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1

Using Geophysical Signatures to Investigate Temporal Changes Due to Source Reduction in the Subsurface Contaminated with Hydrocarbons  

EPA Science Inventory

We investigated the geophysical response to subsurface hydrocarbon contamination source removal. Source removal by natural attenuation or by engineered bioremediation is expected to change the biological, chemical, and physical environment associated with the contaminated matrix....

2

Cosolvency effect in subsurface systems contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and ethanol.  

PubMed

In Brazil, most gas stations and terminals store tanks containing hydrated ethanol, gasohol and diesel. In case of spills, it is possible that a high aqueous ethanol concentration can facilitate the transfer of hydrocarbons into the aqueous phase, enhancing contaminant concentrations in groundwater, a process called cosolvency. This study investigates the cosolvency effect of ethanol on the aqueous solubility of mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and presents a simple log-linear model to predict this effect under equilibrium conditions. Cosolvency experiments were carried out in batch reactors under equilibrium conditions for pure mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, gasohol and diesel. A linear relationship between cosolvency power and Kow was determined, which allows predictions of the increase of aromatic hydrocarbon solubility due to the presence of ethanol. Results indicate that cosolvency would be significant only for high aqueous ethanol concentrations (higher than 10%). Under these conditions, cosolvency may be critical only in cases of large gasohol spills or in simultaneous releases of neat ethanol and other fuels. In this way, the hydrophobic and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), that are usually present in minor aqueous concentrations in fuel spills without ethanol, may be dissolved in larger amounts in groundwater. PMID:15016521

Corseuil, Henry X; Kaipper, Beatriz I A; Fernandes, Marilda

2004-03-01

3

Use of dissolved and vapor-phase gases to investigate methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the subsurface  

USGS Publications Warehouse

[1] At many sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, methanogenesis is a significant degradation pathway. Techniques to estimate CH4 production, consumption, and transport processes are needed to understand the geochemical system, provide a complete carbon mass balance, and quantify the hydrocarbon degradation rate. Dissolved and vapor-phase gas data collected at a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated site near Bemidji, Minnesota, demonstrate that naturally occurring nonreactive or relatively inert gases such as Ar and N2 can be effectively used to better understand and quantify physical and chemical processes related to methanogenic activity in the subsurface. In the vadose zone, regions of Ar and N2 depletion and enrichment are indicative of methanogenic and methanotrophic zones, and concentration gradients between the regions suggest that reaction-induced advection can be an important gas transport process. In the saturated zone, dissolved Ar and N2 concentrations are used to quantify degassing driven by methanogenesis and also suggest that attenuation of methane along the flow path, into the downgradient aquifer, is largely controlled by physical processes. Slight but discernable preferential depletion of N2 over Ar, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones near the free-phase oil, suggests reactivity of N2 and is consistent with other evidence indicating that nitrogen fixation by microbial activity is taking place at this site. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

Amos, R.T.; Mayer, K.U.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Williams, R.L.

2005-01-01

4

Modeling Subsurface Transport of Petroleum Hydrocarbons  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. EPA website contains information on the modeling of subsurface transport of petroleum hydrocarbons and other contaminants. There are a few course modules on the fate and transport of contaminants. There are also OnSite on-line calculators for site-specific assessment calculations.

2008-03-11

5

Subsurface Contamination Control  

SciTech Connect

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-12-12

6

DELINEATION OF SUBSURFACE HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION USING A DIRECT PUSH RESISTIVITY METHOD  

EPA Science Inventory

A direct push resistivity method was evaluated as a complementary screening tool to provide rapid in-situ contaminant detection to aid in better defining locations for drilling, sampling, and monitoring well installation at hazardous waste sites. Nine continuous direct push resi...

7

Delineation of subsurface hydrocarbon contamination at a former hydrogenation plant using spectral induced polarization imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements were conducted at a former hydrogenation plant in Zeitz (NE Germany) to investigate the potential of SIP imaging to delineate areas with different BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) concentrations. Conductivity images reveal a poor correlation with the distribution of contaminants; whereas phase images exhibit two main anomalies: low phase shift values (< 5 mrad) for locations with high BTEX concentrations, including the occurrence of free-phase product (BTEX concentrations > 1.7 g/l), and higher phase values for lower BTEX concentrations. Moreover, the spectral response of the areas with high BTEX concentration and free-phase products reveals a flattened spectrum in the low frequencies (< 40 Hz), while areas with lower BTEX concentrations exhibit a response characterized by a frequency peak. The SIP response was modelled using a Debye decomposition to compute images of the median relaxation-time. Consistent with laboratory studies, we observed an increase in the relaxation-time associated with an increase in BTEX concentrations. Measurements were also collected in the time domain (TDIP), revealing imaging results consistent with those obtained for frequency domain (SIP) measurements. Results presented here demonstrate the potential of the SIP imaging method to discriminate source and plume of dissolved contaminants at BTEX contaminated sites.

Flores Orozco, Adrián; Kemna, Andreas; Oberdörster, Christoph; Zschornack, Ludwig; Leven, Carsten; Dietrich, Peter; Weiss, Holger

2012-08-01

8

UNDERSTANDING THE FATE OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN THE SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

To achieve effective remediation of subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, definite scientific and technical knowledge of their fate after they are spilled onto the ground surface or leaked from underground storage tanks is essential. his paper provides extensive details...

9

EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODELING FOR HYDROCARBON SPILLS INTO THE SUBSURFACE  

EPA Science Inventory

Hydrocarbons which enter the subsurface through spills or leaks may create serious, long-lived ground-water contamination problems. onventional finite difference and finite element models of multiphase, multicomponent flow often have extreme requirements for both computer time an...

10

Containment of subsurface contaminants  

DOEpatents

A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01

11

Containment of subsurface contaminants  

DOEpatents

A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

Corey, J.C.

1994-09-06

12

In situ sensing of subsurface contamination--part I: near-infrared spectral characterization of alkanes, aromatics, and chlorinated hydrocarbons.  

PubMed

There is an imperative need for a chemical sensor capable of remote, in situ, long-term monitoring of chemical species at sites containing toxic chemical spills, specifically at chemical waste dumps, landfills, and locations with underground storage tanks. In the current research, a series of experiments were conducted measuring the near-infrared optical absorption of alkanes, aromatics, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. A spectral library was then developed to characterize the optical spectra of liquid hydrocarbons. Near-infrared analysis was chosen due to compatibility with optical fibers. The goal was to differentiate between classes of hydrocarbons and to also discriminate between compounds within a class of similar molecular structures. It was observed that unique absorption spectra can be obtained for each hydrocarbon, and this uniqueness can be used to discriminate between hydrocarbons from different families. Statistical analyses, namely, principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation coefficient (Spearman and Pearson methods), were attempted to match absorption spectra from an unknown hydrocarbon with the database with limited success. An algorithm was subsequently written to identify the characteristic peaks of each hydrocarbon that could be used to match data from an unknown chemical species with the database. PMID:24445930

Klavarioti, Maria; Kostarelos, Konstantinos; Pourjabbar, Anahita; Ghandehari, Masoud

2014-05-01

13

Subsurface contamination monitoring using laser fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

While innovative technologies in remediation need to be developed, so do innovative ways of site assessment. This monograph describes the development, testing, and performance of a new laser-induced fluorescence soil probe. A screening tool for site characterization, this probe has the potential to provide an economical, rapid assessment of contaminated sites. Cone Penetrometer testing equipment advances the probe into the subsurface. The probe identifies hydrocarbon classes using a multi-channel excitation-emission matrix. This technique facilitates the collection of significant amounts of subsurface information--surpassing conventional data collection methods--that can be used to rapidly identify areas of concern beneath a site. The technology has significant application for the following: rapid environmental site assessment; monitoring remediation programs; and monitoring manufacturing processes and industrial waste water operations.

Balshaw-Biddle, K.; Oubre, C.L.; Ward, C.H. [eds.] [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Kenny, J.E.; Pepper, J.W.; Wright, A.O.; Chen, Y.M. [Tufts Univ., MA (United States); Shelton, C.G. [Shell Research, Ltd. (United States)

1999-11-01

14

Emulsification of hydrocarbons by subsurface bacteria  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions indicating the high probability of biosurfactant production.Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions, indicating a high probability of biosurfactant production.

Francy, D.S.; Thomas, J.M.; Raymond, R.L.; Ward, C.H.

1991-01-01

15

Modeling subsurface contamination at Fernald  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Fernald site is located about 20 miles northwest of Cincinnati. Fernald produced refined uranium metal products from ores between 1953 and 1989. The pure uranium was sent to other DOE sites in South Carolina, Tennessee, Colorado,and Washington in support of the nation`s strategic defense programs. Over the years of large-scale uranium production, contamination of the site`s soil and groundwater occurred.The contamination is of particular concern because the Fernald site is located over the Great Miami Aquifer, a designated sole-source drinking water aquifer. Contamination of the aquifer with uranium was found beneath the site, and migration of the contamination had occurred well beyond the site`s southern boundary. As a result, Fernald was placed on the National Priorities (CERCLA/Superfund) List in 1989. Uranium production at the site ended in 1989,and Fernald`s mission has been changed to one of environmental restoration. This paper presents information about computerized modeling of subsurface contamination used for the environmental restoration project at Fernald.

Jones, B.W.; Flinn, J.C.; Ruwe, P.R.

1994-09-13

16

OPPORTUNITIES FOR BIORECLAMATION OF AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons are an important class of ground water contaminants. Spills of hydrocarbons often produce regions in the subsurface that retain the spilled material trapped as an oily phase. When ground water infiltrates the oily material, the more water-soluble hy...

17

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01

18

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE`s Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-04-01

19

Plant-enhanced subsurface bioremediation of nonvolatile hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, phytoremediation, i.e., the use of plants to clean up soils contaminated with organics, has become a promising new area of research, particularly for in-situ cleanup of large volumes of slightly contaminated soils. A model that can be used as a predictive tool in phytoremediation operations was developed to simulate the transport and fate of a residual hydrocarbon contaminant interacting with plant roots in a partially saturated soil. Time-specific distribution of root quantity through soil, as well as root uptake of soil water and hydrocarbon, was incorporated into the model. In addition, the microbial activity in the soil rhizosphere was modeled with a biofilm theory. A sandy loam, which is dominate in soils of agricultural importance, was selected for simulations. Cotton, which has well-documented plant properties, was used as the model plant. Model parameters involving root growth and root distribution were obtained from the actual field data reported in the literature and ranges of reported literature values were used to obtain a realistic simulation of a phytoremediation operation. Following the verification of the root growth model with published experimental data, it has been demonstrated that plant characteristics such as the root radius are more dominant than contaminant properties in the overall rate of phytoremediation operation. The simulation results showed enhanced biodegradation of a hydrocarbon contaminant mostly because of increased biofilm metabolism of organic contaminants in a growing root system of cotton. Simulations also show that a high mean daily root-water uptake rate increases the contaminant retardation factors because of the resulting low water content. The ability to simulate the fate of a hydrocarbon contaminant is essential in designing technically efficient and cost-effective, plant-aided remedial strategies and in evaluating the effectiveness of a proposed phytoremediation scheme.

Chang, Y.Y. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology Environmental Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Corapcioglu, M.Y. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-02-01

20

Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites  

SciTech Connect

Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of environmental parameters on bioremediation is important in designing a bioremediation system to reduce petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in impacted soils.

Paul Fallgren

2009-03-30

21

Enhanced bioremediation of subsurface contamination: Enzyme recruitment and redesign  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface systems containing radionuclide, heavy metal, and organic wastes must be carefully attended to avoid further impacts to the environment or exposures to human populations. It is appropriate, therefore, to invest in basic research to develop the requisite tools and methods for addressing complex cleanup problems. The rational modification of subsurface microoganisms by enzyme recruitment and enzyme design, in concert with engineered systems for delivery of microorganisms and nutrients to the contaminated zone, are potentially useful tools in the spectrum of approaches that will be required for successful remediation of deep subsurface contamination.

Brockman, F.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

1991-12-01

22

IMPACT OF REDOX DISEQUILIBRIA ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REMEDIATION IN SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Partitioning to mineral surfaces exerts significant control on inorganic contaminant transport in subsurface systems. Remedial technologies for in-situ treatment of subsurface contamination are frequently designed to optimize the efficiency of contaminant partitioning to solid s...

23

Characterization of hydrocarbon contaminated areas by multivariate statistical analysis: Case studies.  

PubMed

Analysis of soil gases is a relatively rapid and inexpensive method to delineate and measure hydrocarbon contamination in the subsurface caused by diesel or gasoline. Techniques originally developed for petroleum exploration have been adapted to tracking hydrocarbons which have leaked or spilled at or below the earth's surface.Discriminant analysis (a multivariate statistical technique) is used to classify soil gas samples of C1 to C7 hydrocarbons as biogenic (natural soil gases) or thermogenic (contaminant hydrocarbons). Map plots of C1 to C7 total interstitial hydrocarbons, C2 to C7 interstitial hydrocarbons, and C1/?C n rations are used to further delineate and document the extent and migration of contamination.Three case studies of the technique are presented: each involves leakage of hydrocarbons from underground storage tanks. Soil gas analysis clearly defines the spread of contamination and can serve as the basis for the correct placement of monitoring wells. The method proved to be accurate, rapid, and cost-effective; it therefore has potential for widespread application to the identification of soil and groundwater contaminated by hydrocarbons. PMID:24233510

Saenz, G; Pingitore, N E

1991-01-01

24

Subsurface Contamination Focus Area technical requirements. Volume 1: Requirements summary  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes functions and requirements for remediation of source term and plume sites identified by the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area. Included are detailed requirements and supporting information for source term and plume containment, stabilization, retrieval, and selective retrieval remedial activities. This information will be useful both to the decision-makers within the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) and to the technology providers who are developing and demonstrating technologies and systems. Requirements are often expressed as graphs or charts, which reflect the site-specific nature of the functions that must be performed. Many of the tradeoff studies associated with cost savings are identified in the text.

Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

1996-10-01

25

Investigations of geoelectrical signatures at a hydrocarbon contaminated site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study provides an evaluation of the utility and resolution of different geoelectrical methods in mapping contaminant distribution in the subsurface, and provides a window into the processes that may control their response at a site in Central Michigan. In situ and 2D surface resistivity, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and electromagnetic methods (EM) constrained by soil boring data were used to investigate the electrical properties of a light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) contaminant plume that resulted from 50 years of leakage into a glacio-fluvial geologic setting. Overall, the electrical signature from the in situ resistivity measurements were best able to image the subsurface stratigraphy and the associated contamination zone. GPR also mapped the subsurface stratigraphy. In particular, the GPR recorded a reflector that is subparallel to the water table, and occurs a few meters above the current free product level, which is coincident with the top of an oil-stained, light-gray sand layer. Further, regions of attenuated GPR reflections (shadow zones) due to enhanced conductivities were found to be coincident with low apparent resistivities. 2D geoelectrical measurements successfully imaged the top of the saturated zone and the underlying clay layer, but was unable to resolve any anomalous region that could be attributed to the hydrocarbon contamination. Likewise, the EM results provided no evidence of the presence of the free product plume at depth. Throughout this investigation, geoelectric measurements consistently recorded low resistivities (high apparent conductivities) associated with zones containing the free/residual product plume instead of high resistivities as has been suggested by the simple intuitive model. From this, it is inferred that substantial modification of the geochemical characteristics of the plume, surrounding media, and associated groundwater has occurred as a result of biogeochemical reactions. It is evident from this study that in situ resistivity measurements combined with surface geoelectrical measurements can characterize the distribution of conductive zones that may be associated with the biodegradation of LNAPL in the subsurface. Thus, the application of these techniques to hydrogeologic, contaminant monitoring, and remediation studies are far reaching.

Atekwana, Estella A.; Sauck, William A.; Werkema, Douglas D.

2000-05-01

26

ANAEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE  

EPA Science Inventory

Anaerobic conditions predominate in contaminated aquifers and are not uncommon in noncontaminated areas. Comparatively little is known about degradative processes and nutrient cycling under anaerobic conditions. However, it is apparent these processes are fundamentally differen...

27

The Stimulation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs with Subsurface Nuclear Explosions  

SciTech Connect

Between 1965 and 1979 there were five documented and one or more inferred attempts to stimulate the production from hydrocarbon reservoirs by detonating nuclear devices in reservoir strata. Of the five documented tests, three were carried out by the US in low-permeability, natural-gas bearing, sandstone-shale formations, and two were done in the USSR within oil-bearing carbonates. The objectives of the US stimulation efforts were to increase porosity and permeability in a reservoir around a specific well by creating a chimney of rock rubble with fractures extending beyond it, and to connect superimposed reservoir layers. In the USSR, the intent was to extensively fracture an existing reservoir in the more general vicinity of producing wells, again increasing overall permeability and porosity. In both countries, the ultimate goals were to increase production rates and ultimate recovery from the reservoirs. Subsurface explosive devices ranging from 2.3 to about 100 kilotons were used at depths ranging from 1208 m (3963 ft) to 2568 m (8427 ft). Post-shot problems were encountered, including smaller-than-calculated fracture zones, formation damage, radioactivity of the product, and dilution of the BTU value of tie natural gas with inflammable gases created by the explosion. Reports also suggest that production-enhancement factors from these tests fell short of expectations. Ultimately, the enhanced-production benefits of the tests were insufficient to support continuation of the pro-grams within increasingly adversarial political, economic, and social climates, and attempts to stimulate hydrocarbon reservoirs with nuclear devices have been terminated in both countries.

LORENZ,JOHN C.

2000-12-08

28

ENGINEERING ISSUE: IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED UNSATURATED SUBSURFACE SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

An emerging technology for the remediation of unsaturated subsurface soils involves the use of microorganisms to degrade contaminants which are present in such soils. Understanding the processes which drive in situ bioremediation, as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of th...

29

A BIOVENTING APPROACH TO REMEDIATE A GASONLINE CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE  

EPA Science Inventory

Bioventing is a subsurface process using an air stream to enhance biodegradation of oily contaminants. wo pilot-scale bioventing systems were installed at a field site. rocess operations began in October 1990. he field site is located at an air station. pill in 1969 of about 100,...

30

Sustainable treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated industrial land   

E-print Network

Land contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons is a widespread and global environmental pollution issue from recovery and refining of crude oil and the ubiquitous use of hydrocarbons in industrial processes and applications. ...

Cunningham, Colin John

2012-06-25

31

INVESTIGATING THE GEOELECTRICAL RESPONSE OF HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION UNDERGOING BIODEGRADATION  

EPA Science Inventory

A newly proposed geoelectrical model for hydrocarbon contaminated sites predicts high conductivities coincident with t he Contaminated zone a s opposed t o t he traditionally accepted low conductivity. The model attributes the high conductivities to mineral weathering resulti...

32

Control and assessment of the hydrocarbon contamination of Ukrainian soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Regularities governing the self-purification of soils from oil hydrocarbons, as well as migration of hydrocarbons, and the effect on the water-physical properties and fertility of soils were revealed in a series of experiments. A system of ecological, economic, and reclamation standards was proposed for regulating economic activities in the case of soil contamination with hydrocarbons.

Miroshnichenko, N. N.

2008-05-01

33

Intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect

A study was designed to determine if the intrinsic bioremediation of gas condensate hydrocarbons represented an important fate process in a shallow aquifer underlying a natural gas production site. For over 4 yr, changes in the groundwater, sediment, and vadose zone chemistry in the contaminated portion of the aquifer were interpreted relative to a background zone. Changes included decreased dissolved oxygen and sulfate levels and increased alkalinity, Fe(II), and methane concentrations in the contaminated groundwater, suggesting that aerobic heterotrophic respiration depleted oxygen reserves leaving anaerobic conditions in the hydrocarbon-impacted subsurface. Dissolved hydrogen levels in the contaminated groundwater indicated that sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were predominant biological processes, corroborating the geochemical findings. Furthermore, 10--1000-fold higher numbers of sulfate reducers and methanogens were enumerated in the contaminated sediment relative to background. Putative metabolites were also detected in the contaminated groundwater, including methylbenzylsuccinic acid, a signature intermediate of anaerobic xylene decay. Laboratory incubations showed that benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and each of the xylene isomers were biodegraded under sulfate-reducing conditions as was toluene under methanogenic conditions. These results coupled with a decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations in contaminated sediment confirm that intrinsic bioremediation contributes to the attenuation of hydrocarbons in this aquifer.

Gieg, L.M.; McInerney; Tanner, R.S.; Harris, S.H. Jr.; Sublette, K.L.; Suflita, J.M. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)); Kolhatkar, R.V. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States). Center for Environmental Research and Technology)

1999-08-01

34

Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface Contaminants  

SciTech Connect

The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation. Research at Rensselaer focused on the development of haloalkane dehalogenase as a critical enzyme in the dehalogenation of contaminated materials (ultimately trichloroethylene and related pollutants). A combination of bioinformatic investigation and experimental work was performed. The bioinformatics was focused on identifying a range of dehalogenase enzymes that could be obtained from the known proteomes of major microorganisms. This work identified several candidate enzymes that could be obtained through relatively straightforward gene cloning and expression approaches. The experimental work focused on the isolation of haloalkane dehalogenase from a Xanthobacter species followed by incorporating the enzyme into silicates to form biocatalytic silicates. These are the precursors of SENs. At the conclusion of the study, dehalogenase was incorporated into SENs, although the loading was low. This work supported a single Ph.D. student (Ms. Philippa Reeder) for two years. The project ended prior to her being able to perform substantive bioinformatics efforts that would identify more promising dehalogenase enzymes. The SEN synthesis, however, was demonstrated to be partially successful with dehalogenases. Further work would provide optimized dehalogenases in SENs for use in pollution remission.

Jonathan S. Dordick; Jay Grate; Jungbae Kim

2007-02-19

35

Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogeneous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally, 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problems are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates.

Aleman, S.E.

1999-07-28

36

GEOPHYSICAL DETECTION OF HYDROCARBON AND ORGANIC CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unambiguous detection of hydrocarbon and organic contamination is the most difficult task for noninvasive geophysical methods at hazardous waste sites. The difficulty is two-fold: 1) the low level of geophysical contrast that these contaminants provide against the background soil and rock, and 2) the low level of contaminant concentration considered to be of regulatory concern. Yet, electrical and electromagnetic methods

Gary R. Olhoeft

37

Assessing impediments to hydrocarbon biodegradation in weathered contaminated soils.  

PubMed

In this study, impediments to hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soils were assessed using chemical and molecular methodologies. Two long-term hydrocarbon contaminated soils were utilised which were similar in physico-chemical properties but differed in the extent of hydrocarbon (C10-C40) contamination (S1: 16.5 g kg(-1); S2: 68.9 g kg(-1)). Under enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) conditions, hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed in S1 microcosms (26.4% reduction in C10-C40 hydrocarbons), however, ENA was unable to stimulate degradation in S2. Although eubacterial communities (PCR-DGGE analysis) were similar for both soils, the alkB bacterial community was less diverse in S2 presumably due to impacts associated with elevated hydrocarbons. When hydrocarbon bioaccessibility was assessed using HP-?-CD extraction, large residual concentrations remained in the soil following the extraction procedure. However, when linear regression models were used to predict the endpoints of hydrocarbon degradation, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) between HP-?-CD predicted and microcosm measured biodegradation endpoints. This data suggested that the lack of hydrocarbon degradation in S2 resulted primarily from limited hydrocarbon bioavailability. PMID:23454918

Adetutu, Eric; Weber, John; Aleer, Sam; Dandie, Catherine E; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

2013-10-15

38

FIELD TRAPPING OF SUBSURFACE VAPOR PHASE PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Soil gas samples from intact soil cores were collected on adsorbents at a field site, then thermally desorbed and analyzed by laboratory gas chromatography (GC). ertical concentration profiles of predominant vapor phase petroleum hydrocarbons under ambient conditions were obtaine...

39

The sea of environmental risk assessment: A navigational guide for hydrocarbon contamination  

SciTech Connect

Federal and many state regulations governing hydrocarbon-contaminated site remediation and closure require environmental risk assessment activities for developing remediation systems. and site closure strategies protective of human and ecological populations. Environmental risk assessment activities are normally foreign to many petroleum industry professionals. This paper is intended to provide those professionals with sufficient knowledge to achieve environmental risk assessment success. Classic environmental risk assessment process consists of data collection and evaluation, exposure assessment, toxicity assessment and risk characterization. These steps ultimately result in identifying what contaminants were released, evaluating which contaminants pose a threat to humans and ecosystems and quantifying how harmful each of the contaminants are to certain human and ecological populations. The physicochemical nature of hydrocarbons relevant to remediation is relevant to risk assessment. The facts that most hydrocarbons are not easily miscible in water, volatilize in the presence of air, readily sorb to clays and are actively bioremediated in the subsurface enable one to avoid risk assessment barriers often encountered with inorganic chemicals. The very unique way hydrocarbons behave in the environment should be used by the petroleum professional turned risk assessment/site closure manager to eliminate chemical exposure scenarios based on little more than organic chemistry. This technique allows petroleum industry professionals to use their realm of expertise to familiarize otherwise unknown waters.

Hippensteel, D.L. [Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1996-12-31

40

The sea of environmental risk assessment: A navigational guide for hydrocarbon contamination  

SciTech Connect

Federal and many state regulations governing hydrocarbon-contaminated site remediation and closure require environmental risk assessment activities for developing remediation systems. and site closure strategies protective of human and ecological populations. Environmental risk assessment activities are normally foreign to many petroleum industry professionals. This paper is intended to provide those professionals with sufficient knowledge to achieve environmental risk assessment success. Classic environmental risk assessment process consists of data collection and evaluation, exposure assessment, toxicity assessment and risk characterization. These steps ultimately result in identifying what contaminants were released, evaluating which contaminants pose a threat to humans and ecosystems and quantifying how harmful each of the contaminants are to certain human and ecological populations. The physicochemical nature of hydrocarbons relevant to remediation is relevant to risk assessment. The facts that most hydrocarbons are not easily miscible in water, volatilize in the presence of air, readily sorb to clays and are actively bioremediated in the subsurface enable one to avoid risk assessment barriers often encountered with inorganic chemicals. The very unique way hydrocarbons behave in the environment should be used by the petroleum professional turned risk assessment/site closure manager to eliminate chemical exposure scenarios based on little more than organic chemistry. This technique allows petroleum industry professionals to use their realm of expertise to familiarize otherwise unknown waters.

Hippensteel, D.L. (Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States))

1996-01-01

41

Modeling subsurface contaminant reactions and transport at the watershed scale  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research are: (1) to numerically examine the multiscale effects of physical and chemical mass transfer processes on watershed scale, variably saturated subsurface contaminant transport, and (2) to conduct numerical simulations on watershed scale reactive solute transport and evaluate their implications to uncertainty characterization and cost benefit analysis. Concurrent physical and chemical nonequilibrium caused by inter aggregate gradients of pressure head and solute concentration and intra-aggregate geochemical and microbiological processes, respectively, may arise at various scales and flowpaths. To this date, experimental investigations of these complex processes at watershed scale remain a challenge and numerical studies are often needed for guidance of water resources management and decision making. This research integrates the knowledge bases developed during previous experimental and numerical investigations at a proposed waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the concurrent effects of physical and chemical nonequilibrium. Comparison of numerical results with field data indicates that: (1) multiregion, preferential flow and solute transport exist under partially saturated condition and can be confirmed theoretically, and that (2) mass transfer between pore regions is an important process influencing contaminant movement in the subsurface. Simulations of watershed scale, multi species reactive solute transport suggest that dominance of geochemistry and hydrodynamics may occur simultaneously at different locales and influence the movement of one species relative to another. Execution times on the simulations of the reactive solute transport model also indicate that the model is ready to assist the selection of important parameters for site characterization.

Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; D`Azevedo, E.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilson, G.V. [Desert Research Inst., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1997-12-01

42

Characterization of subsurface polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at the Deepwater Horizon site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Here, we report the initial observations of distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in subsurface waters near the Deepwater Horizon oil well site (also referred to as the Macondo, Mississippi Canyon Block 252 or MC252 well). Profiles of in situ fluorescence and beam attenuation conducted during 9-16 May 2010 were characterized by distinct peaks at depths greater than 1000 m,

Arne-R. Diercks; Raymond C. Highsmith; Vernon L. Asper; DongJoo Joung; Zhengzhen Zhou; Laodong Guo; Alan M. Shiller; Samantha B. Joye; Andreas P. Teske; Norman Guinasso; Terry L. Wade; Steven E. Lohrenz

2010-01-01

43

Microbial Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminants: An Overview  

PubMed Central

One of the major environmental problems today is hydrocarbon contamination resulting from the activities related to the petrochemical industry. Accidental releases of petroleum products are of particular concern in the environment. Hydrocarbon components have been known to belong to the family of carcinogens and neurotoxic organic pollutants. Currently accepted disposal methods of incineration or burial insecure landfills can become prohibitively expensive when amounts of contaminants are large. Mechanical and chemical methods generally used to remove hydrocarbons from contaminated sites have limited effectiveness and can be expensive. Bioremediation is the promising technology for the treatment of these contaminated sites since it is cost-effective and will lead to complete mineralization. Bioremediation functions basically on biodegradation, which may refer to complete mineralization of organic contaminants into carbon dioxide, water, inorganic compounds, and cell protein or transformation of complex organic contaminants to other simpler organic compounds by biological agents like microorganisms. Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. This paper presents an updated overview of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by microorganisms under different ecosystems. PMID:21350672

Das, Nilanjana; Chandran, Preethy

2011-01-01

44

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in sediment from the Newark Bay estuary, New Jersey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of numerous industrial and municipal sources such as former creosote wood preserving facilities, petroleum storage and refinery facilities, paint and chemical manufacturers, combined sewer overflows, and sewage treatment facilities along the shores of Newark Bay, New Jersey and its major tributaries suggests the potential for widespread contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and petroleum hydrocarbons. In this study,

S. L. Huntley; N. L. Bonnevie; R. J. Wenning

1995-01-01

45

Investigating the geoelectrical response of hydrocarbon contamination undergoing biodegradation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A newly proposed geoelectrical model for hydrocarbon contaminated sites predicts high conductivities coincident with the contaminated zone as opposed to the traditionally accepted low conductivity. The model attributes the high conductivities to mineral weathering resulting from byproducts of microbial redox processes. To evaluate this conductive model, in situ vertical conductivity measurements were acquired from a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL)

D. Dale Werkema Jr; Estella A. Atekwana; Anthony L. Endres; William A. Sauck; Daniel P. Cassidy

2003-01-01

46

Brines as Sources of Long-term Subsurface Contamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concentrated salt solutions, i.e. brines, are source terms for environmental contaminants released into surface waters and groundwaters. Brines arise from both natural and industrial processes such as natural salt deposits, solid rocket fuel production, landfill leachates, nuclear fuel reprocessing, and acid rock drainage. Additionally, many of the in-situ remediation fluids that have been implemented at the pilot or the field scale are also classified as brines. While brines are miscible with water, mixing processes are slow in the subsurface and this constrains the dilution of contaminants present within brines and the delivery of remediation fluids to sites where reactions are needed. The mixing of brines during their vertical migration through aquifers is determined by aquifer permeability as well as differences in density and viscosity between the brine and the ambient groundwater. The stability criterion for brine displacement was predicted in 1952 by Hill and the resulting dispersion at the mixing front is quantified by a compilation of literature data and the acquisition of new experimental data. As brines sink through aquifers, they become emplaced in less accessible locations where mass transfer models predict that contaminants within brines are slowly released into flowing groundwater. For radioactive wastes and environmental contaminants with very low acceptable concentrations, groundwater quality can be impacted for decades. Field data from a cooling water disposal site suggest that a dense brine is likely still present as a source term 40 years after waste disposal was stopped. Overall, analysis of pollution sources, quantification of transport processes, generalization of laboratory data, and limited evaluation of field data indicate that brines represent long-term sources of groundwater contamination and that source control has not been seriously addressed.

Flowers, T. C.; Hunt, J. R.

2004-12-01

47

Fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in the subsurface near Cass Lake, Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigated the natural attenuation of subsurface petroleum hydrocarbons leaked over an unknown number of years from an oil pipeline under the Enbridge Energy Limited Partnership South Cass Lake Pumping Station, in Cass Lake, Minnesota. Three weeks of field work conducted between May 2007 and July 2008 delineated a dissolved plume of aromatic hydrocarbons and characterized the biodegradation processes of the petroleum. Field activities included installing monitoring wells, collecting sediment cores, sampling water from wells, and measuring water-table elevations. Geochemical measurements included concentrations of constituents in both spilled and pipeline oil, dissolved alkylbenzenes and redox constituents, sediment bioavailable iron, and aquifer microbial populations. Groundwater in this area flows east-southeast at approximately 26 meters per year. Results from the oil analyses indicate a high degree of biodegradation, characterized by nearly complete absence of n-alkanes. Cass Lake oil samples were more degraded than two oil samples collected in 2008 from the similarly contaminated USGS Bemidji, Minnesota, research site 40 kilometers away. Based on 19 ratios developed for comparing oil sources, the conclusion is that the oils at the two sites appear to be from the same hydrocarbon source. In the Cass Lake groundwater plume, benzene concentrations decrease by three orders of magnitude within 150 meters (m) downgradient from the oil body floating on the water table (between well MW-10 and USGS-4 well nest). The depths of the highest benzene concentrations increase with distance downgradient from the oil, a condition typical of plumes in shallow, unconfined aquifers. Background groundwater, which is nearly saturated with oxygen, becomes almost entirely anaerobic in the plume. As at the Bemidji site, the most important biodegradation processes are anaerobic and dominated by iron reduction. The similarity between the Cass Lake and Bemidji benzene degradation rates, redox conditions, and aquifer material all support a hypothesis that the Cass Lake plume, like the Bemidji plume, is decades old. As concentrations of alkylbenzenes in the oil decrease over time, the benzene concentrations in the groundwater plume will also decrease and the plume is expected to shrink. The Fox Creek wetland, about 250 m south of the Cass Lake site, is the nearest receptor to the south.

Drennan, Dina M.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Warren, Ean; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Baedecker, Mary Jo; Herkelrath, William N.; Delin, Geoffrey N.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Campbell, Pamela L.

2010-01-01

48

INTERNET COURSE ON MODELING SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Assessment of leaks from underground storage tanks relies on knowledge of contaminant fate and transport, hydrology and in some cases modeling. EPA is developing an interactive, on-line training course to provide states with a low-cost training opportunity for these areas. Two ...

49

Investigations of geoelectrical signatures at a hydrocarbon contaminated site  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study provides an evaluation of the utility and resolution of different geoelectrical methods in mapping contaminant distribution in the subsurface, and provides a window into the processes that may control their response at a site in Central Michigan. In situ and 2D surface resistivity, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and electromagnetic methods (EM) constrained by soil boring data were used

Estella A Atekwana; William A Sauck; Douglas D Werkema

2000-01-01

50

Phytoremediation of Soils Contaminated by Chlorinnated Hydrocarbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, the possible use of deep rooted plants for phytoremediation of soil contaminants has been offered as a potential alternative for waste management, particularly for in situ remediation of large volumes of contaminated soils. Major objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of a warm season grass (Eastern Gamagrass) and a cool season prairie grass (Annual Ryegrass) in the phytoremediation of the soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds e.g., trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) and to determine the main mechanisms of target contaminant dissipation. The preliminary tests and laboratory scale tests were conducted to identify the main mechanisms for phytoremediation of the target contaminants, and to apply the technique in green house application under field conditions. The results of microcosm and bioreactor experiments showed that volatilization can be the dominant pathway of the target contaminant mass losses in soils. Toxicity tests, conducted in nutrient solution in the growth room, and in the greenhouse, showed that both Eastern gamagrass and Annual ryegrass could grow without harmful effects at up to 400 ppm each of all three contaminants together. Preliminary greenhouse experimentw were conducted with the 1.5 m long and 0.3 m diameter PVC columns. Soil gas concentrations monitored and microbial biomass in bulk and rhizosphere soil, root properties, and contaminant concentration in soil after 100 days were analyzed. The results showed that the soil gas concentration of contaminants has rapidly decreased especially in the upper soil and the contaminant concentraitons in soil were also significantly decreased to 0.024, 0.228, and 0.002 of C/Co for TCE, PCE and TCA, respectively. Significant plant effects were not found however showed contaminant loss through volatilization and plant contamination by air.

Cho, C.; Sung, K.; Corapcioglu, M.

2001-12-01

51

Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m.

Socolofsky, Scott A.; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.

2011-01-01

52

Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

Socolofsky, S.A.; Adams, E.E.; Sherwood, C.R.

2011-01-01

53

Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m.

Socolofsky, Scott A.; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.

2011-05-01

54

Characterization of subsurface polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at the Deepwater Horizon site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here, we report the initial observations of distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in subsurface waters near the Deepwater Horizon oil well site (also referred to as the Macondo, Mississippi Canyon Block 252 or MC252 well). Profiles of in situ fluorescence and beam attenuation conducted during 9-16 May 2010 were characterized by distinct peaks at depths greater than 1000 m, with highest intensities close to the wellhead and decreasing intensities with increasing distance from the wellhead. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses of water samples coinciding with the deep fluorescence and beam attenuation anomalies confirmed the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at concentrations reaching 189 ?g L-1 (ppb). Subsurface exposure to PAH at levels considered to be toxic to marine organisms would have occurred in discrete depth layers between 1000 and 1400 m in the region southwest of the wellhead site and extending at least as far as 13 km.

Diercks, Arne-R.; Highsmith, Raymond C.; Asper, Vernon L.; Joung, DongJoo; Zhou, Zhengzhen; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Teske, Andreas P.; Guinasso, Norman; Wade, Terry L.; Lohrenz, Steven E.

2010-10-01

55

Bacterial and archaeal communities in long-term contaminated surface and subsurface soil evaluated through coextracted RNA and DNA.  

PubMed

Soil RNA and DNA were coextracted along a contamination gradient at a landfarming field with aged crude oil contamination to investigate pollution-dependent differences in 16S rRNA and rRNA gene pools. Microbial biomass correlated with nucleic acid yields as well as bacterial community change, indicating that the same factors controlled community size and structure. In surface soil, bacterial community evenness, estimated through length heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR) fingerprinting, appeared higher for RNA-based than for DNA-based communities. The RNA-based community profiles resembled the DNA-based communities of soil with a lower contamination level. Cloning-based identification of bacterial hydrocarbon-degrading taxa in the RNA pool, representing the viable community with high protein synthesis potential, indicated that decontamination processes still continue. Analyses of archaea revealed that only Thaumarchaeota were present in the aerobic samples, whereas more diverse communities were found in the compacted subsurface soil with more crude oil. For subsurface bacteria, hydrocarbon concentration explained neither the community structure nor the difference between RNA-based and DNA-based communities. However, rRNA of bacterial taxa associated with syntrophic and sulphate-reducing alkane degradation was detected. Although the same prokaryotic taxa were identified in DNA and RNA, comparison of the two nucleic acid pools can aid in the assessment of past and future restoration success. PMID:24986450

Mikkonen, Anu; Santalahti, Minna; Lappi, Kaisa; Pulkkinen, Anni-Mari; Montonen, Leone; Suominen, Leena

2014-10-01

56

Phytoremediation of Soils Contaminated by Chlorinnated Hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, the possible use of deep rooted plants for phytoremediation of soil contaminants has been offered as a potential alternative for waste management, particularly for in situ remediation of large volumes of contaminated soils. Major objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of a warm season grass (Eastern Gamagrass) and a cool season prairie grass (Annual

C. Cho; K. Sung; M. Corapcioglu

2001-01-01

57

Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil  

DOEpatents

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01

58

Relationship between mineral surface observations and bulk conductivity at a hydrocarbon contaminated site .  

E-print Network

??"A recent geoelectrical model suggests that the higher bulk electrical conductivities observed at contaminated locations (relative to uncontaminated locations) at an aged hydrocarbon contaminated site… (more)

Burton, Mark Edward, 1975-

2005-01-01

59

FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

Aleman, S.E.

2000-05-05

60

THE ONSITE ON-LINE CALCULATORS AND TRAINING FOR SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT SITE ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA has developed a suite of on-line calculators called "OnSite" for assessing transport of environmental contaminants in the subsurface. The purpose of these calculators is to provide methods and data for common calculations used in assessing impacts from subsurface contaminatio...

61

Biogeochemical Stability of Contaminants in the Subsurface Following In Situ Treatment  

EPA Science Inventory

In recent years, innovative treatment technologies have emerged to meet groundwater cleanup goals. In many cases these methods take advantage of the redox behavior of contaminant species. For example, remedial technologies that strategically manipulate subsurface redox conditio...

62

Applying model abstraction techniques to optimize monitoring networks for detecting subsurface contaminant transport  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Improving strategies for monitoring subsurface contaminant transport includes performance comparison of competing models, developed independently or obtained via model abstraction. Model comparison and parameter discrimination involve specific performance indicators selected to better understand s...

63

PREDICTING SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND TRANSFORMATION: CONSIDERATIONS FOR MODEL SELECTION AND FIELD VALIDATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Predicting subsurface contaminant transport and transformation requires mathematical models based on a variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes. The mathematical model is an attempt to quantitatively describe observed processes in order to permit systematic forecas...

64

Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOEpatents

A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

1995-10-03

65

Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOEpatents

A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01

66

Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOEpatents

A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

1996-02-13

67

Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOEpatents

A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01

68

Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for Subsurface Immobilization of Contaminants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of the greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have found that calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr can be accelerated by the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms, that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning, and that nutrient additions can stimulate ureolytic activity. To extend our understanding of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) in an aquifer setting a continuous recirculation field experiment evaluating MICP was conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO. In this experiment, groundwater extracted from an onsite well was amended with urea (total mass of 42.5 kg) and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into a well approximately 4 meters up-gradient for a period of 12 days followed by 10 months of groundwater sampling and monitoring. Crosshole radar and electrical tomographic data were collected prior, during, and after the MICP treatment. The urea and molasses treatment resulted in an enhanced population of sediment associated urea hydrolyzing organisms as evidenced by increases in the number of ureC gene copies, increases in 14C urea hydrolysis rates, and long-term observations of ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) in the injection, extraction and down gradient monitoring wells. Permeability changes and increases in the calcite saturation indexes in the well field suggest that mineral precipitation has occurred; ongoing analysis of field samples seeks to confirm this. Changes in dielectric constant and electrical conductivity were used to interpret the spatiotemporal distribution of the injectate and subsequent calcite precipitation. Modeling activities are underway to define field-scale urea hydrolysis rates.

Smith, R. W.; Fujita, Y.; Ginn, T. R.; Hubbard, S. S.; Dafflon, B.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Henriksen, J. R.; Peterson, J.; Taylor, J. L.

2011-12-01

69

Investigating the geoelectrical response of hydrocarbon contamination undergoing biodegradation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A newly proposed geoelectrical model for hydrocarbon contaminated sites predicts high conductivities coincident with the contaminated zone as opposed to the traditionally accepted low conductivity. The model attributes the high conductivities to mineral weathering resulting from byproducts of microbial redox processes. To evaluate this conductive model, in situ vertical conductivity measurements were acquired from a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) contaminated site. The results showed high conductivities coincident with the zone of contamination and within the smear zone influenced by seasonal water table fluctuations. We infer this zone as an active zone of biodegradation and suggest significant microbial degradation under partially water saturated conditions. A simple Archie's Law analysis shows large pore water conductivities necessary to reproduce the bulk conductivity measured at the contaminated location. This study supports the conductive layer model and demonstrates the potential of geoelectrical investigations for assessing microbial degradation of LNAPL impacted soils.

Werkema, D. Dale; Atekwana, Estella A.; Endres, Anthony L.; Sauck, William A.; Cassidy, Daniel P.

2003-06-01

70

Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to destroy organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing them to carbon dioxide. Some Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can also reductively dechlorinate chlorinated contaminants. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can reduce a variety of contaminant metals and convert them from soluble forms to forms that are likely to be immobilized in the subsurface. Studies in petroleum-contaminated aquifers have demonstrated that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be effective agents in removing aromatic hydrocarbons from groundwater under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to remove uranium from contaminated groundwaters. The activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be stimulated in several ways to enhance organic contaminant oxidation and metal reduction. Molecular analyses in both field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that microorganisms of the genus Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination. Des micro-organismes simulant la réduction du fer ont la capacité de détruire des polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies en les oxydant en dioxyde de carbone. Certains micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent aussi dé-chlorer par réduction des polluants chlorés. Des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent réduire tout un ensemble de métaux polluants et les faire passer de formes solubles à des formes qui sont susceptibles d'être immobilisées dans le milieu souterrain. Des études d'aquifères pollués par du pétrole ont montré que des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent être des agents efficaces pour éliminer les hydrocarbures aromatiques des eaux souterraines dans des conditions anérobies. Des études en laboratoire ont montré que des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer avaient la capacité d'éliminer l'uranium d'eaux souterraines polluées. L'activité de micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peut être stimulée de différentes manières pour augmenter l'oxydation de polluants organiques et la réduction de métaux. Des analyses moléculaires concernant des études de terrain et de laboratoire ont montré que des micro-organismes du genre Geobacter deviennent les membres dominants de la communauté microbienne quand les conditions de réduction en Fe(III) sont réalisées à la suite d'une pollution organique, ou lorsque la réduction en Fe(III) est stimulée artificiellement. Ces résultats laissent penser que des connaissances supplémentaires sur l'écophysiologie des espèces Geobacter devraient aider à une meilleure prédiction de la diminution naturelle des teneurs en polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies, ainsi qu'à la définition de stratégies de dépollution biologique de pollutions souterraines par les métaux. Algunos microorganismos Fe(III)-reductores son capaces de destruir selectivamente determinados contaminantes orgánicos en condiciones anaerobias, oxidándolos a dióxido de carbono. Otros de estos microorganismos Fe(III)-reductores pueden reducir, bien compuestos clorados, bien una gran variedad de metales, que dejan de ser solubles y se inmovilizan en el subsuelo. Estudios realizados en acuéferos contaminados por petróleo muestran que los microorganismos Fe(III)-reductores pueden ser unos agentes muy eficientes para eliminar los hidrocarburos aromáticos de las aguas subterráneas en condiciones anaerobias, mientras que estudios de laboratorio muestran el potencial de estos microorganismos para eliminar uranio. La actividad de los microorganismos Fe(III)-reductor

Lovley, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

71

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Distribution and Modification in the Sub-surface Plume Near the Deepwater Horizon Wellhead  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A significant concern associated with oil spills is the toxicity associated with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) component. Ratios of various PAH's have also been used as indicators of oil sources. During a late May/early June cruise, 57 samples for PAH analysis were collected in the vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead. Most samples were from the previously reported sub-surface oil plume, centered near 1100 m depth. PAH concentrations ranged up to 117 ?g/L and rapidly diminished in the subsurface with distance from the wellhead. The Macondo well oil was observed to be rich in naphthalenes. Within a few km of the wellhead, the percentage of methyl-naphthalenes in the sub-surface plume was generally higher than in the source, suggesting preferential solubilization of this low molecular weight fraction. However, the percentage rapidly decreased away from the well also suggesting rapid destruction or removal of the naphthalenes. The pyrogenic index (Wang et al.) was <0.05 for all samples, indicating a petroleum origin. For a few samples, some other PAH ratios (e.g., MP/P and P/A ratios) suggested a combustion origin. However, these ratios also tended to vary both with percent methyl-naphthalenes and distance from the wellhead, suggesting anomalous ratios originating from solubilization/degradation effects. We also obtained a more limited set of surface water samples, generally avoiding the most contaminated areas as well as areas of oil burning. For these surface water samples, similar trends were observed as at depth, probably resulting from selective volatilization and photo-degradation. Overall, the data illustrate how environmental factors lead both to reduced concentrations and fractionation of the PAH's.

