediment with less electric power.

  19. An improved external recycle reactor for determining gas-solid reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Irvin M.; Hoyt, Ronald F.

    1987-01-01

    These improvements in the recycle system effectively eliminate initial concentration variation by two modifications: (1) a vacuum line connection to the recycle loop which permits this loop to be evacuated and then filled with the test gas mixture to slightly above atmospheric pressure; and (2) a bypass line across the reactor which permits the reactor to be held under vacuum while the rest of the recycle loop is filled with test gas. A three-step procedure for bringing the feed gas mixture into contact with the catalyst at time zero is described.

  20. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  1. Time-resolved study on the reactions of organic selenides with hydroxyl and oxide radicals, hydrated electrons, and H-atoms in aqueous solution, and DFT calculations of transients in comparison with sulfur analogues.

    PubMed

    Tobien, Thomas; Bonifacić, Marija; Naumov, Sergej; Asmus, Klaus-Dieter

    2010-07-01

    A complementary experimental and quantum chemical study has been undertaken on the reactivity, formation and properties of transients generated in the reaction of selected organic selenides with hydroxyl radicals, oxide radical ions, hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms in aqueous solution. A detailed study of the OH and O (-) reactions with Me(2)Se revealed the formation of the respective adduct-radicals as precursors of (Me(2)Se thereforeSeMe(2))(+) radical cations. In case of the neutral adduct radical Me(2)Se (OH) the conversion into the three-electron bonded dimer species proceeds, in part, via the molecular (Me(2)Se thereforeOH(2))(+) radical cation. Absolute rate constants have been determined for all the underlying processes. The respective reactions with hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms indicate that selenides exhibit a higher reactivity towards redox-active species than sulfides. A most interesting finding is that the reaction of Me(2)Se with H atoms is faster (k = 4.1 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) than the reduction by hydrated electrons (k = 2.1 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)), precluding an electron transfer as mechanistic background. The rationale is rather an effective dissociative attack of the hydrogen atom on the selenium. Both, the e(aq)(-)- and H -induced reductions of Me(2)Se and Me(2)S lead, under cleavage of CH(3) radicals, to the direct formation of selenol and thiol, respectively. Complementary quantum chemical studies, performed with Density Functional Theory (DFT) BHandHLYP methods, confirm this mechanism. They also reveal a generally higher thermodynamic stability of the Se-centered radicals relative to the S-centered ones, e.g., for the molecular radical anions (Me(2)Se) (-) (DeltaH-27 kJ mol(-1)) and (Me(2)S) (-) (DeltaH-16 kJ mol(-1)). Despite of these stabilization energies the calculations indicate an instantaneous Se/S-CH(3) bond lengthening in the respective molecular radical anions. The same applies for the reaction of Me(2)S and Me(2)Se with

  2. Study of Parameters Effect on Hydrodynamics of a Gas-Solid Chamber Experimentally and Numerically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzehei, Mahdi; Rahimzadeh, Hassan

    2012-04-01

    In this research, gas velocity, initial static bed height and particle size effect on hydrodynamics of a non-reactive gas-solid fluidized bed chamber were studied experimentally and computationally. A multi fluid Eulerian model incorporating the kinetic theory for solid particles was applied to simulate the unsteady state behavior of this chamber and momentum exchange coefficients were calculated by using the Syamlal- O'Brien drag functions. Simulation results were compared with the experimental data in order to validate the CFD model. Pressure drops predicted by the simulations at different particle sizes and initial static bed height were in good agreement with experimental measurements at superficial gas velocity higher than the minimum fluidization velocity. Simulation results also indicated that small bubbles were produced at the bottom of the bed. These bubbles collided with each other as they moved upwards forming larger bubbles. Furthermore, this comparison showed that the model can predict hydrodynamic behavior of gas solid fluidized bed chambers reasonably well.

  3. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids fluidized bed simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2013-10-01

    Wall boundary conditions for the solids phase have significant effects on numerical predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open literature for numerical modeling of gas-solids flow. In this study, a model for specularity coefficient used in Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions by Li and Benyahia (AIChE Journal, 2012, 58, 2058-2068) is implemented in the open-source CFD code-MFIX. The variable specularity coefficient model provides a physical way to calculate the specularity coefficient needed by the partial-slip boundary conditions for the solids phase. Through a series of 2-D numerical simulations of bubbling fluidized bed and circulating fluidized bed riser, the model predicts qualitatively consistent trends to the previous studies. Furthermore, a quantitative comparison is conducted between numerical results of variable and constant specularity coefficients to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal variations in specularity coefficient.

  4. Increasing Gas Hydrate Formation Temperature for Desalination of High Salinity Produced Water with Secondary Guests

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jong-Ho; Seol, Yongkoo

    2013-10-07

    We suggest a new gas hydrate-based desalination process using water-immiscible hydrate formers; cyclopentane (CP) and cyclohexane (CH) as secondary hydrate guests to alleviate temperature requirements for hydrate formation. The hydrate formation reactions were carried out in an isobaric condition of 3.1 MPa to find the upper temperature limit of CO2 hydrate formation. Simulated produced water (8.95 wt % salinity) mixed with the hydrate formers shows an increased upper temperature limit from -2 °C for simple CO2 hydrate to 16 and 7 °C for double (CO2 + CP) and (CO2 + CH) hydrates, respectively. The resulting conversion rate to double hydrate turned out to be similar to that with simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Hydrate formation rates (Rf) for the double hydrates with CP and CH are shown to be 22 and 16 times higher, respectively, than that of the simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Such mild hydrate formation temperature and fast formation kinetics indicate increased energy efficiency of the double hydrate system for the desalination process. Dissociated water from the hydrates shows greater than 90% salt removal efficiency for the hydrates with the secondary guests, which is also improved from about 70% salt removal efficiency for the simple hydrates.

  5. Magnesium hydroxide extracted from a magnesium-rich mineral for CO{sub 2} sequestration in a gas-solid system

    SciTech Connect

    Pao-Chung Lin; Cheng-Wei Huang; Ching-Ta Hsiao; Hsisheng Teng

    2008-04-15

    Magnesium hydroxide extracted from magnesium-bearing minerals is considered a promising agent for binding CO{sub 2} as a carbonate mineral in a gas-solid reaction. An efficient extraction route consisting of hydrothermal treatment on serpentine in HCl followed by NaOH titration for Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation was demonstrated. The extracted Mg(OH){sub 2} powder had a mean crystal domain size as small as 12 nm and an apparent surface area of 54 m{sup 2}/g. Under one atmosphere of 10 vol% CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, carbonation of the serpentine-derived Mg(OH){sub 2} to 26% of the stoichiometric limit was achieved at 325{sup o}C in 2 h; while carbonation of a commercially available Mg(OH){sub 2}, with a mean crystal domain size of 33 nm and an apparent surface area of 3.5 m{sup 2}/g, reached only 9% of the stoichiometric limit. The amount of CO{sub 2} fixation was found to be inversely proportional to the crystal domain size of the Mg(OH){sub 2} specimens. The experimental data strongly suggested that only a monolayer of carbonates was formed on the crystal domain boundary in the gas-solid reaction, with little penetration of the carbonates into the crystal domain. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of solids - Rare-gas solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    A method presented by Schlosser et al. (1989) for analyzing the pressure dependence of experimental melting-temperature data is applied to rare-gas solids. The plots of the logarithm of the reduced melting temperature vs that of the reduced pressure are straight lines in the absence of phase transitions. The plots of the reduced melting temperatures for Ar, Kr, and Xe are shown to be approximately straight lines.

  7. A study of pneumatic conveying of gas-solid flow for industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khateeb, Khalid A. S.; Tasnim, Rumana; Khan, Sheroz; Mohammod, Musse; Arshad, Atika; Shobaki, Mohammed M.; Haider, Samnan; Saquib, Nazmus; Rahman, Tawfilur

    2013-12-01

    The complicated nature of gas-solids' physical properties have challenged the researchers over past decades who have led their efforts in developing its' flow sensing and measurement methods. The term 'gas-solid flow' signifies dilute- or dense-phase flow with a very little concentration of solids. For conducting such flow measurement, generally velocity profile and volumetric concentration of the flow particles being conveyed are needed to be measured. An important application of gas-solid flow has taken root in the form of biomass flow in pneumatic conveying systems, and its' online measurement has proven to be an exigent research pursuit. Additionally the other applications have been explored in power plants, food, chemical and automobiles industries as well. This paper aims at exploring the evolution of flow measurement methods along with a brief explanation on existing fundamental sensing techniques. Furthermore, the most recent patents developed for such measurements in pneumatic conveying pipelines are scrutinized along with their concomitant pros and cons.

  8. Clathrate hydrates in cometary nuclei and porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1988-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of formation and decomposition of CO2-clathrate hydrate in cometary nuclei are discussed. As far as it is known, this is the only clathrate hydrate which is unstable at low temperatures. Calculation shows that, in accord with other evidence, neither volume nor grain boundary diffusion in the clathrate lattice can be responsible for the rate of these reactions and that a surface mechanism with the attendant sensitivity to pressure must play a crucial role. Density changes accompanying CO2-clathrate decomposition and formation can lead to microporosity and enhanced brittleness or even to fracture of cometary nuclei at low temperatures. Other clathrate hydrates and mixed clathrates are also discussed.

  9. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Hy, Sunny; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; Liu, Zhaoping; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas-solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high as 301 mAh g(-1) with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g(-1) still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. This study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries. PMID:27363944

  10. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Hy, Sunny; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; Liu, Zhaoping; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-07-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas-solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high as 301 mAh g-1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g-1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. This study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries.

  11. Dynamics simulations of photoinduced proton transfer reactions of 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole in the gas phase and its hydrated clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daengngern, Rathawat; Kungwan, Nawee

    2014-08-01

    The excited-state dynamics simulations of 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and hydrated HBO were performed on their lowest energy structures using RI-ADC(2)/SVP-SV(P). For free HBO, only syn-HBO can undergo tautomerization in the excited state. For HBO(H2O), two different pathways (A) the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (PT) and (B) the excited-state intermolecular PT through hydrogen-bonded network occur. PT time of free HBO is ultrafast at 28 fs, whereas, the PT time of HBO(H2O) takes longer with time range of 43-193 fs depending on the initial structure. The slow PT process of HBO(H2O) is caused by competition between formations of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds.

  12. A theoretical study of [Be,(H 2O) n] 2+, [BeOH,(H 2O) n-1 ] + and [Be(OH) 2,(H 2O) n-2 ] aggregates ( n=1-6). Incidence of the first hydration shells on the hydrolysis reactions of Be 2+ and BeOH + systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorge, Pierre; Masella, Michel

    2000-12-01

    Ab initio results regarding the incidence of the first and part of the second hydration shell on the hydrolysis reaction of solvated Be 2+ and BeOH + systems are presented. These results exhibit that the first shells strongly reduce the energy cost of the Be 2+→BeOH ++H + reaction, however, this reaction remains strongly exothermic. For the BeOH +→Be(OH) 2+H + reaction, the first shells have considerably less incidence on it. This reaction is endothermic and its Helmholtz free energy cost is of the same order of magnitude as that experimentally reported in water.

  13. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  14. Gas hydrate and humans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The potential effects of naturally occurring gas hydrate on humans are not understood with certainty, but enough information has been acquired over the past 30 years to make preliminary assessments possible. Three major issues are gas hydrate as (1) a potential energy resource, (2) a factor in global climate change, and (3) a submarine geohazard. The methane content is estimated to be between 1015 to 1017 m3 at STP and the worldwide distribution in outer continental margins of oceans and in polar regions are significant features of gas hydrate. However, its immediate development as an energy resource is not likely because there are various geological constraints and difficult technological problems that must be solved before economic recovery of methane from hydrate can be achieved. The role of gas hydrate in global climate change is uncertain. For hydrate methane to be an effective greenhouse gas, it must reach the atmosphere. Yet there are many obstacles to the transfer of methane from hydrate to the atmosphere. Rates of gas hydrate dissociation and the integrated rates of release and destruction of the methane in the geo/hydro/atmosphere are not adequately understood. Gas hydrate as a submarine geohazard, however, is of immediate and increasing importance to humans as our industrial society moves to exploit seabed resources at ever-greater depths in the waters of our coastal oceans. Human activities and installations in regions of gas-hydrate occurrence must take into account the presence of gas hydrate and deal with the consequences of its presence.

