Sample records for hydrocarbon contaminated subsurface

  1. Cosolvency effect in subsurface systems contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and ethanol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry X. Corseuil; Beatriz I. A. Kaipper; Marilda Fernandes

    2004-01-01

    In Brazil, most gas stations and terminals store tanks containing hydrated ethanol, gasohol and diesel. In case of spills, it is possible that a high aqueous ethanol concentration can facilitate the transfer of hydrocarbons into the aqueous phase, enhancing contaminant concentrations in groundwater, a process called cosolvency. This study investigates the cosolvency effect of ethanol on the aqueous solubility of

  2. Modeling Subsurface Transport of Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This U.S. EPA website contains information on the modeling of subsurface transport of petroleum hydrocarbons and other contaminants. There are a few course modules on the fate and transport of contaminants. There are also OnSite on-line calculators for site-specific assessment calculations.

  3. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  4. DELINEATION OF SUBSURFACE HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION USING A DIRECT PUSH RESISTIVITY METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct push resistivity method was evaluated as a complementary screening tool to provide rapid in-situ contaminant detection to aid in better defining locations for drilling, sampling, and monitoring well installation at hazardous waste sites. Nine continuous direct push resi...

  5. UNDERSTANDING THE FATE OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN THE SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To achieve effective remediation of subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, definite scientific and technical knowledge of their fate after they are spilled onto the ground surface or leaked from underground storage tanks is essential. his paper provides extensive details...

  6. Delineation of subsurface hydrocarbon contamination at a former hydrogenation plant using spectral induced polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Orozco, Adrián; Kemna, Andreas; Oberdörster, Christoph; Zschornack, Ludwig; Leven, Carsten; Dietrich, Peter; Weiss, Holger

    2012-08-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements were conducted at a former hydrogenation plant in Zeitz (NE Germany) to investigate the potential of SIP imaging to delineate areas with different BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) concentrations. Conductivity images reveal a poor correlation with the distribution of contaminants; whereas phase images exhibit two main anomalies: low phase shift values (< 5 mrad) for locations with high BTEX concentrations, including the occurrence of free-phase product (BTEX concentrations > 1.7 g/l), and higher phase values for lower BTEX concentrations. Moreover, the spectral response of the areas with high BTEX concentration and free-phase products reveals a flattened spectrum in the low frequencies (< 40 Hz), while areas with lower BTEX concentrations exhibit a response characterized by a frequency peak. The SIP response was modelled using a Debye decomposition to compute images of the median relaxation-time. Consistent with laboratory studies, we observed an increase in the relaxation-time associated with an increase in BTEX concentrations. Measurements were also collected in the time domain (TDIP), revealing imaging results consistent with those obtained for frequency domain (SIP) measurements. Results presented here demonstrate the potential of the SIP imaging method to discriminate source and plume of dissolved contaminants at BTEX contaminated sites.

  7. Understanding the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in the subsurface environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chien T. Chen

    1992-01-01

    To achieve effective remediation of subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, definite scientific and technical knowledge of their fate after they are spilled onto the ground surface or leaked from underground storage tanks is essential. The paper provides extensive details of the parameters that affect the fate of petroleum products in the underground environment. These include: the character of the subsurface environment;

  8. Subsurface contamination monitoring using laser fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Balshaw-Biddle, K.; Oubre, C.L.; Ward, C.H. [eds.] [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Kenny, J.E.; Pepper, J.W.; Wright, A.O.; Chen, Y.M. [Tufts Univ., MA (United States); Shelton, C.G. [Shell Research, Ltd. (United States)

    1999-11-01

    While innovative technologies in remediation need to be developed, so do innovative ways of site assessment. This monograph describes the development, testing, and performance of a new laser-induced fluorescence soil probe. A screening tool for site characterization, this probe has the potential to provide an economical, rapid assessment of contaminated sites. Cone Penetrometer testing equipment advances the probe into the subsurface. The probe identifies hydrocarbon classes using a multi-channel excitation-emission matrix. This technique facilitates the collection of significant amounts of subsurface information--surpassing conventional data collection methods--that can be used to rapidly identify areas of concern beneath a site. The technology has significant application for the following: rapid environmental site assessment; monitoring remediation programs; and monitoring manufacturing processes and industrial waste water operations.

  9. Emulsification of hydrocarbons by subsurface bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, D.S.; Thomas, J.M.; Raymond, R.L.; Ward, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions indicating the high probability of biosurfactant production.Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions, indicating a high probability of biosurfactant production.

  10. OPPORTUNITIES FOR BIORECLAMATION OF AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons are an important class of ground water contaminants. Spills of hydrocarbons often produce regions in the subsurface that retain the spilled material trapped as an oily phase. When ground water infiltrates the oily material, the more water-soluble hy...

  11. EVOLVING CONCEPTS OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, a large gap exists between theoretical advances in the understanding of how various natural processes affect subsurface contaminant transport, and our ability to translate those advances into practical applications. The lack of truly representative and reliable field t...

  12. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Rossabi, J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere. 7 figs.

  13. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E. (Aiken, SC); May, Christopher P. (Fairfax, VA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere.

  14. Evaluation of the intrinsic methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) biodegradation potential of hydrocarbon contaminated subsurface soils in batch microcosm systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Moreels; Leen Bastiaens; Frans Ollevier; Roel Merckx; Ludo Diels; Dirk Springael

    2004-01-01

    Eleven soil samples (contaminated and non-contaminated top soils and aquifers) from seven different locations in Belgium were examined in lab-scale batch microcosms simulating in situ conditions for their indigenous capacity to biodegrade methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The effect of implementing nutrients or additional oxygen and of the presence of co-contaminants on MTBE degradation was investigated. All soils showed rapid degradation

  15. UNDERSTANDING THE FATE OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN THE SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sinca a significant number of the two or more million underground storage tank (UST) systems used for petroleum products leak, their cleanup poses a major environmental challenge. Our understnading of the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in the subsurface environment is critical t...

  16. Bioventing soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald E. Hoeppel; Robert E. Hinchee; Mick F. Arthur

    1991-01-01

    Summary Bioventing combines the capabilities of soil venting and enhanced bioremediation to cost-effectively remove light and middle distillate hydrocarbons from vadose zone soils and the groundwater table. Soil venting removes the more volatile fuel components from unsaturated soil and promotes aerobic biodegradation by driving large volumes of air into the subsurface. In theory, air is several thousand times more effective

  17. Tool samples subsurface soil free of surface contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerer, W. W.; Wooley, B. C.