Shiller, A. M.; Joung, D.; Wade, T.

2011-12-01

72

Novel method for cleaning a vacuum chamber from hydrocarbon contamination  

SciTech Connect

A novel method for cleaning a high vacuum chamber is presented. This method is based on concurrent in situ high-energetic UV light activation of contaminants located in the residual gas and at the vacuum chamber surfaces as well as the in situ generation of highly reactive ozone. Ozone oxidizes the contaminants to volatile species. Investigations by energy-dispersive x-ray analysis of residual gas depositions and mass-spectroscopy measurements of the residual gas in the vacuum chamber identify the contaminant species as hydrocarbons. After a cleaning period of 8 h, a decrease in measured chamber contamination by about 90% could be achieved according to atomic force microscope analysis. Mass spectroscopy measurements using a residual gas analyzer indicate the creation of volatile, carbonaceous species during the cleaning process.

Wanzenboeck, H. D.; Roediger, P.; Hochleitner, G.; Bertagnolli, E.; Buehler, W. [Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7/1, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Carl Zeiss NTS GmbH, Carl-Zeiss-Str. 56, Oberkochen 73447 (Germany)

2010-11-15

73

Contaminant Removal Processes in Subsurface-Flow Constructed Wetlands: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main contaminant removal processes occurring in subsurface-flow constructed wetlands treating wastewater are reviewed. Redox conditions prevailing in the wetlands are analyzed and linked to contaminant removal mechanisms. The removal of organic matter and its accumulation in the granular medium of the wetlands are evaluated with regard to particulate and dissolved components and clogging processes. The main biological processes linked

JOAN GARCÍA; DIEDERIK P. L. ROUSSEAU; JORDI MORATÓ; ELS LESAGE; VICTOR MATAMOROS; JOSEP M. BAYONA

2010-01-01

74

Three-dimensional self-potential inversion for subsurface DNAPL contaminant detection at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

E-print Network

River Site where there is known subsurface dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination-potential source inversion methodology and develop it as a predictive tool in the context of contaminated sites for subsurface DNAPL contaminant detection at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, Water Resour. Res., 43, W

Sailhac, Pascal

75

Release of polyaromatic hydrocarbons from coal tar contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

A variety of process wastes generated from manufactured gas production (MGP) have contaminated soils and groundwater at production and disposal sites. Coal tar, consisting of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons present as a nonaqueous phase liquid, makes up a large portion of MGP wastes. Of the compounds in coal tar, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the major constituents of environmental concern due to their potential mutagenic and carcinogenic hazards. Characterization of the release of PAHs from the waste-soil matrix is essential to quantifying long-term environmental impacts in soils and groundwater. Currently, conservative estimates for the release of PAHs to the groundwater are made assuming equilibrium conditions and using relationships derived from artificially contaminated soils. Preliminary work suggests that aged coal tar contaminated soils have much lower rates of desorption and a greater affinity for retaining organic contaminants. To obtain better estimates of desorption rates, the release of PAHs from a coal tar soil was investigated using a flow-interruption, miscible displacement technique. Methanol/water solutions were employed to enhance PAH concentrations above limits of detection. For each methanol/water solution employed, a series of flow interrupts of varying times was invoked. Release rates from each methanol/water solution were estimated from the increase in concentration with duration of flow interruption. Aqueous-phase release rates were then estimated by extrapolation using a log-linear cosolvency model.

Priddy, N.D.; Lee, L.S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Agronomy

1996-11-01

76

Estimation of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in gasoline-contaminated sediment from measured respiration rates  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An open microcosm method for quantifying microbial respiration and estimating biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in gasoline-contaminated sediment samples has been developed and validated. Stainless-steel bioreactors are filled with soil or sediment samples, and the vapor-phase composition (concentrations of oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and selected hydrocarbons) is monitored over time. Replacement gas is added as the vapor sample is taken, and selection of the replacement gas composition facilitates real-time decision-making regarding environmental conditions within the bioreactor. This capability allows for maintenance of field conditions over time, which is not possible in closed microcosms. Reaction rates of CO2 and O2 are calculated from the vapor-phase composition time series. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation are either measured directly from the hydrocarbon mass balance, or estimated from CO2 and O2 reaction rates and assumed reaction stoichiometries. Open microcosm experiments using sediments spiked with toluene and p-xylene were conducted to validate the stoichiometric assumptions. Respiration rates calculated from O2 consumption and from CO2 production provide estimates of toluene and p- xylene degradation rates within about ??50% of measured values when complete mineralization stoichiometry is assumed. Measured values ranged from 851.1 to 965.1 g m-3 year-1 for toluene, and 407.2-942.3 g m-3 year-1 for p- xylene. Contaminated sediment samples from a gasoline-spill site were used in a second set of microcosm experiments. Here, reaction rates of O2 and CO2 were measured and used to estimate hydrocarbon respiration rates. Total hydrocarbon reaction rates ranged from 49.0 g m-3 year-1 in uncontaminated (background) to 1040.4 g m-3 year-1 for highly contaminated sediment, based on CO2 production data. These rate estimates were similar to those obtained independently from in situ CO2 vertical gradient and flux determinations at the field site. In these experiments, aerobic conditions were maintained in the microcosms by using air as the replacement gas, thus preserving the ambient aerobic environment of the subsurface near the capillary zone. This would not be possible with closed microcosms.

Baker, R.J.; Baehr, A.L.; Lahvis, M.A.

2000-01-01

77

INFLUENCE OF COUPLED PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT FATE AND TRANSPORT IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The following chapter emphasizes subsurface environmental research investigations over the past 10 to 15 years that couple hydrological, geochemical, and biological processes as related to contaminant fate and transport. An attempt is made to focus on field-scale studies with possible reference to laboratory-scale endeavors. Much of the research discussed reflects investigations of the influence of coupled processes on the fate and transport of inorganic, radionuclide, and organic contaminants in subsurface environments as a result of natural processes or energy and weapons production endeavors that required waste disposal. The chapter provides on overview of the interaction between hydro-bio-geochemical processes in structured, heterogeneous subsurface environments and how these interactions control contaminant fate and transport, followed by experimental and numerical subsurface science research and case studies involving specific classes of inorganic and organic contaminants. Lastly, thought provoking insights are highlighted on why the study of subsurface coupled processes is paramount to understanding potential future contaminant fate and transport issues of global concern.

Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

2008-01-01

78

Review of Geophysical Techniques to Define the Spatial Distribution of Subsurface Properties or Contaminants  

SciTech Connect

This is a letter report to Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this report is to summarize state-of-the-art, minimally intrusive geophysical techniques that can be used to clarify subsurface geology, structure, moisture, and chemical composition. The technology review focused on geophysical characterization techniques that provide two- or three-dimensional information about the spatial distribution of subsurface properties and/or contaminants.

Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Truex, Michael J.

2005-08-22

79

Hydrocarbon Contamination Decreases Mating Success in a Marine Planktonic Copepod  

PubMed Central

The mating behavior and the mating success of copepods rely on chemoreception to locate and track a sexual partner. However, the potential impact of the water-soluble fraction of hydrocarbons on these aspects of copepod reproduction has never been tested despite the widely acknowledged acute chemosensory abilities of copepods. I examined whether three concentrations of the water-soluble fraction of diesel oil (0.01%, 0.1% and 1%) impacts (i) the swimming behavior of both adult males and females of the widespread calanoid copepod Temora longcornis, and (ii) the ability of males to locate, track and mate with females. The three concentrations of the water-soluble fraction of diesel oil (WSF) significantly and non-significantly affect female and male swimming velocities, respectively. In contrast, both the complexity of male and female swimming paths significantly decreased with increasing WSF concentrations, hence suggesting a sex-specific sensitivity to WSF contaminated seawater. In addition, the three WSF concentrations impacted both T. longicornis mating behavior and mating success. Specifically, the ability of males to detect female pheromone trails, to accurately follow trails and to successfully track a female significantly decreased with increasing WSF concentrations. This led to a significant decrease in contact and capture rates from control to WSF contaminated seawater. These results indicate that hydrocarbon contamination of seawater decreases the ability of male copepods to detect and track a female, hence suggest an overall impact on population fitness and dynamics. PMID:22053187

Seuront, Laurent

2011-01-01

80

Magnetic properties changes due to hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater table fluctuations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims to understand the mechanisms and conditions which control the formation and transformation of ferro(i)magnetic minerals caused by hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater, in particular in the zone of fluctuating water levels. The work extends previous studies conducted at the same site. The study area is a former military air base at Hrad?any, Czech Republic (50°37'22.71"N, 14°45'2.24"E). The site was heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, due to leaks in petroleum storage tanks and jet fuelling stations over years of active use by the Soviet Union, which closed the base in 1991. The site is one of the most important sources of high quality groundwater in the Czech Republic. In a previous study, Rijal et al. (2010) concluded that the contaminants could be flushed into the sediments as the water level rose due to remediation processes leading to new formation of magnetite. In this previous study three different locations were investigated; however, from each location only one core was obtained. In order to recognize significant magnetic signatures versus depth three cores from each of these three locations were drilled in early 2012, penetrating the unsaturated zone, the groundwater fluctuation (GWF) zone and extending to about one meter below the groundwater level (~2.3 m depth at the time of sampling). Magnetic susceptibility (MS) profiles combined with other magnetic properties were analyzed to obtain a significant depth distribution of the ferro(i)magnetic concentration. Sediment properties, hydrocarbon content and bacterial activity were additionally studied. The results show that the highest ferrimagnetic mineral concentrations exist between 1.4-1.9 m depth from the baseline which is interpreted as the top of the GWF zone. Spikes of MS detected in the previous studies turned out to represent small-scale isolated features, but the trend of increasing MS values from the lowermost position of the groundwater table upward was verified. Mineral magnetic parameters indicate that magnetite is responsible for the MS signal which confirms the previous results (Rijal et al., 2010). The so far existing uncertainty of the groundwater level position could be solved. Bacterial activity is studied at particular depth horizons as it is assumed to be responsible for iron mineralogy changes. References: Rijal M.L., Appel E., Petrovský E. and Blaha U., 2010. Change of magnetic properties due to fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater in unconsolidated sediments. Environ.Pollut., 158, 1756-1762.

Ameen, Nawrass

2013-04-01

81

USE OF APATITE FOR CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater at many Federal and civilian industrial sites is often contaminated with toxic metals at levels that present a potential concern to regulatory agencies. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has some unique problems associated with radionuclides (primarily uranium), but metal contaminants most likely drive risk-based cleanup decisions, from the perspective of human health, in groundwater at DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Sites include lead (Pb), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni). Thus, the regulatory ''drivers'' for toxic metals in contaminated soils/groundwaters are very comparable for Federal and civilian industrial sites, and most sites have more than one metal above regulatory action limits. Thus improving the performance of remedial technologies for metal-contaminated groundwater will have ''dual use'' (Federal and civilian) benefit.

Dr. William D. Bostick

2003-05-01

82

Coupled modeling of hydrogeochemical and electrical resistivity data for exploring the impact of recharge on subsurface contamination  

E-print Network

of recharge on subsurface contamination M. B. Kowalsky,1 E. Gasperikova,1 S. Finsterle,1 D. Watson,2 G. Baker measurements, may be useful for monitoring subsurface contamination. However, interpreting geophysical data to the saturation and chemical composition of pore fluids. We present an inverse modeling framework

Hubbard, Susan

83

Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-02-29

84

SPECIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS BY CONE PENETROMETRY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R826184)  

EPA Science Inventory

A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chroma tography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collec...

85

A wireless sensor network based closed-loop system for subsurface contaminant plume monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

A closed-loop contaminant plume monitoring system is being developed that integrates wireless sensor network based monitoring with numerical models for subsurface plumes. The system is based on a novel virtual sensor net- work architecture that supports the formation, usage, adap- tation, and maintenance of dynamic subsets of nodes. This automated monitoring system is intended to capture tran- sient plumes to

Qi Han; Anura P. Jayasumana; Tissa H. Illangasekare; Toshihiro Sakaki

2008-01-01

86

PROTOZOA IN SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FROM SITES CONTAMINATED WITH AVIATION GASOLINE OR JET FUEL  

EPA Science Inventory

Numbers of protozoa in the subsurface of aviation gasoline and jet fuel spill areas at a Coast Guard base at Traverse City, Mich., were determined. oreholes were drilled in an uncontaminated location, in contaminated but untreated parts of the fuel plumes, and in the aviation gas...

87

FIELD SCREENING OF POLYCYCLIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION IN SOIL USING A PORTABLE SYNCHRONOUS SCANNING SPECTROFLUOROMETER  

EPA Science Inventory

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination is a considerable problem at various hazardous waste sites. sources of PAH contamination include: incomplete combustion processes, wood preservatives, and the fuel industry. he development of rapid, cost-effective field screenin...

88

Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

2012-11-21

89

Control of Subsurface Contaminant Migration by Vertical Engineered Barriers  

EPA Science Inventory

This Fact Sheet is intended to provide remedial project managers (RPMs), on-scene coordinators (OSCs), contractors, and other remediation stakeholders with a basic overview of hazardous waste containment systems constructed to prevent or limit the migration of contamination in gr...

90

Stimulating in situ surfactant production to increase contaminant bioavailability and augment bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effectiveness of a bioremediation strategy is largely dependent on relationships between contaminant sequestration (geochemical limitations) and microbial degradation potential (biological limitations). As contaminant bioavailability becomes mass transfer limited, contaminant removal will show less sensitivity to biodegradation enhancements without concurrent enhancements to rates of mass transfer into the bioavailable phase. Implementing a strategy that can simultaneously address geochemical and biological limitations is motivated by a subsurface zone of liquid petroleum hydrocarbons (LPH) contamination that is in excess of 10 acres (40,000 sq. meters). Biodegradation potential at the site is high; however, observed biodegradation rates are generally low, indicative of bioavailability limitations (e.g., low aqueous solubilities, nutrient deficiencies, and/or mass transfer limitations), and estimates indicate that bioremediation (i.e., biosparging/bioventing) with unaugmented biodegradation may be unable to achieve the remedial objectives within an acceptable time. Bench-scale experiments using soils native to the site provide evidence that, in addition to nutrient additions, a pulsed oxygen delivery can increase biodegradation rates by stimulating the microbial production of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids), leading to a reduction in surface tension and an increase in contaminant bioavailability. Pilot-scale tests at the field site are evaluating the effectiveness of stimulating in situ biosurfactant production using cyclic biosparging. The cyclic sparging creates extended periods of alternating aerobic and oxygen-depleted conditions in the submerged smear zone. The increased bioavailability of LPH and the resulting biodegradation enhancements during the test are evaluated using measurements of surface tension (as confirmation of biosurfactant accumulation) and nitrate concentrations (as substantiation of anaerobic biodegradation during shut-off periods). The successful promotion of in situ biosurfactant production during biosparging is expected to provide a cost effective solution to site remediation requirements.

Haws, N. W.; Bentley, H. W.; Yiannakakis, A.; Bentley, A. J.; Cassidy, D. P.

2006-12-01

91

Scale-dependent desorption of uranium from contaminated subsurface sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Column experiments were performed to investigate the scale-dependent desorption of uranyl [U(VI)] from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. The sediment was a coarse-textured alluvial flood deposit containing significant mass percentage of river cobble. U(VI) was, however, only associated with its minor fine-grained (<2 mm) mass fraction.

Chongxuan Liu; John M. Zachara; Nikolla P. Qafoku; Zheming Wang

2008-01-01

92

Geophysical Responses of Hydrocarbon-impacted Zones at the Various Contamination Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

One controlled experiment and two field surveys were conducted to investigate the geoelectrical responses of hydrocarbon-contaminated zones, so called smeared zone, on the geophysical data at the hydrocarbon- contaminated sites with various conditions. One controlled physical model experiment with GPR using fresh gasoline and two different 3-D electrical resistivity investigations at the aged sites. One field site (former military facilities

C. Kim; K. Ko; J. Son; J. Kim

2008-01-01

93

Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in feces of river otters from the southern Pacific  

E-print Network

Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in feces of river otters from the southern Pacific coast hydrocarbon contaminants in coastal river otters (Lontra canadensis) were evaluated by sampling feces (scats, concentrations of TCDD-toxic equivalents exceeded 1500 ng/kg lw, a value for health effects in otters that we

94

Monitoring Contamination of the subsurface with Quasi-Static Deformation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data from a field experiment suggest that we can detect the infiltration of contaminated water (contaminated with 150 ppm of a biosurfactant, Rhamnolipid) into the vadose zone with tilt meters. Three sets of instruments were installed in the vicinity of a 50m x 50m field, which was instrumented and could be irrigated in a controlled manner. Each set consisted of one tiltmeter at the bottom of a 10m cased borehole and one seismometer buried to a depth of about 1m. The instruments were installed in late summer and early fall of 2002. The drift in tilt caused by their installation decayed to near background levels in about one year. The site was irrigated with plain water at 50,000 l/day for 40 days during the fall of 2003. The irrigation was repeated in the fall of 2004 for 50 days, again with 50,000 l/day. This time the irrigation water contained 150ppm of a biosurfactant. This surfactant was chosen to simulate a contaminant through its effect on the modification of surface tension and because it is environmentally benign. It was developed for bioremediation. We expected subtle changes in the relative responses of the instruments as the elastic properties of the vadose zone were altered by the contaminant. This expectation is based on a long series of laboratory measurements, e.g. W. Brunner and H.A. Spetzler 2002. We used natural sources for the excitation of the instruments, solid Earth tides for the tiltmeters and microseisms, i.e. ocean generated noise at about 6s periods, for the seismometers. In the case of the tilt meters we used theoretical site specific tilt and compared that with our measured tilt. We found no significant change in the correlation coefficient between theoretical and measured tilt for the water-only irrigation. The correlation coefficient was generally above 0.9. The correlation coefficient dropped precipitously about ten days after we had started irrigating with the surfactant. It recovered again about ten days after irrigation was stopped. A preliminary analysis of the seismic data shows similar trends, but with much more noise. Using a Born approximation we calculate that a slight perturbation of the complex moduli near the surface does indeed yield changes in tidally-induced tilt near the observed values. Brunner, W. M. and H. A. Spetzler, Contaminant-Induced Mechanical Damping in Partially Saturated Berea Sandstone, Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol.29, No.16, 10.1029/2002GL015455 ,2002

Spetzler, H.; Snieder, R.; Zhang, J.

2005-12-01

95

Unraveling contaminated subsurface complex and dynamic behavior: A scale-dependent perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The uranium plumes present at the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site (WA) and Rifle site (CO), have not attenuated as previously expected and predicted due, most likely, to subsurface complex behavior and multiple sources of contaminant uranium. At the Rifle site, both oxidized and naturally reduced zones are present in the subsurface. The naturally reduced zones usually contain high U concentrations, and are likely significant contributors to the groundwater contamination. We have conducted hypothesis driven research to generate the necessary scientific information needed to: 1. Understand and overcome the physical and mineralogical subsurface heterogeneities; 2. Unravel mineral - fluid interface complexity and dynamics by identifying and estimating the role of key geochemical and hydrological reactions and processes controlling contaminant uranium behavior under a variety of conditions; 3. Develop conceptual models and apply predictive models of contaminant behavior to support development, implementation and monitoring of effective and sustainable remediation approaches. In this talk, results from research efforts, such as wet chemical extractions of different types, as well as, batch and hydraulically saturated and unsaturated column experiments of different types, will be presented. These results were combined with those of a variety of techniques such as XRD, µ-XRD, SEM-EDS, SEM-FIB, TEM-SAED, Mössbauer spectroscopy, EMPA, µXRF and XANES. Collectively, these results provided information about the extent and rates of geochemical (sorption/desorption, dissolution/precipitation and redox) and hydrological reactions and processes which control and/or significantly affect the fate of uranium and other co-contaminants that are present in these contaminated subsurface media.

Qafoku, N.

2012-04-01

96

Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas.  

E-print Network

??The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil… (more)

Moffit, Alfred Edward

2012-01-01

97

Induced Polarization methodology: application to a hydrocarbon contaminated site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Induced Polarization (IP) is a promising method for environmental studies (Vaudelet et al., 2011; Abdel Aal et al., 2006). This method has already been successful for the study of contaminations in the laboratory scale (Vanhala, 1997; Revil et al., 2011; Schmutz et al., 2012) but is still not trivial on the field. Temporal IP seems relatively common for field studies. When contamination implies a significative change of the polarization parameters, successful studies have been lead (Fiandaca et al. 2012; Dahlin et al., 2002 on landfills). Otherwise hydrocarbon contamination may induce small changes on IP parameters (Vaudelet et al., 2011). Spectral induced polarization has not been widely used for field application yet: this method is sensitive to coupling effects and time consuming. Moreover, all the phenomenon responsible of the signal is not completely understood yet (Kemna et al., 2012). The main aim of our presentation is about IP methodology, applied on site affected by a hydrocarbon contamination. In this case, precautions have to be taken to get explicit answers from the contamination. Field investigations have been made: chargeability measurements in order to delineate the free phase contamination extension and spectral induced polarization soundings in order to characterize more precisely the contamination. We would like to provide recommendations to improve induced polarization measurements especially on three aspects, (i) propose a different measurement sequence to make chargeability measurements and (ii) evaluate the influence of the current injection time on chargeability measurements (iii) give general precautions to achieve SIP measurements. A different new chargeability sequence is proposed integrating the use of separated injection and measure cables to avoid coupling phenomena in multicore cables. Indeed, this kind of coupling can significantly decrease the signal / noise ratio (Dahlin et al., 2012). Direct and reverse measurements have been made in order to evaluate if the data and data quality are comparable. Different times of injection have also been tested to evaluate their influence on chargeability measurements: long injection times (4 and 8 seconds) indicate the same high chargeability trend, to the contrary to small injection time (2 seconds). Long injection time generate (i) the polarization of more elements (ii) a stronger polarization of polarizable elements. For environmental purposes, long injection times are recommended. Spectral induced polarization soundings have been made using the SIP Fuchs device, with an amplifier in order to stabilize the injected current (Radic 2004). Unpolarizable measurement electrodes have been connected to the apparatus with optic fiber and metallic injection electrodes have been link with a specific cable arrangement, both to reduce coupling effect with the ground (Vaudelet et al., 2011; Ghorbani et al., 2007). These precautions give good quality result and allow the inversion of the data to obtain Cole Cole parameters (Ghorbani et al., 2007), useful for hydrogeological interpretations.

Blondel, Amelie; Schmutz, Myriam; Tichane, Frederic; Franceschi, Michel; Carles, Margaux

2013-04-01

98

Delineation of Hydrocarbon Contamination of Soils and Sediments With Environmental Magnetic Methods: Laboratory and Field Studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrocarbon contamination of soils and sediments is a worldwide environmental problem. The present research focuses on the study of magnetic properties of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and sediments using environmental magnetic methods both on field sites as well as in laboratory batch experiments. The main objectives of this research are i) to determine a possible application of magnetic proxies for the delineation of organic contamination in soils and sediments and ii) to examine the role of bacteria in changing soil magnetic properties after hydrocarbon contamination. A former oil field and a former military site which are heavily contaminated with hydrocarbons were studied. Additionally, three different types of natural clean soils were investigated in laboratory experiments by simulating hydrocarbon contamination in sterile and microbial active setups. Magnetic properties, soil properties, iron bioavailability, iron redox state and hydrocarbon content of samples were measured. Additionally, magnetic susceptibility (MS) was monitored weekly in laboratory batch set-ups during several months. Results from the field sites showed that there is an increase of MS and a good correlation between MS and hydrocarbon content. A weekly monitored MS result from the laboratory study clearly indicated~~10% change (increase as well as decrease) of initial MS of respective soils only in microbial active set-ups with saturation after a few weeks of experimental period. This depicts that there is a change of MS caused by microbial iron mineral transformation in presence of hydrocarbon contamination in soils. The results from the field study demonstrate that magnetic proxies can be used to localize hydrocarbon contamination. However, more field sites with hydrocarbon contaminated soils and sediments need to be investigated by using environmental magnetic methods for better understanding the factors driving such changes in magnetic properties.

Rijal, M. L.; Appel, E.; Porsch, K.; Kappler, A.; Blaha, U.; Petrovsky, E.

2008-12-01

99

ASSESSING UST CORRECTIVE ACTION TECHNOLOGY: A SCIENTIFIC EVALUATION OF THE MOBILITY AND DEGRADABILITY OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The problems associated with leakage of motor fuels and organic chemicals from underground storage tanks (USTs) are compounded by a general lack of understanding of the partitioning, retention, transformation, and transport of these contaminants in the subsurface environment. he ...

100

RADIO FREQUENCY ENHANCED DECONTAMINATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS  

EPA Science Inventory

There has been considerable effort in the development of innovative treatment technologies for the clean up of sites containing hazardous wastes such as hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Typical examples of such waste material are: chlorinated solvents, polychlorinated b...

101

Polar non-hydrocarbon contaminants in reservoir core extracts  

Microsoft Academic Search

: A geochemical investigation of oils in sandstone core plugs and drill stem test oils was carried out on samples from a North Sea reservoir. A sample of diesel used as a constituent of the drilling fluids was also analysed. The aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and polar non-hydrocarbons were isolated using solid phase extraction methods. GC analysis of the hydrocarbon

B. Bennett; S. R. Larter

2000-01-01

102

Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site  

SciTech Connect

Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site's microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog [reg sign] evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog[reg sign] activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

1992-01-01

103

Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site  

SciTech Connect

Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site`s microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog {reg_sign} evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog{reg_sign} activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

1992-12-31

104

Remediation of contaminated subsurface materials by a metal-reducing bacterium  

SciTech Connect

A biotic approach for remediating subsurface sediments and groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chromium was evaluated. Cells of the Fe(iii)-reducing bacterium strain BrY were added to sealed, anoxic flasks containing Hanford groundwater, natural subsurface sediments, and either carbon tetrachloride, CT, or oxidized chromium, Cr(VI). With lactate as the electron donor, BrY transformed CT to chloroform (CF), which accumulated to about 1 0 % of the initial concentration of CT. The remainder of the CT was transformed to unidentified, nonvolatile compounds. Transformation of CT by BrY was an indirect process Cells reduced solid phase Fe(ill) to chemically reactive FE(II) that chemically transformed the chlorinated contaminant. Cr(VI), in contrast, was reduced by a direct enzymatic reaction in the presence or absence of Fe(III)-bearing sediments. These results demonstrate that Fe(ill)-reducing bacteria provide potential for transforming CT and for reducing CR(VI) to less toxic Cr(III). Technologies for stimulating indigenous populations of metal-reducing bacteria or for introducing specific metal-reducing bacteria to the subsurface are being investigated.

Gorby, Y.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.

1994-11-01

105

STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES  

EPA Science Inventory

The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

106

TAILORING CATALYSTS FOR HYDRODECHLORINATING CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER. (R825689C093)  

EPA Science Inventory

Abstract A palladium-on-zeolite catalyst has been optimized for treating groundwater contaminated with halogenated hydrocarbon compounds (HHCs) by hydrodechlorination with dissolved hydrogen. Aqueous sulfite was used as the model poison and the dechlorination of 1,2-di...

107

TAILORING CATALYSTS FOR HYDRODECHLORINATING CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER. (R825689C078)  

EPA Science Inventory

Abstract A palladium-on-zeolite catalyst has been optimized for treating groundwater contaminated with halogenated hydrocarbon compounds (HHCs) by hydrodechlorination with dissolved hydrogen. Aqueous sulfite was used as the model poison and the dechlorination of 1,2-di...

108

FINAL REPORT. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS FROM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN THE ECOSYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this project was to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, act as hormones or anti- hormones in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. The three major components of the research included: 1)a biotechnology based screening system ...

109

Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues  

SciTech Connect

Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-07-23

110

Microbial Community Responses to Organophosphate Substrate Additions in Contaminated Subsurface Sediments  

PubMed Central

Background Radionuclide- and heavy metal-contaminated subsurface sediments remain a legacy of Cold War nuclear weapons research and recent nuclear power plant failures. Within such contaminated sediments, remediation activities are necessary to mitigate groundwater contamination. A promising approach makes use of extant microbial communities capable of hydrolyzing organophosphate substrates to promote mineralization of soluble contaminants within deep subsurface environments. Methodology/Principal Findings Uranium-contaminated sediments from the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC) Area 2 site were used in slurry experiments to identify microbial communities involved in hydrolysis of 10 mM organophosphate amendments [i.e., glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) or glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P)] in synthetic groundwater at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8. Following 36 day (G2P) and 20 day (G3P) amended treatments, maximum phosphate (PO43?) concentrations of 4.8 mM and 8.9 mM were measured, respectively. Use of the PhyloChip 16S rRNA microarray identified 2,120 archaeal and bacterial taxa representing 46 phyla, 66 classes, 110 orders, and 186 families among all treatments. Measures of archaeal and bacterial richness were lowest under G2P (pH 5.5) treatments and greatest with G3P (pH 6.8) treatments. Members of the phyla Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria demonstrated the greatest enrichment in response to organophosphate amendments and the OTUs that increased in relative abundance by 2-fold or greater accounted for 9%–50% and 3%–17% of total detected Archaea and Bacteria, respectively. Conclusions/Significance This work provided a characterization of the distinct ORFRC subsurface microbial communities that contributed to increased concentrations of extracellular phosphate via hydrolysis of organophosphate substrate amendments. Within subsurface environments that are not ideal for reductive precipitation of uranium, strategies that harness microbial phosphate metabolism to promote uranium phosphate precipitation could offer an alternative approach for in situ sequestration. PMID:24950228

Martinez, Robert J.; Wu, Cindy H.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Andersen, Gary L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Hazen, Terry C.; Taillefert, Martial; Sobecky, Patricia A.

2014-01-01

111

AN EVALUATION OF HANFORD SITE TANK FARM SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION FY2007  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Farm Vadose Zone (TFVZ) Project conducts activities to characterize and analyze the long-term environmental and human health impacts from tank waste releases to the vadose zone. The project also implements interim measures to mitigate impacts, and plans the remediation of waste releases from tank farms and associated facilities. The scope of this document is to report data needs that are important to estimating long-term human health and environmental risks. The scope does not include technologies needed to remediate contaminated soils and facilities, technologies needed to close tank farms, or management and regulatory decisions that will impact remediation and closure. This document is an update of ''A Summary and Evaluation of Hanford Site Tank Farm Subsurface Contamination''. That 1998 document summarized knowledge of subsurface contamination beneath the tank farms at the time. It included a preliminary conceptual model for migration of tank wastes through the vadose zone and an assessment of data and analysis gaps needed to update the conceptual model. This document provides a status of the data and analysis gaps previously defined and discussion of the gaps and needs that currently exist to support the stated mission of the TFVZ Project. The first data-gaps document provided the basis for TFVZ Project activities over the previous eight years. Fourteen of the nineteen knowledge gaps identified in the previous document have been investigated to the point that the project defines the current status as acceptable. In the process of filling these gaps, significant accomplishments were made in field work and characterization, laboratory investigations, modeling, and implementation of interim measures. The current data gaps are organized in groups that reflect Components of the tank farm vadose zone conceptual model: inventory, release, recharge, geohydrology, geochemistry, and modeling. The inventory and release components address residual wastes that will remain in the tanks and tank-farm infrastructure after closure and potential losses from leaks during waste retrieval. Recharge addresses the impacts of current conditions in the tank farms (i.e. gravel covers that affect infiltration and recharge) as well as the impacts of surface barriers. The geohydrology and geochemistry components address the extent of the existing subsurface contaminant inventory and drivers and pathways for contaminants to be transported through the vadose zone and groundwater. Geochemistry addresses the mobility of key reactive contaminants such as uranium. Modeling addresses conceptual models and how they are simulated in computers. The data gaps will be used to provide input to planning (including the upcoming C Farm Data Quality Objective meetings scheduled this year).

MANN, F.M.

2007-07-10

112

Geophysical Responses of Hydrocarbon-impacted Zones at the Various Contamination Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One controlled experiment and two field surveys were conducted to investigate the geoelectrical responses of hydrocarbon-contaminated zones, so called smeared zone, on the geophysical data at the hydrocarbon- contaminated sites with various conditions. One controlled physical model experiment with GPR using fresh gasoline and two different 3-D electrical resistivity investigations at the aged sites. One field site (former military facilities for arms maintenance) was mainly contaminated with lubricating oils and the other (former gas station) was contaminated with gasoline and diesel, respectively. The results from the physical model experiment show that GPR signals were enhanced when LNAPL was present as a residual saturation in the water-saturated system due to less attenuation of the electromagnetic energy through the soil medium of the hydrocarbon-impacted zone (no biodegradation), compared to when the medium was saturated with only water (no hydrocarbon impaction). In the former gas station site, 3-D resistivity results demonstrate that the highly contaminated zones were imaged with low resistivity anomalies since the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons has been undergone for many years, causing the drastic increase in the TDS at the hydrocarbon-impacted zones. Finally, 3-D resistivity data obtained from the former military maintenance site show that the hydrocarbon-contaminated zones show high resistivity anomalies since the hydrocarbons such as lubricating oils at the contaminated soils were not greatly influenced by microbial degradation and has relatively well kept their original physical properties of high electrical resistivity. The results of the study illustrated that the hydrocarbon-impacted zones under various contamination conditions yielded various geophysical responses which include (1) enhanced GPR amplitudes at the fresh LNAPL (Gasoline to middle distillates) spill sites, (2) low electrical resistivity anomalies due to biodegradation at the aged LNAPL- impacted sites, and (3) high electrical resistivity anomalies at the fresh or aged sites contaminated with residual products of crude oils (lubricating oils). The study results also show that the geophysical methods, as a non-invasive sounding technique, can be effectively applied to mapping hydrocarbon-contaminated zones.

Kim, C.; Ko, K.; Son, J.; Kim, J.

2008-12-01

113

Bioremediation of Poly-Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)Contaminated Soil by Composting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a comprehensive and critical review of research on different co-composting approaches to bioremediate hydrocarbon contaminated soil, organisms that have been found to degrade PAHs, and PAH breakdown products. Advantages and limitations of using certain groups of organisms and recommended areas of further research effort are identified. Studies investigating the use of composting techniques to treat contaminated soil

Nadine Loick; Phil J. Hobbs; Mike D. C. Hale; Davey L. Jones

2009-01-01

114

Anaerobic biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the subsurface sediment of mangrove wetland.  

E-print Network

???Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) released into all environmental compartments through natural or anthropogenic activities are toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic. Mangrove wetlands, located along the coastline… (more)

Li, Chunhua (???)

2010-01-01

115

Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Lesperance, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L. [EnvironIssues (United States)

1996-09-01

116

Phytosiderophore effects on subsurface actinide contaminants: potential for phytostabilization and phytoextraction.  

SciTech Connect

In recognition of the need for a safe, effective technology for long term Pu/Th/Actinide stabilization or removal from soils, we have begun an investigation of the potential for phytoremediation (phytostabilization and/or phytoextraction) of Pu and other actinide soil contaminants at DOE sites using phytosiderophore producing plants, and are investigating the contribution of phytosiderophores to actinide mobility in the subsurface environment. Phytoremediation and Phytostabilization have been proven to be a cost-effective, safe, efficient, and publicly acceptable technology for clean up and/or stabilization of contaminant metals . However, no phyto-based technologies have been developed for stabilization or removal of plutonium from soils and groundwater, and very few have been investigated for other actinides . Current metal-phytostabilization and phytoremediation techniques, predominately based around lead, nickel, and other soft-metal phytoextraction, will almost certainly be inadequate for plutonium due its distinct chemical properties . Phytosiderophore-based phytoremediation may provide technically and financially practical methods for remediation and long-term stewardship of soils that have low to moderate, near surface actinide contamination . We plan to demonstrate potential benefits of phytosiderophore-producing plants for long-term actinide contaminant stabilization by the plant's prevention of soil erosion and actinide migration through hydraulic control and/or through actinide removal through phytoextraction . We may also show possible harm caused by these plants through increased presence of actinide chelators that could increase actinide mobilization and migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies .

Ruggiero, C. E. (Christy E.); Twary, S. N. (Scott N.); Deladurantaye, E. (Elise)

2003-01-01

117

Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation of Uranium in Multi–element Contaminated, Organic–rich Subsurface Sediment  

SciTech Connect

Alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing mineral phases have been identified through drilling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at Rifle, CO. Regions of the subsurface from which such sediments are derived are referred to as Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZ). We conducted a study with NRZ sediments with the objective to: i.) Characterize solid phase contamination of U and other co-contaminants; ii.) Document the occurrence of potential U host minerals; iii.) Determine U valence state and micron scale spatial association with co-contaminants. Macroscopic (wet chemical batch extractions and a column experiment), microscopic (SEM-EDS), and spectroscopic (Mössbauer, µ-XRF and XANES) techniques were employed. Results showed that sediments’ solid phase had significant concentrations of U, S, As, Zn, V, Cr, Cu and Se, and a remarkable assortment of potential U hosts (sorbents and/or electron donors), such as Fe oxides (hematite, magnetite, Al-substituted goethite), siderite, reduced Fe(II) bearing clays, sulfides of different types, Zn sulfide framboids and multi – element sulfides. Multi-contaminants, micron size (ca. 5 to 30 µm) areas of mainly U(IV) and some U(VI), and/or other electron scavengers or donors such as Se, As, Cr, and V were discovered in the sediments, suggesting complex micron-scale system responses to transient redox conditions, and different extent and rates of competing U redox reactions than those of single contaminant systems. Collectively, the results improve our understanding and ability to predict U and NRZ’s complex behavior and will delineate future research directions to further study both the natural attenuation and persistence of contaminant plumes and their contribution to groundwater contamination.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noemie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.

2014-03-02

118

Complete Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment.  

PubMed

We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium's genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation. PMID:25614562

Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Glavina Del Rio, T; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Sims, D; Brettin, T; Bruce, D C; Detter, J C; Han, C S; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F W; Land, M L; Hauser, L J; Kyrpides, N; Lykidis, A; Richardson, P; Belieav, A; Sanford, R A; Löeffler, F E; Fields, M W

2015-01-01

119

Bioremediation of Contaminated Soils by Hydrocarbons Degrading Bacteria and Decontamination Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study three strains of Vibrio marine bioluminescent bacteria, have been employed to measure the biotoxicity of hydrocarbon contaminated soils from oil\\u000a terminals. The evaluation of inhibitory effects of samples on emitted light was performed on soil before and during a four\\u000a months bioremediation treatment by hydrocarbons degrading bacteria. The measure ments were carried out at room temperature,\\u000a using

Stefano Girotti; Elisabetta Maiolini; Luca Bolelli; Elida Ferri; Anna Pompei; Diego Matteuzzi; Svetlana Medvedeva; Paolo Fonti

120

Subsurface distribution of hydrocarbons in the Building 403 Area at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

The loss of 9000 to 17,500 gallons of regular gasoline from an underground tank in the Building 403 area was investigated. Samples of saturated and unsaturated soil and ground water were collected and analyzed for total gasoline hydrocarbons and/or aromatic hydrocarbons. These data have defined the vertical and lateral extent of hydrocarbons in soil and ground water in the Building 403 area. Ground water analyses indicate that the aromatic constituents of gasoline, benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) have not migrated horizontally as far as 200 ft southwest, 250 ft west, and 500 ft northwest, northeast, and east from the suspected leak. Low concentrations of benzene in wells 300 ft north and 350 ft southeast of the suspected leak indicate these wells are at or near the fringe of the BTX plume in ground water. Ground water analyses also indicate BTX has not migrated as deep as 185 ft below ground surface near the suspected leak. Short chain alphatic gasoline hydrocarbons have been detected in ground water in higher concentrations and further from the suspected leak than the aromatic hydrocarbons, suggesting that the short chain hydrocarbons are more mobile and may represent the leading edge of a hydrocarbon plume. In saturated soil, BTX in concentrations greater than 100 ppM appears to have migrated preferentially to the southwest and northwest from the leak. Beneath the leak, BTX concentrations greater than 1 ppM in unsaturated soil extend from about 20 ft to the water table, about 100 ft below ground surface. Existing data indicate BTX in concentrations greater than 1 ppM has preferentially migrated about 100 ft northwest of the suspected leak while similar BTX concentrations extend about 50 ft in other directions. The highest concentrations of gasoline hydrocarbons in both saturated and unsaturated soil occur in finer grained sediments, probably as a result of greater sorption in such materials.

Dresen, M.D.; Hoffman, F.; Lovejoy, S. Jr.

1986-07-01

121

Geophysical and geochemical evidence for subsurface hydrocarbon leakage in southern Bering Sea, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted in the southern Bering Sea to investigate whether hydrocarbons found in the surficial sediments, particularly in association with certain geophysical events, indicate the presence and nature of more deeply reservoirs oil and gas deposits. Surface sediment samples were obtained at 1000 sites where high-resolution seismic data indicated the presence of gas, active seepage, and/or surface faulting. In addition, sites for background measurements were chosen away from areas of gas seepage. Sediment samples were frozen to inhibit bacterial action and sent to Houston for analysis. Each sample was examined for free light hydrocarbons, adsorbed light hydrocarbons, liquid hydrocarbons, nonhydrocarbon gas (carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen), and the isotopic composition of methane and carbon dioxide. Results of the geophysical survey showed seismic wipeout zones present throughout the southern Bering Sea. Sediment samples obtained within the shallow wipeout zones confirmed these features are caused by gas. In addition, compositional and isotopic analyses indicated the gas is of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. The thermogenic leakage appears to be related to localized faulting and shallow structuring. Therefore, the high-resolution seismic data provided an excellent tool for locating leakage points, thereby enhancing the opportunity for finding migrated thermogenic hydrocarbons in surficial sediments.

Abrams, M.A.

1989-03-01

122

Monitoring the bio-stimulation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by measurements of soil electrical properties, and CO2 content and its 13C/12C isotopic signature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrocarbon contaminated soils represent an environmental issue as it impacts on ecosystems and aquifers. Where significant subsurface heterogeneity exists, conventional intrusive investigations and groundwater sampling can be insufficient to obtain a robust monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants, as the information they provide is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations, with no information between sampling points. In order to obtain wider information in space volume on subsurface modifications, complementary methods can be used like geophysics. Among geophysical methods, geoelectrical techniques such as electrical resistivity (ER) and induced polarization (IP) seem the more promising, especially to study the effects of biodegradation processes. Laboratory and field geoelectrical experiments to characterize soils contaminated by oil products have shown that mature hydrocarbon-contaminated soils are characterized by enhanced electrical conductivity although hydrocarbons are electrically resistive. This high bulk conductivity is due to bacterial impacts on geological media, resulting in changes in the chemical and physical properties and thus, to the geophysical properties of the ground. Moreover, microbial activity induced CO2 production and isotopic deviation of carbon. Indeed, produced CO2 will reflect the pollutant isotopic signature. Thus, the ratio ?13C(CO2) will come closer to ?13C(hydrocarbon). BIOPHY, project supported by the French National Research Agency (ANR), proposes to use electrical methods and gas analyses to develop an operational and non-destructive method for monitoring in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons in order to optimize soil treatment. Demonstration field is located in the South of Paris (France), where liquid fuels (gasoline and diesel) leaked from some tanks in 1997. In order to stimulate biodegradation, a trench has been dug to supply oxygen to the water table and thus stimulate aerobic metabolic bioprocesses. ER and IP surveys are performed regularly to monitor the stimulated biodegradation and progress of remediation until soil cleanup. Microbial activity is characterized by CO2 production increase and ?13C isotopic deviation, in the produced CO2 measured by infrared laser spectroscopy, and by an evolution of electrical conductivity and IP responses in correlation with microbiological and chemical analyses.

Noel, C.; Gourry, J.; Ignatiadis, I.; Colombano, S.; Dictor, M.; Guimbaud, C.; Chartier, M.; Dumestre, A.; Dehez, S.; Naudet, V.

2013-12-01

123

Modeling for the Separation of Light NonAqueous Phase Liquids from Contaminated Subsurface Through Vacuum-Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vacuum-enhanced recovery (VER) technique has been widely used for separation and removal of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) at petroleum-contaminated sites. In order to effectively design a VER process, a mathematical simulator is desired for simulating multiphase flows of LNAPLs, water and air in subsurface. In this study, a model for simulating the separation of LNAPLs from contaminated soil and

Z. CHEN; L. LIU; G. H. HUANG; Y. F. HUANG; I. MAQSOOD

2005-01-01

124

Potential of phytoremediation for the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated salt marsh sediments.  

PubMed

Degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in colonized and un-colonized sediments by salt marsh plants Juncus maritimus and Phragmites australis collected in a temperate estuary was investigated during a 5-month greenhouse experiment. The efficiency of two bioremediation treatments namely biostimulation (BS) by the addition of nutrients, and bioaugmentation (BA) by addition of indigenous microorganisms was tested in comparison with hydrocarbon natural attenuation in un-colonized and with rhizoremediation in colonized sediments. Hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms and root biomass were assessed as well as hydrocarbon degradation levels. During the study, hydrocarbon degradation in un-colonized sediments was negligible regardless of treatments. Rhizoremediation proved to be an effective strategy for hydrocarbon removal, yielding high rates in most experiments. However, BS treatments showed a negative effect on the J. maritimus potential for hydrocarbon degradation by decreasing the root system development that lead to lower degradation rates. Although both plants and their associated microorganisms presented a potential for rhizoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated salt marsh sediments, results highlighted that nutrient requirements may be distinct among plant species, which should be accounted for when designing cleanup strategies. PMID:24584003

Ribeiro, Hugo; Mucha, Ana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Bordalo, Adriano A

2014-05-01

125

Phospholipid fatty acids of a marine sedimentary microbial community in a laboratory microcosm: Responses to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory microcosm experiments were performed to evaluate petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition in either non-contaminated (NC) or contaminated (C) sedimentary microcosms with a crude oil. An analytical procedure was developed to extract both hydrocarbons and PLFAs from the same culture. PLFAs were analyzed over time during an aerobic microcosm experiment (0–21 days) to obtain a better

A.D. Syakti; N. Mazzella; D. Nerini; M. Guiliano; J.C. Bertrand; P. Doumenq

2006-01-01

126

Enumeration and Characterization of Iron(III)-Reducing Microbial Communities from Acidic Subsurface Sediments Contaminated with Uranium(VI)  

PubMed Central

Iron(III)-reducing bacteria have been demonstrated to rapidly catalyze the reduction and immobilization of uranium(VI) from contaminated subsurface sediments. Thus, these organisms may aid in the development of bioremediation strategies for uranium contamination, which is prevalent in acidic subsurface sediments at U.S. government facilities. Iron(III)-reducing enrichment cultures were initiated from pristine and contaminated (high in uranium, nitrate; low pH) subsurface sediments at pH 7 and pH 4 to 5. Enumeration of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria yielded cell counts of up to 240 cells ml?1 for the contaminated and background sediments at both pHs with a range of different carbon sources (glycerol, acetate, lactate, and glucose). In enrichments where nitrate contamination was removed from the sediment by washing, MPN counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria increased substantially. Sediments of lower pH typically yielded lower counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in lactate- and acetate-amended enrichments, but higher counts were observed when glucose was used as an electron donor in acidic enrichments. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences extracted from the highest positive MPN dilutions revealed that the predominant members of Fe(III)-reducing consortia from background sediments were closely related to members of the Geobacteraceae family, whereas a recently characterized Fe(III) reducer (Anaeromyxobacter sp.) and organisms not previously shown to reduce Fe(III) (Paenibacillus and Brevibacillus spp.) predominated in the Fe(III)-reducing consortia of contaminated sediments. Analysis of enrichment cultures by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) strongly supported the cloning and sequencing results. Dominant members of the Fe(III)-reducing consortia were observed to be stable over several enrichment culture transfers by T-RFLP in conjunction with measurements of Fe(III) reduction activity and carbon substrate utilization. Enrichment cultures from contaminated sites were also shown to rapidly reduce millimolar amounts of U(VI) in comparison to killed controls. With DNA extracted directly from subsurface sediments, quantitative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences with MPN-PCR indicated that Geobacteraceae sequences were more abundant in pristine compared to contaminated environments,whereas Anaeromyxobacter sequences were more abundant in contaminated sediments. Thus, results from a combination of cultivation-based and cultivation-independent approaches indicate that the abundance/community composition of Fe(III)-reducing consortia in subsurface sediments is dependent upon geochemical parameters (pH, nitrate concentration) and that microorganisms capable of producing spores (gram positive) or spore-like bodies (Anaeromyxobacter) were representative of acidic subsurface environments. PMID:14660400

Petrie, Lainie; North, Nadia N.; Dollhopf, Sherry L.; Balkwill, David L.; Kostka, Joel E.