  15. Understanding gas hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Laura; Chanton, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Ian; Martens, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    In order to understand the role gas hydrates play in climate change or their potential as an energy source, we must first understand their basic behaviors. One such behavior not well understood is their dissolution and the factors that control it. Theoretically, hydrates are stable in areas of high pressure, low temperature, moderate salt concentrations, and saturated methane. Yet in nature, we observe hydrate to outcrop seafloor sediments into overlying water that is under-saturated with respect to methane. How do these hydrates not dissolve away? To address this question, we combine both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, we have collected pore-waters directly surrounding gas hydrate outcrops and measured for in situ methane concentrations. This gives us an understanding of the concentration gradients, and thus methane flux, directly from the hydrate to the surrounding environment. From these samples, we found that methane concentrations decreased further from hydrate yet are always under-saturated with respect to methane hydrate. The resulting low methane gradients were then used to calculate low dissolution rates. This result suggests that hydrates are meta-stable in the environment. What controls their apparent meta-stability? We hypothesize that surrounding oils or microbial slimes help protect the hydrate and slow down their dissolution. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments where hydrate was formed at in situ pressure and temperature and the source gas removed; first with no oils, then with oils. Dissolved methane concentrations were then measured in surrounding fluids over time and dissolution rates calculated. To date, both methane and mixed gas hydrate (methane, ethane, and propane) have similar dissolution rates of 0.12 mM/hr. Future experiments will add oils to determine how different hydrate dissolves with such contaminants. This study will further our understanding of factors that control hydrate

  16. Clustering Instability in Sedimenting Gas-Solid Suspensions and its Influence on Flow Properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoqi; Yin, Xiaolong; Liu, Guodong

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that sedimentation or fluidization of solid particles through gas is unstable. Instability is usually recognized as particle clusters when the solid fraction is low, or as void `bubbles' when the solid volume fraction is high. Using particle-resolved numerical simulations, we studied cluster formation in gas-solid systems with gas-to-solid density ratio being 0.01 and 0.001. The particles are uniformly sized spheres with a terminal Re of 30. The solid fraction is 0.25. Up to 4808 particles were used such that the clustering phenomena can be adequately examined. In periodic computational domains whose lateral dimension is about eight particle diameters, nucleated particle clusters quickly coalesce and grow into traveling waves that span the entire width of the domain. Consequently, gas-solid drag is significantly increased compared to that in a homogeneous liquid-solid suspension, the lateral velocity variance is suppressed, and the particle velocity distributions are strongly non-Gaussian. When lateral dimension is increased to about thirty particle diameters, particle clusters never turn into width-spanning traveling waves. As results, the drag is similar to that in a homogeneous suspension, the lateral velocity variance is strongly enhanced and the vertical variance reduced, and particle velocity distributions are nearly Gaussian. These results suggest that the effect of particle clusters should be examined in domains with large lateral dimensions.

  17. Open-source MFIX-DEM software for gas-solids flows: Part II Validation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Garg, Rahul; Galvin, Janine; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2012-01-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware and numerical algorithms, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been increasingly employed as a useful tool for investigating the complex hydrodynamics inherent in multiphase flows. An important step during the development of a CFD model and prior to its application is conducting careful and comprehensive verification and validation studies. Accordingly, efforts to verify and validate the open-source MFIX-DEM software, which can be used for simulating the gas solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles, have been made at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In part I of this paper, extensive verification studies were presented and in this part, detailed validation studies of MFIX-DEM are presented. A series of test cases covering a range of gas solids flow applications were conducted. In particular the numerical results for the random packing of a binary particle mixture, the repose angle of a sandpile formed during a side charge process, velocity, granular temperature, and voidage profiles from a bounded granular shear flow, lateral voidage and velocity profiles from a monodisperse bubbling fluidized bed, lateral velocity profiles from a spouted bed, and the dynamics of segregation of a binary mixture in a bubbling bed were compared with available experimental data, and in some instances with empirical correlations. In addition, sensitivity studies were conducted for various parameters to quantify the error in the numerical simulation.

  18. Quantitative prediction of clustering instabilities in gas-solid homogeneous cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrenya, Christine; Mitrano, Peter; Li, Xiaoqi; Yin, Xiaolong

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic particle clusters are widely documented in gas-solid flow systems, including gasification units for coal or biomass, gravity-driven flow over an array of tubes, pneumatic transport lines, etc. Continuum descriptions based on kinetic theory have been known for over a decade to qualitatively predict the presence of such clustering instabilities. The quantitative ability of such continuum descriptions is relatively unexplored, however, and remains unclear given the low-Knudsen assumption upon which the descriptions are based. In particular, the concentration gradient is relatively large across the boundary between the cluster and the surrounding dilute region, which is counter to the small-gradient assumption inherent in the low-Knudsen-number expansion. In this work, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a gas-solid homogeneous cooling system to determine the critical system size needed for the clustering instability to develop. We then compare the results to the same quantity predicted by a continuum description based on kinetic theory. The agreement is quite good over a wide range of parameters. This finding is reminiscent of molecular fluids, namely the ability of the Navier-Stokes equations to predict well outside the expected range of Knudsen numbers.

  19. Role of fluctuations in instability generation in gas-solid suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Kolakaluri, Ravi; Tenneti, Sudheer

    2013-11-01

    Stability analysis of gas-solid suspensions using kinetic theory (Koch, Phys. Fluids, 1990) relies on a number density function (NDF) that is based on the canonical (constant number) ensemble. Euler-Lagrange simulations of a model problem are used to show that this approach does not accurately represent the scale-dependent interphase coupling between different realizations of the gas velocity field and fluctuations in the number of particles naturally occurring in fluidized beds. The grand-canonical (or variable number) ensemble is better suited to representing this coupling, and it is shown how the NDF can be related to this ensemble. The evolution of the grand-canonical NDF then leads to instabilities and growth of spatial fluctuations in the number density of a homogeneous suspension. This analysis leads to a different explanation for the growth of instabilities in homogeneous gas-solid suspensions that does not require perturbations in the average number density. Rather it is shown that the interaction of different realizations of the gas velocity field with individual realizations of the particle field leads to the growth of instabilities due to the dependence of drag on local volume fraction in each realization, that is extracted from particle-resolved DNS data. This work is partially supported by NSF CBET 1134500.

  20. Decomposition reactions of magnesium sulfate hydrates and phase equilibria in the MgSO 4-H 2O and Na +-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O systems with implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiger, Michael; Linnow, Kirsten; Ehrhardt, Dorothee; Rohde, Mandy

    2011-06-01

    We report new measurements of equilibrium relative humidities for stable and metastable hydration-dehydration equilibria involving several magnesium sulfates in the MgSO 4· nH 2O series. We also report a comprehensive thermodynamic treatment of the system including solution properties and experimental data from the published literature, i.e. solubilities, heat capacities and additional decomposition humidities. While for some magnesium sulfate hydrates solubility data in the binary system MgSO 4-H 2O are sparse, there is a reasonable database of solubility measurements of these hydrates in the ternary MgCl 2-MgSO 4-H 2O and the quaternary reciprocal Na +-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O systems. To make these data suitable for the determination of solubility products, we parameterized a Pitzer ion interaction model for the calculation of activity coefficients and water activities in mixed solutions of these systems and report the ion interaction parameters for the Na +-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O system. The model predicted solubilities in the reciprocal system are in very good agreement with experimental data. Using all available experimental data and the solution model an updated phase diagram of the MgSO 4-H 2O system covering the whole temperature range from about 170 to 473 K is established. This treatment includes MgSO 4·H 2O (kieserite), MgSO 4·4H 2O (starkeyite), MgSO 4·5H 2O (pentahydrite), MgSO 4·6H 2O (hexahydrite), MgSO 4·7H 2O (epsomite) and MgSO 4·11H 2O (meridianiite). It is shown that only kieserite, hexahydrite, epsomite and meridianiite show fields of stable existence while starkeyite and pentahydrite are always metastable. Due to sluggish kinetics of kieserite formation, however, there is a rather extended field of metastable existence of starkeyite which makes this solid a major product in dehydration reactions. The model predicted behavior of the magnesium sulfates is in excellent agreement with observations reported in the literature under terrestrial

  1. Origins of hydration lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  2. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  3. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication. PMID:25585501

  4. Characteristics of dilute gas-solids suspensions in drag reducing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. S.; Pfeffer, R.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements were performed on dilute flowing gas-solids suspensions and included data, with particles present, on gas friction factors, velocity profiles, turbulence intensity profiles, turbulent spectra, and particle velocity profiles. Glass beads of 10 to 60 micron diameter were suspended in air at Reynolds numbers of 10,000 to 25,000 and solids loading ratios from 0 to 4. Drag reduction was achieved for all particle sizes in vertical flow and for the smaller particle sizes in horizontal flow. The profile measurements in the vertical tube indicated that the presence of particles thickened the viscous sublayer. A quantitative theory based on particle-eddy interaction and viscous sublayer thickening has been proposed.

  5. Role of distortion in the hcp vs fcc competition in rare-gas solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainyukova, N. V.

    2011-05-01

    As a prototype of an initial or intermediate structure between hcp and fcc lattices we consider a distorted bcc crystal. We calculate the temperature and pressure dependences of the lattice parameters for the heavier rare gas solids Ar, Kr, Xe in a quasiharmonic approximation with Aziz potentials, and confirm earlier predictions that the hcp structure predominates over fcc in the bulk within wide ranges of P and T. The situation is different for confined clusters with up to 105 atoms, where, owing to the specific surface energetics and terminations, structures with five-fold symmetry made up of fcc fragments are dominant. As a next step we consider the free relaxation of differently distorted bcc clusters, and show that two types (monoclinic and orthorhombic) of initial distortion are a driving force for the final hcp vs fcc configurations. Possible energy relationships between the initial and final structures are obtained and analyzed.

  6. Abnormal heat liberation triggered by current in a D/Pd gas-solid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Tian, Jian

    2015-08-01

    A relationship was studied among D/Pd gas-solid system current, pressure and producing excess heating in this paper. The results indicated that when the pressure of deuterium is at 9 × 104 Pa, electric current is 8 A and lasting heat is 40 days, the superheating energy is 280 MJ, the maximum superheating power is 80 W and averaging to each palladium atom energy for the superheating energy is 1.7 × 104 eV. Analysis of the sample by SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and EDS (energy dispersive spectrometry) found that after the current triggering the surface of sample was changed and new elements such as Pb, Sn, Ca, and Ag appeared. The results suggested that the superheating appeared come from a nuclear transmutation.

  7. Open source development experience with a computational gas-solids flow code

    SciTech Connect

    Syamlal, M; O'Brien, T. J.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Gel, Aytekin; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2008-01-01

    A case study on the use of open source (OS) software development in chemical engineering research and education is presented here. The multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX is the object of the case study. The verification and validation steps required for constructing modern computational software and the advantages of OS development in those steps are discussed. The infrastructure used for enabling the OS development of MFIX is described. The impact of OS development on computational research and education in gas-solids flow and the dissemination of information to other areas such as geotechnical and volcanology research are demonstrated. It is shown that the advantages of OS development methodology were realized: verification by many users, which enhances software quality; the use of software as a means for accumulating and exchanging information; and the facilitation of peer review of the results of computational research.

  8. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas-solids transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeleke, Najeem; Adewumi, Michael; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-08-01

    Two-phase gas-solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas-solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe-Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  9. Kinetics of the reaction of iron blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents with SO{sub 2} at low temperatures: effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.F.; Shih, S.M.

    2009-09-15

    The effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx in the flue gas on the kinetics of the sulfation of blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents at low temperatures were studied using a differential fixed-bed reactor. When O{sub 2} and NOx were not present simultaneously, the reaction kinetics was about the same as that under the gas mixtures containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N{sub 2} only, being affected mainly by the relative humidity. The sulfation of sorbents can be described by the surface coverage model and the model equations derived for the latter case. When both O{sub 2} and NOx, were present, the sulfation of sorbents was greatly enhanced, forming a great amount of sulfate in addition to sulfite. The surface coverage model is still valid in this case, but the model equations obtained show a more marked effect of relative humidity and negligible effects of SO{sub 2} concentration and temperature on the reaction. The effect of sorbent composition on the reaction kinetics was entirely represented by the effects of the initial specific surface area (S{sub g0}) and the Ca molar content (M{sup -1}) of sorbent. The initial conversion rate of sorbent increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}, and the ultimate conversion increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}M{sup -1}. The model equations obtained in this work are applicable to describe the kinetics of the sulfation of the sorbents in the low-temperature dry and semidry fine gas desulfurization processes either with an upstream NOx, removal unit or without.111

  10. Terahertz spectroscopy of concrete for evaluating the critical hydration level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Nallappan, Kathirvel; Sasmal, Saptarshi; Pesala, Bala

    2014-03-01

    Concrete, a mixture of cement, coarse aggregate, sand and filler material (if any), is widely used in the construction industry. Cement, mainly composed of Tricalcium Silicate (C3S) and Dicalcium Silicate (C2S) reacts readily with water, a process known as hydration. The hydration process forms a solid material known as hardened cement paste which is mainly composed of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H), Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. To quantify the critical hydration level, an accurate and fast technique is highly desired. However, in conventional XRD technique, the peaks of the constituents of anhydrated and hydrated cement cannot be resolved properly, where as Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy has low penetration depth and hence cannot be used to determine the hydration level of thicker concrete samples easily. Further, MIR spectroscopy cannot be used to effectively track the formation of Calcium Hydroxide, a key by-product during the hydration process. This paper describes a promising approach to quantify the hydration dynamics of cement using Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. This technique has been employed to track the time dependent reaction mechanism of the key constituents of cement that react with water and form the products in the hydrated cement, viz., C-S-H, Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. This study helps in providing an improved understanding on the hydration kinetics of cement and also to optimise the physio-mechanical characteristics of concrete.

  11. TOUGH-Fx/Hydrate

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-02-01

    TOUGH-Fx/HYORATL can model the non-isothermal gas release. phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural gas hydrate deposits in the subsurtace (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. T006H-Fx/HYDRATE vi .0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate Ibmiation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and upmore » to four mass components-- i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dIssociation or formation, phase changes, and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects, and inhibItor-Induced effects.« less

  12. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  13. QUANTUM MECHANICAL STUDY OF THE COMPETITIVE HYDRATION BETWEEN PROTONATED QUINAZOLINE AND LI+, NA+, AND CA2+ IONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydration reactions are fundamental to many biological functions and environmental processes. The energetics of hydration of inorganic and organic chemical species influences their fate and transport behavior in the environment. In this study, gas-phase quantum mechanical calcula...

  14. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years. PMID:17782901

  15. Henry`s law gas-solid chromatography and correlations of virial coefficients for hydrocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons, ethers, and sulfur hexafluoride adsorbed onto carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Rybolt, T.R.; Epperson, M.T.; Weaver, H.W.; Thomas, H.E.; Clare, S.E.; Manning, B.M.; McClung, J.T.