    1967-01-01

    Sampling device obtains pure subsurface soil that is free of any foreign substance that may exist on the surface. It is introduced through a contaminated surface area in a closed condition, opened, and a subsurface sample collected, sealed while in the subsurface position, and then withdrawn.

  18. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE`s Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  19. The role of microbial populations in the containment of aromatic hydrocarbons in the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Franzmann, P D; Robertson, W J; Zappia, L R; Davis, G B

    2002-01-01

    A survey of soil gases associated with gasoline stations on the Swan Coastal Plain of Western Australia has shown that 20% leak detectable amounts of petroleum. The fates of volatile hydrocarbons in the vadose zone at one contaminated site, and dissolved hydrocarbons in groundwater at another site were followed in a number of studies which are herein reviewed. Geochemical evidence from a plume of hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater has shown that sulfate reduction rapidly developed as the terminal electron accepting process. Toluene degradation but not benzene degradation was linked to sulfate reduction. The sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from the plume represented a new species, Desulfosporosinus meridiei. Strains of the species do not mineralise 14C-toluene in pure culture. The addition of large numbers of cells and sulfate to microcosms did stimulate toluene mineralisation but not benzene mineralisation. Attempts to follow populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria by phospholipid signatures, or Desulfosporosinus meridiei by FISH in the plume were unsuccessful, but fluorescently-labeled polyclonal antibodies were successfully used. In the vadose zone at a different site, volatile hydrocarbons were consumed in the top 0.5 m of the soil profile. The fastest measured rate of mineralisation of 14C-benzene in soils collected from the most active zone (6.5 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) could account for the majority of the flux of hydrocarbon vapourtowards the surface. The studies concluded that intrinsic remediation by subsurface microbial populations in groundwater on the Swan Coastal Plain can control transport of aromatic hydrocarbon contamination, except for the transport of benzene in groundwater. In the vadose zone, intrinsic remediation by the microbial populations in the soil profile can contain the transport of aromatic hydrocarbons, provided the physical transport of gases, in particular oxygen from the atmosphere, is not impeded by structures. PMID:12222956

  20. Field-Scale Assessment of Phytotreatment of Soil Contaminated with Weathered Hydrocarbons and Heavy Metals (9 pp)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kati Vaajasaari; Anneli Joutti

    2006-01-01

    Background, Aim and Scope  \\u000a Phytoremediation is a remediation method which uses plants to remove, contain or detoxify environmental contaminants. Phytoremediation\\u000a has successfully been applied for the removal of fresh hydrocarbon contamination, but removal of aged hydrocarbons has proven\\u000a more difficult. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the subsurface can be enhanced by the presence of plant roots, i.e. the\\u000a rhizosphere effect. Phytostabilization

  1. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of environmental parameters on bioremediation is important in designing a bioremediation system to reduce petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in impacted soils.

  2. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Jr. Wright; J. C. Corey

    2002-01-01

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total

  3. Enhanced bioremediation of subsurface contamination: Enzyme recruitment and redesign

    SciTech Connect

    Brockman, F.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    Subsurface systems containing radionuclide, heavy metal, and organic wastes must be carefully attended to avoid further impacts to the environment or exposures to human populations. It is appropriate, therefore, to invest in basic research to develop the requisite tools and methods for addressing complex cleanup problems. The rational modification of subsurface microoganisms by enzyme recruitment and enzyme design, in concert with engineered systems for delivery of microorganisms and nutrients to the contaminated zone, are potentially useful tools in the spectrum of approaches that will be required for successful remediation of deep subsurface contamination.

  4. IMPACT OF REDOX DISEQUILIBRIA ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REMEDIATION IN SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning to mineral surfaces exerts significant control on inorganic contaminant transport in subsurface systems. Remedial technologies for in-situ treatment of subsurface contamination are frequently designed to optimize the efficiency of contaminant partitioning to solid s...

  5. Subsurface Contamination Focus Area technical requirements. Volume 1: Requirements summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

    1996-10-01

    This document summarizes functions and requirements for remediation of source term and plume sites identified by the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area. Included are detailed requirements and supporting information for source term and plume containment, stabilization, retrieval, and selective retrieval remedial activities. This information will be useful both to the decision-makers within the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) and to the technology providers who are developing and demonstrating technologies and systems. Requirements are often expressed as graphs or charts, which reflect the site-specific nature of the functions that must be performed. Many of the tradeoff studies associated with cost savings are identified in the text.

  6. ANAEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic conditions predominate in contaminated aquifers and are not uncommon in noncontaminated areas. Comparatively little is known about degradative processes and nutrient cycling under anaerobic conditions. However, it is apparent these processes are fundamentally differen...

  7. ENGINEERING ISSUE: IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED UNSATURATED SUBSURFACE SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology for the remediation of unsaturated subsurface soils involves the use of microorganisms to degrade contaminants which are present in such soils. Understanding the processes which drive in situ bioremediation, as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of th...

  8. A BIOVENTING APPROACH TO REMEDIATE A GASONLINE CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioventing is a subsurface process using an air stream to enhance biodegradation of oily contaminants. wo pilot-scale bioventing systems were installed at a field site. rocess operations began in October 1990. he field site is located at an air station. pill in 1969 of about 100,...

  9. INVESTIGATING THE GEOELECTRICAL RESPONSE OF HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION UNDERGOING BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A newly proposed geoelectrical model for hydrocarbon contaminated sites predicts high conductivities coincident with t he Contaminated zone a s opposed t o t he traditionally accepted low conductivity. The model attributes the high conductivities to mineral weathering resulti...