2003-01-01

127

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation by composting in a soot-contaminated alkaline soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study deals with the biodegradation of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)s present in a soil contaminated by soot waste, characterised by a total PAHs content in the 200mgkg?1 range. A challenging characteristic of the waste soil treated was its high alkalinity, with a pH of about 12.8. The waste came from a soot-contaminated area located in the industrial zone

L. M. Moretto; S. Silvestri; P. Ugo; G. Zorzi; F. Abbondanzi; C. Baiocchi; A. Iacondini

2005-01-01

128

Effect of temperature and pore size on the hydraulic properties and flow of a hydrocarbon oil in the subsurface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Capillary pressure relationships in a porous medium determine the distribution of immiscible fluids under static conditions and can largely influence the movement of the fluids when the system is not at equilibrium. Theory predicts that for a given porous medium, the effect of different fluid properties or changes in temperature on capillary pressure are due to changes in interfacial tension and contact angle of the system. The capillary pressure-saturation curves measured here for hydrocarbon oil-water do not have a constant capillary pressure ratio with saturation when compared to the water-air system, and changes in ratio were found when comparing the water-air curves measured at different temperatures. Thus, the scaling theory based on interfacial tensions and contact angles does not adequately account for differences in capillary pressures due to different fluid pairs or temperatures. Also, the curves show the residual wetting and nonwetting phase saturations are greatly affected by temperature and sometimes by the fluid pair, which is not accounted for in the scaling theory and cannot be predicted. When the capillary pressure-saturation relationship is extended to the calculation of relative permeabilities and the prediction of fluid flow in the subsurface, the differences in measured and scaled capillary pressure curves lead to differences in the predicted flow rates and saturations of the immiscible fluids in the subsurface. Thus, care must be used when applying capillary pressure-saturation data from one fluid system to that of another, or when applying it to different conditions.

Davis, Eva L.

1994-05-01

129

1. INTRODUCTION To increase hydrocarbon recovery in the subsurface, it is  

E-print Network

hydrocarbons, because more flow channels are produced. Such a system is called an open, complex hydraulic of data of fracture pressure per fluid has been made, the initial conditions can be manipulated for future and Preparation A standard homogenous material used in hydraulic fracture experiments is Polymethyl methacralate

130

Bioremediation of hydrocarbons contaminating sewage effluent using man-made biofilms: effects of some variables.  

PubMed

Biofilm samples were established on glass slides by submerging them in oil-free and oil-containing sewage effluent for a month. In batch cultures, such biofilms were effective in removing crude oil, pure n-hexadecane, and pure phenanthrene contaminating sewage effluent. The amounts of the removed hydrocarbons increased with increasing biofilm surface area exposed to the effluent. On the other hand, addition of the reducing agent thioglycollate dramatically inhibited the hydrocarbon bioremediation potential of the biofilms. The same biofilm samples removed contaminating hydrocarbons effectively in three successive batch bioremediation cycles but started to become less effective in the cycles thereafter, apparently due to mechanical biofilm loss during successive transfers. As major hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, the biofilms harbored species belonging to the genera Pseudomonas, Microvirga, Zavarzinia, Mycobacterium, Microbacterium, Stenotrophomonas, Gordonia, Bosea, Sphingobium, Brachybacterium, and others. The nitrogen fixer Azospirillum brasilense and the microalga Ochromonas distigma were also present; they seemed to enrich the biofilms, with nitrogenous compounds and molecular oxygen, respectively, which are known to enhance microbiological hydrocarbon degradation. It was concluded that man-made biofilms based upon sewage microflora are promising tools for bioremediation of hydrocarbons contaminating sewage effluent. PMID:25146193

Al-Mailem, D M; Kansour, M K; Radwan, S S

2014-11-01

131

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOEpatents

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

1999-05-25

132

Comparative performance of free surface and sub-surface flow systems in the phytoremediation of hydrocarbons using Scirpus grossus.  

PubMed

Two types of flow system, free surface flow (FSF) and sub-surface flow (SSF), were examined to select a better way to remove total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) using diesel as a hydrocarbon model in a phytotoxicity test to Scirpus grossus. The removal efficiencies of TPH for the two flow systems were compared. Several wastewater parameters, including temperature (T, °C), dissolved oxygen (DO, mgL(-1)), oxidation-reduction potential (ORP, mV), and pH were recorded during the experimental runs. In addition, overall plant lengths, wet weights, and dry weights were also monitored. The phytotoxicity test using the bulrush plant S. grossus was run for 72 days with different diesel concentrations (1%, 2%, and 3%) (Vdiesel/Vwater). A comparison between the two flow systems showed that the SSF system was more efficient than the FSF system in removing TPH from the synthetic wastewater, with average removal efficiencies of 91.5% and 80.2%, respectively. The SSF system was able to tolerate higher diesel concentrations than was the FSF system. PMID:24113536

Al-Baldawi, Israa Abdul Wahab; Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah Sheikh; Suja, Fatihah; Anuar, Nurina; Mushrifah, Idris

2013-11-30

133

Applying model abstraction techniques to optimize monitoring networks for detecting subsurface contaminant transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Improving strategies for monitoring subsurface contaminant transport includes performance comparison of competing models, developed independently or obtained via model abstraction. Model comparison and parameter discrimination involve specific performance indicators selected to better understand subsurface contaminant transport to optimize groundwater monitoring networks (GMN). Three abstraction techniques were validated for GMN design: (1) using pedotransfer functions, (2) profile aggregation, and (3) limiting the input domain by ignoring the unsaturated zone. Data were collected in the tracer experiment at the USDA-ARS OPE3 integrated research site. A pulse of a potassium chloride solution was applied to a 13m x14 m irrigation plot, and chloride concentrations were measured in the groundwater at three sampling depths in 12 observations wells installed at distances of 7 m and 14 m from the irrigation plot. The spatial distribution of soil materials was obtained from cores taken at 0.2 m increments to the depth of 2 m during installation of the observation wells. Soil hydraulic conductivity values were obtained from the HYDRUS-3D calibration with chloride concentration time series measured in the observation wells, and soil water retention was estimated from pedotransfer functions. The model abstraction techniques were evaluated using HYDRUS-3D simulations performed for different hydrologic scenarios. These scenarios included three weather, two ground-water depth, and two groundwater slope scenarios, as well as two different locations of the contaminant release selected within the irrigation plot. The weather scenarios were based on 25%, 50% and 75% of the 10-year probability of mean annual precipitation. The monitoring locations for GMN were selected based on three performance indicators: the peak concentration (Cpeak), the time to the peak concentration (Tpeak) and total chemical flux (QC). The monitoring locations were selected based on (a) more frequent, and (b) more probable and persistent appearance of maximum or minimum values of the above performance indicators. Cpeak and QC appeared to be more reliable performance indicators compared to Tpeak. The profile aggregation method was found to be the only abstraction technique that generated a GMN differed from the network obtained using the calibrated HYDRUS-3D model based on Cpeak and QC performance indicators. The outcome of this study provides reasonable assurance that model abstraction techniques can be used to optimize monitoring network strategies, and can provide specific the information for the future data collection and abstraction efforts to optimize a GMN.

Pachepsky, Y. A.; Guber, A.; Gish, T. J.; Yakirevich, A.; Nicholson, T. J.; Cady, R.

2012-12-01

134

STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF A SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER CONTAMINATED WITH FUEL HYDROCARBONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Ground-water chemistry and the stable C isotope composition ( 13CDIC) of dissolved C (DIC) were measured in a sand aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Results show that ground water in the upgradient zone was characterized by DIC content of 14-20 mg C/L and 13CDIC...

135

Triphasic desorption of highly resistant chlorobenzenes, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in field contaminated sediment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pollutants in aged field sediments seem to differ from spiked sediments in their chemical and biological availability. Biphasic desorption is often used as an explanation. In the present study, desorption kinetics and partitioning of chlorobenzenes (CBs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in long term field contaminated sediment cores and top layer sediment were measured by gas-purging. Desorption

E. M. T. Ten Hulscher; B. A. Vrind; H. van den Heuvel; L. E. van der Velde; P. C. M. van Noort; J. E. M. Beurskens; H. A. J. Govers

1999-01-01

136

EARLY WARNING MARINE WATER SUPPLY PROTECTION STRATEGY: THE THREAT OF OIL SPILL (PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON) CONTAMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Oil spills resulting from the twice-grounded freighter New Carissa on the Central Oregon coast in the spring of 1999 caused substantial concern regarding potential petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contamination of Coos Bay, Alsea Bay and Yaquina Bay estuaries and resident seawater fac...

137

Surfactants and Bacterial Bioremediation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soil—Unlocking the Targets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The activities of man produce significant levels of toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs), which have been identified as excellent candidates for biodegradative removal from contaminated sites. PAHs strongly sorb to soil particles and can also partition into a nonaqueous phase, often limiting bioavailability. In this context, synthetic surfactants and biosurfactants will be discussed as a means to mobilize and

Roy Elliot; Naresh Singhal; Simon Swift

2010-01-01

138

Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants in marine habitats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bioremediation is being increasingly seen as an effective, environmentally benign treatment for shorelines contaminated as a result of marine oil spills. Despite a relatively long history of research on oil-spill bioremediation, it remains an essentially empirical technology and many of the factors that control bioremediation have yet to be adequately understood. Nutrient amendment is a widely accepted practice in oil-spill

Ian M Head; Richard PJ Swannell

1999-01-01

139

BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN MARINE HABITATS  

EPA Science Inventory

Bioremediation is being increasingly seen as an effective environmentally benign treatment for shorelines contaminated as a result of marine oil spills. Despite a relatively long history of research on oil-spill bioremediation, it remains an essentially empirical technology and m...

140

Ambivalent role of water in thermodesorption of hydrocarbons from contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Thermodesorption studies with soil samples from a former filling station for light crude oil contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons (mainly benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, naphthalene, alkylnaphthalenes, and C(10) to C(14) alkanes) have revealed an ambivalent influence of water on desorption rates. Particularly, the influences of soil moisture content, humidity of the purge gas, temperature, and content of soil organic matter (SOM) were studied. At low temperature, purge gas humidity strongly affected the mobility of hydrocarbons in the soil organic matter (SOM) leading to an enhanced release of contaminants at higher moisture contents. Heating resulted in a decrease of thermodesorption when connected with desiccation of soil, in spite of the strong temperature impact on the vapor pressure of contaminants. At high water content of the SOM, the transfer of the pollutant molecules into the gas phase was found to be markedly hindered by the formation of water films or pore-filling by bulk water, both acting as diffusion barriers. PMID:21133366

Roland, Ulf; Holzer, Frank; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

2011-01-15

141

CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV. Also conducted was screening of 13 chemicals to determine their relative effectiveness and the selection of three chemicals for further testing.

L.A. Johnson, Jr.

2003-06-30

142

Occurrence of atrazine and degradates as contaminants of subsurface drainage and shallow groundwater  

SciTech Connect

Atrazine is a commonly used herbicide in corn (Zea mays L.) growing areas of the USA. Because of its heavy usage, moderate persistence, and mobility in soil, monitoring of atrazine movement under field conditions is essential to assess its potential to contaminate groundwater. Concentrations of atrazine, deisopropylatrazine (DIA), and deethlatraaine (DEA) were measured in subsurface drainage and shallow groundwater beneath continuous, no-till corn. Water samples were collected from the subsurface drain (tile) outlets and suction lysimeters in the growing seasons of 1990 and 1991, and analyzed for atrazine and two principle degradates won solid-phase extraction and HPLC. In 1990, atrazine concentration ranged from 1.3 to 5.1{mu}g L{sup -1} in tile-drain water and from 0.5 to 20.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} in lysimeter water. In general, concentrations of parent and degradates in solution were atrazine > DEA > DIA. Lesser levels of atrazine were measured in 1991 from Plots 2 and 4; however, greater concentrations of atrazine (6.0-8.4 {mu}g L{sup -1}) were measured from plot 5. Throughout the two growing seasons, atrazine concentration in Plot 5 tile-drain water was greater than that of Plots 2 and 4, suggesting a preferential movement of atrazine. Concentrations of DIA and DEA ranged from 0.1 to 2.2 and 0.9 to 3.2 {mu}g L{sup -1} respectively, indicating that the degradation products by themselves or in combination with parent atrazine can exceed the maximum contaminant level (mcl) of 3 {mu}g L{sup -1} even though atrazine by itself may be <3 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The deethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratio (DAR) is an indicator of residence time in soil during transport of atrazine to groundwater. In Plots 2 and 4, DAR values for tile-drain water ranged from 0.43 to 2.70 and 0.50 to 2.66 respectively. By comparison, a DAR of 0.38 to 0.60 was observed in Plot 5, suggesting less residence time in the soil. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Jayachandran, K.; Steinheimer, T.R.; Moorman, T.B. [National Soil Tilth Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

1994-03-01

143

Prediction of ecotoxicity of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using physicochemical parameters  

SciTech Connect

The physicochemical properties of eight hydrocarbon-contaminated soils were used to predict toxicity to earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and plants. The toxicity of these preremediated soils was assessed using earthworm avoidance, survival, and reproduction and seed germination and root growth in four plant species. No-observed-effect and 25% inhibitory concentrations were determined from the earthworm and plant assays. Physical property measurements and metals analyses of the soils were conducted. Hydrocarbon contamination was characterized by total petroleum hydrocarbons, oil and grease, and GC boiling-point distribution. Univariate and multivariate statistical methods were used to examine relationships between physical and chemical properties and biological endpoints. Soil groupings based on physicochemical properties and toxicity from cluster and principal component analyses were generally similar. Correlation analysis identified a number of significant relationships between soil parameters and toxicity that were used in univariate model development. Total petroleum hydrocarbons by gas chromatography and polars were identified as predictors of earthworm avoidance and survival and seed germination, explaining 65 to 75% of the variation in the data. Asphaltenes also explained 83% of the variation in seed germination. Gravimetric total petroleum hydrocarbons explained 40% of the variation in earthworm reproduction, whereas 43% of the variation in plant root growth was explained by asphaltenes. Multivariate one-component partial least squares models, which identified predictors similar to those identified by the univariate models, were also developed for worm avoidance and survival and seed germination and had predictive powers of 42 and 29%, respectively.

Wong, D.C.L.; Chai, E.Y.; Chu, K.K.; Dorn, P.B.

1999-11-01

144

Efficiency of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from contaminated soil.  

PubMed

This study describes the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from the soil samples collected from industrial dumping site. High concentrations of heavy metals (like iron, lead, nickel, cadmium, copper, cobalt and zinc) and petroleum hydrocarbons were present in the contaminated soil samples. Lipopeptide biosurfactant, consisting of surfactin and fengycin was obtained from Bacillus subtilis A21. Soil washing with biosurfactant solution removed significant amount of petroleum hydrocarbon (64.5 %) and metals namely cadmium (44.2 %), cobalt (35.4 %), lead (40.3 %), nickel (32.2 %), copper (26.2 %) and zinc (32.07 %). Parameters like surfactant concentration, temperature, agitation condition and pH of the washing solution influenced the pollutant removing ability of biosurfactant mixture. Biosurfactant exhibited substantial hydrocarbon solubility above its critical micelle concentration. During washing, 50 % of biosurfactant was sorbed to the soil particles decreasing effective concentration during washing process. Biosurfactant washed soil exhibited 100 % mustard seed germination contradictory to water washed soil where no germination was observed. The results indicate that the soil washing with mixture of lipopeptide biosurfactants at concentrations above its critical micelle concentration can be an efficient and environment friendly approach for removing pollutants (petroleum hydrocarbon and heavy metals) from contaminated soil. PMID:23681773

Singh, Anil Kumar; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

2013-10-01

145

Biomarkers for Great Lakes priority contaminants: halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons.  

PubMed Central

One of the major goals of the Great Lakes Action Plan is to actively accumulate and assess toxicological information on persistent toxic substances found in the Great Lakes basin. As part of Health Canada's commitment to this plan, a review of biomarkers for the environmental contaminants polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) was conducted. In general, while food consumption was identified as the major source of human exposure to both contaminant groups, certain commodities, such as fish, milk and dairy products, and meat, were found to predominate. Due to the ubiquitous nature of these environmental contaminants and their propensity to bioaccumulate, all humans will have detectable body burdens, which in certain cases can be positively associated with the consumption of particular foods (i.e., PCBs and freshwater fish from the Great Lakes). When dealing with environmental exposure only, relating specific effect biomarkers to contaminant exposure or tissue levels was difficult, due in part to the complex nature of the exposure and the nonspecific nature of the effect. For PCBs, the most likely biomarkers of effect included some form of alteration in lipid metabolism (serum triglyceride/cholesterol levels) and elevation of hepatic-related enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Cross-species extrapolation also indicates the potential for neurotoxicologic effects to occur in humans. For PCDDs/PCDFs, dermatologic lesions (chloracne) and indications of hepatic enzyme induction have been documented, but primarily due to occupational or high acute accidental exposures. Recent evidence suggests that neonates may represent a potential at-risk population due to relatively high exposure to PCDDs/PCDFs, as with PCBs, during breast feeding as compared to standard adult dietary intake. Future areas of potential benefit for biomarker development include immunologic and endocrine effects, primarily based on biologic plausibility from experimental animal research. PMID:8635442

Feeley, M M

1995-01-01

146

Effects of Heterogeneities, Sampling Frequencies, Tools and Methods on Uncertainties in Subsurface Contaminant Concentration Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term monitoring (LTM) is particularly important for contaminants which are mitigated by natural processes of dilution, dispersion, and degradation. At many sites, LTM can require decades of expensive sampling at tens or even hundreds of existing monitoring wells, resulting in hundreds of thousands, or millions of dollars per year for sampling and data management. Therefore, contaminant sampling tools, methods and frequencies are chosen to minimize waste and data management costs while ensuring a reliable and informative time-history of contaminant measurement for regulatory compliance. The interplay play between cause (i.e. subsurface heterogeneities, sampling techniques, measurement frequencies) and effect (unreliable data and measurements gap) has been overlooked in many field applications which can lead to inconsistencies in time- histories of contaminant samples. In this study we address the relationship between cause and effect for different hydrogeological sampling settings: porous and fractured media. A numerical model has been developed using AMR-FEM to solve the physicochemical processes that take place in the aquifer and the monitoring well. In the latter, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations while in the former the flow is governed by the diffusivity equation; both are fully coupled to mimic stressed conditions and to assess the effect of dynamic sampling tool on the formation surrounding the monitoring well. First of all, different sampling tools (i.e., Easy Pump, Snapper Grab Sampler) were simulated in a monitoring well screened in different homogeneous layered aquifers to assess their effect on the sampling measurements. Secondly, in order to make the computer runs more CPU efficient the flow in the monitoring well was replaced by its counterpart flow in porous media with infinite permeability and the new model was used to simulate the effect of heterogeneities, sampling depth, sampling tool and sampling frequencies on the uncertainties in the concentration measurements. Finally, the models and results were abstracted using a simple mixed-tank approach to further simplify the models and make them more accessible to field hydrogeologists. During the abstraction process a novel method was developed for mapping streamlines in the fractures as well within the monitoring well to illustrate mixing and mixing zones. Applications will be demonstrated for both sampling in porous and fractured media. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

Ezzedine, S. M.; McNab, W. W.

2007-12-01

147

In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) and remediation of aquifers contaminated with hydrophobic contaminants require insitu production of biosurfactants for mobilization of entrapped hydrophobic liquids. Most of the biosurfactant producing microorganisms produce them under aerobic condition and hence surfactant production is limited in subsurface condition due to lack of oxygen. Currently bioremediation involves expensive air sparging or excavation followed by exsitu biodegradation. Use of microorganisms which can produce biosurfactants under anaerobic conditions can cost effectively expedite the process of insitu bioremediation or mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of anaerobic biosurfactant production in three mixed anaerobic cultures prepared from groundwater and soil contaminated with chlorinated compounds and municipal sewage sludge was investigated. The cultures were previously enriched under complete anaerobic conditions in the presence of Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for more than a year before they were studied for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant production under anaerobic conditions was simulated using two methods: i) induction of starvation in the microbial cultures and ii) addition of complex fermentable substrates. Positive result for biosurfactant production was not observed when the cultures were induced with starvation by adding PCE as blobs which served as the only terminal electron acceptor. However, slight reduction in interfacial tension was noticed which was caused by the adherence of microbes to water-PCE interface. Biosurfactant production was observed in all the three cultures when they were fed with complex fermentable substrates and surface tension of the liquid medium was lowered below 35 mN/m. Among the fermentable substrates tested, vegetable oil yielded highest amount of biosurfactant in all the cultures. Complete biodegradation of PCE to ethylene at a faster rate was also observed when vegetable oil was amended to the microbial cultures. The microorganisms responsible for biosurfactant production was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas Sp (designated as Pseudomonas Sp ANBIOSURF-1, Gene bank no: FJ930079), Pseudomonas stutzeri (MTCC 10033), Pseudomonas Sp (MTCC 10032) from groundwater, soil and municipal sewage sludge enrichments respectively. This study confirms that biosurfactants can be produced under anaerobic conditions and also in sufficient quantities. The cultures were also able to cometabolically degrade PCE to Ethylene. The isolated microorganisms can be used for remediation of DNAPL contaminated sites by in-situ biosurfactant production.

Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

2009-12-01

148

Coupling of Groundwater Recharge and Biodegradation of Subsurface Crude-Oil Contamination (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surface hydrologic properties controlling groundwater recharge can have a large effect on biodegradation rates in the subsurface. Two studies of crude oil contamination show that degradation rates are dramatically increased where recharge rates are enhanced. The first site, located near Bemidji, Minnesota, was contaminated in August, 1979 when oil from a pipeline rupture infiltrated into a surficial glacial outwash aquifer. Discrete oil phases form three separate pools at the water table, the largest of which is 25x75 m at a depth of 6-8 m. Gas and water concentrations and microbial community data show that methanogenic conditions prevail in this oil pool. There is extreme spatial dependence in the degradation rates such that most of the n-alkanes have been degraded in the upgradient end, but in the downgradient end n-alkane concentrations are nearly unaltered from the original spill. Recharge rates through the two ends of the oil body were estimated using a water table fluctuation method. In 2002, the more degraded end received 15.2 cm of recharge contrasted to 10.7 cm at the less degraded end. The enhanced recharge is caused by topographic focusing of runoff toward a local depression. Microbial data using the Most Probable Number method show that the methanogen concentrations are 10-100 times greater in the more degraded end of the oil body suggesting that a growth nutrient is supplied by recharge. A decrease in partial pressure of N2 compared to Ar in the soil gas indicates nitrogen fixation probably meets N requirements (Amos et al., 2005, WRR, doi:10.1029/2004WR003433). Organic phosphorus is the main form of P in infiltrating pore water and concentration decreases with depth. The second site is located 40 km southeast of the Bemidji site at an oil pipeline pumping station near Cass Lake, Minnesota. This site was contaminated by oil leaking from a pipe coupling for an unknown duration of time between 1971 and 2002. The oil body at this site lies under a fenced area of the pumping station and is comparable in size to the largest Bemidji site oil pool. The oil is heavily degraded with complete loss of the n-alkane fraction suggesting that degradation is accelerated at this site. The pumping station is flat, gravel-covered, devoid of vegetation, and surrounded by a berm. Thus, the combined effects of no runoff, rapid infiltration, and zero transpiration all enhance recharge to the oil body. Recharge rates through the gravel yard and the adjacent forested area were estimated using a water table fluctuation method. Data for the first six months of 2010 showed that recharge below the gravel yard was 40% greater than below the forested area. Groundwater ammonia concentrations increase from 0.02 to 0.5 mmol/L under the oil body, while background NO3 is only 0.01 mmol/L and there is negligible N in the oil, again suggesting that N fixation meets N requirements. Combined, these studies suggest that enhanced transport of a limiting nutrient other than N from the surface may accelerate degradation of subsurface contamination.

Bekins, B. A.; Hostettler, F. D.; Delin, G. N.; Herkelrath, W. N.; Warren, E.; Campbell, P.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Cozzarelli, I.

2010-12-01

149

Processes affecting the fate of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in an aquifer contaminated by crude oil  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Crude oil spilled from a subsurface pipeline in north-central Minnesota has dissolved in the groundwater, resulting in the formation of a plume of aliphatic, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons. Comparison of paired oil and groundwater samples collected along the central axis of the residual oil body shows that the trailing edge of the oil is depleted in the more soluble aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., benzene, toluene, etc.) when compared with the leading edge. At the same time, concentrations of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in groundwater beneath the oil increase as the water moves toward the leading edge of the oil. Immediately downgradient from the leading edge of the oil body, certain aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., benzene) are found at concentrations near those expected of a system at equilibrium, and the concentrations exhibit little variation over time (???8-20%). Other compounds (e.g., toluene) appear to be undersaturated, and their concentrations show considerably more temporal variation (???20-130%). The former are persistent within the anoxic zone downgradient from the oil, whereas concentrations of the latter decrease rapidly. Together, these observations suggest that the volatile hydrocarbon composition of the anoxic groundwater near the oil body is controlled by a balance between dissolution and removal rates with only the most persistent compounds reaching saturation. Examination of the distributions of homologous series and isomeric assemblages of alkylbenzenes reveals that microbial degradation is the dominant process controlling the fate of these compounds once groundwater moves away from the oil. For all but the most persistent compounds, the distal boundary of the plume at the water table extends no more than 10-15 m down-gradient from the oxic/anoxic transition zone. Thus, transport of the monoaromatic hydrocarbons is limited by redox conditions that are tightly coupled to biological degradation processes.

Eganhouse, R.P.; Dorsey, T.F.; Phinney, C.S.; Westcott, A.M.

1996-01-01

150

Amanzi and Akuna: Two New Community Codes for Subsurface Contaminant Flow and Transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) program is developing a modular and extensible open-source set of tools for understanding the fate and transport of contaminants in natural and engineered systems. These tools not only support a fundamental shift toward standardized assessments of performance and risk for the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) cleanup and closure decisions, but establish a modern high-quality code base for a growing interdisciplinary community. Specifically, ASCEM is leveraging advances and expertise from applied mathematics, computer and computational sciences, and the geosciences, in this new development. A toolset named Akuna will provide capabilities for data management, visualization, conceptual model development, uncertainty quantification, parameter estimation, risk analysis, and decision support. Akuna will integrate with Amanzi, a flexible high performance computing simulator, which is designed to leverage the growing parallelism in modern systems. This talk will describe the approach that we have taken to develop this new open-source capability, including issues of intellectual property, licensing, the developers tool chain, and the users tool chain. The modular and extensible design will be discussed, highlighting the potential for collaboration and inclusion of recent modeling and algorithmic advances. In addition, it will discuss the advantages and challenges of relying on an open-source model that leverages a wide variety of open-source efforts from other programs. Results from early prototype development will be presented to highlight the potential of these new tools to contaminated subsurface environments, including calculations for variably saturated flow, advection of non-reactive species and the reactive-transport of 17 different chemical species on both structured and unstructured meshes.

Dixon, P. R.; Moulton, J. D.; Gorton, I.; Meza, J.; Freshley, M.

2011-12-01

151

Use of the FIDLER Scintillation Probe for the Characterization of Subsurface Radionuclide Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The Measurement Applications and Development Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has used a FIDLER to characterize a site where numerous localized and dispersed concentrations of uranium had been previously discovered beneath a poured concrete floor. The thick floor impeded the evaluation of the distribution of regions containing uranium without boring numerous holes through the concrete. The purpose of this study was to perform a radiological assessment of the building in preparation for remediation of the site. Integrated counts were taken with the FIDLER probes fixed in place on a systematic grid across the area to be evaluated. The results were then superimposed on a drawing of the area of evaluation. This approach allowed the boundaries of the regions with subsurface contamination to be resolved much better than by using standard survey techniques and decreased the number of borehole samples and subsequent analyses. The study demonstrated that this survey technique provides rapid and essential characterization information and reduces sampling, analytical, and remediation costs.

Coleman, R.L.; Murray, M.E.

1999-11-14

152

Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments  

SciTech Connect

Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this manuscript is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following manuscript we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of-the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

2004-11-14

153

Biogeochemical evidence for subsurface hydrocarbon occurrence, Recluse oil field, Wyoming; preliminary results  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Anomalously high manganese-to-iron ratios occurring in pine needles and sage leaves over the Recluse oil field, Wyoming, suggest effects of petroleum microseepage on the plants. This conclusion is supported by iron and manganese concentrations in soils and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in rock samples. Seeping hydrocarbons provided reducing conditions sufficient to enable divalent iron and manganese to be organically complexed or adsorbed on solids in the soils. These bound or adsorped elements in the divalent state are essential to plants, and the plants readily assimilate them. The magnitude of the plant anomalies, combined with the supportive isotopic and chemical evidence confirming petroleum leakage, makes a strong case for the use of plants as a biogeochemical prospecting tool.

Dalziel, Mary C.; Donovan, Terrence J.

1980-01-01

154

Transport and Degradation of Semivolatile Hydrocarbons in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer, Bemidji, Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were used as probes to identify the processes controlling the transport and fate of aqueous semivolatile hydrocarbons (SVHCs) in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. PAH and other SVHCs were isolated from ground water by field solid-phase extraction and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Close to the oil body, aqueous aliphatic hydrocarbon compositions are substantially different from the parent oil, suggesting microbial alteration prior to or during dissolution. Aqueous PAH concentrations are elevated above oil-water equilibrium concentrations directly beneath the oil and decrease dramatically at distances ranging from the 25 to 65 m downgradient from the leading edge of the oil body. Variations in downgradient distributions of naphthalene, fluorene and phenanthrene, coupled with their biodegradation, partitioning and volatility characteristics, suggest that the PAH are useful probes for distinguishing between the biogeochemical processes affecting SVHC transport and persistence in ground water.

Furlong, E.T.; Koleis, J.C.; Aiken, G.R.

1997-01-01

155

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01

156

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1995-01-24

157

Environmental assessment of aromatic hydrocarbons-contaminated sediments of the Mexican Salina Cuz Bay.  

PubMed

Concentrations of total aromatic hydrocarbons and extractable organic matter in the water column and sediment were determined in samples collected in the course of the last 20 years from the Salina Cruz Harbor, México, to assess the degree of organic contamination. In sediments, organic compounds accumulate in shallow areas mostly associated with extractable organic matter and fine fractions. Calculated geocumulation index and enrichment factors suggest that contamination could be derived from anthropogenic activities attributed to harbor and ship scrapping activities, as well as transboundary source. Concentration of total aromatic hydrocarbons (as chrysene equivalents) ranged from 0.01 to 534 microg l(-1) in water, and from 0.10 to 2,160 microg g(-1) in sediments. Total aromatic concentration of 5 microg g(-1) is proposed as background concentration. PMID:17295107

González-Macías, C; Schifter, I; Lluch-Cota, D B; Méndez-Rodríguez, L; Hernández-Vázquez, S

2007-10-01

158

Mobile hydrocarbon microspheres from >2-billion-year-old carbon-bearing seams in the South African deep subsurface.  

PubMed

By ~2.9 Ga, the time of the deposition of the Witwatersrand Supergroup, life is believed to have been well established on Earth. Carbon remnants of the microbial biosphere from this time period are evident in sediments from around the world. In the Witwatersrand Supergroup, the carbonaceous material is often concentrated in seams, closely associated with the gold deposits and may have been a mobile phase 2 billion years ago. Whereas today the carbon in the Witwatersrand Supergroup is presumed to be immobile, hollow hydrocarbon spheres ranging in size from <1 ?m to >50 ?m were discovered emanating from a borehole drilled through the carbon-bearing seams suggesting that a portion of the carbon may still be mobile in the deep subsurface. ToF-SIMS and STXM analyses revealed that these spheres contain a suite of alkane, alkenes, and aromatic compounds consistent with the described organic-rich carbon seams within the Witwatersrand Supergroup's auriferous reef horizons. Analysis by electron microscopy and ToF-SIMS, however, revealed that these spheres, although most likely composed of biogenic carbon and resembling biological organisms, do not retain any true structural, that is, fossil, information and were formed by an abiogenic process. PMID:22901282

Wanger, G; Moser, D; Hay, M; Myneni, S; Onstott, T C; Southam, G

2012-11-01

159

Calcium hypochlorite removal of mercury and petroleum hydrocarbons from co-contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Former oil and gas processing sites are often contaminated with both mercury and petroleum hydrocarbons. Traditional methods for treating these co-contaminated soils include thermal treatments and placement in landfills (Stepan et al. 1993). This study examines a chemical oxidation treatment, calcium hypochlorite, and its effectiveness in reducing both the petroleum and mercury content of several industrial soils. A sequential extraction method was used to determine the forms of mercury removed through the hypochlorite treatment. The forms included five organic forms of mercury, mercury associated with the mineral phase, ion exchangeable mercury, water phase mercury, and mercury associated with the petroleum hydrocarbons. The hypochlorite treatment did lower the mercury content of all five soils, but failed to remove the petroleum hydrocarbons from the soils. Prior to the hypochlorite treatment the dominant form of mercury was that associated with soil organic matter while after treatment most of the mercury remaining in the soil was associated with either the petroleum hydrocarbons or the mineral phase. PMID:12498483

Renneberg, Adrian J; Dudas, Marvin J

2002-10-01

160

Remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated sites by DNA diagnosis-based bioslurping technology.  

PubMed

The application of effective remediation technologies can benefit from adequate preliminary testing, such as in lab-scale and Pilot-scale systems. Bioremediation technologies have demonstrated tremendous potential with regards to cost, but they cannot be used for all contaminated sites due to limitations in biological activity. The purpose of this study was to develop a DNA diagnostic method that reduces the time to select contaminated sites that are good candidates for bioremediation. We applied an oligonucleotide microarray method to detect and monitor genes that lead to aliphatic and aromatic degradation. Further, the bioremediation of a contaminated site, selected based on the results of the genetic diagnostic method, was achieved successfully by applying bioslurping in field tests. This gene-based diagnostic technique is a powerful tool to evaluate the potential for bioremediation in petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. PMID:25129160

Kim, Seungjin; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Kim, Jong-Oh; Chung, Jinwook

2014-11-01

161

Contamination of soils in the urbanized areas of Belarus with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soils of urbanized areas, including the impact zones of Belarus, were studied. The concentrations of 16 PAHs in the soils were determined for individual and high-rise building zones, forests, and forest parks of Belarus. The levels of the PAH accumulation in the soils of different industrial enterprises and boiler stations were analyzed. Possible sources of soil contamination with PAHs were considered, and the structure of the PAHs in the soils was shown. The levels of the soil contamination were determined from the regulated parameters for individual compounds and the sum of 16 PAHs.

Kukharchyk, T. I.; Khomich, V. S.; Kakareka, S. V.; Kurman, P. V.; Kozyrenko, M. I.

2013-02-01

162

Leaching and microbial treatment of a soil contaminated by sulphide ore ashes and aromatic hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contaminated soil from a historical industrial site and containing sulfide ore ashes and aromatic hydrocarbons underwent sequential\\u000a leaching by 0.5 M citrate and microbial treatments. Heavy metals leaching was with the following efficiency scale: Cu (58.7%)\\u000a > Pb (55.1%) > Zn (44.5%) > Cd (42.9%) > Cr (26.4%) > Ni (17.7%) > Co (14.0%) > As (12.4%) > Fe (5.3%) >

Alessandro D’Annibale; Vanessa Leonardi; Ermanno Federici; Franco Baldi; Fulvio Zecchini; Maurizio Petruccioli

2007-01-01

163

Biogeochemical evidence for microbial community change in a jet fuel hydrocarbons-contaminated aquifer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A glacio-fluvial aquifer located at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, MI, had been contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons released after the crash of a tanker aircraft in October of 1988. Microbial biomass and community structure, associated with the aquifer sediments, were characterized based on the analysis of phospholipid ester-linked fatty acids (PLFA). Fatty acids ranged from C12–C20 in carbon chain length,

Jiasong Fang; M. J Barcelona

1998-01-01

164

Influence of oil contamination levels on hydrocarbon biodegradation in sandy sediment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of oil concentration on hydrocarbon biodegradation in a sandy sediment was studied in polyvinyl chloride reactors (0.45×0.28×0.31 m) containing 76.8 kg of beach sand in natura, where the upper layer was artificially contaminated with petroleum. The oil-degrading microorganisms used consisted of a mixed culture named ND, obtained from landfarming and associated with indigenous microorganisms. On the 28th day

J. P Del'Arco; F. P de França

2001-01-01

165

Microbial diversity in a hydrocarbon- and chlorinated-solvent-contaminated aquifer undergoing intrinsic bioremediation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic approach was used to survey constituents of microbial communities associated with an aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents undergoing intrinsic bioremediation. Samples were obtained from three redox zones: methanogenic, methanogenic-sulfate reducing, and iron or sulfate reducing. Small-subunit rRNA genes were amplified directly from aquifer material DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria- or Archaea-specific

MICHAEL A. DOJKA; PHILIP HUGENHOLTZ; N. R. Pace; S. K. Haack

1998-01-01

166

Bacterial communities of surface and deep hydrocarbon-contaminated waters of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill  

Microsoft Academic Search

We performed a 16S rRNA gene sequencing survey of bacterial communities within oil-contaminated surface water, deep hydrocarbon plume water, and deep water samples above and below the plume to determine spatial and temporal patterns of oil-degrading bacteria growing in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. In addition, we are reporting 16S rRNA sequencing results from time series incubation, enrichment

T. Yang; L. M. Nigro; L. McKay; K. Ziervogel; T. Gutierrez; A. Teske

2010-01-01

167

TOXICOKINETICS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT BY THE AMPHIBIAN LARVAE (PLEURODELES WALTL)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The newt larvae (Pleurodeles waltl) stage 48–49 in the development table of Gallien and Durocher (1) were exposed for 30 days to sediment previously contaminated with individual C-labeled polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including anthracene (Ant), phenanthrene (Phe), pyrene (Pyr), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Toxicokinetic parameters (uptake and depuration rate constants) were measured. The rate of radioactivity release was measured under both

P. Garrigues; J. E. Djomo; V. Ferrier; A. Dauta; A. Monkiedje; A. Mvondo Ze; J. F. Narbonne

2004-01-01

168

Pyrosequence Analysis of Unamplified and Whole Genome Amplified DNA from Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Groundwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pyrosequence data was used to analyze the composition and metabolic potential of a metagenome from a hydrocarbon-contaminated\\u000a site. Unamplified and whole genome amplified (WGA) sequence data was compared from this source. According to MG-RAST, an additional\\u000a 2,742,252 bp of DNA was obtained with the WGA, indicating that WGA has the ability to generate a large amount of DNA from\\u000a a

Nathlee S. Abbai; Algasan Govender; Rehana Shaik; Balakrishna Pillay

169

CROSS-INDUCTION OF PYRENE AND PHENANTHRENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM SP. ISOLATED FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED RIVER SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading culture enriched from contaminated river sediments and a Mycobacterium sp. isolated from the enrichment were tested to investigate the possible synergistic and antagonistic interactions affecting the degradation of pyrene in the p...

170

PILOT-SCALE SUBCRITICAL WATER REMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON- AND PESTICIDE-CONTAMINATED SOIL. (R825394)  

EPA Science Inventory

Subcritical water (hot water under enough pressure to maintain the liquid state) was used to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides from highly contaminated soils. Laboratory-scale (8 g of soil) experiments were used to determine conditions f...

171

COMPARISON OF IMMUNOASSAY AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are frequently encountered in the environment and may pose health concerns due to their carcinogenicity. A commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was evaluated as a screening method for monitoring PAHs at contaminated site...

172

PHOTOACTIVATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON TOXICITY IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) EMBRYOS: RELEVANCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL RISK IN CONTAMINATED SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

The hazard for photoactivated toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been clearly demonstrated; however, to our knowledge, the risk in contaminated systems has not been characterized. To address this question, a median lethal dose (LD50) for fluoranthene photoa...

173

Horizontal arrangement of anodes of microbial fuel cells enhances remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

With the aim of in situ bioremediation of soil contaminated by hydrocarbons, anodes arranged with two different ways (horizontal or vertical) were compared in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Charge outputs as high as 833 and 762C were achieved in reactors with anodes horizontally arranged (HA) and vertically arranged (VA). Up to 12.5 % of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was removed in HA after 135 days, which was 50.6 % higher than that in VA (8.3 %) and 95.3 % higher than that in the disconnected control (6.4 %). Hydrocarbon fingerprint analysis showed that the degradation rates of both alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in HA were higher than those in VA. Lower mass transport resistance in the HA than that of the VA seems to result in more power and more TPH degradation. Soil pH was increased from 8.26 to 9.12 in HA and from 8.26 to 8.64 in VA, whereas the conductivity was decreased from 1.99 to 1.54 mS/cm in HA and from 1.99 to 1.46 mS/cm in VA accompanied with the removal of TPH. Considering both enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon and generation of charge in HA, the MFC with anodes horizontally arranged is a promising configuration for future applications. PMID:25189807

Zhang, Yueyong; Wang, Xin; Li, Xiaojing; Cheng, Lijuan; Wan, Lili; Zhou, Qixing

2015-02-01

174

Methodology to develop risk-based corrective actions at petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites  

SciTech Connect

Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. (Parsons ES) has been working with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) to develop and field test a {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} methodology to implement RBCA at both large and small fuel hydrocarbon contaminated sites. AFCEE intends to incorporate the lessons learned from a multi-site demonstration effort into a protocol on how best to implement RBCA at fuel hydrocarbon contaminated sites nationwide. The AFCEE RBCA approach has been field tested at several sites, two of which are located on Wurtsmith Air Force Base (AFB), Michigan. Saturated soils and groundwater were contaminated by a release from a heating fuel oil underground storage tank (UST) at one of the sites at Wurtsmith AFB. Chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) for soils and groundwater included benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes (BTEX) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene and phenanthrene. Because measured concentrations of COPCs were below site-specific, risk-based cleanup criteria, the recommendation that no additional action is required at the site was favorably received by regulators. Groundwater was contaminated by JP-4 jet fuel released during an aircraft crash at the other site at Wurtsmith AFB. COPCs included the BTEX compounds. Data indicate that COPCs are biodegrading in situ. Conservative computer simulations using the Bioplume II code predicts that COPCs will be biodegraded to below detection within 10 years. Although no engineered activities were recommended, the remedy included maintaining land controls to prevent exposure to residual contamination and long-term monitoring to confirm in situ COPC destruction and/or nondestructive attenuation. This approach was favorably received by Michigan regulators who are national leaders in the risk-based remediation arena.

Benson, L.A.; Frishmuth, R.A.; Downey, D.C.

1996-12-31

175

Environmental forensics evaluation of sources of sediment hydrocarbon contamination in Milford Haven Waterway.  

PubMed

Current and historic petroleum-related activities in Milford Haven Waterway (MHW; Wales, UK) contribute to hydrocarbon contamination of surficial sediments. Three main hydrocarbon components of sediments were analyzed: (1) aliphatic hydrocarbons of predominantly biogenic origin, representing about 5-15% of total hydrocarbons (THC); (2) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from recent petrogenic and mainly older pyrogenic sources, representing about 2-6% of THC; (3) unresolved complex mixture from spill-related and heavily-weathered petrogenic sources, representing as much as 70-85% of THC. Environmental forensics evaluation of the data demonstrate that although 72?000 tonnes (t) crude oil spilled from the Sea Empress in 1996, the Forties blend cargo was not identified in 2010. However, using biomarkers, heavy fuel oil (HFO) from Sea Empress' bunkers (480 t spilled) was detected further upstream and more widely than previously. Iranian crude (100 t) spilled by the El Omar in 1988 and fuel (130?000 t) lost during bombing in 1940 also were tentatively identified. The PAH source ratios demonstrate that the historic pyrogenic PAHs come mainly from biomass and coal combustion. The distribution pattern of PAHs appeared more pyrogenic in 2012 than in 1996, as if recovering from the more petrogenic signature, in places, of the Sea Empress. The heavier PAH distributions were pyrogenic at most stations, and similar to those in sediments from oil terminal berths up to 2006, when dredging operations peaked. Partly as a result of this, in 2007 the concentrations of PAHs peaked throughout the waterway. Apart from effluent, atmospheric and runoff inputs, most of the identified inputs to the surficial sediments are historic. Therefore, likely processes include disturbance by construction (e.g. pile-driving) and dredging of contaminants sequestered in sediments, followed by their wide redistribution via suspended sediment transport. PMID:25536472

Little, David I; Galperin, Yakov; Bullimore, Blaise; Camplin, Mike

2015-02-11

176

Effects of oxygen supply on the biodegradation rate in oil hydrocarbons contaminated soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Respirometry studies using the 10-chamber Micro-Oxymax respirometer (Columbus, Ohio) were conducted to determine the effect of biostimulation (by diverse ways of O2 supply) on enhancing biodegradation in soils contaminated with oil hydrocarbons. Soil was collected from a former military airport in Kluczewo, Poland. Oxygen was supplied by means of aerated water, aqueous solutions of H2O2 and KMnO4. The biodegradation was evaluated on the basis of O2 uptake and CO2 production. The O2 consumption and CO2 production rates during hydrocarbons biodegradation were estimated from the slopes of cumulative curve linear regressions. The pertinent intrinsic and enhanced biodegradation rates were calculated on the basis of mass balance equation and O2 uptake and CO2 production rates. The biodegradation rates of 5-7 times higher as compared to a control were observed when the aqueous solution of KMnO4 in concentration of 20 g L-1 was applied. Permanganate is known to readily oxidize alkene carbon - carbon double bonds; so it can be successfully applied in remediation technology for soils contaminated with oil hydrocarbons. While hydrocarbons are not completely mineralized by permanganate oxidation reactions, their structure is altered by polar functional groups providing vast improvements in aqueous solubility and availability for biodegradation. The 3% aqueous solution of H2O2 caused significant improvement of the biodegradation rates as compared to a control (on average about 260%). Aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons can benefit from the presence of oxygen released during H2O2 decomposition. Adding of aerated water resulted in an increase of biodegradation rates (about 114 - 229%) as compared to a control. The aerated water can both be the source of oxygen for microorganisms and determine the transport of substrate to bacteria cells.

