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Sample records for hydride generation elements

  1. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D.

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  2. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  3. [Indirect determination of rare earth elements in Chinese herbal medicines by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Xue, Min-Hua; Tan, Fang-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    Based on their similarity in chemical properties, rare earth elements were able to form stable coordinated compounds with arsenazo III which were extractable into butanol in the presence of diphenylguanidine. The butanol was removed under reduced pressure distillation; the residue was dissolved with diluted hydrochloric acid. As was released with the assistance of KMnO4 and determined by hydrogen generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry in terms of rare earth elements. When cesium sulfate worked as standard solution, extraction conditions, KMnO4 amount, distillation temperature, arsenazo III amount, interfering ions, etc were optimized. The accuracy and precision of the method were validated using national standard certified materials, showing a good agreement. Under optimum condition, the linear relationship located in 0.2-25 microg x mL(-1) and detection limit was 0.44 microg x mL(-1). After the herbal samples were digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, the rare earth elements were determined by this method, showing satisfactory results with relative standard deviation of 1.3%-2.5%, and recoveries of 94.4%-106.0%. The method showed the merits of convenience and rapidness, simple instrumentation and high accuracy. With the rare earths enriched into organic phase, the separation of analytes from matrix was accomplished, which eliminated the interference. With the residue dissolved by diluted hydrochloric acid after the solvent was removed, aqueous sample introduction eliminated the impact of organic phase on the tubing connected to pneumatic pump. PMID:25269316

  4. Ni/metal hydride secondary element

    DOEpatents

    Bauerlein, Peter

    2005-04-19

    A Ni/metal hydride secondary element having a positive nickel hydroxide electrode, a negative electrode having a hydrogen storage alloy, and an alkaline electrolyte, the positive electrode, provided with a three-dimensional metallic conductive structure, also contains an aluminum compound which is soluble in the electrolyte, in addition to nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxide. The aluminum compound is aluminum hydroxide and/or aluminum oxide, and the mass of the aluminum compound which is present in the positive bulk material mixture is 0.1 to 2% by weight relative to the mass of the nickel hydroxide which is present. In combination with aluminum hydroxide or aluminum oxide, the positive electrode further contains lanthanoid oxidic compounds Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2, as well as mixtures of these compounds.

  5. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, ormore » during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.« less

  6. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  7. Development of a direct hydride generation nebulizer for the determination of selenium by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrión, Nereida; Murillo, Miguel; Montiel, Edie; Díaz, Dorfe

    2003-08-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a new direct hydride generation nebulizer system for determination of hydride forming elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. This system was designed and optimized to obtain the highest sensitivity. Several experimental designs were used for these purposes. To optimize the individual parameters of the system, and to study the interaction between these parameters for both direct hydride generation nebulizers, a central composite orthogonal design with eight factors was set up. Significant behavioral differences were observed in the two direct hydride generation nebulizers studied. Finally, a 70 μm gas orifice nebulizer exhibits a better detection limit than the 120 μm nebulizer. Generally, for determination of selenium, this new direct hydride generation nebulizer system exhibits a linear dynamic range and detection limit (3 σb) of 3 orders of magnitude and 0.2 μg l -1 for selenium, respectively. This new hydride generator is much simpler system that conventional hydride generation systems, which does not need to be changed to work in normal mode with the inductively coupled plasma, since this system may be used for hydride forming elements and those that do not form them. It produces a rapid response with low memory effect. It reduces the interference level of Ni, Co and Cu to 600, 500 and 5 mg l -1, respectively. The accuracy of the system was verified by the determination of selenium in several standard reference materials of ambient, food and clinical sample matrices. No statistically significant differences (95 confidence level) were obtained between our method and the reference values.

  8. Compressed hydrogen generation using chemical hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Yoshitsugu; Kawai, Yasuaki; Nakanishi, Haruyuki; Matsumoto, Shinichi

    In a closed pressure vessel, the reaction of sodium borohydride (NaBH 4) with Pt-LiCoO 2 catalyst and a stoichiometric amount of water drastically increases the pressure owing to the generation of large quantities of hydrogen gas by synergism of hydrogen pressure and the catalyst (gravimetric hydrogen density per unit weight of NaBH 4 and H 2O including the Pt-LiCoO 2 catalyst is 9.0 wt.%, volumetric hydrogen density per unit weight of NaBH 4 and H 2O including the Pt-LiCoO 2 catalyst is 101 kg H 2/m -3). The hydrogen densities are high enough to reach the US Department of Energy (DOE) targets for use in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV) and also for other applications such as a fuel cell uninterrupted power supply (FCUPS).

  9. Improvement in thallium hydride generation using iodide and Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Picón, David; Carrero, Pablo; Valero, Maribel; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; Gutiérrez, Luís

    2015-05-01

    A continuous flow hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CF-HG-AAS) system was used to study the enhancement effect of different substances for conventional chemical HG of thallium. At room temperature, the acidified sample solution containing the respective enhancement reagent merged with the aqueous NaBH4 solution. The generated thallium hydride was stripped from the eluent solution by the addition of a nitrogen flow and thereafter the bulk phases were separated in a gas-liquid separator. The main factors under study were concentration and type of enhancement reagent (Te, iodide added as KI, Rhodamine B, malachite green and crystal violet) and acid (HCl, H2SO4 or HNO3). Other parameters affecting the thallium hydride generation, such as: NaBH4 concentration, carrier gas flow rate, length of reaction-mixing coil and reagents flow rates, were studied and optimized. Among the enhancement reagents tested, the combination of Rhodamine B and iodide produced the best results. A linear response was obtained between the detection limit (LOD (3σ)) of 1.5μg L(-1) and 1000μg L(-1). The RSD% (n=10) for a solution containing 15μg L(-1) of Tl was 2.9%. The recoveries of thallium in environmental water samples by spiking the samples with 10 and 20µg L(-1) of Tl were in the 97.0-102.5% range. The accuracy for Tl determination was further confirmed by the analysis of a water standard reference material (1643e form NIST, USA). Finally, it was demonstrated that malachite green and crystal violet showed similar enhancement effect like Rhodamine B for thallium HG. PMID:25702995

  10. Process for massively hydriding zirconium--uranium fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Katz, N.H.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of hydriding uranium-zirconium alloy by heating the alloy in a vacuum, introducing hydrogen and maintaining an elevated temperature until occurrence of the beta--delta phase transformation and isobarically cooling the composition. (Official Gazette)

  11. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  12. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  13. Electrochemical selenium hydride generation with in situ trapping in graphite tube atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šíma, Jan; Rychlovský, Petr

    2003-05-01

    A manifold coupling continuous electrolytic hydride generation of volatile hydrides with atomization in graphite tube atomizers after in situ collection was used for Se(IV) determination. Laboratory-made thin-layer flow-through cells with lead wire (cell I) and granular lead (cell II) as the cathode material were used as the electrolytic generators of volatile selenium hydride. The automatic sampling equipment of the graphite atomizer, with an untreated fused silica capillary, was used both for the introduction of volatile hydride into the atomizer and for pretreatment of the graphite furnace surface with a palladium modifier. The influence of the experimental parameters on the analytical signal was studied and optimum conditions for selenium determination were found. The optimum experimental parameters for hydride generation were: catholyte (1 mol l -1 HCl)/anolyte (2 mol l -1 H 2SO 4) flow rate of 2.0 ml min -1; applied generation current of 1.2 A (cell I) and 0.8 A (cell II); and carrier gas flow rate of 40 (cell I) and 70 ml min -1 (cell II). The hydride generated was collected in the graphite tube (pre-treated with 5 μg of Pd reduced at 800 °C) at a temperature of 400 °C for 30 s. The overall efficiency of H 2Se electrochemical generation, transport and collection was 71±7% for cell I and 80±5% for cell II. The results for electrochemical generation of H 2Se (cell II) (absolute limit of detection 50 pg, 3σ criterion) were compared with the original generation of H 2Se using NaBH 4 as a reduction agent (absolute limit of detection 30 pg) and with conventional liquid sampling. The repeatability at the 1.0 ng ml -1 level was better than 2.4% (relative standard deviation) for electrochemical hydride generation and better than 2.8% for chemical hydride generation.

  14. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS..

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride ...

  15. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS...

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride s...

  16. Elemental step thermodynamics of various analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtaining hydride in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Lei, Nan-Ping; Fu, Yan-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-12-21

    A series of analogues of indazolium alkaloids were designed and synthesized. The thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 elemental steps for the analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtain hydride in acetonitrile were determined using an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and electrochemical methods, respectively. The effects of molecular structure and substituents on the thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 steps were examined. Meanwhile, the oxidation mechanism of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids was examined using the chemical mimic method. The result shows that the oxidation of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids in vivo takes place by one-step concerted hydride transfer mechanism. PMID:26451708

  17. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant ( Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae ( Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 °C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 °C and atomization temperature 2100 °C) with 1.5 μg Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 μmol of zirconium and then with 0.10 μmol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely overcome by standard additions technique. Calibration by means of CRMs has

  18. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, for use in fuel cells, engines, and turbines for transportation or mobile applications. Hydrogen is desirable as an energy carrier, because its oxidation by air releases substantial energy (thermally or electrochemically) and produces only water as a product. In contrast, hydrocarbon energy carriers inevitably produce CO2, contributing to global warming. While CO2 capture may prove feasible in large stationary applications, implementing it in transportation and mobile applications is a daunting challenge. Thus a zero-emission energy carrier like hydrogen is especially needed in these cases. Use of H2 as an energy carrier also brings new challenges such as safe handling of compressed hydrogen and implementation of new transport, storage, and delivery processes and infrastructure. With current storage technologies, hydrogen's energy per volume is very low compared to other automobile fuels. High density storage of compressed hydrogen requires combinations of high pressure and/or low temperature that are not very practical. An alternative for storage is use of solid light weight hydrogenous material systems which have long durability, good adsorption properties and high activity. Substantial research has been conducted on carbon materials like activated carbon, carbon nanofibers, and carbon nanotubes due to their high theoretical hydrogen capacities. However, the theoretical values have not been achieved, and hydrogen uptake capacities in these materials are below 10 wt. %. In this thesis we investigated the use of silicon for hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation via water oxidation of silicon had been ignored due to slow reaction kinetics. We hypothesized that the hydrogen generation rate could be improved by using high surface area silicon nanoparticles. Our laser-pyrolysis-produced nanoparticles showed surprisingly rapid hydrogen generation and high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical maximum of two moles of H2 per

  19. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ARSENICALS BY PH-SELECTIVE HYDRIDE GENERATION-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory


    A method based on pH-selective generation and separation of arsines is commonly used for analysis of inorganic, methylated, and dimethylated trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). We have optimized this method to pe...

  20. Chemical vapor generation for atomic spectrometry. A contribution to the comprehension of reaction mechanisms in the generation of volatile hydrides using borane complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Baiocchi, Cristiano; Pitzalis, Emanuela; Onor, Massimo; Zamboni, Roberto

    2004-04-01

    A systematic study has been developed in order to clarify the mechanism of hydride generation using different borane complexes [sodium tetrahydroborate(III), NaBH 4 (THB); borane-ammonia complex, H 3B-NH 3 (AB); borane- tert-Butylamine complex, H 3B-NH 2C(CH 3) 3 (TBAB)], as derivatizing reagents. Stannane, stibine and bismuthine were generated in a continuous flow reaction system at different acidities in the pH range of 1.38-12.7. The pH of sample solution was pre-equilibrated on-line in a mixing loop by the addition of appropriate solution before the reaction with the derivatizing reagent in a reaction loop. The generated hydrides were delivered to a miniature argon hydrogen flame atomizer and free atoms detected by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The effect of pH on the relative sensitivity has been investigated by varying both the mixing loop volume (4, 15 and 50 μl) and reaction loop volume (100 and 500 μl). The mixing rates of the solutions have been also tested to avoid any undesired effect arising from the incomplete mixing of the solution in the flow reaction system. The generation of hydrides using on-line pre-equilibration of pH can be observed also in alkaline or neutral conditions, while the generation of the same hydrides is observed only in acidic solution if the equilibration of pH was performed off-line. Stannane generation using amineboranes has never been reported before. Kinetic calculations were performed in order to estimate the concentration of nascent hydrogen arising from the decomposition of the derivatizing agents in the flow reaction system. It has been found that in many cases, the mechanism of nascent hydrogen failed to explain the generation of the hydrides. The direct action of BH 4- and H 3B-X species (X=ammonia or amino group) on the analyte element, present in solution in a suitable chemical form, is the only possible mechanism of hydride formation in a wide range of solution acidities, from pH 4.5 up to pH 12.7. The

  1. Method of generating hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan, Sesha S; Niemann, Michael U; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K

    2013-05-14

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  2. AN INTRALABORATORY COMPARATIVE STUDY OF HYDRIDE GENERATION AND GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES FOR DETERMINING ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENIC IN COMPLEX WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed intralaboratory comparison of the determination of arsenic in complex wastewater samples by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption techniques has been conducted. Two hydride generation techniques were employed. One consisted of the use of sodium boro...

  3. Determination of arsenic and selenium in environmental and agricultural samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hershey, J.W.; Oostdyk, T.S.; Keliher, P.N.

    1988-11-01

    Agricultural and environmental samples are digested with acid, and arsenic and selenium are determined using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Interelement interferences are eliminated by high acid concentrations or cation-exchange resins. Agreement with standard reference material is excellent. The technique is also applied to actual samples.

  4. Direct generation of oxygen-stabilized radicals by H• transfer from transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jonathan L; Hartung, John; Han, Arthur; Norton, Jack R

    2015-01-28

    Transition-metal hydrides generate α-alkoxy radicals by H• transfer to enol ethers. We have measured the rate constant for transfer from CpCr(CO)3H to n-butyl vinyl ether and have examined the chemistry of radicals generated by such transfers. Radicals from appropriate substrates undergo 5-exo cyclization, with higher diastereoselectivity than the analogous all-carbon radicals. From such radicals it is straightforward to make substituted tetrahydrofurans. PMID:25569214

  5. Hydrogen generation from hydrides in millimeter scale reactors for micro proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Masel, R. I.; Shannon, M. A.

    This paper introduces and discusses the feasibility of millimeter scale powder packed-bed reactors using high energy density chemical hydrides for micro-PEM fuel cell applications. Two different reactors were designed and tested using LiBH 4, LiAlH 4, NaAlH 4 and CaH 2 hydride fuels. The mechanisms that limit the total yield of H 2 generated and impact the performance of the hydrogen generator are investigated in this paper, including density, solubility and porosity of the reaction byproducts. The volume expansion of the byproducts has significant effect on the total energy density of micro-hydrogen generators because the byproducts are left in the millimeter scale reactor after the reactions and the micro-hydrogen generators have limited fuel storage space. The SEM images of the reaction byproducts indicates that the byproducts of LiBH 4 can form a single solid mass that clogged the reaction vessel and limit the full utilization of the hydride. However, the byproducts of LiAlH 4 and CaH 2 reactions are non-agglomerated and they do not form impermeable mass. The experimental results show that the highest yield of hydrogen generation was achieved with LiAlH 4 and CaH 2 fuels.

  6. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained. PMID:25089667

  7. Analysis of Ni-HYDRIDE Thin Film after Surface Plasmon Generation by Laser Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violante, V.; Castagna, E.; Sibilia, C.; Paoloni, S.; Sarto, F.

    2005-12-01

    A nickel hydride thin film was studied by the attenuated total reflection method. The differences in behavior between a "black" film, and a pure nickel film "blank," are shown. The black nickel hydride film has been obtained by a short electrolysis with 1 M Li2SO4 electrolyte in light water, A shift in the minimum of the observed reflected light occurs, together with a change in the minimum shape (i.e. its half-height width increases). These two phenomenon are due to the change in the electronic band structure of the metal induced by electrons added to the lattice by hydrogen. The change of the electronic structure, revealed by the laser coupling conditions, leads us to consider that a hydride phase was created. Both the blank (not hydrogenated) and black (hydrogenated) specimens were taken under He-Ne laser beam at the reflectance minimum angle for about three hours. A SIMS analysis was also implemented to reveal differences in the isotopic composition of Cu, as marker element between the blank and black films, in order to study the coupled effect of electrolysis and plasmon-polariton excitation on LENR processes in condensed matter.

  8. Pyrometallurgical Extraction of Valuable Elements in Ni-Metal Hydride Battery Electrode Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yin-ju; Deng, Yong-chun; Bu, Wen-gang

    2015-10-01

    Gas selective reduction-oxidation (redox) and melting separation were consecutively applied to electrode materials of AB5-type Ni-metal hydride batteries leading to the production of a Ni-Co alloy and slag enriched with rare earth oxides (REO). In the selective redox process, electrode materials were treated with H2/H2O at 1073 K and 1173 K (800 °C and 900 °C). Active elements such as REs, Al, and Mn were oxidized whereas relatively inert elements such as Ni and Co were transformed into their elemental states in the treated materials. SiO2 and Al2O3 powders were added into the treated materials as fluxes which were then melted at 1823 K (1550 °C) to yield a Ni-Co alloy and a REO-SiO2-Al2O3-MnO slag. The high-purity Ni-Co alloy produced can be used as a raw material for AB5-type hydrogen-storage alloy. The REO content in slag was very high, i.e., 48.51 pct, therefore it can be used to recycle rare earth oxides.

  9. Achieving 100% Efficient Postcolumn Hydride Generation for As Speciation Analysis by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2016-04-01

    An experimental setup consisting of a flow injection hydride generator coupled to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer was optimized in order to generate arsanes from tri- and pentavalent inorganic arsenic species (iAs(III), iAs(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MAs(V)), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)) with 100% efficiency with the use of only HCl and NaBH4 as the reagents. The optimal concentration of HCl was 2 mol L(-1); the optimal concentration of NaBH4 was 2.5% (m/v), and the volume of the reaction coil was 8.9 mL. To prevent excessive signal noise due to fluctuations of hydride supply to an atomizer, a new design of a gas-liquid separator was implemented. The optimized experimental setup was subsequently interfaced to HPLC and employed for speciation analysis of arsenic. Two chromatography columns were tested: (i) ion-pair chromatography and (ii) ion exchange chromatography. The latter offered much better results for human urine samples without a need for sample dilution. Due to the equal hydride generation efficiency (and thus the sensitivities) of all As species, a single species standardization by DMAs(V) standard was feasible. The limits of detection for iAs(III), iAs(V), MAs(V), and DMAs(V) were 40, 97, 57, and 55 pg mL(-1), respectively. Accuracy of the method was tested by the analysis of the standard reference material (human urine NIST 2669), and the method was also verified by the comparative analyses of human urine samples collected from five individuals with an independent reference method. PMID:26938848

  10. Experimental Hydrogen Plant with Metal Hydrides to Store and Generate Electrical Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzatti, Frank; Nizolli, Vinícius; Ferrigolo, Fredi Zancan; Farret, Felix Alberto; de Mello, Marcos Augusto Silva

    2016-02-01

    Generation of electrical energy with renewable sources is interruptible due to the primary energy characteristics (sun, wind, hydro, etc.). In these cases, it is necessary to use energy storage so increasing penetrability of these sources connected to the distribution system. This paper discusses in details some equipment and accessories of an integrated power plant using fuel cell stack, electrolyzer and metal hydrides. During the plant operation were collected the power consumption data and established the efficiency of each plant component. These data demonstrated an overall efficiency of about 11% due to the low efficiencies of the commercial electrolyzers and power inverters used in the experiments.

  11. Organic solvents as interferents in arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Dědina, Jiri; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Onor, Massimo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2006-05-01

    Interference effects of various organic solvents miscible with water on arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry have been studied. Arsine was chemically generated in continuous flow hydride generation system and atomized by using a flame atomizer able to operate in two modes: miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-flame. The effects of experimental variables and atomization mode were investigated: tetrahydroborate and hydrochloric acid concentrations, argon, hydrogen and oxygen supply rates for the microflame, and the distance from the atomization region to the observation zone. The nature of the species formed in the flame due to the pyrolysis of organic solvent vapors entering the flame volume together with arsine is discussed. The observed signal depression in the presence of organic solvents has been mainly attributed to the atomization interference due to heterogeneous gas-solid reaction between the free arsenic atoms and finely dispersed carbon particles formed by carbon radicals recombination. The best tolerance to interferences was obtained by using flame-in-flame atomization (5-10 ml min - 1 of oxygen flow rate), together with higher argon and hydrogen supply rates and elevated observation heights.

  12. Evaluation of electrochemical generation of volatile zinc hydride by heated quartz tube atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad-Hossein; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Youssefi, Abbas; Aliakbari, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG) as a sample introduction system for determination of zinc was developed. It was directly coupled to an electrically heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) system. The hydride generator is a laboratory-made semi-batch electrolytic cell that consists of a lead-tin alloy cathode and a platinum anode. The effects of typical parameters on the generation efficiency of the technique, such as types of cathode material and catholyte and anolyte solutions, were studied. The influences of numerical experimental operating parameters on the analytical signal were evaluated in detail and optimum conditions were obtained. The analytical figures of merit for the developed method were determined. The calibration curve was linear up to 300 ng mL(-1) of Zn. A concentration detection limit (3σ, n = 9) of 11 ng mL(-1) Zn and a relative standard deviation of 5.0% (RSD, n = 9) for 200 ng mL(-1) Zn were accessed. In addition, the susceptibility of interference from various ions was evaluated. The accuracy of the method was verified by determination of Zn in a certified reference material and in tap water. The achieved concentrations were found to be in good agreement with both the certified value and the data obtained using flame AAS. PMID:22790376

  13. Development of a MSFIA system for sequential determination of antimony, arsenic and selenium using hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Santana, Fernanda A; Portugal, Lindomar A; Serra, Antonio M; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Víctor; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2016-08-15

    This paper proposed a multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system for antimony, arsenic and selenium determination in peanut samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). The optimization step of the hydride generation was performed using a two-level full factorial design involving the parameters: hydrochloric acid, sodium tetrahydroborate and potassium iodide concentrations. So, using the chemical conditions optimized, this method allows the determination of these elements employing the external calibration technique using aqueous standards with limits of detection and quantification of 0.04 and 0.14µgL(-1) for antimony, 0.04 and 0.14µgL(-1) for arsenic and 0.14 and 0.37µgL(-1) for selenium, respectively. Additionally, the effect of vanadium, chromium, cobalt, nickel, zinc, copper, iron and molybdenum on the generation of chemical vapour was also studied. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation varied from 1.2 to 3.6% for antimony, 1.8-3.9% for arsenic and 1.8-2% for selenium. The accuracy for arsenic and selenium was confirmed using the certified peach leaves reference material SRM 1547 produced by National Institute of Standard and Technology. The proposed method showed 45 injection throughput (h(-1)) using 1.6mL sample volume for each element, 0.8mL NaBH4 0.5% (w/v) containing NaOH 0.05% (w/v), 0.8mL HCl 5M and 0.4mL KI 14% (w/v) containing L-ascorbic acid 2.5% (w/v). The method was applied to the determination of antimony, arsenic and selenium in peanut samples, which were firstly lyophilized and afterward digested using microwave assisted radiation. Six samples were analyzed and the contents of the elements found were: 28.7-41.3µgkg(-1) for arsenic, 86.4-480.1µgkg(-1) for selenium and 32.6-52.4µgkg(-1) for antimony. Addition/recovery tests were also performed to confirm the method accuracy for the three elements. PMID:27260431

  14. Steric effects on alkyl cation affinities of maingroup-element hydrides.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Juan M; Mulder, R Joshua; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2011-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of gas-phase alkyl cation affinities (ACA) of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic system using zeroth order regular approximation-relativistic density functional theory at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. ACA values were computed for the methyl, ethyl, i-propyl and t-butyl cations and compared with the corresponding proton affinities (PA). One purpose of this work is to provide an intrinsically consistent set of values of the 298 K ACA of all anionic (XH (n-1)(-)) and neutral bases (XH(n)) constituted by maingroup-element hydrides of groups 14-17 and the noble gases (group 18) along the periods 1-6. Another purpose is to determine and rationalize the trend in affinity for a cation as the latter varies from proton to t-butyl cation. This undertaking is supported by quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses. Correlations are established between PA and ACA values. PMID:20882538

  15. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  16. Automated determinations of selenium in thermal power plant wastewater by sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ezoe, Kentaro; Ohyama, Seiichi; Hashem, Md Abul; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    After the Fukushima disaster, power generation from nuclear power plants in Japan was completely stopped and old coal-based power plants were re-commissioned to compensate for the decrease in power generation capacity. Although coal is a relatively inexpensive fuel for power generation, it contains high levels (mgkg(-1)) of selenium, which could contaminate the wastewater from thermal power plants. In this work, an automated selenium monitoring system was developed based on sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection. This method could be applied to control of wastewater contamination. In this method, selenium is vaporized as H2Se, which reacts with ozone to produce chemiluminescence. However, interference from arsenic is of concern because the ozone-induced chemiluminescence intensity of H2Se is much lower than that of AsH3. This problem was successfully addressed by vaporizing arsenic and selenium individually in a sequential procedure using a syringe pump equipped with an eight-port selection valve and hot and cold reactors. Oxidative decomposition of organoselenium compounds and pre-reduction of the selenium were performed in the hot reactor, and vapor generation of arsenic and selenium were performed separately in the cold reactor. Sample transfers between the reactors were carried out by a pneumatic air operation by switching with three-way solenoid valves. The detection limit for selenium was 0.008 mg L(-1) and calibration curve was linear up to 1.0 mg L(-1), which provided suitable performance for controlling selenium in wastewater to around the allowable limit (0.1 mg L(-1)). This system consumes few chemicals and is stable for more than a month without any maintenance. Wastewater samples from thermal power plants were collected, and data obtained by the proposed method were compared with those from batchwise water treatment followed by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. PMID:26653491

  17. Photoconductive circuit element pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    Rauscher, Christen

    1989-01-01

    A pulse generator for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test.