  10. Intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Gieg, L.M.; McInerney; Tanner, R.S.; Harris, S.H. Jr.; Sublette, K.L.; Suflita, J.M. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)); Kolhatkar, R.V. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States). Center for Environmental Research and Technology)

    1999-08-01

    A study was designed to determine if the intrinsic bioremediation of gas condensate hydrocarbons represented an important fate process in a shallow aquifer underlying a natural gas production site. For over 4 yr, changes in the groundwater, sediment, and vadose zone chemistry in the contaminated portion of the aquifer were interpreted relative to a background zone. Changes included decreased dissolved oxygen and sulfate levels and increased alkalinity, Fe(II), and methane concentrations in the contaminated groundwater, suggesting that aerobic heterotrophic respiration depleted oxygen reserves leaving anaerobic conditions in the hydrocarbon-impacted subsurface. Dissolved hydrogen levels in the contaminated groundwater indicated that sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were predominant biological processes, corroborating the geochemical findings. Furthermore, 10--1000-fold higher numbers of sulfate reducers and methanogens were enumerated in the contaminated sediment relative to background. Putative metabolites were also detected in the contaminated groundwater, including methylbenzylsuccinic acid, a signature intermediate of anaerobic xylene decay. Laboratory incubations showed that benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and each of the xylene isomers were biodegraded under sulfate-reducing conditions as was toluene under methanogenic conditions. These results coupled with a decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations in contaminated sediment confirm that intrinsic bioremediation contributes to the attenuation of hydrocarbons in this aquifer.

  11. Geophysical techniques in the study of Hydrocarbon contamination: lab experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampaolo, Valeria; Rizzo, Enzo; Straface, Salvatore; Votta, Mario; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Remediation of sites contaminated by hydrocarbon, due to blow out, leakage from tank or pipe and oil spill, is an environmental problem because infiltrated oil can persist in the ground for a long time and the actual method are invasive and expansive . In the last years there was a growing interest in the use of geophysical methods for environmental monitoring (Greenhouse et al., 1993; Daily and Ramirez, 1995; Lendvay et al., 1998; Atekwana et al., 2000; Chambers et al., 2004; Song et al., 2005; French et al., 2009), and there have been several recent study that relate self-potential measurements to subsurface contaminants (Perry et al., 1996; Naudet et al., 2003; Naudet et al., 2004). Infact, this method is a valid tool for site characterization and monitoring because it is sensitive to contaminant chemistry and redox processes generated by bacteria during the biodegradation phase (Atekwana et al., 2004; Naudet and Revil, 2005). Therefore the goal of this investigation is to characterize underground contaminant distributions using minimally invasive geophysical methods (electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential), in combination with hydrochemical measurements, and to develop fundamental constitutive relations between soil physical and degradation activity parameters and geophysically measurable parameters, in order to improve site remediation efficiency. These tests have been realized at a PVC pool situated in the Hydrogeosite Laboratory of CNR-IMAA. The pool is completely filled with ~ 0.80 m3 of an homogeneous medium (quartz-rich sand with a medium-high hydraulic conductivity in the order of 10-5 m/s), to simulate the space and time dynamics of an artificial aquifer; besides it has been endowed of a sensors network at surface and in borehole, to measure self-potential and electrical resistivity. The experiments consist in geophysical measurements to monitor a simulated oil spill into sand-box following by water rain. The experiment was able to obtain information about contaminant distribution and biodegradation in the subsurface. Besides combining measurements from multiple geophysical and/or hydrochemical measurements allow us to obtain more accurate characterization of spatial variability. The work is part of the research project ModelPROBE (Model-Driven soil probing, site assessment and evaluation, Grant No. 213161 in the framework of the EC-FP7 funded).

  12. Numerical modelling on fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in an unsaturated subsurface system for varying source scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, M.; Vasudevan, M.; Kumar, G. Suresh; Nambi, Indumathi M.

    2015-04-01

    The vertical transport of petroleum hydrocarbons from a surface spill through an unsaturated subsurface system is of major concern in assessing the vulnerability of groundwater contamination. A realistic representation on fate and transport of volatile organic compounds at different periods after spill is quite challenging due to the variation in the source behaviour at the surface of spill as well as the variation in the hydrodynamic parameters and the associated inter-phase partitioning coefficients within the subsurface. In the present study, a one dimensional numerical model is developed to simulate the transport of benzene in an unsaturated subsurface system considering the effect of volatilization, dissolution, adsorption and microbial degradation of benzene for (i) constant continuous source, (ii) continuous decaying source, and (iii) residual source. The numerical results suggest that volatilization is the important sink for contaminant removal considering the soil air migration within the unsaturated zone. It is also observed that the coupled effect of dissolution and volatilization is important for the decaying source at the surface immediately after the spill, whereas rate-limited dissolution from residually entrapped source is responsible for the extended contamination towards later period.

  13. Groundwater risk assessment for a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) contaminated

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2001-53 Groundwater risk assessment for a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) contaminated site to simulate a contamination of soils and groundwaters by PAH at a disused coke plant site were compared applying a risk assessment approach to contaminated sites, of primary importance is the evaluation

  14. Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Jay Grate; Jungbae Kim

    2007-02-19

    The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation. Research at Rensselaer focused on the development of haloalkane dehalogenase as a critical enzyme in the dehalogenation of contaminated materials (ultimately trichloroethylene and related pollutants). A combination of bioinformatic investigation and experimental work was performed. The bioinformatics was focused on identifying a range of dehalogenase enzymes that could be obtained from the known proteomes of major microorganisms. This work identified several candidate enzymes that could be obtained through relatively straightforward gene cloning and expression approaches. The experimental work focused on the isolation of haloalkane dehalogenase from a Xanthobacter species followed by incorporating the enzyme into silicates to form biocatalytic silicates. These are the precursors of SENs. At the conclusion of the study, dehalogenase was incorporated into SENs, although the loading was low. This work supported a single Ph.D. student (Ms. Philippa Reeder) for two years. The project ended prior to her being able to perform substantive bioinformatics efforts that would identify more promising dehalogenase enzymes. The SEN synthesis, however, was demonstrated to be partially successful with dehalogenases. Further work would provide optimized dehalogenases in SENs for use in pollution remission.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fuel-oil contaminated soils, Antarctica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jackie Aislabie; Megan Balks; Norma Astori; Gavin Stevenson; Robert Symons

    1999-01-01

    Where fuel oil spills have occurred on Antarctic soils polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) may accumulate. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected from fuel spill sites up to 30 years old, and from nearby control sites, and analysed for the 16 PAHs on the USEPA priority pollutants list, as well as for two methyl substituted naphthalenes, 1-methylnaphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene. PAH

  16. Microbial Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminants: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nilanjana; Chandran, Preethy