Zawierucha, I.; Malina, G.

2011-04-01

177

Ecotoxicological and analytical assessment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and application to ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments of contaminated soil aim to understand the effect of introduced chemicals on the soil flora and fauna. Ecotoxicity test methods were developed and conducted on hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and on adjacent uncontaminated control soils from eight field locations. Tests included 7-d, 14-d, and chronic survival tests and reproduction assays for the earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and seed germination, root length, and plant growth assays for corn, lettuce, mustard, and wheat. Species-specific responses were observed with no-observed effect concentrations (NOECs) ranging from <1 to 100% contaminated soil. The 14-d earthworm survival NOEC was equal to or greater than the reproduction NOEC values for numbers of cocoons and juveniles, which were similar to one another. Cocoon and juvenile production varied among the control soils. Germination and root length NOECs for mustard and lettuce were less than NOECs for corn and wheat. Root length NOECs were similar to or less than seed germination NOECs. Statistically significant correlations for earthworm survival and seed germination as a function of hydrocarbon measurements were found. The 14-d earthworm survival and the seed germination tests are recommended for use in the context of a risk-based framework for the ecological assessment of contaminated sites.

Saterbak, A.; Toy, R.J.; Wong, D.C.L.; McMain, B.J.; Williams, M.P.; Dorn, P.B.; Brzuzy, L.P.; Chai, E.Y.; Salanitro, J.P.

1999-07-01

178

Temporal and spatial changes of terminal electron-accepting processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer and the significance for contaminant biodegradation  

SciTech Connect

Identifying the predominant terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) in contaminated groundwater is an important step in determining the fate of contaminants. Although petroleum hydrocarbons are most readily degraded under aerobic conditions it is apparent that degradation also occures on methanogenic, sulfate-reducing, ferric iron-reducing, and nitrate reducing conditions. Further, there is evidence that biodegradation rates depend on TEAPs. This paper examines the short-term spatial and temporal variations in TEAPs in a shallow, petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. 24 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Vroblesky, D.A.; Chapelle, F.H. [Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (United States)] [Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (United States)

1994-05-01

179

Electrokinetic remediation and microbial community shift of ?-cyclodextrin-dissolved petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Electrokinetic (EK) migration of ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD), which is inclusive of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), is an economically beneficial and environmentally friendly remediation process for oil-contaminated soils. Remediation studies of oil-contaminated soils generally prepared samples using particular TPHs. This study investigates the removal of TPHs from, and electromigration of microbial cells in field samples via EK remediation. Both TPH content and soil respiration declined after the EK remediation process. The strains in the original soil sample included Bacillus sp., Sporosarcina sp., Beta proteobacterium, Streptomyces sp., Pontibacter sp., Azorhizobium sp., Taxeobacter sp., and Williamsia sp. Electromigration of microbial cells reduced the biodiversity of the microbial community in soil following EK remediation. At 200 V?m(-1) for 10 days, 36% TPH was removed, with a small population of microbial cells flushed out, demonstrating that EK remediation is effective for the present oil-contaminated soils collected in field. PMID:21052991

Wan, Chunli; Du, Maoan; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Ma, Wencheng; Zheng, Lina

2011-03-01

180

Benzene and naphthalene sorption on soil contaminated with high-molecular-weight residual hydrocarbons from unleaded gasoline  

SciTech Connect

For complex nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), the composition of the NAPL retained in the pore space of geologic material weathers until the residual NAPL no longer acts as a liquid and exists as discrete regions of hydrocarbon (termed residual hydrocarbons) in association with the geologic media (water wet media), or as thin film coatings on the media (NAPL wet media). In the study, the residual hydrocarbons were found to resist separation from the soil solids even when subjected to shaking in batch reactors. In addition, the magnitude of solute sorption was significantly higher for a low organic carbon soil contaminated with residual hydrocarbons than for natural soil organic carbon.

Bouchard, D.C.; Mravik, S.C.; Smith, G.B.

1990-01-01

181

Rapid evolution of redox processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water chemistry data collected over a six-year period show that the distribution of contaminants and redox processes in a shallow petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer has changed rapidly over time. Shortly after a gasoline release occurred in 1990, high concentrations of benzene were present near the contaminant source area. In this contaminated zone, dissolved oxygen in ground water was depleted, and by 1994 Fe(III) reduction and sulfate reduction were the predominant terminal electron accepting processes. Significantly, dissolved methane was below measurable levels in 1994, indicating the absence of significant methanogenesis. By 1996, however, depletion of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides in aquifer sediments and depletion of dissolved sulfate in ground water resulted in the onset of methanogenesis. Between 1996 and 2000, water-chemistry data indicated that methanogenic metabolism became increasingly prevalent. Molecular analysis of 16S-rDNA extracted from sediments shows the presence of a more diverse methanogenic community inside as opposed to outside the plume core, and is consistent with water-chemistry data indicating a shift toward methanogenesis over time. This rapid evolution of redox processes reflects several factors including the large amounts of contaminants, relatively rapid ground water flow (???0.3 m/day [???1 foot/day]), and low concentrations of microbially reducible Fe(III) oxyhydroxides (???1 ??mol/g) initially present in aquifer sediments. These results illustrate that, under certain hydrologic conditions, redox conditions in petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers can change rapidly in time and space, and that the availability of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides affects this rate of change.

Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Lovley, D.R.; O'Neill, K.; Landmeyer, J.E.

2002-01-01

182

XPS study of the effect of hydrocarbon contamination on polytetrafluoroethylene (teflon) exposed to atomic oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The presence of hydrocarbon contamination on the surface of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) markedly affects the oxygen uptake, and hence the wettability, of this polymer when exposed to an oxygen plasma. As revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, the oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C) for such a polymer can increase sharply, and correspondingly the fluorine-to-carbon ratio (F/C) can decrease sharply, at very short exposure times; at longer times, however, such changes in the O/C and F/C ratios reverse direction, and these ratios then assume values similar to those of the unexposed PTFE. The greater the extent of hydrocarbon contamination in the PTFE, the larger are the amplitudes of the 'spikes' in the O/C- and F/C-exposure time plots. In contrast, a pristine PTFE experiences a very small, monotonic increase of surface oxidation or O/C ratio with time of exposure to oxygen atoms, while the F/C ratio is virtually unchanged from that of the unexposed polymer (2.0). Unless the presence of adventitious hydrocarbon is taken into account, anomalous surface properties relating to polymer adhesion may be improperly ascribed to PTFE exposed to an oxygen plasma.

Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Cormia, Robert D.

1991-01-01

183

Ecotoxicity monitoring of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil during bioremediation: a case study.  

PubMed

The ecotoxicity of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil originating from a brownfield site was evaluated during a 17-month biodegradation pilot test. The initial concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in the soil was 6380 microg/g dry weight. An amount of 200 kg soil was inoculated with 1.5 L of the bacterial preparation GEM-100 containing Pseudomonas sp. and Acinetobacter sp. strains (5.3 x 10(10) CFU.mL(-1)) adapted to diesel fuel. The concentration of TPHs in the soil decreased by 65.5% after bioremediation. Different organisms such as the bacterium Vibrio fischeri, terrestrial plants Sinapis alba, Lactuca sativa, and Hordeum vulgare, the water plant Lemna minor, the earthworm Eisenia fetida, and the crustacean Heterocypris incongruens were used for ecotoxicity evaluation. The highest toxicity was detected in the first period of bioremediation. However, certain toxic effects were detectable during the whole bioremediation process. The contact tests with plants, earthworms, and crustaceans were the most sensitive of all of the bioassays. Therefore, the contact tests performed directly on soil samples were shown to be a better tool for ecotoxicity evaluation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil than the tests performed on soil elutriates. The ecotoxicity measured by the responses of the tests did not always correlate with the decrease in TPH concentrations in the soil during bioremediation. PMID:17106791

Hubálek, Tomás; Vosáhlová, Simona; Matej?, Vít; Kovácová, Nora; Novotný, Cenek

2007-01-01

184

[Compositions and residual properties of petroleum hydrocarbon in contaminated soil of the oilfields].  

PubMed

The aims of this study were to determine the compositions and residual properties of petroleum hydrocarbon in soil, as well as to identify the source and weathering degree of the pollution. A total of 5 producing wells in Gudao and Hekou oil producing region of Shengli oilfields were analyzed. More than 50 individual target compounds including straight-and branched-chain alkanes( n-alkanes, pristine and phytane) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil samples and crude oil were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The percentages of chain alkanes and PAHs in total solvent extractable matters(TSEM) of soil samples were both much lower than those in the crude oil samples. The compositions of petroleum hydrocarbon in soil samples differed from those in crude oil, which indicated the n-alkanes with carbon numbers <12 were much easier to lose in contrast to the n-alkanes with high carbon numbers. With n-octadecane/phytane as index for the weathering rate of oil contaminated soils, the relationship between the index and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds was analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The results showed that the n-alkanes with carbon numbers > 33 and the PAHs with rings between 3 and 5 were much harder to degrade. PCA of 4 indexes for source identification revealed more than 50% of the soil samples were polluted by crude oil, which needs more attention during remediation. PMID:24720209

Hu, Di; Li, Chuan; Dong, Qian-Qian; Li, Li-Ming; Li, Guang-He

2014-01-01

185

RESEARCH PROJECT -- IN SITU CO-OXIDATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS DURING BIOVENTING OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS (SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

There are a large number of sites containing both petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. Fire training pits at military bases are the most common example. These were often used to dispose of waste oils and solvents. Incomplete burning resulted in releases of contamin...

186

Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic contaminants. The results from a study with TCE contaminated-clay indicate that electrochemically inducing reductive dechlorination of TCE in a saturated matrix may offer an effective and viable alternative to remediation TCE and other contaminants with potential of being reduced. Another study focused on steel wool oxidation to electrochemically increase population of hydrocarbon-degrading denitrifying bacteria. Significantly larger denitrifying activity was observed in the cathode chamber of a treatment unit setup like an MFC with steel wool as the anode. This enhanced nitrate reduction could be due to direct electron utilization by denitrifying bacteria on the cathode, thereby stimulating microbial denitrification or a combination of electron transfer directly to NO{sub 3}{sup -} and electron transfer to nitrate reducing bacteria, which may serve as a type of bio-catalyst on the cathode for nitrate reduction. Overall, the studies conducted under Task 72 demonstrated different innovative methods to enhance petroleum hydrocarbon degradation and associated contaminants.

Paul Fallgren

2009-03-06

187

Migration of selected hydrocarbon contaminants into dry pasta packaged in direct contact with recycled paperboard.  

PubMed

This paper deals with the migration of selected hydrocarbon contaminants, namely mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOH), diisopropyl naphthalenes (DIPN) and polyalphaolefins (PAO) from adhesives into dry semolina and egg pasta packaged in direct contact with recycled paperboard. Migration was monitored during its shelf life (for up to two years) simulating storage in a supermarket (packs on shelves) and conditions preventing exchange with the surrounding environment (packs wrapped in aluminium foil). Migration from the secondary packaging (transport boxes of corrugated board) was also studied for semolina pasta. After 24 months of exposure, semolina pasta stored on shelves reached 3.2 and 0.6 mg kg(-1) of MOSH and MOAH, respectively, Migration from the adhesives used to close the boxes and from the transport boxes contributed about 30% and 25% of the total contamination, respectively. The highest contamination levels (14.5 and 2.0 mg kg(-1) of MOSH and MOAH, respectively, after 24 months) were found in egg pasta stored on shelves (no adhesives), and seemed due to the highest contribution from the external environment. PMID:25571955

Barp, Laura; Suman, Michele; Lambertini, Francesca; Moret, Sabrina

2015-02-01

188

Remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by ex situ microwave treatment: technical, energy and economic considerations.  

PubMed

In this study, the remediation of diesel-polluted soils was investigated by simulating an ex situ microwave (MW) heating treatment under different conditions, including soil moisture, operating power and heating duration. Based on experimental data, a technical, energy and economic assessment for the optimization of full-scale remediation activities was carried out. Main results show that the operating power applied significantly influences the contaminant removal kinetics and the moisture content in soil has a major effect on the final temperature reachable during MW heating. The first-order kinetic model showed an excellent correlation (r2 > 0.976) with the experimental data for residual concentration at all operating powers and for all soil moistures tested. Excellent contaminant removal values up to 94.8% were observed for wet soils at power higher than 600 W for heating duration longer than 30 min. The use of MW heating with respect to a conventional ex situ thermal desorption treatment could significantly decrease the energy consumption needed for the removal of hydrocarbon contaminants from soils. Therefore, the MW treatment could represent a suitable cost-effective alternative to the conventional thermal treatment for the remediation of hydrocarbon-polluted soil. PMID:25145181

Falciglia, P P; Vagliasindi, F G A

2014-01-01

189

Hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book details research and development programs taking place to ensure hydrocarbon availability in the future. At present, hydrocarbons are the single most important source of energy, since they are the most versatile and widely used energy form. It is expected that their primary role in energy production will extend well into the next century. This book presents a review

G. Imarisio; M. Frias; J. M. Bemtgen

1989-01-01

190

Temporal evolution of the geoelectrical response on a hydrocarbon contaminated site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A geoelectrical campaign was initiated in 2009 to delineate a massive hydrocarbon spill, which occurred because of a petroleum pipe breakdown in 2009. These measurements have been compared with both field resistivity measurements made in 2009 and with laboratory measurements. From a physicochemical point of view, a hydrocarbon contamination has to be understood as a spatially and temporally varying object, responsible for a change in geoelectrical response. To evaluate the signal measured on site, geoelectrical laboratory measurements were performed on the petroleum oil extracted from the site during two stages of degradation. On the laboratory scale, the non-degraded oil shows an increase in resistivity, normalized chargeability and quadrature conductivity with oil content, whereas the degraded oil indicates a slight decrease in resistivity, but no modification of the phase-lag and chargeability parameters. In the field, resistivity measurements performed in 2009, just after the pipe breakdown, show weak changes in resistivity measured over the contaminated area. However, between 2009 and 2012, biodegradation of the oil has led to a clear decrease in the resistivity within the impacted zone. No variations in normalized chargeability or quadrature conductivity were measured in 2012 between the contaminated and the non-contaminated areas, despite the presence of biofilms. In the field, the studied hydrocarbon contamination under degradation appears not to modify the capacitive part of conduction, but rather it concerns the ohmic part of conduction. The field and laboratory measurements led us to the conclusion that to choose the most discriminatory and efficient geophysical parameters, it is necessary to have a priori information about the oil (i.e. non-degraded or partially degraded). In the present case study, there is no need to acquire chargeability and phase-lag parameters to locate the contamination in the field, as they do not undergo any change. On the other hand, the resistivity parameter is a good indicator of the presence of partially degraded oil. We also note that normalized chargeability values have been very useful in characterizing the geometry of the clayey-silt roof.

Blondel, Amélie; Schmutz, Myriam; Franceschi, Michel; Tichané, Frédéric; Carles, Margaux

2014-04-01

191

Assessment of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination in the surficial sediments and ground water at three former underground storage tank locations, Fort Jackson, South Carolina, 1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water and sediment contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons resulting from leaks and overfills was detected during tank removal activities at three former underground storage tank locations at Fort Jackson, near Columbia, South Carolina. Investigations were initiated to assess the effect of contamination to the surficial aquifer at Sites 1062, 2438, and 2444. These investigations involved the installation of permanent monitoring wells and the collection and analysis of sediment and ground-water samples at the three sites. Water-level data were collected at all sites to determine hydraulic gradients and the direction of ground-water flow. In addition, aquifer tests were made at Site 1062 to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the surficial aquifer at that site. Sediment borings were made at the three sites to collect subsurface-sediment samples for lithologic description and laboratory analyses, and for the installation of ground-water monitoring wells. Laboratory analyses of sediment samples collected from boreholes at Site 1062 indicated elevated concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons at three locations. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons - Diesel Range Organics were detected at one borehole at a concentration of 388,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene concentrations in sediment from the site ranged from less than 350 to over 100,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total lead was detected at concentrations ranging from 2,900 to 5,900 micrograms per kilogram. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected at Site 2438 in one borehole at a trace concentration of 112 micrograms per kilogram of para- and meta-xylenes. No concentrations exceeding the detection limits were reported for petroleum hydrocarbons in sediment samples collected from Site 2444; however, total lead was detected in sediment samples from two boreholes, each at concentrations of 600 micrograms per kilogram. Ground-water samples were collected from each site for laboratory analysis and field-property determinations. Petroleum hydrocarbons and lead were detected at concentrations exceeding regulatory limits for drinking water in ground water from Site 1062 only. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in ground water from three wells at Site 1062, with the highest concentrations occurring in the area of the former underground storage tanks. Benzene was detected at concentrations as much as 28 micrograms per liter; toluene as much as 558 micrograms per liter; para- and meta-xylenes as much as 993 micrograms per liter; and naphthalene as much as 236 micrograms per liter. Ethylbenzene and ortho-xylene were detected in one well at concentrations of 70 and 6 micrograms per liter, respectively. Dissolved lead was detected in ground water from four wells at concentrations from 5 to 152 micrograms per liter. Analysis of ground-water samples collected from Sites 2438 and 2444 showed little evidence of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination. Petroleum hydrocarbons were not detected in any of the ground-water samples collected from Site 2438. With the exception of a low concentration of naphthalene (11 micrograms per liter) detected in ground water from one well, petroleum hydrocarbons and lead were not detected in ground water collected from Site 2444.

Robertson, J.F.

1996-01-01

192

Effects of humic acid on phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil simultaneously contaminated with heavy metals.  

PubMed

The use of humic acid (HA) to enhance the efficiency of phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel was evaluated in this study. A sample of soil was artificially contaminated with commercially available diesel fuel to an initial total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) concentration of 2300 mg/kg and four heavy metals with concentrations of 400 mg/kg for Pb, 200 mg/kg for Cu, 12 mg/kg for Cd, and 160 mg/kg for Ni. Three plant species, Brassica campestris, Festuca arundinacea, and Helianthus annuus, were selected for the phytodegradation experiment. Percentage degradation of TPH in the soil in a control pot supplemented with HA increased to 45% from 30% without HA. The addition of HA resulted in an increases in the removal of TPH from the soil in pots planted with B. campestris, E arundinacea, and H. annuus, enhancing percentage degradation to 86%, 64%, and 85% from 45%, 54%, and 66%, respectively. The effect of HA was also observed in the degradation of n-alkanes within 30 days. The rates of removal of n-alkanes in soil planted with B. campestris and H. annuus were high for n-alkanes in the range of C11-C28. A dynamic increase in dehydrogenase activity was observed during the last 15 days of a 30-day experimental period in all the pots amended with HA. The enhanced biodegradation performance for TPHs observed might be due to an increase in microbial activities and bioavailable TPH in soils caused by combined effects of plants and HA. The results suggested that HA could act as an enhancing agent for phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel and heavy metals. PMID:22432335

Park, Soyoung; Kim, Ki Seob; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Kang, Daeseok; Sung, Kijune

2011-01-01

193

Estimating the availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for bioremediation of creosote contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Bioremediation of soil contaminated by organic compounds can remove the contaminants to a large extent, but residual contamination levels may remain which are not or only slowly biodegraded. Residual levels often exceed existing clean-up guidelines and thereby limit the use of bioremediation in site clean-up. A method for estimating the expected residual levels would be a useful tool in the assessment of the feasibility of bioremediation. In this study, three soil types from a creosote-contaminated field site, which had been subjected to 6 months of bioremediation in laboratory column studies, were used to characterize the residual contamination levels and assess their availability for biodegradation. The soils covered a wide range of organic carbon levels and particle size distributions. Results from the biodegradation studies were compared with desorption rate measurements and selective extractability using butanol. Residual levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons after bioremediation were found to be strongly dependent on soil type. The presence of both soil organic matter and asphaltic compounds in the soil was found to be associated with higher residual levels. Good agreement was found between the biodegradable fraction and the rapidly desorbable fraction in two of the three soils studied. Butanol extraction was found to be a useful method for roughly estimating the biodegradable fraction in the soil samples. The results indicate that both desorption and selective extraction measurements could aid the assessment of the feasibility for bioremediation and identifying acceptable end-points. PMID:10968642

Breedveld, G D; Karlsen, D A

2000-08-01

194

Bioremediation of poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil by composting  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a comprehensive and critical review of research on different co-composting approaches to bioremediate hydrocarbon contaminated soil, organisms that have been found to degrade PAHs, and PAH breakdown products. Advantages and limitations of using certain groups of organisms and recommended areas of further research effort are identified. Studies investigating the use of composting techniques to treat contaminated soil are broad ranging and differ in many respects, which makes comparison of the different approaches very difficult. Many studies have investigated the use of specific bio-additives in the form of bacteria or fungi with the aim of accelerating contaminant removal; however, few have employed microbial consortia containing organisms from both kingdoms despite knowledge suggesting synergistic relationships exist between them in contaminant removal. Recommendations suggest that further studies should attempt to systemize the investigations of composting approaches to bio-remediate PAH-contaminated soil, to focus on harnessing the biodegradative capacity of both bacteria and fungi to create a cooperative environment for PAH degradation, and to further investigate the array of PAHs that can be lost during the composting process by either leaching or volatilization.

Loick, N.; Hobbs, P.J.; Hale, M.D.C.; Jones, D.L. [University of Wales, Bangor (United Kingdom). School of Environmental & Natural Resources

2009-07-01

195

Interrelationship of Pyrogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination in Different Environmental Media  

PubMed Central

Interrelationships between pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed in air, soil, water, sediment, and tree leaves by using multi-media monitoring data. Concurrent concentration measurements were taken bimonthly for a year for the multi-media at urban and suburban sites. PAH level correlations between air and other media were observed at the urban site but were less clear at the suburban site. Considering a closer PAHs distribution/fate characteristics to soil than suspended solids, contamination in sediment seemed to be governed primarily by that in soil. The partitioning of PAHs in waters could be better accounted for by sorption onto black carbon and dissolved organic carbon. PMID:22303141

Kim, Seung-Kyu; Lee, Dong Soo; Shim, Won Joon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Seung

2009-01-01

196

Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide- and metal-contaminated subsurface soils.  

PubMed

In this study, the immobilization of toxic uranium [U(VI)] mediated by the intrinsic phosphatase activities of naturally occurring bacteria isolated from contaminated subsurface soils was examined. The phosphatase phenotypes of strains belonging to the genera, Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella, previously isolated from subsurface soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), were determined. The ORFRC represents a unique, extreme environment consisting of highly acidic soils with co-occurring heavy metals, radionuclides and high nitrate concentrations. Isolates exhibiting phosphatase-positive phenotypes indicative of constitutive phosphatase activity were subsequently tested in U(VI) bioprecipitation assays. When aerobically grown in synthetic groundwater (pH 5.5) amended with 10 mM glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), phosphatase-positive Bacillus and Rahnella spp. strains Y9-2 and Y9602 liberated sufficient phosphate to precipitate 73% and 95% of total soluble U added as 200 microM uranyl acetate respectively. In contrast, an Arthrobacter sp. X34 exhibiting a phosphatase-negative phenotype did not liberate phosphate from G3P or promote U(VI) precipitation. This study provides the first evidence of U(VI) precipitation via the phosphatase activity of naturally occurring Bacillus and Rahnella spp. isolated from the acidic subsurface at the DOE ORFRC. PMID:17991039

Martinez, Robert J; Beazley, Melanie J; Taillefert, Martial; Arakaki, Adrian K; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Sobecky, Patricia A

2007-12-01

197

Effect of nutrient amendments on indigenous hydrocarbon biodegradation in oil-contaminated beach sediments.  

PubMed

Nutrient amendment to oil-contaminated beach sediments is a critical factor for the enhancement of indigenous microbial activity and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the intertidal marine environment. In this study, we investigated the stimulatory effect of the slow-release fertilizers Osmocote (Os; Scotts, Marysville, OH) and Inipol EAP-22 (Ip; ATOFINA Chemicals, Philadelphia, PA) combined with inorganic nutrients on the bioremediation of oil-spiked beach sediments using an open irrigation system with artificial seawater over a 45-d period. Osmocote is comprised of a semipermeable membrane surrounding water-soluble inorganic N, P, and K. Inipol, which contains organic N and P, has been used for oil cleanup on beach substrate. Nutrient concentrations and microbial activity in sediments were monitored by analyzing sediment leachates and metabolic dehydrogenase activity of the microbial biomass, respectively. Loss of aliphatics (n-C12 to n-C33, pristane, and phytane) was significantly greater (total loss between 95 and 97%) in oil-spiked sediments treated with Os alone or in combination with other nutrient amendments, compared with an unamended oil-spiked control (26% loss) or sediments treated with the other nutrient amendments (28-65% loss). A combination of Os and soluble nutrients (SN) was favorable for the rapid metabolic stimulation of the indigenous microbial biomass, the sustained release of nutrients, and the enhanced biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in leached, oil-contaminated sediments. PMID:12931877

Xu, Ran; Obbard, Jeffrey P

2003-01-01

198

Mutagenic hazards of complex polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures in contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present study was to evaluate hazard/risk assessment methods for complex environmental mixtures that involve a targeted, priority chemical approach based on the cumulative hazard/risk of known mixture components or analyses of sufficiently similar mixtures. Ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils were separated into nonpolar and semipolar fractions, and both fractions elicited positive responses on the Salmonella reverse mutation assay. Targeted and nontargeted methods of hazard prediction routinely overestimated mutagenic activities for the nonpolar soil fractions, suggesting nonadditive interactions of PAHs in complex mixtures. This suggests that current risk assessment methods for complex mixtures may provide conservative estimates regarding soils contaminated with priority PAHs alone. Significant underestimations of total risk, however, will be obtained if the soils also contain unidentified PAHs as well as polycyclic aromatic compounds and related compounds that contribute to the total mutagenic activity. Furthermore, estimates of excess lifetime cancer risk associated with the nondietary ingestion of the PAH-contaminated soils studied here indicate that a traditional risk assessment model based on identified priority PAHs and an assumption of additivity generally underestimates the risk associated with the nonpolar soil fractions (in comparison to bioassay-derived risk estimates). Additional cancer risk may be associated with the more polar compounds that also are found at these contaminated sites and that rarely are included in the standard risk assessment methodology.

Lemieux, C.L.; Lambert, A.B.; Lundstedt, S.; Tysklind, M.; White, P.A. [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Safe Environment Program

2008-04-15

199

Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in oil-contaminated beach sediments treated with nutrient amendments.  

PubMed

Microbial biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during the process of bioremediation can be constrained by lack of nutrients, low bioavailability of the contaminants, or scarcity of PAH-biodegrading microorganisms. This study focused on addressing the limitation of nutrient availability for PAH biodegradation in oil-contaminated beach sediments. In our previous study, three nutrient sources including inorganic soluble nutrients, the slow-release fertilizer Osmocote (Os; Scotts, Marysville, OH) and Inipol EAP-22 (Ip; ATOFINA Chemicals, Philadelphia, PA), as well as their combinations, were applied to beach sediments contaminated with an Arabian light crude oil. Osmocote was the most effective nutrient source for aliphatic biodegradation. This study presents data on PAH biodegradation in the oil-spiked beach sediments amended with the three nutrients. Biodegradation of total target PAHs (two- to six-ring) in all treatments followed a first-order biodegradation model. The biodegradation rates of total target PAHs in the sediments treated with Os were significantly higher than those without. On Day 45, approximately 9.3% of total target PAHs remained in the sediments amended with Os alone, significantly lower than the 54.2 to 58.0% remaining in sediment treatments without Os. Amendment with Inipol or soluble nutrients alone, or in combination, did not stimulate biodegradation rates of PAHs with a ring number higher than 2. The slow-release fertilizer (Os) is therefore recommended as an effective nutrient amendment for intrinsic biodegradation of PAHs in oil-contaminated beach sediments. PMID:15224921

Xu, Ran; Obbard, Jeffrey P

2004-01-01

200

Temporal and spatial changes of terminal electron-accepting processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer and the significance for contaminant biodegradation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying the predominant terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) in contaminated groundwater is an important step in determining the fate of contaminants. Although petroleum hydrocarbons are most readily degraded under aerobic conditions it is apparent that degradation also occures on methanogenic, sulfate-reducing, ferric iron-reducing, and nitrate reducing conditions. Further, there is evidence that biodegradation rates depend on TEAPs. This paper examines the

Don A. Vroblesky; Francis H. Chapelle

1994-01-01

201

Microbial Diversity and Bioremediation of a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico)  

PubMed Central

Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources has become a major environmental and human health concern in many parts of the world. Our objectives were to employ both culture and culture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbial community structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate a diesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normal operating conditions, 97 to 99% of total hydrocarbons were removed with only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultures were isolated from the treatment unit (96% which utilized diesel constituents as sole carbon source). Approximately 20% of the isolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with most belonging to the ?, ? and ? subdivision of the Proteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the genetic constitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple time points with a Functional Gene Array (FGA) containing over 12,000 probes for genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemical cycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using an isothermal ?29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, and hybridized to the arrays in 50% formimide overnight at 50°C. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course of treatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbial community. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation (including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane, biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene); and 333 genes involved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases [nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB], potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase [pmoA]) were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE, nitroaromatics and chlorinated compounds were also present, indicating a broad catabolic potential of the treatment unit. FGA’s demonstrated the early establishment of a diverse community with concurrent aerobic and anaerobic processes contributing to the bioremediation process. PMID:16968977

Rodríguez-Martínez, Enid M.; Pérez, Ernie X.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Zhou, Jizhong; Massol-Deyá, Arturo A.

2006-01-01

202

Microbial in situ degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer monitored by carbon isotope fractionation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an approach for characterizing in situ microbial degradation using the 13C/ 12C isotope fractionation of contaminants as an indicator of biodegradation. The 13C/ 12C isotope fractionation of aromatic hydrocarbons was studied in anoxic laboratory soil percolation columns with toluene or o-xylene as the sole carbon and electron source, and sulfate as electron acceptor. After approximately 2 months' of incubation, the soil microbial community degraded 32 mg toluene l -1 and 44 mg o-xylene l -1 to less than 0.05 mg l -1, generating a stable concentration gradient in the column. The 13C/ 12C isotope ratio in the residual non-degraded fraction of toluene and o-xylene increased significantly, corresponding to isotope fractionation factors (?C) of 1.0015 and 1.0011, respectively. When the extent of biodegradation in the soil column was calculated based on the measured isotope ratios ( Rt) and an isotope fractionation factor (?C=1.0017) obtained from a sulfate-reducing batch culture the theoretical residual substrate concentrations ( Ct) matched the measured toluene concentrations in the column. This indicated that a calculation of biodegradation based on isotope fractionation could work in systems like soil columns. In a field study, a polluted, anoxic aquifer was analyzed for BTEX and PAH contaminants. These compounds were found to exhibit a significant concentration gradient along an 800-m groundwater flow path downstream of the source of contamination. A distinct increase in the carbon isotope ratio ( ?13C) was observed for the residual non-degraded toluene (7.2‰), o-xylene (8.1‰) and naphthalene fractions (1.2‰). Based on the isotope values and the laboratory-derived isotope fractionation factors for toluene and o-xylene, the extent to which the residual substrate fraction in the monitoring wells had been degraded by microorganisms was calculated. The results revealed significant biodegradation along the groundwater flow path. In the wells at the end of the plume, the bioavailable toluene and o-xylene fractions had been almost completely reduced by in situ microbial degradation. Although indane and indene showed decreasing concentrations downstream of the groundwater flow path, suggesting microbial degradation, their carbon isotope ratios remained constant. As the physical properties of these compounds are similar to those of BTEX compounds, the constant isotope values of indane and indene indicated that microbial degradation did not lead to isotope fractionation of all aromatic hydrocarbons. In addition, physical interaction with the aquifer material during the groundwater passage did not significantly alter the carbon isotope composition of aromatic hydrocarbons.

Richnow, Hans H.; Annweiler, Eva; Michaelis, Walter; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

2003-08-01

203

Role of Autochthonous Filamentous Fungi in Bioremediation of a Soil Historically Contaminated with Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

PubMed Central

Nine fungal strains isolated from an aged and heavily contaminated soil were identified and screened to assess their degradative potential. Among them, Allescheriella sp. strain DABAC 1, Stachybotrys sp. strain DABAC 3, and Phlebia sp. strain DABAC 9 were selected for remediation trials on the basis of Poly R-478 decolorization associated with lignin-modifying enzyme (LME) production. These autochthonous fungi were tested for the abilities to grow under nonsterile conditions and to degrade various aromatic hydrocarbons in the same contaminated soil. After 30 days, fungal colonization was clearly visible and was confirmed by ergosterol determination. In spite of subalkaline pH conditions and the presence of heavy metals, the autochthonous fungi produced laccase and Mn and lignin peroxidases. No LME activities were detected in control microcosms. All of the isolates led to a marked removal of naphthalene, dichloroaniline isomers, o-hydroxybiphenyl, and 1,1?-binaphthalene. Stachybotrys sp. strain DABAC 3 was the most effective isolate due to its ability to partially deplete the predominant contaminants 9,10-anthracenedione and 7H-benz[DE]anthracen-7-one. A release of chloride ions was observed in soil treated with either Allescheriella sp. strain DABAC 1 or Stachybotrys sp. strain DABAC 3, suggesting the occurrence of oxidative dehalogenation. The autochthonous fungi led to a significant decrease in soil toxicity, as assessed by both the Lepidium sativum L. germination test and the Collembola mortality test. PMID:16391021

D'Annibale, A.; Rosetto, F.; Leonardi, V.; Federici, F.; Petruccioli, M.

2006-01-01

204

Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01

205

A Cyclic Approach for the Qunatification and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new approach to contaminated land assessment and revitalisation, focusing on groundwater quality and complex contamination patterns at urban industrial megasites was developed. The new approach comprises three cycles: (a) the assessment of groundwater contamination using an integral mass flux based investigation method at the scale of entire industrial sites, (b) the delimiting of potential contamination source zones using backtracking and contaminant fingerprinting techniques, and (c) the development of emission oriented remediation strategies. The major advantage of the new approach is that the number of areas to be considered for further investigation and remediation is reduced from one cycle to the next. Consequently, a large potentially contaminated area is screened initially, but only a small area may be finally remediated, yielding a significant reduction of costs. The results from the integral investigation at the scale of entire megasites can be used for risk assessment purposes, for the quantification of the natural attenuation potential, as well as for the development of priorities for clean-up and / or further investigations and for the design of remediation measures. In addition, a consistent quantification of uncertainties in the results from the application of the integral groundwater investigation method is possible. Finally, the delimiting of the source zone extent and its uncertainty allows to define priorities for further investigation measures at a smaller scale, and to develop cost-optimized clean-up strategies. In this contribution, the focus will be on the three cycles of the new approach. Also, examples of application will be presented.

Ptak, T.; Teutsch, G.

2004-12-01

206

Enhanced bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil using pilot-scale bioelectrochemical systems.  

PubMed

Two column-type bioelectrochemical system (BES) modules were installed into a 50-L pilot scale reactor packed with diesel-contaminated soils to investigate the enhancement of passive biodegradation of petroleum compounds. By using low cost electrodes such as biochar and graphite granule as non-exhaustible solid-state electron acceptors, the results show that 82.1-89.7% of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was degraded after 120 days across 1-34 cm radius of influence (ROI) from the modules. This represents a maximum of 241% increase of biodegradation compared to a baseline control reactor. The current production in the BESs correlated with the TPH removal, reaching the maximum output of 70.4 ± 0.2 mA/m(2). The maximum ROI of the BES, deducting influence from the baseline natural attenuation, was estimated to be more than 90 cm beyond the edge of the reactor (34 cm), and exceed 300 cm should a non-degradation baseline be used. The ratio of the projected ROI to the radius of BES (ROB) module was 11-12. The results suggest that this BES can serve as an innovative and sustainable technology for enhanced in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in large field scale, with additional benefits of electricity production and being integrated into existing field infrastructures. PMID:24762696

Lu, Lu; Yazdi, Hadi; Jin, Song; Zuo, Yi; Fallgren, Paul H; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

2014-06-15

207

Anaerobic oxidation of crude oil hydrocarbons by the resident microorganisms of a contaminated anoxic aquifer.  

PubMed

The biodegradation of two crude oils by microorganisms from an anoxic aquifer previously contaminated by natural gas condensate was examined under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions. Artificially weathered Alaska North Slope crude oil greatly stimulated both methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. Gas chromatographic analysis revealed the entire n-alkane fraction of this oil (C13-C34) was consumed under both conditions. Naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, and 2-ethylnaphthalene were also biodegraded but only in the presence of sulfate. Alba crude oil, which is naturally depleted in n-alkanes, resulted in a relatively modest stimulation of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation was similar to that found for the Alaska North Slope crude oil, but a broader range of compounds was metabolized, including 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene in the presence of sulfate. These results indicate that n-alkanes are relatively labile, and their biodegradation in terrestrial environments is not necessarily limited by electron acceptor availability. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are relatively more recalcitrant, and the biodegradation of these substrates appeared to be sulfate-dependent and homologue-specific. This information should be useful for assessing the limits of in situ crude oil biodegradation in terrestrial environments and for making decisions regarding risk-based corrective actions. PMID:14655710

Townsend, G Todd; Prince, Roger C; Suflita, Joseph M

2003-11-15

208

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Contamination in Osprey Eggs and Nestlings from the Canadian Great Lakes Basin, 1991–1995  

Microsoft Academic Search

Populations of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) in the Great Lakes basin declined dramatically during the 1950s–1970s due largely to adverse effects of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons, ingested in their fish prey, on eggshell thickness and adult survival. Nevertheless, these contaminants were not measured in osprey tissues during the decades of decline on the Canadian Great Lakes. Between 1991 and 1995, we monitored

Pamela A. Martin; Shane R. De Solla; Peter Ewins

2003-01-01

209

A case study of bioremediation of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated soil at a crude oil spill site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory and field pilot studies were carried out on the bioremediation of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons in the Borhola oil fields, Assam, India. The effects of aeration, nutrients (i.e. nitrogen and phosphorus) and inoculation of extraneous microbial consortia on the bioremediation process were investigated. The beneficial effects of these parameters on the bioremediation rate were realised equally in laboratory

B. K. Gogoi; N. N. Dutta; P. Goswami; T. R. Krishna Mohan

2003-01-01

210

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination of American lobster, Homarus americanus , in the proximity of a coal-coking plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants resulting predominantly from anthropogenic pyrolytic and combustion processes (NRCC 1983). In addition to the usual methods of aerial and aqueous transport to the coastal marine environment substantial amounts of PAH are added through the use of products such as creosote, coal tar and coal tar pitch as preservative and antifouling agents in

J. F. Uthe; C. J. Musial

1986-01-01

211

The relationship of total dissolved solids measurements to bulk electrical conductivity in an aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbon  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recent conceptual model links higher bulk conductivities at hydrocarbon impacted sites to higher total dissolved solids (TDS) resulting from enhanced mineral weathering due to acids produced during biodegradation. In this study, we evaluated the above model by investigating the vertical distribution of bulk conductivity, TDS, and specific conductance in groundwater. The results showed higher TDS at contaminated locations consistent

Eliot A. Atekwanaa; Estella A. Atekwanaa; Rebecca S. Roweb; D. Dale; Franklyn D. Legalld

212

Using trees to remediate groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'Industrial practices in the past have resulted in contamination of groundwater with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) at many DOE sites, such as Hanford and Savannah River. Such contamination is a major problem because existing groundwater remediation technologies are expensive and difficult. An inexpensive method for groundwater remediation is greatly needed. Trees could be used to remediate CHC polluted groundwater at minimal cost (phytoremediation). Before phytoremediation can be extensively applied, the authors must determine the range of compounds that are attacked, the effects of metabolic products on the plants and the environment, and the effect of transpiration and concentration of CHC on uptake and metabolism. They will test the ability of hybrid poplar to take up and transform the chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethylenes. The rate of uptake and transformation by poplar of TCE as a function of concentration in the soil, transpiration rate and illumination level will be determined. Methods will be developed to permit rapid testing of plants from contaminated sites for species able to oxidize and sequester chlorinated compounds. They will identify the nature of the bound residues of TCE metabolism in poplar. They will identify the mechanisms involved in CHC oxidation in poplar and use genetic manipulations to enhance that activity. They will introduce the genes for mammalian cytochrome P-450-IIE1, known to oxidize light CHCs such as TCE to attempt to increase the CHC metabolism capacity of poplar. The results of this research will place phytoremediation of CHCs on a firm scientific footing, allowing a rational assessment of its application to groundwater contamination. This report summarizes the results of the first 1.5 years of work on a three-year project.'

Strand, S.E.; Gordon, M.P.

1998-06-01

213

Occurrence and Phylogenetic Diversity of Sphingomonas Strains in Soils Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

PubMed Central

Bacterial strains of the genus Sphingomonas are often isolated from contaminated soils for their ability to use polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as the sole source of carbon and energy. The direct detection of Sphingomonas strains in contaminated soils, either indigenous or inoculated, is, as such, of interest for bioremediation purposes. In this study, a culture-independent PCR-based detection method using specific primers targeting the Sphingomonas 16S rRNA gene combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was developed to assess Sphingomonas diversity in PAH-contaminated soils. PCR using the new primer pair on a set of template DNAs of different bacterial genera showed that the method was selective for bacteria belonging to the family Sphingomonadaceae. Single-band DGGE profiles were obtained for most Sphingomonas strains tested. Strains belonging to the same species had identical DGGE fingerprints, and in most cases, these fingerprints were typical for one species. Inoculated strains could be detected at a cell concentration of 104 CFU g of soil?1. The analysis of Sphingomonas population structures of several PAH-contaminated soils by the new PCR-DGGE method revealed that soils containing the highest phenanthrene concentrations showed the lowest Sphingomonas diversity. Sequence analysis of cloned PCR products amplified from soil DNA revealed new 16S rRNA gene Sphingomonas sequences significantly different from sequences from known cultivated isolates (i.e., sequences from environmental clones grouped phylogenetically with other environmental clone sequences available on the web and that possibly originated from several potential new species). In conclusion, the newly designed Sphingomonas-specific PCR-DGGE detection technique successfully analyzed the Sphingomonas communities from polluted soils at the species level and revealed different Sphingomonas members not previously detected by culture-dependent detection techniques. PMID:15066784

Leys, Natalie M. E. J.; Ryngaert, Annemie; Bastiaens, Leen; Verstraete, Willy; Top, Eva M.; Springael, Dirk

2004-01-01

214

Use of tree rings to investigate the onset of contamination of a shallow aquifer by chlorinated hydrocarbons  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Oaks (Quercus velutina Lam.) growing over a shallow aquifer contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons were studied to determine if it was possible to estimate the approximate year that contamination began. The annual rings of some trees downgradient from the contaminant release site contained elevated concentrations of chloride possibly derived from dechlorination of contaminants. Additionally, a radial-growth decline began in these trees at approximately the same time that chloride became elevated. Growth did not decline in trees that contained smaller concentrations of chloride. The source of elevated chloride and the corresponding reductions in tree growth could not be explained by factors other than contamination. On the basis of tree-ring evidence alone, the release occurred in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Contaminant release at a second location apparently occurred in the mid- to late 1970s, suggesting that the area was used for disposal for at least 5 years and possibly longer. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

Yanosky, T.M.; Hansen, B.P.; Schening, M.R.

2001-01-01

215

PROGRESS REPORT. FIXATION MECHANISMS AND DESORPTION RATES OF SORBED CS IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS: IMPLICATIONS TO FUTURE BEHAVIOR AND IN-GROUND STABILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

This project is focused on defining the in-ground geochemistry of sorbed 137Cs released from high-level waste tanks, so that better future projections can be made of Cs mobility in the vadose zone. The project will study Cs-contaminated subsurface sediments from various Hanford t...

216

Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites. (authors)

Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin [Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Wellman, Dawn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth [ARCADIS U.S., Inc., Emeryville, CA 94608 (United States)

2012-07-01

217

Fingerprinting of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and other biogenic organic compounds (BOC) in oil-contaminated and background soil samples.  

PubMed

Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) or petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) are one of the most widespread soil contaminants in Canada, the United States and many other countries worldwide. Clean-up of PHC-contaminated soils costs the Canadian economy hundreds of millions of dollars annually. In Canada, most PHC-contaminated site evaluations are based on the methods developed by the Canadian Council of the Ministers of the Environment (CCME). However, the CCME method does not differentiate PHC from BOC (the naturally occurring biogenic organic compounds), which are co-extracted with petroleum hydrocarbons in soil samples. Consequently, this could lead to overestimation of PHC levels in soil samples. In some cases, biogenic interferences can even exceed regulatory levels (300 ?g g(-1) for coarse soils and 1300 ?g g(-1) for fine soils for Fraction 3, C(16)-C(34) range, in the CCME Soil Quality Level). Resulting false exceedances can trigger unnecessary and costly cleanup or remediation measures. Therefore, it is critically important to develop new protocols to characterize and quantitatively differentiate PHC and BOC in contaminated soils. The ultimate objective of this PERD (Program of Energy Research and Development) project is to correct the misconception that all detectable hydrocarbons should be regulated as toxic petroleum hydrocarbons. During 2009-2010, soil and plant samples were collected from over forty oil-contaminated and paired background sites in various provinces. The silica gel column cleanup procedure was applied to effectively remove all target BOC from the oil-contaminated sample extracts. Furthermore, a reliable GC-MS method in combination with the derivatization technique, developed in this laboratory, was used for identification and characterization of various biogenic sterols and other major biogenic compounds in these oil-contaminated samples. Both PHC and BOC in these samples were quantitatively determined. This paper reports the characterization results of this set of 21 samples. In general, the presence of petroleum-characteristic alkylated PAH homologues and biomarkers can be used as unambiguous indicators of the contamination of oil and petroleum product hydrocarbons; while the absence of petroleum-characteristic alkylated PAH homologues and biomarkers and the presence of abundant BOC can be used as unambiguous indicators of the predominance of natural organic compounds in soil samples. PMID:22796730

Wang, Zhendi; Yang, C; Yang, Z; Hollebone, B; Brown, C E; Landriault, M; Sun, J; Mudge, S M; Kelly-Hooper, F; Dixon, D G

2012-09-01

218

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: bees, honey and pollen as sentinels for environmental chemical contaminants.  