    1995-07-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to determine the Henry`s law second gas-solid virial coefficients within the temperature range of 314--615 K for ethane, propane, butane, isobutane, pentane, hexane, heptane, chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, tetrachloromethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12), methyl ether, ethyl ether, and sulfur hexafluoride with Carbopack B, a microporous carbon adsorbent. The temperature dependence of the second gas-solid virial coefficients of these adsorbates was used in conjunction with analyses based on a graphical method, a single-surface numeric integration method, a single-surface analytic expression method, and a two-surface analytic expression method to determine the gas-solid interaction energies and other parameters. The interaction energies were correlated with a ratio of the critical temperature divided by the square root of the critical pressure. The four methods were compared in their abilities to successfully calculate second gas-solid virial coefficient values.

  16. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  17. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  18. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point. PMID:26203042

  19. Real time mass flux measurements of gas-solid suspensions at low velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J H; Chao, B T; Soo, S L

    1981-01-01

    In previous work, measurement of the particulate mass flux was made based upon a novel electrostatic technique. A small conducting wire sensor was inserted in the flow and as each particle hit the sensor an individual pulse of current was identified. Through suitable electronic circuitry, the number of pulses in a given time were counted. This was a direct measure of the number of particle-probe collisions which was related to local particle mass flow. The technique is currently limited to monodisperse suspensions. A primary advantage of the impact counter system is that the output does not depend upon the magnitude of the actual charge transfer. As long as the pulses are sufficiently above the noise level, variations in charge transfer will not affect the measurement. For the current work, the technique was applied to vertical gas-solid flow where the fluid velocity was slightly above the particle terminal velocity. Under these conditions a sufficient signal to noise ratio was not found. The Cheng-Soo charge transfer theory indicated that the low particle-sensor impact velocity was responsible. The probe system was then modified by extracting a particulate sample isokinetically and accelerating the particles to a sufficient velocity by an area reduction in the sampling tube. With this technique the signal to noise ratio was about 12 to 1. Mass flux results are shown to compare favorably with filter collection and weighing.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Ding, T.; Miao, J. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Qu, Z G; Ding, T; Miao, J Y

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems. PMID:27176384

  2. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-01

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ˜0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  3. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    SciTech Connect

    Morishige, Kunimitsu Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  4. Research of the gas-solid flow character based on the DEM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueyao; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-12-01

    Numerical simulation of gas-solid flow behaviors in a rectangular fluidized bed is carried out three dimensionally by the discrete element method (DEM). Euler method and Lagrange method are employed to deal with the gas phase and solid phase respectively. The collided force among particles, striking force between particle and wall, drag force, gravity, Magnus lift force and Saffman lift force are considered when establishing the mathematic models. Soft-sphere model is used to describe the collision of particles. In addition, the Euler method is also used for modeling the solid phase to compare with the results of DEM. The flow patterns, particle mean velocities, particles' diffusion and pressure drop of the bed under typical operating conditions are obtained. The results show that the DEM method can describe the detailed information among particles, while the Euler-Euler method cannot capture the micro-scale character. No matter which method is used, the diffusion of particles increases with the increase of gas velocity. But the gathering and crushing of particles cannot be simulated, so the energy loss of particles' collision cannot be calculated and the diffusion by using the Euler-Euler method is larger. In addition, it is shown by DEM method, with strengthening of the carrying capacity, more and more particles can be schlepped upward and the dense suspension upflow pattern can be formed. However, the results given by the Euler-Euler method are not consistent with the real situation.

  5. Numerical simulation of gas-solid two-phase flow in U-beam separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. Y.; Zhang, H. Z.; Chen, X. P.; Ruan, J. M.; Dou, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation is carried out for gas-solid two-phase flow in a U-beam separator. In this study, the U-beam is altered with the inlet fins in order to improve the performance of the separator. The inlet fin angle of the separator are 30°, 35°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55 ° and 60°. The governing equations are the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with the standard k-epsilon model and the discrete phase model (DPM) describing the discrete two - phase flow as well as stochastic tracking model. Results show that the pressure drop deviation with fins is within 3% from those without fins. It is found that there is a maximum separation efficiency at the fin angle of 35°. Fin induces generation of a stagnation region which could collect particles and lead to change of vortical structures. The fin induced flow also causes the turbulent intensity inside the baffle to decrease to facilitate separation.

  6. High-Resolution Simulations of Gas-Solids Jet Penetration Into a High Density Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution simulations of a gas-solids jet in a 0.3 m diameter and 15.9 m tall circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser were conducted with the open source software-MFIX. In the numerical simulations, both gas and solids injected through a 1.6 cm diameter radial-directed tube 4.3 m above the bottom distributor were tracked as tracers, which enable the analysis of the characteristics of a two-phase jet. Two jetting gas velocities of 16.6 and 37.2 m/s were studied with the other operating conditions fixed. Reasonable flow hydrodynamics with respect to overall pressure drop, voidage, and solids velocity distributions were predicted. Due to the different dynamic responses of gas and particles to the crossflow, a significant separation of gas and solids within the jet region was predicted for both cases. In addition, the jet characteristics based on tracer concentration and tracer mass fraction profiles at different downstream levels are discussed. Overall, the numerical predictions compare favorably to the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  7. Laser studies of chemical dynamics at the gas-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanagh, Richard R.; King, David S.

    The DOE funded research program Laser Studies of Chemical Dynamics at the Gas-Solid Interface has taken a detailed, microscopic view of molecules desorbed from surfaces in order to gain an understanding of energy flow and interaction potentials and how these control chemical reactivity at interfaces. Successful completion of these experiments required technical expertise both in surface science and laser-based molecular dynamics, a collaborative situation that exists in the NIST center for Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. During the three year period covered by this progress report, our goal was to use state-resolved techniques to examine a single chemisorption system in detail, and to observe how changes in the interaction potential or method of surface excitation are manifest in the desorption dynamics. The system chosen was NO/Pt(111). Studies were undertaken in which the effects on the NO-Pt interaction potential of coadsorbates--both weakly (CO) and strongly (NH(sub 3)) interacting-- could be examined. In addition, attempts were to be made to study non- equilibrium dynamics by using pulsed laser heating.

  8. New Simulator for Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Hydrate Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, B.; Qorbani Nashaqi, K.; Jemai, K.; Vafaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to Gibbs phase rule and combination of first and second law of thermodynamics, hydrate in nature cannot be in equilibrium since they come from different parent phases. In this system hydrate formation and dissociation is affected by local variables such as pressure, temperature and composition with mass and energy transport restrictions. Available simulators have attempted to model hydrate phase transition as an equilibrium reaction. Although those which treated the processes of formation and dissociation as kinetics used model of Kim and Bishnoi based on laboratory PVT experiment, and consequently hard to accept up scaling to real reservoirs condition. Additionally, they merely check equilibrium in terms of pressure and temperature projections and disregard thermodynamic requirements for equilibrium especially along axes of concentrations in phases. Non-equilibrium analysis of hydrate involves putting aside all the phase transitions which are not possible and use kinetic evaluation to measure phase transitions progress in each grid block for each time step. This procedure is Similar to geochemical reservoir simulators logic. As a result RetrasoCodeBright has been chosen as hydrate reservoir simulator and our work involves extension of this code. RetrasoCodeBright (RCB) is able to handle competing processes of formation and dissociation of hydrates as pseudo reactions at each node and each time step according to the temperature, pressure and concentration. Hydrates can therefore be implemented into the structure as pseudo minerals, with appropriate kinetic models. In order to implement competing nature of phase transition kinetics of hydrate formation, we use classical nucleation theory based on Kvamme et al. as a simplified model inside RCB and use advanced theories to fit parameters for the model (PFT). Hydrate formation and dissociation can directly be observed through porosity changes in the specific areas of the porous media. In this work which is in

  9. Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Cancer.gov

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  10. Transformations in methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Chou, I-Ming; Sharma, Anurag; Burruss, Robert C.; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed study of pure methane hydrate in a diamond cell with in situ optical, Raman, and x-ray microprobe techniques reveals two previously unknown structures, structure II and structure H, at high pressures. The structure II methane hydrate at 250 MPa has a cubic unit cell of a = 17.158(2) Å and volume V = 5051.3(13) Å3; structure H at 600 MPa has a hexagonal unit cell of a = 11.980(2) Å, c = 9.992(3) Å, and V = 1241.9(5) Å3. The compositions of these two investigated phases are still not known. With the effects of pressure and the presence of other gases in the structure, the structure II phase is likely to dominate over the known structure I methane hydrate within deep hydrate-bearing sediments underlying continental margins. PMID:11087836

  11. Impact of Compound Hydrate Dynamics on Phase Boundary Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Compound hydrate reactions are affected by the local concentration of hydrate forming materials (HFM). The relationship between HFM composition and the phase boundary is as significant as temperature and pressure. Selective uptake and sequestration of preferred hydrate formers (PF) has wide ranging implications for the state and potential use of natural hydrate formation, including impact on climate. Rising mineralizing fluids of hydrate formers (such as those that occur on Earth and are postulated to exist elsewhere in the solar system) will sequester PF before methane, resulting in a positive relationship between depth and BTU content as ethane and propane are removed before methane. In industrial settings the role of preferred formers can separate gases. When depressurizing gas hydrate to release the stored gas, the hydrate initial composition will set the decomposition phase boundary because the supporting solution takes on the composition of the hydrate phase. In other settings where hydrate is formed, transported, and then dissociated, similar effects can control the process. The behavior of compound hydrate systems can primarily fit into three categories: 1) In classically closed systems, all the material that can form hydrate is isolated, such as in a sealed laboratory vessel. In such systems, formation and decomposition are reversible processes with observed hysteresis related to mass or heat transfer limitations, or the order and magnitude in which individual hydrate forming gases are taken up from the mixture and subsequently released. 2) Kinetically closed systems are exposed to a solution mass flow across a hydrate mass. These systems can have multiple P-T phase boundaries based on the local conditions at each face of the hydrate mass. A portion of hydrate that is exposed to fresh mineralizing solution will contain more preferred hydrate formers than another portion that is exposed to a partially depleted solution. Examples of kinetically closed

  12. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  13. A DFT-based comparative equilibrium study of thermal dehydration and hydrolysis of CaCl₂ hydrates and MgCl₂ hydrates for seasonal heat storage.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Amar Deep; Nedea, Silvia; Zondag, Herbert; Rindt, Camilo; Smeulders, David

    2016-04-21

    Salt hydrates store solar energy in chemical form via a reversible dehydration-hydration reaction. However, as a side reaction to dehydration, hydrolysis (HCl formation) may occur in chloride based salt hydrates (specially in MgCl2 hydrates), affecting the durability of the storage system. The mixture of CaCl2 and MgCl2 hydrates has been shown experimentally to have exceptional cycle stability and improved kinetics. However, the optimal operating conditions for the mixture are unknown. To understand the appropriate balance between dehydration and hydrolysis kinetics in the mixtures, it is essential to gain in-depth insight into the mixture components. We present a GGA-DFT level study to investigate the various gaseous structures of CaCl2 hydrates and to understand the relative stability of their conformers. The hydration strength and relative stability of conformers are dominated by electrostatic interactions. A wide network of intramolecular homonuclear and heteronuclear hydrogen bonds is observed in CaCl2 hydrates. Equilibrium product concentrations are obtained during dehydration and hydrolysis reactions under various temperature and pressure conditions. The trend of the dehydration curve with temperature in CaCl2 hydrates is similar to the experiments. Comparing these results to those of MgCl2 hydrates, we find that CaCl2 hydrates are more resistant towards hydrolysis in the temperature range of 273-800 K. Specifically, the present study reveals that the onset temperatures of HCl formation, a crucial design parameter for MgCl2 hydrates, are lower than for CaCl2 hydrates except for the mono-hydrate. PMID:27004734

  14. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of laboratory-grown gas clathrate hydrates formed from melting ice, and comparison to natural hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Circone, S.; Durham, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate grain texture and pore structure development within various compositions of pure sI and sII gas hydrates synthesized in the laboratory, as well as in natural samples retrieved from marine (Gulf of Mexico) and permafrost (NW Canada) settings. Several samples of methane hydrate were also quenched after various extents of partial reaction for assessment of mid-synthesis textural progression. All laboratory-synthesized hydrates were grown under relatively high-temperature and high-pressure conditions from rounded ice grains with geometrically simple pore shapes, yet all resulting samples displayed extensive recrystallization with complex pore geometry. Growth fronts of mesoporous methane hydrate advancing into dense ice reactant were prevalent in those samples quenched after limited reaction below and at the ice point. As temperatures transgress the ice point, grain surfaces continue to develop a discrete "rind" of hydrate, typically 5 to 30 ??m thick. The cores then commonly melt, with rind microfracturing allowing migration of the melt to adjacent grain boundaries where it also forms hydrate. As the reaction continues under progressively warmer conditions, the hydrate product anneals to form dense and relatively pore-free regions of hydrate grains, in which grain size is typically several tens of micrometers. The prevalence of hollow, spheroidal shells of hydrate, coupled with extensive redistribution of reactant and product phases throughout reaction, implies that a diffusion-controlled shrinking-core model is an inappropriate description of sustained hydrate growth from melting ice. Completion of reaction at peak synthesis conditions then produces exceptional faceting and euhedral crystal growth along exposed pore walls. Further recrystallization or regrowth can then accompany even short-term exposure of synthetic hydrates to natural ocean-floor conditions, such that the final textures may closely mimic

  15. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  16. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  17. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  18. Dynamics of protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water.