    2011-01-01

    One of the major environmental problems today is hydrocarbon contamination resulting from the activities related to the petrochemical industry. Accidental releases of petroleum products are of particular concern in the environment. Hydrocarbon components have been known to belong to the family of carcinogens and neurotoxic organic pollutants. Currently accepted disposal methods of incineration or burial insecure landfills can become prohibitively expensive when amounts of contaminants are large. Mechanical and chemical methods generally used to remove hydrocarbons from contaminated sites have limited effectiveness and can be expensive. Bioremediation is the promising technology for the treatment of these contaminated sites since it is cost-effective and will lead to complete mineralization. Bioremediation functions basically on biodegradation, which may refer to complete mineralization of organic contaminants into carbon dioxide, water, inorganic compounds, and cell protein or transformation of complex organic contaminants to other simpler organic compounds by biological agents like microorganisms. Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. This paper presents an updated overview of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by microorganisms under different ecosystems. PMID:21350672

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Injection in the Subsurface for Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery and Sequestration

    E-print Network

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Mathematical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Injection in the Subsurface for Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery and Sequestration Philip C. Myint, Laurence Rongy, Kjetil B. Haugen, Abbas Firoozabadi Department. Combustion of fossil fuels contributes to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels that have been

  18. Modeling subsurface contaminant reactions and transport at the watershed scale

    SciTech Connect

    Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; D`Azevedo, E.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilson, G.V. [Desert Research Inst., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to numerically examine the multiscale effects of physical and chemical mass transfer processes on watershed scale, variably saturated subsurface contaminant transport, and (2) to conduct numerical simulations on watershed scale reactive solute transport and evaluate their implications to uncertainty characterization and cost benefit analysis. Concurrent physical and chemical nonequilibrium caused by inter aggregate gradients of pressure head and solute concentration and intra-aggregate geochemical and microbiological processes, respectively, may arise at various scales and flowpaths. To this date, experimental investigations of these complex processes at watershed scale remain a challenge and numerical studies are often needed for guidance of water resources management and decision making. This research integrates the knowledge bases developed during previous experimental and numerical investigations at a proposed waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the concurrent effects of physical and chemical nonequilibrium. Comparison of numerical results with field data indicates that: (1) multiregion, preferential flow and solute transport exist under partially saturated condition and can be confirmed theoretically, and that (2) mass transfer between pore regions is an important process influencing contaminant movement in the subsurface. Simulations of watershed scale, multi species reactive solute transport suggest that dominance of geochemistry and hydrodynamics may occur simultaneously at different locales and influence the movement of one species relative to another. Execution times on the simulations of the reactive solute transport model also indicate that the model is ready to assist the selection of important parameters for site characterization.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A DATA EVALUATION/DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subsurface contamination frequently originates from spatially distributed sources of multi-component nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Such chemicals are typically persistent sources of ground-water contamination that are difficult to characterize. This work addresses the feasi...

  20. Fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in the subsurface near Cass Lake, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drennan, Dina M.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Warren, Ean; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Baedecker, Mary Jo; Herkelrath, William N.; Delin, Geoffrey N.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Campbell, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigated the natural attenuation of subsurface petroleum hydrocarbons leaked over an unknown number of years from an oil pipeline under the Enbridge Energy Limited Partnership South Cass Lake Pumping Station, in Cass Lake, Minnesota. Three weeks of field work conducted between May 2007 and July 2008 delineated a dissolved plume of aromatic hydrocarbons and characterized the biodegradation processes of the petroleum. Field activities included installing monitoring wells, collecting sediment cores, sampling water from wells, and measuring water-table elevations. Geochemical measurements included concentrations of constituents in both spilled and pipeline oil, dissolved alkylbenzenes and redox constituents, sediment bioavailable iron, and aquifer microbial populations. Groundwater in this area flows east-southeast at approximately 26 meters per year. Results from the oil analyses indicate a high degree of biodegradation, characterized by nearly complete absence of n-alkanes. Cass Lake oil samples were more degraded than two oil samples collected in 2008 from the similarly contaminated USGS Bemidji, Minnesota, research site 40 kilometers away. Based on 19 ratios developed for comparing oil sources, the conclusion is that the oils at the two sites appear to be from the same hydrocarbon source. In the Cass Lake groundwater plume, benzene concentrations decrease by three orders of magnitude within 150 meters (m) downgradient from the oil body floating on the water table (between well MW-10 and USGS-4 well nest). The depths of the highest benzene concentrations increase with distance downgradient from the oil, a condition typical of plumes in shallow, unconfined aquifers. Background groundwater, which is nearly saturated with oxygen, becomes almost entirely anaerobic in the plume. As at the Bemidji site, the most important biodegradation processes are anaerobic and dominated by iron reduction. The similarity between the Cass Lake and Bemidji benzene degradation rates, redox conditions, and aquifer material all support a hypothesis that the Cass Lake plume, like the Bemidji plume, is decades old. As concentrations of alkylbenzenes in the oil decrease over time, the benzene concentrations in the groundwater plume will also decrease and the plume is expected to shrink. The Fox Creek wetland, about 250 m south of the Cass Lake site, is the nearest receptor to the south.

  1. Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolofsky, Scott A.; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2011-05-01

    Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m.

  2. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

  3. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1995-01-01

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  4. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1996-02-13

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  5. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-10-03

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  6. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  7. Bioremediation: Technology for treating hydrocarbon-contaminated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Towprayoon, S.; Kuntrangwattana, S. [King Mongkut`s Institute of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1996-12-31

    Cutting oil wastewater from an iron and steel factory was applied to the soil windrow. Self-remediation was then compared with remediation with acclimatized indigenous microbes. The incremental reduction rate of the microorganisms and hydrocarbon-degradable microbes was slower in self-remediation than in the latter treatment. Within 30 days, when the acclimatized indigenous microbes were used, there was a significant reduction of the contaminated hydrocarbons, while self-remediation took longer to reduce to the same concentration. Various nitrogen sources were applied to the soil pile, namely, organic compost, chemical fertilizer, ammonium sulfate, and urea. The organic compost induced a high yield of hydrocarbon-degradable microorganisms, but the rate at which the cutting oil in the soil decreased was slower than when other nitrogen sources were used. The results of cutting oil degradation studied by gas chromatography showed the absence of some important hydrocarbons. The increment of the hydrocarbon-degradable microbes in the land treatment ecosystem does not necessarily correspond to the hydrocarbon reduction efficiency. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  8. GEOCHEMISTRY OF SUBSURFACE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive barriers that couple subsurface fluid flow with a passive chemical treatment zone are emerging, cost effective approaches for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. Factors such as the build-up of surface precipitates, bio-fouling, and changes in subsurface tr...