PubMed

Three beehive matrices, sampled in six different apiaries from West France, were analyzed for the presence of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH4: benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and chrysene). Samples were collected during four different periods in both 2008 and 2009. Honey samples showed the lowest levels of PAH4 contamination (min=0.03 ?g kg(-1); max=5.80 ?g kg(-1); mean=0.82 ?g kg(-1); Sd=1.17). Bee samples exhibited higher levels of PAH4 contamination (min=0.32 ?g kg(-1); max=73.83 ?g kg(-1); mean=7.03 ?g kg(-1); Sd=17.83) with a great dispersion of the concentrations due to four main events of high concentrations. Pollen samples showed only one major episode with the highest PAH4 concentration found (min=0.33 ?g kg(-1); max=129.41 ?g kg(-1); mean=7.10 ?g kg(-1); Sd=22.28). The PAH4 concentrations found were significantly influenced by the landscape context for all beehive samples. PMID:22051346

Lambert, Olivier; Veyrand, Bruno; Durand, Sophie; Marchand, Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Piroux, Mélanie; Puyo, Sophie; Thorin, Chantal; Delbac, Frédéric; Pouliquen, Hervé

2012-01-01

219

Effects of climatic modalities on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) availability and attenuation in historically contaminated Technosol  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the decline of industrial activities in France, large areas of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs)-contaminated soils have remained derelict. Thus, the fate of PAHs in such soils through natural attenuation process needs to be assessed. On the long-term scale (10-100 years), climate will greatly contribute to the evolution of soil physico-chemical properties and by consequences PAHs availability. In our study, we examined the effect of three contrasted climatic conditions (freeze-thawing, wetting-drying and high temperature) on soil aging processes of 11 historically contaminated soils and consequences on the availability of polycyclic aromatic compounds (including the 16 priority pollutants PAHs). Batch experiments were set-up for each modality; freeze-dried soil underwent variation of humidity and/or temperature. In a first step, PACs availability was roughly evaluated, with a water-extraction method using a H2O2 + CaCl2 solution. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content was measured in these extracts before and after applying the climatic modalities. Difference in DOC indicated an effect of the climatic modality on PACs availability. If an effect was noticed, available PACs was then accurately measured using (i) an hydrogen-peroxide oxidation on the soils followed (ii) a dichloromethane (DCM) extraction and a Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) quantification of the remaining PACs (i.e. unavailable). Variation of PACs availability will greatly help to understand the mechanisms associated between PACs desorption/sequestration and the abiotic influence of climate. Results of this work will further help understanding and predict the rate of natural attenuation of PACs in contaminated soils for the incoming decades.

Dagois, Robin; Schwartz, Christophe; Faure, Pierre

2014-05-01

220

Biological treatment of waste gas containing volatile hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A biological system to treat volatile hydrocarbon-contaminated gases generated during in situ bioventing and air sparging of subsurfaces contaminated with gasoline was field-tested. The system consisted of an air/water separator, a trickling filter, and a biofilter in series. During the field test, extensive monitoring was carried out to evaluate system performance, including the measurement of physical, chemical, biochemical, and microbiological parameters. Degradation and mineralization of volatile hydrocarbons such as benzene and toluene were demonstrated by gene probing and mineralization assays. Data collected showed an average removal of 90% of the BTX (benzene, toluene, and xylenes) and 72% for total hydrocarbons.

Lei, J.; Lord, D.; Arneberg, R.; Cyr, B. [Biogenie, Inc., Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada); Rho, D.; Greer, C. [National Research Council-Canada, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.

1995-12-31

221

Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation in Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects On Contaminant Fate and Transport  

SciTech Connect

Reactive mixing fronts can occur at large scales, e.g. when chemical amendments are injected in wells, or at small scales (pore-scales) when reactive intermediates are being generated in situ at grain boundaries, cell surfaces and adjacent to biofilms. The product of the reactions such as mineral precipitates, biofilms or filtered colloids modifies permeability leading to the complex coupling between flow and reactions and precipitation. The objectives are to determine how precipitates are distributed within large and small scale mixing fronts, how permeability and flow is modified by precipitation, how the mobility of a representative contaminant, strontium, is affected by the precipitation of carbonates, and how subsequent dissolution of the carbonates result in mobilization of Sr and increased flow. The desired outcomes of the project are to help develop methods leading to sequestration of metal contaminants, and to determine how macroscopic field-scale modeling can be applied to predict the outcome of remediation activities.

Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Redden, George D.; Yoshiko Fujita; Scheibe, Tim; Smith, Robert; Reddy, Michael; Kelly, Shelly

2006-06-01

222

Bacterial communities of surface and deep hydrocarbon-contaminated waters of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We performed a 16S rRNA gene sequencing survey of bacterial communities within oil-contaminated surface water, deep hydrocarbon plume water, and deep water samples above and below the plume to determine spatial and temporal patterns of oil-degrading bacteria growing in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. In addition, we are reporting 16S rRNA sequencing results from time series incubation, enrichment and cultivation experiments. Surface oil slick samples were collected 3 nautical miles from ground zero, (5/6/10, RV Pelican) and were added to uncontaminated surface water (collected within a 30 nautical mile radius of ground zero, 5/6/10 - 5/9/10, RV Pelican). This mixture was incubated for 20 days in a rolling bottle at 25°C. 16S rRNA clone libraries from marine snow-like microbial flocs that had formed during the incubation yielded a highly diverse bacterial community, predominately composed of the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, and a smaller number of Planktomycetes and other bacterial lineages. The most frequently recovered proteobacterial sequences were closely related to cultured species of the genus Cycloclasticus, specialists in aerobic oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. These time series incubation results will be compared to the microbial community structure of contaminated surface water, sampled on the same cruise with RV Pelican (5/6/10-5/9/10) and frozen immediately. Stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments with C13-labelled alkanes and polycyclic aromatic substrates and gulf water samples have yielded different enrichments. With naphthalene, predominantly Alteromonas-related clones and a smaller share of Cycloclasticus clones were recovered; phenanthrene yielded predominantly clones related to Cycloclasticus, and diverse other Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria. Analyses of SIP experiments with hexadecane are in progress. The microbial community composition of the deep hydrocarbon plume was characterized using water column profile samples taken with RV Walton Smith on May 30, at station WS 46 near the leak (28°N659.35; 88°W.43498). Water was collected and filtered from above the plume (800 m), within the plume (1170 m and 1210 m) and below the plume (1320 m) as indicated by Color Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) measurements. Clone libraries of both plume samples were dominated by a cluster of closely related 16S rRNA clones within the Oceanospirillales. The closest relatives were aerobic alkane oxidizers of the genera Oleispira and Thalassolituus. In contrast, the water samples above and below the plume showed distinct, diverse bacterial communities that lacked the characteristic clones of the hydrocarbon plume. Analysis of additional water samples from different locations and time points will further resolve spatial and temporal dynamics of oil degrading microbes in the water column. Thus far, our results indicate a stratified bacterial community in the oil-polluted water column with distinct types of oil-degrading bacteria in surface oil slicks and finely dispersed deepwater plumes.

Yang, T.; Nigro, L. M.; McKay, L.; Ziervogel, K.; Gutierrez, T.; Teske, A.

2010-12-01

223

In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments.  

PubMed

Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M

2013-01-01

224

(The role of colloidal particles on the subsurface transport of contaminants)  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this foreign travel was to attend the 10th meeting of the European Community's CoCo (colloids and complexation) Club to learn about research on groundwater colloids in Europe and inform the CoCo participants about the colloid subprogram of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Science Program. The goal of CoCo Club research, and of the umbrella MIRAGE (MIgration of RAdionuclides in the GEosphere) Project, is to develop data and understanding necessary to complete safety assessments for licensing nuclear repositories in Europe. The emphasis of CoCo Club research is sorption of radionuclides to organic and inorganic colloidal particles. The traveler also visited the British Geological Survey (BGS) headquarters and a BGS field site. Discussions focused on development of innovative drilling equipment for minimizing aquifer disturbance, development and application of computerized resistivity tomography for aquifer characterization, and laboratory research on the role of organic matter on metal transport. The trip was successful in that the traveler obtained a comprehensive overview of European research on groundwater colloids which will help improve and focus DOE's colloid subprogram, and the traveler learned about advances in specific areas that will contribute to his own DOE-funded project.

McCarthy, J.F.

1990-02-22

225

Microbial Diversity in a Hydrocarbon- and Chlorinated-Solvent-Contaminated Aquifer Undergoing Intrinsic Bioremediation  

PubMed Central

A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic approach was used to survey constituents of microbial communities associated with an aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons (mainly jet fuel) and chlorinated solvents undergoing intrinsic bioremediation. Samples were obtained from three redox zones: methanogenic, methanogenic-sulfate reducing, and iron or sulfate reducing. Small-subunit rRNA genes were amplified directly from aquifer material DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria- or Archaea-specific primers and were cloned. A total of 812 clones were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), approximately 50% of which were unique. All RFLP types that occurred more than once in the libraries, as well as many of the unique types, were sequenced. A total of 104 (94 bacterial and 10 archaeal) sequence types were determined. Of the 94 bacterial sequence types, 10 have no phylogenetic association with known taxonomic divisions and are phylogenetically grouped in six novel division level groups (candidate divisions WS1 to WS6); 21 belong to four recently described candidate divisions with no cultivated representatives (OP5, OP8, OP10, and OP11); and 63 are phylogenetically associated with 10 well-recognized divisions. The physiology of two particularly abundant sequence types obtained from the methanogenic zone could be inferred from their phylogenetic association with groups of microorganisms with a consistent phenotype. One of these sequence types is associated with the genus Syntrophus; Syntrophus spp. produce energy from the anaerobic oxidation of organic acids, with the production of acetate and hydrogen. The organism represented by the other sequence type is closely related to Methanosaeta spp., which are known to be capable of energy generation only through aceticlastic methanogenesis. We hypothesize, therefore, that the terminal step of hydrocarbon degradation in the methanogenic zone of the aquifer is aceticlastic methanogenesis and that the microorganisms represented by these two sequence types occur in syntrophic association. PMID:9758812

Dojka, Michael A.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Haack, Sheridan K.; Pace, Norman R.

1998-01-01

226

Microbial diversity and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation potential in an oil-contaminated mangrove sediment  

PubMed Central

Background Mangrove forests are coastal wetlands that provide vital ecosystem services and serve as barriers against natural disasters like tsunamis, hurricanes and tropical storms. Mangroves harbour a large diversity of organisms, including microorganisms with important roles in nutrient cycling and availability. Due to tidal influence, mangroves are sites where crude oil from spills farther away can accumulate. The relationship between mangrove bacterial diversity and oil degradation in mangrove sediments remains poorly understood. Results Mangrove sediment was sampled from 0–5, 15–20 and 35–40 cm depth intervals from the Suruí River mangrove (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), which has a history of oil contamination. DGGE fingerprinting for bamA, dsr and 16S rRNA encoding fragment genes, and qPCR analysis using dsr and 16S rRNA gene fragment revealed differences with sediment depth. Conclusions Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity revealed changes with depth. DGGE for bamA and dsr genes shows that the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community profile also changed between 5 and 15 cm depth, and is similar in the two deeper sediments, indicating that below 15 cm the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community appears to be well established and homogeneous in this mangrove sediment. qPCR analysis revealed differences with sediment depth, with general bacterial abundance in the top layer (0–5 cm) being greater than in both deeper sediment layers (15–20 and 35–40 cm), which were similar to each other. PMID:22935169

2012-01-01

227

Transformations of elemental mercury to inorganic and organic forms in mercury and hydrocarbon co-contaminated soils.  

PubMed

There are many industrial sites, such as gas processing plants, that are contaminated with both mercury and hydrocarbons. These sites tend to be localized but can have very high concentrations of mercury in the soil and heterogeneous distribution of hydrocarbons. The original form of mercury in many cases was elemental mercury from broken manometers. Over time the mercury has become redistributed within soil and has undergone chemical transformations into new forms. The forms of mercury will govern the chemical behavior and the availability of the mercury to biological receptors. The availability of the mercury is important as it will govern the risk associated with the contaminated soil and will also determine the effectiveness of any attempts at remediation. In the present study a chemical extraction protocol was used to determine the forms of mercury in soil originally contaminated by spillage of elemental mercury and petroleum hydrocarbons. Chemical extractions have been used in the past to determine the forms of mercury in uncontaminated soils and several researchers have used them to study contaminated soils. However, to date, no researchers have studied the forms of mercury in soils following years of weathering of elemental mercury after a spill. This study shows that decades after the original spill the elemental mercury has transformed and is dominantly (up to 85%) associated with soil organic matter, and to a lesser extent the mineral fraction of soil. PMID:11695587

Renneberg, A J; Dudas, M J

2001-11-01

228

Effective sensing approach for assessment and monitoring of in-situ biodegradation in a subsurface environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rapid assessment and monitoring of biological conditions in a subsurface environment is becoming more and more important as bioremediation approaches become widely used in environmental cleanup. Remediation monitoring is also more challenging for in-situ remedial approaches, such as bioventing, biosparging, or passive bioremediation, where conventional 'inlet' and 'outlet' monitoring can no longer be applied. A sensing approach using subsurface chemical sensors offers a cost- effective alternative for remediation monitoring. Additional benefits of deploying subsurface sensors include continuous and unattended measurement with minimum disturbance to the subsurface condition. In a series of field studies, an electrochemical oxygen sensor, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide sensor, and two hydrocarbons sensors were employed for monitoring in-situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. Biodegradation rates were effectively measured through an in-situ respiration measurement using subsurface oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors. The high sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor to small change in the concentration enables rapid respiration measurements. Subsurface hydrocarbon sensors offer a means to monitor the progress of remediation and the migration of contaminant vapors during the remediation. The chemical sensors tested are clearly cost effective for remediation monitoring. The strengths of oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors are complimentary to each other. Strengths and limitations of different hydrocarbon sensors were also noted. Balancing cost and performance of sensors is crucial for environmental remediation application.

Li, Dong X.

1999-02-01

229

Borehole Calibration Facilities to Support Gamma Logging for Hanford Subsurface Investigation and Contaminant Monitoring - 13516  

SciTech Connect

Repeated gamma logging in cased holes represents a cost-effective means to monitor gamma-emitting contamination in the deep vadose zone over time. Careful calibration and standardization of gamma log results are required to track changes and to compare results over time from different detectors and logging systems. This paper provides a summary description of Hanford facilities currently available for calibration of logging equipment. Ideally, all logging organizations conducting borehole gamma measurements at the Hanford Site will take advantage of these facilities to produce standardized and comparable results. (authors)

McCain, R.G.; Henwood, P.D.; Pope, A.D.; Pearson, A.W. [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01

230

Phytoremediation of hydrocarbon contaminants in subantarctic soils: an effective management option.  

PubMed

Accidental fuel spills on world heritage subantarctic Macquarie Island have caused considerable contamination. Due to the island's high latitude position, its climate, and its fragile ecosystem, traditional methods of remediation are unsuitable for on-site clean up. We investigated the tolerance of a subantarctic native tussock grass, Poa foliosa (Hook. f.), to Special Antarctic Blend (SAB) diesel fuel and its potential to reduce SAB fuel contamination via phytoremediation. Toxicity of SAB fuel to P. foliosa was assessed in an 8 month laboratory growth trial under growth conditions which simulated the island's environment. Single seedlings were planted into 1 L pots of soil spiked with SAB fuel at concentrations of 1000, 5 000, 10,000, 2000 and 40,000 mg/kg (plus control). Plants were harvested at 0, 2, 4 and 8 months and a range of plant productivity endpoints were measured (biomass production, plant morphology and photosynthetic efficiency). Poa foliosa was highly tolerant across all SAB fuel concentrations tested with respect to biomass, although higher concentrations of 20,000 and 40,000 mg SAB/kg soil caused slight reductions in leaf length, width and area. To assess the phytoremediation potential of P. foliosa (to 10 000 mg/kg), soil from the planted pots was compared with that from paired unplanted pots at each SAB fuel concentration. The effect of the plant on SAB fuel concentrations and the associated microbial communities found within the soil (total heterotrophs and hydrocarbon degraders) were compared between planted and unplanted treatments at the 0, 2, 4 and 8 month harvest periods. The presence of plants resulted in significantly less SAB fuel in soils at 2 months and a return to background concentration by 8 months. Microbes did not appear to be the sole driving force behind the observed hydrocarbon loss. This study provides evidence that phytoremediation using P. foliosa is a valuable remediation option for use at Macquarie Island, and may be applicable to the management of fuel spills in other cold climate regions. PMID:24836716

Bramley-Alves, Jessica; Wasley, Jane; King, Catherine K; Powell, Shane; Robinson, Sharon A

2014-09-01

231

Use of slow-release fertilizer and biopolymers for stimulating hydrocarbon biodegradation in oil-contaminated beach sediments.  

PubMed

Nutrient concentration and hydrocarbon bioavailability are key factors affecting biodegradation rates of oil in contaminated beach sediments. The effect of a slow-release fertilizer, Osmocote, as well as two biopolymers, chitin and chitosan, on the bioremediation of oil-spiked beach sediments was investigated using an open irrigation system over a 56-day period under laboratory conditions. Osmocote was effective in sustaining a high level of nutrients in leached sediments, as well as elevated levels of microbial activity and rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation. Chitin was more biodegradable than chitosan and gradually released nitrogen into the sediment. The addition of chitin or chitosan to the Osmocote amended sediments enhanced biodegradation rates of the alkanes relative to the presence of Osmocote alone, where chitosan was more effective than chitin due to its greater oil sorption capacity. Furthermore, chitosan significantly enhanced the biodegradation rates of all target polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:16291209

Xu, Ran; Yong, Li Ching; Lim, Yong Giak; Obbard, Jeffrey Philip

2005-01-01

232

Intrinsic bioremediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater at a petroleum-hydrocarbon spill site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An oil-refining plant site located in southern Taiwan has been identified as a petroleum-hydrocarbon [mainly methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)] spill site. In this study, groundwater samples collected from the site were analyzed to assess the occurrence of intrinsic MTBE biodegradation. Microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of biodegrading MTBE by indigenous microorganisms under aerobic, cometabolic, iron reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results from the field investigation and microbial enumeration indicate that the intrinsic biodegradation of MTBE and BTEX is occurring and causing the decrease in MTBE and BTEX concentrations. Microcosm results show that the indigenous microorganisms were able to biodegrade MTBE under aerobic conditions using MTBE as the sole primary substrate. The detected biodegradation byproduct, tri-butyl alcohol (TBA), can also be biodegraded by the indigenous microorganisms. In addition, microcosms with site groundwater as the medium solution show higher MTBE biodegradation rate. This indicates that the site groundwater might contain some trace minerals or organics, which could enhance the MTBE biodegradation. Results show that the addition of BTEX at low levels could also enhance the MTBE removal. No MTBE removal was detected in iron reducing and methanogenic microcosms. This might be due to the effects of low dissolved oxygen (approximately 0.3 mg/L) within the plume. The low iron reducers and methanogens (<1.8×103 cell/g of soil) observed in the aquifer also indicate that the iron reduction and methanogenesis are not the dominant biodegradation patterns in the contaminant plume. Results from the microcosm study reveal that preliminary laboratory study is required to determine the appropriate substrates and oxidation-reduction conditions to enhance the biodegradation of MTBE. Results suggest that in situ or on-site aerobic bioremediation using indigenous microorganisms would be a feasible technology to clean up this MTBE-contaminated site.

Chen, K. F.; Kao, C. M.; Chen, T. Y.; Weng, C. H.; Tsai, C. T.

2006-06-01

233

Subsurface Microbial Communities and Geochemistry Within a Vertical Transect of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbial communities and geochemistry were analyzed within floodplain alluvia of the San Juan River, New Mexico, down-gradient of a uranium mill tailings disposal cell. A multi-level sampling device was used to investigate vertical variations in geochemistry and microbial community structure within the uranium contaminant plume within this shallow aquifer. Chemical analyses indicate that the interaction of uncontaminated artesian water and contaminant fluids has resulted in three geochemically-distinct regions. Similarity comparisons of bacterial community 16S rDNA fingerprints, based on T-RFLP analyses, show a grouping of microbial populations into three assemblages. These groupings correspond to the three geochemically-defined regions of the aquifer profile, indicating a relationship between community structure and geochemistry. Combined Bacterial 16S rDNA clone library and T-RFLP analyses show a predominance of organisms related to Nitrospira and Nitrosolobus, chemolithotrophic nitrite and ammonia oxidizers respectively, in the uncontaminated region of the aquifer profile. Within the plume-impacted area, organisms related to known nitrifying bacteria were not detected. Bacteria phylogenetically related to Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Gallionella, Psuedomonas, and Thiomicrospira were identified in both the uncontaminated and plume regions. Within the contaminated region, sequences from organisms related to the metal oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix and Sphaerotilus were also found. 16S rDNA sequences with high similarity to Duganella zoogloeoides, a chemolithotrophic Mn-oxidizing bacterium known for uranyl complexation and sorption, were abundant in the clone library from the plume-impacted region. A diversity of organisms related to sulfate- and sulfur-reducing bacteria including Desulfobulbus, Desulfofrigus, Desulfosarcina, Desulfosporosinus, Desulfotomaculum, and Geobacter were present in the uncontaminated zone while less SRB diversity (Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus, and Desulfonema) was observed in the plume region. T-RFLP results substantiate this trend, suggesting sulfate reducer populations shift from high diversity and low relative abundance to less diversity and a larger abundance over the transition from uncontaminated water into the plume region. These findings indicate that there is considerable biological potential for uranium immobilization at this site through reductive precipitation by sulfate or other metal reducing organisms or microbial uptake and sequestration. Given the diversity of microorganisms related to chemolithotrophic bacteria, growth by this mode of metabolism, and the biological oxidation of reduced metals, is also potentially an important process that may influence metal biogeochemistry at this site.

Gihring, T. M.; McKinley, J. P.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Long, P. E.

2002-12-01

234

Two- and Three-Dimensional Depiction of Subsurface Geology Using Commercial Software for Support of Groundwater Contaminant Fate and Transport Analysis - 13345  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other nuclear reactor operation-related contaminants has resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas (the Hanford Site 100 Area). The large geographic extent of the resultant contaminant plumes requires an extensive level of understanding of the aquifer structure, characteristics, and configuration to support assessment and design of remedial alternatives within the former 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K reactor areas. The authors have prepared two- and three-dimensional depictions of the key subsurface geologic structures at two Hanford Site reactor operable units (100-K and 100-D/H). These depictions, prepared using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) visualization software, provide a basis for expanding the understanding of groundwater contaminant migration pathways, including identification of geologically-defined preferential groundwater flow pathways. These identified preferential flow pathways support the conceptual site model and help explain both historical and current contaminant distribution and transport. (authors)

Ivarson, Kristine A. [North Wind, Inc. Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [North Wind, Inc. Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Miller, Charles W.; Arola, Craig C. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01

235

Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons at a petroleum?contaminated site  

PubMed Central

Summary Field metabolomics and laboratory assays were used to assess the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underlying a former refinery. Benzene, ethylbenzene, 2?methylnaphthalene, 1,2,4? and 1,3,5?trimethylbenzene were targeted as contaminants of greatest regulatory concern (COC) whose intrinsic remediation has been previously reported. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization of alkylbenzenes, including the trimethylbenzene COC, PAHs and several n?alkanes in the contaminated portions of the aquifer. Anaerobic biodegradation experiments designed to mimic in situ conditions showed no loss of exogenously amended COC; however, a substantive rate of endogenous electron acceptor reduction was measured (55?±?8?µM SO4 day?1). An assessment of hydrocarbon loss in laboratory experiments relative to a conserved internal marker revealed that non?COC hydrocarbons were being metabolized. Purge and trap analysis of laboratory assays showed a substantial loss of toluene, m? and o?xylene, as well as several alkanes (C6–C12). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that benzene is persistent under the prevailing site anaerobic conditions. We could find no in situ benzene intermediates (phenol or benzoate), the parent molecule proved recalcitrant in laboratory assays and low copy numbers of Desulfobacterium were found, a genus previously implicated in anaerobic benzene biodegradation. This study also showed that there was a reasonable correlation between field and laboratory findings, although with notable exception. Thus, while the intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation was clearly evident at the site, non?COC hydrocarbons were preferentially metabolized, even though there was ample literature precedence for the biodegradation of the target molecules. PMID:21261914

Parisi, Victoria A.; Brubaker, Gaylen R.; Zenker, Matthew J.; Prince, Roger C.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Da Silva, Marcio L.B.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.; Suflita, Joseph M.

2009-01-01

236

Pilot-scale bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated clayey soil from a sub-Arctic site.  

PubMed

Bioremediation is a potentially cost-effective solution for petroleum contamination in cold region sites. This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (C16-C34) in a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15°C for periods up to 385 days, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. Although several studies on bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from cold region sites have been reported for coarse-textured, sandy soils, there are limited studies of bioremediation of petroleum contamination in fine-textured, clayey soils. Our results indicate that aeration and moisture addition was sufficient for achieving 47% biodegradation and an endpoint of 530 mg/kg for non-volatile (C16-C34) petroleum hydrocarbons. Nutrient amendment with 95 mg-N/kg showed no significant effect on biodegradation compared to a control system without nutrient but similar moisture content. In contrast, in a biopile amended with 1340 mg-N/kg, no statistically significant biodegradation of non-volatile fraction was detected. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of alkB and 16S rRNA genes revealed that inhibition of hydrocarbon biodegradation was associated with a lack of change in microbial community composition. Overall, our data suggests that biopiles are feasible for attaining the bioremediation endpoint in clayey soils. Despite the significantly lower biodegradation rate of 0.009 day(-1) in biopile tank compared to 0.11 day(-1) in slurry bioreactors for C16-C34 hydrocarbons, the biodegradation extents for this fraction were comparable in these two systems. PMID:25218258

Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis

2014-09-15

237

ESCA study of the effect of hydrocarbon contamination on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) exposed to atomic oxygen plasma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ESCA spectra and data obtained by Morra et al. (1989) on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) exposed to atomic oxygen plasma are closely reexamined. It is shown that the spikes observed in Morra et al. plots of O/C or F/C versus time of the exposure of PTFE to atomic oxygen plasma were not characteristic of PTFE per se but were instead a result of a contamination by hydrocarbon present in their PTFE samples. This was demonstrated experimentally by comparing data derived for a very clean PTFE sample exposed for 10, 20, and 30 min to oxygen plasma with data obtained on PTFE samples with very small amounts of hydrocarbon contamination.

Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Cormia, Robert D.

1991-01-01

238

Biostimulation Reveals Functional Redundancy of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil.  

PubMed

Stable-isotope probing was previously used to identify bacterial anthracene-degraders in untreated soil from a former manufactured gas plant site. However, subsequent pyrosequence analyses of total bacterial communities and quantification of 16S rRNA genes indicated that relative abundances of the predominant anthracene-degrading bacteria (designated Anthracene Group 1) diminished as a result of biological treatment conditions in lab-scale, aerobic bioreactors. This study identified Alphaproteobacterial anthracene-degrading bacteria in bioreactor-treated soil which were dissimilar to those previously identified. The largest group of sequences was from the Alterythrobacter genus while other groups of sequences were associated with bacteria within the order Rhizobiales and the genus Bradyrhizobium. Conditions in the bioreactor enriched for organisms capable of degrading anthracene which were not the same as those identified as dominant degraders in the untreated soil. Further, these data suggest that identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in contaminated but untreated soil may be a poor indicator of the most active degraders during biological treatment. PMID:24302851

Dunlevy, Sage R; Singleton, David R; Aitken, Michael D

2013-11-01

239

Influence of the bioaccessible fraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the ecotoxicity of historically contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Sequential supercritical fluid extraction together with a two-site desorption model were employed to estimate the bioaccessible fraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in four historically contaminated soils. The ecotoxicity of the soils was assayed by four different contact tests. The same soils were exposed to exhaustive extraction and the extracts were returned to the soils to ensure total 100% bioaccessibility of the pollutants. Then the soils were assayed again. Statistical evaluation revealed that the predicted bioaccessible PAHs generally correlated with the ecotoxicity responses of the tests. The estimated bioaccessible fractions varied from 10 to 98%. This value increased for PAHs with higher lipophilicity and showed no correlation with the organic carbon content in the soils. The ecotoxicity tests in the study indicated different sensitivity toward PAHs and the tests employing Heterocypris incongruens and Eisenia fetida were found to be more suitable than Lemna minor and Vibrio fischeri. Mortality and growth inhibition of ostracods correlated with all the types of PAHs and earthworm growth inhibition and mortality were preferentially sensitive to PAHs with only 3-4 aromatic rings. Determination of the biota-soil accumulation factors indicated that the earthworm growth inhibition corresponded to increased accumulation of PAHs in the earthworm tissue. PMID:23611796

?van?arová, Monika; K?esinová, Zdena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

2013-06-15

240

Laboratory studies of the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil by in-vessel composting.  

PubMed

The biodegradation of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), listed as priority pollutants by the USEPA, present in a coal-tar-contaminated soil from a former manufactured gas plant site was investigated using laboratory-scale in-vessel composting reactors to determine the suitability of this approach as a bioremediation technology. Preliminary investigations were conducted over 16 weeks to determine the optimum soil composting temperature (38, 55 and 70 degrees C). Three tests were performed; firstly, soil was composted with green-waste, with a moisture content of 60%. Secondly, microbial activity was HgCl2-inhibited in the soil green-waste mixture with a moisture content of 60%, to evaluate abiotic losses, while in the third experiment only soil was incubated at the three different temperatures. PAHs and microbial populations were monitored. PAHs were lost from all treatments with 38 degrees C being the optimum temperature for both PAH removal and microbial activity. Calculated activation energy values (E(a)) for total PAHs suggested that the main loss mechanism in the soil-green waste reactors was biological, whereas in the soil reactors it was chemical. Total PAH losses in the soil-green waste composting mixtures were by pseudo-first order kinetics at 38 degrees C (k = 0.013 day(-1), R2 = 0.95), 55 degrees C (k = 0.010 day(-1), R2 = 0.76) and at 70 degrees C (k = 0.009 day(-1), R2 = 0.73). PMID:15823743

Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca; Lopez-Real, Joseph; Beck, Angus J

2005-01-01

241

Ecotoxicological assessment of bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

A battery of bioassays [barley seed germination, barley plant growth, lettuce seed germination, worm mortality, Microtox{reg_sign}, lettuce root elongation, algae Selenastrum capricornutum growth, Daphnia magna mortality, and SOS Chromotest ({+-}S9)] was used to assess an above-ground heap pile treatment of a soil contaminated with aliphatic petroleum hydrocarbons (12 to 24 carbons). Despite an initial oil and grease concentration of 2,000 mg/kg, no significant (geno)toxicity was apparent in the soil sample before treatment. During the treatment, which decreased oil and grease concentrations to 800 mg/kg, slight toxicity was revealed by three bioassays (barley seed germination, worm mortality, Daphnia magna mortality), and a significant increase in genotoxicity was measured with the SOS Chromotest ({+-} S9). It appears that ecotoxicological evaluation revealed harmful condition(s) that were not detected by chemical assessment. This suggests that the remediation had ceased before complete detoxification occurred. This phenomenon must be further investigated, however, to furnish solid conclusions on the toxicological effectiveness of the biotreatment.

Renoux, A.Y.; Tyagi, R.D. [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Inst. National de Recherche Scientifique sur l`Eau; Roy, Y. [Analex Inc., Chomedey, Quebec (Canada); Samson, R. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Chemical Engineering Dept.

1995-12-31

242

Screening of biosurfactant producers from petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sources in cold marine environments.  

PubMed

An overview of literature about isolating biosurfactant producers from marine sources indicated no such producers have been reported form North Atlantic Canada. Water and sediment samples were taken from petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated coastal and offshore areas in this region. Either n-hexadecane or diesel was used as the sole carbon source for the screening. A modified colony-based oil drop collapsing test was used to cover sessile biosurfactant producers. Fifty-five biosurfactant producers belong to genera of Alcanivorax, Exiguobacterium, Halomonas, Rhodococcus, Bacillus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Streptomyces were isolated. The first three genera were established after 1980s with interesting characteristics and limited relevant publications. Some of the 55 isolated strains were found with properties such as greatly reducing surface tension, stabilizing emulsion and producing flocculant. Isolates P6-4P and P1-5P were selected to demonstrate the performance of biosurfactant production, and were found to reduce the surface tension of water to as low as 28 dynes/cm. PMID:25034191

Cai, Qinhong; Zhang, Baiyu; Chen, Bing; Zhu, Zhiwen; Lin, Weiyun; Cao, Tong

2014-09-15

243

Identification of persulfate oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during remediation of contaminated soil.  

PubMed

The extent of PAH transformation, the formation and transformation of reaction byproducts during persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking plant soil was investigated. Pre-oxidation analyses indicated that oxygen-containing PAHs (oxy-PAHs) existed in the soil. Oxy-PAHs including 1H-phenalen-1-one, 9H-fluoren-9-one, and 1,8-naphthalic anhydride were also produced during persulfate oxidation of PAHs. Concentration of 1,8-naphthalic anhydride at 4h in thermally activated (50°C) persulfate oxidation (TAPO) treatment increased 12.7 times relative to the oxidant-free control. Additionally, the oxy-PAHs originally present and those generated during oxidation can be oxidized by unactivated or thermally activated persulfate oxidation. For example, 9H-fluoren-9-one concentration decreased 99% at 4h in TAPO treatment relative to the control. Thermally activated persulfate resulted in greater oxy-PAHs removal than unactivated persulfate. Overall, both unactivated and thermally activated persulfate oxidation of PAH-contaminated soil reduced PAH mass, and oxidized most of the reaction byproducts. Consequently, this treatment process could limit environmental risk related to the parent compound and associated reaction byproducts. PMID:24862467

Liao, Xiaoyong; Zhao, Dan; Yan, Xiulan; Huling, Scott G

2014-07-15

244

Using discriminant analysis to assess polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination in Yongding New River.  

PubMed

Yongding New River has been polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which are carcinogenic and mutagenic. In three periods (the abundant water period, mean water period, dry water period), ten sites (totally 30 samples) in Yongding New River were clustered into four categories by hierarchical cluster analysis (hierarchical CA). In the same cluster, the samples had the same approximate contamination situation. In order to eliminate the dimensional differences, the data in each sample, containing 16 kinds of PAHs, were standardized with normal standardization and maximum difference standardization. According to the results of the cubic clustering criterion, pseudo F, and pseudo t (2) (PST2), the proper number of clustering for the 30 samples is 4. Before conducting hierarchical CA and K-means cluster analysis on the samples, we used principal component analysis to obtain another group data set. This data set was composed of the principal component scores which are uncorrelated variables. Hierarchical CA and K-means cluster analysis were used to classify the two data sets into four categories. With the classification results of hierarchical CA and K-means cluster analysis, discriminant analysis is applied to determine which method was better for normalization of the original data and which one was proper to cluster the samples and establish discriminant functions so that a new sample can be grouped into the right categories. PMID:23657734

Wang, Xiaojing; Zou, Zhihong; Zou, Hui

2013-10-01

245

Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons.  

PubMed

Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer. PMID:14607476

Namocatcat, J A; Fang, J; Barcelona, M J; Quibuyen, A T O; Abrajano, T A

2003-12-01

246

Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer.

Namocatcat, J. A.; Fang, J.; Barcelona, M. J.; Quibuyen, A. T. O.; Abrajano, T. A.

2003-12-01

247

Anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments under sulfate-reducing and artificially imposed iron-reducing conditions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The potential use of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in-situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments was investigated. Previous studies have indicated that Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) can oxidize some electron donors more effectively than sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB). In contrast to previous results in freshwater sediments, the addition of Fe(III) to marine sediments from San Diego Bay, CA did not switch the terminal electron-accepting process (TEAP) from sulfate reduction to Fe-(III) reduction. Addition of Fe(III) also did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III)] followed by anaerobic incubation of the sediments, resulted in Fe-(III) reduction as the TEAP, but contaminant degradation was not stimulated and in some instances was inhibited. The difference in the ability of FeRB to compete with the SRB in the different sediment treatments was related to relative population sizes. Although the addition of Fe(III) did not stimulate hydrocarbon degradation, the results presented here as well as other recent studies demonstrate that there may be significant anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments.

Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.

1996-01-01

248

Effect of reduced iron on the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated soil and ground water: A review of publications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chlorinated hydrocarbons are among the most hazardous organic pollutants. The traditional remediation technologies, i.e., pumping of contaminated soil- and groundwater and its purification appear to be costly and not very efficient as applied to these pollutants. In the last years, a cheaper method of destroying chlorine-replaced hydrocarbons has been used based on the construction of an artificial permeable barrier, where the process develops with the participation of in situ bacteria activated by zerovalent iron. The forced significant decrease in the redox potential (Eh) down to -750 mV provides the concentration of electrons necessary for the reduction of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A rise in the pH drastically accelerates the dechlorination process. In addition to chlorine-organic compounds, ground water is often contaminated with heavy metals. The influence of the latter on the effect of zerovalent iron may be different: both accelerating its degradation (Cu) and inhibiting it (Cr). Most of the products of zerovalent iron corrosion, i.e., green rust, magnetite, ferrihydrite, hematite, and goethite, weaken the efficiency of the Fe0 barrier by mitigating the dechlorination and complicating the water filtration. However, pyrrhotite FeS, on the contrary, accelerates the dechlorination of chlorine hydrocarbons.

Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

2014-02-01

249

Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and

J. A. Namocatcat; J. Fang; M. J. Barcelona; A. T. O. Quibuyen; T. A. Abrajano

2003-01-01

250

Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas  

E-print Network

EFFECTIVENESS OF IN SITE BIODEGRADATION FOR THE REMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AT A CONTAMINATED OIL REFINERY, PORT ARTHUR, TEXAS A Thesis by ALFRED EDWARD MOFFIT III Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8, M..., PORT ARTHUR, TEXAS A Thesis by ALFRED EDWARD MOFFIT III Submitted to Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Bruce E. Herbert (Chair of Committee...

Moffit, Alfred Edward

2000-01-01

251

Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes the progress of three years of a three-year grant awarded to the Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) at Tulane and Xavier Universities. The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. The three major areas of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects; and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular focus in this study are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The focus of the literature research was to provide an analysis of the contaminants located on or around various Department of Energy (DOE) sites that are or have the potential to function as endocrine disruptors and to correlate the need for studying endocrine disruptors to DOE's programmatic needs. Previous research within the Center for Bioenvironmental Research at Tulane and Xavier Universities has focused on understanding the effects of environmental agents on the human and wildlife health and disease. In particular this research has focused on how exogenous agents can function to mimic or disrupt normal endocrine signaling, i.e. estrogen, thyroid within various systems from whole animal studies with fish, amphibians and insects to human cancer cell lines. Significant work has focused on the estrogenic and anti-estrogenic action of both synthetic organochlorine chemicals and naturally produced phytochemicals. Recent projects have extended these research objectives to examination of these environmental agents on the symbiotic relationship between nitrogen fixing rhizobial bacteria and leguminous plants. This research will form the foundation for future experiments into the genetic manipulation of plants to potentially promote greater or more specific symbiotic relationships between plant and Rhizobium allowing this biological phenomenon to be used in a greater number of crop types. Future technology developments could include the genetic engineering of crops suitable for in situ vadose zone 2 bioremediation (via microbes) and phytoremediation (through the crop, itself) in contaminated DOE sites.

McLachlan, John A.

2000-06-01

252

Hydrodynamics of foam flows for in situ bioremediation of DNAPL-contaminated subsurface  

SciTech Connect

In situ remediation technologies such as (1) pump-and-treat, (2) soil vacuum extraction, (3) soil flushing/washing, and (4) bioremediation are being promoted for cleanup of contaminated sites. However, these technologies are limited by flow channeling of chemical treatment agents. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the Gas Research Institute, and the Institute of Gas Technology are collaboratively investigating a new bioremediation technology using foams. The ability of a foam to block pores and limit flow bypassing makes it ideal for DNAPL remediation. The hydrodynamics of gas/liquid foam flows differ significantly from the hydrodynamics of single and multiphase nonfoaming flows. This is illustrated using a multiphase flow hydrodynamic computer model and a two-dimensional flow visualization cell. A state-of-the-art, nonintrusive, three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging technique was developed to visualize DNAPL mobilization in three dimensions. Mechanisms to be investigated are in situ DNAPL interactions with the foam, DNAPL emulsification, DNAPL scouring by the foam, and subsequent DNAPL mobilization/redeposition in the porous media.

Bouillard, J.X.; Enzien, M.; Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.; Botto, R.E.; Cody, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-12-31

253

The co-application of earthworms (Dendrobaena veneta) and compost to increase hydrocarbon losses from diesel contaminated soils.  

PubMed

The feasibility of using composted civic waste for the remediation of a soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons (extractable petroleum hydrocarbons (EPH) 10+/-1.8 g kg(-1) and total 16 USEPA PAH 1.62+/-0.5 g kg(-1)) was assessed. The effects of compost to soil ratio, in combination with and without earthworm presence (Dendrobaena veneta), upon the loss of contaminants were determined for EPH (GC-FID) and PAH (GC-MS), respectively. Increasing the ratio of compost substrate to hydrocarbon impacted soil (1:0.5, 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4 (soil:compost wt/wt)) in the absence of earthworms resulted in significantly (p < 0.05) greater losses of both EPH and SigmaPAH after an 84 d incubation period, when compared to the soil only control. Where earthworms were present without compost, EPH losses were significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced in the soil only treatment (33.4+/-5.3% residual) compared to the soil only control (54.4+/-5.3% residual). However, PAH loss in the soil only treatment (with-earthworm presence) were only slightly enhanced (65.3+/-9.3% residual), with respect to the soil only control (69.2+/-6.4% residual). Synergistic benefits of both earthworm and compost presence were most significant for PAHs (p < 0.05), and less so for EPH. 14C-respirometer studies, to establish catabolic competence in terms of microbial mineralisation of key hydrocarbons, complemented the hydrocarbon analysis. PMID:18456332

Hickman, Zachary A; Reid, Brian J

2008-10-01

254

Petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation under seasonal freeze-thaw soil temperature regimes in contaminated soils from a sub-Arctic site.  

PubMed

Several studies have shown that biostimulation in ex situ systems such as landfarms and biopiles can facilitate remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils at sub-Arctic sites during summers when temperatures are above freezing. In this study, we examine the biodegradation of semivolatile (F2: C10-C16) and nonvolatile (F3: C16-C34) petroleum hydrocarbons and microbial respiration and population dynamics at post- and presummer temperatures ranging from -5 to 14 °C. The studies were conducted in pilot-scale tanks with soils obtained from a historically contaminated sub-Arctic site in Resolution Island (RI), Canada. In aerobic, nutrient-amended, unsaturated soils, the F2 hydrocarbons decreased by 32% during the seasonal freeze-thaw phase where soils were cooled from 2 to -5 °C at a freezing rate of -0.12 °C d(-1) and then thawed from -5 to 4 °C at a thawing rate of +0.16 °C d(-1). In the unamended (control) tank, the F2 fraction only decreased by 14% during the same period. Biodegradation of individual hydrocarbon compounds in the nutrient-amended soils was also confirmed by comparing their abundance over time to that of the conserved diesel biomarker, bicyclic sesquiterpanes (BS). During this period, microbial respiration was observed, even at subzero temperatures when unfrozen liquid water was detected during the freeze-thaw period. An increase in culturable heterotrophs and 16S rDNA copy numbers was noted during the freezing phase, and the (14)C-hexadecane mineralization in soil samples obtained from the nutrient-amended tank steadily increased. Hydrocarbon degrading bacterial populations identified as Corynebacterineae- and Alkanindiges-related strains emerged during the freezing and thawing phases, respectively, indicating there were temperature-based microbial community shifts. PMID:21194195

Chang, Wonjae; Klemm, Sara; Beaulieu, Chantale; Hawari, Jalal; Whyte, Lyle; Ghoshal, Subhasis

2011-02-01

255

Assessment of diesel contamination in groundwater using electromagnetic induction geophysical techniques  

SciTech Connect

Determining hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater is typically accomplished through the installation of extensive monitoring wells. Issues of scale and site heterogeneities tend to introduce errors in delineating the extent of contamination and environmental impact. In this study, electromagnetic induction survey was investigated as an alternative technique for mapping petroleum contaminants in the subsurface. The surveys were conducted at a coal mining site near Gillette, Wyoming, using the EM34-XL ground conductivity meter. Data from this survey were validated with known concentrations of diesel compounds detected in groundwater from the study site. Groundwater data correlated well with the electromagnetic survey data, which was used to generate a site model to identify subsurface diesel plumes. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to use electromagnetic survey techniques for mapping hydrocarbon contamination in groundwater. Results from this study indicate that this geophysical technique can be an effective tool for assessing subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon sources and plumes at contaminated sites.

Jin, S.; Fallgren, P.; Cooper, J.; Morris, J; . Urynowicz, M. [Western Research Institute, Laramie, WY (United States)

2008-07-01

256

Contamination, source identification, and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in agricultural soil of Shanghai, China.  

PubMed

The level, distribution, compositional pattern, and possible sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in agricultural soil of Shanghai were investigated. The concentrations ranged from 140.7 to 2,370.8 ?g kg(?-1) for 21 PAHs and from 92.2 to 2,062.7 ?g kg(?-1) for 16 priority PAHs, respectively. The higher level of PAHs was mainly distributed in the south and west of Shanghai region, and the lower concentration was found in Chongming Island. Generally, the composition pattern of PAHs was characterized with high molecular weight PAHs, the seven possible carcinogenic PAHs accounted for 4.8-50.8% of the total PAHs, and fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[b]fluoranthene were the most dominant components in soil samples. The correlation analysis suggested that low molecular weight PAHs and high molecular weight PAHs were originated from different sources and further corroborated that total organic carbon was a key soil property affecting the fate of persistent organic pollutants in the environment. The isomer ratios and principal component analysis indicated that PAHs in the investigated areas were derived primarily from combustion of biomass, coal, and petroleum. Compared to the soil quality standards of the Netherlands, all the target PAHs (except Ant) in most samples exceeded their target values. The Nemerow composite index based on the same soil quality standard showed that 69.4% of the soil samples were heavily polluted. The total BaP(eq) of ten Dutch target PAHs in 72% soil samples were higher than the reference total carcinogenic potency. Therefore, the agricultural soil in Shanghai is suffering from serious PAHs contamination. PMID:21360000

Jiang, YuFeng; Wang, XueTong; Wu, MingHong; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, JiaMo

2011-12-01

257

Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

McLachlan, J.