  18. [Research on optimization of mathematical model of flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Xue-Hong; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Ya-Bing; Jiang, Xue-Hui; Dai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry was a widely used method in the industries of health, environmental, geological and metallurgical fields for the merit of high sensitivity, wide measurement range and fast analytical speed. However, optimization of this method was too difficult as there exist so many parameters affecting the sensitivity and broadening. Generally, the optimal conditions were sought through several experiments. The present paper proposed a mathematical model between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients using the law of conservation of mass according to the characteristics of hydride chemical reaction and the composition of the system, which was proved to be accurate as comparing the theoretical simulation and experimental results through the test of arsanilic acid standard solution. Finally, this paper has put a relation map between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients, and summarized that GLS volume, carrier solution flow rate and sample loop volume were the most factors affecting sensitivity and broadening coefficients. Optimizing these three factors with this relation map, the relative sensitivity was advanced by 2.9 times and relative broadening was reduced by 0.76 times. This model can provide a theoretical guidance for the optimization of the experimental conditions. PMID:24783570

  19. Advanced Metal-Hydrides-Based Thermal Battery: A New Generation of High Density Thermal Battery Based on Advanced Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    HEATS Project: The University of Utah is developing a compact hot-and-cold thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides that could offer efficient climate control system for EVs. The team’s innovative designs of heating and cooling systems for EVs with high energy density, low-cost thermal batteries could significantly reduce the weight and eliminate the space constraint in automobiles. The thermal battery can be charged by plugging it into an electrical outlet while charging the electric battery and it produces heat and cold through a heat exchanger when discharging. The ultimate goal of the project is a climate-controlling thermal battery that can last up to 5,000 charge and discharge cycles while substantially increasing the driving range of EVs, thus reducing the drain on electric batteries.

  20. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM(IV) AND SELENIUM(VI) USING COUPLED ION CHROMATOGRAPHY: HYDRIDE GENERATION ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple method was developed to speciate inorganic selenium in the microgram per liter range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determination of the redox states selenite, Se(IV), and s...

  1. Arsenic Speciation of Waters from the Aegean Region, Turkey by Hydride Generation: Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Tülin Deniz; Henden, Emur

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a serious problem for human health. Since the toxicity of arsenic species As(III) and As(V) is different, it is important to determine the concentrations separately. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an accurate and sensitive method for the speciation of arsenic. It was intended with this work to determine the concentrations of arsenic species in water samples collected from Izmir, Manisa and nearby areas. A batch type hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer was used. As(V) gave no signal under the optimal measurement conditions of As(III). A certified reference drinking water was analyzed by the method and the results showed excellent agreement with the reported values. The procedure was applied to 34 water samples. Eleven tap water, two spring water, 19 artesian well water and two thermal water samples were analyzed under the optimal conditions. PMID:27236436

  2. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2007-03-01

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation — integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H 2Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an "integrated trap") was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3 σ), was 0.9 ng mL - 1 for Te. For a 2 min in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation — atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% ( n = 6) for Te. The designs studied include slotted tube, single silica tube and integrated atom trap-cooled atom traps. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  3. Spontaneous Double Hydrometallation Induced by N→M Coordination in Organometallic Hydrides of Group 14 Elements.

    PubMed

    Novák, Miroslav; Dostál, Libor; Turek, Jan; Alonso, Mercedes; De Proft, Frank; Růžička, Aleš; Jambor, Roman

    2016-04-11

    Our attempts to synthesise N→M intramolecularly coordinated diorganometallic hydrides L2 MH2 [M=Si (4), Ge (5), Sn (6)] containing the CH=N imine group (in which L is C,N-chelating ligand {2-[(2,6-iPr2 C6 H3 )N=CH]C6 H4 }(-) ) yielded 1,1'-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-2,2'-spriobi[benzo[c][1,2]azasilole] (7), 1,1'-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-2,2'-spriobi[benzo[c][1,2]azagermole] (8) and C,N-chelated homoleptic stannylene L2 Sn (10), respectively. Compounds 7 and 8 are an outcome of a spontaneous double hydrometallation of the two CH=N imine moieties induced by N→M intramolecular coordination (M=Si, Ge) in the absence of any catalyst. In contrast, the diorganotin hydride L2 SnH2 (6) is redox-unstable and the reduction of the tin centre with the elimination of H2 provided the C,N-chelated homoleptic stannylene L2 Sn (10). Compounds 7 and 8 were characterised by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Because the proposed N→M intramolecularly coordinated diorganometallic hydrides L2 MH2 [M=Si (4), Ge (5), Sn (6)] revealed two different types of reduction reactions, DFT calculations were performed to gain an insight into the structures and bonding of the non-isolable diorganometallic hydrides as well as the products of their subsequent reactions. Furthermore, the thermodynamic profiles of the different reaction pathways with respect to the central metal atom were also investigated. PMID:26934563

  4. Preconcentration and determination of tellurium in garlic samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Marcos M; Cerutti, Soledad; Salonia, José A; Gásquez, José A; Martinez, Luis D

    2005-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of traces of total tellurium (Te) in garlic (Allium sativa) is described that combines hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with preconcentration of the analyte by coprecipitation. The samples, each spiked with lanthanum nitrate (20 mg/L), are introduced into an Amberlite XAD-4 resin and mixed with ammonium buffer (pH 9.1). Te is preconcentrated by coprecipitation with the generated lanthanum hydroxide precipitate. The precipitate is quantitatively collected in the resin, eluted with hydrochloric acid, and then transferred into the atomizer device. Considering a sample consumption of 25 mL, an enrichment factor of 10 was obtained. The detection limit (3sigma) was 0.03 microg/L, and the precision (relative standard deviation) was 3.5% (n = 10) at the 10 microg/L level. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for Te was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993. Satisfactory results were obtained for the analysis of Te in garlic samples. PMID:16152948

  5. Determination of arsenic in a nickel alloy by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, C. P.; Tyson, J. F.; Offley, S. G.

    1992-08-01

    The development of a method for the direct determination of trace arsenic quantities in nickel alloy digests, by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, is described. An optimization study of the manifold and chemical parameters produced system performance, in terms of tolerance of the nickel matrix and sensitivity, such that matrix removal and pre-reduction of As(V) to As (III) prior to arsine generation were eliminated. Full recovery of the As(V) signal from a solution containing 5 ng ml -1 in the presence of 60 μg ml -1 nickel was obtained. Validation of the method was achieved by analyzing a British Chemical Standard (BCS) Certified Reference Material (CRM) #346 IN nickel alloy containing arsenic at a concentration of 50 μg g -1. Following dissolution in nitric and hydrofluoric acids by a microwave assisted procedure, the only subsequent preparation required was dilution by the appropriate factor. Up to 60 injections h -1 may be made, with a detection limit of 0.5 ng ml -1 arsenic (250 pg absolute) as As(V) in a 500 μl sample. The peak height characteristic concentration is 0.46 ng ml -1, with a relative standard deviation of 3.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 As(V) standard ( n = 6).

  6. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  7. A COMPARISON OF URINARY ARSENIC SPECIATION VIA DIRECT NEBULIZATION AND ON-LINE PHOTOOXIDATION-HYDRIDE GENERATION WITH DETECTION BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic speciation continues to be important in assessing human and environmental exposure risk. Urinary arsenic analysis provides information on recent arsenic exposure. In this study, two sample introduction pathways: direct nebulization (DN) and hydride generation (HG) were ut...

  8. DETERMINATION OF TRACE AMOUNTS OF SELENIUM IN CORN, LETTUCE, POTATOES, SOYBEANS, AND WHEAT BY HYDRIDE GENERATION/CONDENSATION AND FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the nutritional and toxicological significance of low selenium concentrations in agricultural crops, a procedure utilizing wet digestion followed by hydride generation/condensation-flame atomic absorption was developed for the routine analysis of selenium in different ...

  9. Quantifying uncertainty in the measurement of arsenic in suspended particulate matter by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with hydride generator

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is the toxic element, which creates several problems in human being specially when inhaled through air. So the accurate and precise measurement of arsenic in suspended particulate matter (SPM) is of prime importance as it gives information about the level of toxicity in the environment, and preventive measures could be taken in the effective areas. Quality assurance is equally important in the measurement of arsenic in SPM samples before making any decision. The quality and reliability of the data of such volatile elements depends upon the measurement of uncertainty of each step involved from sampling to analysis. The analytical results quantifying uncertainty gives a measure of the confidence level of the concerned laboratory. So the main objective of this study was to determine arsenic content in SPM samples with uncertainty budget and to find out various potential sources of uncertainty, which affects the results. Keeping these facts, we have selected seven diverse sites of Delhi (National Capital of India) for quantification of arsenic content in SPM samples with uncertainty budget following sampling by HVS to analysis by Atomic Absorption Spectrometer-Hydride Generator (AAS-HG). In the measurement of arsenic in SPM samples so many steps are involved from sampling to final result and we have considered various potential sources of uncertainties. The calculation of uncertainty is based on ISO/IEC17025: 2005 document and EURACHEM guideline. It has been found that the final results mostly depend on the uncertainty in measurement mainly due to repeatability, final volume prepared for analysis, weighing balance and sampling by HVS. After the analysis of data of seven diverse sites of Delhi, it has been concluded that during the period from 31st Jan. 2008 to 7th Feb. 2008 the arsenic concentration varies from 1.44 ± 0.25 to 5.58 ± 0.55 ng/m3 with 95% confidence level (k = 2). PMID:21466671

  10. Slurry sampling for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination of arsenic in cigarette tobaccos.

    PubMed

    Mierzwa, J; Adeloju, S B; Dhindsa, H S

    1997-06-01

    The development of a slurry sampling hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric (HGAAS) method for the determination of arsenic in cigarette tobacco samples is described. The method is relatively simple and has been shown to give values of total arsenic close to those obtained using methods requiring total dissolution and decomposition of all vegetable matter before analysis. Pre-treatment of samples slurried in nitric acid by ultrasonication permitted the extraction of about 90% of the total arsenic from tobacco samples. Further improvement in the recovery efficiency (up to 93-94%) was accomplished by the use of an additional step of short microwave-accelerated treatment. L-Cysteine was used as a pre-reduction agent. The accuracy and precision of the slurry sampling HGAAS method were studied using the certified reference material (CRM) CTA-OTL-1 Oriental Tobacco Leaves. Under the optimum conditions, as little as 2.6 ng of arsenic can be detected. The relative standard deviation of the overall procedure was calculated to be below 7.6% at arsenic concentration levels of 0.5-0.9 mg kg-1 and the analytical results obtained for the CRM agreed with the certified value. The main factors that influenced the reliability of the method were sample homogeneity, particle size and slurry concentration. PMID:9282401

  11. A metallic furnace atomizer in hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry: Determination of bismuth and selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Aline; Kim, Manuela Leticia; Tudino, Mabel Beatriz; Baccan, Nivaldo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2008-08-01

    A flow injection hydride generation system with a metal furnace atomizer (Inconel 600® alloy) was employed for Bi and Se determination. The presented methods have linear ranges up to 200 and 500 μg L - 1 for Bi and Se, respectively, with good linearities ( r2 = 0.9997 and 0.9974, respectively). The limits of quantification obtained according to IUPAC recommendations were 2.3 μg L - 1 for Bi and 6 μg L - 1 for Se, and the relative standard deviations ( N = 6) based on Bi and Se analytical responses from real samples were 2.7% and 10%, respectively. Accuracy evaluations were based on certified materials such as SRM 361, SRM 363, and SRM 364 (steel alloys) for Bi, Mess-3 (marine sediment), SRM 397 (human hair), and Bio-Rad2 — 69042 (urine) for Se. Good agreements between the results were obtained at the 95% confidence level, according to the t-test.

  12. [Microsecond Pulsed Hollow Cathode Lamp as Enhanced Excitation Source of Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo

    2015-09-01

    The spectral, electrical and atomic fluorescence characteristics of As, Se, Sb and Pb hollow cathode lamps (HCLs) powered by a laboratory-built high current microsecond pulse (HCMP) power supply were studied, and the feasibility of using HCMP-HCLs as the excitation source of hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) was evaluated. Under the HCMP power supply mode, the As, Se, Sb, Pb HCLs can maintain stable glow discharge at frequency of 100~1000 Hz, pulse width of 4.0~20 μs and pulse current up to 4.0 A. Relationship between the intensity of characteristic emission lines and HCMP power supply parameters, such as pulse current, power supply voltage, pulse width and frequency, was studied in detail. Compared with the conventional pulsed (CP) HCLs used in commercial AFS instruments, HCMP-HCLs have a narrower pulse width and much stronger pulse current. Under the optimized HCMP power supply parameters, the intensity of atomic emission lines of As, Se, Sb HCLs had sharp enhancement and that indicated their capacity of being a novel HG-AFS excitation source. However, the attenuation of atomic lines and enhancement of ionic lines negated such feasibility of HCMP-Pb HCL. Then the HG-AFS analytical capability of using the HCMP-As/Se/Sb HCLs excitation source was established and results showed that the HCMP-HCL is a promising excitation source for HG-AFS. PMID:26669140

  13. Dissolution of Uranium Metal Without Hydride Formation or Hydrogen Gas Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Oliver, Brian M.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2008-09-01

    This study shows that metallic uranium will cleanly dissolve in carbonate-peroxide solution without generation of hydrogen gas or uranium hydride. Metallic uranium shot, 0.5 to 1 mm diameter, were reacted with ammonium carbonate - hydrogen peroxide solution ranging in concentration from 0.13M to 1.0M carbonate and 0.50M to 2.0M peroxide. The uranium beads were weighed before and after reacting with the etch solution, and from the weights of the beads, their diameters were calculated, before and after the etch. The etch rate on the beads was then calculated from the reduction in bead diameter, and independently by uranium analysis of the solution. The calculated etch rate ranged from about 4 x 10-4 to 8 x 10-4 cm per hour, dependent primarily on the peroxide concentration. A hydrogen analysis of the etched beads showed that no detectable hydrogen was introduced into the uranium metal by the etching process.

  14. Determination of arsenic and selenium by hydride generation and headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburska, Anna; Jankowski, Krzysztof; Rodzik, Agnieszka

    2011-07-01

    A hydride generation headspace solid phase microextraction technique has been developed in combination with optical emission spectrometry for determination of total arsenic and selenium. Hydrides were generated in a 10 mL volume septum-sealed vial and subsequently collected onto a polydimethylsiloxane/Carboxen solid phase microextraction fiber from the headspace of sample solution. After completion of the sorption, the fiber was transferred into a thermal desorption unit and the analytes were vaporized and directly introduced into argon inductively coupled plasma or helium microwave induced plasma radiation source. Experimental conditions of hydride formation reaction as well as sorption and desorption of analytes have been optimized showing the significant effect of the type of the solid phase microextraction fiber coating, the sorption time and hydrochloric acid concentration of the sample solution on analytical characteristics of the method developed. The limits of detection of arsenic and selenium were 0.1 and 0.8 ng mL - 1 , respectively. The limit of detection of selenium could be improved further using biosorption with baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for analyte preconcentration. The technique was applied for the determination of total As and Se in real samples.

  15. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Bystroff, Roman I.; Miller, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  16. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  17. Arsenic and antimony determination by on-line flow hydride generation glow discharge optical emission detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillermo Orellana-Velado, Néstor; Fernández, Matilde; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2001-01-01

    Hollow cathode (HC) and conventional flat cathode (FC) glow discharge (GD) optical emission spectrometry (OES) were used as detectors for the determination of arsenic and antimony by on-line hydride generation (HG) in a flow system. Both radiofrequency (rf) and direct current (dc) sources were investigated to produce the discharge. The design of the HC and FC and also the parameters governing the discharge (pressure, He flow rate, voltage, current and delivered power) and the HG (sodium borohydride concentration and reagent flow rates) were investigated using both cathodes. The analytical performance characteristics of HG-GD-OES with HC and FC were evaluated for some emission lines of arsenic (193.7, 200.3, 228.8 and 234.9 nm). The best detection limit (0.2 μg l -1) was obtained when the emission line of 228.8 nm was used with FC. Under the same arsenic optimized experimental conditions, the system was evaluated to determine antimony at 259.7, 252.7 and 231.1 nm, 252.7 nm being the emission line which produced the best detection limit (0.7 μg l -1). The rf-HC-GD-OES system was applied successfully to the determination of arsenic in freeze-dried urine in the standard reference material 2670 from NIST. Finally, a flow injection system was assayed to determine arsenic at 228.8 nm, using a dc-GD with both FC and HC. The results indicated that for low volumes of sample, the HC discharge allows better analytical signals than the FC.

  18. Atomic-absorption spectrochemical analysis for ultratrace elements in geological materials by hydride-forming techniques: Selenium.

    PubMed

    Sighinolfi, G P; Gorgoni, C

    1981-03-01

    A method based on hydride generation for the AAS determination of selenium at nanogram levels in geological materials is described. The sample is decomposed by aqua regia attack in a sealed Teflon bomb. After treatment with hydrochloric acid, selenium is converted into hydrogen selenide by reaction with sodium borohydride and determined by AAS. Matrix interference effects have been investigated, but though they are rarely significant, the standard-additions method is recommended. The absolute sensitivity of the method is about 2.0 ng of Se (in 10 ml of solution). Detection limits of about 5-10 ng in a 1.0-g sample have been achieved with the use of "Suprapure" reagents. The selenium content of some USGS, CRPG and ANRT reference samples is reported. PMID:18962885

  19. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  20. Hydriding process

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, J.W.; Taketani, H.

    1973-12-01

    BS>A method is described for hydriding a body of a Group IV-B metal, preferably zirconium, to produce a crack-free metal-hydride bedy of high hydrogen content by cooling the body at the beta to beta + delta boundary, without further addition of hydrogen, to precipitate a fine-grained delta-phase metal hydride in the beta + delta phase region and then resuming the hydriding, preferably preceded by a reheating step. (Official Gazette)

  1. Determination of inorganic arsenic species by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with variable sodium tetrahydroborate concentrations*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Mirna E.; Beldoménico, Horacio R.

    2004-07-01

    This work describes a study on the determination of inorganic arsenic species in ground water and synthetic experimental matrices, using a flow injection system with on-line hydride generation device coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer with flame-heated quartz atomizer (FI HG AAS). Specific trivalent arsenic determination is based on the slow kinetics of As(V) on the hydride generation reaction using sufficiently low concentrations of sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH 4) as reductant in highly acidic conditions (pH<0). Under these conditions, the efficiency of hydride generation from As(V) is much lower than that from As(III). The pentavalent form is determined by the difference between total inorganic arsenic and As(III). As(V) interferences were studied using As(III) solutions ranging from 0% to 50% of total inorganic As. The optimized NaBH 4 concentration was 0.035% (w/v). The detection limit was 1.4 μg l -1 As(III). As(V) interferences were 6% in the case of water samples with 6 μg l -1 As(III) in the presence of 54 μg l -1 As(V) (i.e. 10% As(III)). Interferences of methylated arsenic species (MMA and DMA) were evaluated. Speciation method was satisfactorily applied to 20 field arsenical water samples from Santa Fe, Argentina, with values ranging from 30 to 308 μg l -1 total As. We found from 0% to 36% As(III) in the 20 field samples. The developed methodology constitutes an economic, simple and reliable way to evaluate inorganic arsenic distribution in underground waters or similar systems with negligible or no content of organoarsenicals.

  2. Speciation of methyl- and butyltin compounds and inorganic tin in oysters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.S.; Weber, J.H.

    1988-02-15

    Because of the toxicity of tributyltin originating from many antifouling marine paints, there is much concern about its effect on aquatic life and, particularly, on shellfish. This paper describes speciation of inorganic tin, methyltin compounds, and butyltin compounds from oyster samples. The authors validated the hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometric technique by demonstrating ca. 100% recovery from spiked samples and by the absence of any organotin decomposition products. Absolute detection limits (3sigma) are 1.1-2.5 ng for 0.1-g oyster samples (wet weight). This method is superior to published techniques because of careful validation, low limits of detection, and minimal sample manipulation.

  3. Performance and cycle life test results of a PEVE first-generation prismatic nickel/metal-hydride battery pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, B. G.; Duong, T. Q.; Bloom, I.

    A first-generation, prismatic, nickel/metal-hydride battery pack from Panasonic EV Energy Company Ltd. (PEVE) was characterized following the standard PNGV test procedures and then cycle life tested at 25 °C. The pack met, or exceeded, PNGV power and energy goals at the beginning of life. After more than 500,000 cycles, the data for capacity and discharge pulse power capability showed no measurable fade; similarly, discharge pulse resistance at 60% DOD also showed no measurable change. After the same pack was tested with two size factors, it still met or exceeded the PNGV goals.

  4. Determination of antimony in environment samples by gas phase chemiluminescence detection following flow injection hydride generation and cryotrapping.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yousheng; Sang, Jianchi; Ma, Hongbing; Tao, Guanhong

    2010-06-15

    A novel method for the determination of antimony in environmental samples was developed with gas phase chemiluminescence detection following flow injection hydride generation and cryotrapping. The stibine, generated from samples by borohydride reduction of antimony using flow injection technique, was separated by using a new gas-liquid separator, dried with an ice-salt cryogenic bath and concentrated in a glass U-tube immersed in liquid nitrogen. Re-vaporization of stibine based on its boiling point was achieved by allowing the tube to warm at room temperature. A gas phase chemiluminescence signal was produced during the ozonation of the hydride in a reflective chamber. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method was characterized by a wide linear calibration range from 1.0microgL(-1) to 10.0mgL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.18microgL(-1) (n=11). The relative standard deviation for 10.0microgL(-1) antimony was 3.56% (n=11) and the sampling rate was 15 samples h(-1). Blank signal was reduced by the purification of reagents and the interference from transition metal ions was eliminated by the addition of L-cysteine into samples. The method was applied to the determination of antimony in environmental samples with satisfactory results. PMID:20441930

  5. Tin Content Determination in Canned Fruits and Vegetables by Hydride Generation Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rončević, Sanda; Benutić, Anica; Nemet, Ivan; Gabelica, Buga

    2012-01-01

    Tin content in samples of canned fruits and vegetables was determined by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-OES), and it was compared with results obtained by standard method of flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Selected tin emission lines intensity was measured in prepared samples after addition of tartaric acid and followed by hydride generation with sodium borohydride solution. The most favorable line at 189.991 nm showed the best detection limit (1.9 μg L−1) and limit of quantification (6.4 μg kg−1). Good linearity and sensitivity were established from time resolved analysis and calibration tests. Analytical accuracy of 98–102% was obtained by recovery study of spiked samples. Method of standard addition was applied for tin determination in samples from fully protected tinplate. Tin presence at low-concentration range was successfully determined. It was shown that tenth times less concentrations of Sn were present in protected cans than in nonprotected or partially protected tinplate. PMID:22550488

  6. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium.

  7. Polar intermetallic compounds of the silicon and arsenic family elements and their ternary hydrides and fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Leon-Escamilla, E.A.