  19. Dynamics of protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M; Emmert, S; Gulich, R; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water. PMID:26465518

  20. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at

  1. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of a new structure of gas hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, Christopher A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Ehm, Lars; Klug, Dennis D; Parise, John B; Yang, Ling; Martin, Dave; Ripmeester, John; Moudrakovski, Igor; Ratcliffe, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Atoms and molecules 0.4 0.9 nm in diameter can be incorporated in the cages formed by hydrogen-bonded water molecules making up the crystalline solid clathrate hydrates. There are three structural families of these hydrates , known as sI, sII and sH, and the structure usually depends on the largest guest molecule in the hydrate. Species such as Ar, Kr, Xe and methane form sI or sII hydrate, sH is unique in that it requires both small and large cage guests for stability. All three structures, containing methane, other hydrocarbons, H2S and CO2, O2 and N2 have been found in the geosphere, with sI methane hydrate by far the most abundant. At high pressures (P > 0.7 kbar) small guests (Ar, Kr, Xe, methane) are also known to form sH hydrate with multiple occupancy of the largest cage in the hydrate. The high-pressure methane hydrate of sH has been proposed as playing a role in the outer solar system, including formation models for Titan , and yet another high pressure phase of methane has been reported , although its structure remains unknown. In this study, we report a new and unique hydrate structure that is derived from the high pressure sH hydrate of xenon. After quench recovery at ambient pressure and 77 K it shows considerable stability at low temperatures (T < 160 K) and is compositionally similar to the sI Xe clathrate starting material. This evidence of structural complexity in compositionally similar clathrate compounds indicates that thermodynamic pressure temperature conditions may not be the only important factor in structure determination, but also the reaction path may have an important effect.

  3. Can Satraplatin be hydrated before the reduction process occurs? The DFT computational study.

    PubMed

    Bradáč, Ondřej; Zimmermann, Tomáš; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2013-11-01

    Hydration reactions of two anticancer Pt(IV) complexes JM149 and JM216 (Satraplatin) were studied computationally together with the hydration of the Pt(II) complex JM118, which is a product of the Satraplatin reduction. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the reactions were determined at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2df.2pd)//B3LYP/6-31 + G(d)) level of theory. The water solution was modeled using the COSMO implicit solvation model, with cavities constructed using Klamt's atomic radii. It was found that hydration of the Pt(IV) complexes is an endergonic/endothermic reaction. It follows the (pseudo)associative mechanism is substantially slower (k ≈ 10(-11) s(-1)) than the corresponding reaction of Pt(II) analogues ((k ≈ 10(-5) s(-1)). Such a low value of the reaction constant signifies that the hydration of JM149 and Satraplatin is with high probability a kinetically forbidden reaction. Similarly to JM149 and Satraplatin, the hydration of JM118 is an endothermic/endoergic reaction. On the other hand, the kinetic parameters are similar to those of cisplatin Zimmermann et al. (J Mol Model 17:2385-2393, 2011), allowing the hydration reaction to occur at physiological conditions. These results suggest that in order to become active Satraplatin has to be first reduced to JM118, which may be subsequently hydrated to yield the active species. PMID:22643969

  4. Methane hydrate synthesis from ice: Influence of pressurization and ethanol on optimizing formation rates and hydrate yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Po-Chun.; Huang, Wuu-Liang; Stern, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline methane gas hydrate (MGH) was synthesized using an ice-seeding method to investigate the influence of pressurization and ethanol on the hydrate formation rate and gas yield of the resulting samples. When the reactor is pressurized with CH4 gas without external heating, methane hydrate can be formed from ice grains with yields up to 25% under otherwise static conditions. The rapid temperature rise caused by pressurization partially melts the granular ice, which reacts with methane to form hydrate rinds around the ice grains. The heat generated by the exothermic reaction of methane hydrate formation buffers the sample temperature near the melting point of ice for enough time to allow for continuous hydrate growth at high rates. Surprisingly, faster rates and higher yields of methane hydrate were found in runs with lower initial temperatures, slower rates of pressurization, higher porosity of the granular ice samples, or mixtures with sediments. The addition of ethanol also dramatically enhanced the formation of polycrystalline MGH. This study demonstrates that polycrystalline MGH with varied physical properties suitable for different laboratory tests can be manufactured by controlling synthesis procedures or parameters. Subsequent dissociation experiments using a gas collection apparatus and flowmeter confirmed high methane saturation (CH 4·2O, with n = 5.82 ± 0.03) in the MGH. Dissociation rates of the various samples synthesized at diverse conditions may be fitted to different rate laws, including zero and first order.

  5. Hydration of gas-phase ytterbium ion complexes studied by experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, Philip X; Michelini, Maria C.; Bray, Travis H.; Russo, Nino; Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2011-02-11

    Hydration of ytterbium (III) halide/hydroxide ions produced by electrospray ionization was studied in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and by density functional theory (DFT). Gas-phase YbX{sub 2}{sup +} and YbX(OH){sup +} (X = OH, Cl, Br, or I) were found to coordinate from one to four water molecules, depending on the ion residence time in the trap. From the time dependence of the hydration steps, relative reaction rates were obtained. It was determined that the second hydration was faster than both the first and third hydrations, and the fourth hydration was the slowest; this ordering reflects a combination of insufficient degrees of freedom for cooling the hot monohydrate ion and decreasing binding energies with increasing hydration number. Hydration energetics and hydrate structures were computed using two approaches of DFT. The relativistic scalar ZORA approach was used with the PBE functional and all-electron TZ2P basis sets; the B3LYP functional was used with the Stuttgart relativistic small-core ANO/ECP basis sets. The parallel experimental and computational results illuminate fundamental aspects of hydration of f-element ion complexes. The experimental observations - kinetics and extent of hydration - are discussed in relationship to the computed structures and energetics of the hydrates. The absence of pentahydrates is in accord with the DFT results, which indicate that the lowest energy structures have the fifth water molecule in the second shell.

  6. Electronucleation for Rapid and Controlled Formation of Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Katherine; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    Nucleation of hydrates involves very long induction times (hours to days), which is a challenge for applications requiring rapid hydrate formation. This study introduces and analyzes the use of electric fields to accelerate and control hydrate nucleation. Experiments with tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrates reveal that the induction time can be reduced by 100×, by applying an electrical potential across the precursor solution. The induction time rapidly decreases with increasing voltages and is on the order of a few minutes at 100 V. It is seen that voltage-induced current flow in the solution is responsible for electronucleation. Very low currents (microamperes) are sufficient for electronucleation. Nucleation promotion can be attributed to phenomena associated with bubble formation due to chemical reactions at the electrodes. Overall, this study lays the foundation for the control and promotion of nucleation by electric fields, and enables possibilities for instantaneous nucleation. PMID:27299519

  7. Hydration of C{sub 3}S thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rheinheimer, Vanessa; Casanova, Ignasi

    2012-04-15

    Thin films of C{sub 3}S of a few tens of nanometers were produced by electron beam evaporation. After verification that the chemical composition of the bulk material remained unchanged, the samples were hydrated with water vapor in a reaction chamber under saturated pressure and temperature conditions, and were kept isolated from atmospheric exposure throughout the whole duration of the experiment. Analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at different stages of hydration evidence a shift of the Si peaks to higher energies and a subsequent decrease of the Ca-Si binding energy distance, indicating silicate polymerization expected upon formation of C-S-H. The measured molar Ca/Si ratio evolves from that of a jennite-like material, of about 1.55, at the beginning of the experiment (attributed to pre-hydration of the thin films), to a tobermorite-like ratio of 0.85 after 3 h of hydration.

  8. Feedbacks of Rock Hydration on Hydrothermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, K.; Ruepke, L.

    2009-04-01

    Hydration of the oceanic lithosphere is an important process which alters both the chemical and physical properties of the affected lithologies. Although hydrothermal convection has been extensively researched, little work has been done on the effects of hydration reactions occurring during convection. One of the most important reactions occurring in the oceanic lithosphere is serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. We present a numerical solution for hydrothermal circulation which explores the feedbacks generated during serpentinization of mantle rocks. The model is two dimensional and uses the FEM approach. Three coupled, time-dependent equations are solved: the first equation is mass conserving and is based on Darcy flow. The second equation describes heat transport and accounts for advective and diffusive heat transfer as well as latent heat effects. The final equation describes the serpentinization rate of olivine in ultramafic rocks (Emmanuel and Berkowitz, 2006) and is derived from experimental results (Martin and Fyfe, 1970). Serpentinization is a fluid-consuming process and manifests itself as a sink term in the Darcy flow equation. The exothermic heat of reaction is added as a source term in the heat transport equation. Moreover, serpentinization is associated with a large positive volume change. This large volume change may decrease the porosity of the rock but can also increase permeability by deformation. The rate of serpentinization used in the model is, therefore, also coupled to the porosity and permeability. We investigate the role of hydration in a box model using thermodynamically constrained fluid properties where the lower part is composed of reactive mantle rocks. The effects of serpentinization on the temperatures of the venting fluids and variations in flow pathways are explored. Furthermore, the model is also used in a mid-ocean ridge setting and the amount and depth of serpentinization, in addition to the above mentioned effects, is also

  9. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  10. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivener, Karen L.; Juilland, Patrick; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-12-15

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C{sub 3}A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed.

  11. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  12. CO2 hydrate: Synthesis, composition, structure, dissociation behavior, and a comparison to structure I CH4 hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Structure I (sI) carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrate exhibits markedly different dissociation behavior from sI methane (CH4) hydrate in experiments in which equilibrated samples at 0.1 MPa are heated isobarically at 13 K/h from 210 K through the H2O melting point (273.15 K). The CO2 hydrate samples release only about 3% of their gas content up to temperatures of 240 K, which is 22 K above the hydrate phase boundary. Up to 20% is released by 270 K, and the remaining CO2 is released at 271.0 plusmn; 0.5 K, where the sample temperature is buffered until hydrate dissociation ceases. This reproducible buffering temperature for the dissociation reaction CO2??nH2O = CO2(g) + nH2O(1 to s) is measurably distinct from the pure H2O melting point at 273.15 K, which is reached as gas evolution ceases. In contrast, when si CH4 hydrate is heated at the same rate at 0.1 MPa, >95% of the gas is released within 25 K of the equilibrium temperature (193 K at 0.1 MPa). In conjunction with the dissociation study, a method for efficient and reproducible synthesis of pure polycrystalline CO2 hydrate with suitable characteristics for material properties testing was developed, and the material was characterized. CO2 hydrate was synthesized from CO2 liquid and H2O solid and liquid reactants at pressures between 5 and 25 MPa and temperatures between 250 and 281 K. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicates that the samples consist of dense crystalline hydrate and 50-300 ??m diameter pores that are lined with euhedral cubic hydrate crystals. Deuterated hydrate samples made by this same procedure were analyzed by neutron diffraction at temperatures between 4 and 215 K; results confirm that complete conversion of water to hydrate has occurred and that the measured unit cell parameter and thermal expansion are consistent with previously reported values. On the basis of measured weight gain after synthesis and gas yields from the dissociation experiments, approximately all cages in the

  13. Hydration-dependent dynamic crossover phenomenon in protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Fratini, Emiliano; Li, Mingda; Le, Peisi; Mamontov, Eugene; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2014-10-01

    The characteristic relaxation time τ of protein hydration water exhibits a strong hydration level h dependence. The dynamic crossover is observed when h is higher than the monolayer hydration level hc=0.2-0.25 and becomes more visible as h increases. When h is lower than hc, τ only exhibits Arrhenius behavior in the measured temperature range. The activation energy of the Arrhenius behavior is insensitive to h, indicating a local-like motion. Moreover, the h dependence of the crossover temperature shows that the protein dynamic transition is not directly or solely induced by the dynamic crossover in the hydration water.

  14. Gas hydrate measurements at Hydrate Ridge using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, K. C.; Dunk, R. M.; White, S. N.; Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Sloan, E. D.

    2007-06-01

    Oceanic gas hydrates have been measured near the seafloor for the first time using a seagoing Raman spectrometer at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, where extensive layers of hydrates have been found to occur near the seafloor. All of the hydrates analyzed were liberated from the upper meter of the sediment column near active gas venting sites in water depths of 770-780 m. Hydrate properties, such as structure and composition, were measured with significantly less disturbance to the sample than would be realized with core recovery. The natural hydrates measured were sI, with methane as the predominant guest component, and minor/trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide present in three of the twelve samples measured. Methane large-to-small cage occupancy ratios of the hydrates varied from 1.01 to 1.30, in good agreement with measurements of laboratory synthesized and recovered natural hydrates. Although the samples visually appeared to be solid, varying quantities of free methane gas were detected, indicating the possible presence of occluded gas in a hydrate bubble fabric.