1998-06-01

258

Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of Hong Kong soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dioxins/furans.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate mutagenicity and genotoxicity of soils from 12 different land use types such as electronic waste dismantling workshop, open burning site and car dismantling workshop (CDW), based on soil concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Soils of CDW contained the sum of 10 PAHs level (94392?g/kg) exceeded The New Dutch List (Dutch Intervention Value (40000?g/kg)), dominated by high molecular PAHs (99.6%) and benzo(a)pyrene (82.6%), indicating its potential carcinogenic risks. In addition, Ames test and SOS Chromotest further manifested that soil of CDW had a significantly higher mutagenic potency (MP) of 13.8 and 7.43 on both strains of TA98 and TA100 with S9 mix, respectively, and a relatively higher genotoxicity with S9 mix (SOS inducing potency=1.16), amongst the 12 different soil types. BaP TEQ PAHs in soils were significantly correlated with MP of TA98, with and without S9 mix (r=0.858 and r=0.976 at p<0.01); MP of TA100 with and without S9 mix (r=0.666 at p<0.05 and r=0.819 at p<0.01); and SOSIP of Escherichia coli PQ 37 with S9 mix (r=0.693 at p<0.05), accordingly. Soils of CDW possessed a higher carcinogenic risk (mutagenicity and genotoxicity), based on PAHs concentrations. Bioremediation is recommended to treat the contaminated soils. PMID:23391780

Man, Yu Bon; Chow, Ka Lai; Kang, Yuan; Wong, Ming Hung

2013-04-15

259

Remediation of hydrocarbons in crude oil-contaminated soils using Fenton's reagent.  

PubMed

Sandy soil samples spiked with Bonny light crude oil were subsequently treated with Fenton's reagent at acidic, neutral, and basic pH ranges. Oil extracts from these samples including an untreated one were analyzed 1 week later with a gas chromatograph to provide evidence of hydrocarbon depletion by the oxidant. The reduction of three broad hydrocarbon groups-total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH); benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX); and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) were investigated at various pHs. Hydrocarbon removal was efficient, with treatment at the acidic pH giving the highest removal of about 96% for PAH, 99% for BTEX, and some TPH components experiencing complete disappearance. The four-ringed PAHs were depleted more than their three-ringed counterparts at the studied pH ranges. PMID:22160385

Ojinnaka, Chukwunonye; Osuji, Leo; Achugasim, Ozioma

2012-11-01

260

Immunoquantitation and Microsomal Monooxygenase Activities of Hepatic Cytochromes P4501A and P4502B and Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Contaminant Levels in Polar Bear ( Ursus maritimus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contamination of the Arctic ecosystem by anthropogenic compounds has resulted in exposure of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) to lipophilic chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) accumulated through the marine food web. Liver samples were collected from 16 adult male polar bears in the Canadian arctic and subjected to chemical analysis for CHCs and metabolites, determination of alkoxyresorufinO-dealkylase activities, and immunoquantitation of cytochrome

Robert J. Letcher; Ross J. Norstrom; Song Lin; Malcolm A. Ramsay; Stelvio M. Bandiera

1996-01-01

261

Clonal Variation in Survival and Growth of Hybrid Poplar and Willow in an IN SITU Trial on Soils Heavily Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Species and hybrids between species belonging to the genera Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) have been used successfully for phytoremediation of contaminated soils. Our objectives were to: 1) evaluate the potential for establishing genotypes of poplar and willow on soils heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and 2) identify promising genotypes for potential use in future systems. We evaluated height, diameter,

Ronald S. Zalesny Jr; Edmund O. Bauer; Richard B. Hall; Jill A. Zalesny; Joshua Kunzman; Chris J. Rog; Don E. Riemenschneider

2005-01-01

262

Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models  

DOEpatents

A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

He, Wei (New Milford, NJ); Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY)

1998-01-01

263

Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models  

DOEpatents

A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

1998-08-25

264

Linkage between bacterial and fungal rhizosphere communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is related to plant phylogeny.  

PubMed

Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to excavating and chemically treating contaminated soils. Certain plants can directly bioremediate by sequestering and/or transforming pollutants, but plants may also enhance bioremediation by promoting contaminant-degrading microorganisms in soils. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region to compare the community composition of 66 soil samples from the rhizosphere of planted willows (Salix spp.) and six unplanted control samples at the site of a former petrochemical plant. The Bray-Curtis distance between bacterial communities across willow cultivars was significantly correlated with the distance between fungal communities in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils but not in highly contaminated (HC) soils (>2000?mg?kg(-1) hydrocarbons). The mean dissimilarity between fungal, but not bacterial, communities from the rhizosphere of different cultivars increased substantially in the HC blocks. This divergence was partly related to high fungal sensitivity to hydrocarbon contaminants, as demonstrated by reduced Shannon diversity, but also to a stronger influence of willows on fungal communities. Abundance of the fungal class Pezizomycetes in HC soils was directly related to willow phylogeny, with Pezizomycetes dominating the rhizosphere of a monophyletic cluster of cultivars, while remaining in low relative abundance in other soils. This has implications for plant selection in phytoremediation, as fungal associations may affect the health of introduced plants and the success of co-inoculated microbial strains. An integrated understanding of the relationships between fungi, bacteria and plants will enable the design of treatments that specifically promote effective bioremediating communities. PMID:23985744

Bell, Terrence H; El-Din Hassan, Saad; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Al-Otaibi, Fahad; Hijri, Mohamed; Yergeau, Etienne; St-Arnaud, Marc

2014-02-01

265

Linkage between bacterial and fungal rhizosphere communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is related to plant phylogeny  

PubMed Central

Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to excavating and chemically treating contaminated soils. Certain plants can directly bioremediate by sequestering and/or transforming pollutants, but plants may also enhance bioremediation by promoting contaminant-degrading microorganisms in soils. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region to compare the community composition of 66 soil samples from the rhizosphere of planted willows (Salix spp.) and six unplanted control samples at the site of a former petrochemical plant. The Bray–Curtis distance between bacterial communities across willow cultivars was significantly correlated with the distance between fungal communities in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils but not in highly contaminated (HC) soils (>2000?mg?kg?1 hydrocarbons). The mean dissimilarity between fungal, but not bacterial, communities from the rhizosphere of different cultivars increased substantially in the HC blocks. This divergence was partly related to high fungal sensitivity to hydrocarbon contaminants, as demonstrated by reduced Shannon diversity, but also to a stronger influence of willows on fungal communities. Abundance of the fungal class Pezizomycetes in HC soils was directly related to willow phylogeny, with Pezizomycetes dominating the rhizosphere of a monophyletic cluster of cultivars, while remaining in low relative abundance in other soils. This has implications for plant selection in phytoremediation, as fungal associations may affect the health of introduced plants and the success of co-inoculated microbial strains. An integrated understanding of the relationships between fungi, bacteria and plants will enable the design of treatments that specifically promote effective bioremediating communities. PMID:23985744

Bell, Terrence H; El-Din Hassan, Saad; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Al-Otaibi, Fahad; Hijri, Mohamed; Yergeau, Etienne; St-Arnaud, Marc

2014-01-01

266

Contrasting the community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from hydrocarbon-contaminated and uncontaminated soils following willow (Salix spp. L.) planting.  

PubMed

Phytoremediation is a potentially inexpensive alternative to chemical treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, but its success depends heavily on identifying factors that govern the success of root-associated microorganisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation and plant growth stimulation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with many terrestrial plants, and are known to stimulate plant growth, although both species identity and the environment influence this relationship. Although AMF are suspected to play a role in plant adaptation to hydrocarbon contamination, their distribution in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is not well known. In this study, we examined how AMF communities were structured within the rhizosphere of 11 introduced willow cultivars as well as unplanted controls across uncontaminated and hydrocarbon-contaminated soils at the site of a former petrochemical plant. We obtained 69 282 AMF-specific 18S rDNA sequences using 454-pyrosequencing, representing 27 OTUs. Contaminant concentration was the major influence on AMF community structure, with different AMF families dominating at each contaminant level. The most abundant operational taxonomic unit in each sample represented a large proportion of the total community, and this proportion was positively associated with increasing contamination, and seemingly, by planting as well. The most contaminated soils were dominated by three phylotypes closely related to Rhizophagus irregularis, while these OTUs represented only a small proportion of sequences in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils. These results suggest that in situ inoculation of AMF strains could be an important component of phytoremediation treatments, but that strains should be selected from the narrow group that is both adapted to contaminant toxicity and able to compete with indigenous AMF species. PMID:25032685

Hassan, Saad El-Din; Bell, Terrence H; Stefani, Franck O P; Denis, David; Hijri, Mohamed; St-Arnaud, Marc

2014-01-01

267

Contrasting the Community Structure of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi from Hydrocarbon-Contaminated and Uncontaminated Soils following Willow (Salix spp. L.) Planting  

PubMed Central

Phytoremediation is a potentially inexpensive alternative to chemical treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, but its success depends heavily on identifying factors that govern the success of root-associated microorganisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation and plant growth stimulation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with many terrestrial plants, and are known to stimulate plant growth, although both species identity and the environment influence this relationship. Although AMF are suspected to play a role in plant adaptation to hydrocarbon contamination, their distribution in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is not well known. In this study, we examined how AMF communities were structured within the rhizosphere of 11 introduced willow cultivars as well as unplanted controls across uncontaminated and hydrocarbon-contaminated soils at the site of a former petrochemical plant. We obtained 69 282 AMF-specific 18S rDNA sequences using 454-pyrosequencing, representing 27 OTUs. Contaminant concentration was the major influence on AMF community structure, with different AMF families dominating at each contaminant level. The most abundant operational taxonomic unit in each sample represented a large proportion of the total community, and this proportion was positively associated with increasing contamination, and seemingly, by planting as well. The most contaminated soils were dominated by three phylotypes closely related to Rhizophagus irregularis, while these OTUs represented only a small proportion of sequences in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils. These results suggest that in situ inoculation of AMF strains could be an important component of phytoremediation treatments, but that strains should be selected from the narrow group that is both adapted to contaminant toxicity and able to compete with indigenous AMF species. PMID:25032685

Stefani, Franck O. P.; Denis, David; Hijri, Mohamed; St-Arnaud, Marc

2014-01-01

268

CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON DEGRADATION IN PLANTS: MECHANISMS AND ENHANCEMENT OF PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a...

269

Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated microbial activity in contaminated soil.  

PubMed

The contamination of soils by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a widespread environmental problem and the remediation of PAHs from these areas has been a major concern. The effectiveness of many in situ bioremediation systems may be constrained by low contaminant bioavailability due to limited aqueous solubility or a large magnitude of sorption. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) on bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 of an aged PAH-contaminated soil. When 10% (W/W) MCD amendment was combined with bioaugmentation by the PAH-degrading bacterium Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2, the percentage degradation of total PAHs was significantly enhanced up to 34.8%. Higher counts of culturable PAH-degrading bacteria and higher soil dehydrogenase and soil polyphenol oxidase activities were observed in 10% (W/W) MCD-assisted bioaugmentation soil. This MCD-assisted bioaugmentation strategy showed significant increases (p < 0.05) in the average well color development (AWCD) obtained by the BIOLOG Eco plate assay, Shannon-Weaver index (H) and Simpson index (lambda) compared with the controls, implying that this strategy at least partially restored the microbiological functioning of the PAH-contaminated soil. The results suggest that MCD-aided bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 may be a promising practical bioremediation strategy for aged PAH-contaminated soils. PMID:22893972

Sun, Mingming; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Zhengao; Teng, Ying

2012-01-01

270

Assessment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Contamination of Breeding Pools Utilized by the Puerto Rican Crested Toad, Peltophryne lemur  

PubMed Central

Habitat preservation and management may play an important role in the conservation of the Puerto Rican crested toad, Peltophryne lemur, due to this species' small geographic range and declining native wild population. Bioavailable water concentrations of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants within breeding pools at 3 sites were established using Passive Sampling Devices (PSDs) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A more diverse population of PAH analytes were found in higher concentrations at the breeding site that allowed direct vehicular access, but calculated risk quotients indicated low risk to toad reproduction associated with the current PAH analyte levels. PMID:23762634

Gjeltema, Jenessa; Stoskopf, Michael; Shea, Damian; De Voe, Ryan

2012-01-01

271

Novel Application of Cyclolipopeptide Amphisin: Feasibility Study as Additive to Remediate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contaminated Sediments  

PubMed Central

To decontaminate dredged harbor sediments by bioremediation or electromigration processes, adding biosurfactants could enhance the bioavailability or mobility of contaminants in an aqueous phase. Pure amphisin from Pseudomonas fluorescens DSS73 displays increased effectiveness in releasing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) strongly adsorbed to sediments when compared to a synthetic anionic surfactant. Amphisin production by the bacteria in the natural environment was also considered. DSS73’s growth is weakened by three model PAHs above saturation, but amphisin is still produced. Estuarine water feeding the dredged material disposal site of a Norman harbor (France) allows both P. fluorescens DSS73 growth and amphisin production. PMID:21673923

Groboillot, Anne; Portet-Koltalo, Florence; Le Derf, Franck; Feuilloley, Marc J. G.; Orange, Nicole; Poc, Cécile Duclairoir

2011-01-01

272

Sample preparation and characterization for a study of environmentally acceptable endpoints for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

In the past, the interdisciplinary research effort required to investigate the acceptable cleanup endpoints for hydrocarbon-impacted soils has been limited by the lack of standardized soils for testing. To support the efforts of the various researchers participating in the EAE research initiative, soil samples were collected from ten sites representing hydrocarbon-impacted soils typical of exploration/production, refinery, and bulk storage terminal operations. The hydrocarbons in the standard soils include crude oil, mixed refinery products, diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Physical characterization included analysis of soil texture, water retention, particle density, nanoporosity, pH, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, buffer capacity, organic carbon, sodium adsorption ratio, and clay mineralogy. Chemical characterization included analysis of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and metals, and TCLP for metals and organics. An analysis of the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions was performed on each soil to support the use of various models for assessing soil toxicity. Screening-level toxicity tests were conducted using Microtox{trademark}, plant seed germination and growth, and earthworm mortality and growth. Biodegradability screening tests were performed in slurry shake flasks to estimate the availability of hydrocarbon fractions to soil microorganisms.

Kreitinger, J.P.; Finn, J.T. [Remediation Technologies, Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1995-12-31

273

Emerging organic contaminant removal depending on primary treatment and operational strategy in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: influence of redox.  

PubMed

This study aimed at assessing the influence of primary treatment (hydrolytic upflow sludge blanket (HUSB) reactor vs. conventional settling) and operational strategy (alternation of saturated/unsaturated phases vs. permanently saturated) on the removal of various emerging organic contaminants (i.e. ibuprofen, diclofenac, acetaminophen, tonalide, oxybenzone, bisphenol A) in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands. For that purpose, a continuous injection experiment was carried out in an experimental treatment plant for 26 days. The plant had 3 treatment lines: a control line (settler-wetland permanently saturated), a batch line (settler-wetland operated with saturate/unsaturated phases) and an anaerobic line (HUSB reactor-wetland permanently saturated). In each line, wetlands had a surface area of 2.95 m(2), a water depth of 25 cm and a granular medium D(60) = 7.3 mm, and were planted with common reed. During the study period the wetlands were operated at a hydraulic and organic load of 25 mm/d and about 4.7 g BOD/m(2)d, respectively. The injection experiment delivered very robust results that show how the occurrence of higher redox potentials within the wetland bed promotes the elimination of conventional quality parameters as well as emerging microcontaminants. Overall, removal efficiencies were always greater for the batch line than for the control and anaerobic lines, and to this respect statistically significantly differences were found for ibuprofen, diclofenac, oxybenzone and bisphenol A. As an example, ibuprofen, whose major removal mechanism has been reported to be biodegradation under aerobic conditions, showed a higher removal in the batch line (85%) than in the control (63%) and anaerobic (52%) lines. Bisphenol A showed also a great dependence on the redox status of the wetlands, finding an 89% removal rate for the batch line, as opposed to the control and anaerobic lines (79 and 65%, respectively). Furthermore, diclofenac showed a greater removal under a higher redox status (70, 48 and 32% in the batch, control and anaerobic lines). Average removal efficiencies of acetaminophen, oxybenzone and tonalide were almost >90% for the 3 treatment lines. The results of this study indicate that the efficiency of horizontal flow constructed wetland systems can be improved by using a batch operation strategy. Furthermore, we tentatively identified 4-hydroxy-diclofenac and carboxy-bisphenol A as intermediate degradation products. The higher abundance of the latter under the batch operation strategy reinforced biodegradation as a relevant bisphenol A removal pathway under higher redox conditions. PMID:23123085

Avila, Cristina; Reyes, Carolina; Bayona, Josep María; García, Joan

2013-01-01

274

Reproductive and morphological condition of wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lutra canadensis) in relation to chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.  

PubMed Central

We assessed chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of mink and river otters on the Columbia and Fraser River systems of northwestern North America, in relation to morphological measures of condition. We obtained carcasses of mink and river otters from commercial trappers during the winters 1994-1995 and 1995-1996. Necropsies included evaluation of the following biological parameters: sex, body mass and length, age, thymus, heart, liver, lung, spleen, pancreas, kidney, gonad, omentum, adrenal gland and baculum masses, baculum length, and stomach contents. Livers were analyzed, individually or in pools, for residues of organochlorine (OC) pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans. Contaminant levels were relatively low compared to those documented in other North American populations, although they ranged higher than those detected during an earlier survey (1990-1992) of these regional populations. Body condition varied slightly among collection regions, but showed no relationship with contaminant burden. Mink from the upper Fraser River had less fat stores and also had some of the lowest OC contamination levels observed. Similarly, a few individuals with enlarged livers and kidneys had low contaminant levels. Although a few individual animals with gross abnormalities of reproductive systems did not show high levels of contamination, there was a significant negative correlation between total PCB concentrations (as Aroclor 1260) and baculum length in juvenile mink (r = 0.707; p = 0.033; n = 8). The association of juvenile baculum length with eventual reproductive success is unknown, but further characterization of reproductive organ morphology and relationship to contaminants should be undertaken in a larger subset of these populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9924010

Harding, L E; Harris, M L; Stephen, C R; Elliott, J E

1999-01-01

275

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of soil and olives collected in areas contaminated with creosote released from old railway ties.  

PubMed

Simple sample preparation procedures involving sonication and solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and spectrofluorometric detection, were used to analyse polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and olives collected in areas contaminated with creosote-treated railway ties. Very high PAH contents (with amounts ranging from 114.7 to 2157.2 and from 167.3 to 3121.8 microg kg(-1) dry weight for total light PAHs and total heavy PAHs, respectively) were found in soil sampled up to 1 m from the source of contamination. The PAH load decreased rapidly with the distance from the railway ties. High amounts of light PAHs, up to 6359.9 microg kg(-1), were also found in oil extracted from olives collected in a rural area where old railway ties were stored. No appreciable transfer of heavy PAHs and benzo[a]pyrene was observed in oil samples. PMID:17689591

Moret, Sabrina; Purcaro, Giorgia; Conte, Lanfranco S

2007-11-01

276

Changes in hydrocarbon groups, soil ecotoxicity and microbiology along horizontal and vertical contamination gradients in an old landfarming field for oil refinery waste.  

PubMed

Horizontal and vertical contaminant gradients in an old landfarming field for oil refinery waste were characterised with the aim to assess parallel changes in hydrocarbon groups and general, microbiological and ecotoxicological soil characteristics. In the surface soil polar compounds were the most prevalent fraction of heptane-extractable hydrocarbons, superseding GC-FID-resolvable and high-molar-mass aliphatics and aromatics, but there was no indication of their relatively higher mobility or toxicity. The size of the polar fraction correlated poorly with soil physical, chemical and microbiological properties, which were better explained by the total heptane-extractable and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Deleterious effects on soil microbiology in situ were observed at surprisingly low TPH concentrations (0.3%). Due to the accumulation of polar and complexed degradation products, TPH seems an insufficient measure to assess the quality and monitor the remediation of soil with weathered hydrocarbon contamination. PMID:22243888

Mikkonen, Anu; Hakala, Kati P; Lappi, Kaisa; Kondo, Elina; Vaalama, Anu; Suominen, Leena

2012-03-01

277

Hydrocarbon contamination of arctic tundra soils of the Bol'shoi Lyakhovskii Island (the Novosibirskie Islands)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data on the distribution of the components of oil products that have accumulated in the arctic tundra soils of the Bol'shoi Lyakhovskii Island (the Novosibirskie Islands) under the impact of technogenic loads are analyzed. The examined soils differ in the vertical and lateral distribution patterns of the methanenaphthenic and naphthenic hydrocarbons and in the degree of their transformation. This is determined by the position of particular soils in the catenas and by the sorption of particular hydrocarbon compounds in the soils. The portion of light molecular-weight hydrocarbons in the upper horizons decreases by two-ten times in comparison with the deeper soil layers. In the lateral direction, the twofold difference in the contents of the methane-naphthenic and naphthenic hydrocarbons in the upper horizons is seen. The degree of transformation of the hydrocarbons under the impact of microbiological processes depends on the aeration conditions, the depth of permafrost table, the composition of oil products, and the soil organic matter content.

Kachinskii, V. L.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Gennadiev, A. N.

2014-02-01

278

Molecular Analysis of Surfactant-Driven Microbial Population Shifts in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil†  

PubMed Central

We analyzed the impact of surfactant addition on hydrocarbon mineralization kinetics and the associated population shifts of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in soil. A mixture of radiolabeled hexadecane and phenanthrene was added to batch soil vessels. Witconol SN70 (a nonionic, alcohol ethoxylate) was added in concentrations that bracketed the critical micelle concentration (CMC) in soil (CMC?) (determined to be 13 mg g?1). Addition of the surfactant at a concentration below the CMC? (2 mg g?1) did not affect the mineralization rates of either hydrocarbon. However, when surfactant was added at a concentration approaching the CMC? (10 mg g?1), hexadecane mineralization was delayed and phenanthrene mineralization was completely inhibited. Addition of surfactant at concentrations above the CMC? (40 mg g?1) completely inhibited mineralization of both phenanthrene and hexadecane. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene segments showed that hydrocarbon amendment stimulated Rhodococcus and Nocardia populations that were displaced by Pseudomonas and Alcaligenes populations at elevated surfactant levels. Parallel cultivation studies revealed that the Rhodococcus population can utilize hexadecane and that the Pseudomonas and Alcaligenes populations can utilize both Witconol SN70 and hexadecane for growth. The results suggest that surfactant applications necessary to achieve the CMC alter the microbial populations responsible for hydrocarbon mineralization. PMID:10877792

Colores, Gregory M.; Macur, Richard E.; Ward, David M.; Inskeep, William P.

2000-01-01

279

Natural attenuation of fuel hydrocarbon contaminants: Hydraulic conductivity dependency of biodegradation rates in a field case study  

SciTech Connect

Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

2003-07-15

280

Increased mortality odds ratio of male liver cancer in a community contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater  

PubMed Central

Aims: To investigate the association between cancer mortality risk and exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater of a downstream community near a contaminated site. Methods: Death certificates inclusive for the years 1966–97 were collected from two villages in the vicinity of an electronics factory operated between 1970 and 1992. These two villages were classified into the downstream (exposed) village and the upstream (unexposed) according to groundwater flow direction. Exposure classification was validated by the contaminant levels in 49 residential wells measured with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Mortality odds ratios (MORs) for cancer were calculated with cardiovascular-cerebrovascular diseases as the reference diseases. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to estimate the effects of exposure and period after adjustment for age. Results: Increased MORs were observed among males for all cancer, and liver cancer for the periods after 10 years of latency, namely, 1980–89, and 1990–97. Adjusted MOR for male liver cancer was 2.57 (95% confidence interval 1.21 to 5.46) with a significant linear trend for the period effect. Conclusion: The results suggest a link between exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons and male liver cancer risk. However, the conclusion is limited by lack of individual information on groundwater exposure and potential confounding factors. PMID:12709523

Lee, L; Chung, C; Ma, Y; Wang, G; Chen, P; Hwang, Y; Wang, J

2003-01-01

281

Characterization of Rhodococcus opacus R7, a strain able to degrade naphthalene and o -xylene isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rhodococcus opacus R7 was isolated from a soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for its ability to grow on naphthalene. The strain was also able to degrade o-xylene, the isomer of xylenes most recalcitrant to microbial degradation. The catabolic pathways for naphthalene and o-xylene were investigated by identification of metabolites in R. opacus R7 cultures performed with the two hydrocarbons and

Patrizia Di Gennaro; Emanuela Rescalli; Enrica Galli; Guido Sello; Giuseppina Bestetti

2001-01-01

282

Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil by composting in biopiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Composting of contaminated soil in biopiles is an ex situ technology, where organic matter such as bark chips are added to contaminated soil as a bulking agent. Composting of lubricating oil-contaminated soil was performed in field scale (5×40 m3) using bark chips as the bulking agent, and two commercially available mixed microbial inocula as well as the effect of the

K. S. Jørgensen; J. Puustinen; A.-M. Suortti

2000-01-01

283

Olivibacter oleidegradans sp. nov., a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from a biofilter clean-up facility on a hydrocarbon-contaminated site.  

PubMed

A novel hydrocarbon-degrading, Gram-negative, obligately aerobic, non-motile, non-sporulating, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain TBF2/20.2(T), was isolated from a biofilter clean-up facility set up on a hydrocarbon-contaminated site in Hungary. It was characterized by using a polyphasic approach to determine its taxonomic position. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolate is affiliated with the genus Olivibacter in the family Sphingobacteriaceae. It was found to be related most closely to Olivibacter ginsengisoli Gsoil 060(T) (93.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Strain TBF2/20.2(T) grew at pH 6-9 (optimally at pH 6.5-7.0) and at 15-42 °C (optimally at 30-37 °C). The major fatty acids were iso-C(15:0) (39.4%), summed feature 3 (iso-C(15:0) 2-OH and/or C(16:1)?7c; 26.0%), iso-C(17:0) 3-OH (14.5%) and C(16:0) (4.5%). The major menaquinone was MK-7 and the predominant polar lipid was phosphatidylethanolamine. The DNA G+C content of strain TBF2/20.2(T) was 41.2 mol%. Physiological and chemotaxonomic data further confirmed the distinctiveness of strain TBF2/20.2(T) from recognized members of the genus Olivibacter. Thus, strain TBF2/20.2(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Olivibacter, for which the name Olivibacter oleidegradans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TBF2/20.2(T) (=NCAIM B 02393(T) =CCM 7765(T)). PMID:21257685

Szabó, István; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Kriszt, Balázs; Háhn, Judit; Harkai, Péter; Baka, Erzsébet; Táncsics, András; Kaszab, Edit; Privler, Zoltán; Kukolya, József

2011-12-01

284

There are many locations throughout the world where sub-surface contamination impacts the natural environment, with  

E-print Network

announcement 02-03). One of the initial steps in deal- ing with a contaminated site is that referred to as site. Such a model is required to design an appropriate plan for remediation of a contaminated site and can also the contaminated region. The most common approach to site characterization involves drilling and directly sampling

Knight, Rosemary

285

Anaerobic Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Alkanes in Petroleum-Contaminated Marine Harbor Sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have usually been found to persist under strict anaer- obic conditions, in a previous study an unusual site was found in San Diego Bay in which two PAHs, naphthalene and phenanthrene, were oxidized to carbon dioxide under sulfate-reducing conditions. Further investigations with these sediments revealed that methylnaphthalene, fluorene, and fluoranthene were also anaerobically oxidized to

JOHN D. COATES; JOAN WOODWARD; JON ALLEN; PAUL PHILP; DEREK R. LOVLEY

1997-01-01

286

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Our research objectives are as follows: (1) Transform poplar and other tree species to extend and optimize chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) oxidative activities. (2) Determine the mechanisms of CHC oxidation in plants. (3) Isolate the genes responsible for CHC oxidation in plants.

Strand, Stuart E.

2003-06-01

287

Contamination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments of mangrove swamps  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentrations of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (?PAHs) and 15 individual PAH compounds in 20 surface sediments collected from four mangrove swamps in Hong Kong were analysed. ?PAH concentrations ranged from 356 to 11,098 ng g?1 dry weight with mean and median values of 1992 and 1142 ng g?1, respectively. These values were significantly higher than those of marine bottom

N. F. Y Tam; L Ke; X. H Wang; Y. S Wong

2001-01-01

288

POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON BIODEGRADATION AS A FUNCTION OF OXYGEN TENSION IN CONTAMINATED SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pyrene and nonspiked 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in the soil. The soil used for the evaluation was...

289

Chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination in osprey eggs and nestlings from the Canadian Great Lakes basin, 1991-1995.  

PubMed

Populations of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) in the Great Lakes basin declined dramatically during the 1950s-1970s due largely to adverse effects of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons, ingested in their fish prey, on eggshell thickness and adult survival. Nevertheless, these contaminants were not measured in osprey tissues during the decades of decline on the Canadian Great Lakes. Between 1991 and 1995, we monitored recovering osprey populations on the Great Lakes, including Georgian Bay and the St. Marys River area on Lake Huron and the St. Lawrence Islands National Park, as well as at two inland sites within the basin. Current OC levels, even from the most contaminated lakes, were typically lower than those associated with reproductive effects. DDE levels in fresh eggs averaged 1.2-2.9 microg/g, well below the 4.2 microg/g level associated with significant eggshell thinning and shell breakage. Nevertheless, a proportion of eggs from all study areas did exceed this level. PCB levels in eggs seldom exceeded 5 microg/g except in one lake of high breeding density in the Kawartha Lakes inland study area, where the mean sum PCB level was 7.1 microg/g and the maximum concentration measured was 26.5 microg/g. On average, mean reproductive output (0.78-2.75 young per occupied nest) of breeding populations in Great Lakes basin study areas exceeded the threshold of 0.8 young thought necessary to maintain stable populations. We concluded that, although eggs and especially nestling plasma, are useful in reflecting local contaminant levels, ospreys are relatively insensitive, at least at the population level, to health effects of current levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the Canadian Great Lakes. PMID:12739869

Martin, Pamela A; De Solla, Shane R; Ewins, Peter

2003-01-01

290

ANNUAL REPORT. DEVELOPMENT OF RADON AS A NATURAL TRACER FOR MONITORING THE REMEDIATION OF NAPL CONTAMINATION IN THE SUBSURFACE  

EPA Science Inventory

Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) present long-term challenges in terms of quantification in the subsurface at many DOE facilities. Over the past year we have continued investigating a potentially lower-cost method fo...

291

Biotransformation of chlorobenzene and aromatic hydrocarbons under denitrifying conditions. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Aromatic hydrocarbons are common contaminants in surface water and ground water supplies. Objectives of this research were to improve our understanding of the environmental fate of chlorobenzene (CB) and aromatic hydrocarbons under denitrifying conditions and to assess the extent to which nitrate can enhance bioremediation in contaminated soils and ground water. CB and toluene (TOL) biodegradation under denitrifying conditions was measured in a series of aqueous batch experiments in which CB or TOL was the sole aromatic substrate. The positive biotransformations of CB and TOL under denitrification suggest that injection of nitrate into a region of subsurface contamination could result in a successful bioremediation.

Bouwer, E.J.; Trizinsky, M.A.

1993-12-01

292

Evidence of hydrocarbon contamination from the Burgan oil field, Kuwait: interpretations from thermal remote sensing data.  

PubMed

The paper presents the application of thermal remote sensing for mapping hydrocarbon polluted sites. This has been achieved by mono-window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) measurements, using multi-date band 6 data of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The emissivity, transmittance and mean atmospheric temperature were used as critical factors to estimate LST. The changes in the surface emissivity due to oil pollution alter the apparent temperature, which was used as a recognition element to map out oil polluted surfaces. The LST contrast was successfully used to map spatial distribution of hydrocarbon pollution in the Burgan Oil field area of Kuwait. The methodology can be positively used to detect waste dumping, oil spills in oceans and ports, besides environmental management of oil pollution at or near the land surface. PMID:17291680

ud Din, Saif; Al Dousari, Ahmad; Literathy, Peter

2008-03-01

293

Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated saline–alkaline soils of the former Lake Texcoco  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as phenanthrene, anthracene and Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) are toxic for the environment. Removing these components from soil is difficult as they are resistant to degradation and more so in soils with high pH and large salt concentrations as in soil of the former lake Texcoco, but stimulating soil micro-organisms growth by adding nutrients might accelerate soil

L. A. Betancur-Galvis; D. Alvarez-Bernal; A. C. Ramos-Valdivia; L. Dendooven

2006-01-01

294

Biomonitoring of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Contamination in the Island of Crete Using Pine Needles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pine needles were selected as cost-effective and easy collectable matrices suitable for long-term monitoring of the lower\\u000a troposphere pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Overall, 27 sampling sites around the island of Crete\\u000a were selected, and upon availability, second- and third-year needles from two pine species (Pinus brutia Ten. and Pinus pinea L.) were collected. In general, the results for

Nuno Ratola; Arminda Alves; Elefteria Psillakis

2011-01-01

295

Evaluation of sediment contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Gironde estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface sediments, collected in the Gironde estuary during February and October 1993, were analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The aromatic fractions were separated by liquid chromatography of the extracts and analysed by gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry (GC\\/MS). Total PAH concentrations ranged among 1000 to 2000 ng\\/g of dry sediment. The resulting distributions and molecular ratios of specific aromatic compounds (phenanthrene,

H. Budzinski; I. Jones; J. Bellocq; C. Piérard; P. Garrigues

1997-01-01

296

Toxicity to Daphnia pulex and QSAR predictions for polycyclic hydrocarbons representative of Great Lakes contaminants  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the toxicity of several types of polycyclic hydrocarbons characteristic of Great Lakes samples to Daphnia pulex, a Great Lakes zooplankter, (2) to investigate the influence of different structural characteristics on toxicity, and (3) to determine the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) parameters and model that describe these compounds. These results will be related to comparative toxicity of other Great Lakes environmental compounds and to their application in site specific risk assessment.

Passino-Reader, D.R.; Hickey, J.P.; Ogilvie, L.M.

1997-01-01

297

MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN A SHALLOW HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Little is known about the complex interactions between microbial communities and electrical properties in contaminated aquifers. In order to investigate possible connections between these parameters a study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that the degradation of hydr...

298

SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MIXTURES FROM CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

Highly contaminated (with PAHs) topsoils were extracted with supercritical CO2 to determine the feasibility and mechanism of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Effect of SCF density, temperature, cosolvent type and amount, and of slurrying the soil with water were ...

299

The physiology of mycorrhizal Lolium multiflorum in the phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil  

E-print Network

, Cunninghamella echinulata var. elegans ATCC-36112 (Ce), on growth and selected physiological responses of L. multiflorum during phytoremediation of soil contaminated with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) or ACO. This research provides evidence that AMF enhance...

Alarcon, Alejandro

2009-06-02

300

Food contamination by hydrocarbons from packaging materials determined by coupled LC-GC.  

PubMed

Paraffins from raw extracts of foods and packing materials were isolated by LC and directly transferred to GC, applying concurrent eluent evaporation and a loop-type interface. Paraffins from various packing materials have been characterized: sisal bags, cardboard boxes, plastic films, wax-coated paper and cardboard as well as paraffin coatings. Important food contamination was found for sisal bags, cardboard boxes, and wax-coated paper/cardboard. Contamination by paraffin coatings on cheese was surprisingly small. PMID:1962505

Grob, K; Biedermann, M; Artho, A; Egli, J

1991-09-01

301

Soil-Water Repellency and Critical Humidity as Cleanup Criteria for Remediation of a Hydrocarbon Contaminated Mud  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The majority of soil remediation programs focus mainly on reducing the hydrocarbon concentration, based on the assumption that the primary impact is toxicity and/or leachates and that these are directly proportional to concentration. None-the-less, interference with natural soil-water interactions are frequently more damaging, especially for sites contaminated with very viscous, weathered hydrocarbons. Therefore, the kind of hydrocarbons present in the soil and their interactions with soil surfaces may be more important than the overall hydrocarbon concentration in terms of soil restoration. One recently patented technology, the Chemical-Biological Stabilization process, focuses specifically on restoring soil fertility as the main objective for remediation of sites with agricultural use. This method was recently validated at an industrial scale by the treatment of 150 cubic meters of bentonitic drilling muds (70,5% fines) from an old sulphur mine, which were contaminated with very weathered oil (4° API), consisting of 31% asphaltenes. This material was treated by adding 4% (w/w, dry) of calcium hydroxide, followed by 4% (w/w, dry) of sugar cane cachasse (a fine fibered agricultural waste), thoroughly mixing between additions using an excavator. After the soil had dried sufficiently and the pH was <8, a fine-rooted, C-4 tropical grass (Brachiaria humidicola) was planted by seed. Over a two year period this material was monitored for several factors including field moisture (%H), field capacity (FC), and soil water repellency. MED was measured on air dried soil and WDPT values were calculated from the extrapolation of penetration time vs. ethanol molarity functions (Rx=0,99). Additionally, water penetration times were measured at different humidities to determine critical moisture levels for absorption in <5s and <60s. Initially, the FC increased from 24,9%H to 33,8%H (in 4½ months), probably due to the addition of the organic amendment. Over the next 6½ months, the FC dropped to 25,6% H, likely due to organic matter decomposition. However, during the following year+ (13½ months) the FC increased to 33,8%H probably due to an increase of soil humic substances while a vigorous vegetative growth was established. During two years of treatment the MED values were reduced 30% from 5,13 to 3,58M, and WDPT values were reduced over 25 times (from 10 exp5,6 s to 10 exp4,2 s). Critical humidity values varied from ~16,9 - 19,5%H for penetration in <5 s and from ~15,1 - 15,5%H for penetration in <60 s, in both treated and untreated material. During the driest part of the year, in May before the first rains, the soil humidity was 20,3%, and thus values below the critical levels were not experienced. This permitted the development of a complete vegetative cover, vigorous growth, and transformation of a geologic substrate (bentonitic drilling muds) into a soil-like material apt for agricultural use. This focus on soil-water relationships and the use of soil fertility parameters in general is important in establishing cleanup criteria for the real remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites in agricultural areas. As seen in this study, relatively high WDPT and MED values may not necessarily indicate soil moisture problems and these need to be complemented with actual site information on soil humidity during the annual cycle and with determinations of critical humidity. Additionally, the augmentation of field capacity using organic conditioners may effectively mitigate potential critical humidity problems.

Guzmán, Francisco Javier; Adams, Randy H.

2010-05-01

302

Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation  

PubMed Central

Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5–nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes) were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12–nC34) and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene) were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales) were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 ?mol CH4/g sediment/day) with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12–nC34). For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 ?mol CH4/g sediment/day). This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers. PMID:24765087

Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell J.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Jones, D. Martin; Head, Ian M.; Gray, Neil D.

2014-01-01

303

Tryptophan Oxidative Metabolism Catalyzed by Geobacillus Stearothermophilus: A Thermophile Isolated from Kuwait Soil Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons  

PubMed Central

Tryptophan metabolism has been extensively studied in humans as well as in soil. Its metabolism takes place mainly through kynurenine pathway yielding hydroxylated, deaminated and many other products of physiological significance. However, tryptophan metabolism has not been studied in an isolated thermophilic bacterium. Geobacillus stearothermophilus is a local thermophile isolated from Kuwait desert soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The bacterium grows well at 65 °C in 0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 7), when supplied with organic compounds as a carbon source and has a good potential for transformation of steroids and related molecules. In the present study, we used tryptophan ethyl ester as a carbon source for the bacterium to study the catabolism of the amino acid at pH 5 and pH 7. In this endeavor, we have resolved twenty one transformation products of tryptophan by GC/LC and have identified them through their mass spectral fragmentation. PMID:22084599

Al-Hassan, Jassim M.; Al-Awadi, Samira; Oommen, Sosamma; Alkhamis, Abdulaziz; Afzal, Mohammad

2011-01-01

304

X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of the Effect of Hydrocarbon Contamination on Poly(Tetrafluoroethylene) Exposed to a Nitrogen Plasma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It has been shown that unless the surface of poly(tetrafluoroethylene)(PTFE) is free of hydrocarbon contamination, anomalous changes in the oxygen and fluorine contents, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and hence also the surface properties, may be improperly ascribed to a PTFE film exposed to a oxygen plasma.

Golub, Morton A.; Lopata, Eugene S.; Finney, Lorie S.

1993-01-01

305

Coagulation-flocculation process applied to wastewaters generated in hydrocarbon-contaminated soil washing: Interactions among coagulant and flocculant concentrations and pH value  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wastewater produced in the contaminated soil washing was treated by means of coagulation-flocculation (CF) process. The wastewater contained petroleum hydrocarbons, a surfactant, i.e., sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as well as salts, brownish organic matter and other constituents that were lixiviated from the soil during the washing process. The main goal of this work was to develop a process for treating

Luis G. Torres; Claudia Belloc; Mabel Vaca; Rosario Iturbe; Erick R. Bandala

2009-01-01

306

Improving the Biotreatment of Hydrocarbons-Contaminated Soils by Addition of Activated Sludge taken from the Wastewater Treatment Facilities of an Oil Refinery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Addition of activated sludge taken from the wastewater treatment facilities ofan oil refinery to a soil contaminated with oily sludge stimulated hydrocarbonbiodegradation in microcosms, bioreactors and biopile. Microcosms containing50 g of soil to which 0.07 % (w\\/w) of activated sludge was added presented ahigher degradation of alkanes (80 % vs 24 %) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs) (77 % vs 49

Pierre Juteau; Jean-Guy Bisaillon; François Lépine; Valérie Ratheau; Réjean Beaudet; Richard Villemur

2003-01-01

307

Airborne concentrations, skin contamination, and urinary metabolite excretion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among paving workers exposed to coal tar derived road tars  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exposure of surface dressing workers to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was studied. Four different paving sites, at which coal tar-containing binders were applied, were selected as work sites with high exposure levels of PAH. Breathing zone airborne particulates, contamination of the skin with PAH, and 1-hydroxypyrene in urine of the workers involved in chip sealing were determined. Substantial concentrations

FRANS J. JONGENEELEN; PAUL T. J. SCHEEPERS; ANITA GROENENDIJK; LEON A. G. J. M. VAN AERTS; ROB B. M. ANZION; ROBERT P. BOS; SIEBRAND J. VEENSTRA

1988-01-01

308

Hydrocarbon wastes at petroleum- and creosote-contaminated sites. Rapid characterization of component classes by thin-layer chromatography with flame ionization detection  

SciTech Connect

Adaptation of thin-layer chromatography with flame ionization detection for the semiquantitative characterization of residual hydrocarbon contamination at petroleum and wood-preserving hazardous waste sites is described. Soils collected from an abandoned oilfield battery site and a former creosote wood treatment facility in Alberta were solvent extracted and the residues characterized using two mobile-phase systems, one capable of separating polar waste components and the other of separating constituent aromatics according to ring number. The method provides a rapid component class fingerprint of the saturate, aromatic, and polar components of heavy hydrocarbon wastes, is analogous to column chromatography, and is useful for estimating the extent of weathering experienced by aged hydrocarbon wastes in the soil environment. As such, it can be useful for preliminary screening of the potential biotreatability or inherent recalcitrance of hydrocarbon waste mixtures. 34 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Pollard, S.J.; Hrudey, S.E. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Fuhr, B.J.; Alex, R.F.; Holloway, L.R.; Tosto, F. (Oil Sands and Hydrocarbon Recovery Analytical Lab., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

1992-12-01

309

Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil by composting in biopiles.  

PubMed

Composting of contaminated soil in biopiles is an ex situ technology, where organic matter such as bark chips are added to contaminated soil as a bulking agent. Composting of lubricating oil-contaminated soil was performed in field scale ( [Formula: see text] m(3)) using bark chips as the bulking agent, and two commercially available mixed microbial inocula as well as the effect of the level of added nutrients (N,P,K) were tested. Composting of diesel oil-contaminated soil was also performed at one level of nutrient addition and with no inoculum. The mineral oil degradation rate was most rapid during the first months, and it followed a typical first order degradation curve. During 5 months, composting of the mineral oil decreased in all piles with lubrication oil from approximately 2400 to 700 mg (kg dry w)(-1), which was about 70% of the mineral oil content. Correspondingly, the mineral oil content in the pile with diesel oil-contaminated soil decreased with 71% from 700 to 200 mg (kg dry w)(-1). In this type of treatment with addition of a large amount of organic matter, the general microbial activity as measured by soil respiration was enhanced and no particular effect of added inocula was observed. PMID:15093002

Jørgensen, K S; Puustinen, J; Suortti, A M

2000-02-01

310

Three-dimensional modeling of subsurface contamination: A case study from the radio frequency-heating demonstration at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Computer based three-dimensional modeling is a powerful tool used for visualizing and interpreting environmental data collected at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Three-dimensional modeling was used to image and interpret subsurface spatial data, primarily, changes in the movement, the accumulation, and the depletion of contaminants at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS), a proving ground for experimental environmental remediation technologies. Three-dimensional models are also educational tools, relaying complex environmental data to interested non-technical individuals who may be unfamiliar with the concepts and terminology involved in environmental studies. The public can draw their own conclusions of the success of the experiments after viewing the three-dimensional images set up in a chronological order. The three-dimensional grids generated during these studies can also be used to create images for visualization and animated sequences that model contamination movement. Animation puts the images of contamination distribution in motion and results in a new perspective on the effects of the remedial demonstration.

Poppy, S.P. [South Carolina Univ., Aiken, SC (United States)]|[Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Jarosch, T.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-07-01

311

Bioremediation Of Groundwater Contaminated Wtih Gasoline Hydrocarbons And Oxygenates Using A Membrane-Based Reactor  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this study was to operate a novel, field-scale, aerobic bioreactor and assess its performance in the ex situ treatment of groundwater contaminated with gasoline from a leaking underground storage tank in Pascoag, RI. The groundwater contained elevated concentrat...

312

IN SITU APPARENT CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION DISTRIBUTION AT A HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

We investigated the bulk electrical conductivity and microbial population distribution in sediments at a site contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). The bulk conductivity was measured using in situ vertical resistivity probes, while the most probable number met...

313

Diffusion sampler for compound specific carbon isotope analysis of dissolved hydrocarbon contaminants.  

PubMed

Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) is widely utilized to study the fate of organic contaminants in groundwater. To date, however, no method is available to obtain CSIA samples at a fine (cm) spatial scale across the sediment-surface water interface (SWI), a key boundary for discharge of contaminated groundwater to surface water. Dissolved contaminants in such discharged zones undergo rapid temporal and spatial changes due to heterogeneity in redox conditions and microbial populations. The compatibility of a passive sediment pore water sampler ("peeper") to collect 40 mL samples for CSIA of benzene, toluene, monochlorobenzene, and 1,2-dichlorobenzene at field-relevant concentrations (0.1-5 mg L(-1)) was evaluated in laboratory experiments. Results demonstrate that physical diffusion across the polysulfone membrane does not alter the carbon isotope values (±0.5‰). Measured ?(13)C values also remain invariant despite significant adsorption of the compounds on the peeper material, an effect which increased with higher numbers of chlorine atoms and sorption coefficient (Koc) values. In addition, isotope equilibrium between the peeper chamber and the sediment pore water occurred in less than a day, indicating the peeper method can be used to provide samples for CSIA analysis at fine spatial and temporal sampling resolutions in contaminated sediments. PMID:25058598

Passeport, Elodie; Landis, Richard; Mundle, Scott O C; Chu, Katrina; Mack, E Erin; Lutz, Edward; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood

2014-08-19

314

Keratinolytic Fungi as Indicators of Hydrocarbon Contamination and Bioremediation Progress in a Petroleum Refinery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Keratinolytic fungi were examined in soil heavily contaminated with petroleum waste during long-term bioremediation in a biopile at the Czechowice Oil Refinery located in southern Poland. Soil chemistry and associated microbiological parameters were monitored for 39 months to assess the bioremediation process at this site. These fungi were found to occur relatively frequently in the biopile, with the geophilic derma-

K. Ulfig; G. P?aza; A. Worsztynowicz; T. Ma?ko; A. J. Tien; R. L. Brigmon

315

CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT RESULTING FROM MULTICOMPONENT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID POOL DISSOLUTION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL SUBSURFACE FORMATIONS (R823579)  

EPA Science Inventory

A semi-analytical method for simulating transient contaminant transport originating from the dissolution of multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) pools in three-dimensional, saturated, homogeneous porous media is presented. Each dissolved component may undergo first-order...