    1996-10-17

    An investigation has been made on the effects of hydrogen and fluoride in the solid state chemistry of alkaline-earth and divalent rare-earth metal pnictide (Pn) and tetrelide (Tt) phases A{sub 5}(Pn,Tt,){sub 3}Z{sub x}, where A = Ca, Sr, Ba, Sm, Eu, Yb; Pn = As, Sb, Bi; Tt = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb and Z = H, F. Several trivalent rare-earth-metal pnictides, RE{sub 5}Pn{sub 3} (RE = Y, La, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) and alkaline-earth-metal trielides, A{sub 5}Tr{sub 3}Z{sub x} (Tr = Ga, In, Tl) have been included in an effort to complete observed structural trends. Two main experimental techniques were followed throughout this work, (a) reactions in absence of hydrogen or under continuous high vacuum, and (b) reactions with binary metal hydrides, AH{sub x}, in closed containers. The results demonstrate that all the phases reported with the {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}-type structure in the A{sub 5}Pn{sub 3} systems are hydrogen-stabilized compounds. Reactions in absence of hydrogen lead to compounds with the Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type structure. The structure type {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} (= Ca{sub 5}SB{sub 3}F) was found to be characteristic of ternary systems and inaccurately associated with phases that form in the Y{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}-type. A new series of isomorphous Zintl compounds with the Ca{sub 16}Sb{sub 11}-type structure were prepared and studied as well. All the alkaline-earth-metal tetrelides, A{sub 5}Tt{sub 3}, that crystallize in the Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3}-type structure can be interstitially derivatized by hydrogen or fluoride. Binary and ternary compounds were characterized by Guinier powder patterns, single crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. In an effort to establish property-structure relationships, electrical resistivity and magnetic measurements were performed on selected systems, and the results were explained in terms of the Zintl concepts, aided by extended Hueckel band calculations.

  8. Proton affinities of maingroup-element hydrides and noble gases: trends across the periodic table, structural effects, and DFT validation.

    PubMed

    Swart, Marcel; Rösler, Ernst; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2006-10-01

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of the gas-phase basicity of archetypal neutral bases across the periodic system using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of the density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. First, we validate DFT as a reliable tool for computing proton affinities and related thermochemical quantities: BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P is shown to yield a mean absolute deviation of 2.0 kcal/mol for the proton affinity at 298 K with respect to experiment, and 1.2 kcal/mol with high-level ab initio benchmark data. The main purpose of this work is to provide the proton affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of the neutral bases constituted by all maingroup-element hydrides of groups 15-17 and the noble gases, that is, group 18, and periods 1-6. We have also studied the effect of step-wise methylation of the protophilic center of the second- and third-period bases. PMID:16823810

  9. tert-Butyl cation affinities of maingroup-element hydrides: effect of methyl substituents at the protophilic center.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Juan M; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2011-07-28

    We have conducted an extensive computational exploration of how the gas-phase tert-butyl cation affinities (t-BCA) of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic system are affected by stepwise replacement of all hydrogen atoms at the protophilic center with methyl substituents. This study was conducted using zeroth-order regular approximation relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at the BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P level. The trends are interpreted in terms of the steric effects of methyl substituents at the protophilic center of the anionic (Me(m)XH(n-1-m)(-)) and neutral bases (Me(m)XH(n-m)). Besides insight, this work also provides an intrinsically consistent set of values of the 298 K tert-butyl cation affinities of all (partially) methyl-substituted or unsubstituted bases constituted by maingroup-element hydrides of groups 14-16 in anionic cases (Me(m)XH(n-1-m)(-)) and groups 15-17 in neutral ones (Me(m)XH(n-m)) along periods 2-6. The effect of long-range dispersion (van der Waals) interactions was estimated through dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3) at the BP86-D3/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P level. PMID:21718012

  10. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma atomizer for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry-Performance evaluation for selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duben, Ondřej; Boušek, Jaroslav; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Atomization of selenium hydride in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized and its performance was compared to that of the externally heated quartz multiatomizer. Argon was found as the best DBD discharge gas employing a flow rate of 75 ml min- 1 Ar while the DBD power was optimized at 14 W. The detection limits reached 0.24 ng ml- 1 Se in the DBD and 0.15 ng ml- 1 Se in the multiatomizer. The tolerance of DBD to interferences is even better than with the multiatomizer.

  11. Hydrometallurgical separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from spent nickel-metal-hydride batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Luiz Eduardo Oliveira Carmo; Mansur, Marcelo Borges

    The separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from NiMH battery residues is evaluated in this paper. Analysis of the internal content of the NiMH batteries shows that nickel is the main metal present in the residue (around 50% in weight), as well as potassium (2.2-10.9%), cobalt (5.1-5.5%), rare earth elements (15.3-29.0%) and cadmium (2.8%). The presence of cadmium reveals that some Ni-Cd batteries are possibly labeled as NiMH ones. The leaching of nickel and cobalt from the NiMH battery powder with sulfuric acid is efficient; operating variables temperature and concentration of H 2O 2 has no significant effect for the conditions studied. A mixture of rare earth elements is separated by precipitation with NaOH. Finally, solvent extraction with D2EHPA (di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid) followed by Cyanex 272 (bis-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid) can separate cadmium, cobalt and nickel from the leach liquor. The effect of the main operating variables of both leaching and solvent extraction steps are discussed aiming to maximize metal separation for recycling purposes.

  12. Investigation of cobalt interference on lead hydride generation with tetrahydroborate(III) in the presence of hexacyanoferrate(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Lin, Li; Zhu, Lihui; Jiang, Mindi

    2009-03-01

    The interference of Co(II) on plumbane generation with tetrahydroborate in the presence of hexacyanoferrate(III) was studied with a new mechanism proposed to explain the interference. The products that were obtained, following reactions of a CoCl 2 solution with tetrahydroborate(III), which interfere with plumbane generation, were precipitated and investigated by inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and -mass spectrometry (ICP-OES and ICP-MS). Batch experiments of the potentiometer analysis and pH determination were performed to investigate a mechanism of Co(II) interference on plumbane generation, the role of hexacyanoferrate(III) on plumbane generation, and the function of the masking agent on Co(II) interference. The preferentially formed nanoscale catalytic and magnetic cobalt borides in the redox system cause a potential for a strong reducing condition and induces the precipitation of Fe(III) and Pb(II) in the solution, which is counter to plumbane generation. Potassium thiocyanate/oxalic acid/1,10-phenanthroline, as the combined masking agent and working with hexacyanoferrate(III), decreases the amount of borides in the precipitates and acts as a kind of buffer of the redox potential, which maintains the conditions for plumbane generation. This hydride generation method has been applied to the direct determination of trace Pb in cobalt oxide standard reference materials with a detection limit of 0.3 µg L - 1 .

  13. Catalytic generation of molecular hydrogen from hydrazine using lithium and beryllium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinnen, Saartje; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2010-08-01

    The catalytic effect of LiH, 2LiH, BeH 2 and 2BeH 2 on the hydrogen release from hydrazine is studied using quantum chemical calculations. Potential energy surfaces of the relevant reactions are constructed using MP2 and CCSD(T) methods and the aug-cc-pVnZ basis functions and extrapolated to the complete basis sets. No extra energy is needed for hydrogen release, and regeneration of the catalyst in the case of 2LiH. A small amount of energy is needed for the regeneration of 2BeH 2. The results suggest the capacities of small hydride molecules to act as efficient catalysts for H 2 production.

  14. Speciation of arsenic(III)/arsenic(V) and selenium(IV)/ selenium(VI) using coupled ion chromatography - hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple analytical methods have been developed to speciate inorganic arsenic and selenium in the ppb range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determinations of the redox states arsenite A...

  15. On-line Sulfur Isotope Determination by Hydride Generation coupled to MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callac, Nolwenn; Rouxel, Olivier; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2010-05-01

    In seafloor hydrothermal systems, Sulfur is an important element present in various forms such as sulfate, elemental sulfur or sulfide in hydrothermal fluids and pore waters. Sulfur, as either electron donor or acceptor, is one element that enables support for microbial life in the deep biosphere. Traditionally, measurements of 34S/32S ratios (δ34S) are performed using gas-source mass spectrometry (GS-MS) in which sulfur is introduced as gaseous SO2 or SF6 species. We recently developed an alternate technique for the accurate and precise determination of 34S/32S ratios in sulfur-bearing minerals using solution and laser ablation multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) (Craddock et al, 2008; Chemical Geology 253 p102-113). We examined and determined rigorous corrections for analytical difficulties such as instrumental mass bias, unresolved isobaric interferences, blanks, and laser ablation- and matrix-induced isotopic fractionation. In particular, the use of high resolution sector-field mass spectrometry has been shown to remove major isobaric interferences from O2+ while standard-sample bracketing allowed the correcting instrumental mass bias of unknown samples. Here, we evaluate a new method for the direct determination of S isotope in environmental samples using on-line generation of hydrogen sulfide coupled to MC-ICPMS. It is expected that the introduction of volatile S-species in the plasma torch will lower the minimum amounts of S required per analysis by more than 1 order of magnitude while permitting matrix-free isotope analysis. An important aim of this study was to determine optimal procedures to overcome analytical difficulties such as instrumental mass bias, unresolved isobaric interferences, blanks, and isotope fractionation induced during hydrogen sulfide generation. We initially applied this method to investigate the diversity of sulfur isotope fractionations during microbial sulfur-reducing or sulfate-reducing at

  16. The role of group 14 element hydrides in the activation of C-H bonds in cyclic olefins.

    PubMed

    Summerscales, Owen T; Caputo, Christine A; Knapp, Caroline E; Fettinger, James C; Power, Philip P

    2012-09-01

    Formally, triple-bonded dimetallynes ArEEAr [E = Ge (1), Sn (2); Ar = C(6)H(3)-2,6-(C(6)H(3)-2,6-(i)Pr(2))(2)] have been previously shown to activate aliphatic, allylic C-H bonds in cyclic olefins, cyclopentadiene (CpH), cyclopentene (c-C(5)H(8)) and 1,4-cyclohexadiene, with intriguing selectivity. In the case of the five-membered carbocycles, cyclopentadienyl species ArECp [E = Ge (3), Sn (4)] are formed. In this study, we examine the mechanisms for activation of CpH and c-C(5)H(8) using experimental methods and describe a new product found from the reaction between 1 and c-C(5)H(8), an asymmetrically substituted digermene ArGe(H)Ge(c-C(5)H(9))Ar (5), crystallized in 46% yield. This compound contains a hydrogenated cyclopentyl moiety and is found to be produced in a 3:2 ratio with 3, explaining the fate of the liberated H atoms following triple C-H activation. We show that when these C-H activation reactions are carried out in the presence of tert-butyl ethylene (excess), compounds {ArE(CH(2)CH(2)tBu)}(2) [E = Ge(8), Sn(9)] are obtained in addition to ArECp; in the case of CpH, the neohexyl complexes replace the production of H(2) gas, and for c-C(5)H(8) they displace cyclopentyl product 5 and account for all the hydrogen removed in the dehydroaromatization reactions. To confirm the source of 8 and 9, it was demonstrated that these molecules are formed cleanly between the reaction of (ArEH)(2) [E = Ge(6), Sn(7)] and tert-butyl ethylene, new examples of noncatalyzed hydro-germylation and -stannylation. Therefore, the presence of transient hydrides of the type 6 and 7 can be surmised to be reactive intermediates in the production of 3 and 4, along with H(2), from 1 and 2 and CpH (respectively), or the formation of 3 and 5 from 1. The reaction of 6 or 7 with CpH gave 3 or 4, respectively, with concomitant H(2) evolution, demonstrating the basic nature of these low-valent group 14 element hydrides and their key role in the 'cascade' of C-H activation steps

  17. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    DOEpatents

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  18. Hydride Generation for Headspace Solid-Phase Extraction with CdTe Quantum Dots Immobilized on Paper for Sensitive Visual Detection of Selenium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Xu, Kailai; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Lu; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2016-01-01

    A low-cost, simple, and highly selective analytical method was developed for sensitive visual detection of selenium in human urine both outdoors and at home, by coupling hydride generation with headspace solid-phase extraction using quantum dots (QDs) immobilized on paper. The visible fluorescence from the CdTe QDs immobilized on paper was quenched by H2Se from hydride generation reaction and headspace solid-phase extraction. The potential mechanism was investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT). Potential interferences from coexisting ions, particularly Ag(+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+), were eliminated. The selectivity was significantly increased because the selenium hydride was effectively separated from sample matrices by hydride generation. Moreover, due to the high sampling efficiency of hydride generation and headspace solid phase extraction, the sensitivity and the limit of detection (LOD) were significantly improved compared to conventional methods. A LOD of 0.1 μg L(-1) and a relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 7) of 2.4% at a concentration of 20 μg L(-1) were obtained when using a commercial spectrofluorometer as the detector. Furthermore, a visual assay based on the proposed method was developed for the detection of Se, 5 μg L(-1) of selenium in urine can be discriminated from the blank solution with the naked eye. The proposed method was validated by analysis of certified reference materials and human urine samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26631425

  19. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  20. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung, W.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  1. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung W.

    1995-01-01

    A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  2. Multireference study of spin-orbit coupling in the hydrides of the 6p-block elements using the model core potential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Tao; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Klobukowski, Mariusz

    2010-02-01

    Careful spin-orbit multireference studies were carried out for the late p-block elements Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, and Rn and their hydrides using the model core potentials developed in the present work. The model core potentials were designed to treat the scalar-relativistic and spin-orbit coupling effects at the Douglas-Kroll level. The variational stability of the spin-orbit coupling operator was discussed in terms of the relativistic kinematic operators and depicted graphically. A detailed analysis of the spin-orbit multireference dissociation curves of the 6p element hydrides as well as of their atomic spectra allowed to establish the accuracy of the model core potentials with respect to all-electron calculations to be within several mÅ for re, meV (ceV) for De at the correlation level of configuration interaction (multireference perturbation theory), 30 cm-1 for ωe, and about 350 cm-1 for the low-lying atomic and molecular term and level energies. These values are expected to be the maximum error limits for the model core potentials of all the np-block elements (n =2-6). Furthermore, a good agreement with experiment requires that many terms be coupled in the spin-orbit coupling calculations. A timing study of Tl and TlH computations indicates that the model core potentials lead to 20-fold (6-fold) speedup at the level of configuration interaction (multireference perturbation theory) calculations.

  3. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  4. Cyclopentadiene-mediated hydride transfer from rhodium complexes.

    PubMed

    Pitman, C L; Finster, O N L; Miller, A J M

    2016-07-12

    Attempts to generate a proposed rhodium hydride catalytic intermediate instead resulted in isolation of (Cp*H)Rh(bpy)Cl (1), a pentamethylcyclopentadiene complex, formed by C-H bond-forming reductive elimination from the fleeting rhodium hydride. The hydride transfer ability of diene 1 was explored through thermochemistry and hydride transfer reactions, including the reduction of NAD(+). PMID:26949917

  5. A study of mechanism of nickel interferences in hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination of arsenic and antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, Emur; İşlek, Yasemin; Kavas, Miray; Aksuner, Nur; Yayayürük, Onur; Çiftçi, Tülin Deniz; İlktaç, Raif

    2011-11-01

    Studies have been carried out to clarify the mechanism of nickel interferences in the hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination of arsenic and antimony. The most serious nickel interferences are observed when nickel/nickel boride nanoparticles are produced during NaBH 4 reduction. In this study these particles have been observed to have diameters of less than 40 nm and sorb As(III), As(V) and Sb(III) species rather than arsine and stibine generated as so far assumed. Bulk chemical composition and surface structure of these nanoparticles were studied and it was found that if the NaBH 4 reduction is carried out while passing nitrogen through the solution the black nanoparticles were composed of Ni 2B and, if the reduction is carried out under air the black nanoparticles were found to consist of Ni 3B or possibly a mixture of Ni(0) and Ni 2B. Surface analysis studies with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and X-ray diffraction analysis have shown that the particles have amorphous structure consisting of Ni(0), Ni 2B, Ni 3B and Ni(OH) 2. However, sorption studies have shown that Ni(0) and Ni(OH) 2 do not sorb the analyte ions and arsine and stibine significantly.

  6. On-line pre-reduction of Se(VI) by thiourea for selenium speciation by hydride generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianhua; Wang, Qiuquan; Ma, Yuning; Yang, Limin; Huang, Benli

    2006-07-01

    In this study, thiourea (TU) was novelly developed as a reduction reagent for on-line pre-reduction of selenium(VI) before conventional hydride generation (HG) by KBH 4/NaOH-HCl. After TU on-line pre-reduction, the HG efficiency of Se(VI) has been greatly improved and because even higher than that of the same amount of Se(IV) obtained in the conventional HG system. The possible pre-reduction mechanism is discussed. The detection limit (DL) of selenate reaches 10 pg mL - 1 when using on-line TU pre-reduction followed by HG atomic fluorescence detection. When TU pre-reduction followed by HG is used as an interface between ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography and atomic fluorescence spectrometry, selenocystine, selenomethionine, selenite and selenate can be measured simultaneously and quantitatively. The DLs of these are 0.06, 0.08, 0.05 and 0.04 ng mL - 1 , respectively, and the relative standard deviations of 9 duplicate runs for all the 4 species are less than 5%. Furthermore, it was successfully applied to Se speciation analysis of cultured garlic samples, and validated by determination of total selenium and selenium species in certified reference material NIST 1946.

  7. Development of an analytical method for antimony speciation in vegetables by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea; Neaman, Alexander; Quiroz, Waldo

    2012-01-01

    A new method for antimony speciation in terrestrial edible vegetables (spinach, onions, and carrots) was developed using HPLC with hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Mechanical agitation and ultrasound were tested as extraction techniques. Different extraction reagents were evaluated and optimal conditions were determined using experimental design methodology, where EDTA (10 mmol/L, pH 2.5) was selected because this chelate solution produced the highest extraction yield and exhibited the best compatibility with the mobile phase. The results demonstrated that EDTA prevents oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) and maintains the stability of antimony species during the entire analytical process. The LOD and precision (RSD values obtained) for Sb(V), Sb(III), and trimethyl Sb(V) were 0.08, 0.07, and 0.9 microg/L and 5.0, 5.2, and 4.7%, respectively, for a 100 microL sample volume. The application of this method to real samples allowed extraction of 50% of total antimony content from spinach, while antimony extracted from carrots and onion samples ranged between 50 and 60 and 54 and 70%, respectively. Only Sb(V) was detected in three roots (onion and spinach) that represented 60-70% of the total antimony in the extracts. PMID:22970588

  8. Determination of arsenic speciation in sulfidic waters by Ion Chromatography Hydride-Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (IC-HG-AFS).

    PubMed

    Keller, Nicole S; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    A method for the analysis of arsenic species in aqueous sulfide samples is presented. The method uses an ion chromatography system connected with a Hydride-Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometer (IC-HG-AFS). With this method inorganic As(III) and As(V) species in water samples can be analyzed, including arsenite (HnAs(III)O3(n-3)), thioarsenite (HnAs(III)S3(n-3)), arsenate (HnAs(V)O4(n-3)), monothioarsenate (HnAs(V)SO3(n-3)), dithioarsenate (HnAs(V)S2O2(n-3)), trithioarsenate (HnAs(V)S3O(n-3)) and tetrathioarsenate (HnAs(V)S4(n-3)). The peak identification and retention times were determined based on standard analysis of the various arsenic compounds. The analytical detection limit was ~1-3 µg L(-1) (LOD), depending on the quality of the baseline. This low detection limit makes this method also applicable to discriminate between waters meeting the drinking water standard of max. 10 µg L(-1) As, and waters that do not meet this standard. The new method was successfully applied for on-site determination of arsenic species in natural sulfidic waters, in which seven species were unambiguously identified. PMID:25059187

  9. Cloud point extraction for trace inorganic arsenic speciation analysis in water samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan; Wang, Mei; Zhong, Yizhou; Zhang, Zehua; Yang, Bingyi

    2015-09-01

    A new cloud point extraction technique was established and used for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in water samples combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). As(III) and As(V) were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and molybdate, respectively. The complexes were quantitatively extracted with the non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) by centrifugation. After addition of antifoam, the surfactant-rich phase containing As(III) was diluted with 5% HCl for HGAFS determination. For As(V) determination, 50% HCl was added to the surfactant-rich phase, and the mixture was placed in an ultrasonic bath at 70 °C for 30 min. As(V) was reduced to As(III) with thiourea-ascorbic acid solution, followed by HGAFS. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detection of 0.009 and 0.012 μg/L were obtained for As(III) and As(V), respectively. Concentration factors of 9.3 and 7.9, respectively, were obtained for a 50 mL sample. The precisions were 2.1% for As(III) and 2.3% for As(V). The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of trace As(III) and As(V) in water samples, with satisfactory recoveries.

  10. Determination of total selenium in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem G; Kolachi, Nida F; Afridi, Hassan I; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Shah, Faheem

    2014-01-01

    The total selenium (Se) was determined in herbal and pharmaceutical supplements used for liver diseases. The total Se contents were determined in different pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The accuracy of the techniques was evaluated by using certified reference material and the standard addition method. The recoveries of total Se were 99.4 and 99.0% for HGAAS and GFAAS, respectively. The precision of the techniques expressed as RSD were 2.34 and 4.54% for HGAAS and GFAAS measurements, respectively. The LOD values for HGAAS and GFAAS were 0.025 and 0.052 pglg, respectively. The concentrations of Se in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements were found in the range of 19.2-53.8 and 25.0-42.5 pg/g, respectively, corresponding to 35-76% and 45-76% of the total recommended dose of Se for adults. PMID:25632445

  11. Determination of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in cereals by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos Reyes, M. N.; Cervera, M. L.; Campos, R. C.; de la Guardia, M.

    2007-09-01

    A fast, sensitive and simple non-chromatographic analytical method was developed for the speciation analysis of toxic arsenic species in cereal samples, namely rice and wheat semolina. An ultrasound-assisted extraction of the toxic arsenic species was performed with 1 mol L - 1 H 3PO 4 and 0.1% (m/v) Triton XT-114. After extraction, As(III), As(V), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) concentrations were determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry using a series of proportional equations corresponding to four different experimental reduction conditions. The detection limits of the method were 1.3, 0.9, 1.5 and 0.6 ng g - 1 for As(III), As(V), DMA and MMA, respectively, expressed in terms of sample dry weight. Recoveries were always greater than 90%, and no species interconversion occurred. The speciation analysis of a rice flour reference material certified for total arsenic led to coherent results, which were also in agreement with other speciation studies made on the same certified reference material.

  12. Slurry sampling hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of extractable/soluble As in sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzwa, Jerzy; Dobrowolski, Ryszard

    1998-01-01

    A method combining the sampling of slurry pretreated by ultrasonic agitation and microwave assisted extraction with hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) for the determination of arsenic in sediment samples is proposed and evaluated. The pretreatment of slurried samples by ultrasonication enabled the extraction of (approximately) up to 85% of arsenic from the studied sediment samples. The further (slight) improvement of the efficiency of extraction was accomplished by the introduction of a short microwave-accelerated treatment. L-cysteine was used as an efficient pre-reduction reagent. The accuracy and precision of the slurry sampling HGAAS method were studied using the certified reference materials: Sediment GBW 30043 (NRCCRM, People's Republic of China), Sediment NIST 2704 (NIST, USA) and Marine Sediment BCSS-1 (NRCC, Canada). The relative standard deviation of the full (overall) analytical procedure was 8.5% and an absolute limit of detection of 2.75 ng was achieved. Factors which influence the reliability of this method are, for example, the choice of slurry liquid phase (extraction medium), sample homogeneity and, in particular, very effective mixing of slurries.

  13. UV-assisted Fenton digestion of rice for the determination of trace cadmium by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huimin; Ai, Xi; Xu, Kailai; Zheng, Chengbin; Hou, Xiandeng

    2016-02-21

    A new digestion method using UV-assisted Fe(0) Fenton reaction was developed for the determination of trace Cd in rice by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The proposed method integrated the advantages of simplicity, small dose of reagents, low cost and moderate reaction conditions, and was successfully utilized to analyze a Certified Reference Material (CRM) and real rice samples. A 1 mL mixture of the sample and reagents (0.0500 g rice powder, 0.2% (m/v) Fe(0), 0.75% (v/v) HNO3 and 18% (v/v) H2O2) was irradiated by UV-light for 50 min and then a clear solution was obtained by separating excess Fe(0) with a magnet prior to spectral analysis. The limit of detection (LOD) for Cd was found to be 0.02 mg kg(-1) and the relative standard deviation was better than 5.0% at a concentration level of 0.40 mg kg(-1). The recovery obtained by analyzing the CRM was 103% and spiked recoveries with 0.40 mg kg(-1) Cd in rice samples were 93% and 101%. The t-test proved that there is no significant difference between the certified value and the determined value of the CRM, and between the proposed method and microwave-assisted digestion coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MWD-ICP-MS) at 95% confidence level. PMID:26759832

  14. GaN growth using gallium hydride generated by hydrogenation of liquid gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayoshi, H.; Nishimura, S.; Takeuchi, T.; Hirai, M.; Terashima, K.