  15. Clathrate hydrates for ozone preservation.

    PubMed

    Muromachi, Sanehiro; Ohmura, Ryo; Takeya, Satoshi; Mori, Yasuhiko H

    2010-09-01

    We report the experimental evidence for the preservation of ozone (O(3)) encaged in a clathrate hydrate. Although ozone is an unstable substance and is apt to decay to oxygen (O(2)), it may be preserved for a prolonged time if it is encaged in hydrate cavities in the form of isolated molecules. This possibility was assessed using a hydrate formed from an ozone + oxygen gas mixture coexisting with carbon tetrachloride or xenon. Each hydrate sample was stored in an air-filled container at atmospheric pressure and a constant temperature in the range between -20 and 2 degrees C and was continually subjected to iodometric measurements of its fractional ozone content. Such chronological measurements and structure analysis using powder X-ray diffraction have revealed that ozone can be preserved in a hydrate-lattice structure for more than 20 days at a concentration on the order of 0.1% (hydrate-mass basis). PMID:20707330

  16. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  17. Elevating salinity and temperature with hydrate formation at deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Liu, Xiaoli

    2013-04-01

    We study the Ursa vent in ~1070 meters water depth at lease blocks MC852/853 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Elevated salinities and temperatures at the vent shift the base of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the seafloor (Paull et al., 2005; Ruppel et al., 2005). We model the coexistence of high salinities, high temperatures, and an uplifted hydrate phase boundary with a one-dimensional, multicomponent, multiphase, fluid- and heat-flow model of hydrate formation. In this model, free gas supplied from depth migrates vertically through a high-permeability conduit to the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ). Once reaching the base of the RHSZ, gas combines with water to form hydrate, salt is excluded, and heat is released. Hydrate formation continues until water is too warm and saline for further hydrate formation. This process self generates three-phase (gas, liquid, hydrate) equilibrium through the RHSZ and allows gas to vent from the base of the RHSZ to the seafloor. Once the reaction front breaches the seafloor, a pseudo steady state is reached in which a continuous salt flux diffuses from the seafloor, and further hydrate formation occurs at a rate necessary to replace the diffuse salt loss. This continued hydrate formation has the potential to produce large, steady fluxes of salt and heat from the seafloor. Such gas-hydrate and fluid-flow systems are important because they are especially sensitive to global ocean warming due to the large concentrations of hydrate that exist at three-phase equilibrium near the seafloor. References: Paull, C., Ussler, W., Lorenson, T., Winters, W., Dougherty, J., 2005. Geochemical constraints on the distribution of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico. Geo-Marine Letters 25, 273-280. Ruppel, C., Dickens, G.R., Castellini, D.G., Gilhooly, W., Lizarralde, D., 2005. Heat and salt inhibition of gas hydrate formation in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, L04605.

  18. APPARATUS FOR SHORT TIME MEASUREMENTS IN A FIXED-BED, GAS/SOLID REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    An apparatus for exposure of a solid to reactive process gas is described which makes possible short time (≥ 0.3 to 15 s) exposures in a fixed-bed reactor. Operating conditions for differential reaction with respect to the gas concentration and rapid quench for arresting hi...

  19. Balancing Accuracy and Computational Efficiency for Ternary Gas Hydrate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic accumulations of natural gas hydrates hold vast organic carbon reserves, which have the potential of meeting global energy needs for decades. Estimates of vast amounts of global natural gas hydrate deposits make them an attractive unconventional energy resource. As with other unconventional energy resources, the challenge is to economically produce the natural gas fuel. The gas hydrate challenge is principally technical. Meeting that challenge will require innovation, but more importantly, scientific research to understand the resource and its characteristics in porous media. Producing natural gas from gas hydrate deposits requires releasing CH4 from solid gas hydrate. The conventional way to release CH4 is to dissociate the hydrate by changing the pressure and temperature conditions to those where the hydrate is unstable. The guest-molecule exchange technology releases CH4 by replacing it with a more thermodynamically stable molecule (e.g., CO2, N2). This technology has three advantageous: 1) it sequesters greenhouse gas, 2) it releases energy via an exothermic reaction, and 3) it retains the hydraulic and mechanical stability of the hydrate reservoir. Numerical simulation of the production of gas hydrates from geologic deposits requires accounting for coupled processes: multifluid flow, mobile and immobile phase appearances and disappearances, heat transfer, and multicomponent thermodynamics. The ternary gas hydrate system comprises five components (i.e., H2O, CH4, CO2, N2, and salt) and the potential for six phases (i.e., aqueous, liquid CO2, gas, hydrate, ice, and precipitated salt). The equation of state for ternary hydrate systems has three requirements: 1) phase occurrence, 2) phase composition, and 3) phase properties. Numerical simulation of the production of geologic accumulations of gas hydrates have historically suffered from relatively slow execution times, compared with other multifluid, porous media systems, due to strong nonlinearities and

  20. Insight on Tricalcium Silicate Hydration and Dissolution Mechanism from Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Hegoi; Durgun, Engin; López-Arbeloa, Iñigo; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2015-07-15

    Hydration of mineral surfaces, a critical process for many technological applications, encompasses multiple coupled chemical reactions and topological changes, challenging both experimental characterization and computational modeling. In this work, we used reactive force field simulations to understand the surface properties, hydration, and dissolution of a model mineral, tricalcium silicate. We show that the computed static quantities, i.e., surface energies and water adsorption energies, do not provide useful insight into predict mineral hydration because they do not account for major structural changes at the interface when dynamic effects are included. Upon hydration, hydrogen atoms from dissociated water molecules penetrate into the crystal, forming a disordered calcium silicate hydrate layer that is similar for most of the surfaces despite wide-ranging static properties. Furthermore, the dynamic picture of hydration reveals the hidden role of surface topology, which can lead to unexpected water tessellation that stabilizes the surface against dissolution. PMID:26107551

  1. The role of water in gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    When raised to temperatures above the ice melting point, gas hydrates release their gas in well-defined, reproducible events that occur within self-maintained temperature ranges slightly below the ice point. This behavior is observed for structure I (carbon dioxide, methane) and structure II gas hydrates (methane-ethane, and propane), including those formed with either H2O- or D2O-host frameworks, and dissociated at either ambient or elevated pressure conditions. We hypothesize that at temperatures above the H2O (or D2O) melting point: (1) hydrate dissociation produces water + gas instead of ice + gas, (2) the endothermic dissociation reaction lowers the temperature of the sample, causing the water product to freeze, (3) this phase transition buffers the sample temperatures within a narrow temperature range just below the ice point until dissociation goes to completion, and (4) the temperature depression below the pure ice melting point correlates with the average rate of dissociation and arises from solution of the hydrate-forming gas, released by dissociation, in the water phase at elevated concentrations. In addition, for hydrate that is partially dissociated to ice + gas at lower temperatures and then heated to temperatures above the ice point, all remaining hydrate dissociates to gas + liquid water as existing barriers to dissociation disappear. The enhanced dissociation rates at warmer temperatures are probably associated with faster gas transport pathways arising from the formation of water product.

  2. Hydration energies of protonated and sodiated thiouracils.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    Hydration reactions of protonated and sodiated thiouracils (2-thiouracil, 6-methyl-2-thiouracil, and 4-thiouracil) generated by electrospray ionization have been studied in a gas phase at 10 mbar using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical data, ΔH(o)n, ΔS(o)n, and ΔG(o)n, for the hydrated systems were obtained by equilibrium measurements. The water binding energies of protonated thiouracils, [2SU]H(+) and [6Me2SU]H(+), were found to be of the order of 51 kJ/mol for the first, and 46 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. For [4SU]H(+), these values are 3-4 kJ/mol lower. For sodiated complexes, these energies are similar for all studied systems, and varied between 62 and 68 kJ/mol for the first and between 48 and 51 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. The structural aspects of the precursors for hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. PMID:25270881

  3. Hydration Energies of Protonated and Sodiated Thiouracils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    Hydration reactions of protonated and sodiated thiouracils (2-thiouracil, 6-methyl-2-thiouracil, and 4-thiouracil) generated by electrospray ionization have been studied in a gas phase at 10 mbar using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical data, ΔH o n, ΔS o n, and ΔG o n, for the hydrated systems were obtained by equilibrium measurements. The water binding energies of protonated thiouracils, [2SU]H+ and [6Me2SU]H+, were found to be of the order of 51 kJ/mol for the first, and 46 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. For [4SU]H+, these values are 3-4 kJ/mol lower. For sodiated complexes, these energies are similar for all studied systems, and varied between 62 and 68 kJ/mol for the first and between 48 and 51 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. The structural aspects of the precursors for hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data.

  4. Propane Clathrate Hydrate Formation Accelerated by Methanol.

    PubMed

    Amtawong, Jaruwan; Guo, Jin; Hale, Jared S; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Fleischer, Everly B; Martin, Rachel W; Janda, Kenneth C

    2016-07-01

    The role of methanol as both an inhibitor and a catalyst for the formation of clathrate hydrates (CHs) has been a topic of intense study. We report a new quantitative study of the kinetics of propane CH formation at 253 K from the reaction of propane gas with <75 μm ice particles that have been doped with varying amounts of methanol. We find that methanol significantly accelerates the formation reaction with quite small doping quantities. Even for only 1 methanol molecule per 10 000 water molecules, the maximum uptake rate of propane into CHs is enhanced and the initiation pressure is reduced. These results enable more efficient production of CHs for gas storage. This remarkable acceleration of the CH formation reaction by small quantities of methanol may place constraints on the mechanism of the inhibition effect observed under other conditions, usually employing much larger quantities of methanol. PMID:27275862

  5. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  6. Bubble migration during hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Chiglintseva, A. S.; Rusinov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    A model of the process of migration of methane bubbles in water under thermobaric conditions of hydrate formation is proposed. The peculiarities of the temperature field evolution, migration rate, and changes in the radius and volume fraction of gas hydrate bubbles are studied. It is shown that, with a constant mass flow of gas from the reservoir bottom, for all parameters of the surfacing gas hydrate disperse system, there is a quasistationary pattern in the form of a "step"-like wave. Depending on the relationship of the initial gas bubble density with the average gas density in the hydrate composition determined by the depth from which bubbles rise to the surface, the final radius of hydrate particles may be larger or smaller than the initial gas bubble radii. It is established that the speed at which gas hydrate inclusions rise to the surface decreases by several times due to an increase in their weight during hydrate formation. The influence of the depth of the water reservoir whose bottom is a gas flow source on the dynamics of hydrate formation is studied.

  7. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  8. Gas Hydrate Petroleum System Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    In a gas hydrate petroleum system, the individual factors that contribute to the formation of gas hydrate accumulations, such as (1) gas hydrate pressure-temperature stability conditions, (2) gas source, (3) gas migration, and (4) the growth of the gas hydrate in suitable host sediment can identified and quantified. The study of know and inferred gas hydrate accumulations reveal the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly controlled by the presence of fractures and/or coarser grained sediments. Field studies have concluded that hydrate grows preferentially in coarse-grained sediments because lower capillary pressures in these sediments permit the migration of gas and nucleation of hydrate. Due to the relatively distal nature of the deep marine geologic settings, the overall abundance of sand within the shallow geologic section is usually low. However, drilling projects in the offshore of Japan, Korea, and in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the occurrence of significant hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The 1999/2000 Japan Nankai Trough drilling confirmed occurrence of hydrate-bearing sand-rich intervals (interpreted as turbidite fan deposits). Gas hydrate was determined to fill the pore spaces in these deposits, reaching saturations up to 80% in some layers. A multi-well drilling program titled "METI Toaki-oki to Kumano-nada" also identified sand-rich reservoirs with pore-filling hydrate. The recovered hydrate-bearing sand layers were described as very-fine- to fine-grained turbidite sand layers measuring from several centimeters up to a meter thick. However, the gross thickness of the hydrate-bearing sand layers were up to 50 m. In 2010, the Republic of Korea conducted the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate (UBGH2) Drilling Expedition. Seismic data clearly showed the development of a thick, potential basin wide, sedimentary sections characterized by mostly debris flows. The downhole LWD logs and core data from Site UBGH2-5 reveal that each debris flows is

  9. Preparation and characterization of a novel strontium-containing calcium phosphate cement with the two-step hydration process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Ye, Jiandong; Wang, Yingjun

    2009-09-01

    A novel Sr-containing calcium phosphate cement (CPC) with excellent compressive strength, good radiopacity and suitable setting time was developed in this work. The two-step hydration reaction resulted in a high compressive strength, with a maximum of up to 74.9MPa. Sr was doped into the calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite as a hydrated product during the hydration reaction of the CPC. Because of the existence of Sr element and the compact microstructure after hydration, the Sr-containing CPC shows good radiopacity. It is expected to be used in orthopedic and maxillofacial surgery for bone defects repairing. PMID:19380262

  10. PARTICLE FLOW, MIXING, AND CHEMICAL REACTION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mixing model has been developed to simulate the particle residence time distribution (RTD) in a circulating fluidized bed absorber (CFBA). Also, a gas/solid reaction model for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by lime has been developed. For the reaction model that considers RTD dis...

  11. Gas hydrate dynamics in heterogeneous media - challenges for numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwicz, Ewa; Ruepke, Lars; Wallmann, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    fluids, gas hydrate, and gaseous methane) and several chemical species (particular organic carbon (POC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved methane, dissolved sulfates, free methane gas). Chemical reactions are resolving for the bio- chemical processes in anoxic marine sediments (POC degradation via sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM)). The model has been calibrated to the data derived from well drilling, seismic analyzes, and climate models.