  9. Applying model abstraction techniques to optimize monitoring networks for detecting subsurface contaminant transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving strategies for monitoring subsurface contaminant transport includes performance comparison of competing models, developed independently or obtained via model abstraction. Model comparison and parameter discrimination involve specific performance indicators selected to better understand s...

  10. Biogeochemical Stability of Contaminants in the Subsurface Following In Situ Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, innovative treatment technologies have emerged to meet groundwater cleanup goals. In many cases these methods take advantage of the redox behavior of contaminant species. For example, remedial technologies that strategically manipulate subsurface redox conditio...

  11. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for Subsurface Immobilization of Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.; Fujita, Y.; Ginn, T. R.; Hubbard, S. S.; Dafflon, B.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Henriksen, J. R.; Peterson, J.; Taylor, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of the greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have found that calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr can be accelerated by the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms, that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning, and that nutrient additions can stimulate ureolytic activity. To extend our understanding of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) in an aquifer setting a continuous recirculation field experiment evaluating MICP was conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO. In this experiment, groundwater extracted from an onsite well was amended with urea (total mass of 42.5 kg) and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into a well approximately 4 meters up-gradient for a period of 12 days followed by 10 months of groundwater sampling and monitoring. Crosshole radar and electrical tomographic data were collected prior, during, and after the MICP treatment. The urea and molasses treatment resulted in an enhanced population of sediment associated urea hydrolyzing organisms as evidenced by increases in the number of ureC gene copies, increases in 14C urea hydrolysis rates, and long-term observations of ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) in the injection, extraction and down gradient monitoring wells. Permeability changes and increases in the calcite saturation indexes in the well field suggest that mineral precipitation has occurred; ongoing analysis of field samples seeks to confirm this. Changes in dielectric constant and electrical conductivity were used to interpret the spatiotemporal distribution of the injectate and subsequent calcite precipitation. Modeling activities are underway to define field-scale urea hydrolysis rates.

  12. Biogeochemical processes in ethanol stimulated uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Santosh R; Kollah, Bharati; Hedrick, David B; Peacock, Aaron D; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Roden, Eric E

    2008-06-15

    A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted with uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment to assess the geochemical and microbial community response to ethanol amendment. A classical sequence of terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) was observed in ethanol-amended slurries, with NO3- reduction, Fe(III) reduction, SO4(2-) reduction, and CH4 production proceeding in sequence until all of the added 13C-ethanol (9 mM) was consumed. Approximately 60% of the U(VI) content of the sediment was reduced during the period of Fe(III) reduction. No additional U(VI) reduction took place during the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic phases of the experiment Only gradual reduction of NO3-, and no reduction of U(VI), took place in ethanol-free slurries. Stimulation of additional Fe(III) or SO4(2-) reduction in the ethanol-amended slurries failed to promote further U(VI) reduction. Reverse transcribed 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed major increases in the abundance of organisms related to Dechloromonas, Geobacter, and Herbaspirillum in the ethanol-amended slurries. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) indicative of Geobacter showed a distinct increase in the amended slurries, and analysis of PLFA 13C/12C ratios confirmed the incorporation of ethanol into these PLFAs. A increase in the abundance of 13C-labeled PLFAs indicative of Desulfobacter, Desulfotomaculum, and Desulfovibrio took place during the brief period of sulfate reduction that followed the Fe(III) reduction phase. Our results show that major redox processes in ethanol-amended sediments can be reliably interpreted in terms of standard conceptual models of TEAPs in sediments. However, the redox speciation of uranium is complex and cannot be explained based on simplified thermodynamic considerations. PMID:18605559

  13. Novel method for cleaning a vacuum chamber from hydrocarbon contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Wanzenboeck, H. D.; Roediger, P.; Hochleitner, G.; Bertagnolli, E.; Buehler, W. [Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7/1, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Carl Zeiss NTS GmbH, Carl-Zeiss-Str. 56, Oberkochen 73447 (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    A novel method for cleaning a high vacuum chamber is presented. This method is based on concurrent in situ high-energetic UV light activation of contaminants located in the residual gas and at the vacuum chamber surfaces as well as the in situ generation of highly reactive ozone. Ozone oxidizes the contaminants to volatile species. Investigations by energy-dispersive x-ray analysis of residual gas depositions and mass-spectroscopy measurements of the residual gas in the vacuum chamber identify the contaminant species as hydrocarbons. After a cleaning period of 8 h, a decrease in measured chamber contamination by about 90% could be achieved according to atomic force microscope analysis. Mass spectroscopy measurements using a residual gas analyzer indicate the creation of volatile, carbonaceous species during the cleaning process.

  14. The role of biominerals in enhancing the geophysical response at hydrocarbon contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewafy, Farag Mohamed

    There are several source mechanisms by which microbial activity in the subsurface can change geophysical signatures. To date the source mechanisms generating the geophysical signatures in microbially active environments remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the link between the biogeochemical processes resulting in biotransformation of metallic iron mineral phases and the associated biogeophysical signatures. Hydrocarbon contaminated environments provide excellent laboratories for investigating iron mineral biotransformation. In particular, we investigated the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the complex conductivity (CC) signatures of a hydrocarbon contaminated site near Bemidji, Minnesota. For the MS study, we investigated the changes in the MS response for cores retrieved from the site as well as down boreholes. The contaminated location revealed two enriched MS zones. The first MS lies within the hydrocarbon smear zone, which is limited to the zone of water table fluctuation with high concentrations of dissolved Fe(II) and organic carbon content. Magnetite and siderite were the dominant minerals formed during this process. However, magnetite was responsible for the bulk of MS changes. The second zone of MS enhancement lies within the vadose zone which is characterized by methane depletion suggesting that aerobic or anaerobic oxidation of methane is coupled to iron-reduction resulting in magnetite precipitation. For the CC work, we conducted laboratory CC measurements along four cores in addition to field CC survey. We found that the real (sigma?) and imaginary (sigma?) conductivity are higher for samples from within the oil plume especially within the smear zone compared to background uncontaminated samples. Using magnetite as an example of the biometallic minerals in the smear zone at the site, a clear increase in the sigma? response with increasing magnetite content was observed suggesting that the presence of bio-metallic mineral phases as well as electroactive Fe(II) within the smear zone impacts the imaginary conductivity. Our results suggest that the biogeochemical processes leading to the precipitation of metallic iron mineral phases impacts the geophysical signatures at hydrocarbon contaminated sites undergoing active biodegradation. These bio-metallic minerals (e.g., magnetite) provide us with another source mechanism which has not been considered in previous studies. Therefore, the recognition of the zone of enriched bio-metallic iron mineral phases within the water table fluctuating zone calls for a reevaluation of biogeophysical signatures observed at hydrocarbon contaminated sites commonly attributed to an enhancement of pore water conductivity related to the production of metabolic byproducts.