    2005-02-01

    The novel growth method of GaN using hydrogen radicals has been investigated. This paper is the first report of gallium hydrogenation reaction and deposition of GaN using hydrogenated gallium. We found that gallium (Ga) could be volatilized at low temperature by hydrogenation reaction with hydrogen radicals. In this reaction, Ga assumed to be volatilized as GaH 3. The GaN deposition was attempted by using gas phase reaction of NH 3 and GaH 3 generated by the reaction between liquid Ga and hydrogen radicals. Hydrogen radicals were generated by hot tungsten filament, which works as a catalyst during hydrogen cracking, whose temperature was 1600 °C. Surface morphology, deposition rate, and film structure were investigated. It was confirmed that GaN could be deposited by this method. The source materials of this method are safe and of low cost compared to the conventional methods.

  15. Determination of arsenic in geological materials by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrometry after hydride generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.; Welsch, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    Rock and soil samples are decomposed with HClO4-HNO3; after further treatment, arsine is generated and absorbed in a dilute silver nitrate solution. Aliquots of this solution are injected into a carbon rod atomizer. Down to 1 ppm As in samples can be determined and there are no significant interferences, even from chromium in soils. Good results were obtained for geochemical reference samples. ?? 1979.

  16. New considerations about the separation and quantification of antimony species by ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miravet, R; López-Sánchez, J F; Rubio, R

    2004-10-15

    A new method for the speciation of inorganic [Sb(III) and Sb(V)] and organic (Me3SbCl2) antimony species by using a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based anion-exchange HPLC column (Hamilton PRP-X100) coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) is presented. Several mobile phases were tested for the baseline separation of these three antimony species, investigating in detail experimental parameters such as concentration and pH. The best efficiency and resolution was achieved by using a gradient elution between diammonium tartrate 250 mmol l(-1) pH 5.5 (A) and KOH 20 mmol l(-1) pH 12 (B). The gradient programme used was 100% B for 1.5 min, decreasing to 0% B in 0.1 min and maintained the elution with 100% A for 5.5 min. Analysis time was less than 7 min. Equilibration of the column with the complexing mobile phase was found to be critical in order to avoid Sb(III) double peak formation. Dilution in diammonium tartrate medium was necessary in order to avoid Sb(III) oxidation at microg l(-1) concentration level. Detection limits of 0.06 microg l(-1) for Sb(V), 0.09 microg l(-1) for Me3SbCl2 and 0.04 microg l(-1) for Sb(III) as well as repeatability and reproducibility better than 5% R.S.D. (n = 10) and 9% R.S.D. (n = 30) (for 1 and 5 microg l(-1) of Sb(V) and Sb(III) and 5 and 10 microg l(-1) of Me3SbCl2) were obtained. Accuracy and recovery studies were carried out by analysing one river freshwater sample and two water certified reference materials. The proposed methodology can be considered reliable and straightforward for antimony speciation in fresh water samples. PMID:15527128

  17. Methyl cation affinities of neutral and anionic maingroup-element hydrides: trends across the periodic table and correlation with proton affinities.

    PubMed

    Mulder, R Joshua; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2010-07-22

    We have computed the methyl cation affinities in the gas phase of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic table using ZORA-relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. The main purpose of this work is to provide the methyl cation affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of all anionic (XH(n-1)(-)) and neutral bases (XH(n)) constituted by maingroup-element hydrides of groups 14-17 and the noble gases (i.e., group 18) along the periods 2-6. The cation affinity of the bases decreases from H(+) to CH(3)(+). To understand this trend, we have carried out quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). Quantitative correlations are established between the MCA and PA values. PMID:20575582

  18. Combined passive bearing element/generator motor

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2000-01-01

    An electric machine includes a cylindrical rotor made up of an array of permanent magnets that provide a N-pole magnetic field of even order (where N=4, 6, 8, etc.). This array of permanent magnets has bars of identical permanent magnets made of dipole elements where the bars are assembled in a circle. A stator inserted down the axis of the dipole field is made of two sets of windings that are electrically orthogonal to each other, where one set of windings provides stabilization of the stator and the other set of windings couples to the array of permanent magnets and acts as the windings of a generator/motor. The rotor and the stator are horizontally disposed, and the rotor is on the outside of said stator. The electric machine may also include two rings of ferromagnetic material. One of these rings would be located at each end of the rotor. Two levitator pole assemblies are attached to a support member that is external to the electric machine. These levitator pole assemblies interact attractively with the rings of ferromagnetic material to produce a levitating force upon the rotor.

  19. Arsenic speciation in environmental samples by hydride generation and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anawar, Hossain Md

    2012-01-15

    For the past few years many studies have been performed to determine arsenic (As) speciation in drinking water, food chain and other environmental samples due to its well-recognized carcinogenic and toxic effects relating to its chemical forms and oxidation states. This review provides an overview of analytical methods, preconcentration and separation techniques, developed up to now, using HGAAS and ETAAS for the determination of inorganic As and organoarsenic species in environmental samples. Specific advantages, disadvantages, selectivity, sensitivity, efficiency, rapidity, detection limit (DL), and some aspects of recent improvements and modifications for different analytical and separation techniques, that can define their application for a particular sample analysis, are highlighted. HG-AAS has high sensitivity, selectivity and low DL using suitable separation techniques; and it is a more suitable, affordable and much less expensive technique than other detectors. The concentrations of HCl and NaBH(4) have a critical effect on the HG response of As species. Use of l-cysteine as pre-reductant is advantageous over KI to obtain the same signal response for different As species under the same, optimum and mild acid concentration, and to reduce the interference of transition metals on the arsine generation. Use of different pretreatment, digestion, separation techniques and surfactants can determine As species with DL from ngL(-1) to μgL(-1). Out of all the chromatographic techniques coupled with HGAAS/ETAAS, ion-pair reversed-phase chromatography (IP-RP) is the most popular due to its higher separation efficiency, resolution selectivity, simplicity, and ability to separate up to seven As species for both non-ionic and ionic compounds in a signal run using the same column and short time. However, a combination of anion- and cation-exchange chromatography seems the most promising for complete resolution up to eight As species. The ETAAS method using different

  20. Determination of As in tobacco by using electrochemical hydride generation at a Nafion® solid polymer electrolyte cell hyphenated with atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qinghua; Gan, Wuer; Deng, Yun; Sun, Huihui

    2011-11-01

    In the present work, a novel solid polymer electrolyte hydride generation (SPE-HG) cell was developed. The home-made SPE-HG cell, mainly composed of three components (Nafion®117 membrane for separating and H + exchanging, a soft graphite felt cathode and a Ti mesh modified by Ir anode), was employed for detecting As by coupling to atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The H + generated by electrolysis of pure water in anode chamber transferred to cathode chamber through SPE, and immediately reacted with As 3 + to generate AsH 3. The relative mechanisms and operation conditions for hydride generation of As were investigated in detail. The developed cell employed water as an alternative of acid anolyte, with virtues of low-cost, more than 6 months lifetime and environment friendly compared with the conventional cell. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of determination of As 3 + for sample blank solution was 0.12 μg L - 1 , the RSD was 2.9% for 10 consecutive measurements of 5 μg L - 1 As 3 + standard solution. The accuracy of the method was verified by the determination of As in the reference Tea (GBW07605) and the developed method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of As in tobacco samples with recovery from 97% to 103%.

  1. Program Helps Generate Boundary-Element Mathematical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. K.

    1995-01-01

    Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method (COM-GEN-BEM) computer program significantly reduces time and effort needed to construct boundary-element mathematical models of continuous-fiber composite materials at micro-mechanical (constituent) scale. Generates boundary-element models compatible with BEST-CMS boundary-element code for anlaysis of micromechanics of composite material. Written in PATRAN Command Language (PCL).

  2. SYSTEM OPTIMIZATION FOR THE AUTOMATIC SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF ARSENIC, SELENIUM, AND ANTIMONY, USING HYDRIDE GENERATION INTRODUCTION TO AN INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyen, Grace S.; Browner, Richard F.; Long, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    A fixed-size simplex has been used to determine the optimum conditions for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, selenium, and antimony by hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry. The variables selected for the simplex were carrier gas flow rate, rf power, viewing height, and reagent conditions. The detection limit for selenium was comparable to the preoptimized case, but there were twofold and fourfold improvements in the detection limits for arsenic and antimony, respectively. Precision of the technique was assessed with the use of artificially prepared water samples.

  3. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  4. G2(+)M study on N-alkylamino cation affinities of neutral main-group element hydrides: trends across the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Geng, Song; Wu, Ding-Lu; Yang, Jing; Wei, Xi-Guang; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Ren, Yi; Lau, Kai-Chung

    2014-05-01

    We have made an extensive theoretical exploration of gas-phase N-alkylamino cation affinities (NAAMCA), including amino cation affinities (AMCA) and N-dimethylamino cation affinities (NDMAMCA), of neutral main-group element hydrides of groups 15-17 and periods 2-4 in the periodic table by using the G2(+)M method. Some similarities and differences are found between NAAMCA and the corresponding alkyl cation affinities (ACA) of H(n)X. Our calculations show that the AMCA and NDMAMCA are systematically lower than the corresponding proton affinities (PA) for H(n)X. In general, there is no linear correlation between NAAMCA and PA of H(n)X. Instead, the correlations exist only within the central elements X in period 2, or periods 3-4, which is significantly different from the reasonable correlations between ACA and PA for all H(n)X. NAAMCA (H(n)X) are weaker than NAAMCA (H(n-1)X(-)) by more than 700 kJ/mol and generally stronger than ACA (H(n)X), with three exceptions: H2ONR2(+)(R = H, Me) and HFNH2(+). These new findings can be rationalized by the negative hyperconjugation and Pauli repulsion. PMID:24738576

  5. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen. PMID:27483171

  6. Hydride compressor

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  7. A General-Purpose Mesh Generator for Finite Element Codes.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1984-02-28

    Version 00 INGEN is a general-purpose mesh generator for use in conjunction with two and three dimensional finite element programs. The basic components of INGEN are surface and three-dimensional region generators that use linear-blending interpolation formulae. These generators are based on an i, j, k index scheme, which is used to number nodal points, construct elements, and develop displacement and traction boundary conditions.

  8. Selective determination of four arsenic species in rice and water samples by modified graphite electrode-based electrolytic hydride generation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-An; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Lin; Chi, Miao-Bin; Hu, Hui-Hui; Zhang, Wang-Bing

    2016-10-01

    This work describes a novel non-chromatographic approach for the accurate and selective determining As species by modified graphite electrode-based electrolytic hydride generation (EHG) for sample introduction coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) detection. Two kinds of sulfydryl-containing modifiers, l-cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH), are used to modify cathode. The EHG performance of As has been changed greatly at the modified cathode, which has never been reported. Arsenite [As(III)] on the GSH modified graphite electrode (GSH/GE)-based EHG can be selectively and quantitatively converted to AsH3 at applied current of 0.4A. As(III) and arsenate [As(V)] on the Cys modified graphite electrode (Cys/GE) EHG can be selectively and efficiently converted to arsine at applied current of 0.6A, whereas monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) do not form any or only less volatile hydrides under this condition. By changing the analytical conditions, we also have achieved the analysis of total As (tAs) and DMA. Under the optimal condition, the detection limits (3s) of As(III), iAs and tAs in aqueous solutions are 0.25μgL(-1), 0.22μgL(-1) and 0.10μgL(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the method is verified through the analysis of standard reference materials (SRM 1568a). PMID:27474289

  9. The effect of stress state on zirconium hydride reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim

    Prior to storage in a dry-cask facility, spent nuclear fuel must undergo a vacuum drying cycle during which the spent fuel rods are heated up to elevated temperatures of ≤ 400°C to remove moisture the canisters within the cask. As temperature increases during heating, some of the hydride particles within the cladding dissolve while the internal gas pressure in fuel rods increases generating multi-axial hoop and axial stresses in the closed-end thin-walled cladding tubes. As cool-down starts, the hydrogen in solid solution precipitates as hydride platelets, and if the multiaxial stresses are sufficiently large, the precipitating hydrides reorient from their initial circumferential orientation to radial orientation. Radial hydrides can severely embrittle the spent nuclear fuel cladding at low temperature in response to hoop stress loading. Because the cladding can experience a range of stress states during the thermo-mechanical treatment induced during vacuum drying, this study has investigated the effect of stress state on the process of hydride reorientation during controlled thermo-mechanical treatments utilizing the combination of in situ X-ray diffraction and novel mechanical testing analyzed by the combination of metallography and finite element analysis. The study used cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet containing approx. 180 wt. ppm hydrogen as its material basis. The failure behavior of this material containing radial hydrides was also studied over a range of temperatures. Finally, samples from reactor-irradiated cladding tubes were examined by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. To reveal the stress state effect on hydride reorientation, the critical threshold stress to reorient hydrides was determined by designing novel mechanical test samples which produce a range of stress states from uniaxial to "near-equibiaxial" tension when a load is applied. The threshold stress was determined after thermo-mechanical treatments by

  10. Mixed Element Type Unstructured Grid Generation for Viscous Flow Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcum, David L.; Gaither, J. Adam

    2000-01-01

    A procedure is presented for efficient generation of high-quality unstructured grids suitable for CFD simulation of high Reynolds number viscous flow fields. Layers of anisotropic elements are generated by advancing along prescribed normals from solid boundaries. The points are generated such that either pentahedral or tetrahedral elements with an implied connectivity can be be directly recovered. As points are generated they are temporarily attached to a volume triangulation of the boundary points. This triangulation allows efficient local search algorithms to be used when checking merging layers, The existing advancing-front/local-reconnection procedure is used to generate isotropic elements outside of the anisotropic region. Results are presented for a variety of applications. The results demonstrate that high-quality anisotropic unstructured grids can be efficiently and consistently generated for complex configurations.

  11. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    remain constant in the tensile direction during the second precipitation regime. This could be due to the fact that the face of reoriented hydride platelet is in compression once these platelets have grown to a sufficient size. The second goal of this study was to perform a spatially resolved study of the effect of a stress concentration such as a notch or a crack on hydride reorientation. Using SEM and image analysis, it was found that a sharp crack induces a different hydride microstructure than a blunt notch. In the case of sharp crack, hydrides are more localized and align more with the defect than for blunt notches. The hydride connectivity also increases close to a stress concentration which will assist in crack propagation during DHC. Using TEM, the microstructure of hydrides grown near crack tips were observed to be similar to that of circumferential hydrides grown in the bulk. The orientation relationship studied with SEM and micro-X-ray diffraction was found to be in most cases δ(111)// α(0002) for hydrides grown both near and far from stress concentrations. Using the same micro-X-ray diffraction technique local hydride and matrix elastic strains were measured and observed to vary significantly from grain to grain. It was however observed that hydrides grown close to the stress concentration are in tension in the face of the platelet, similar to reoriented hydrides, while those grown far from the stress concentration are in tension, similar to circumferential hydrides. The orders of magnitude of the measured strains in the hydrides and the zirconium matrix compared well to those predicted by finite element models. This study shows that it is possible to study hydride dissolution and precipitation in-situ using time-dependent techniques. It was found that the precipitation temperature is lowered by hydride reorientation. The evolution of hydride strains during precipitation was found to be different for unstressed, stressed and reoriented hydrides. The

  12. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM AND ARSENIC COMPOUNDS BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW AND ON-LINE REDUCTION OF SELENIUM(VI) TO SELENIUM(IV) WITH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with hydride generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine four arsenicals and two selenium species. Selenate (SeVI) was reduced on-line to selenite (SeIV') by mixing the CE effluent with concentrated HCl. A microporo...

  13. Cheaper Hydride-Forming Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Blue, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Hydride-forming cathodes for electrochemical experiments made of materials or combinations of materials cheaper and more abundant than pure palladium, according to proposal. Concept prompted by needs of experimenters in now-discredited concept of electrochemical nuclear fusion, cathodes useful in other electrochemical applications involving generation or storage of hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium.

  14. Development of a non-chromatographic method for the speciation analysis of inorganic antimony in mushroom samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Ferreira, Hadla; Costa Ferreira, Sergio Luis; Cervera, M. Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2009-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the direct determination of toxic species of antimony in mushroom samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG AFS). The determination of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was based on the efficiency of hydride generation employing NaBH 4, with and without a previous KI reduction, using proportional equations corresponding to the two different measurement conditions. The extraction efficiency of total antimony and the stability of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in different extraction media (nitric, sulfuric, hydrochloric, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol) were evaluated. Results demonstrated that, based on the extraction yield and the stability of extracts, 0.5 mol L - 1 H 2SO 4 proved to be the best extracting solution for the speciation analysis of antimony in mushroom samples. The limits of detection of the developed methodology were 0.6 and 1.1 ng g - 1 for Sb(III) and Sb(V), respectively. The relative standard derivation was 3.8% (14.7 ng g - 1 ) for Sb(V) and 5.1% (4.6 ng g - 1 ) for Sb(III). The recovery values obtained for Sb(III) and Sb(V) varied from 94 to 106% and from 98 to 105%, respectively. The method has been applied to determine Sb(III), Sb(V) and total Sb in five different mushroom samples; the Sb(III) content varied from 4.6 to 11.4 ng g - 1 and Sb(V) from 14.7 to 21.2 ng g - 1 . The accuracy of the method was confirmed by the analysis of a certified reference material of tomato leaves.

  15. A self-induced stress model for simulating hydride formation at flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, D.R.; Sauve, R.G.

    1996-12-01

    Formation of hydride at stress concentrations occurs in some materials as part of a stable cracking mechanism called delayed hydride cracking (DHC). As hydrogen combines with matrix material to become hydride, transformation strain is accommodated by local redistribution of stress. Since stress gradients drive hydrogen diffusion, this self-induced stress alters the conditions for subsequent hydride growth, and conditions required to fracture the hydrided material. A numerical model, using the finite element method, has been developed which couples the effect of stress driven hydrogen diffusion, and stress due to applied loads and hydride formation. Strong nonlinearities in this problem are solved effectively by a unique adaptation of the dynamic relaxation method. The simulation provides the volume fraction distribution of hydride, and the corresponding stress distribution. Application of the model to hydride formation at sharp and blunt flaws predicts hydride distribution shapes that are in good agreement with hydrides observed in experiments.

  16. The development of metal hydrides using as concentrating solar thermal storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xuanhui; Li, Yang; Li, Ping; Wan, Qi; Zhai, Fuqiang

    2015-12-01

    Metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique has great promising future prospects in solar power generation, industrial waste heat utilization and peak load regulating of power system. This article introduces basic principle of metal hydrides for thermal storage, and summarizes developments in advanced metal hydrides high-temperature thermal storage materials, numerical simulation and thermodynamic calculation in thermal storage systems, and metal hydrides thermal storage prototypes. Finally, the future metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique is been looked ahead.

  17. A mesh generator for tetrahedral elements using Delaunay triangulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, J.S.; Fitzsimons, C.J. )

    1993-03-01

    A tetrahedral mesh generator has been developed. The generator is based on the Delaunay triangulation which is implemented by employing the insertion polyhedron algorithm. In this paper some new methods to deal with the problems associated with the three-dimensional Delaunay triangulation and the insertion polyhedron algorithm are presented: degeneracy, the crossing situation, identification of the internal elements and internal point generation. The generator works both for convex and non-convex domains, including those with high aspect-ratio subdomains. Some examples are given in this paper to illustrate the capability of the generator.

  18. Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.

    1998-08-01

    A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

  19. Modelling of hydride cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.J.; Metzger, D.R.; Glinka, G.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Zirconium alloys may be susceptible to hydride formation under certain service conditions, due to hydrogen diffusion and precipitation in the presence of stress concentrations and temperature gradients. The inhomogeneous brittle hydride platelets that form are modeled as plane defects of zero thickness, with fracture toughness less than that of the matrix. A fracture criterion based on sufficient energy and stress is proposed for either delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under constant loading conditions, or hydride cracking at rising loads, such as in a fracture toughness test. The fracture criterion is validated against available experimental data concerning initiation of hydride fracture in smooth specimens, and DHC in cracked specimens under various loading and temperature conditions.

  20. Oxidation state specific generation of arsines from methylated arsenicals based on L-cysteine treatment in buffered media for speciation analysis by hydride generation-automated cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušek, Tomáš; Hernández-Zavala, Araceli; Svoboda, Milan; Langrová, Lenka; Adair, Blakely M.; Drobná, Zuzana; Thomas, David J.; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2008-03-01

    An automated system for hydride generation-cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer is described. Arsines are preconcentrated and separated in a Chromosorb filled U-tube. An automated cryotrapping unit, employing nitrogen gas formed upon heating in the detection phase for the displacement of the cooling liquid nitrogen, has been developed. The conditions for separation of arsines in a Chromosorb filled U-tube have been optimized. A complete separation of signals from arsine, methylarsine, dimethylarsine, and trimethylarsine has been achieved within a 60 s reading window. The limits of detection for methylated arsenicals tested were 4 ng l - 1 . Selective hydride generation is applied for the oxidation state specific speciation analysis of inorganic and methylated arsenicals. The arsines are generated either exclusively from trivalent or from both tri- and pentavalent inorganic and methylated arsenicals depending on the presence of L-cysteine as a prereductant and/or reaction modifier. A TRIS buffer reaction medium is proposed to overcome narrow optimum concentration range observed for the L-cysteine modified reaction in HCl medium. The system provides uniform peak area sensitivity for all As species. Consequently, the calibration with a single form of As is possible. This method permits a high-throughput speciation analysis of metabolites of inorganic arsenic in relatively complex biological matrices such as cell culture systems without sample pretreatment, thus preserving the distribution of tri- and pentavalent species.

  1. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  2. Hyphenating multisyringe flow injection lab-on-valve analysis with atomic fluorescence spectrometry for on-line bead injection preconcentration and determination of trace levels of hydride-forming elements in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2006-12-15

    In this work the third generation of flow injection analysis, that is, the so-called micro-lab-on-valve (microLOV) approach, is proposed for the first time for the separation, preconcentration, and monitoring of metalloids as hyphenated with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). This was made feasible by interfacing the micromachined LOV-module with AFS by a multisyringe flowing stream network for on-line postcolumn derivatization of the eluate aimed at generation of hydride species. The potential of this new hyphenated technique for environmental assays was ascertained via determination of ultratrace level concentrations of total inorganic arsenic in freshwater. Employing quantitative preoxidation of As(III) to As(V) in the samples by means of permanganate, the method involves preconcentration of arsenate at pH 10 on a renewable anion exchanger, namely, Q-Sepharose, packed in a LOV microcolumn. The analyte species is afterward stripped out and concurrently prereduced by a 300 microL eluent plug containing 6 mol L(-)1 HCl and 10% KI. The eluate is downstream merged with a metered volume of sodium tetrahydroborate (0.3% w/v) for generation of arsine, which is subsequently quantified by AFS. The flow system facilitates on-column reduction of the retained arsenic with no need for application of programmable stopped flow. Yet, the high concentration of reductant and extreme pH conditions for elution hinder the sorbent to be reused due to gradual deactivation of the functional moieties, so that maximum benefit can be taken from the application of the bead renewable strategy. The proposed procedure is characterized by a high tolerance to metal species and interfering hydride-forming elements. In fact, ratios of Se(IV) to As < or = 5000 and Sb(V) to As < or = 500 are tolerated at the 10% interference level. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a detection limit (3sigma) of 0.02 ng mL(-1) As, a dynamic linear range of 0.05-2.0 ng mL(-1) As (by tailoring the AFS

  3. An evaluation of the bioaccessibility of arsenic in corn and rice samples based on cloud point extraction and hydride generation coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Castor, José Martín Rosas; Portugal, Lindomar; Ferrer, Laura; Hinojosa-Reyes, Laura; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge Luis; Hernández-Ramírez, Aracely; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-08-01

    A simple, inexpensive and rapid method was proposed for the determination of bioaccessible arsenic in corn and rice samples using an in vitro bioaccessibility assay. The method was based on the preconcentration of arsenic by cloud point extraction (CPE) using o,o-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) complex, which was generated from an in vitro extract using polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114) as a surfactant prior to its detection by atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a hydride generation system (HG-AFS). The CPE method was optimized by a multivariate approach (two-level full factorial and Doehlert designs). A photo-oxidation step of the organic species prior to HG-AFS detection was included for the accurate quantification of the total As. The limit of detection was 1.34μgkg(-1) and 1.90μgkg(-1) for rice and corn samples, respectively. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analyzing certified reference material ERM BC-211 (rice powder). The corn and rice samples that were analyzed showed a high bioaccessible arsenic content (72-88% and 54-96%, respectively), indicating a potential human health risk. PMID:26988526

  4. Rapid mesh generation for finite element analysis of investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lober, R.R.; Bohnhoff, W.J.; Meyers, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    FASTCAST is a Sandia National Laboratories program to produce investment cast prototypical hardware faster by integrating experimental and computational technologies into the casting process. FASTCAST uses the finite element method to characterize the metal flow and solidification processes to reduce uncertainty in the mold design. For the casting process to benefit from finite element analysis, analysis results must be available in a very short time frame. By focusing on the bottleneck of finite element model creation, automated mesh generation can drastically reduce the time span between geometry definition (design) and accurate analysis results. The increased availability of analysis results will diminish the need for trial and error approaches to acquiring production worthy mold and gating systems for investment casting. The CUBIT meshing tool kit is being developed to address the need for rapid mesh generation. CUBIT is being designed to effectively automate the generation of quadrilateral and hexahedral elements. It is a solid-modeler based, two- and three-dimensional preprocessor that prepares solid models for finite element analysis. CUBIT contains several meshing algorithms including two- and three-dimensional mapping, two- and three-dimensional paving (patented), and a general two and one-half dimensional sweeper based upon the plastering algorithm. This paper describes progress in the development of the CUBIT meshing toolkit.