  12. Calculation of multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid-liquid systems: Calculation methods, thermochemical data, and applications to studies of high-temperature volcanic gases with examples from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Symonds, R.B. ); Reed, M.H. )

    1993-10-01

    This paper documents the numerical formulations, thermochemical data base, and possible applications of computer programs, SOLVGAS and GASWORKS, for calculating multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid-liquid systems. SOLVGAS and GASWORKS compute simultaneous equilibria by solving simultaneously a set of mass balance and mass action equations written for all gas species and for all gas-solid or gas-liquid equilibria. The programs interface with a thermo-chemical data base, GASTHERM, which contains coefficients for retrieval of the equilibrium constants from 25[degrees] to 1200[degrees]C. The programs and data base model dynamic chemical processes in 30- to 40-component volcanic-gas systems. The authors can model gas evaporation from magma, mixing of magmatic and hydrothermal gases, precipitation of minerals during pressure and temperature decrease, mixing of volcanic gas with air, and reaction of gases with wall rock. Examples are given of the gas-evaporation-from-magma and precipitation-with-cooling calculations for volcanic gases collected from Mt. St. Helens in September 1981. The authors predict: (1) the amounts of trace elements volatilized from shallow magma, deep magma, and wall rock, and (2) the solids that precipitate from the gas upon cooling. The predictions are tested by comparing them with the measured trace-element concentrations in gases and the observed sublimate sequence. This leads to the following conclusions: (1) most of the trace elements in the Mt. St. Helens gases are volatilized from shallow magma as simple chlorides; (2) some elements (for example, Al, Ca) exist dominantly in rock aerosols, not gases, in the gas stream; (3) near-surface cooling of the gases triggers precipitation of oxides, sulfides, halides, tungstates, and native elements; and (4) equilibrium cooling of the gases to 100[degrees]C causes most trace elements, except for Hg, Sb, and Se, to precipitate from the gas. 94 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  14. Water, Hydration and Health

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Barry M.; D’Anci, Kristen E.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to provide some sense of our current knowledge of water including overall patterns of intake and some factors linked with intake, the complex mechanisms behind water homeostasis, the effects of variation in water intake on health and energy intake, weight, and human performance and functioning. Water represents a critical nutrient whose absence will be lethal within days. Water’s importance for prevention of nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases has emerged more recently because of the shift toward large proportions of fluids coming from caloric beverages. Nevertheless, there are major gaps in knowledge related to measurement of total fluid intake, hydration status at the population level, and few longer-term systematic interventions and no published random-controlled longer-term trials. We suggest some ways to examine water requirements as a means to encouraging more dialogue on this important topic. PMID:20646222

  15. A Sea Floor Methane Hydrate Displacement Experiment Using N2 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Hester, K.

    2009-12-01

    The production of free methane gas from solid methane hydrate accumulations presents a considerable challenge. The presently preferred procedure is pressure reduction whereby the relief of pressure to a condition outside the hydrate phase boundary creates a gas phase. The reaction is endothermic and thus a problematic water ice phase can form if the extraction of gas is too rapid, limiting the applicability of this procedure. Additionally, the removal of the formation water in contact with the hydrate phase is required before meaningful pressure reduction can be attained -- and this can take time. An alternate approach that has been suggested is the injection of liquid CO2 into the formation, thereby displacing the formation water. Formation of a solid CO2 hydrate is thermodynamically favored under these conditions. Competition between CH4 and CO2 for the hydrate host water molecules can occur displacing CH4 from the solid to the gas phase with formation of a solid CO2 hydrate. We have investigated another alternate approach with displacement of the surrounding bulk water phase by N2 gas, resulting in rapid release of CH4 gas and complete loss of the solid hydrate phase. Our experiment was carried out at the Southern Summit of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, at 780m depth. There we harvested hydrate fragments from surficial sediments using the robotic arm of the ROV Doc Ricketts. Specimens of the hydrate were collected about 1m above the sediment surface in an inverted funnel with a mesh covered neck as they floated upwards. The accumulated hydrate was transferred to an inverted glass cylinder, and N2 gas was carefully injected into this container. Displacement of the water phase occurred and when the floating hydrate material approached the lower rim the gas injection was stopped and the cylinder placed upon a flat metal plate effectively sealing the system. We returned to this site after 7 days to measure progress, and observed complete loss of the hydrate phase

  16. Evaluating of scale-up methodologies of gas-solid spouted beds for coating TRISO nuclear fuel particles using advanced measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Neven Y.

    The work focuses on implementing for the first time advanced non-invasive measurement techniques to evaluate the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity that has been reported in the literature based on matching dimensionless groups and the new mechanistic scale up methodology that has been developed in our laboratory based on matching the radial profile of gas holdup since the gas dynamics dictate the hydrodynamics of the gas-solid spouted beds. These techniques are gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) to measure the cross-sectional distribution of the phases' holdups and their radial profiles along the bed height and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) to measure in three-dimension (3D) solids velocity and their turbulent parameters. The measured local parameters and the analysis of the results obtained in this work validate our new methodology of scale up of gas-solid spouted beds by comparing for the similarity the phases' holdups and the dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters that are non-dimensionalized using the minimum spouting superficial gas velocity. However, the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds that is based on matching dimensionless groups has not been validated for hydrodynamics similarity with respect to the local parameters such as phases' holdups and dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters. Unfortunately, this method was validated in the literature by only measuring the global parameters. Thus, this work confirms that validation of the scale-up methods of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity should reside on measuring and analyzing the local hydrodynamics parameters.

  17. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane hydrate...

  18. Hydration of lysozyme as observed by infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liltorp, K; Maréchal, Y

    2005-11-01

    Infrared spectra of a film of lysozyme 3 mum thick, immersed in an atmosphere displaying a relative humidity, or hygrometry, which spans the whole range from 0 to 1 at room temperature, are recorded. The evolution of the spectra with this relative humidity is quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a newly proposed method. It allows the precise measurement of the quantity of water that remains embedded inside the dried sample at each stage of hydration, and the definition, in terms of chemical reactions of the three hydration mechanisms that correspond to the three hydration spectra on which all experimental spectra can be decomposed. With respect to preceding similar studies, some refinements are introduced that allow improvement of the interpretation, but that also raise some new questions, which mainly concern the structure of the hydrogen-bond network around the carbonyl peptide groups. PMID:15986502

  19. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David R; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  20. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow. PMID:17806883

  1. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  2. Hydrate control in deepwater drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Gas-hydrate formation during deepwater offshore drilling and production is a well-recognized operational hazard. In water depths greater than 1,000 ft, seabed conditions of pressure and temperature become conducive to gas-hydrate formation. In a well-control situation, although the kick fluid leaves the formation at a high temperature, it can cool to seabed temperature with an extended shut-in period. With high enough hydrostatic pressure at the mudline, hydrates could form in the blowout-preventer (BOP) stack and choke and kill lines, as has been observed in field operations. The current practice in deepwater drilling is to suppress the hydrate-formation temperature by use of highly saline drilling fluids formulated from NaCl or other salts. This solution is applicable for the Gulf of Mexico but insufficient for the conditions encountered in Norwegian deep waters. At extreme water depths or extremely low mudline temperatures, this thermodynamic inhibition alone may not be sufficient to prevent hydrate formation. Instead, the use of kinetic inhibitors or crystal modifiers, in conjunction with thermodynamic inhibitors, may allow successful operations in such an environment. The definition of kinetic inhibitors (to distinguish them from the classic thermodynamic inhibitors, such as polar compounds and electrolytes) comes from the effect of the chemicals on the nucleation and growth of natural gas hydrates, both of which are time-dependent, stochastic processes. The paper describes deepwater drilling fluids, polar and surface-active additives, kinetic inhibition and crystal modifiers, laboratory measurements, and test results.

  3. Effect of placements (horizontal with vertical) on gas-solid flow and particle impact erosion in gate valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhe; Zhu, Linhang; Cui, Baoling; Li, Yi; Ruan, Xiaodong

    2014-12-01

    Gate valve has various placements in the practical usages. Due to the effect of gravity, particle trajectories and erosions are distinct between placements. Thus in this study, gas-solid flow properties and erosion in gate valve for horizontal placement and vertical placement are discussed and compared by using Euler-Lagrange simulation method. The structure of a gate valve and a simplified structure are investigated. The simulation procedure is validated in our published paper by comparing with the experiment data of a pipe and an elbow. The results show that for all investigated open degrees and Stokes numbers (St), there are little difference of gas flow properties and flow coefficients between two placements. It is also found that the trajectories of particles for two placements are mostly identical when St « 1, making the erosion independent of placement. With the increase of St, the distinction of trajectories between placements becomes more obvious, leading to an increasing difference of the erosion distributions. Besides, the total erosion ratio of surface T for horizontal placement is two orders of magnitudes larger than that for vertical placement when the particle diameter is 250μm.

  4. An Improved Pneumatic Nebulization Gas-Solid Microextraction Device Used to Detect Triazine Herbicides in White Spirit.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Fei, Qiang; Shan, Hongyan; Huan, Yanfu; Mi, Hongyu; Zhang, Hanqi; Li, Guanghua; Feng, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    The pneumatic nebulization gas-solid microextraction device fascinating us is because it directly atomized organic samples to cross a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) cartridge without any pretreatment. In this work, both the spray chamber and SPME column of the extraction device were heated. We found that this would significantly improve the extraction efficiency of this method. Then, this method was used to detect seven triazine herbicides (atraton, desmetryn, atrazine, terbumeton, terbuthylazine, terbutryn, and dipropetryn) in drinking alcohol samples. The experimental results indicated that this extraction procedure could conveniently, efficiently and accurately concentrate any triazine herbicides from drinking alcohol samples. The limits of detection (LODs) were from 0.08 to 0.23 μg L(-1), the limits of quantification (LOQs) were from 0.27 to 0.78 μg L(-1). We used this method to detect triazine herbicides in five white spirit samples. Four concentrations were chosen (5, 25, 50 and 100 μg L(-1)) as the amounts of spikes to investigate the recovery and precision of the present PN-GSME method. The recoveries ranged from 95.91 to 106.67%. The relative standard deviations were not more than 6.51%. Also this method matches the requirement of the maximum residue limits of the European Union. PMID:26860563

  5. Transport of temperature-velocity covariance in gas-solid flow and its relation to the axial dispersion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Sun, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The presence of solid particles in a steady laminar flow generates velocity fluctuations with respect to the mean fluid velocity that are termed pseudo-turbulence. The level of these pseudo-turbulent velocity fluctuations has been characterized in statistically homogeneous fixed particle assemblies and freely evolving suspensions using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) by Mehrabadi et al. (JFM, 2015), and it is found to be a significant contribution to the total kinetic energy associated with the flow. The correlation of these velocity fluctuations with temperature (or a passive scalar) generates a flux term that appears in the transport equation for the average fluid temperature (or average scalar concentration). The magnitude of this transport of temperature-velocity covariance is quantified using PR-DNS of thermally fully developed flow past a statistically homogeneous fixed assembly of particles, and the budget of the average fluid temperature equation is presented. The relation of this transport term to the axial dispersion coefficient (Brenner, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A, 1980) is established. The simulation results are then interpreted in the context of our understanding of axial dispersion in gas-solid flow. NSF CBET 1336941.

  6. A Study of the Influence of Numerical Diffusion on Gas-Solid Flow Predictions in Fluidized Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandriz, Ronak; Sheikhi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an investigation is made of the influence of numerical diffusion on the accuracy of gas-solid flow predictions in fluidized beds. This is an important issue particularly in bubbling fluidized beds since numerical error greatly affects the dynamics of bubbles and their associated mixing process. A bed of coal (classified as Geldart A) is considered which becomes fluidized as the velocity of nitrogen stream into the reactor is gradually increased. The fluidization process is simulated using various numerical schemes as well as grid resolutions. Simulations involve Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow modeling approach and results are compared with experimental data. It is shown that higher order schemes equipped with flux limiter give favorable prediction of bubble and particle dynamics and hence, the mixing process within the reactor. The excessive numerical diffusion associated with lower order schemes results in unrealistic prediction of bubble shapes and bed height. Comparison is also made of computational efficiency of various schemes. It is shown that the Monotonized Central scheme with down wind factor results in the shortest simulation time because of its efficient parallelization on distributed memory platforms.

  7. Impacts of Hydrate Pore Habit on Physical Properties of Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Y.; Dai, S.; Choi, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments, to a large extent, are governed by the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. For sediments containing the same amount of hydrates, their overall physical properties may vary several orders of magnitude depending on hydrate pore habit. We investigate the interplay among hydrate formation methods, hydrate pore habits, and fundamental physical properties of hydrate bearing sediments. We have developed a new method to synthesize noncementing hydrate in sands, a multi-properties characterization chamber to test the hydrate bearing sediments, and pore network models to simulate fluid flow processes in hydrate bearing sediments. We have found that (1) the growth pattern of hydrate crystal in the pore spaces of water saturated sediments is dominated by the relative magnitude of the capillary force (between hydrate crystal and pore fluid) and the skeleton force, which will result in pore-filling or grain-displacing type of hydrate pore character; (2) the existing capillary tube models of water permeability in hydrate bearing sediments are sensitive to pore geometry and hydrate pore habit; and (3) preliminary CT results suggest that hydrate nucleation in partially water saturated sands tends to agglomerate in patches, rather than in an uniformly-distributed contact-cementing morphology. Additional CT results with a small amount of fines (5wt%) and visualization via micro-CT of hydrate pore habits in sediments using different hydrate formation methods will be discussed.

  8. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  9. Cross-correlation focus method with an electrostatic sensor array for local particle velocity measurement in dilute gas-solid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jingyu; Gao, Wenbin; Ding, Hongbing; Wu, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    The gas-solid two-phase flow has been widely applied in the power, chemical and metallurgical industries. It is of great significance in the research of gas-solid two-phase flow to measure particle velocity at different locations in the pipeline. Thus, an electrostatic sensor array comprising eight arc-shaped electrodes was designed. The relationship between the cross-correlation (CC) velocity and the distribution of particle velocity, charge density and electrode spatial sensitivity was analysed. Then the CC sensitivity and its calculation method were proposed. According to the distribution of CC sensitivity, it was found that, between different electrode pairs, it had different focus areas. The CC focus method was proposed for particle velocity measurement at different locations and validated by a belt-style electrostatic induction experiment facility. Finally, the particle velocities at different locations with different flow conditions were measured to research the particle velocity distribution in a dilute horizontal pneumatic conveying pipeline.

  10. Hydration water in dynamics of a hydrated beta-lactoglobulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Longeville, S.