316

Enumeration and Characterization of Iron(III)Reducing Microbial Communities from Acidic Subsurface Sediments Contaminated with Uranium(VI)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fe(III)-reducing bacteria yielded cell counts of up to 240 cells ml1 for the contaminated and background sediments at both pHs with a range of different carbon sources (glycerol, acetate, lactate, and glucose). In enrichments where nitrate contamination was removed from the sediment by washing, MPN counts of Fe(III)- reducing bacteria increased substantially. Sediments of lower pH typically yielded lower counts

Lainie Petrie; Nadia N. North; Sherry L. Dollhopf; David L. Balkwill; Joel E. Kostka

2003-01-01

317

Identifying the sources of subsurface contamination at the Hanford Site in Washington using high-precision uranium isotopic measurements.  

PubMed

In the mid-1990s, a groundwater plume of uranium (U) was detected in monitoring wells in the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area at the Hanford Site in Washington. This area has been used since the late 1940s to store high-level radioactive waste and other products of U fuel-rod processing. Using multiple-collector ICP source magnetic sector mass spectrometry, high-precision uranium isotopic analyses were conducted of samples of vadose zone contamination and of groundwater. The isotope ratios 236U/238U, 234U/238U, and 238U/235U are used to distinguish contaminant sources. On the basis of the isotopic data, the source of the groundwater contamination appears to be related to a 1951 overflow event at tank BX-102 that spilled high-level U waste into the vadose zone. The U isotopic variation of the groundwater plume is a result of mixing between contaminant U from this spill and natural background U. Vadose zone U contamination at tank B-110 likely predates the recorded tank leak and can be ruled out as a significant source of groundwater contamination, based on the U isotopic composition. The locus of vadose zone contamination is displaced from the initial locus of groundwater contamination, indicating that lateral migration in the vadose zone was at least 8 times greater than vertical migration. The time evolution of the groundwater plume suggests an average U migration rate of approximately 0.7-0.8 m/day showing slight retardation relative to a groundwater flow of approximately 1 m/day. PMID:15260332

Christensen, John N; Dresel, P Evan; Conrad, Mark E; Maher, Kate; DePaolo, Donald J

2004-06-15

318

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

Strand, Stuart E.

2002-06-01

319

Characterization of novel polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dioxygenases from the bacterial metagenomic DNA of a contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (RHDs) play a crucial role in the biodegradation of a range of aromatic hydrocarbons found on polluted sites, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Current knowledge on RHDs comes essentially from studies on culturable bacterial strains, while compelling evidence indicates that pollutant removal is mostly achieved by uncultured species. In this study, a combination of DNA-SIP labeling and metagenomic sequence analysis was implemented to investigate the metabolic potential of main PAH degraders on a polluted site. Following in situ labeling using [(13)C]phenanthrene, the labeled metagenomic DNA was isolated from soil and subjected to shotgun sequencing. Most annotated sequences were predicted to belong to Betaproteobacteria, especially Rhodocyclaceae and Burkholderiales, which is consistent with previous findings showing that main PAH degraders on this site were affiliated to these taxa. Based on metagenomic data, four RHD gene sets were amplified and cloned from soil DNA. For each set, PCR yielded multiple amplicons with sequences differing by up to 321 nucleotides (17%), reflecting the great genetic diversity prevailing in soil. RHDs were successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli, but full activity required the coexpression of two electron carrier genes, also cloned from soil DNA. Remarkably, two RHDs exhibited much higher activity when associated with electron carriers from a sphingomonad. The four RHDs showed markedly different preferences for two- and three-ring PAHs but were poorly active on four-ring PAHs. Three RHDs preferentially hydroxylated phenanthrene on the C-1 and C-2 positions rather than on the C-3 and C-4 positions, suggesting that degradation occurred through an alternate pathway. PMID:25128340

Chemerys, Angelina; Pelletier, Eric; Cruaud, Corinne; Martin, Florence; Violet, Fabien; Jouanneau, Yves

2014-11-01

320

Impact of erosion and transfer processes in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon contamination of water bodies in the Seine River basin (France)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) reach problematic concentrations in water and sediment of numerous streams of the world. In the Seine River (France), they prevent to achieve the good chemical status enforced by European law. However, the provenance and the fate of PAHs found in rivers are still poorly understood. Here, we combined chemical and fallout radionuclide measurements conducted on a large number of suspended sediment (SS) (n = 231) and soil (n = 37) samples collected at 62 sites during an entire hydrological year. A model was developed to estimate mean PAH concentration in sediment from the population density in the drainage area and good relationships were found during both low stage and flood periods. Influence of human population also appeared to be stronger during the latter period. However, some discrepancies between measured and modeled PAH concentrations were observed and the role of the origin of SS was investigated. During the low flow period, the observed differences were explained by the provenance of river sediment (agricultural topsoil vs. eroded channel banks). Time-averaged PAH concentrations measured in suspended sediment collected in the catchments where erosion of agricultural topsoil dominated were systematically higher than the predicted values. On the contrary, in the catchments where erosion mainly occurred in deep soil or river embankment, the supply of particles protected from atmospheric fallout contamination led to measure concentrations below the predicted values. As this relationship between population density and SS contamination was no longer valid during the flood period, the role of transfer times was also investigated. The percentages of freshly eroded sediment in samples were determined by comparing the 7Be/210Pb ratio in rainfall and SS. An annual turn-over cycle of sediment was observed but no relationship was found between PAH contamination and residence times of particles within rivers. This result suggested that the impact of PAH exchanges between aqueous and particulate phases was negligible. Finally, results derived from PAH diagnostic ratios showed that the contamination signature vary between rural soil and urban signatures therefore suggesting that the temporal changes in riverine pollution mainly depend on the variations of contribution of both pools. More specifically, the low flow period is characterized by background signal provided by erosion and mainly driven by the origin of SS and the stocks accumulated in the vicinity of anthropogenic activities. During the flood period, an additional signal of contamination is provided by direct urban releases due to the increase in PAH emissions (household heating) and impervious surface leaching.

Gateuille, David; Evrard, Olivier; Moreau-Guigon, Elodie; Chevreuil, Marc; Mouchel, Jean-Marie

2014-05-01

321

Sandhopper Talitrus saltator (Montagu) as a bioindicator of contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.  

PubMed

This study evaluates the use of the sandhopper Talitrus saltator as a bioindicator of PAHs contamination of the supralittoral zone of sandy beaches. Adult amphipods were collected at eight localities on the Tuscany shore in summer. Concentrations of 16 PAHs indicated as priority pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency were determined. T. saltator is able to accumulate PAHs (total PAHs ranging from 0.75 to 62.1 ng g(-1)), with concentrations generally greater than in the sand (total PAHs ranging from 0.04 to 38 ng g(-1)). In particular, it accumulates Phe, Cry, and BbF. Preliminary laboratory tests indicate food as a possible route of PAHs intake by sandhoppers. Despite the need of further studies to clarify the variability of the PAH concentrations found in the substrata and in sandhoppers, T. saltator could be used as a bioindicator of PAHs contamination of the supralittoral zone of sandy shores. PMID:23014635

Ugolini, Alberto; Perra, Guido; Focardi, Silvano; Somigli, Silvia; Martellini, Tania; Cincinelli, Alessandra

2012-12-01

322

Geophysical Signatures of Microbial Activity at Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microorganisms participate in a variety of geologic processes that alter the chemical and physical properties of their environment.\\u000a Understanding the geophysical signatures of microbial activity in the environment has resulted in the development of a new\\u000a sub-discipline in geophysics called “biogeophysics”. This review focuses primarily on literature pertaining to biogeophysical\\u000a signatures of sites contaminated by light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL),

Estella A. Atekwana; Eliot A. Atekwana

2010-01-01

323

Relationship between heavy fuel oil phytotoxicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in Salicornia fragilis.  

PubMed

Greenhouse experiments were carried out to study the effects of heavy fuel oil contamination on the growth and the development of Salicornia fragilis Ball and Tutin, a salt-marsh edible species. Plants were sampled in spring at the "Aber du Conquet" (Finistère, France), and artificially exposed by coating shoot sections with N degrees 6 fuel oil or by mixing it in their substratum. The impact of petroleum on plant development was followed by phytotoxicity assessments and PAH shoots assays. The plants exhibited visual symptoms of stress, i.e. chlorosis, yellowing, growth reduction and perturbations in developmental parameters. The contamination of plants by shoot coating appeared to be less than through soil. Moreover, the increase of the degree of pollution induced more marked effects on plants, likely because of the physical effects of fuel. However, bioaccumulation of PAHs in shoot tissues was also found to be significant, even at very low levels of contamination, and highly related to the conditions of exposure to oil. The strong relationships between the PAH contents of Salicornia plants and growth reduction suggest a chemical toxicity of fuel oil, compounds like PAHs being known to inhibit physiological processes in plants. PMID:17493664

Meudec, Anna; Poupart, Nathalie; Dussauze, Jacques; Deslandes, Eric

2007-08-01

324

In vitro Mammalian mutagenicity of complex polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures in contaminated soils.  

PubMed

This study employed an in vitro version of the lacZ transgenic rodent mutation assay to assess the mutagenicity of nonpolar neutral and semipolar aromatic soil fractions from 10 PAH-contaminated sites, and evaluated the assumption of dose additivity that is routinely employed to calculate the risk posed by PAH mixtures. Significant mutagenic activity was detected in all nonpolar neutral fractions, and 8 of 10 semipolar aromatic fractions (nonpolar > semipolar). Mutagenic activity of synthetic PAH mixtures that mimic the PAH content of the soils (i.e., 5-PAH or 16-PAH mix) were greater than that of the PAH-containing soil fractions, with 5-PAH mix >16-PAH-mix. Predictions of mutagenic activity, calculated as the sum of the contributions from the mutagenic mixture components, were all within 2-fold of the observed activity of the nonpolar neutral fractions, with one exception. Observed differences in mutagenic activity are likely the result of dynamic metabolic processes, involving a complex interplay of AhR agonsim and saturation of metabolic machinery by competitive inhibition of mixture components. The presence of hitherto unidentified polar compounds present in PAH-contaminated soils may also contribute to overall hazard; however, these compounds are generally not included in current contaminated site risk assessment protocols. PMID:25419852

Lemieux, Christine L; Long, Alexandra S; Lambert, Iain B; Lundstedt, Staffan; Tysklind, Mats; White, Paul A

2015-02-01

325

INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched. The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

2003-09-01

326

Deep subsurface microbial processes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of other habitats, the study of deep subsurface microbiology is still in its infancy.

Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

1995-01-01

327

Microbial diversity, community composition and metabolic potential in hydrocarbon contaminated oily sludge: prospects for in situ bioremediation.  

PubMed

Microbial community composition and metabolic potential have been explored in petroleum-hydrocarbon-contaminated sludge of an oil storage facility. Culture-independent clone library-based 16S rRNA gene analyses revealed that the bacterial community within the sludge was dominated by the members of ?-Proteobacteria (35%), followed by Firmicutes (13%), ?-Proteobacteria (11%), Bacteroidetes (10%), Acidobacteria (6%), ?-Proteobacteria (3%), Lentisphaerae (2%), Spirochaetes (2%), and unclassified bacteria (5%), whereas the archaeal community was composed of Thermoprotei (54%), Methanocellales (33%), Methanosarcinales/Methanosaeta (8%) and Methanoculleus (1%) members. Methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA) gene (a functional biomarker) analyses also revealed predominance of hydrogenotrophic, methanogenic Archaea (Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales and Methanoculleus members) over acetoclastic methanogens (Methanosarcinales members). In order to explore the cultivable bacterial population, a total of 28 resident strains were identified and characterized in terms of their physiological and metabolic capabilities. Most of these could be taxonomically affiliated to the members of the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus, Micrococcus, Brachybacterium, Aerococcus, and Zimmermannella, while two strains were identified as Pseudomonas and Pseudoxanthomonas. Metabolic profiling exhibited that majority of these isolates were capable of growing in presence of a variety of petroleum hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon, tolerating different heavy metals at higher concentrations (?1 mM) and producing biosurfactant during growth. Many strains could grow under a wide range of pH, temperature, or salinity as well as under anaerobic conditions in the presence of different electron acceptors and donors in the growth medium. Correlation between the isolates and their metabolic properties was estimated by the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis. Overall observation indicated the presence of diverse groups of microorganisms including hydrocarbonoclastic, nitrate reducing, sulphate reducing, fermentative, syntrophic, methanogenic and methane-oxidizing bacteria and Archaea within the sludge community, which can be exploited for in situ bioremediation of the oily sludge. PMID:24682711

Das, Ranjit; Kazy, Sufia K

2014-06-01

328

Final Report Coupling in silico microbial models with reactive transport models to predict the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.  

SciTech Connect

This project successfully accomplished its goal of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with hydrological and geochemical models to predict the activity of subsurface microorganisms during uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated how this modeling approach can be used to develop new strategies to optimize bioremediation. The approach of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with reactive transport modeling is now well enough established that it has been adopted by other DOE investigators studying uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, the basic principles developed during our studies will be applicable to much broader investigations of microbial activities, not only for other types of bioremediation, but microbial metabolism in diversity of environments. This approach has the potential to make an important contribution to predicting the impact of environmental perturbations on the cycling of carbon and other biogeochemical cycles.

Lovley, Derek R.

2012-10-31

329

Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Evaluation of Residual Chromium Contamination in the Subsurface Soil at 100-C-7  

SciTech Connect

This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) provides the requirements for sample collection and laboratory analysis to evaluate the extent of hexavalent chromium contamination present in the soil below the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 remedial action waste site excavations.

W. S. Thompson

2007-02-15

330

Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation In Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects on Contaminant Fate and Transport (Project no. 99272)  

SciTech Connect

This project is aimed at understanding how contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media is impacted by precipitation and dissolution events through chemical interactions with precipitates and as a consequence of coupling between precipitation and flow. We hypothesize that precipitation/coprecipitation, encapsulation, isolation from flow and alteration of reactive surfaces will contribute to altering contaminant mobility during precipitation events, and that predicting the release of contaminants during precipitate dissolution requires an understanding of how precipitates are distributed and how contaminants are released from the different compartments over time. Using calcium carbonate as a model system, physical experiments and modeling at the pore-scale and continuum-scale will be used to improve the conceptual approach to predicting the impact of flow-precipitation coupling on solute migration. Column and 2-dimensional intermediate-scale experiments with constructed physical and chemical heterogeneities will be used to investigate the movement of fluids and reactive solutes during different types of mixing events that lead to calcium carbonate supersaturation and precipitation. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling will be used to simulate pore-scale mixing and precipitation in heterogeneous porous media and estimate continuum-scale parameters. Continuum-scale modeling will be used to test conceptual models and associated effective parameters that simulate the macroscopic behavior of the experimental domains.

Redden, G.D.; Fujita, Y.; Scheibe, T.D.; Tartakovsky, A.M.; Smith, R.W.; Reddy, M.M.; Kelly, S.D.

2006-04-05

331

STUDY TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF USING A GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR FOR MORE EFFECTIVE REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Remediation of hazardous material spills is often costly and entails cumbersome procedures. he traditional method is to drill core samples in the area where the contaminant is thought to be present and then analyze these samples in a laboratory. he denser the sampling grid, the m...

332

DEVELOPMENT OF RADON-222 AS A NATURAL TRACER FOR MONITORING THE REMEDIATION OF NAPL CONTAMINATION IN THE SUBSURFACE  

EPA Science Inventory

One of the major obstacles preventing cost-effective cleanup of many DOE sites is the current inability to accurately locate and quantify residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. The recently developed natural radon tracer method has the potential to provide a rapid...

333

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The research objectives for this report are: (1) Transform poplar and other tree species to extend and optimize chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) oxidative activities. (2) Determine the mechanisms of CHC oxidation in plants. (3) Isolate the genes responsible for CHC oxidation in plants. We have made significant progress toward an understanding of the biochemical mechanism of CHC transformation native to wild-type poplar. We have identified chloral, trichloroethanol, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid as products of TCE metabolism in poplar plants and in tissue cultures of poplar cells.(Newman et al. 1997; Newman et al. 1999) Use of radioactively labeled TCE showed that once taken up and transformed, most of the TCE was incorporated into plant tissue as a non-volatile, unextractable residue.(Shang et al. 2001; Shang and Gordon 2002) An assay for this transformation was developed and validated using TCE transformation by poplar suspension cells. Using this assay, it was shown that two different activities contribute to the fixation of TCE by poplar cells: one associated with cell walls and insoluble residues, the other associated with a high molecular weight, heat labile fraction of the cell extract, a fixation that was apparently catalyzed by plant enzymes.

Stuart Strand

2004-09-27

334

Phytoremediation of a petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated shallow aquifer in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A former bulk fuel terminal in North Carolina is a groundwater phytoremediation demonstration site where 3,250 hybrid poplars, willows, and pine trees were planted from 2006 to 2008 over approximately 579,000 L of residual gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. Since 2011, the groundwater altitude is lower in the area with trees than outside the planted area. Soil-gas analyses showed a 95 percent mass loss for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and a 99 percent mass loss for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). BTEX and methyl tert-butyl ether concentrations have decreased in groundwater. Interpolations of free-phase, fuel product gauging data show reduced thicknesses across the site and pooling of fuel product where poplar biomass is greatest. Isolated clusters of tree mortalities have persisted in areas with high TPH and BTEX mass. Toxicity assays showed impaired water use for willows and poplars exposed to the site's fuel product, but Populus survival was higher than the willows or pines on-site, even in a noncontaminated control area. All four Populus clones survived well at the site.

Nichols, Elizabeth Guthrie; Cook, Rachel L.; Landmeyer, James E.; Atkinson, Brad; Malone, Donald R.; Shaw, George; Woods, Leilani

2014-01-01

335

Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial community profile data and a nonparametric decision-making process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbial biodiversity in groundwater and soil presents a unique opportunity for improving characterization and monitoring at sites with multiple contaminants, yet few computational methods use or incorporate these data because of their high dimensionality and variability. We present a systematic, nonparametric decision-making methodology to help characterize a water quality gradient in leachate-contaminated groundwater using only microbiological data for input. The data-driven methodology is based on clustering a set of molecular genetic-based microbial community profiles. Microbes were sampled from groundwater monitoring wells located within and around an aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate. We modified a self-organizing map (SOM) to weight the input variables by their relative importance and provide statistical guidance for classifying sample similarities. The methodology includes the following steps: (1) preprocessing the microbial data into a smaller number of independent variables using principal component analysis, (2) clustering the resulting principal component (PC) scores using a modified SOM capable of weighting the input PC scores by the percent variance explained by each score, and (3) using a nonparametric statistic to guide selection of appropriate groupings for management purposes. In this landfill leachate application, the weighted SOM assembles the microbial community data from monitoring wells into groupings believed to represent a gradient of site contamination that could aid in characterization and long-term monitoring decisions. Groupings based solely on microbial classifications are consistent with classifications of water quality from hydrochemical information. These microbial community profile data and improved decision-making strategy compliment traditional chemical groundwater analyses for delineating spatial zones of groundwater contamination.

Pearce, Andrea R.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Mouser, Paula J.

2011-06-01

336

Influence of mature compost amendment on total and bioavailable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils.  

PubMed

A laboratory microcosm study was carried out to assess the influence of compost amendment on the degradation and bioavailability of PAHs in contaminated soils. Three soils, contaminated with diesel, coal ash and coal tar, respectively, were amended with two composts made from contrasting feedstock (green waste and predominantly meat waste) at two different rates (250 and 750 t ha(-1)) and incubated for 8 months. During this period the treatments were sampled for PAH analysis after 0, 3, 6 and 8 months. Total and bioavailable fractions were obtained by sequential ultrasonic solvent extraction and hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin extraction, respectively, and PAHs were identified and quantified by GC-MS. Bioavailability decrease due to sorption was only observed at the first 3 months in the diesel spiked soil. After 8 months, compost addition resulted in over 90% loss of total PAHs irrespective of soil types. Desorption and degradation contributed to 30% and 70%, respectively, of the PAH loss in the spiked soil, while PAH loss in the other two soils resulted from 40% enhanced desorption and 60% enhanced degradation. Compost type and application rates had little influence on PAH bioavailability, but higher PAH removal was observed at higher initial concentration during the early stage of incubation. The bioavailable fraction of PAH was inversely correlated to the number of benzene rings and the octanol-water partition coefficient. Further degradation was not likely after 8-month although over 30% of the residual PAHs were bioavailable, which highlighted the application of bioavailability concept during remediation activities. PMID:23141842

Wu, Guozhong; Kechavarzi, Cedric; Li, Xingang; Sui, Hong; Pollard, Simon J T; Coulon, Frédéric

2013-02-01

337

Influence of food supply and chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants on breeding success of bald eagles.  

PubMed

Food supply and contaminants were investigated as possible causes of low bald eagle productivity near a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill at Crofton on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Over a seven year period, 1992-1998, average productivity of five eagle territories situated south of the pulp mill at Crofton was significantly lower (0.43 young/occupied territory) than six territories north of the mill (1.04 young/occupied territory). A reference population of 32 territories located in Barkley Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island demonstrated intermediary mean productivity (0.75 young/occupied territory). Measures of prey biomass delivered to nests were lowest south of the mill, and correlated significantly with nesting success. On average, measures of energy delivered to nests and a parameter determined to be related to prey availability, adult nest attendance time, accounted for about 70% of variability in nest success. Contaminant concentrations, including pulp mill derived polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), as well as dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and calculated tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) were significantly greater in plasma samples of nestlings from south of the mill compared to the other two sites, but did not correlate significantly with individual nest success data. Nests south of the mill concentrate around Maple Bay, which appears to be a deposition area for contaminants transported by tides and currents from sources such as the pulp mill. Concentrations of DDE and PCBs in plasma of nestling eagles from south of the mill were less than the critical values estimated to affect production of young. For TEQs, there are no published critical values for plasma by which to compare our results. We conclude that less than adequate energy provisioning to nests, presumably related to low prey availability, was likely the main cause of poor nest success south of the mill site at Crofton. However, higher concentrations of both DDE and PCDD/F derived TEQs may have acted in concert with food stress to further reduce bald eagle productivity. PMID:12739860

Gill, Christopher E; Elliott, John E

2003-01-01

338

Alteromonas as a key agent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in crude oil-contaminated coastal sediment.  

PubMed

Following the 2007 oil spill in South Korean tidal flats, we sought to identify microbial players influencing the environmental fate of released polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Two years of monitoring showed that PAH concentrations in sediments declined substantially. Enrichment cultures were established using seawater and modified minimal media containing naphthalene as sole carbon source. The enriched microbial community was characterized by 16S rRNA-based DGGE profiling; sequencing selected bands indicated Alteromonas (among others) were active. Alteromonas sp. SN2 was isolated and was able to degrade naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene in laboratory-incubated microcosm assays. PCR-based analysis of DNA extracted from the sediments revealed naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) genes of only two bacterial groups: Alteromonas and Cycloclasticus, having gentisate and catechol metabolic pathways, respectively. However, reverse transcriptase PCR-based analysis of field-fixed mRNA revealed in situ expression of only the Alteromonas-associated NDO genes; in laboratory microcosms these NDO genes were markedly induced by naphthalene addition. Analysis by GC/MS showed that naphthalene in tidal-flat samples was metabolized predominantly via the gentisate pathway; this signature metabolite was detected (0.04 ?M) in contaminated field sediment. A quantitative PCR-based two-year data set monitoring Alteromonas-specific 16S rRNA genes and NDO transcripts in sea-tidal flat field samples showed that the abundance of bacteria related to strain SN2 during the winter season was 20-fold higher than in the summer season. Based on the above data, we conclude that strain SN2 and its relatives are site natives--key players in PAH degradation and adapted to winter conditions in these contaminated sea-tidal-flat sediments. PMID:22709320

Jin, Hyun Mi; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Lee, Hyo Jung; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

2012-07-17

339

Possible Causes of Decreasing Benzene Concentrations in an Oil-Contaminated Aquifer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crude oil contamination from a 1979 oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota resulted in a subsurface oil body and a dissolved hydrocarbon plume in the groundwater. Benzene concentrations in the plume adjacent to the oil decreased from nearly 5 mg\\/L in 1993 to less than 3 mg\\/L in 2007. Benzene depletion within the plume and oil body was investigated with a

D. Drennan; B. A. Bekins; E. Warren; M. J. Baedecker; R. P. Eganhouse

2010-01-01

340

Chemical oxidation treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated soil using Fenton`s reagent  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses the effectiveness of Fenton`s reagent to oxidize the constituents of petroleum products such as 2-methylnaphthalene and n-hexadecane in soils. Laboratory tests were conducted in 2.5 liter glass bottles at various pH levels and organic concentrations. The results showed that 2-methylnaphthalene was rapidly removed by Fenton`s reagent in soil matrix; however, n-hexadecane was removed at a slower rate. The natural organic content of the soil does not appear to affect the 2-methylnaphthalene destruction. Both contaminants showed higher reaction rates at pH 7 than at pH 2. The slower degradation of n-hexadecane may be due to the competition of natural organic compounds; therefore, alkanes may need additional hydrogen peroxide to be effectively oxidized.

Chen, T.C.; Tafuri, A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States); Rahman, M. [IT Corporation, Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31

341

Diversity and Distribution of Anaeromyxobacter Strains in a Uranium-Contaminated Subsurface Environment with a Nonuniform Groundwater Flow? †  

PubMed Central

Versaphilic Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strains implicated in hexavalent uranium reduction and immobilization are present in the fractured saprolite subsurface environment at the U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site near Oak Ridge, TN. To provide insight into the in situ distribution of Anaeromyxobacter strains in this system with a nonuniform groundwater flow, 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers and linear hybridization (TaqMan) probes were designed for Oak Ridge IFC Anaeromyxobacter isolates FRC-D1 and FRC-W, along with an Anaeromyxobacter genus-targeted probe and primer set. Multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (mqPCR) was applied to samples collected from Oak Ridge IFC site areas 1 and 3, which are not connected by the primary groundwater flow paths; however, transport between them through cross-plane fractures is hypothesized. Strain FRC-W accounted for more than 10% of the total quantifiable Anaeromyxobacter community in area 1 soils, while strain FRC-D1 was not detected. In FeOOH-amended enrichment cultures derived from area 1 site materials, strain FRC-D1 accounted for 30 to 90% of the total Anaeromyxobacter community, demonstrating that this strain was present in situ in area 1. The area 3 total Anaeromyxobacter abundance exceeded that of area 1 by 3 to 5 orders of magnitude, but neither strain FRC-W- nor FRC-D1-like sequences were quantifiable in any of the 33 area 3 groundwater or sediment samples tested. The Anaeromyxobacter community in area 3 increased from <105 cells/g sediment outside the ethanol biostimulation treatment zone to 108 cells/g sediment near the injection well, and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis revealed that representatives of a novel phylogenetic cluster dominated the area 3 Anaeromyxobacter community inside the treatment loop. The combined applications of genus- and strain-level mqPCR approaches along with clone libraries provided novel information on patterns of microbial variability within a bacterial group relevant to uranium bioremediation. PMID:19346346

Thomas, Sara H.; Padilla-Crespo, Elizabeth; Jardine, Phillip M.; Sanford, Robert A.; Löffler, Frank E.

2009-01-01

342

Diversity and distribution of anaeromyxobacter strains in a uranium-contaminated subsurface environment with a nonuniform groundwater flow.  

PubMed

Versaphilic Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strains implicated in hexavalent uranium reduction and immobilization are present in the fractured saprolite subsurface environment at the U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site near Oak Ridge, TN. To provide insight into the in situ distribution of Anaeromyxobacter strains in this system with a nonuniform groundwater flow, 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers and linear hybridization (TaqMan) probes were designed for Oak Ridge IFC Anaeromyxobacter isolates FRC-D1 and FRC-W, along with an Anaeromyxobacter genus-targeted probe and primer set. Multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (mqPCR) was applied to samples collected from Oak Ridge IFC site areas 1 and 3, which are not connected by the primary groundwater flow paths; however, transport between them through cross-plane fractures is hypothesized. Strain FRC-W accounted for more than 10% of the total quantifiable Anaeromyxobacter community in area 1 soils, while strain FRC-D1 was not detected. In FeOOH-amended enrichment cultures derived from area 1 site materials, strain FRC-D1 accounted for 30 to 90% of the total Anaeromyxobacter community, demonstrating that this strain was present in situ in area 1. The area 3 total Anaeromyxobacter abundance exceeded that of area 1 by 3 to 5 orders of magnitude, but neither strain FRC-W- nor FRC-D1-like sequences were quantifiable in any of the 33 area 3 groundwater or sediment samples tested. The Anaeromyxobacter community in area 3 increased from <10(5) cells/g sediment outside the ethanol biostimulation treatment zone to 10(8) cells/g sediment near the injection well, and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis revealed that representatives of a novel phylogenetic cluster dominated the area 3 Anaeromyxobacter community inside the treatment loop. The combined applications of genus- and strain-level mqPCR approaches along with clone libraries provided novel information on patterns of microbial variability within a bacterial group relevant to uranium bioremediation. PMID:19346346

Thomas, Sara H; Padilla-Crespo, Elizabeth; Jardine, Phillip M; Sanford, Robert A; Löffler, Frank E

2009-06-01

343

Linking specific heterotrophic bacterial populations to bioreduction of uranium and nitrate using stable isotope probing in contaminated subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect

Shifts in terminal electron-accepting processes during biostimulation of uranium-contaminated sediments were linked to the composition of stimulated microbial populations using DNA-based stable isotope probing. Nitrate reduction preceded U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction in [{sup 13}C]ethanol-amended microcosms. The predominant, active denitrifying microbial groups were identified as members of the Betaproteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria dominated under metal-reducing conditions.

Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kerkhof, Lee [Rutgers University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Watson, David B [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

2011-01-01

344

Pyrosequence analyses of bacterial communities during simulated in situ bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Barcoded amplicon pyrosequencing was used to generate libraries of partial 16S rRNA genes from two columns designed to simulate in situ bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in weathered, contaminated soil. Both columns received a continuous flow of artificial groundwater but one of the columns additionally tested the impact of biostimulation with oxygen and inorganic nutrients on indigenous soil bacterial communities. The penetration of oxygen to previously anoxic regions of the columns resulted in the most significant community changes. PAH-degrading bacteria previously determined by stable-isotope probing (SIP) of the untreated soil generally responded negatively to the treatment conditions, with only members of the Acidovorax and a group of uncharacterized PAH-degrading Gammaproteobacteria maintaining a significant presence in the columns. Additional groups of sequences associated with the Betaproteobacterial family Rhodocyclaceae (including those associated with PAH degradation in other soils), and the Thiobacillus, Thermomonas, and Bradyrhizobium genera were also present in high abundance in the biostimulated column. Similar community responses were previously observed during biostimulated ex situ treatment of the same soil in aerobic, slurry-phase bioreactors. While the low relative abundance of many SIP-determined groups in the column libraries may be a reflection of the slow removal of PAHs in that system, the similar response of known PAH degraders in a higher-rate bioreactor system suggests that alternative PAH-degrading bacteria, unidentified by SIP of the untreated soil, may also be enriched in engineered systems. PMID:23132343

Singleton, David R; Jones, Maiysha D; Richardson, Stephen D; Aitken, Michael D

2013-09-01

345

Combination of biochar amendment and mycoremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons immobilization and biodegradation in creosote-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Soils impregnated with creosote contain high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). To bioremediate these soils and avoid PAH spread, different bioremediation strategies were tested, based on natural attenuation, biochar application, wheat straw biostimulation, Pleurotus ostreatus mycoremediation, and the novel sequential application of biochar for 21 days and P. ostreatus 21 days more. Soil was sampled after 21 and 42 days after the remediation application. The efficiency and effectiveness of each remediation treatment were assessed according to PAH degradation and immobilization, fungal and bacterial development, soil eco-toxicity and legal considerations. Natural attenuation and biochar treatments did not achieve adequate PAH removal and soil eco-toxicity reduction. Biostimulation showed the highest bacterial development but low PAH degradation rate. Mycoremediation achieved the best PAH degradation rate and the lowest bioavailable fraction and soil eco-toxicity. This bioremediation strategy achieved PAH concentrations below Spanish legislation for contaminated soils (RD 9/2005). Sequential application of biochar and P. ostreatus was the second treatment most effective for PAH biodegradation and immobilization. However, the activity of P. ostreatus was increased by previous biochar application and PAH degradation efficiency was increased. Therefore, the combined strategy for PAH degradation have high potential to increase remediation efficiency. PMID:25506817

García-Delgado, Carlos; Alfaro-Barta, Irene; Eymar, Enrique

2015-03-21

346

Contamination of Runoff Water at Gda?sk Airport (Poland) by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)  

PubMed Central

Airport runoff can contain high concentrations of various pollutants, in particular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), the environmental levels of which have to be monitored. Airport runoff water samples, collected at the Gda?sk-R?biechowo Airport from 2008 to 2009, were analysed for PAHs and PCBs by gas chromatography. The aromatic fractions were separated by liquid-liquid extraction and analysed by GC/MS. Total PAH concentrations were 295–6,758 ng/L in 2008 and 180–1,924 ng/L in 2009, while total PCB levels in 2008 ranged from 0.14 to 0.44 ?g/L and in 2009 from 0.06 to 0.23 ?g/L. The PAH and PCB compositions in airport runoff waters were examined over a range of spatial and temporal scales to determine distributions, trends and possible sources. This pollution is mainly pyrolytic and related to anthropogenic activity. There were significant differences between the samples collected in the two seasons. An understanding of the magnitude of contamination due to airport runoff water is important for the effective management of airport infrastructure. PMID:22247699

Sulej, Anna Maria; Polkowska, ?aneta; Namie?nik, Jacek

2011-01-01

347

Mitogen induced proliferative responses of lymphocytes from spot (Leiostomus xanthurus) exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated environments  

SciTech Connect

The marine fish spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, was collected from five sites in the lower Chesapeake Bay system representing a gradient of sediment polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations. The proliferative responses to mitogens by anterior kidney lymphocytes were assessed using (3H)-thymidine uptake by replicating DNA. The data show two different mitogen-dependent lymphocytic responses as the sediment PAH levels increase at the sampling sites; a suppression of the response to the T cell mitogens, concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohemagglutinin, and a sharp augmentation of the response to B cell mitogen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as well as to poke weed mitogen and peanut agglutinin. The magnitude of the lymphoproliferative responses correlated strongly with the total sediment PAH concentrations (r2 greater than 0.8). A similar correlation was also observed with 15 selected individual PAH compounds regardless of their molecular weights. By maintaining the fish in clean York River water for up to 24 weeks, it was possible to reverse the augmented proliferative responses to LPS of fish from all sampling sites and to increase the reduced responses to Con A, in fish from three sites, and partially in two sites where sediments were highly contaminated with PAH. These results suggest that the proliferative responses of fish lymphocytes to mitogens may be a potentially sensitive biomarker of exposure to, and effects of xenobiotics.

Faisal, M.; Marzouk, M.S.; Smith, C.L.; Huggett, R.J. (Virginia Institute of Marine Science, School of Marine Science, College of William Mary, Gloucester Point (United States))

1991-01-01

348

Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an aged coal tar contaminated soil under in-vessel composting conditions.  

PubMed

In-vessel composting of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in contaminated soil from a manufactured gas plant site was investigated over 98 days using laboratory-scale in-vessel composting reactors. The composting reactors were operated at 18 different operational conditions using a 3-factor factorial design with three temperatures (T, 38 degrees C, 55 degrees C and 70 degrees C), four soil to green waste ratios (S:GW, 0.6:1, 0.7:1, 0.8:1 and 0.9:1 on a dry weight basis) and three moisture contents (MC, 40%, 60% and 80%). PAH losses followed first order kinetics reaching 0.015 day(-1) at optimal operational conditions. A factor analysis of the 18 different operational conditions under investigation indicated that the optimal operational conditions for degradation of PAHs occurred at MC 60%, S:GW 0.8:1 and T 38 degrees C. Thus, it is recommended to maintain operational conditions during in-vessel composting of PAH-solid waste close to these values. PMID:16246473

Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca; Lopez-Real, Joe; Beck, Angus James

2006-06-01

349

Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils: comparison of biosolids addition, carbon supplementation, and monitored natural attenuation.  

PubMed

Two methods of biostimulation were compared in a laboratory incubation study with monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) degradation in diesel-contaminated Tarpley clay soil with low carbon content. One method utilized rapid-release inorganic fertilizers rich in N and P, and the other used sterilized, slow-release biosolids, which added C in addition to N and P. After 8 weeks of incubation, both biostimulation methods degraded approximately 96% of TPH compared to MNA, which degraded 93.8%. However, in the first week of incubation, biosolids-amended soils showed a linear two orders of magnitude increase in microbial population compared to MNA, whereas, in the fertilizer-amended soils, only a one order of magnitude increase was noted. In the following weeks, microbial population in the fertilizer-amended soils dropped appreciably, suggesting a toxic effect owing to fertilizer-induced acidity and/or NH(3) overdosing. Results suggest that biosolids addition is a more effective soil amendment method for biostimulation than the commonly practiced inorganic fertilizer application, because of the abilities of biosolids to supplement carbon. No statistically significant difference was observed between the biostimulation methods and MNA, suggesting that MNA can be a viable remediation strategy in certain soils with high native microbial population. PMID:15809120

Sarkar, Dibyendu; Ferguson, Michael; Datta, Rupali; Birnbaum, Stuart

2005-07-01

350

Characterization of hydrocarbon-degrading and biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas sp. P-1 strain as a potential tool for bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

The Pseudomonas sp. P-1 strain, isolated from heavily petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, was investigated for its capability to degrade hydrocarbons and produce a biosurfactant. The strain degraded crude oil, fractions A5 and P3 of crude oil, and hexadecane (27, 39, 27 and 13% of hydrocarbons added to culture medium were degraded, respectively) but had no ability to degrade phenanthrene. Additionally, the presence of gene-encoding enzymes responsible for the degradation of alkanes and naphthalene in the genome of the P-1 strain was reported. Positive results of blood agar and methylene blue agar tests, as well as the presence of gene rhl, involved in the biosynthesis of rhamnolipid, confirmed the ability of P-1 for synthesis of glycolipid biosurfactant. 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectrum and mass spectrum analyses indicated that the extracted biosurfactant was affiliated with rhamnolipid. The results of this study indicate that the P-1 and/or biosurfactant produced by this strain have the potential to be used in bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. PMID:24743958

Pacwa-P?ociniczak, Magdalena; P?aza, Gra?yna Anna; Poliwoda, Anna; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

2014-08-01

351

Functional Diversity and Electron Donor Dependence of Microbial Populations Capable of U(VI) Reduction in Radionuclide-Contaminated Subsurface Sediments?  

PubMed Central

In order to elucidate the potential mechanisms of U(VI) reduction for the optimization of bioremediation strategies, the structure-function relationships of microbial communities were investigated in microcosms of subsurface materials cocontaminated with radionuclides and nitrate. A polyphasic approach was used to assess the functional diversity of microbial populations likely to catalyze electron flow under conditions proposed for in situ uranium bioremediation. The addition of ethanol and glucose as supplemental electron donors stimulated microbial nitrate and Fe(III) reduction as the predominant terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs). U(VI), Fe(III), and sulfate reduction overlapped in the glucose treatment, whereas U(VI) reduction was concurrent with sulfate reduction but preceded Fe(III) reduction in the ethanol treatments. Phyllosilicate clays were shown to be the major source of Fe(III) for microbial respiration by using variable-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy. Nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) were abundant throughout the shifts in TEAPs observed in biostimulated microcosms and were affiliated with the genera Geobacter, Tolumonas, Clostridium, Arthrobacter, Dechloromonas, and Pseudomonas. Up to two orders of magnitude higher counts of FeRB and enhanced U(VI) removal were observed in ethanol-amended treatments compared to the results in glucose-amended treatments. Quantification of citrate synthase (gltA) levels demonstrated a stimulation of Geobacteraceae activity during metal reduction in carbon-amended microcosms, with the highest expression observed in the glucose treatment. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the active FeRB share high sequence identity with Geobacteraceae members cultivated from contaminated subsurface environments. Our results show that the functional diversity of populations capable of U(VI) reduction is dependent upon the choice of electron donor. PMID:18378664

Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kerkhof, Lee; Stucki, Joseph W.; Anastácio, Alexandre S.; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Küsel, Kirsten; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Watson, David B.; Kostka, Joel E.

2008-01-01

352

Accumulation and degradation of dead-end metabolites during treatment of soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with five strains of white-rot fungi  

Microsoft Academic Search

The white-rot fungi Trametes versicolor PRL 572, Trametes versicolor MUCL 28407, Pleurotus ostreatus MUCL 29527, Pleurotus sajor-caju MUCL 29757 and Phanerochaete chrysosporium DSM 1556 were investigated for their ability to degrade the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) anthracene, benz[a]anthracene and dibenz[a,h]anthracene in soil. The fungi were grown on wheat straw and mixed with artificially contaminated soil. The results of this\\u000a study

B. E. Andersson; T. Henrysson

1996-01-01

353

Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and Their Metabolites in Blood, Feces, and Urine of Rats Orally Exposed to PAH Contaminated Soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) have become an ubiquitous upper soil component as a consequence of industrialization\\u000a involving a multitude of combustion processes. Ingestion of PAH contaminated soil is considered to be a major exposure route,\\u000a specifically for small children living on these soils. Health risk assessment is based on extrapolations from data obtained\\u000a via studies performed with pure chemicals.

F. J. van Schooten; E. J. C. Moonen; L. van der Wal; J. C. S. Kleinjans

1997-01-01

354

Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000  

SciTech Connect

The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites.

McLachlan, John A.

2000-09-14

355

Emerging organic contaminants in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands: influence of media size, loading frequency and use of active aeration.  

PubMed

Four side-by-side pilot-scale vertical flow (VF) constructed wetlands of different designs were evaluated for the removal of eight widely used emerging organic contaminants from municipal wastewater (i.e. ibuprofen, acetaminophen, diclofenac, tonalide, oxybenzone, triclosan, ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A). Three of the systems were free-draining, with one containing a gravel substrate (VGp), while the other two contained sand substrate (VS1p and VS2p). The fourth system had a saturated gravel substrate and active aeration supplied across the bottom of the bed (VAp). All beds were pulse-loaded on an hourly basis, except VS2p, which was pulse-loaded every 2h. Each system had a surface area of 6.2m(2), received a hydraulic loading rate of 95 mm/day and was planted with Phragmites australis. The beds received an organic loading rate of 7-16 gTOC/m(2)d. The sand-based VF (VS1p) performed significantly better (p<0.05) than the gravel-based wetland (VGp) both in the removal of conventional water quality parameters (TSS, TOC, NH4-N) and studied emerging organic contaminants except for diclofenac (85 ± 17% vs. 74 ± 15% average emerging organic contaminant removal for VS1p and VGp, respectively). Although loading frequency (hourly vs. bi-hourly) was not observed to affect the removal efficiency of the cited conventional water quality parameters, significantly lower removal efficiencies were found for tonalide and bisphenol A for the VF wetland that received bi-hourly dosing (VS2p) (higher volume per pulse), probably due to the more reducing conditions observed in that system. However, diclofenac was the only contaminant showing an opposite trend to the rest of the compounds, achieving higher elimination rates in the wetlands that exhibited less-oxidizing conditions (VS2p and VGp). The use of active aeration in the saturated gravel bed (VAp) generally improved the treatment performance compared to the free-draining gravel bed (VGp) and achieved a similar performance to the free-draining sand-based VF wetlands (VS1p). PMID:25046612

Avila, Cristina; Nivala, Jaime; Olsson, Linda; Kassa, Kinfe; Headley, Tom; Mueller, Roland A; Bayona, Josep Maria; García, Joan

2014-10-01

356

Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Natural selection in highly radioactive waste sites may yield bacteria with favorable bioremediating characteristics. However, until recently the microbial ecology of such environments has remained unexplored because of the high costs and technical complexities associated with extracting and characterizing samples from such sites. We have examined the bacterial ecology within radioactive sediments from a high-level nuclear waste plume in the vadose zone on the DOE?s Hanford Site in south-central Washington state (Fredrickson et al, 2004). Manganese-dependent, radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from this contaminated site including the highly Mn-dependent Deinococcus and Arthrobacter spp.

Daly, Michael J.

2005-06-01

357

Uranium biomineralization as a result of bacterial phosphatase activity: insights from bacterial isolates from a contaminated subsurface.  

PubMed

Uranium contamination is an environmental concern at the Department of Energy's Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In this study, we investigated whether phosphate biomineralization, or the aerobic precipitation of U(VI)-phosphate phases facilitated by the enzymatic activities of microorganisms, offers an alternative to the more extensively studied anaerobic U(VI) bioreduction. Three heterotrophic bacteria isolated from FRC soils were studied for their ability to grow and liberate phosphate in the presence of U(VI) and an organophosphate between pH 4.5 and 7.0. The objectives were to determine whether the strains hydrolyzed sufficient phosphate to precipitate uranium, to determine whether low pH might have an effect on U(VI) precipitation, and to identify the uranium solid phase formed during biomineralization. Two bacterial strains hydrolyzed sufficient organophosphate to precipitate 7395% total uranium after 120 h of incubation in simulated groundwater. The highest rates of uranium precipitation and phosphatase activity were observed between pH 5.0 and 7.0. EXAFS spectra identified the uranyl phosphate precipitate as an autunite/meta-autunite group mineral. The results of this study indicate that aerobic heterotrophic bacteria within a uranium-contaminated environment that can hydrolyze organophosphate, especially in low pH conditions, may play an important role in the bioremediation of uranium. PMID:17874776

Beazley, Melanie J; Martinez, Robert J; Sobecky, Patricia A; Webb, Samuel M; Taillefert, Martial

2007-08-15

358

Uranium Biomineralization As a Result of Bacterial Phosphatase Activity: Insights From Bacterial Isolates From a Contaminated Subsurface  

SciTech Connect

Uranium contamination is an environmental concern at the Department of Energy's Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In this study, we investigated whether phosphate biomineralization, or the aerobic precipitation of U(VI)-phosphate phases facilitated by the enzymatic activities of microorganisms, offers an alternative to the more extensively studied anaerobic U(VI) bioreduction. Three heterotrophic bacteria isolated from FRC soils were studied for their ability to grow and liberate phosphate in the presence of U(VI) and an organophosphate between pH 4.5 and 7.0. The objectives were to determine whether the strains hydrolyzed sufficient phosphate to precipitate uranium, to determine whether low pH might have an effect on U(VI) precipitation, and to identify the uranium solid phase formed during biomineralization. Two bacterial strains hydrolyzed sufficient organophosphate to precipitate 73-95% total uranium after 120 h of incubation in simulated groundwater. The highest rates of uranium precipitation and phosphatase activity were observed between pH 5.0 and 7.0. EXAFS spectra identified the uranyl phosphate precipitate as an autunite/meta-autunite group mineral. The results of this study indicate that aerobic heterotrophic bacteria within a uranium-contaminated environment that can hydrolyze organophosphate, especially in low pH conditions, may play an important role in the bioremediation of uranium.