  5. Rapid mesh generation for finite element analysis of investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lober, R.R.; Bohnhoff, W.J.; Meyers, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    FASTCAST is a Sandia National Laboratories program to produce investment cast prototypical hardware faster by integrating experimental and computational technologies into the casting process. FASTCAST uses the finite element method to characterize the metal flow and solidification processes to reduce uncertainty in the mold design. For the casting process to benefit from finite element analysis, analysis results must be available in a very short time frame. By focusing on the bottleneck of finite element model creation, automated mesh generation can drastically reduce the time span between geometry definition (design) and accurate analysis results. The increased availability of analysis results will diminish the need for trial and error approaches to acquiring production worthy mold and gating systems for investment casting. The CUBIT meshing tool kit is being developed to address the need for rapid mesh generation. CUBIT is being designed to effectively automate the generation of quadrilateral and hexahedral elements. It is a solid-modeler based, two- and three-dimensional preprocessor that prepares solid models for finite element analysis. CUBIT contains several meshing algorithms including two- and three-dimensional mapping, two- and three-dimensional paving (patented), and a general two and one-half dimensional sweeper based upon the plastering algorithm. This paper describes progress in the development of the CUBIT meshing toolkit.

  6. Ultrasound- and microwave-assisted extractions followed by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for lead determination in geological samples.

    PubMed

    Welna, Maja; Borkowska-Burnecka, Jolanta; Popko, Malgorzata

    2015-11-01

    Followed the current idea of simplified sample pretratmet before analysis we evaluated the procedure for the determination of Pb in calcium-rich materials such as dolomites after ultrasound- or microwave- assisted extraction with diluted acids using hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-OES). Corresponding Pb hydride was generated in the reaction of an acidified sample solution with NaBH4 after pre-oxidation of Pb(II) to Pb(IV) by K3[Fe(CN)6]. Several chemical (acidic media: HCl, HNO3 or CH3COOH, concentration of the reductant as well as type and concentration of oxidazing agents) and physical (reagents flow rates, reaction coil length) parameters affecting the efficiency of plumbane formation were optimized in order to improve the detectability of Pb using HG-ICP-OES. Limitation of the method derived from the matrix effects was pointed out. Employing Pb separation by HG technique allows the significant reduction of interferences caused by sample matrix constituents (mainly Ca and Mg), nevertheless they could not be overcame at all, hence calibration based on the standard addition method was recommended for Pb quantification in dolomites. Under the selected conditions, i.e. 0.3 mol L(-1) HCl, HNO3 or CH3COOH, 1.5% NaBH4 and 3.0% K3[Fe(CN)6] the limits of detection (LODs) between 2.3-5.6 μg L(-1) (3.4-6.8 μg L(-1) considering matrix effects) and the precision below 5% were achieved. The accuracy of the procedure was verified by analysis of certified reference materials (NCS DC70308 (Carbonate Rock) and NIST 14000 (Bone Ash)) and recovery test with satisfactory results of Pb recoveries ranging between 94-108% (CRMs analysis) and 92-114% (standard addition method). The applicability of the proposed method was demonstrated by the determination of Pb in dolomites used by different fertiliser factories. PMID:26452913

  7. High performance Zr-based metal hydride alloys for nickel metal hydride batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Ovshinsky, S.R.; Huang, B.; Chao, B.S.; Li, Y.

    2000-07-01

    Based upon Ovonic's multi-element, atomic engineering approach, two families of alloys are being used in commercial Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries, i.e., the mischmetal (Mm) based AB{sub 5} and Zr based AB{sub 2} alloys. While Mm based alloys are faster to activate, they are limited by a discharge capacity of only 320--340 mAh/g. The Zr based alloy, although slightly slower to activate, provides a much higher discharge capacity. In this paper, the authors first discuss the use of Ovonic's multi-element approach to generate a spectrum of disordered local environments. They then present experimental data to illustrate that through these atomically engineered local environments, they are able to control the hydrogen site occupancy, discharge capacity, kinetics, and surface states. The Zr based alloy with a specific discharge capacity of 465 mAh/g and excellent rate capability has been demonstrated.

  8. Hydride precipitation in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, H.; Kowia, M.

    1984-10-01

    The crystal structure and morphology of hydride (deuteride) precipitates are investigated on ..cap alpha..-titanium specimens containing 1-3 at.% H or D by transmission electron microscopy. The hydride is found to have a face-centered tetragonal structure (c/a = 1.09) with an ordered arrangement of hydrogen, being isomorphous to ..gamma..-zirconium hydride. Two types of precipitation mode are observed with the habit planes (0110) and near (0225).

  9. Unconstrained paving and plastering method for generating finite element meshes

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L.; Owen, Steven J.; Blacker, Teddy D.; Kerr, Robert

    2010-03-02

    Computer software for and a method of generating a conformal all quadrilateral or hexahedral mesh comprising selecting an object with unmeshed boundaries and performing the following while unmeshed voids are larger than twice a desired element size and unrecognizable as either a midpoint subdividable or pave-and-sweepable polyhedra: selecting a front to advance; based on sizes of fronts and angles with adjacent fronts, determining which adjacent fronts should be advanced with the selected front; advancing the fronts; detecting proximities with other nearby fronts; resolving any found proximities; forming quadrilaterals or unconstrained columns of hexahedra where two layers cross; and establishing hexahedral elements where three layers cross.

  10. On-line pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals by thioglycolic acid for speciation analysis by selective hydride generation cryotrapping atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš

    2008-06-01

    An improvement of current method of selective hydride generation based on pre-reduction for differentiation of tri- and pentavalent arsenicals is described, applied for the oxidation state specific speciation analysis of inorganic, mono-, di- and trimethylated arsenicals with minimum sample pretreatment using atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The preconcentration and separation of arsine, methylarsine, dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine are then carried out by means of cryotrapping. The presented study shows that 2% (m/v) L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate ( L-cys) currently used for off-line pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals can be substituted with 1% (m/v) thioglycolic acid (TGA). Much faster pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals at 25 °C with equal sensitivities as in the case of L-cys has been achieved with TGA. A setup for on-line pre-reduction by TGA has been optimized, with the application of segmented flow analysis for suppression of axial dispersion in the pre-reduction coil. Standard calibrations measured with or without on-line pre-reduction indicate uniform and equal sensitivities for all As forms. The possibility of standardization by water standards of single species (e.g. iAs(III)) for quantification of all other As forms in urine is demonstrated in the recovery study. Limits of detection were 100 ng l - 1 for iAs(III), 135 ng l - 1 for iAs(V) and 30 to 50 ng l - 1 for methylated arsenicals.

  11. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in fruit juices by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lai, Guoxin; Chen, Guoying; Chen, Tuanwei

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive method was developed to speciate and quantify As(III) and As(V) in fruit juices. At pH 3.0, As(III) and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) formed a complex, which was extracted into CCl4 by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and subsequently quantified by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). After As(V) was reduced by thiosulphate at pH 1.7-1.8, total inorganic arsenic (iAs) was determined following the same protocol and As(V) was calculated from the difference. Interference from methylarsonic acid (MMA) was managed at <10% by controlling the pH of the reduction reaction. This procedure achieved 1.2 μg L(-1) limit of detection (3σ) and 92-102% recovery at 10 μg L(-1), and is applicable to most fruit juices except certain pear juice that may contain considerable MMA. PMID:26212955

  12. Masking Agents Evaluation for Lead Determination by Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Technique: Effect of KI, L-Cysteine, and 1,10-Phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Blanca G; Leal, Luz O; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Hydride generation (HG) of lead technique presents interferences from foreign ions of complex matrix samples. In order to minimize these interferences, the effect of masking agents such as KI, L-cysteine, and 1,10-phenanthroline was studied in the absence and in the presence of selected interfering species (As, Cr, Cu, and Fe). Different modes of addition of masking agents were accomplished, that is, to either sample or KBH4 reducing solution. The lead determinations were performed using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system coupled to HG and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The linearity of calibration curves (1-10 μg Pb L(-1)) was not affected by the addition of the masking agents. The use of KI in the reducing solution diminished interferences from concentrations of As and Cu, while 1,10-phenanthroline showed a positive effect on the interference by As. Moreover, Cr and Cu appeared to be the most serious interfering ions for plumbane (PbH4), because they drastically reduced the analytical signal of lead. Fe did not present any interference under the employed experimental conditions, even at high levels. The accuracy was established through the analysis of certified reference material (i.e., BCR-610, groundwater) using KI as masking agent. The detection limit reached by FIA-HG-AFS proposed methodology was 0.03 μg Pb L(-1). PMID:27148365

  13. Determination of arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, and tetramethylarsonium cations in seafoods and human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography - thermochemical hydride generation - atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Momplaisir, G.M.; Blais, J.S.; Quinteiro, M.; Marshall, W.D. )

    1991-08-01

    A simple method was developed for the determination of arsonium compounds in edible marine tissues (lobster tail muscle, peeled deveined shrimp, cod fillet, and cod liver oil) and human urine. The homogenized marine tissue (5-10 g (or an equivalent weight of freeze-dried powder)) was blended with methanol; the extracts were combined and flash evaporated. Alternatively, urine (5 mL) was diluted with 50 mL of ethanol and placed in a dry ice-acetone bath for 20 min. Supernatant was separated from the resulting precipitate by centrifugation and flash evaporated. Residues from either sample type were resuspended in water, filtered through an anion exchanger, and acidified. The arsonium analytes were partitioned into liquefied phenol, which was diluted with diethyl ether and back extracted with water. The combined water extracts were taken to dryness, redissolved in methanol, concentrated to 1 mL, and separated on a cyanopropyl bonded-phase column using a methanolic mobile phase containing 19% (v/v) diethyl ether, 1% (v/v) acetic acid, 0.12% (v/v) triethylamine, and pricrylsulfonic acid (0.200 g/L). Analytes were detected on-line by thermochemical hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry. Recoveries from tissues or from urine which had been spiked at 0.1-3.4 {mu}g of cation/g of fresh weight were 83% or greater from each of the five sample types.

  14. A comparative evaluation of different ionic liquids for arsenic species separation and determination in wine varietals by liquid chromatography - hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Castro Grijalba, Alexander; Fiorentini, Emiliano F; Martinez, Luis D; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2016-09-01

    The application of different ionic liquids (ILs) as modifiers for chromatographic separation and determination of arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], dimethylarsonic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) species in wine samples, by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection (RP-HPLC-HG-AFS) was studied in this work. Several factors influencing the chromatographic separation of the As species, such as pH of the mobile phase, buffer solution concentration, buffer type, IL concentration and length of alkyl groups in ILs were evaluated. The complete separation of As species was achieved using a C18 column in isocratic mode with a mobile phase composed of 0.5% (v/v) 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C8mim]Cl) and 5% (v/v) methanol at pH 8.5. A multivariate methodology was used to optimize the variables involved in AFS detection of As species after they were separated by HPLC. The ILs showed remarkable performance for the separation of As species, which was obtained within 18min with a resolution higher than 0.83. The limits of detection for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA were 0.81, 0.89, 0.62 and 1.00μg As L(-1). The proposed method was applied for As speciation analysis in white and red wine samples originated from different grape varieties. PMID:27495368

  15. Pressurized liquid extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for arsenic and selenium speciation in atmospheric particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Moscoso-Pérez, Carmen; Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; López-Mahía, Purificación; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Fernández-Fernández, Esther; Prada-Rodríguez, Darío

    2008-12-26

    This paper describes the development of a chelating solvent-based pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) method for the simultaneous extraction of As and Se species (As(III), As(V), Se(IV) and Se(VI)) in atmospheric particulate matter (PM(10)). The extracted As and Se species were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-HG-AFS). The feasibility of several pressurized chelating solvents was recently investigated to leach As and Se species from atmospheric particulate matter. The best results (high recoveries) were obtained when using EDTA. Experimental design approaches were used to achieve the best compromise conditions for the simultaneous extraction of As and Se species by EDTA-PLE. Analytical performances, such as limits of detection (in the range of 0.01-0.02 ng m(-3)), quantification (in the range of 0.02-0.07 ng m(-3)), and repeatability of the over-all procedure ( approximately 10%) were established. Finally, As and Se species were determined in several atmospheric particulate matter (PM(10)) samples collected in an urban area of A Coruña city (northwest coast of Spain) in 2006. In all the atmospheric particulate matter samples that were analysed, As(V) and Se(IV) (in the range of 0.17-0.60 ng m(-3)) were the major species found. PMID:19010477

  16. Masking Agents Evaluation for Lead Determination by Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Technique: Effect of KI, L-Cysteine, and 1,10-Phenanthroline

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Blanca G.; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Hydride generation (HG) of lead technique presents interferences from foreign ions of complex matrix samples. In order to minimize these interferences, the effect of masking agents such as KI, L-cysteine, and 1,10-phenanthroline was studied in the absence and in the presence of selected interfering species (As, Cr, Cu, and Fe). Different modes of addition of masking agents were accomplished, that is, to either sample or KBH4 reducing solution. The lead determinations were performed using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system coupled to HG and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The linearity of calibration curves (1–10 μg Pb L−1) was not affected by the addition of the masking agents. The use of KI in the reducing solution diminished interferences from concentrations of As and Cu, while 1,10-phenanthroline showed a positive effect on the interference by As. Moreover, Cr and Cu appeared to be the most serious interfering ions for plumbane (PbH4), because they drastically reduced the analytical signal of lead. Fe did not present any interference under the employed experimental conditions, even at high levels. The accuracy was established through the analysis of certified reference material (i.e., BCR-610, groundwater) using KI as masking agent. The detection limit reached by FIA-HG-AFS proposed methodology was 0.03 μg Pb L−1. PMID:27148365

  17. On-line determination of Sb(III) and total Sb using baker's yeast immobilized on polyurethane foam and hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegário, Amauri A.; Silva, Ariovaldo José; Pozzi, Eloísa; Durrant, Steven F.; Abreu, Cassio H.

    2006-09-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was immobilized in cubes of polyurethane foam and the ability of this immobilized material to separate Sb(III) and Sb(V) was investigated. A method based on sequential determination of total Sb (after on-line reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) with thiourea) and Sb(III) (after on-line solid-liquid phase extraction) by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry is proposed. A flow system assembled with solenoid valves was used to manage all stages of the process. The effects of pH, sample loading and elution flow rates on solid-liquid phase extraction of Sb(III) were evaluated. Also, the parameters related to on-line pre-reduction (reaction coil and flow rates) were optimized. Detection limits of 0.8 and 0.15 μg L - 1 were obtained for total Sb and Sb(III), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of river water and effluent samples. The results obtained for the determination of total Sb were in agreement with expected values, including the river water Standard Reference Material 1640 certified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Recoveries of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in spiked samples were between 81 ± 19 and 111 ±15% when 120 s of sample loading were used.

  18. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer)

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Zavala, Araceli; Matoušek, Tomáš; Drobná, Zuzana; Paul, David S.; Walton, Felecia; Adair, Blakely M.; Jiří, Dědina; Thomas, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Analyses of arsenic (As) species in tissues and body fluids of individuals chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic (iAs) provide essential information about the exposure level and pattern of iAs metabolism. We have previously described an oxidation state-specific analysis of As species in biological matrices by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS), using cryotrapping (CT) for preconcentration and separation of arsines. To improve performance and detection limits of the method, HG and CT steps are automated and a conventional flame-in-tube atomizer replaced with a recently developed multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer). In this system, arsines from AsIII-species are generated in a mixture of Tris-HCl (pH 6) and sodium borohydride. For generation of arsines from both AsIII- and AsV-species, samples are pretreated with L-cysteine. Under these conditions, dimethylthioarsinic acid, a newly described metabolite of iAs, does not interfere significantly with detection and quantification of methylated trivalent arsenicals. Analytical performance of the automated HG-CT-AAS was characterized by analyses of cultured cells and mouse tissues that contained mono- and dimethylated metabolites of iAs. The capacity to detect methylated AsIII- and AsV-species was verified, using an in vitro methylation system containing recombinant rat arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and cultured rat hepatocytes treated with iAs. Compared with the previous HG-CT-AAS design, detection limits for iAs and its metabolites have improved significantly with the current system, ranging from 8 to 20 pg. Recoveries of As were between 78 and 117%. The precision of the method was better than 5% for all biological matrices examined. Thus, the automated HG-CT-AAS system provides an effective and sensitive tool for analysis of all major human metabolites of iAs in complex biological matrices. PMID:18677417

  19. Development of an analytical method for the determination of arsenic in gasoline samples by hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B.; Boschetti, Wiliam; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.; Welz, Bernhard

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present work was to optimize the conditions for the determination of arsenic in gasoline with hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after acid digestion using a full two-level factorial design with center point. The arsine was generated in a batch system and collected in a graphite tube coated with 150 μg Ir as a permanent modifier. The sample volume, the pre-reduction conditions, the temperature program and modifier mass were kept fixed for all experiments. The estimated main effects were: reducing agent concentration (negative effect), acid concentration (negative effect) and trapping temperature (positive effect). It was observed that there were interactions between the variables. Moreover, the curvature was significant, indicating that the best conditions were at the center point. The optimized parameters for arsine generation were 2.7 mol L- 1 hydrochloric acid and 1.6% (w/v) sodium tetrahydroborate. The optimized conditions to collect arsine in the graphite furnace were a trapping temperature of 250 °C and a collection time of 30 s. The limit of detection was 6.4 ng L- 1 and the characteristic mass was 24 pg. Two different systems for acid digestion were used: a digester block with cold finger and a microwave oven. The concentration of arsenic found with the proposed method was compared with that obtained using a detergentless microemulsion and direct graphite furnace determination. The results showed that the factorial design is a simple tool that allowed establishing the appropriate conditions for sample preparation and also helped in evaluating the interaction between the factors investigated.

  20. Generating unaveraged equations of motion in common orbital elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    Cartesian equations of motion must be converted or integrated in order to impart information about the evolution of orbital elements such as the semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, longitude of ascending node, argument of pericentre and true anomaly. Alternatively, equations of motion in terms of only these orbital elements can reveal aspects of the motion simply by inspection. I advertise a quick method to generate such equations for perturbed two-body problems, where the perturbation may be arbitrarily large, and where no averaging is involved. I use the method to generate complete unaveraged equations from perturbations due to Poynting-Robertson drag, general relativity, mass loss, Galactic tides, and additional massive bodies under the guise of the general restricted few-body problem.

  1. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  2. Metal hydride heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakata, Y.; Yamaji, K.; Yoshida, K.

    1983-12-27

    A metal hydride heat pump is disclosed comprising a first and a second heat medium receptacle having heat media flowing therein and a plurality of closed vessels each containing a hydrogen gas atmosphere and divided into a first chamber having a first metal hydride filled therein and a second chamber having a second metal hydride filled therein. The first and second chambers of each closed vessel are made to communicate with each other so that hydrogen gas passes from one chamber to the other but the metal hydrides do not, and a group of the first chambers of the closed vessels being located within the first heat medium receptacle and a group of the second chambers of the closed vessels being located within the second heat medium receptacle, whereby heat exchange is carried out between the heat media in the first and second heat medium receptacles and the first and second metal hydrides through the external walls of the closed vessels.

  3. Storage, generation, and use of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    McClaine, Andrew W.; Rolfe, Jonathan L.; Larsen, Christopher A.; Konduri, Ravi K.

    2006-05-30

    A composition comprising a carrier liquid; a dispersant; and a chemical hydride. The composition can be used in a hydrogen generator to generate hydrogen for use, e.g., as a fuel. A regenerator recovers elemental metal from byproducts of the hydrogen generation process.

  4. Elements of a Successful Climate Data Records Generation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    For the past four decades, data flowing from satellite-borne sensors have provided environmental information at spatial scales only dreamed of previously. Remarkable insights have been gained regarding Earth's land, atmosphere, oceans and cryosphere systems. This includes their internal dynamics and kinematics, along with important interrelationships. Additionally, time series of elements within these systems have been scrutinized in attempts to better understand climate variability and to identify critical trends that may signal changes in the climate system. From these studies, has emerged a growing appreciation for the importance of satellite climate data records (CDRs) that possess the accuracy, longevity and stability to facilitate credible climate monitoring. These satellite CDRs provide abundant information to assist those making decisions regarding the fate of our environment. Recently, a National Research Council committee was tasked with assisting the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as it designs a plan to establish this agency as the chief steward of satellite CDRs. Based on an evaluation of historical lessons learned, community surveys, a workshop, and committee expertise, the committee identified 14 key elements for creating a CDR program based mainly on satellites. They are divided into three general categories that include organizational, generation and sustaining elements, many of which are applicable to any CDR endeavor. This presentation will address the 14 elements and provide examples of candidate satellite CDRs.