    2007-02-01

    Incoherent spin-echo signals of a hydrated β-lactoglobulin protein were investigated, at 275 and 293 K. The intermediate scattering functions I(Q,t) were divided in two contributions from surface water and protein, respectively. On one hand, the dynamics of the surface water follows a KWW stretched exponential function (the exponent is ~0.5), on the other hand, that of the protein follows a single exponential. The present results are consistent with our previous results of hydrated C-phycocyanin combining elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering and by molecular dynamics simulation.

  11. Dependence of molecular hydrogen formation in water on scavengers of the precursor to the hydrated electron

    SciTech Connect

    Pastina, B. |; LaVerne, J.A.; Pimblott, S.M.

    1999-07-22

    Early studies on the radiolysis of water suggested a wide variety of precursors, and mechanisms, for the formation of the observed yield of molecular hydrogen. Molecular hydrogen yields have been measured in the {gamma} radiolysis of aqueous solutions with a wide variety of scavengers of the hydrated electron and its precursors. A decrease in molecular hydrogen yield with increasing scavenging capacity of the hydrated electron is found with all solutes. Scavengers with particularly high rate coefficients for reaction with the precursors to the hydrated electron compared to the hydrated electron, such as selenate and to a lesser extent molybdate, show a more rapid decrease in hydrogen yields with increasing scavenging capacity than is observed with the other solutes. The yield of molecular hydrogen is better parameterized by the scavenging capacity for the precursors to the hydrated electron than by the scavenging capacity for the hydrated electron. Good scavengers of precursors to the hydrated electrons do not exhibit a nonscavengable hydrogen yield in the high scavenging capacity limit. These results suggest that the previously accepted nonscavengable yield of molecular hydrogen is due to precursors of the hydrated electron and it can be lowered with appropriate scavengers.

  12. Production of amylases from rice by solid-state fermentation in a gas-solid spouted-Bed bioreactor

    PubMed

    Silva; Yang

    1998-07-01

    A gas-solid spouted-bed bioreactor was developed to produce amylases from rice in solid-state fermentation by Aspergillus oryzae. The spouted-bed bioreactor was developed to overcome many of the problems inherent to large-scale solid-state fermentation, including mass- and heat-transfer limitations in the conventional tray reactors and solids-handling difficulties seen in packed-bed bioreactors. The solid-state fermentation results from the tray-type reactor with surface aeration were poor because of mass- and heat-transfer problems. A packed-bed bioreactor with continuous aeration through the rice bed produced high protein and enzymes, but the fermented rice was difficult to remove and process due to the formation of large chunks of rice aggregates knitted together with fungal mycelia. Also, the fermentation was not uniform in the packed bed. The spouted-bed bioreactor with intermittent spouting with air achieved high production levels in both total protein and enzymes (alpha-amylase, beta-amylase, and glucoamylase) that were comparable to those found in the packed-bed bioreactor, but without the nonuniformity and solids-handling problems. However, continual spouting was found to be detrimental to this solid-state fermentation, possibly because of shear or impact damage to fungal mycelia during spouting. Increasing spouting frequency from 4-h intervals to 1-h intervals decreased protein and enzyme production. Other operating conditions critical to the fermentation include proper humidification to prevent drying of the substrate and control of reactor wall temperature to prevent excessive condensation, which would interfere with proper spouting. PMID:9694679

  13. Rates and mechanisms of conversion of ice nanocrystals to hydrates of HCl and HBr: acid diffusion in the ionic hydrates.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul; Gulluru, Dheeraj B; Buch, Victoria

    2005-03-01

    This FTIR study focuses on solid-state chemistry associated with formation and interconversion of the ionic HX (X = Cl, Br) hydrates. Kinetic data are reported for conversions of ice nanocrystal arrays exposed to the saturation pressure of the acids in the 110 approximately 125 K range. The product is amorphous acid dihydrate in the case of HBr, and amorphous monohydrate for HCl. The rate-determining step is identified as HX diffusion through the hydrate product crust toward the interfacial reaction zone, rather than diffusion through ice, as commonly believed. Slowing of the conversion process is thus observed with increasing thickness of the crust. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) and activation energy values for HX diffusion through the hydrates were evaluated with the help of the shrinking-core model. Hydrate crystallization occurs as a separate step, upon heating above 130 K. Subsequently, rates of reversible transitions between crystal di- and monohydrates were observed upon exposure to acid vapor and acid evacuation. In conversion from di- to monohydrate, the rate slows after fast formation of several layers; subsequently, diffusion through the product crust appears to be the rate-controlling step. The activation energy for HBr diffusion through crystal dihydrate is found to be significantly higher than that for the amorphous analogue. Conjecture is offered for a molecular mechanism of HX transport through the crystal hydrate, based on (i) spectroscopic/computational evidence for the presence of molecular HX bonded to X(-) in each of the ionic hydrate phases and (ii) the relative E(a) values found for HBr and HCl diffusion. Monte Carlo modeling suggests acid transport to the reaction zone along boundaries between "nanocrystallites" generated by multiple hydrate nucleation events at the particle surfaces. The reverse conversion, of crystalline monohydrate particles to the dihydrate phase, as well as dihydrate to trihydrate, displays nearly constant rate

  14. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  15. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  16. Complex gas hydrate from the Cascadia margin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hailong; Seo, Yu-taek; Lee, Jong-won; Moudrakovski, Igor; Ripmeester, John A; Chapman, N Ross; Coffin, Richard B; Gardner, Graeme; Pohlman, John

    2007-01-18

    Natural gas hydrates are a potential source of energy and may play a role in climate change and geological hazards. Most natural gas hydrate appears to be in the form of 'structure I', with methane as the trapped guest molecule, although 'structure II' hydrate has also been identified, with guest molecules such as isobutane and propane, as well as lighter hydrocarbons. A third hydrate structure, 'structure H', which is capable of trapping larger guest molecules, has been produced in the laboratory, but it has not been confirmed that it occurs in the natural environment. Here we characterize the structure, gas content and composition, and distribution of guest molecules in a complex natural hydrate sample recovered from Barkley canyon, on the northern Cascadia margin. We show that the sample contains structure H hydrate, and thus provides direct evidence for the natural occurrence of this hydrate structure. The structure H hydrate is intimately associated with structure II hydrate, and the two structures contain more than 13 different hydrocarbon guest molecules. We also demonstrate that the stability field of the complex gas hydrate lies between those of structure II and structure H hydrates, indicating that this form of hydrate is more stable than structure I and may thus potentially be found in a wider pressure-temperature regime than can methane hydrate deposits. PMID:17230188

  17. Hydration properties determining the reactivity of nitrite in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Vchirawongkwin, Saowapak; Kritayakornupong, Chinapong; Tongraar, Anan; Vchirawongkwin, Viwat

    2014-08-28

    The knowledge of the hydration properties of the nitrite ion is key to understanding its reaction mechanism controlled by solvent effects. Here, ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics was performed to obtain the structural and dynamical properties of the hydration shell in an aqueous solution of nitrite ions, elucidated by data analysis using a molecular approach and an extended quantitative analysis of all superimposed trajectories with three-dimensional alignment (density map). The pattern of the power spectra corresponded to the experimental data, indicating the suitability of the Hartree-Fock method coupled with double-ζ plus polarization and diffuse functional basis sets to study this system. The density maps revealed the structure of the hydration shell, that presented a higher density in the N-O bond direction than in the axis vertical to the molecular plane, whereas the atomic and molecular radial distribution functions provided vague information. The number of actual contacts indicated 4.6 water molecules interacting with a nitrite ion, and 1.5 extra water molecules located in the molecular hydration shell, forming a H-bonding network with the bulk water. The mean residence times for the water ligands designated the strength of the hydration spheres for the oxygen sites, whilst the results for the nitrogen sites over-estimated the number of water molecules from other sites and indicated a weak structure. These results show the influence of the water molecules surrounding the nitrite ion creating an anisotropic hydration shell, suggesting that the reactive sites are situated above and below the molecular plane with a lower water density. PMID:24840033

  18. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  19. Natural Gas Hydrates Update 1998-2000

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    Significant events have transpired on the natural gas hydrate research and development front since "Future Supply Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates" appeared in Natural Gas 1998 Issues and Trends and in the Potential Gas Committee's 1998 biennial report.

  20. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  1. Leaching of oxidic zinc materials with chlorine and chlorine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. K.; Fray, D. J.

    1981-06-01

    Low grade zinc ores and residues were leached in chlorine water and chlorine hydrate water mixtures. It was found that the rate of leaching Adrar ore and Electric Arc Furnace dust obeyed a shrinking core diffusion model, whereas, the rate of leaching of Turkish ore appeared to be controlled by a surface reaction. In all cases, lead leached with the zinc but the iron oxides remained virtually undissolved.

  2. Why alite stops hydrating below 80% relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Flatt, Robert J.; Scherer, George W.; Bullard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-09-15

    It has been observed that the hydration of cement paste stops when the relative humidity drops below about 80%. A thermodynamic analysis shows that the capillary pressure exerted at that RH shifts the solubility of tricalcium silicate, so that it is in equilibrium with water. This is a reflection of the chemical shrinkage in this system: according to Le Chatelier's principle, since the volume of the products is less than that of the reactants, a negative (capillary) pressure opposes the reaction.

  3. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice... Federal Officer; Welcome by the Chair of the Committee; Committee Business; Update on Prudhoe Bay Testing; FY 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Activities; Update on International Activity; Methane Hydrate...

  4. 76 FR 59667 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice...

  5. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  6. Surface reactions of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.F.

    1986-12-31

    Reactions at natural glass surfaces are important in studies involving nuclear waste transport due to chemical control on ground water in host rocks such as basalt and tuff, to potential diffusion into natural hydrated glass surfaces and as natural analogs for waste glass stability. Dissolution kinetics can be described by linear surface reaction coupled with cation interdiffusion with resulting rates similar to those of synthetic silicate glasses. Rates of Cs diffusion into hydrated obsidian surfaces between 25{sup 0} and 75{sup 0}C were determined by XPS depth profiles and loss rates from aqueous solutions. Calculated diffusion coefficients were ten others of magnitude more rapid than predicted from an Arrhenius extrapolation of high temperature tracer diffusion data due to surface hydration reactions.

  7. Enhanced Photoreduction of Nitro-aromatic Compounds by Hydrated Electrons Derived from Indole on Natural Montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haoting; Guo, Yong; Pan, Bo; Gu, Cheng; Li, Hui; Boyd, Stephen A

    2015-07-01

    A new photoreduction pathway for nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs) and the underlying degradation mechanism are described. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene was reduced to 3-nitroaniline by the widely distributed aromatic molecule indole; the reaction is facilitated by montmorillonite clay mineral under both simulated and natural sunlight irradiation. The novel chemical reaction is strongly affected by the type of exchangeable cation present on montmorillonite. The photoreduction reaction is initiated by the adsorption of 1,3-dinitrobenzene and indole in clay interlayers. Under light irradiation, the excited indole molecule generates a hydrated electron and the indole radical cation. The structural negative charge of montmorillonite plausibly stabilizes the radical cation hence preventing charge recombination. This promotes the release of reactive hydrated electrons for further reductive reactions. Similar results were observed for the photoreduction of nitrobenzene. In situ irradiation time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies provided direct evidence for the generation of hydrated electrons and the indole radical cations, which supported the proposed degradation mechanism. In the photoreduction process, the role of clay mineral is to both enhance the generation of hydrated electrons and to provide a constrained reaction environment in the galley regions, which increases the probability of contact between NACs and hydrated electrons. PMID:26029791

  8. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago. PMID:17768978

  9. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1968-01-01

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  10. Attraction between hydrated hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-08-01

    According to common knowledge, hydrophilic surfaces repel via hydration forces while hydrophobic surfaces attract, but mounting experimental evidence suggests that also hydrophilic surfaces can attract. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations at prescribed water chemical potential we study the crossover from hydration repulsion to hydrophobic attraction for planar polar surfaces of varying stiffness and hydrogen-bonding capability. Rescaling the partial charges of the polar surface groups, we cover the complete spectrum from very hydrophobic surfaces (characterized by contact angles θ ≃ 135°) to hydrophilic surfaces exhibiting complete wetting (θ = 0°). Indeed, for a finite range θadh < θ < 90°, we find a regime where hydrophilic surfaces attract at sub-nanometer separation and stably adhere without intervening water. The adhesive contact angle θadh depends on surface type and lies in the range 65° < θadh < 80°, in good agreement with experiments. Analysis of the total number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed by water and surface groups rationalizes this crossover between hydration repulsion and hydrophilic attraction in terms of a subtle balance: Highly polar surfaces repel because of strongly bound hydration water, less polar hydrophilic surfaces attract because water-water HBs are preferred over surface-water HBs. Such solvent reorganization forces presumably underlie also other important phenomena, such as selective ion adsorption to interfaces as well as ion pair formation.