  15. Release of polyaromatic hydrocarbons from coal tar contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, N.D.; Lee, L.S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Agronomy

    1996-11-01

    A variety of process wastes generated from manufactured gas production (MGP) have contaminated soils and groundwater at production and disposal sites. Coal tar, consisting of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons present as a nonaqueous phase liquid, makes up a large portion of MGP wastes. Of the compounds in coal tar, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the major constituents of environmental concern due to their potential mutagenic and carcinogenic hazards. Characterization of the release of PAHs from the waste-soil matrix is essential to quantifying long-term environmental impacts in soils and groundwater. Currently, conservative estimates for the release of PAHs to the groundwater are made assuming equilibrium conditions and using relationships derived from artificially contaminated soils. Preliminary work suggests that aged coal tar contaminated soils have much lower rates of desorption and a greater affinity for retaining organic contaminants. To obtain better estimates of desorption rates, the release of PAHs from a coal tar soil was investigated using a flow-interruption, miscible displacement technique. Methanol/water solutions were employed to enhance PAH concentrations above limits of detection. For each methanol/water solution employed, a series of flow interrupts of varying times was invoked. Release rates from each methanol/water solution were estimated from the increase in concentration with duration of flow interruption. Aqueous-phase release rates were then estimated by extrapolation using a log-linear cosolvency model.

  16. The stability and utility of diagnostic ratio hydrocarbon fingerprinting for soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, G.S.; Sara McMillen

    1996-12-31

    In order to recover costs for oil spill cleanup and restoration regulatory agencies and trustees of natural resources are interested in identifying parties responsible for hydrocarbon releases, and for associated environmental damages. Chemical analyses of contaminated soil and groundwater samples are currently used to identify the sources of contamination in soil and groundwater systems. However, conventional hydrocarbon fingerprinting approaches such as EPA Method 8015, EPA Method 8270, and ASTM Method 3328-91 afford a low resolution fingerprint that is easily degraded in the environment. The challenge to the hydrocarbon chemist is to develop an analytical approach that minimizes the impact of environmental weathering and biodegradation on the oil signature and improves the accuracy of oil source identification. An advanced chemical fingerprinting strategy is presented that combines sensitive and hydrocarbon specific analytical methods with a detailed interpretive strategy designed to minimize the impacts of environmental weathering and biodegradation. Data will be presented from a series of oil biodegradation studies in soil that clearly demonstrate the utility and stability of source ratio analysis over a wide range of oil degradation states and oil types. Using principal component analysis, stable source ratios of C{sub 3}-dibenzothiophenes/C{sub 3}-phenanthrenes, and C{sub 2}-dibenzothiophenes/C{sub 2}-phenanthrenes were identified and evaluated. These source ratios retain their characteristic source ratio signature even after 95 percent of the PAH and dibenzothiophene target analytes and 70 percent of the total oil has been biodegraded.

  17. The stability and utility of diagnostic ratio hydrocarbon fingerprinting for soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, G.S.; Sara McMillen

    1996-01-01

    In order to recover costs for oil spill cleanup and restoration regulatory agencies and trustees of natural resources are interested in identifying parties responsible for hydrocarbon releases, and for associated environmental damages. Chemical analyses of contaminated soil and groundwater samples are currently used to identify the sources of contamination in soil and groundwater systems. However, conventional hydrocarbon fingerprinting approaches such as EPA Method 8015, EPA Method 8270, and ASTM Method 3328-91 afford a low resolution fingerprint that is easily degraded in the environment. The challenge to the hydrocarbon chemist is to develop an analytical approach that minimizes the impact of environmental weathering and biodegradation on the oil signature and improves the accuracy of oil source identification. An advanced chemical fingerprinting strategy is presented that combines sensitive and hydrocarbon specific analytical methods with a detailed interpretive strategy designed to minimize the impacts of environmental weathering and biodegradation. Data will be presented from a series of oil biodegradation studies in soil that clearly demonstrate the utility and stability of source ratio analysis over a wide range of oil degradation states and oil types. Using principal component analysis, stable source ratios of C[sub 3]-dibenzothiophenes/C[sub 3]-phenanthrenes, and C[sub 2]-dibenzothiophenes/C[sub 2]-phenanthrenes were identified and evaluated. These source ratios retain their characteristic source ratio signature even after 95 percent of the PAH and dibenzothiophene target analytes and 70 percent of the total oil has been biodegraded.

  18. Three-dimensional self-potential inversion for subsurface DNAPL contaminant detection at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    E-print Network

    Sailhac, Pascal

    River Site where there is known subsurface dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination-potential source inversion methodology and develop it as a predictive tool in the context of contaminated sites for subsurface DNAPL contaminant detection at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, Water Resour. Res., 43, W

  19. INFLUENCE OF COUPLED PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT FATE AND TRANSPORT IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The following chapter emphasizes subsurface environmental research investigations over the past 10 to 15 years that couple hydrological, geochemical, and biological processes as related to contaminant fate and transport. An attempt is made to focus on field-scale studies with possible reference to laboratory-scale endeavors. Much of the research discussed reflects investigations of the influence of coupled processes on the fate and transport of inorganic, radionuclide, and organic contaminants in subsurface environments as a result of natural processes or energy and weapons production endeavors that required waste disposal. The chapter provides on overview of the interaction between hydro-bio-geochemical processes in structured, heterogeneous subsurface environments and how these interactions control contaminant fate and transport, followed by experimental and numerical subsurface science research and case studies involving specific classes of inorganic and organic contaminants. Lastly, thought provoking insights are highlighted on why the study of subsurface coupled processes is paramount to understanding potential future contaminant fate and transport issues of global concern.