  5. Arsenic fractionation in agricultural soil using an automated three-step sequential extraction method coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Portugal, L; Ferrer, L; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Cerdà, V; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2015-05-18

    A fully automated modified three-step BCR flow-through sequential extraction method was developed for the fractionation of the arsenic (As) content from agricultural soil based on a multi-syringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Critical parameters that affect the performance of the automated system were optimized by exploiting a multivariate approach using a Doehlert design. The validation of the flow-based modified-BCR method was carried out by comparison with the conventional BCR method. Thus, the total As content was determined in the following three fractions: fraction 1 (F1), the acid-soluble or interchangeable fraction; fraction 2 (F2), the reducible fraction; and fraction 3 (F3), the oxidizable fraction. The limits of detection (LOD) were 4.0, 3.4, and 23.6 μg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. A wide working concentration range was obtained for the analysis of each fraction, i.e., 0.013-0.800, 0.011-0.900 and 0.079-1.400 mg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. The precision of the automated MSFIA-HG-AFS system, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was evaluated for a 200 μg L(-1) As standard solution, and RSD values between 5 and 8% were achieved for the three BCR fractions. The new modified three-step BCR flow-based sequential extraction method was satisfactorily applied for arsenic fractionation in real agricultural soil samples from an arsenic-contaminated mining zone to evaluate its extractability. The frequency of analysis of the proposed method was eight times higher than that of the conventional BCR method (6 vs 48 h), and the kinetics of lixiviation were established for each fraction. PMID:25910440

  6. Eggshell membrane-based solid-phase extraction combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for trace arsenic(V) in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjiang; Wang, Weidong; Li, Lu; Huang, Yuming; Cao, Jia

    2010-03-15

    The eggshell membrane (ESM) contains several surface functional groups such as amines, amides and carboxylic groups with potential as SPE adsorbent for the retention of target species of interest. In this paper, the potential use of ESM, a typical biomaterial, as solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbent is evaluated for analysis of trace arsenic(V) in environmental water samples in combination with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). In order to obtain the satisfactory recovery of arsenic(V), various parameters including the desorption and enrichment conditions such as pH, the flow rate and the volume of sample solution, the amount of ESM and the content of sodium chloride were systematically optimized and the effects of co-existed ions were also investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, arsenic(V) could be easily extracted by the ESM packed cartridge and the breakthrough adsorption capacity was found to be 3.9 microg g(-1). The favorable limit of detection (LOD) for arsenic(V) was found to be 0.001 microg L(-1) with an enrichment factor of 33.3, and the relative standard deviations (R.S.Ds) was 2.1% for 0.6 microg L(-1) arsenic (n=11). The reproducibility among columns was satisfactory (R.S.D. among columns is less than 5%). The proposed method has been successfully applied to analysis of arsenic(V) in aqueous environmental samples, which suggests the ESM can be an excellent SPE adsorbent for arsenic(V) pretreatment and enrichment from real water samples. PMID:20152431

  7. Speciation Analysis of Arsenic by Selective Hydride Generation-Cryotrapping-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry with Flame-in-Gas-Shield Atomizer: Achieving Extremely Low Detection Limits with Inexpensive Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L–1 for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). PMID:25300934

  8. On-line electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction of inorganic selenium followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Shamsayei, Maryam; Safari, Meysam; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2016-05-30

    In this work, for the first time, a rapid, simple and sensitive microextraction procedure is demonstrated for the matrix separation, preconcentration and determination of inorganic selenium species in water samples using an electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC-in-tube SPME) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). In this approach, in which EC-in-tube SPME and HG-AAS system were combined, the total analysis time, was decreased and the accuracy, repeatability and sensitivity were increased. In addition, to increases extraction efficiency, a novel nanostructured composite coating consisting of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was prepared on the inner surface of a stainless-steel tube by a facile electrodeposition method. To evaluate the offered setup and the new PPy-EGDMA coating, it was used to extract inorganic selenium species in water samples. Extraction of inorganic selenium species was carried out by applying a positive potential through the inner surface of coated in-tube under flow conditions. Under the optimized conditions, selenium was detected in amounts as small as 4.0 parts per trillion. The method showed good linearity in the range of 0.012-200 ng mL(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.9996. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n = 5) were in the range of 2.0-2.5% and 2.7-3.2%, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of inorganic selenium species in some water samples and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:27154830

  9. Determination of total arsenic by batch hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry in injectable drugs containing high levels of Sb(V) as N-methylglucamine antimonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes; Barcelos da Silva, Fabiana E.; Santos, Eliane Pereira dos; Paula, Fávero Reisdorfer; Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Zanella, Renato; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Bittencourt, Celso Figueiredo

    2002-12-01

    A procedure for the determination of arsenic by batch hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG AAS) in commercial samples of injectable drugs, containing high concentrations of Sb(V), is described. The procedure is based on the complexing effect for Sb of citric, oxalic and acetic acids as reaction media. Aqua regia was used for sample digestion prior to As determination by HG AAS. The following experimental conditions for the determination of total As, as As(V), were evaluated: the acid medium and its concentration, sodium tetrahydroborate concentration, purge time, and influence of the different oxidation states of As. The effect of the delay time after mixing of sample and acid solution was also studied. Optimized conditions were: 10% (m/v) citric acid, 1.5% (m/v) sodium tetrahydroborate solution and 30 s for purge time. A delay time of 1 h was required after the digested sample had been mixed with citric acid, before As determination could be carried out. No interference on As(III) and As(V) signals was observed in the presence of up to 1 mg Sb(V). The tolerance limits for Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) were 1 mg, 100 μg and 100 μg, respectively. Recovery tests for As(III) and As(V) resulted in values between 97 and 101%. Characteristic mass and detection limit (3σ), using the recommended conditions, were 0.52 and 0.8 ng, respectively, for total As.

  10. Isotope dilution analysis of Se in human blood serum by using high-power nitrogen microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometry coupled with a hydride generation technique.

    PubMed

    Ohata, M; Ichinose, T; Furuta, N; Shinohara, A; Chiba, M

    1998-07-01

    To establish a method for sensitive, accurate, and precise determination of Se in real samples, isotope dilution analysis using high-power nitrogen microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometry (N2 MIP-IDMS) was conducted. In this study, freeze-dried human blood serum (Standard Reference Material, NIES No. 4) provided by NIES (National Institute for Environmental Studies) was used as a real sample. The measured isotopes of Se were 78Se and 80Se which are the major isotopes of Se. The appropriate amount of a Se spike solution was theoretically calculated by using an error multiplication factor (F) and was confirmed experimentally for the isotope dilution analysis. The mass discrimination effect was corrected for by using a standard Se solution for the measurement of Se isotope ratios in the spiked sample. However, the sensitivity for the detection of Se was not so good and the precision of the determination was not improved (2-3%) by N2 MIP-IDMS with use of the conventional nebulizer. Therefore, a hydride generation system was connected to N2 MIP-IDMS as a sample introduction system (HG-N2 MIP-IDMS) in order to establish a more sensitive detection and a more precise determination of Se. A detection limit (3 sigma) of 10 pg mL-1 could be achieved, and the RSD was less than 1% at the concentration level of 5.0-10.0 ng mL-1 by HG-N2 MIP-IDMS. The analytical results were found to be in a good agreement with those obtained by the standard addition method using conventional Ar ICPMS. PMID:9666737

  11. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer: achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, Jenna M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-10-21

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L(-1) for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). PMID:25300934

  12. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  13. CFFF testing of ceramic elements for MHD generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, J.T.; Christiansen, P.J.

    1994-12-31

    In September 1992, the POC test LMF5-J was concluded at the CFFF in accordance with the objectives as set for the western coal POC test program. During this activity, a {open_quotes}piggyback{close_quotes} type test was conducted for the Busek Company in partial fulfillment of a DOE Phase II SBIR. A near prototypical design, generator module that was designed and constructed by the Busek Co. was installed in the LMF upstream test train of the CFFF for this test. The module incorporated AlN{sub 2} (ceramic) sidebar elements. The objective of the SBIR Phase II was to evaluate the integrity of this material subject to long duration operation under typical coal-fired MHD generator conditions. A summary of the LMF5-J test at the CFFF and activities and test results relevant to the SBIR Phase II related to the Busek SBIR project are provided.

  14. Nickel Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Nathan A; Guan, Hairong

    2016-08-10

    Nickel hydride complexes, defined herein as any molecules bearing a nickel hydrogen bond, are crucial intermediates in numerous nickel-catalyzed reactions. Some of them are also synthetic models of nickel-containing enzymes such as [NiFe]-hydrogenase. The overall objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of this specific type of hydride complexes, which has been studied extensively in recent years. This review begins with the significance and a very brief history of nickel hydride complexes, followed by various methods and spectroscopic or crystallographic tools used to synthesize and characterize these complexes. Also discussed are stoichiometric reactions involving nickel hydride complexes and how some of these reactions are developed into catalytic processes. PMID:27437790

  15. [Cloud Point extraction for determination of mercury in Chinese herbal medicine by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry with optimization using Box-Behnken design].

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Li, Shan; Zhou, Jian-dong; Xu, Ying; Long, Jun-biao; Yang, Bing-yi

    2014-08-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) is proposed as a pre-concentration procedure for the determination of Hg in Chinese herbal medicine samples by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Hg2+ was reacted with dithizone to form hydrophobic chelate under the condition of pH. Using Triton X-114, as surfactant, chelate was quantitatively extracted into small volume of the surfactant-rich phase by heating the solution in a water bath for 15 min and centrifuging. Four variables including pH, dithizone concentration, Triton X-114 concentration and equilibrium temperature (T) showed the significant effect on extraction efficiency of total Hg evaluated by single-factor experiment, and Box-Behnken design and response surface method- ology were adopted to further investigate the mutual interactions between these variables and to identify their optimal values that would generate maximum extraction efficiency. The results showed that the binomial was used to fit the response to experimental levels of each variable. ALL linear, quadratic terms of four variables, and interactions between pH and Trion X-114, pH and di- thizone affected the response value(extraction efficiency) significantly at 5% level. The optimum extraction conditions were as follows: pH 5.1, Triton X-114 concentration of 1.16 g x L(-1), dithizone concentration of 4.87 mol x L(-1), and T 58.2 degrees C, the predicted value of fluorescence was 4528.74 under the optimum conditions, and the experimental value had only 2.1% difference with it. Under the conditions, fluorescence was linear to mercury concentration in the range of 1-5 microg x L(-1). The limit of detection obtained was 0.01247 microg x L(-1) with the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) for six replicate determinations of 1.30%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determination of Hg in morindae Radix, Andrographitis and dried tangerine samples with the recoveries of 95.0%-100.0%. Apparently Box-Behnken design combined with

  16. [Cloud Point extraction for determination of mercury in Chinese herbal medicine by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry with optimization using Box-Behnken design].

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Li, Shan; Zhou, Jian-dong; Xu, Ying; Long, Jun-biao; Yang, Bing-yi

    2014-08-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) is proposed as a pre-concentration procedure for the determination of Hg in Chinese herbal medicine samples by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Hg2+ was reacted with dithizone to form hydrophobic chelate under the condition of pH. Using Triton X-114, as surfactant, chelate was quantitatively extracted into small volume of the surfactant-rich phase by heating the solution in a water bath for 15 min and centrifuging. Four variables including pH, dithizone concentration, Triton X-114 concentration and equilibrium temperature (T) showed the significant effect on extraction efficiency of total Hg evaluated by single-factor experiment, and Box-Behnken design and response surface method- ology were adopted to further investigate the mutual interactions between these variables and to identify their optimal values that would generate maximum extraction efficiency. The results showed that the binomial was used to fit the response to experimental levels of each variable. ALL linear, quadratic terms of four variables, and interactions between pH and Trion X-114, pH and di- thizone affected the response value(extraction efficiency) significantly at 5% level. The optimum extraction conditions were as follows: pH 5.1, Triton X-114 concentration of 1.16 g x L(-1), dithizone concentration of 4.87 mol x L(-1), and T 58.2 degrees C, the predicted value of fluorescence was 4528.74 under the optimum conditions, and the experimental value had only 2.1% difference with it. Under the conditions, fluorescence was linear to mercury concentration in the range of 1-5 microg x L(-1). The limit of detection obtained was 0.01247 microg x L(-1) with the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) for six replicate determinations of 1.30%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determination of Hg in morindae Radix, Andrographitis and dried tangerine samples with the recoveries of 95.0%-100.0%. Apparently Box-Behnken design combined with

  17. Placing three-dimensional isoparametric elements into NASTRAN. [alterations in matrix assembly to simplify generation of higher order elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, M. B.; Filstrup, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Linear (8 node), parabolic (20 node), cubic (32 node) and mixed (some edges linear, some parabolic and some cubic) have been inserted into NASTRAN, level 15.1. First the dummy element feature was used to check out the stiffness matrix generation routines for the linear element in NASTRAN. Then, the necessary modules of NASTRAN were modified to include the new family of elements. The matrix assembly was changed so that the stiffness matrix of each isoparametric element is only generated once as the time to generate these higher order elements tends to be much longer than the other elements in NASTRAN. This paper presents some of the experiences and difficulties of inserting a new element or family of elements into NASTRAN.

  18. Laboratory Rotational Spectroscopy of the Interstellar Diatomic Hydride Ion SH+ (X 3Σ-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfen, DeWayne; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2016-06-01

    Diatomic hydride are among the most common molecular species in the interstellar medium (ISM). The low molecular mass and thus moments of inertia cause their rotational spectra to lie principally in the submillimeter and far-infrared regions. Diatomic hydrides, both neutral (MH) and ionic (MH+) forms, are also basic building blocks of interstellar chemistry. In ionic form, they may be the “hidden” carriers of refractory elements in dense gas. They are therefore extremely good targets for space-borne and airborne platforms such as Herschel, SOFIA, and SAFIR. However, in order to detect these species in the ISM, their rotational spectra must first be measured in the laboratory. To date, there is very little high resolution data available for many hydride species, in particular the ionic form. Using submillimeter/THz direct absorption methods in the Ziurys laboratory, spectra of the interstellar diatomic hydride SH+ (X 3Σ-) have been recorded. Recent work has concerned measurement of all three fine structure components of the fundamental rotational transition N = 1 ← 0 in the range 345 - 683 GHz. SH+ was generated from H2S and argon in an AC discharge. The data have been analyzed, and spectroscopic constants for this species have been refined. SH+ is found in Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs) and X-ray Dominated Regions (XDRs) and is thought to trace energetic processes in the ISM. These current measurements confirm recent observations of this species at submillimeter/THz wavelengths with ALMA and other ground-based telescopes.

  19. Metal interferences and their removal prior to the determination of As(T) and As(III) in acid mine waters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ball, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) is a sensitive and selective method for the determination of total arsenic (arsenic(III) plus arsenic(V)) and arsenic(III); however, it is subject to metal interferences for acid mine waters. Sodium borohydride is used to produce arsine gas, but high metal concentrations can suppress arsine production. This report investigates interferences of sixteen metal species including aluminum, antimony(III), antimony(V), cadmium, chromium(III), chromium(IV), cobalt, copper(II), iron(III), iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(IV), selenium(VI), and zinc ranging in concentration from 0 to 1,000 milligrams per liter and offers a method for removing interfering metal cations with cation exchange resin. The degree of interference for each metal without cation-exchange on the determination of total arsenic and arsenic(III) was evaluated by spiking synthetic samples containing arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) with the potential interfering metal. Total arsenic recoveries ranged from 92 to 102 percent for all metals tested except antimony(III) and antimony(V) which suppressed arsine formation when the antimony(III)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 4 or the antimony(V)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 2. Arsenic(III) recoveries for samples spiked with aluminum, chromium(III), cobalt, iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(VI), and zinc ranged from 84 to 107 percent over the entire concentration range tested. Low arsenic(III) recoveries occurred when the molar ratios of metals to arsenic(III) were copper greater than 120, iron(III) greater than 70, chromium(VI) greater than 2, cadmium greater than 800, antimony(III) greater than 3, antimony(V) greater than 12, or selenium(IV) greater than 1. Low recoveries result when interfering metals compete for available sodium borohydride, causing incomplete arsine production, or when the interfering metal oxidizes arsenic(III). Separation of interfering metal cations using

  20. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  1. Finite Element Modeling for Megagauss Magnetic Field Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, David

    2005-10-01

    Applying external magnetic fields with MegaGauss strength is needed for hot plasma confinement and stabilization. We investigate the possibility of generating ultra-high magnetic fields with the fast z-pinch generator ``Zebra'' for experiments at the NTF. Zebra can produce a load a current of 1 MA in 100 ns. To design appropriate loads we use FemlabootnotetextFemlab 3 -- multi-physics, finite-element modeling program by Comsol AB, 2004 and ScreamerootnotetextScreamer -- A Pulsed Power Design Tool developed at SNL by M. L. Kiefer, K. L. Fugelso, K. W. Struve, and M. M. Widner. to simulate the magnetic field. Screamer predicts the load current using a detailed model of Zebra and helps optimize the operation. Using the information from Screamer, Femlab is able to calculate the magnetic field, heating, and stress on the conductor. All these effects must be taken into consideration to determine the integrity of the coil until maximum field is reached. The presentation will include simulation results for single- and multi-turn coils, as well as quasi-force-free inductors.

  2. Estimation of Thermoelectric Generator Performance by Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowski, P.; Poinas, P.; Leszczynski, J.; Karpinski, G.; Müller, E.

    2010-09-01

    Prediction of thermoelectric performance parameters by numerical methods is an inherent part of thermoelectric generator (TEG) development and allows for time- and cost-saving assessment of material combinations and variations of crucial design parameters (e.g., shape, pellet length, and thermal coupling). Considering the complexity of a TEG system and its numerous affecting factors, the clarity and the flexibility of a mathematical treatment comes to the fore. Comfortable tools are provided by commercial finite element modeling (FEM) software offering powerful geometry interfaces, mesh generators, solvers, and postprocessing options. We describe the level of development and the simulation results of a three dimensional (3D) TEG FEM. Using ANSYS 11.0, we implemented and simulated a TEG module geometry under various conditions. Comparative analytical one dimensional (1D) results and a direct comparison with inhouse-developed TEG simulation software show the consistency of results. Several pellet aspect ratios and contact property configurations (thermal/electrical interface resistance) were evaluated for their impact on the TEG performance as well as parasitic effects such as convection, radiation, and conductive heat bypass. The scenarios considered revealed the highest efficiency decay for convectionally loaded setups (up to 4.8%pts), followed by the impacts of contact resistances (up to 4.8%pts), by radiation (up to 0.56%pts), and by thermal conduction of a solid filling material within the voids of the module construction (up to 0.14%pts).

  3. Extraction and applications of skeletons in finite element mesh generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2010-05-01

    This paper focuses on the extraction of skeletons of CAD models and its applications in finite element (FE) mesh generation. The term 'skeleton of a CAD model' can be visualized as analogous to the 'skeleton of a human body'. The skeletal representations covered in this paper include medial axis transform (MAT), Voronoi diagram (VD), chordal axis transform (CAT), mid surface, digital skeletons, and disconnected skeletons. In the literature, the properties of a skeleton have been utilized in developing various algorithms for extracting skeletons. Three main approaches include: (1) the bisection method where the skeleton exists at equidistant from at least two points on boundary, (2) the grassfire propagation method in which the skeleton exists where the opposing fronts meet, and (3) the duality method where the skeleton is a dual of the object. In the last decade, the author has applied different skeletal representations in all-quad meshing, hex meshing, mid-surface meshing, mesh size function generation, defeaturing, and decomposition. A brief discussion on the related work from other researchers in the area of tri meshing, tet meshing, and anisotropic meshing is also included. This paper concludes by summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of the skeleton-based approaches in solving various geometry-centered problems in FE mesh generation. The skeletons have proved to be a great shape abstraction tool in analyzing the geometric complexity of CAD models as they are symmetric, simpler (reduced dimension), and provide local thickness information. However, skeletons generally require some cleanup, and stability and sensitivity of the skeletons should be controlled during extraction. Also, selecting a suitable application-specific skeleton and a computationally efficient method of extraction is critical.

  4. Metal hydride heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakata, Y.; Yamaji, K.; Yoshida, K.

    1985-06-18

    A metal hydride heat pump system has a plurality of operating units, the metal hydride heat exchange medium of each operating unit be a combination of a first metal hydride having a lower equilibrium dissociation pressure at the operating temperature and a second metal hydride having a higher equilibrium dissociation pressure at the opening temperature and the metal hydrides being such that hydrogen can flow freely between the two metal hydrides, wherein the equilibrium dissociation pressure characteristics of one or both of the first and second metal hydrides in a given operating unit differ from those of one or both of the first and second metal hydrides in at least one other operating unit.

  5. Generation of Random Particle Packings for Discrete Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Weatherley, D.; Ayton, T.

    2012-04-01

    An important step in the setup process of Discrete Element Model (DEM) simulations is the generation of a suitable particle packing. There are quite a number of properties such a granular material specimen should ideally have, such as high coordination number, isotropy, the ability to fill arbitrary bounding volumes and the absence of locked-in stresses. An algorithm which is able to produce specimens fulfilling these requirements is the insertion based sphere packing algorithm originally proposed by Place and Mora, 2001 [2] and extended in this work. The algorithm works in two stages. First a number of "seed" spheres are inserted into the bounding volume. In the second stage the gaps between the "seed" spheres are filled by inserting new spheres in a way so they have D+1 (i.e. 3 in 2D, 4 in 3D) touching contacts with either other spheres or the boundaries of the enclosing volume. Here we present an implementation of the algorithm and a systematic statistical analysis of the generated sphere packings. The analysis of the particle radius distribution shows that they follow a power-law with an exponent ≈ D (i.e. ≈3 for a 3D packing and ≈2 for 2D). Although the algorithm intrinsically guarantees coordination numbers of at least 4 in 3D and 3 in 2D, the coordination numbers realized in the generated packings can be significantly higher, reaching beyond 50 if the range of particle radii is sufficiently large. Even for relatively small ranges of particle sizes (e.g. Rmin = 0.5Rmax) the maximum coordination number may exceed 10. The degree of isotropy of the generated sphere packing is also analysed in both 2D and 3D, by measuring the distribution of orientations of vectors joining the centres of adjacent particles. If the range of particle sizes is small, the packing algorithm yields moderate anisotropy approaching that expected for a face-centred cubic packing of equal-sized particles. However, once Rmin < 0.3Rmax a very high degree of isotropy is demonstrated in

  6. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  7. Solar Electric Generating System II finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, J.L.; Anderson, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    On June 2, 1992, Landers` earthquake struck the Solar Electric Generating System II, located in Daggett, California. The 30 megawatt power station, operated by the Daggett Leasing Corporation (DLC), suffered substantial damage due to structural failures in the solar farm. These failures consisted of the separation of sliding joints supporting a distribution of parabolic glass mirrors. At separation, the mirrors fell to the ground and broke. It was the desire of the DLC and the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and to redesign these joints so that, in the event of future quakes, costly breakage will be avoided. To accomplish this task, drawings of collector components were developed by the STDAC, from which a detailed finite element computer model of a solar collector was produced. This nonlinear dynamic model, which consisted of over 8,560 degrees of freedom, underwent model reduction to form a low order nonlinear dynamic model containing only 40 degrees of freedom. This model was then used as a design tool to estimate joint dynamics. Using this design tool, joint configurations were modified, and an acceptable joint redesign determined. The results of this analysis showed that the implementation of metal stops welded to support shafts for the purpose of preventing joint separation is a suitable joint redesign. Moreover, it was found that, for quakes of Landers` magnitude, mirror breakage due to enhanced vibration in the trough assembly is unlikely.

  8. Essential Elements for Recruitment and Retention: Generation Y

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luscombe, Jenna; Lewis, Ioni; Biggs, Herbert C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Generation Y (Gen Y) is the newest and largest generation entering the workforce. Gen Y may differ from previous generations in work-related characteristics which may have recruitment and retention repercussions. Currently, limited theoretically-based research exists regarding Gen Y's work expectations and goals in relation to…

  9. COMGEN-BEM: Boundary element model generation for composite materials micromechanical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method (COMGEN-BEM) is a program developed in PATRAN command language (PCL) which generates boundary element models of continuous fiber composites at the micromechanical (constituent) scale. Based on the entry of a few simple parameters such as fiber volume fraction and fiber diameter, the model geometry and boundary element model are generated. In addition, various mesh densities, material properties, fiber orientation angles, loads, and boundary conditions can be specified. The generated model can then be translated to a format consistent with a boundary element analysis code such as BEST-CMS.

  10. Examples of finite element mesh generation using SDRC IDEAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, John; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    IDEAS (Integrated Design Engineering Analysis Software) offers a comprehensive package for mechanical design engineers. Due to its multifaceted capabilities, however, it can be manipulated to serve the needs of electrical engineers, also. IDEAS can be used to perform the following tasks: system modeling, system assembly, kinematics, finite element pre/post processing, finite element solution, system dynamics, drafting, test data analysis, and project relational database.

  11. An improved method for the determination of trace levels of arsenic and antimony in geological materials by automated hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved, automated method for the determination of arsenic and antimony in geological materials is described. After digestion of the material in sulfuric, nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids, a hydrochloric acid solution of the sample is automatically mixed with reducing agents, acidified with additional hydrochloric acid, and treated with a sodium tetrahydroborate solution to form arsine and stibine. The hydrides are decomposed in a heated quartz tube in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The absorbance peak height for arsenic or antimony is measured. Interferences that exist are minimized to the point where most geological materials including coals, soils, coal ashes, rocks and sediments can be analyzed directly without use of standard additions. The relative standard deviation of the digestion and the instrumental procedure is less than 2% at the 50 ??g l-1 As or Sb level. The reagent-blank detection limit is 0.2 ??g l-1 As or Sb. ?? 1982.

  12. Superstoichiometric hydride of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Kupryazhkin, A.Ya.; Shchepetkin, A.A.; Zabolotskaya, E.V.; Pletnev, R.N.; Alyamovskii, S.I.; Kitaev, G.A.

    1987-12-01

    Superstoichiometric hydrides of zirconium have been obtained all the way up to the composition ZrH/sub 2.4/ by additional hydrogenation of ZrH/sub 2/ as a result of redistribution of hydrogen atoms between t- and o-positions. In the preparation of the hydrides the authors used zirconium iodide with an impurity content no greater than 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -2/ mole %; the hydrogen and helium used in this work had a minimum purity of 99.95%. The content of hydrogen in the specimens was determined by a volumetric method. The x-ray diffraction analysis was performed in a DRON-2.0 unit (CuK/sub ..cap alpha../ radiation). PMR spectra were recorded in a broad-line spectrometer in the temperature interval 150-450 K.