  11. Polycrystalline methane hydrate: Synthesis from superheated ice, and low-temperature mechanical properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new and efficient technique to grow aggregates of pure methane hydrate in quantities suitable for physical and material properties testing. Test specimens were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with granulated H2O ice, and then warming the reactants to promote the reaction CH4(g) + 6H2O(s???1) ??? CH4??6H2O (methane hydrate). Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface on ice grain surfaces, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above the ice melting point and up to 290 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 h. The resulting material is pure, cohesive, polycrystalline methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random orientation. Synthesis conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature while reaction progressed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the unreacted portions of ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, showed that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting are easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while reacting to form hydrate. Direct observations of the hydrate growth process in a small, high-pressure optical cell verified these conclusions and revealed additional details of the hydrate growth process. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T = 140-200 K, Pc = 50-100 MPa, and ?? = 10-4 10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to an unusually high degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing

  12. Simulation of High-Pressure Methane Hydrate Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Pavel; Sirignano, William

    2015-11-01

    With its prevalence in ocean floor deposits, methane hydrate has recently attracted considerable attention in the combustion community. We present a new scheme for the simulation of methane hydrate combustion at high, near critical pressures. This process features a combination of solid, liquid and gas phases, wherein the solid methane hydrate melts into a bubbly liquid, which then evaporates into a gas phase; methane-air combustion occurs in the gas phase. In addition to its multiphase nature, this problem features the additional challenge of modelling the gas/liquid phase transition at near-critical pressures. A new computational procedure has been developed to simulate this problem, using a detailed chemical mechanism for the simulation of reaction in the gas phase, and featuring a volume-of-fluid (VOF) approach for the simulation of the liquid phase with gas bubbles - a low Stokes number is assumed. This procedure is applied to a laminar shear flow methane hydrate combustion problem. Particular attention is directed to the effects on simulation results of the high-pressure equation of state, liquid/gas phase transition modelling, and the bubbly liquid phase modelling. Simulation results are compared to experimental observations. Supported by AFOSR grant FA9550-12-1-0156, AFOSR scientific manager: Dr. Mitat Birkan.

  13. Gas-Solid Interactions During Nonisothermal Heat Treatment of a High-Strength CrMnCN Austenitic Steel Powder: Influence of Atmospheric Conditions and Heating Rate on the Densification Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasokha, Nikolaj; Weber, Sebastian; Huth, Stephan; Zumsande, Kathrin; Theisen, Werner

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with gas-solid interactions between a high-alloyed steel powder and the surrounding atmosphere during continuous heating. It is motivated by the recently developed corrosion-resistant CrMnCN austenitic cast steels. Here, powder metallurgical processing would be desirable to manufacture highly homogeneous parts and/or novel corrosion-resistant metal-matrix composites. However, the successful use of this new production route calls for a comprehensive investigation of interactions between the sintering atmosphere and the metallic powder to prevent undesirable changes to the chemical composition, e.g., degassing of nitrogen or evaporation of manganese. In this study, dilatometric measurements combined with residual gas analysis, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provided detailed information about the influence of different atmospheric conditions on the microstructure, constitution, and densification behavior of a gas-atomized CrMnCN steel powder during continuous heating. Intensive desorption of nitrogen led to the conclusion that a vacuum atmosphere is not suitable for powder metallurgical (PM) processing. Exposure to an N2-containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of nitrides and lattice expansion. Experimental findings have shown that the N content can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, the reduction of surface oxides because of a carbothermal reaction at elevated temperatures and the resulting enhancement of the powder's densification behavior are discussed in this work.

  14. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  15. Physical activity, hydration and health.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ascensión; Manonelles, Pedro; Palacios, Nieves; Wärnberg, Julia; Casajús, José A; Pérez, Margarita; Aznar, Susana; Benito, Pedro J; Martínez-Gomez, David; Ortega, Francisco B; Ortega, Eduardo; Urrialde, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory disea ses and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences. PMID:24972459

  16. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  17. Formation of porous gas hydrates: Diffraction experiments and multi-stage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staykova, D. K.; Genov, G.; Goreshnik, E.; Salamatin, A. N.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2003-04-01

    Laboratory-grown gas hydrates were examined by cryo scanning electron microscopy and found to have a sub-micron porous structure. This microstructure is undistinguishable from the one observed in natural gas hydrates suggesting similar formation processes. In-situ observations of the formation of synthetic porous methane and carbon dioxide hydrates starting from ice Ih powders with known surfaces areas were made using time-resolved neutron diffraction on the high-flux diffractometer D20 (ILL, Grenoble) at different pressures and temperatures. Some runs were also made going through the ice melting point into liquid water. At similar reduced fugacities, the reaction of carbon dioxide was distinctly faster than that of methane. The transient formation of carbon dioxide hydrate crystal structure II was observed in coexistence with the usual type-I hydrate reaching a maximum of 5% after 5 h of the reaction at 272 K. At lower temperatures a temporary inhibition of formation was observed in the case of carbon dioxide. The rate of methane hydrate growth showed little pressure sensitivity in our experiments at low temperatures ~230 K in contrast to the situation at higher temperatures. A phenomenological model for the kinetics of the gas hydrate formation from ice powders is developed with special account of sample consolidation effects. It describes the initial stage (I) of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface and the two subsequent stages which are limited (II) by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and (III) by the gas and water transport (diffusion) through the hydrate shells surrounding the shrinking ice cores. Comparable activation energies of the CH4-hydrate formation are found in deuterated and hydrogenated systems for the reaction-limited process (stage II) to be 8.1 and 9.5 kcal/mol, respectively. In the case of a diffusion-limited clathration (stage III) the activation energy can be estimated as 14.3 kcal/mol. The relevance of our

  18. Synthesis of polycrystalline methane hydrate, and its phase stability and mechanical properties at elevated pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Test specimens of methane hydrate were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with H2O ice grains, then warming the system to promote the reaction CH4 (g) + 6H2O (s???l) ??? CH4??6H2O. Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above 271.5 K and up to 289 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 hours. The resulting material is pure methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random texture. Fabrication conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature before reaction completed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, verified that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting is easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably at temperatures well above its melting point. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T= 140-200 K, Pc= 50-100 MPa, and ????= 10-4-10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to a higher degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing stoichiometry under pressure during plastic deformation; x-ray analyses showed that methane hydrate undergoes a process of solid-state disproportionation or exsolution during deformation at conditions well within its conventional stability field.

  19. Experimental hydration studies of natural and synthetic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.; Gerding, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a series of hydration experiments on natural glasses (Hawaiian basalt, obsidian) and the nuclear waste glass WV-44 done to examine laboratory methods of accelerating reaction processes are summarized. The glasses were reacted in hydrothermal solution and in saturated vapor water. It was found that different reaction rates and processes were found using the differing conditions, and that laboratory efforts to accelerate and duplicate natural processes must amount for the physical processes that occur naturally. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  1. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria: Rapid hydrate growth versus slow hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, N.; Bohrmann, G.; Ruffine, L.; Pape, T.; Riboulot, V.; Colliat, J.-L.; De Prunelé, A.; Dennielou, B.; Garziglia, S.; Himmler, T.; Marsset, T.; Peters, C. A.; Rabiu, A.; Wei, J.

    2014-04-01

    In previous works, it has been suggested that dissolution of gas hydrate can be responsible for pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria. It was shown that those pockmarks which are at different stages of maturation are characterized by a common internal architecture associated to gas hydrate dynamics. New results obtained by drilling into gas hydrate-bearing sediments with the MeBo seafloor drill rig in concert with geotechnical in situ measurements and pore water analyses indicate that pockmark formation and evolution in the study area are mainly controlled by rapid hydrate growth opposed to slow hydrate dissolution. On one hand, positive temperature anomalies, free gas trapped in shallow microfractures near the seafloor and coexistence of free gas and gas hydrate indicate rapid hydrate growth. On the other hand, slow hydrate dissolution is evident by low methane concentrations and almost constant sulfate values 2 m above the Gas Hydrate Occurrence Zone.

  3. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  4. How Sodium Chloride Salt Inhibits the Formation of CO2 Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Holzammer, Christine; Finckenstein, Agnes; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas S

    2016-03-10

    We present an experimental Raman study on how the addition of sodium chloride to CO2-hydrate-forming systems inhibits the hydrate formation thermodynamically. For this purpose, the molar enthalpy of reaction and the molar entropy of reaction for the reaction of weakly hydrogen-bonded water molecules to strongly hydrogen bonded water molecules are determined for different salinities from the Raman spectrum of the water-stretching vibration. Simultaneously, the influence of the salinity on the solubility of CO2 in the liquid water-rich phase right before the start of hydrate formation is analyzed. The results demonstrate that various mechanisms contribute to the inhibition of gas hydrate formation. For the highest salt concentration of 20 wt % investigated, the temperature of gas hydrate formation is lowered by 12 K. For this concentration the molar enthalpy and entropy of reaction become smaller by 50 and 20%, respectively. Concurrently, the solubility of carbon dioxide is reduced by 70%. These results are compared with data in literature for systems of sodium chloride in water (without carbon dioxide). PMID:26867107

  5. Development of Millimeter-Wave Velocimetry and Acoustic Time-of-Flight Tomography for Measurements in Densely Loaded Gas-Solid Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Pfund, David M.; Sheen, David M.; Pappas, Richard A.; Morgen, Gerald P.

    2007-04-01

    The MFDRC was formed in 1998 to advance the state-of-the-art in simulating multiphase turbulent flows by developing advanced computational models for gas-solid flows that are experimentally validated over a wide range of industrially relevant conditions. The goal was to transfer the resulting validated models to interested US commercial CFD software vendors, who would then propagate the models as part of new code versions to their customers in the US chemical industry. Since the lack of detailed data sets at industrially relevant conditions is the major roadblock to developing and validating multiphase turbulence models, a significant component of the work involved flow measurements on an industrial-scale riser contributed by Westinghouse, which was subsequently installed at SNL. Model comparisons were performed against these datasets by LANL. A parallel Office of Industrial Technology (OIT) project within the consortium made similar comparisons between riser measurements and models at NETL. Measured flow quantities of interest included volume fraction, velocity, and velocity-fluctuation profiles for both gas and solid phases at various locations in the riser. Some additional techniques were required for these measurements beyond what was currently available. PNNL’s role on the project was to work with the SNL experimental team to develop and test two new measurement techniques, acoustic tomography and millimeter-wave velocimetry. Acoustic tomography is a promising technique for gas-solid flow measurements in risers and PNNL has substantial related experience in this area. PNNL is also active in developing millimeter wave imaging techniques, and this technology presents an additional approach to make desired measurements. PNNL supported the advanced diagnostics development part of this project by evaluating these techniques and then by adapting and developing the selected technology to bulk gas-solids flows and by implementing them for testing in the SNL riser

  6. National workshop on gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Michael D.; Dillon, William P.; Malone, Rodney D.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.

    The range of present knowledge on the subject of gas hydrates and related federal research programs was the topic of discussion at the National Workshop on Gas Hydrates, April 23-24. The intention of the meeting was to provide the impetus for an expanded and broader-based national research program in both academia and government. Held at the U.S. Geological Survey National Center, Reston, Va., the workshop was organized by Michael D. Max, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; William P. Dillon, USGS, Woods Hole, Mass.; and Rodney D. Malone, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, W.Va. The 33 attendees represented academia (33%), federal agencies (58%), and industry (9%).

  7. Dynamics of hydrated starch saccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, M.; Deriu, A.; Albanese, G.; Cavatorta, F.

    2003-08-01

    We report here elastic neutron scattering data on glucose and on two of its polymeric forms: amylose and amylopectin. We have covered the hydration range from the dry state to about 0.6 g water/g dry saccharide. The data indicate, in all the analysed systems, the presence of a dynamic glass-like transition similar to that observed in hydrated proteins. The fact that this feature is observed also in a relatively small molecule like glucose confirms the hypothesis already put forward by other authors, that this transition in biomolecular species is essentially triggered and driven by the interaction of the macromolecule with the network of fluctuating H-bond of the solvent.

  8. Uranyl p-toluenesulphonate and its crystal hydrates. Synthesis and dehydration-hydration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, A. V.; Mityakhina, V. S.; Bogachev, S. V.; Suglobova, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    Lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulphonate (UPTS) and anhydrous salt were synthesised. The dehydration-hydration processes were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. It has been established that the hydrate shell of UPTS has a layered structure. The IR spectra of UPTS and its hydrates were recorded. It was found that the IR spectra of UPTS crystal hydrates of the same composition, produced in dehydration-hydration, noticeably differ in the range of water vibrations and are the same in the range corresponding to vibrations of sulphonate groups.

  9. Hydrated Electrons in a Quaternary Microemulsion System: A Pulse Radiolysis Study

    PubMed

    Adhikari; Joshi; Gopinathan

    1997-07-01

    Using the technique of pulse radiolysis, hydrated electrons have been produced and studied in quaternary microemulsion (sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS)/water/cyclohexane/1-pentanol) system. Remarkably high lifetimes ( approximately 20 &mgr;s) for hydrated electrons have been obtained. In general, these are two orders of magnitude higher than those reported earlier in reverse micelles. The water droplet sizes and location of the probes have been determined from the decay kinetics of hydrated electrons. The yields and half-lives (t 1/2 ) of the hydrated electrons vary smoothly as the water droplet sizes are changed. We believe that these studies will be useful not only in interpreting electron transfer reactions occurring in small water pockets in biological systems but also in the production of metal nanoclusters by radiation chemical method. PMID:9241228

  10. Identification of the hydrate gel phases present in phosphate-modified calcium aluminate binders

    SciTech Connect

    Chavda, Mehul A.; Bernal, Susan A.; Apperley, David C.; Kinoshita, Hajime; Provis, John L.

    2015-04-15

    The conversion of hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates to cubic phases in hydrated calcium aluminate cements (CAC) can involve undesirable porosity changes and loss of strength. Modification of CAC by phosphate addition avoids conversion, by altering the nature of the reaction products, yielding a stable amorphous gel instead of the usual crystalline hydrate products. Here, details of the environments of aluminium and phosphorus in this gel were elucidated using solid-state NMR and complementary techniques. Aluminium is identified in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination states, and phosphorus is present in hydrous environments with varying, but mostly low, degrees of crosslinking. A {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) experiment showed the existence of aluminium–phosphorus interactions, confirming the formation of a hydrated calcium aluminophosphate gel as a key component of the binding phase. This resolves previous disagreements in the literature regarding the nature of the disordered products forming in this system.