  20. A hybrid method for inverse characterization of subsurface contaminant flux

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Newman; Kirk Hatfield; Joel Hayworth; P. S. C. Rao; Tom Stauffer

    2005-01-01

    The methods presented in this work provide a potential tool for characterizing contaminant source zones in terms of mass flux. The problem was conceptualized by considering contaminant transport through a vertical “flux plane” located between a source zone and a downgradient region where contaminant concentrations were measured. The goal was to develop a robust method capable of providing a statement

  1. Review of Geophysical Techniques to Define the Spatial Distribution of Subsurface Properties or Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Truex, Michael J.

    2005-08-22

    This is a letter report to Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this report is to summarize state-of-the-art, minimally intrusive geophysical techniques that can be used to clarify subsurface geology, structure, moisture, and chemical composition. The technology review focused on geophysical characterization techniques that provide two- or three-dimensional information about the spatial distribution of subsurface properties and/or contaminants.

  2. INNOVATIVE PROCESSES FOR RECLAMATION OF CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research to better assess the capabilities and limitations of fixed-film bioreactors for removing selected organic contaminants from ground water or from contaminated vapor streams produced by air stripping of polluted ground water and by soil venting operations is described. ...

  3. INNOVATIVE PROCESS FOR RECLAMATION OF CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research to better assess the capabilities and limitations of fixed-film bioreactors for removing selected organic contaminants from ground water or from contaminated vapor streams produced by air stripping of polluted ground water and by soil venting operations is described. ork...

  4. FIELD SCREENING OF POLYCYCLIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION IN SOIL USING A PORTABLE SYNCHRONOUS SCANNING SPECTROFLUOROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination is a considerable problem at various hazardous waste sites. sources of PAH contamination include: incomplete combustion processes, wood preservatives, and the fuel industry. he development of rapid, cost-effective field screenin...

  5. Three-dimensional geologic modeling to determine the spatial attributes of hydrocarbon contamination, Noval Facility Fuel Farm, El Centro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Mutch, S.; Padgett, D.; Roche, L. (Jacobs Engineering Group, Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1994-04-01

    An investigation was conducted at the Naval Air Facility located in El Centro (NAFEC), to determine the vertical and horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the facilities fuel farm. The fuel products are the result of tank and pipeline leakage, past tank cleaning, and past disposal of fuel dispensing and filter cleaning practices. Subsurface soil and groundwater data was collected via soil borings, monitoring wells, and CPT probes. Soil, groundwater, and analytical data were integrated using the LYNX geoscience modeling system (GMS). Interactive sessions with the data visualizer helped guide the modeling and identify data gaps. Modeling results indicate a continuous surface confining clay layer to a depth of about 12 to 15 ft. Groundwater is confined beneath this clay layer and monitoring wells indicate about 3 to 5 ft of artesian head. Hydrocarbon contamination is concentrated within this clay layer from about 5 to 12 ft below the ground surface. Residual fuel products located in the groundwater are attributed to slow leakage through the confirming clay layer. LYNX was also used to compute volumes of contaminated soil to aid in remediation cost analysis. Preliminary figures indicate about 60,000 yards[sup 3] of contaminated soil. Since the contamination is primarily confined to relatively impermeable clayey soils, site remediation will likely be ex-situ land farming.

  6. FIELD-DRIVEN APPROACHES TO SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations from field sites provide a means for prioritizing research activities. For petroleum release sites observations include spiking of concentration distributions that may be related to water table fluctuation, co-location of contaminant plumes with geochemical indicat...

  7. FIELD-DRIVEN APPROACHES TO SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT MODELING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations from field sites provide a means for prioritizing research activities. In the case of petroleum releases, observations may include spiking of concentration distributions that may be related to water table fluctuation, co-location of contaminant plumes with geochemi...

  8. Characterization of the methanotrophic bacterial community present in a trichloroethylene-contaminated subsurface groundwater site.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J P; Jiménez, L; Rosario, I; Hazen, T C; Sayler, G S

    1993-01-01

    Groundwater, contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), was collected from 13 monitoring wells at Area M on the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site near Aiken, S.C. Filtered groundwater samples were enriched with methane, leading to the isolation of 25 methanotrophic isolates. The phospholipid fatty acid profiles of all the isolates were dominated by 18:1 omega 8c (60 to 80%), a signature lipid for group II methanotrophs. Subsequent phenotypic testing showed that most of the strains were members of the genus Methylosinus and one isolate was a member of the genus Methylocystis. Most of the methanotroph isolates exhibited soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) activity. This was presumptively indicated by the naphthalene oxidation assay and confirmed by hybridization with a gene probe encoding the mmoB gene and by cell extract assays. TCE was degraded at various rates by most of the sMMO-producing isolates, whereas PCE was not degraded. Savannah River Area M and other groundwaters, pristine and polluted, were found to support sMMO activity when supplemented with nutrients and then inoculated with Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. The maximal sMMO-specific activity obtained in the various groundwaters ranged from 41 to 67% compared with maximal rates obtained in copper-free nitrate mineral salts media. This study partially supports the hypothesis that stimulation of indigenous methanotrophic communities can be efficacious for removal of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons from subsurface sites and that the removal can be mediated by sMMO. PMID:8368829

  9. Environmental Research 105 (2007) 101118 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    Environmental Research 105 (2007) 101­118 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination hydrocarbons (PAH) are widespread contaminants in the San Francisco Bay. Several exceedances of water quality criteria raise the possibility that PAH may be impacting aquatic biota. The Regional Monitoring Program

  10. Sources of contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Spanish virgin olive oils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafael Rodríguez-Acuña; María del Carmen Pérez-Camino; Arturo Cert; Wenceslao Moreda

    2008-01-01

    The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in virgin olive oils results from contamination on olive skins and the oil itself during processing. Determination of nine PAHs was carried out by isolation of the hydrocarbon fraction and subsequent clean-up by solid phase extraction, followed by RP-HPLC analysis using a programmable fluorescence detector. Contamination of olive skins depends directly on environmental

  11. Contaminant removal efficiency depending on primary treatment and operational strategy in horizontal subsurface flow treatment wetlands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Pedescoll; Angélica Corzo; Eduardo Álvarez; Jaume Puigagut; Joan García

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the contaminant removal efficiency of shallow horizontal subsurface flow treatment wetlands (SSF TWs) as a function of (1) primary treatment (hydrolytic upflow sludge blanket (HUSB) reactor vs. conventional settling) and (2) operation strategy (alternation of saturated\\/unsaturated phases vs. permanently saturated). An experimental plant was constructed, operated and surveyed for the main water quality parameters over

  12. SPECIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS BY CONE PENETROMETRY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R826184)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chroma tography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collec...