  13. FEATURE-BASED MULTIBLOCK FINITE ELEMENT MESH GENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Kiran H.; Tadepalli, Srinivas C.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2010-01-01

    Hexahedral finite element mesh development for anatomic structures and biomedical implants can be cumbersome. Moreover, using traditional meshing techniques, detailed features may be inadequately captured. In this paper, we describe methodologies to handle multi-feature datasets (i.e., feature edges and surfaces). Coupling multi-feature information with multiblock meshing techniques has enabled anatomic structures, as well as orthopaedic implants, to be readily meshed. Moreover, the projection process, node and element set creation are automated, thus reducing the user interaction during model development. To improve the mesh quality, Laplacian- and optimization-based mesh improvement algorithms have been adapted to the multi-feature datasets. PMID:21076650

  14. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  15. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  16. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  17. The Worked Example Effect, the Generation Effect, and Element Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ouhao; Kalyuga, Slava; Sweller, John

    2015-01-01

    The worked example effect indicates that examples providing full guidance on how to solve a problem result in better test performance than a problem-solving condition with no guidance. The generation effect occurs when learners generating responses demonstrate better test performance than learners in a presentation condition that provides an…

  18. A Finite Element Mesh Generation Code System with On-Line Graphic Display.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1980-05-30

    Version 00 LOOM-P is a two-dimensional mesh generation program which produces a best finite element mesh network for a reactor core geometry. This is an on-line automatic mesh generating program which can produce triangular mesh elements as an edit program to QMESH-RENUM.

  19. 17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING SYSTEM WAS PART OF THE FAST ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS. (11/11/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  20. Uranium thorium hydride nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Simnad, M.T.

    1985-01-15

    A nuclear fuel includes uranium dispersed within a thorium hydride matrix. The uranium may be in the form of particles including fissile and non-fissile isotopes. Various hydrogen to thorium ratios may be included in the matrix. The matrix with the fissile dispersion may be used as a complete fuel for a metal hydride reactor or may be combined with other fuels.

  1. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  2. A nickel metal hydride battery for electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ovshinsky, S R; Fetcenko, M A; Ross, J

    1993-04-01

    Widespread use of electric vehicles can have significant impact on urban air quality, national energy independence, and international balance of trade. An efficient battery is the key technological element to the development of practical electric vehicles. The science and technology of a nickel metal hydride battery, which stores hydrogen in the solid hydride phase and has high energy density, high power, long life, tolerance to abuse, a wide range of operating temperature, quick-charge capability, and totally sealed maintenance-free operation, is described. A broad range of multi-element metal hydride materials that use structural and compositional disorder on several scales of length has been engineered for use as the negative electrode in this battery. The battery operates at ambient temperature, is made of nontoxic materials, and is recyclable. Demonstration of the manufacturing technology has been achieved. PMID:17807176

  3. A nickel metal hydride battery for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ovshinsky, S.R.; Fetcenko, M.A. ); Ross, J. )

    1993-04-09

    Widespread use of electric vehicles can have significant impact on urban air quality, national energy independence, and international balance of trade. An efficient battery is the key technological element to the development of practical electric vehicles. The science and technology of a nickel metal hydride battery, which stores hydrogen in the solid hydride phase and has high energy density, high power, long life, tolerance to abuse, a wide range of operating temperature, quick-charge capability, and totally sealed maintenance-free operation, is described. A broad range of multi-element metal hydride materials that use structural and compositional disorder on several scales of length has been engineered for use as the negative electrode in this battery. The battery operates at ambient temperature, is made of nontoxic materials, and is recyclable. Demonstration of the manufacturing technology has been achieved. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Tellurium Hydrides at High Pressures: High-Temperature Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Shoutao; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    Observation of high-temperature superconductivity in compressed sulfur hydrides has generated an irresistible wave of searches for new hydrogen-containing superconductors. We herein report the prediction of high-T_{c} superconductivity in tellurium hydrides stabilized at megabar pressures identified by first-principles calculations in combination with a swarm structure search. Although tellurium is isoelectronic to sulfur or selenium, its heavier atomic mass and weaker electronegativity makes tellurium hydrides fundamentally distinct from sulfur or selenium hydrides in stoichiometries, structures, and chemical bondings. We identify three metallic stoichiometries of H_{4}Te, H_{5}Te_{2}, and HTe_{3}, which are not predicted or known stable structures for sulfur or selenium hydrides. The two hydrogen-rich H_{4}Te and H_{5}Te_{2} phases are primarily ionic and contain exotic quasimolecular H_{2} and linear H_{3} units, respectively. Their high-T_{c} (e.g., 104 K for H_{4}Te at 170 GPa) superconductivity originates from the strong electron-phonon couplings associated with intermediate-frequency H-derived wagging and bending modes, a superconducting mechanism which differs substantially with those in sulfur or selenium hydrides where the high-frequency H-stretching vibrations make considerable contributions. PMID:26894729

  5. Tellurium Hydrides at High Pressures: High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Shoutao; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    Observation of high-temperature superconductivity in compressed sulfur hydrides has generated an irresistible wave of searches for new hydrogen-containing superconductors. We herein report the prediction of high-Tc superconductivity in tellurium hydrides stabilized at megabar pressures identified by first-principles calculations in combination with a swarm structure search. Although tellurium is isoelectronic to sulfur or selenium, its heavier atomic mass and weaker electronegativity makes tellurium hydrides fundamentally distinct from sulfur or selenium hydrides in stoichiometries, structures, and chemical bondings. We identify three metallic stoichiometries of H4Te , H5Te2 , and HTe3 , which are not predicted or known stable structures for sulfur or selenium hydrides. The two hydrogen-rich H4Te and H5Te2 phases are primarily ionic and contain exotic quasimolecular H2 and linear H3 units, respectively. Their high-Tc (e.g., 104 K for H4Te at 170 GPa) superconductivity originates from the strong electron-phonon couplings associated with intermediate-frequency H-derived wagging and bending modes, a superconducting mechanism which differs substantially with those in sulfur or selenium hydrides where the high-frequency H-stretching vibrations make considerable contributions.

  6. Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R.

    2012-10-23

    Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

  7. Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

  8. Efficient generation of Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams through kinoform phase elements.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Olivas, Dilia; Mellado-Villaseñor, Gabriel; Sánchez-de-la-Llave, David; Arrizón, Victor

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the generation of Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams employing phase elements whose transmittances coincide with the phase modulations of such beams. A scaled version of the desired field appears, distorted by marginal optical noise, at the element's Fourier domain. The motivation to perform this study is that, in the context of the proposed approach, the desired beams are generated with the maximum possible efficiency. A disadvantage of the method is the distortion of the desired beams by the influence of several nondesired beam modes generated by the phase elements. We evaluate such distortion employing the root mean square deviation as a figure of merit. PMID:26479622

  9. Crystal plasticity finite element analysis for René88DT statistical volume element generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Joseph C.; Cerrone, Albert R., III; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2015-04-01

    This work focuses on the major cause of life limiting behavior in Ni-based superalloys for high pressure and temperature turbine disks applications in low cycle fatigue. Specific ideas of local microstructure features, such as the role of as large as (ALA) grains, in promoting slip localization in directly measured 3D microstructures were tested with finite element method (FEM) simulations with crystal plasticity. Synthetic microstructures with experimentally determined microstructurally small fatigue crack weakest link features of ALA grains comprise the test cases. A René88 damage tolerant (R88DT) dataset, from electron backscatter diffraction, was used to instantiate approximately 1.5 million elements and 200 grains from FEM sensitivity studies. Changing mesh resolution minimally impacted global damage response, but local convergence required the maximum resolution. The present results help to quantify the deleterious impact of ALA grains in Ni-based superalloys to extend service life.

  10. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-04-28

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneousmore » systems by identifying the type of material in each element.« less

  11. Pamgen, a library for parallel generation of simple finite element meshes.

    SciTech Connect

    Foucar, James G.; Drake, Richard Roy; Hensinger, David M.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony

    2008-04-01

    Generating finite-element meshes is a serious bottleneck for large parallel simulations. When mesh generation is limited to serial machines and element counts approach a billion, this bottleneck becomes a roadblock. Pamgen is a parallel mesh generation library that allows on-the-fly scalable generation of hexahedral and quadrilateral finite element meshes for several simple geometries. It has been used to generate more that 1.1 billion elements on 17,576 processors. Pamgen generates an unstructured finite element mesh on each processor at the start of a simulation. The mesh is specified by commands passed to the library as a 'C'-programming language string. The resulting mesh geometry, topology, and communication information can then be queried through an API. pamgen allows specification of boundary condition application regions using sidesets (element faces) and nodesets (collections of nodes). It supports several simple geometry types. It has multiple alternatives for mesh grading. It has several alternatives for the initial domain decomposition. Pamgen makes it easy to change details of the finite element mesh and is very useful for performance studies and scoping calculations.

  12. Multifunctional diffractive optical elements for the generation of higher order Bessel-like-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, A.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2015-01-01

    Higher Order Bessel Beams (HOBBs) have many useful applications in optical trapping experiments. The generation of HOBBs is achieved by illuminating an axicon by a Laguerre-Gaussian beam generated by a spiral phase plate. It can also be generated by a Holographic Optical Element (HOE) containing the functions of the Spiral Phase Plate (SPP) and an axicon. However the HOBB's large focal depth reduces the intensity at each plane. In this paper, we propose a multifunctional Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) containing the functions of a SPP, axicon and a Fresnel Zone Lens (FZL) to generate higher efficiency higher order Bessel-like-beams with a reduced focal depth. The functions of a SPP and a FZL were combined by shifting the location of zones of FZL in a spiral fashion. The resulting element is combined with an axicon by modulo-2π phase addition technique. The final composite element contains the functions of SPP, FZL and axicon. The elements were designed with different topological charges and fabricated using electron beam direct writing. The elements were tested and the generation of a higher order Bessel-like-beams is confirmed. Besides, the elements also generated high quality donut beams at two planes equidistant from the focal plane of the FZL.

  13. Resistance temperature detective materials as the thermo power generator elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaspal; Verma, S. S.

    2015-08-01

    The conventional RTD (Resistance Temperature Detective) thermocouples of types B, E, R, K and S are the efficient keys in the temperature sensing applications. These are the combinations of thermoelectric materials like Platinum, Rhodium, Constantan, Chromel, and Alumel which works on the Seebeck theory. The chief objective of this research work is only to explore their energy conversion efficiencies in the temperature range of 330°C by the generations of thermo emf. The present research work is carried out in the two parts; one is for the normal conditions and the other for the applied magnetic field of three different magnitudes i.e. 260Gauss, 360Gauss and 460Gauss. Hence this paper reports about the energy management aspects of RTD materials not only by the direct conversion of heat into electricity but also along with the magnetic field.

  14. Development of metal hydride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    Most of current hydride technology at Savannah River Site is based on beds of metal hydride powders; the expansion upon hydridation and the cycling results in continued breakdown into finer particles. Goal is to develop a composite which will contain the fines in a dimensionally stable matrix, for use in processes which require a stable gas flow through a hydride bed. Metal hydride composites would benefit the advanced Thermal Cycling Absorption process (hydrogen isotope separation), and the Replacement Tritium Facility (storage, pumping, compression, purification of hydrogen isotopes). These composites were fabricated by cold compaction of a mixture of metal hydride granules and coarse copper powder; the porosity in the granules was introduced by means of ammonium carbonate. The composite pellets were cycled 138 times in hydrogen with the loss of LANA0.75 (LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75}) limited to the surface. Vacuum sintering can provide additional strength at the edges. Without a coating, the metal hydride particles exposed at the pellet surface can be removed by cycling several times in hydrogen.

  15. KAM torus frequency generation from two line element sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, G.; Wiesel, W.

    2011-09-01

    The Kolmogorov Arnold and Moser (KAM) theorem states that a lightly perturbed Hamiltonian system will have solutions which lie on a torus. Earlier work by the second author has shown that most Earth satellite orbits perturbed by the geopotential lie on KAM tori. The problem then arises as to how to convert the current satellite tracking orbits to KAM tori. A KAM torus is characterized by three frequencies and three phase angles. The frequencies are essentially the rates of change of the mean anomaly, the longitude of the ascending node, and the argument of perigee. In this paper we explore the determination of these three rates from the fitting of SGP4 two line element sets (TLEs), and then constructing KAM tori with the specified frequencies. The success of this process, and an idea of the residual errors, can then be obtained by comparing the SGP4 predictions with the KAM torus predictions. Second order polynomials are fit to data from TLEs over 18 months using a least squares technique. The first order coefficients are used as the torus basis frequencies while the second order terms are used to account for perturbations to the satellite's orbit such as air drag. Four cases are attempted using the Hubble Space Telescope and three rocket bodies as test subjects. A KAM torus with the desired basis frequencies is constructed and used to predict satellite position. For the final test case, this shows an oscillatory error with an amplitude of less than 80 km over a period of almost two years. The authors speculate that this is caused by periodic lunar and solar perturbations, masked in the SGP4 fits by frequent updates.

  16. Techniques for Unifying Disparate Elements in an EOS Instrument's Product Generation System Development Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Alex; Eng, Bjorn; Leff, Craig; Schwarz, Arnold

    1997-01-01

    In the development environment for ASTER level II product generation system, techniques have been incorporated to allow automated information sharing among all system elements, and to enable the use of sound software engineering techniques in the scripting languages.

  17. Orthodontic forces generated by a simulated archwire appliance evaluated by the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Spyrakos, C C; Bernard, D O

    1990-01-01

    The finite element method has been used to determine the stress distribution generated by the initial placement of a simulated preset bracket-type orthodontic appliance utilizing titanium-nickel alloy archwire. PMID:2256565

  18. A parallel algorithm for generation and assembly of finite element stiffness and mass matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, O. O.; Carmona, E. A.; Nguyen, D. T.; Baddourah, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    A new algorithm is proposed for parallel generation and assembly of the finite element stiffness and mass matrices. The proposed assembly algorithm is based on a node-by-node approach rather than the more conventional element-by-element approach. The new algorithm's generality and computation speed-up when using multiple processors are demonstrated for several practical applications on multi-processor Cray Y-MP and Cray 2 supercomputers.

  19. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  20. Metallurgy of rechargeable hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Rudman, P.S.; Sandrock, G.D.

    1982-01-01

    Thermodynamic principles of metal-hydrogen (M-H) systems are reviewed, and the theory and practice of M-H alloys are detailed. Pseudobinary systems, phase transformations, and metastability are briefly discussed. The LaNi5-H system is used to examine plateau slope and hysteresis in M-H alloy formation, and the rules of simple averaging and reversed stability are assessed with respect to their usefulness in predicting the behavior of such systems. The crystal structure of metal hydrides is addressed, including AB, AB2, and AB5 structure. Finally, the use of ternary substitutional alloying in controlling the thermodynamic properties of M-H systems is discussed, illustrating the substitution of copper for nickel in LaN5 and the dependence of the equilibrium pressure on the unit cell volume of various CaCu5 type compounds.

  1. Heat-actuated metal hydride hydrogen compressor testing

    SciTech Connect

    Piraino, M.; Metz, P.D.; Nienke, J.L.; Freitelberg, A.S.; Rahaman, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    Electric utilities use hydrogen for cooling turbine generators. The majority of the utilities purchase the gas from industrial gas markets. On-site electrolytic hydrogen production may prove advantageous both logistically and economically. In order to demonstrate this concept, Public Service Electric and Gas Co. (PSE and G) and EPRI installed an electrolyzer at the Sewaren (NJ) station. To compress the gas, PSE and G purchased a heat-activated metal hydride compressor from Ergenics, Inc. This report describes closed- and open-cycle tests conducted on this metal hydride hydrogen compressor. Test systems, plans, methodologies, and results are presented. A brief discussion evaluates these performance results, addresses some of the practical problems involved with electrolyzer-compressor interface, and compares the costs and benefits of metal hydride versus mechanical hydrogen compression for utility generator cooling.

  2. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Sandrock, G.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  3. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  4. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  5. COMGEN: A computer program for generating finite element models of composite materials at the micro level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    1990-01-01

    COMGEN (Composite Model Generator) is an interactive FORTRAN program which can be used to create a wide variety of finite element models of continuous fiber composite materials at the micro level. It quickly generates batch or session files to be submitted to the finite element pre- and postprocessor PATRAN based on a few simple user inputs such as fiber diameter and percent fiber volume fraction of the composite to be analyzed. In addition, various mesh densities, boundary conditions, and loads can be assigned easily to the models within COMGEN. PATRAN uses a session file to generate finite element models and their associated loads which can then be translated to virtually any finite element analysis code such as NASTRAN or MARC.

  6. Determination of soluble toxic arsenic species in alga samples by microwave-assisted extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    García Salgado, S; Quijano Nieto, M A; Bonilla Simón, M M

    2006-09-29

    A microwave-based procedure for arsenic species extraction in alga samples (Sargassum fulvellum, Chlorella vulgaris, Hizikia fusiformis and Laminaria digitata) is described. Extraction time and temperature were tested in order to evaluate the extraction efficiency of the process. Arsenic compounds were extracted in 8 ml of deionised water at 90 degrees C for 5 min. The process was repeated three times. Soluble arsenic compounds extracted accounted for about 78-98% of total arsenic. The results were compared with those obtained in a previous work, where the extraction process was carried out by ultrasonic focussed probe for 30 s. Speciation studies were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-AES). The chromatographic method allowed us to separate As(III), As(V), monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in less than 13 min. The chromatographic analysis of the samples allowed us to identify and quantify As(V) in Hizikia sample and Sargasso material, while the four arsenic species studied were found in Chlorella sample. In the case of Laminaria sample, none of these species was identified by HPLC-HG-ICP-AES. However, in the chromatographic analysis of this alga by HPLC-ICP-AES, an unknown arsenic species was detected. PMID:16876177

  7. Quasi-transverse optical phonon mode in self-generated semipolar AlN grains embedded in c-oriented AlN matrix grown on sapphire using hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. Y.; Zhou, T. F.; Zheng, S. N.; Liu, X. H.; Zhao, J. J.; Su, X. J.; Huang, J.; Qiu, Y. X.; Zhang, J. C.; Xu, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we present a microspectroscopic investigation on the quasi-transverse optical phonon modes Q(TO) in some self-generated aluminum nitride (AlN) grains grown on sapphire using hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, these grains were confirmed to be embedded in (0001)-AlN (c-AlN) epitaxial matrix with an appearance plane of (10 1 ¯ 1 ) (s-plane). Two beam bright field images further showed that the AlN grains were free of dislocation. In-plane phonon anisotropy of the AlN grains was discussed in detail using angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy. The dependence of pure Raman phonons intensity on rotation angle agrees well with the calculation. The Q(TO) phonon intensity exhibited similar behavior to that of A1(TO) phonon, which can be explained by Loudon's formula. However, the observed frequency fluctuation for the Q(TO) phonon differs from that of the pure phonon modes, which cannot be directly understood from the classic Loudon's formula. A modified Loudon's formula appropriate to non-normal incidence was presented to explain the observed Q(TO) phonon frequency fluctuation. Combining with the angular-dependent Raman spectra, we proposed that a small inclination of s-plane along with the various in-plane orientations in c-AlN matrix lead to the frequency fluctuation of Q(TO) in these embedded semipolar AlN grains.

  8. Can sample treatments based on advanced oxidation processes assisted by high-intensity focused ultrasound be used for toxic arsenic determination in human urine by flow-injection hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Correia, A; Galesio, M; Santos, H; Rial-Otero, R; Lodeiro, C; Oehmen, A; Conceição, Antonio C L; Capelo, J L

    2007-05-15

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), namely, KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU and H(2)O(2)/HCl/HIFU are studied and compared for the determination of toxic arsenic in human urine [As(III)+As(V)+MMA+DMA] by flow-injection hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HG-AAS). The KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU procedure was found to be adequate for organic matter degradation in human urine. l-cysteine (letra minuscula) was used for As reduction to the trivalent state. The new procedure was assessed with seven urines certified in different As species. Results revealed that with KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU plus l-cysteine the toxic arsenic can be accurately measured in human urine whilst the H(2)O(2)/HCl/HIFU procedure underestimates toxic As. DMA and MMA degradation in urine were observed, due to the effects of the ultrasonic field. Recoveries for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA were within the certified ranges. Arsenobetaine was not degraded by the AOPs. The new procedure adheres well to the principles of analytical minimalism: (i) low reagent consumption, (ii) low reagent concentration, (iii) low waste production and (iv) low amount of time required for sample preparation and analysis. PMID:19071711

  9. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  10. Approaches to the automatic generation and control of finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.

    1987-01-01

    The algorithmic approaches being taken to the development of finite element mesh generators capable of automatically discretizing general domains without the need for user intervention are discussed. It is demonstrated that because of the modeling demands placed on a automatic mesh generator, all the approaches taken to date produce unstructured meshes. Consideration is also given to both a priori and a posteriori mesh control devices for automatic mesh generators as well as their integration with geometric modeling and adaptive analysis procedures.

  11. Bulk Hydrides and Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, Eric F.

    Zirconium alloys are susceptible to engineering problems associated with the uptake of hydrogen throughout their design lifetime in nuclear reactors. Understanding of hydrogen embrittlement associated with the precipitation of brittle hydride phases and a sub-critical crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) is required to provide the engineering justifications for safe reactor operation. The nature of bulk zirconium hydrides at low concentrations (< 100 wt. ppm) is subject to several contradictory descriptions in the literature associated with the stability and metastability of gamma-phase zirconium hydride. Due to the differing volume expansions (12-17%) and crystallography between gamma and delta hydride phases, it is suggested that the matrix yield strength may have an effect on the phase stability. The present work indicated that although yield strength can shift the phase stability, other factors such as microstructure and phase distribution can be as or more important. This suggests that small material differences are the reason for the literature discrepancies. DHC is characterised by the repeated precipitation, growth, fracture of brittle hydride phases and subsequent crack arrest in the ductile metal. DHC growth is associated primarily the ability of hydrogen to diffuse under a stress induced chemical potential towards a stress raiser. Knowledge of the factors controlling DHC are paramount in being able to appropriately describe DHC for engineering purposes. Most studies characterise DHC upon cooling to the test temperature. DHC upon heating has not been extensively studied and the mechanism by which it occurs is somewhat controversial in the literature. This work shows that previous thermo-mechanical processing of hydrided zirconium can have a significant effect on the dissolution behaviour of the bulk hydride upon heating. DHC tests with gamma-quenched, furnace cooled-delta and reoriented bulk hydrides upon heating and DHC upon

  12. Quasi-static Compaction of Polyhedra by the Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kyle C.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Alam, Meheboob

    2009-06-01

    Metal hydrides have tremendous potential to meet on-board hydrogen storage requirements for fuel cell vehicles as set by the US DoE. Cyclic strain caused by addition and depletion of hydrogen in metal hydride beds results in brittle fracture and subsequent formation of micron-sized, faceted particles. These beds inhibit hydride formation because of poor inter-particle heat conduction that increases the bed's temperature during exothermic hydriding reactions. This work involves the development of a model for generating loose configurations of metal hydride powder and for assessing the commensurate quasi-static loading characteristics. Particles in the powder are modeled by regular tetrahedra and cubes. An energy-based elastic contact mechanics model for particles of general shape is utilized. The numerical methods utilized to determine quasi-static equilibrium are described and exercised with particular emphasis on issues of stability and computational efficiency. Triaxial strain is applied to simulate evolution of the solid fraction, coordination number, force network connectivity, and internal pressure as consolidation occurs in the absence of interparticle friction. These modeling elements form the mechanical basis of a model that will ultimately predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of metal hydride powders and compacts.

  13. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Kandalam, Anil K.

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H.; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Kandalam, Anil K.

    2014-04-01

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, BxAlyHz-, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Kandalam, Anil K

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, BxAlyHz(-), were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms. PMID:24784280

  17. Learning to use the finite-element mesh generator, ESCHER 3. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, W.R. Jr.

    1989-08-01

    ESCHER is a finite-element mesh generator designed to generate valid and well proportioned two-dimensional and three-dimensional meshes. It is intended for use in a loosely integrated analysis system. Edge-geometry data can be input to ESCHER from almost any computer-aided drafting program used today. ESCHER produces a finite-element model in a neutral file format that can be translated for input to specific finite-element analysis codes. This report describes how to use ESCHER. It explains what constitutes a valid geometrical model, how to construct one from edge geometry, how to define a finite-element model given a geometrical model, and how to verify that the created model is valid. The computer-hardware system required is explained, and ESCHER's relationship to other computer codes in the Integrated Design Engineering Analysis Library, IDEAL, is discussed. 5 refs., 11 figs.