Beazley, M.J.; Martinez, R.J.; Sobecky, P.A.; Webb, S.M.; Taillefert, M.; /Georgia Tech /SLAC, SSRL

2007-10-31

359

Environmental projects. Volume 5, part 1: Study of subsurface contamination. Part 2: Guide to implement environmental compliance programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In support of the national goal for the preservation of the environment and the protection of human health and safety, NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex have adopted the position that their operating installations shall maintain a high level of compliance in regard to regulations concerning environmental hazards. An investigation carried out by Engineering Science, Inc. focused on possible underground contamination that may have resulted from leaks and/or spills from storage facilities at the Goldstone Communications Complex. It also involved the cleanup of a non-hazardous waste dumpsite at the Mojave Base Site at the Goldstone complex. The report also includes details of the management duties and responsibilities needed to maintain compliance with environmental laws and regulations.

Bengelsdorf, I.

1988-01-01

360

Role of natural attenuation, phytoremediation and hybrid technologies in the remediation of a refinery soil with old/recent petroleum hydrocarbons contamination.  

PubMed

Within a search for a biological remediation technology to remove petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) from a contaminated soil from a refinery, the potential of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) was compared with the use of transplants of Cortaderia selloana both in the absence and in the presence of soil amendments. After 31 months of experiments, MNA was effective in removing most of the recent PHC contamination (50% of the initial total contamination) at 5-20 cm depth. The presence of weathered contamination explains the existence of an established community of PHC degraders, as can be inferred by the most probable number technique. C. selloana, in its turn, showed capacity to mobilize the most recalcitrant fraction of PHC to its roots, nevertheless masking its remediation capacity. The use of a hybrid technology (C. selloana together with treatments with a surfactant and a bioaugmentation product) improved the removal of PHC at 15-20 cm depth, the presence of C. selloana facilitating the migration of additives into the deeper layers of soil, which can be considered a secondary but positive role of the plant. In the surface soil layer, which was exposed to both microorganisms and the atmosphere, a further 20% of weathered PHC contamination disappeared (70% total removal) as a result of photo- and chemical degradation. Periodic revolving of the soil, like tillage, to expose all the contaminated soil to the atmosphere will therefore be a reliable option for reducing the contamination of the refinery soil if conditions (space and equipment) permit this operation. PMID:23240204

Couto, Maria Nazaré P F S; Pinto, Dorabela; Basto, M Clara P; Vasconcelos, Teresa S D

2012-09-01

361

Succession of Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Metabolic Community Characteristics during In Vitro Bioslurry Treatment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Sediments  

PubMed Central

Dredged harbor sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was removed from the Milwaukee Confined Disposal Facility and examined for in situ biodegradative capacity. Molecular techniques were used to determine the successional characteristics of the indigenous microbiota during a 4-month bioslurry evaluation. Ester-linked phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), multiplex PCR of targeted genes, and radiorespirometry techniques were used to define in situ microbial phenotypic, genotypic, and metabolic responses, respectively. Soxhlet extractions revealed a loss in total PAH concentrations of 52%. Individual PAHs showed reductions as great as 75% (i.e., acenapthene and fluorene). Rates of 14C-PAH mineralization (percent/day) were greatest for phenanthrene, followed by pyrene and then chrysene. There was no mineralization capacity for benzo[a]pyrene. Ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid analysis revealed a threefold increase in total microbial biomass and a dynamic microbial community composition that showed a strong correlation with observed changes in the PAH chemistry (canonical r2 of 0.999). Nucleic acid analyses showed copies of genes encoding PAH-degrading enzymes (extradiol dioxygenases, hydroxylases, and meta-cleavage enzymes) to increase by as much as 4 orders of magnitude. Shifts in gene copy numbers showed strong correlations with shifts in specific subsets of the extant microbial community. Specifically, declines in the concentrations of three-ring PAH moieties (i.e., phenanthrene) correlated with PLFA indicative of certain gram-negative bacteria (i.e., Rhodococcus spp. and/or actinomycetes) and genes encoding for naphthalene-, biphenyl-, and catechol-2,3-dioxygenase degradative enzymes. The results of this study suggest that the intrinsic biodegradative potential of an environmental site can be derived from the polyphasic characterization of the in situ microbial community. PMID:11282603

Ringelberg, David B.; Talley, Jeffrey W.; Perkins, Edward J.; Tucker, Samuel G.; Luthy, Richard G.; Bouwer, Edward J.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.

2001-01-01

362

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in sediments of the Upper Scheldt River Basin: contamination levels and source apportionment.  

PubMed

The Scheldt River system is located in northern France, Belgium and the Netherlands and includes a dense network of rivers, which contributed to the urban and industrial development in this area. Three sediment cores, collected in the Upper Scheldt River (Helkijn) and two of its tributaries (the Lys River at Wervik and the Espierre Canal), were analysed for n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Total n-alkane and PAH concentrations in all the sampled cores ranged from 2.8 to 29 mg kg(-1) and from 4.9 to 96 mg kg(-1), respectively. The contributions of biogenic, petrogenic and pyrolytic sources were investigated using n-alkane indexes and PAH diagnostic ratios. n-alkane chromatograms were characterized by the predominance of odd over even long chain n-alkanes (produced by terrestrial plants) and by the occurrence of a broad unresolved complex mixture (UCM) which evidenced biodegraded petroleum residues. For the three studied cores, correlations between the concentrations of UCM and n-alkanes (both expressed on an organic carbon basis) indicated a common origin or similar pathways of these allochtonous compounds to the aquatic environment. Wervik sediments were distinguished by higher n-alkane concentrations and by a major aquatic biogenic source for low molecular weight n-alkanes. The prevalence of combustion-derived PAHs was indicated by the high contribution of four, five and six rings compounds and was confirmed by isomer ratios. Higher levels of low molecular weight PAHs in Helkijn surface sediments suggested modest petrogenic inputs in this navigable canal. High PAH concentrations in Espierre sediments could be explained by a major historical contamination from urban and industrial emissions. PMID:19436869

Charriau, Adeline; Bodineau, Laurent; Ouddane, Baghdad; Fischer, Jean-Claude

2009-05-01

363

MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF THE SUBSURFACE AT AN ABANDONED CREOSOTE WASTE SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

The microbial ecology of pristine, slightly contaminated, and heavily contaminated subsurface materials, and four subsurface materials on the periphery of the plume at an abandoned creosote waste site was investigated. xcept for the unsaturated zone of the heavily contaminated ma...

364

MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF THE SUBSURFACE AT AN ABANDONED CREOSOTE WASTE SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

The microbial ecology of pristine, slightly contaminated, and heavily contaminated subsurface materials, and four subsurface materials on the periphery of the plume at an abandoned creosote waste site was investigated. Except for the unsaturated zone of the heavily contaminated m...

365

Three-dimensional model for subsurface transport and biodegradation  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes and demonstrates a numerical model for subsurface solute transport with aerobic and sequential anaerobic biodegradation. The model can depict multiple constituents in a three-dimensional (3D), anisotropic, heterogeneous domain. Hydrocarbon contaminants are simulated as electron donors for microbial growth, and available electron acceptors (EAs) may be utilized simultaneously or in the following sequence: O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Mn(IV), Fe(III), SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and CO{sub 2}. The model can account for Mn(II), Fe(II), H{sub w}S, CH{sub 4}, and a user-defined nitrogenous compound as products of biodegradation. Biodegradation of each hydrocarbon substrate follows Monod kinetics, modified to include the effects of EA and nutrient availability. Inhibition functions allow any EA to inhibit the utilization of all other EAs that provide less energy to the microbes. Microbial biomass is conceptualized as scattered microcolonies attached to the porous medium. The model assumes that interphase diffusion limitations to microbial growth are negligible and no geometrical parameters are assigned to the colonies. The behavior of the model was demonstrated using simple, hypothetical test cases. Transport of a biodegradable hydrocarbon was compared to a nonbiodegradable tracer in a 3D, hypothetical domain. Anaerobic biodecay significantly reduced predicted contaminant concentrations and travel distance. Biodegradation of the total contaminant mass depends on EA availability and did not follow first-order kinetics.

Waddill, D.W. [Anderson and Associates, Inc., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Widdowson, M.A. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-04-01

366

Reproductive success and chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination in tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) nesting along rivers receiving pulp and paper mill effluent discharges.  

PubMed

The insectivorous tree swallow was chosen as an indicator species to investigate the uptake of pulp mill-related chlorinated hydrocarbons from emergent aquatic insects. Nest box populations were monitored for reproductive success at locations upstream and downstream of pulp mills on two river systems in British Columbia, Canada. Also, 16-day-old nestlings were collected and analysed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), pesticides, chlorophenols and chloroguaiacols. Most reproductive parameters were not different between populations at upstream and downstream locations, and were equivalent to or greater than those recorded for other tree swallow populations. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of nestlings was low at all sites. The highest tissue concentrations were detected downstream of pulp mills on the Fraser River, where PCDD and PCDF patterns along with the presence of pentachlorophenol (PCP) suggested that the primary source of contaminants was past use of PCP for timber preservation. Although the absolute tissue concentration of contaminants was less, the toxic concentration (as estimated with I-TEQs) was greatest in nestlings downstream of a pulp mill on the Thompson River. The proportionately larger contributions from 2,3,7,8-TCDF and PCB-77 elevated these TEQs in comparison to other populations. Nest success was the one reproductive measure that showed substantial reductions in downstream populations on both rivers; however, there was little indication that nest failures were the direct result of contamination. Failures were largely due to parental abandonment, and, while poor parental attentiveness and nest abandonment have been associated with chlorinated hydrocarbon tissue concentrations in other studies, our 1-year assessment was insufficient to establish any link with pulp mill effluent exposure. Nestling growth models showed some subtle differences in growth patterns between nest box populations on the two rivers, but an association with pulp mill effects on aquatic insect prey availability was not established. PMID:15092845

Harris, M L; Elliott, J E

2000-11-01

367

Halomonas sulfidaeris-dominated microbial community inhabits a 1.8?km-deep subsurface Cambrian Sandstone reservoir.  

PubMed

A low-diversity microbial community, dominated by the ?-proteobacterium Halomonas sulfidaeris, was detected in samples of warm saline formation porewater collected from the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone in the Illinois Basin of the North American Midcontinent (1.8?km/5872?ft burial depth, 50°C, pH?8, 181 bars pressure). These highly porous and permeable quartz arenite sandstones are directly analogous to reservoirs around the world targeted for large-scale hydrocarbon extraction, as well as subsurface gas and carbon storage. A new downhole low-contamination subsurface sampling probe was used to collect in situ formation water samples for microbial environmental metagenomic analyses. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that this H.?sulfidaeris-dominated subsurface microbial community is indigenous and not derived from drilling mud microbial contamination. Data to support this includes V1-V3 pyrosequencing of formation water and drilling mud, as well as comparison with previously published microbial analyses of drilling muds in other sites. Metabolic pathway reconstruction, constrained by the geology, geochemistry and present-day environmental conditions of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, implies that H.?sulfidaeris-dominated subsurface microbial community may utilize iron and nitrogen metabolisms and extensively recycle indigenous nutrients and substrates. The presence of aromatic compound metabolic pathways suggests this microbial community can readily adapt to and survive subsurface hydrocarbon migration. PMID:24238218

Dong, Yiran; Kumar, Charu Gupta; Chia, Nicholas; Kim, Pan-Jun; Miller, Philip A; Price, Nathan D; Cann, Isaac K O; Flynn, Theodore M; Sanford, Robert A; Krapac, Ivan G; Locke, Randall A; Hong, Pei-Ying; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Liu, Wen-Tso; Mackie, Roderick I; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Wright, Chris L; Mikel, Mark A; Walker, Jared L; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Yannarell, Anthony C; Fouke, Bruce W

2014-06-01

368

In vitro evaluation of germination and growth of five plant species on medium supplemented with hydrocarbons associated with contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of a hydrocarbon mixture (HCM) of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Maya crude oil on germination, growth and survival of four grasses (Bouteloua curtipendula, Cenchrus ciliaris, Echinochloa crusgalli and Rhynchelytrum repens) was studied and compared to a control (Festuca arundinacea) under in vitro conditions. The species were cultured on MS medium with different HCM initial concentrations. Germination

L. Reynoso-Cuevas; M. E. Gallegos-Martínez; F. Cruz-Sosa; M. Gutiérrez-Rojas

2008-01-01

369

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in sediments of the Upper Scheldt River Basin: contamination levels and source apportionment  

E-print Network

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in sediments of the Upper Scheldt River Basin River at Wervik and the Espierre Canal), were analysed for n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Total n-alkane and PAH concentrations in all the sampled cores ranged from 2.8 to 29 mg kg

Boyer, Edmond

370

Investigation of the impacts of ethyl lactate based Fenton treatment on soil quality for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils.  

PubMed

This study aims to investigate the impacts of ethyl lactate (EL) based Fenton treatment on soil quality for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils. Accumulation of oxygenated-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) was observed, but quantitative measurement on the most abundant compound 9,10-anthraquinone (ATQ) showed lower accumulation of the compound than that reported for ethanol (ET) based Fenton treatment. In general, as compared to conventional water (CW) based Fenton treatment, the EL based Fenton treatment exerted either a lower or higher negative impact on soil physicochemical properties depending on the property type and shared the main disadvantage of reduced soil pH. For revegetation, EL based Fenton treatment was most appropriately adopted for soil with native pH >/~ 6.2 in order to obtain a final soil pH >/~ 4.9 subject to the soil buffering capacity. PMID:24121640

Gan, Suyin; Yap, Chiew Lin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Venny

2013-11-15

371

Benthic foraminifera as tools in interpretation of subsurface hydrocarbon fluid flow at Veslemøy High and Hola-Vesterålen areas of the Barents Sea.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Relatively few studies have focused on high-latitude benthic foraminifera related to hydrocarbon seeps. In this study, we present micropaleontological data from 8 gravity cores from the Veslemøy High and 4 surface sediments (0-1cm) from Hola-Vesterålen, Norway. The study of hydrocarbon impregnation and its effect on benthic foraminfera was conducted on selected sediment samples from the calcium-rich Holocene sediments of the Veslemøy High. The assemblage of foraminifera have been identified from three regional clusters. Cluster I and II are dominated by benthic foraminifera Buccella, Cassidulina, Cibicides, Discopulvinulina, Epistominella, Pullenia and Trifarina. Cluster III is distinct with an elevated abundance of Cassidulina, Cibicides and Trifarina with significant (>5 %) occurrence of Nonionella and Uvigerina. There is no apparent dissolution on the preserved foraminifera. However, there can be differential dissolution or destruction of the more fragile (thinner-walled test) species like Epistominella, Nonionella or Pullenia while leaving behind over-represented species like Cibicides or Trifarina (both preferring coarse grained, high energy areas that can withstand permanent winnowing and redeposition) with higher preservation potential. Also, Cluster III is placed right over the underlying fault line with shallow seep-indications and thus the fluids released may have induced the dissolution of the fragile species. Moreover, the significant occurrence of benthic foraminifera Nonionella auris, and Uvigerina peregrina, in Holocene deposits of Cluster III may be indicative of environments influenced by hydrocarbon migration to the seafloor. Previous studies have reported active natural hydrocarbon seepage in the Hola area and the stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of methane in the sediments suggests a predominantly thermogenic methane source. The seep-assemblage is composed of Cibicides (~60%), Cassidulina, Discanomalina, Textularia and Trifarina. Discanomalina coronata is an indicator species to identify active cold-water coral mounds. A negative carbon isotopic signal is recorded by D. coronata in all samples. Seep samples with low diversities also contain deformed individuals of Cibicides lobatulus (3.4-6.5 %), similar to those reported for a gigantic oil spill from a tanker or for environments polluted with heavy metals. However, it is an attached form and thus its test shape is affected by the nature of the substratum. Carbon isotopic signature of the deformed specimens reveal slightly lower values than their undeformed counterparts. One sample from Ullsfjorden was also studied where the assemblage is represented by Bulimina, Cassidulina, Globobulimina, Melonis, Nonionella and Reophax. Infaunal fauna B. marginata, M. barleeanum, and N. labradorica prefer muddy/silty to sandy substrata and high organic matter input, and thrive under suboxic-dysoxic conditions. All species in this assemblage have recorded negative carbon isotopic signal.

Baranwal, Soma; Sauer, Simone; Knies, Jochen; Chand, Shyam; Jensen, Henning; Klug, Martin

2014-05-01

372

Using Video to Communicate Scientific Findings -- Parking lot sealcoat as a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) provides information about (1) water-quality conditions and how those conditions vary locally, regionally, and nationally, (2) water-quality trends, and (3) factors that affect those trends and conditions. Video is one tool being used to communicate the relevance of scientific findings of the NAWQA program to general audiences, such as resource managers, educational groups, public officials, and the general public. One hundred twenty scientists and educators attending the 2010 and 2011 Fall meetings of the American Geophysical Union and the 2012 meeting of the National Monitoring Council viewed USGS videos and answered surveys using Likert response-scaling to identify the important elements of science videos. The most important elements identified from the surveys were style, including strong visuals and an engaging story with a simple message, as well as elements of substance including a take-home message, clarity, and believability. Deemed least important were journalistic elements showing different points of view and obstacles overcome. Viewers also identified the inclusion of the hypothesis statement and study methods as unimportant to include in a science video. As part of the NAWQA assessment of water-quality conditions and the factors that affect those conditions, parking-lot sealcoat is being studied as a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination. A film documenting a study to quantify the transport of PAHs from a parking-lot area coated with coal-tar sealcoat aims to make the study understandable to a lay audience. The film, titled "Paint it Black," documents the experimental site preparation, sealcoat application, and air and water sampling, with commentary by the principal scientists. Methods for sampling are described and shown in the video, and results from previous coal-tar sealcoat studies are summarized. The film provides a website address with links to additional information about PAHs and coal-tar sealcoat. The website and film are an example of USGS efforts aimed at improving science communication to a general audience.

Harned, D. A.; Moorman, M.; Van Metre, P. C.; Mahler, B. J.

2012-12-01

373

IMPORTANCE OF BLACK CARBON IN DISTRIBUTION AND BIOACCUMULATION MODELS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The roles and relative importance of nonpyrogenic organic carbon (NPOC) and black carbon (BC) as binding phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed by their ability to estimate pore water concentrations and biological uptake in various marine sediments. Sedim...

374

THE RELATIONSHIP OF TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS MEASUREMENTS TO BULK ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN AN AQUIFER CONTAMINATED WITH HYDROCARBON  

EPA Science Inventory

A recent conceptual model links high bulk electrical conductivities at hydrocarbon impacted sites to higher total dissolved solids (TDS) resulting from enhanced mineral weathering due to acids produced during biodegradation. In this study, we investigated the vertical distributio...

375

Evaluating the Effects of Bioremediation on Genotoxicity of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil Using Genetically Engineered, Higher Eukaryotic Cell Lines  

PubMed Central

Bioremediation is one of the commonly applied remediation strategies at sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, remediation goals are typically based on removal of the target contaminants rather than on broader measures related to health risks. We investigated changes in the toxicity and genotoxicity of PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site before and after two simulated bioremediation processes: a sequencing batch bioreactor system and a continuous-flow column system. Toxicity and genotoxicity of the residues from solvent extracts of the soil were determined by the chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic cell line and its DNA-repair-deficient mutants. Although both bioremediation processes significantly removed PAHs from the contaminated soil (bioreactor 69% removal; column 84% removal), bioreactor treatment resulted in an increase in toxicity and genotoxicity over the course of a treatment cycle, whereas long-term column treatment resulted in a decrease in toxicity and genotoxicity. However, when screening with a battery of DT40 mutants for genotoxicity profiling, we found that column treatment induced DNA damage types that were not observed in untreated soil. Toxicity and genotoxicity bioassays can supplement chemical analysis-based risk assessment for contaminated soil when evaluating the efficacy of bioremediation. PMID:22443351

Hu, Jing; Nakamura, Jun; Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

2012-01-01

376

Low-concentration tailing and subsequent quicklime-enhanced remediation of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by mechanical soil aeration.  

PubMed

Mechanical soil aeration has long been regarded as an effective ex-situ remediation technique and as suitable for remediation of large-scale sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at low cost. However, it has been reported that the removal efficiency of VOCs from soil is relatively low in the late stages of remediation, in association with tailing. Tailing may extend the remediation time required; moreover, it typically results in the presence of contaminants residues at levels far exceeding regulations. In this context, the present study aimed to discuss the tailing that occurs during the process of remediation of soils contaminated artificially with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs) and to assess possible quicklime-enhanced removal mechanisms. The results revealed the following conclusions. First, temperature and aeration rate can be important controls on both the timing of appearance of tailing and the levels of residual contaminants. Furthermore, the addition of quicklime to soil during tailing can reduce the residual concentrations rapidly to below the remedial target values required for site remediation. Finally, mechanical soil aeration can be enhanced using quicklime, which can improve the volatilization of VCHs via increasing soil temperature, reducing soil moisture, and enhancing soil permeability. Our findings give a basic understanding to the elimination of the tailing in the application of mechanical soil aeration, particularly for VOCs-contaminated soils. PMID:25433980

Ma, Yan; Du, Xiaoming; Shi, Yi; Xu, Zhu; Fang, Jidun; Li, Zheng; Li, Fasheng

2015-02-01

377

Airborne concentrations, skin contamination, and urinary metabolite excretion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among paving workers exposed to coal tar derived road tars.  

PubMed

The exposure of surface dressing workers to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was studied. Four different paving sites, at which coal tar-containing binders were applied, were selected as work sites with high exposure levels of PAH. Breathing zone airborne particulates, contamination of the skin with PAH, and 1-hydroxypyrene in urine of the workers involved in chip sealing were determined. Substantial concentrations of cyclohexane-soluble airborne particulate matter were found (GM = 0.2 mg/m3, n = 28). Skin contamination was determined using two different methods: with exposure pads and by hand washing. Pads were mounted on several parts of the body: wrist, elbow, neck, shoulder, and ankle. The pads located on the wrist appeared to be the most contaminated (pyrene: GM = 22 ng/1.77 cm2, n = 40). The end-of-shift hand washing showed that the hands of the workers were contaminated with PAH (pyrene: GM = 70 micrograms, n = 35). Preshift hand washing showed far lower, but detectable, quantities of PAH on workers' hands (pyrene: GM = 5 micrograms, n = 35). Enhanced levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene among the workers were found. The highest levels were found in the end-of-shift urine samples. Correlations between the pyrene exposure variables were studied. Significant positive correlations were found between pyrene on the wrist pad versus end-of-shift urinary 1-hydroxypyrene; between pyrene on the hands versus end-of-shift urinary 1-hydroxypyrene; and between the two different skin contamination variables. PMID:3213813

Jongeneelen, F J; Scheepers, P T; Groenendijk, A; Van Aerts, L A; Anzion, R B; Bos, R P; Veenstra, S J

1988-12-01

378

Elucidating cellular and behavioural effects of contaminant impact (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) in both laboratory-exposed and field-collected shore crabs, Carcinus maenas (Crustacea: Decapoda).  

PubMed

Monitoring effects of contaminants at lower levels of biological organisation (e.g. biochemical and cellular) allows for mechanistic evaluation of effects of contaminant exposure through laboratory exposures. However, higher level organism effects (e.g. physiological and behavioural) are deemed more ecologically-relevant. In the present study, cellular (cell viability and immune function), physiological (cardiac activity) and behavioural (foraging behaviour) responses were evaluated in field-collected shore crabs Carcinus maenas from three estuaries [a 'relatively' (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) PAH-contaminated site (Plym Estuary) and two 'comparatively clean' field sites (Avon and Yealm Estuaries)] and compared with responses of crabs exposed in the laboratory to a model organic contaminant (PAH) pyrene (200 ?g l(-1) for 28 days). The hypothesis that behavioural indicators may be more sensitive than other more traditional methods was tested. No significant impacts were observed at the cellular or physiological level in Plym-collected crabs (the 'relatively' contaminated site), but foraging behaviour was significantly altered (increased prey handling time) compared to individuals collected from the 'relatively' uncontaminated sites (Avon and Yealm). When given a cockle as a prey item, both Plym-collected and laboratory-exposed crabs took longer to handle and break into cockle shells. Therefore, ecologically-relevant behavioural observations may serve as valuableindicators of environmental quality. PMID:20727579

Dissanayake, Awantha; Piggott, Camilla; Baldwin, Christopher; Sloman, Katherine A

2010-12-01

379

Comparison of earthworm responses to petroleum hydrocarbon exposure in aged field contaminated soil using traditional ecotoxicity endpoints and 1H NMR-based metabolomics.  

PubMed

(1)H NMR metabolomics and conventional ecotoxicity endpoints were used to examine the response of earthworms exposed to petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) in soil samples collected from a site that was contaminated with crude oil from a pipeline failure in the mid-1990s. The conventional ecotoxicity tests showed that the soils were not acutely toxic to earthworms (average survival ? 90%), but some soil samples impaired reproduction endpoints by >50% compared to the field control soil. Additionally, metabolomics revealed significant relationships between earthworm metabolic profiles (collected after 2 or 14 days of exposure) and soil properties including soil PHC concentration. Further comparisons by partial least squares regression revealed a significant relationship between the earthworm metabolomic data (collected after only 2 or 14 days) and the reproduction endpoints (measured after 63 days). Therefore, metabolomic responses measured after short exposure periods may be predictive of chronic, ecologically relevant toxicity endpoints for earthworms exposed to soil contaminants. PMID:23938450

Whitfield Åslund, Melissa; Stephenson, Gladys L; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

2013-11-01

380

Assessment of the distortions caused by a pipe and an excavation in the electric and electromagnetic responses of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here, we present the results of a geophysical survey performed to characterize a hydrocarbon contamination plume, arising from a puncture in a master crude oil pipe in Argentina. This pipe was buried in an inhabited suburban yard with flat topography. At the moment of the event a stretch of the duct was uncovered and the leaked oil flooded the terrain up to several meters around the puncture. The contamination was produced by infiltration from the surface and also by flowing through the inner layers. The first steps in the treatment of the spill were to pump the oil, excavate the sector nearby the puncture and repair the pipe. Around one year later, we preformed the geophysical prospecting, which goal was to determine the extent of the contaminant plume, required for selecting adequate remediation strategies. We combined dual-coil, frequency domain electromagnetic induction surveys and 2D dipole-dipole geoelectrical profiling. Besides, we performed Wenner soundings at several positions on the walls of the excavation, where contaminated and clean sediments were exposed. From the 1D inversion of the electromagnetic data, 2D inversion of the dipole-dipole data, and Wenner data, we found that, in general, the contamination decreased the resistivity of the affected subsoil volumes. However, three of the geoelectrical profiles exhibited localized, very resistive anomalies, which origin was not clear. They did not seem to be associated to the presence of high concentrations of poorly or non-degraded hydrocarbon, since two of these profiles crossed the more contaminated area, but the other was located quite further away. As an attempt to identify the cause of these anomalies, we carried out a 3D numerical simulation of the effects of the pipe and the excavation on the 2D dipole-dipole images. From this study, we could effectively determine that they were mainly distortions generated by those structures. This allowed for providing a proper interpretation of the images of the three profiles, consistent with the other results. Thus, we could finally delimit the impacted zone and ascertain the main features of the contaminant plume.

Martinelli, Hilda Patricia; Robledo, Fabiana Elizabeth; Osella, Ana María; de la Vega, Matías

2012-02-01

381

Estimation of uncertainty in the sampling and analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil in Brighton, UK.  

PubMed

The heterogeneity of environmental samples is increasingly recognised, yet rarely examined in organic contamination investigations. In this study soil samples from an ex-landfill site in Brighton, UK were analysed for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination by using a balanced sampling protocol. The analytical technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was found to be fit for purpose by the use of duplicate samples and the statistical analysis of variances, as well as of certified reference materials. The sampling uncertainty was found to significantly overweigh the analytical uncertainty, by a factor of 3 and 6 for PCBs and PAHs, respectively. The soil samples showed a general trend of PCB concentration that was under the recommended target level of 20 ng/g dry weight. It is possible that one site alongside the main road may exceed the 20 ng/g target level, after taking into consideration the overall measurement uncertainty (70.8%). The PAH contamination was more severe, with seven sites potentially exceeding the effect-range medium concentrations. The soil samples with relatively high PCB and PAH concentrations were all taken from the grass verge, which also had the highest soil organic carbon content. The measurement uncertainty which was largely due to sampling can be reduced by sampling at a high resolution spacing of 17 m, which is recommended in future field investigations of soil organic contamination. PMID:25128886

Zhou, John L; Siddiqui, Ertan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan

2014-11-01

382

In vitro evaluation of germination and growth of five plant species on medium supplemented with hydrocarbons associated with contaminated soils.  

PubMed

The effect of a hydrocarbon mixture (HCM) of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Maya crude oil on germination, growth and survival of four grasses (Bouteloua curtipendula, Cenchrus ciliaris, Echinochloa crusgalli and Rhynchelytrum repens) was studied and compared to a control (Festuca arundinacea) under in vitro conditions. The species were cultured on MS medium with different HCM initial concentrations. Germination was not affected for any assayed concentration; however, the length of the stems and roots decreased when HCM increased and the survival of the four species also diminished. Except for F. arundinacea, a direct link between hydrocarbon concentration and plant survival was observed. In vitro studies are clean and easy to handle techniques allowing isolation of the plant activity from that derived from associations with microorganisms in non-sterile cultures. To our knowledge, this is the first work towards phytoremediation assisted by in vitro plant cultivation. PMID:18222086

Reynoso-Cuevas, L; Gallegos-Martínez, M E; Cruz-Sosa, F; Gutiérrez-Rojas, M

2008-09-01

383

Potential subsurface structures and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the southern Appalachian Basin beneath the Cumberland Plateau and eastern Highland Rim, Tennessee, Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oil and gas exploration in the southern Appalachian basin is typically concentrated around areas with historically proven reserves and very limited prospecting is conducted elsewhere in the region. To remove possible correlation problems and promote regional prospecting a standardized picking methodology was established in geophysical logs for the Middle Ordovician carbonate lithofacies (Nashville-Stones River Groups). This methodology was then used to correlate the units across Cumberland Plateau of Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia, from the Nashville-Jessamine domes to the Clinchport-Whiteoak Mountain thrust in the Valley and Ridge. The same lithofacies may extend in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York, suggesting a standardized nomenclature be established. This methodology is key to resolving regional and local structures, and structural trends in this area. To identify deformation probably associated with blind structural trends and producing fields, regional structure contour, trend surface residual anomaly, and isopach maps were constructed using data from 7,639 geophysical logs, 1,960 drill cores, and 433 surface contacts. These maps correlate well with known producing fields and identified a possible decollement in the Chattanooga Shale along with the southern extension of the Rome trough in Tennessee. A geologic model for hydrocarbon emplacement was constructed to accommodate all the available structural and petroleum information. The model illustrates a proposed decollement soled in the Chattanooga Shale that forms linear potential Mississippian-age traps and a previously unidentified continuation of the Rome trough and Sequatchie Valley fault beneath the western section of the Wartburg basin in Tennessee. The Flynn Creek impact structure was also investigated because it has a good hydrocarbon potential and may have economical reserves. The impact occurred in a carbonate-dominated target during the Late Devonian. Four persistent, concentric faults indicate the Flynn Creek impact structure is not asymmetric and has a diameter of 4.7 km (2.9 mi), which was calculated from the outermost partially developed fault system, or 4 km (2.5 mi) using the third fault system, which is fully developed. Both estimates are larger than the previously estimated 3.8 km.

Evenick, Jonathan Charles

2006-04-01

384

Sequestration of Sr-90 Subsurface Contamination in the Hanford 100-N Area by Surface Infiltration of a Ca-Citrate-Phosphate Solution  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a method to emplace apatite precipitate in the 100N vadose zone, which results in sorption and ultimately incorporation of Sr-90 into the apatite structure. The Ca-citrate-PO4 solution can be infiltrated into unsaturated sediments to result in apatite precipitate to provide effective treatment of Sr-90 contamination. Microbial redistribution during solution infiltration and a high rate of citrate biodegradation for river water microbes (water used for solution infiltration) results in a relatively even spatial distribution of the citrate biodegradation rate and ultimately apatite precipitate in the sediment. Manipulation of the Ca-citrate-PO4 solution infiltration strategy can be used to result in apatite precipitate in the lower half of the vadose zone (where most of the Sr-90 is located) and within low-K layers (which are hypothesized to have higher Sr-90 concentrations). The most effective infiltration strategy to precipitate apatite at depth (and with sufficient lateral spread) was to infiltrate a high concentration solution (6 mM Ca, 15 mM citrate, 60 mM PO4) at a rapid rate (near ponded conditions), followed by rapid, then slow water infiltration. Repeated infiltration events, with sufficient time between events to allow water drainage in the sediment profile can be used to buildup the mass of apatite precipitate at greater depth. Low-K heterogeneities were effectively treated, as the higher residual water content maintained in these zones resulted in higher apatite precipitate concentration. High-K zones did not receive sufficient treatment by infiltration, although an alternative strategy of air/surfactant (foam) was demonstrated effective for targeting high-K zones. The flow rate manipulation used in this study to treat specific depths and heterogeneities are not as easy to implement at field scale due to the lack of characterization of heterogeneities and difficulty tracking the wetting front over a large subsurface area. However, the use of real-time surface and cross-borehole geophysics can be used to track the infiltrating Ca-citrate-PO4 front so some adjustments can be made in the infiltration rate to precipitate apatite in desired zones. In addition, the reactive transport code used in this study with field scale physical parameters for sediments can be used to evaluate infiltration strategies along with preliminary water infiltration tests at field scale.

Szecsody, James E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Oostrom, Martinus; Moore, R. C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Williams, Mark D.; Zhong, Lirong; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; McKinley, James P.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Covert, Matthew A.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Garcia, Ben J.

2009-03-01

385

User’s guide to the collection and analysis of tree cores to assess the distribution of subsurface volatile organic compounds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analysis of the volatile organic compound content of tree cores is an inexpensive, rapid, simple approach to examining the distribution of subsurface volatile organic compound contaminants. The method has been shown to detect several volatile petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated aliphatic compounds associated with vapor intrusion and ground-water contamination. Tree cores, which are approximately 3 inches long, are obtained by using an increment borer. The cores are placed in vials and sealed. After a period of equilibration, the cores can be analyzed by headspace analysis gas chromatography. Because the roots are exposed to volatile organic compound contamination in the unsaturated zone or shallow ground water, the volatile organic compound concentrations in the tree cores are an indication of the presence of subsurface volatile organic compound contamination. Thus, tree coring can be used to detect and map subsurface volatile organic compound contamination. For comparison of tree-core data at a particular site, it is important to maintain consistent methods for all aspects of tree-core collection, handling, and analysis. Factors affecting the volatile organic compound concentrations in tree cores include the type of volatile organic compound, the tree species, the rooting depth, ground-water chemistry, the depth to the contaminated horizon, concentration differences around the trunk related to variations in the distribution of subsurface volatile organic compounds, concentration differences with depth of coring related to volatilization loss through the bark and possibly other unknown factors, dilution by rain, seasonal influences, sorption, vapor-exchange rates, and within-tree volatile organic compound degradation.

Vroblesky, Don A.

2008-01-01

386

Implications and concerns of deep-seated disposal of hydrocarbon exploration produced water using three-dimensional contaminant transport model in Bhit Area, Dadu District of Southern Pakistan.  

PubMed

A three-dimensional contaminant transport model has been developed to simulate and monitor the migration of disposal of hydrocarbon exploration produced water in Injection well at 2,100 m depth in the Upper Cretaceous Pab sandstone, Bhit area in Dadu district of Southern Pakistan. The regional stratigraphic and structural geological framework of the area, landform characteristics, meteorological parameters, and hydrogeological milieu have been used in the model to generate the initial simulation of steady-state flow condition in the underlying aquifer's layers. The geometry of the shallow and deep-seated characteristics of the geological formations was obtained from the drilling data, electrical resistivity sounding surveys, and geophysical well-logging information. The modeling process comprised of steady-state simulation and transient simulation of the prolific groundwater system of contamination transport after 1, 10, 30 years of injection. The contaminant transport was evaluated from the bottom of the injection well, and its short- and long-term effects were determined on aquifer system lying in varying hydrogeological and geological conditions. PMID:19936954

Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Akhter, Gulraiz; Ashraf, Arshad; Fryar, Alan

2010-11-01

387

The use of coarse, separable, condensed-phase organic carbon particles to characterize desorption resistance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments  

SciTech Connect

Physical separations were employed to characterize the source of desorption-resistant behavior for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laboratory- and field-contaminated sediments. Size and density separation of laboratory-contaminated sediments did not effectively separate the amorphous-phase (volatile) and condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon as measured by thermal oxidation at 375 {sup o}C. These separations also did not result in sediment fractions with significantly different desorption characteristics as measured by apparent partition coefficients. Coarse particles from a field-contaminated sediment from Utica Harbor (UH; Utica, NY, USA), however, could be directly separated into sandy fractions and organic fractions that were composed of woody organic matter, charcoal or charred vegetative matter, and coal-like and coal-cinder particles. Chemical analysis showed that coal-like (glassy, nonporous) and coal-cinder (porous, sintered) particles exhibited very high PAH concentrations and high apparent partition coefficients. These particles also exhibited significantly higher condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon contents as defined by thermal oxidation at 375{sup o}C. The apparent partition coefficients of PAHs in the coal-cinder particles were a good indication of the apparent partition coefficients in the desorption-resistant fraction of UH sediment, indicating that the coarse particles provided a reasonable characterization of the desorption-resistance phenomena in these sediments even though the coarse fractions represented less than 25% of the organic carbon in the whole sediment.

Chai, Y.Z.; Kochetkov, A.; Reible, D.D. [University of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

2007-07-15

388

The use of coarse, separable, condensed-phase organic carbon particles to characterize desorption resistance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments.  

PubMed

Physical separations were employed to characterize the source of desorption-resistant behavior for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laboratory- and field-contaminated sediments. Size and density separation of laboratory-contaminated sediments did not effectively separate the amorphous-phase (volatile) and condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon as measured by thermal oxidation at 375 degrees C. These separations also did not result in sediment fractions with significantly different desorption characteristics as measured by apparent partition coefficients. Coarse particles from a field-contaminated sediment from Utica Harbor (UH; Utica, NY, USA), however, could be directly separated into sandy fractions and organic fractions that were composed of woody organic matter, charcoal or charred vegetative matter, and coal-like and coal-cinder particles. Chemical analysis showed that coal-like (glassy, nonporous) and coal-cinder (porous, sintered) particles exhibited very high PAH concentrations and high apparent partition coefficients. These particles also exhibited significantly higher condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon contents as defined by thermal oxidation at 375 degrees C. The apparent partition coefficients of PAHs in the coal-cinder particles were a good indication of the apparent partition coefficients in the desorption-resistant fraction of UH sediment, indicating that the coarse particles provided a reasonable characterization of the desorption-resistance phenomena in these sediments even though the coarse fractions represented less than 25% of the organic carbon in the whole sediment. PMID:17665677

Chai, Yunzhou; Kochetkov, Alexander; Reible, Danny D

2007-07-01

389

Subsurface Mapping  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Target areas for sinking base holes, underground pipelines, etc., can be identified with the assistance of NASA Ames developed technology, by Airborne Pipeline Services, Inc. Subsurface features are computer processed; the system can cover 250 miles a day and was first developed by Applied Science, Inc.

1985-01-01

390

A cost effective bioremediation strategy using low technology resources for reclamation of dry land hydrocarbon contamination: A case study  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon containing soil was bioremediated at a combination wastewater and slop oil skim evaporation pond utilizing cost effective low technology resources. Fluids and sludge from the football field-sized pond were extraction procedure toxicity and purgeable organics tested, and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations determined. An impact risk analysis was performed, and a corrective action plan developed and implemented. The three year project was closely coordinated with the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) who established the closure level. The impacted soils at the pond were completely excavated and closure was immediately granted by KDHE for the excavated area. The 24,000 cubic yards of excavated soil were then surface spread on adjacent Mobil property. A nutrient and microbial base was applied to bioaugment the soil. The preapplication land surface and the subsequently land farmed soil was periodically disced and chiseled. A job safety plan including industrial hygiene measures to eliminate workforce exposure was developed and implemented. The final remediation cost analysis amounts to $1.48 per cubic yard compared to the $30 to $150 per cubic yard industry o estimates for similar projects. Several factors were critical in ailing costs to remain so low: (1) assessment and implementation by local in-house staff, (2) conservative remedial action plan and sampling strategy; (3) local contractors; (4) locally available soil amendment; and (5) effective regulatory coordination. The methods described can be used to cost effectively characterize and bioremediate other sites where hydrocarbon-impacted soils exist in similar dry-land environments.

Robb, A.J. III; Hoggatt, P.R.

1995-12-01

391

Biodegradation of polyacyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil by biostimulation and bioaugmentation in the presence of copper(II) ions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of a combination of biostimulation, bioaugmentation and the presence of CuSO4 on the biodegradation of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dibenzofuran 210 mg kg?1, benzo(a)anthracene 200 mg kg?1, dibenzo-p-dioxine 100 mg kg?1 and 9-fluorenone 100 mg kg?1 in a sandy loam soil was studied. The pH of the soil was raised from 5 to 7 with agricultural lime. The soil was then divided into two sets

Harrison Ifeanyichukwu Atagana

2006-01-01

392

Development, calibration, and predictive results of a simulator for subsurface pathway fate and transport of aqueous- and gaseous-phase contaminants in the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the development, calibration, and predictive results of a simulation study of fate and transport of waste buried in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) (which is hereafter referred to as the SDA simulation study). This report builds on incorporates a previous report that dealt only with the calibration of a flow model for simulation of water movement beneath the SDA (Magnuson and Sondrup 1996). The primary purpose of the SDA simulation study was to perform fate and transport calculations to support the IRA. A secondary purpose of the SDA simulation study was to be able to use the model to evaluate possible remediation strategies and their effects on flow and transport in the OU 7-13/14 feasibility study.

Magnuson, S.O.; Sondrup, A.J.

1998-07-01

393

Assessment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Contamination in Water, Sediment and Fish of Temsah Lake, Suez Canal, Egypt  

E-print Network

The nature, origin and distribution of the listed reference US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) priority pollutants; 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in water, sediment and fish of Temsah Lake (Suez Canal, Egypt) using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The compositions of PAHs determined in all samples were measured in order to use them as chemical markers for identifying different sources of PAHs pollution in the studied region. Qualitative and quantitative distribution of PAHs detected in all investigated samples have followed no particular pattern, but rather irregular. Quantitative determination of PAHs show that their concentration ranged from 52.46–3393µg/L, 585.9-8592.8µg/L and 1696.4–4785.7µg/L for water, sediment and fish samples, respectively. Data show that these values are considered to be alarmingly high and the studied areas have values high enough to cause lethal toxicity effect to the surrounding environment and consequently to the human health. All samples are characterized by low concentration of low molecular weight PAHs compared to high molecular weight PAHs. Sediment and fish samples are characterized by relatively high concentration of six membered rings PAHs. The origin of PAHs in collected samples is either petrogenic, biogenic or mixed petrogenic and biogenic. Key words: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; water, sediment, fish, pollution and Temsah Lake.

Hager R. Ali; Sh. El-gendy; Samia El- Ezbewy; Galal H. El-gemaee; Y. M. Moustafa; M. I. Roushdy

2006-01-01

394

A STUDY OF DISSOLUTION RATE-LIMITED BIOREMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL HYDROCARBONS. (R825549C039)  

EPA Science Inventory

The widespread release of organic chemicals in the environment frequently leads to ground-water contamination with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) because many of these organic chemicals are barely soluble in water. Understanding the mechanisms of transport and biotic transf...

395

Relating ground water and sediment chemistry to microbial characterization at a BTEX-contaminated site.  

PubMed

The National Center for Manufacturing Science is investigating bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon at a site near Belleville, MI. As part of this study, we examined the microbial communities to help elucidate biodegradative processes currently active at the site. We observed high densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers in the less-contaminated sediments. Low densities of iron and sulfate reducers were measured in the same sediments. In contrast, the highly contaminated sediments showed low densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers, and high densities of iron and sulfate reducers. Methanogens were also found in these highly contaminated sediments. These contaminated sediments also showed a higher biomass, by the phospholipid fatty acids, and greater ratios of phospholipid fatty acids, which indicate stress within the microbial community. Aquifer chemistry analyses indicated that the highly contaminated area was more reduced and had lower sulfate than the less-contaminated area. These conditions suggest that the subsurface environment at the highly contaminated area had progressed into sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. The less-contaminated area, although less reduced, also appeared to be progressing into primarily iron- and sulfate-reducing microbial communities. The proposed treatment to stimulate bioremediation includes addition of oxygen and nitrate to the subsurface. Ground water chemistry and microbial analyses revealed significant differences that resulted from the injection of dissolved oxygen and nitrate. These differences included an increase in Eh, small decrease in pH, and large decreases in BTEX, dissolved iron, and sulfate concentrations at the injection well. Injected nitrate was rapidly utilized by the subsurface microbial communities, and significant nitrite amounts were observed in the injection well and in nearby down-gradient observation wells. Microbial and molecular analyses indicated an increase in denitrifying bacteria after nitrate injection. The activity and population of denitrifying bacteria were significantly increased at the injection well relative to a down-gradient well for as long as 2 mo after the nitrate injection ended. PMID:18576131

Pfiffner, S M; Palumbo, A V; Gibson, T; Ringelberg, D B; McCarthy, J F

1997-01-01

396

SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System is an integrated technology used for attacking all phases of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in soil and groundwater. The SVVS technology promotes insitu remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with or-ga...

397

Modulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor target genes in circulating lymphocytes from dairy cows bred in a dioxin-like PCB contaminated area.  

PubMed

Animal productions (i.e. fish, eggs, milk and dairy products) represent the major source of exposure to dioxins, furans, and dioxin-like (DL) polychlorobiphenyls for humans. The negative effects of these highly toxic and persistent pollutants are mediated by the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) that elicits the transcriptional induction of several genes, including those involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Previously we demonstrated the presence and functioning of the AHR signaling pathway in primary cultures of bovine blood lymphocytes. The aim of the present study was to investigate by real time PCR the expression and the inducibility of selected target genes (i.e. AHR, AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), AHR repressor, CYP1A1 and CYP1B1) in uncultured cells from dairy cows naturally exposed to DL-compounds. The study was carried out on two groups of animals bred in a highly polluted area and characterized by a different degree of contamination, as assessed by bulk milk TEQ values, and a control group reared in an industry free area. Bovine lymphocytes expressed only AHR, ARNT and CYP1B1 genes to a detectable level; moreover, only CYP1B1 expression appeared to be correlated to TEQ values, being higher in the most contaminated group, and d