  18. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  19. Specific Genomic Fingerprints of Phosphate Solubilizing Pseudomonas Strains Generated by Box Elements

    PubMed Central

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2014-01-01

    Primers corresponding to conserved bacterial repetitive of BOX elements were used to show that BOX-DNA sequences are widely distributed in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains. Phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas was isolated from oil palm fields (tropical soil) in Malaysia. BOX elements were used to generate genomic fingerprints of a variety of Pseudomonas isolates to identify strains that were not distinguishable by other classification methods. BOX-PCR, that derived genomic fingerprints, was generated from whole purified genomic DNA by liquid culture of phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas. BOX-PCR generated the phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas specific fingerprints to identify the relationship between these strains. This suggests that distribution of BOX elements' sequences in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains is the mirror image of their genomic structure. Therefore, this method appears to be a rapid, simple, and reproducible method to identify and classify phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains and it may be useful tool for fast identification of potential biofertilizer strains. PMID:25580434

  20. Synthesis and hydride transfer reactions of cobalt and nickel hydride complexes to BX3 compounds.

    PubMed

    Mock, Michael T; Potter, Robert G; O'Hagan, Molly J; Camaioni, Donald M; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; DuBois, Daniel L

    2011-12-01

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H(2) gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)(2) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX(3) compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt(3). This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔG(H(-))°) of HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX(3) compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX(3) compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)(2) was observed to transfer H(-) to BX(3) compounds with X = H, OC(6)F(5), and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)(3) is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH(3))(2) and dmpe-(BH(2)(SPh))(2) products that follow from a reduction of multiple B-SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)(2) and B(SPh)(3) in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh and Et(3)N-BH(3) with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) with B(SPh)(3) under analogous conditions give Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)(2)(SPh)](+). The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)(2) (dedpe = Et(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)) from H(2) and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)(2)Co(dedpe)(2)][BF(4)]. PMID:22040085

  1. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX3 Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-12-05

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2} gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe){sub 2}, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) was capable of reducing a variety of BX{sub 3} compounds having hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to HA of BEt{sub 3}. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, (HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +}), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities ({Delta}G{sub H{sup -}}{sup o}) of HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX{sub 3} compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX{sub 3} compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe){sub 2} was observed to transfer H{sup -} to BX{sub 3} compounds with X = H, OC{sub 6}F{sub 5} and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh){sub 3} is accompanied by formation of (BH{sub 3}){sub 2}-dmpe and (BH{sub 2}SPh){sub 2}-dmpe products that follow from reduction of multiple BSPh bonds and loss of a dmpe ligand from Co. Reactions between HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and B(SPh){sub 3} in the presence of triethylamine result in formation of Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh and Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3} with no loss of dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} with B(SPh){sub 3} under analogous conditions give Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe){sub 2}(SPh)]{sup +}. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe){sub 2} (dedpe = diethyldiphenyl(phosphino)ethane) from H{sub 2} and a base is also discussed; including the formation of an uncommon trans

  2. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX₃ Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. Scott; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-10-31

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H₂ gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)₂ (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX₃ compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt₃. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)₂ and [HNi(dmpe)₂]+, to form B–H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔGH °) of HCo(dmpe)₂ and [HNi(dmpe)₂]+ were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX₃ compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX₃ compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)₂ was observed to transfer H to BX₃ compounds with X = H, OC₆F₅, and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)₃ is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH₃)₂ and dmpe-(BH₂(SPh))₂ products that follow from a reduction of multiple B–SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)₂ and B(SPh)₃ in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et₃N–BH₂SPh and Et₃N–BH₃ with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)₂]+ with B(SPh)₃ under analogous conditions give Et₃N–BH₂SPh as the final product along with the nickel–thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)₂(SPh)]+. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)₂ (dedpe = Et₂PCH₂CH₂PPh₂) from H₂ and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)₂Co(dedpe)₂][BF₄].

  3. Assessing nanoparticle size effects on metal hydride thermodynamics using the Wulff construction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Chul; Dai, Bing; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2009-05-20

    The reaction thermodynamics of metal hydrides are crucial to the use of these materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In addition to altering the kinetics of metal hydride reactions, the use of nanoparticles can also change the overall reaction thermodynamics. We use density functional theory to predict the equilibrium crystal shapes of seven metals and their hydrides via the Wulff construction. These calculations allow the impact of nanoparticle size on the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from these metal hydrides to be predicted. Specifically, we study the temperature required for the hydride to generate a H(2) pressure of 1 bar as a function of the radius of the nanoparticle. In most, but not all, cases the hydrogen release temperature increases slightly as the particle size is reduced. PMID:19420649

  4. Iron Hydride Detection and Intramolecular Hydride Transfer in a Synthetic Model of Mono-Iron Hydrogenase with a CNS Chelate.

    PubMed

    Durgaprasad, Gummadi; Xie, Zhu-Lin; Rose, Michael J

    2016-01-19

    We report the identification and reactivity of an iron hydride species in a synthetic model complex of monoiron hydrogenase. The hydride complex is derived from a phosphine-free CNS chelate that includes a Fe-C(NH)(═O) bond (carbamoyl) as a mimic of the active site iron acyl. The reaction of [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(CO)2(Br)] (1) with NaHBEt3 generates the iron hydride intermediate [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(H)(CO)2] (2; δFe-H = -5.08 ppm). Above -40 °C, the hydride species extrudes CH3S(-) via intramolecular hydride transfer, which is stoichiometrically trapped in the structurally characterized dimer μ2-(CH3S)2-[((O═)C(HN)N(Ph))Fe(CO)2]2 (3). Alternately, when activated by base ((t)BuOK), 1 undergoes desulfurization to form a cyclometalated species, [((O═)C(NH)NC(Ph))Fe(CO)2] (5); derivatization of 5 with PPh3 affords the structurally characterized species [((O═)C(NH)NC)Fe(CO)(PPh3)2] (6), indicating complex 6 as the common intermediate along each pathway of desulfurization. PMID:26405810

  5. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was initiated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized, and the knowledge regarding the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant portion of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides is collaborators in the International Energy Agreement Task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and is an excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  6. Finite Element Analysis Generates an Increasing Interest in Dental Research: A Bibliometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Abdoulaziz; Mushegyan, Vagan; Naveau, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to provide a longitudinal overview of published studies that use finite element analysis in dental research, by using the SCI-expanded database of Web of Science® (Thomson Reuters). Material and Methods: Eighty publications from 1999-2000 and 473 from 2009-2010 were retrieved. This literature grew faster than the overall dental literature. The number of publishing countries doubled. The main journals were American or English, and dealt with implantology. For the top 10 journals publishing dental finite element papers, the mean impact factor increased by 75% during the decade. Results: Finite elements generate an increasing interest from dental authors and publishers worldwide. PMID:27006722

  7. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified tritium hydride bed development, Part 2 - Experimental validation of key conceptual design features

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, K.J.; Morgan, G.A.

    2015-03-15

    The Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed is an interim replacement for the first generation (Gen1) process hydride beds currently in service in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facilities. 3 new features are implemented in the TECH Mod hydride bed prototype: internal electric cartridge heaters, porous divider plates, and copper foam discs. These modifications will enhance bed performance and reduce costs by improving bed activation and installation processes, in-bed accountability measurements, end-of-life bed removal, and He-3 recovery. A full-scale hydride bed test station was constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in order to evaluate the performance of the prototype TECH Mod hydride bed. Controlled hydrogen (H{sub 2}) absorption/ desorption experiments were conducted to validate that the conceptual design changes have no adverse effects on the gas transfer kinetics or H{sub 2} storage/release properties compared to those of the Gen1 bed. Inert gas expansions before, during, and after H{sub 2} flow tests were used to monitor changes in gas transfer rates with repeated hydriding/de-hydriding of the hydride material. The gas flow rates significantly decreased after initial hydriding of the material; however, minimal changes were observed after repeated cycling. The data presented herein confirm that the TECH Mod hydride bed would be a suitable replacement for the Gen1 bed with the added enhancements expected from the advanced design features. (authors)

  8. Application of Element Balance Method to Evaluate the Quantity and Period of Biogas Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LU, Shuangfang; LIU, Shaojun; SHEN, Jianian; XUE, Haitao; XU, Qingxia; HU, Huiting; WANG, Min

    The period of biogenic gas generation plays a very important role in its accumulation, but till now there is no creditable and effective method to appraise it at home and abroad. It is a material balance process of organic elements during organic matter evolution, regardless of the mechanisms of biogenic gas. In this article, the element balance method is explored and established to appraise biogenic gas, which is demarcated and applied according to the abundant analyzed data in Songliao basin. Results indicate that the depth of biogenic gas generation is possibly shallower than 800 m; the biogas-generated quantity of source rock in this area is about 285.0 × 10 12 m 3. And the main period of biogenic gas generation occurs before the end of Nenjiang period.

  9. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  10. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18849978

  11. Automatic data generation scheme for finite-element method /FEDGE/ - Computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuz, F.

    1970-01-01

    Algorithm provides for automatic input data preparation for the analysis of continuous domains in the fields of structural analysis, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. The computer program utilizes the natural coordinate systems concept and the finite element method for data generation.

  12. Composite axilens-axicon diffractive optical elements for generation of ring patterns with high focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavarapu, Raghu; Vijayakumar, A.; Brunner, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-03-01

    A binary Fresnel Zone Axilens (FZA) is designed for the infinite conjugate mode and the phase profile of a refractive axicon is combined with it to generate a composite Diffractive Optical Element (DOE). The FZA designed for two focal lengths generates a line focus along the propagation direction extending between the two focal planes. The ring pattern generated by the axicon is focused through this distance and the radius of the ring depends on the propagation distance. Hence, the radius of the focused ring pattern can be tuned, during the design process, within the two focal planes. The integration of the two functions was carried out by shifting the location of zones of FZA with respect to the phase profile of the refractive axicon resulting in a binary composite DOE. The FZAs and axicons were designed for different focal depth values and base angles respectively, in order to achieve different ring radii within the focal depth of each element. The elements were simulated using scalar diffraction formula and their focusing characteristics were analyzed. The DOEs were fabricated using electron beam direct writing and evaluated using a fiber coupled diode laser. The tunable ring patterns generated by the DOEs have prospective applications in microdrilling as well as microfabrication of circular diffractive and refractive optical elements.

  13. Automated volumetric grid generation for finite element modeling of human hand joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Underhill, K.; Rainsberger, R.

    1995-02-01

    We are developing techniques for finite element analysis of human joints. These techniques need to provide high quality results rapidly in order to be useful to a physician. The research presented here increases model quality and decreases user input time by automating the volumetric mesh generation step.

  14. ESCHER: An interactive mesh-generating editor for preparing finite-element input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    ESCHER is an interactive mesh generation and editing program designed to help the user create a finite-element mesh, create additional input for finite-element analysis, including initial conditions, boundary conditions, and slidelines, and generate a NEUTRAL FILE that can be postprocessed for input into several finite-element codes, including ADINA, ADINAT, DYNA, NIKE, TSAAS, and ABUQUS. Two important ESCHER capabilities, interactive geometry creation and mesh archival storge are described in detail. Also described is the interactive command language and the use of interactive graphics. The archival storage and restart file is a modular, entity-based mesh data file. Modules of this file correspond to separate editing modes in the mesh editor, with data definition syntax preserved between the interactive commands and the archival storage file. Because ESCHER was expected to be highly interactive, extensive user documentation was provided in the form of an interactive HELP package.

  15. A finite-element mesh generator based on growing neural networks.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllidis, D G; Labridis, D P

    2002-01-01

    A mesh generator for the production of high-quality finite-element meshes is being proposed. The mesh generator uses an artificial neural network, which grows during the training process in order to adapt itself to a prespecified probability distribution. The initial mesh is a constrained Delaunay triangulation of the domain to be triangulated. Two new algorithms to accelerate the location of the best matching unit are introduced. The mesh generator has been found able to produce meshes of high quality in a number of classic cases examined and is highly suited for problems where the mesh density vector can be calculated in advance. PMID:18244543

  16. Characteristics and Applications of Metal Hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, G. J.; Lynch, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Report discusses engineering principles of uses of metal hydrides in spacecraft. Metal hydrides absorb, store, pump, compress, and expand hydrogen gas. Additionally, they release or absorb sizeable amounts of heat as they form and decompose - property adapted for thermal-energy management or for propulsion. Describes efforts to: Identify heat sources and sinks suitable for driving metal hydride thermal cycles in spacecraft; develop concepts for hydride subsystems employing available heating and cooling methods; and produce data base on estimated sizes, masses, and performances of hydride devices for spacecraft.

  17. A STUDY OF THE PARTICULATE AND GASEOUS EMISSIONS OF TRITIUM FROM NEUTRON GENERATOR TARGETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neutron generator targets are prepared by adsorption of elemental tritium on titanium or zirconium film on a copper backing. The stability of tritium on the target depends on the ability of Ti or Zr to form stable hydrides (tritides) resulting in chemical compounds rather than a ...

  18. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption. PMID:19420657

  19. Hydride generation in-atomizer collection atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of antimony in acetic acid leachates from pewter cups.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; Kratzer, Jan; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Dědina, Jiří

    2011-12-15

    Antimony is one of the constituents of pewter, an alloy composed of a minimum of 90% tin with the balance being made up with copper, antimony and perhaps some bismuth. A method has been developed to determine Sb in acetic acid leachates from pewter cups. The employed instrumentation, an atomic absorption spectrometer, equipped with a quartz trap-and-atomizer device, is simple and relatively inexpensive with low running costs. Interferences due to the presence of tin and ways to control them were investigated in detail. The applied approach made possible to overcome potentially serious interference of Sn leached from the cup material (which was shown to take place in the atomizer), by a combination of (i) high concentration of HCl, which decreases the efficiency of stannane generation and (ii) in-atomizer collection. The resulting Sn tolerance limit was between 10 and 20 mg L(-1). The advantages of the in-atomizer collection are a lower tin interference in the atomizer, and a much better limit of detection (LOD), which makes possible reducing the atomization interference further by working with more diluted sample solutions. Besides the Sn interference, an interference of an unknown volatile compound transported to the atomizer together with stibine was identified in the measured sample solutions. This interference could be controlled using the analyte addition technique. The applicability of the method was tested on solutions containing a wide range of interferents leached from the pewter cups, obtained at leaching times between 1 and 24h. The LOD in the sample solutions was found to be 0.03 μg L(-1) Sb. PMID:22099676

  20. Gata2 cis-element is required for hematopoietic stem cell generation in the mammalian embryo.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Johnson, Kirby D; Chang, Yuan-I; Boyer, Meghan E; Dewey, Colin N; Zhang, Jing; Bresnick, Emery H

    2013-12-16

    The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta, gonad, mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo is crucial for development of the adult hematopoietic system. We described a deletion of a Gata2 cis-element (+9.5) that depletes fetal liver HSCs, is lethal at E13-14 of embryogenesis, and is mutated in an immunodeficiency that progresses to myelodysplasia/leukemia. Here, we demonstrate that the +9.5 element enhances Gata2 expression and is required to generate long-term repopulating HSCs in the AGM. Deletion of the +9.5 element abrogated the capacity of hemogenic endothelium to generate HSC-containing clusters in the aorta. Genomic analyses indicated that the +9.5 element regulated a rich ensemble of genes that control hemogenic endothelium and HSCs, as well as genes not implicated in hematopoiesis. These results reveal a mechanism that controls stem cell emergence from hemogenic endothelium to establish the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:24297994

  1. Gata2 cis-element is required for hematopoietic stem cell generation in the mammalian embryo

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Johnson, Kirby D.; Chang, Yuan-I; Boyer, Meghan E.; Dewey, Colin N.; Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta, gonad, mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo is crucial for development of the adult hematopoietic system. We described a deletion of a Gata2 cis-element (+9.5) that depletes fetal liver HSCs, is lethal at E13–14 of embryogenesis, and is mutated in an immunodeficiency that progresses to myelodysplasia/leukemia. Here, we demonstrate that the +9.5 element enhances Gata2 expression and is required to generate long-term repopulating HSCs in the AGM. Deletion of the +9.5 element abrogated the capacity of hemogenic endothelium to generate HSC-containing clusters in the aorta. Genomic analyses indicated that the +9.5 element regulated a rich ensemble of genes that control hemogenic endothelium and HSCs, as well as genes not implicated in hematopoiesis. These results reveal a mechanism that controls stem cell emergence from hemogenic endothelium to establish the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:24297994

  2. Characterization of laser induced breakdown plasmas used for measurements of arsenic, antimony and selenium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonsson, J. B.; Williamson, L. J.

    2011-09-01

    Studies have been performed to characterize laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) plasmas formed in Ar/H 2 gas mixtures that are used for hydride generation (HG) LIBS measurements of arsenic (As), antimony (Sb) and selenium (Se) hydrides. The plasma electron density and plasma excitation temperature have been determined through hydrogen, argon and arsenic emission measurements. The electron density ranges from 4.5 × 10 17 to 8.3 × 10 15 cm -3 over time delays of 0.2 to 15 μs. The plasma temperatures range from 8800 to 7700 K for Ar and from 8800 to 6500 K for As in the HG LIBS plasmas. Evaluation of the plasma properties leads to the conclusion that partial local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are present in the HG LIBS plasmas. Comparison measurements in LIBS plasmas formed in Ar gas only indicate that the temperatures are similar in both plasmas. However it is also observed that the electron density is higher in the Ar only plasmas and that the emission intensities of Ar are higher and decay more slowly in the Ar only plasmas. These differences are attributed to the presence of H 2 which has a higher thermal conductivity and provides additional dissociation, excitation and ionization processes in the HG LIBS plasma environment. Based on the observed results, it is anticipated that changes to the HG conditions that change the amount of H 2 in the plasma will have a significant effect on analyte emission in the HG LIBS plasmas that is independent of changes in the HG efficiency. The HG LIBS plasmas have been evaluated for measurements of elements hydrides using a constant set of HG LIBS plasma conditions. Linear responses are observed and limits of detection of 0.7, 0.2 and 0.6 mg/L are reported for As, Sb and Se, respectively.

  3. Methods and evaluations of MRI content-adaptive finite element mesh generation for bioelectromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. H.; Kim, T.-S.; Cho, M. H.; Ahn, Y. B.; Lee, S. Y.

    2006-12-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element analysis (FEA) offers several advantages over conventional methods such as the boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropic conductivity. For FEA, mesh generation is the first critical requirement and there exist many different approaches. However, conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes (cMeshes), resulting in numerous nodes and elements in modelling the conducting domain, and thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present efficient content-adaptive mesh generation schemes for complex biological volumes of MR images. The presented methodology is fully automatic and generates FE meshes that are adaptive to the geometrical contents of MR images, allowing optimal representation of conducting domain for FEA. We have also evaluated the effect of cMeshes on FEA in three dimensions by comparing the forward solutions from various cMesh head models to the solutions from the reference FE head model in which fine and equidistant FEs constitute the model. The results show that there is a significant gain in computation time with minor loss in numerical accuracy. We believe that cMeshes should be useful in the FEA of bioelectromagnetic problems.

  4. Transposition of reversed Ac element ends generates chromosome rearrangements in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianbo; Peterson, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    In classical "cut-and-paste" transposition, transposons are excised from donor sites and inserted at new locations. We have identified an alternative pathway in which transposition involves the 5' end of an intact Ac element and the 3' end of a nearby terminally deleted fAc (fractured Ac). The Ac and fAc elements are inserted at the maize p1 locus on chromosome 1s in the same orientation; the adjacent ends of the separate elements are thus in reversed orientation with respect to each other and are separated by a distance of approximately 13 kb. Transposition involving the two ends in reversed orientation generates inversions, deletions, and a novel type of local rearrangement. The rearrangement breakpoints are bounded by the characteristic footprint or target site duplications typical of Ac transposition reactions. These results demonstrate a new intramolecular transposition mechanism by which transposons can greatly impact genome evolution. PMID:15342530

  5. Generation of mask patterns for diffractive optical elements using Mathematica{sup T}{sup M}

    SciTech Connect

    OShea, D.C.

    1996-07-01

    The generation of binary and grayscale masks used in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements is usually performed using a proprietary piece of software or a computer-aided drafting package. Once the pattern is computed or designed, it must be output to a plotting or imaging system that will produce a reticle plate. This article describes a number of short Mathematica modules that can be used to generate binary and grayscale patterns in a PostScript-compatible format. Approaches to ensure that the patterns are directly related to the function of the element and the design wavelength are discussed. A procedure to preserve the scale of the graphic output when it is transferred to another application is given. Examples of surfaces for a 100 mm effective focal length lens and an Alvarez surface are given. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Pipe crack identification based on finite element method of second generation wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Junjie; He, Yumin; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhai, Zhi; Wang, Youming; He, Zhengjia

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, a new method is presented to identify crack location and size, which is based on stress intensity factor suitable for pipe structure and finite element method of second generation wavelets (SGW-FEM). Pipe structure is dispersed into a series of nested thin-walled pipes. By making use of stress intensity factor of the thin-walled pipe, a new calculation method of crack equivalent stiffness is proposed to solve the stress intensity factor of the pipe structure. On this basis, finite element method of second generation wavelets is used to establish the dynamic model of cracked pipe. Then we combine forward problem with inverse problem in order to establish quantitative identification method of the crack based on frequency change, which provides a non-destructive testing technology with vibration for the pipe structure. The efficiency of the proposed method is verified by experiments.

  7. Microstructure of surface cerium hydride growth sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, Martin; Knowles, John; Montgomery, Neil; Preuss, Michael

    2014-05-15

    Samples of cerium were exposed to hydrogen under controlled conditions causing cerium hydride sites to nucleate and grow on the surface. The hydriding rate was measured in situ, and the hydrides were characterised using secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The results show that the hydriding rate proceeded more quickly than earlier studies. Characterisation confirmed that the hydrogen is confined to the sites. The morphology of the hydrides was confirmed to be oblate, and stressed material was observed surrounding the hydride, in a number of cases lathlike features were observed surrounding the hydride sites laterally with cracking in the surface oxide above them. It is proposed that during growth the increased lattice parameter of the CeH{sub 2} induces a lateral compressive stress around the hydride, which relieves by the ca. 16% volume collapse of the γ-Ce to α-Ce pressure induced phase transition. Cracking of the surface oxide above the laths reduces the diffusion barrier to hydrogen reaching the metal/oxide interface surrounding the hydride site and contributes to the anisotropic growth of the hydrides.

  8. A simple adaptive mesh generator for 2-D finite element calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, F.A.; Yong, Y.C.; Ettinger, R.D. )

    1993-03-01

    A strategy for adaptive mesh generation is proposed. The method consists of the use of a suitably defined density function', which can either be defined by the user or be calculated from a previous approximate solution, to guide the generation of a new mesh. This new mesh is built starting from a minimal number of triangular elements which are then in several sweeps, repeatedly refined according to the density function. The Delaunay algorithm is used in each stage to keep the shape of the triangles as equilateral as possible.

  9. Laser generation of Lamb waves for defect detection: experimental methods and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Susan E; Dutton, Ben; Dixon, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of Lamb waves generated by a pulsed laser beam in an aluminum sheet is modeled using finite element analysis, and the interaction with defects is studied and compared to experimental results. The ultrasonic Lamb waves are detected by an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). The frequency content of the received wave is shown to be enhanced when the generation point is situated directly over the defect in both the modeled and experimental cases. Time-frequency analysis using a Wigner transform has enabled individual modes to be identified. PMID:22293738

  10. ZONE - a finite element mesh generator. [2-D, for CDC 7600

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, M.J.

    1980-03-12

    The ZONE computer program is a finite element mesh generator that produces the nodes and element description of any two-dimensional geometry. The geometry is subdivided into a mesh of quadrilateral and triangular zones arranged sequentially in an ordered march through the geometry. The order of march can be chosen so that the minimum bandwidth is obtained. The node points are defined in terms of the x and y coordinates in a global rectangular coordinate system. The zones generated are quadrilaterals or triangles defined by four node points in a counterclockwise sequence. Node points defining the outside boundary are generated for slide lines and to describe pressure boundary conditions. The mesh that is generated can be used as input to any two dimensional as well as any axisymmetrical structure program. The following points are taken up: program concept and characteristics; regions; layers; meridians (offset, circular arc, ellipse); rays; common characterstics - rays and meridians, ZONE input description; output files; examples; and program availability. Also generated is the input to the program PLOT. 15 figures. (RWR)