  13. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

  14. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE: PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the alternatives considered for the remediation of soil and ground water at hazardous wastes sites are the use of natural processes to reduce or remove the contaminants of concern. Under favorable conditions, the use of natural attenuation can result in significant cost sa...

  15. TRANSPORT AND FATE OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication is based on a series of t.technology Transfer seminars that were conducted in 1987 and 1988. The document provides an overview of many of the issues associated with the physical, chemical and biological processes that control contaminant transport in the subsurfa...

  16. Control of Subsurface Contaminant Migration by Vertical Engineered Barriers

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Fact Sheet is intended to provide remedial project managers (RPMs), on-scene coordinators (OSCs), contractors, and other remediation stakeholders with a basic overview of hazardous waste containment systems constructed to prevent or limit the migration of contamination in gr...

  17. Time series analysis of contaminant transport in the subsurface: applications to conservative tracer and engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunmei; Li, Yusong

    2014-08-01

    Accurately predicting the transport of contaminants in the field is subject to multiple sources of uncertainty due to the variability of geological settings, the complexity of field measurements, and the scarcity of data. Such uncertainties can be amplified when modeling some emerging contaminants, such as engineered nanomaterials, when a fundamental understanding of their fate and transport is lacking. Typical field work includes collecting concentration at a certain location for an extended period of time, or measuring the movement of plume for an extended period time, which would result in a time series of observation data. This work presents an effort to evaluate the possibility of applying time series analysis, particularly, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, to forecast contaminant transport and distribution in the subsurface environment. ARIMA modeling was first assessed in terms of its capability to forecast tracer transport at two field sites, which had different levels of heterogeneity. After that, this study evaluated the applicability of ARIMA modeling to predict the transport of engineered nanomaterials at field sites, including field measured data of nanoscale zero valent iron and (nZVI) and numerically generated data for the transport of nano-fullerene aggregates (nC60). This proof-of-concept effort demonstrates the possibility of applying ARIMA to predict the contaminant transport in the subsurface environment. Like many other statistical models, ARIMA modeling is only descriptive and not explanatory. The limitation and the challenge associated with applying ARIMA modeling to contaminant transport in the subsurface are also discussed. PMID:24987973

  18. A hybrid method for inverse characterization of subsurface contaminant flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Mark; Hatfield, Kirk; Hayworth, Joel; Rao, P. S. C.; Stauffer, Tom

    2005-12-01

    The methods presented in this work provide a potential tool for characterizing contaminant source zones in terms of mass flux. The problem was conceptualized by considering contaminant transport through a vertical "flux plane" located between a source zone and a downgradient region where contaminant concentrations were measured. The goal was to develop a robust method capable of providing a statement of the magnitude and uncertainty associated with estimated contaminant mass flux values. In order to estimate the magnitude and transverse spatial distribution of mass flux through a plane, the problem was considered in an optimization framework. Two numerical optimization techniques were applied, simulated annealing (SA) and minimum relative entropy (MRE). The capabilities of the flux plane model and the numerical solution techniques were evaluated using data from a numerically generated test problem and a nonreactive tracer experiment performed in a three-dimensional aquifer model. Results demonstrate that SA is more robust and converges more quickly than MRE. However, SA is not capable of providing an estimate of the uncertainty associated with the simulated flux values. In contrast, MRE is not as robust as SA, but once in the neighborhood of the optimal solution, it is quite effective as a tool for inferring mass flux probability density functions, expected flux values, and confidence limits. A hybrid (SA-MRE) solution technique was developed in order to take advantage of the robust solution capabilities of SA and the uncertainty estimation capabilities of MRE. The coupled technique provided probability density functions and confidence intervals that would not have been available from an independent SA algorithm and they were obtained more efficiently than if provided by an independent MRE algorithm.

  19. Surface and subsurface characterization of uranium contamination at the Fernald environmental management site

    SciTech Connect

    Schilk, A.J.; Perkins, R.W.; Abel, K.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    The past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils, and the three-dimensional distribution of the uranium at these sites must be thoroughly characterized before any effective remedial protocols can be established. To this end, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the DOE`s Office of Technology Development with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies for the measurement of uranium in surface and subsurface soils at the Fernald Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration site. These studies are detailed in this report.

  20. Persistence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination in a California marine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.R.; Gossett, R.W.; Heesen, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Despite major reductions in the dominant DDT and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) input off Los Angeles (California, U.S.A.) in the early 1970s, the levels of these pollutants decreased only slightly from 1972 to 1975 both in surficial bottom sediments and in a flatfish bioindicator (Dover sole, Microstomus pacificus) collected near the submarine outfall. Concentrations of these pollutants in the soft tissues of the mussel Mytilus californianus, collected intertidally well inshore of the highly contaminated bottom sediments, followed much more closely the decreases in the outfall discharges. These observations suggest that contaminated sediments on the seafloor were the principal (although not necessarily direct) cause of the relatively high and persistent concentrations of DDT and PCB residues in tissues. The study indicated that residues of the higher-molecular-weight chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as DDT and PCB, can be highly persistent once released to coastal marine ecosystems and that their accumulation in surficial bottom sediments is the most likely cause of this persistence observed in the biota of the discharge zone.

  1. Integrated magnetic, gravity, and GPR surveys to locate the probable source of hydrocarbon contamination in Sharm El-Sheikh area, south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsy, Mona; Rashed, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Sharm El-Sheikh waters were suddenly hit by hydrocarbon spills which created a serious threat to the prosperous tourism industry in and around the city. Analysis of soil samples, water samples, and seabed samples collected in and around the contaminated bay area showed anomalous levels of hydrocarbons. An integrated geophysical investigation, using magnetic, gravity, and ground penetrating radar geophysical tools, was conducted in the headland overlooking the contaminated bay in order to delineate the possible subsurface source of contamination. The results of the geophysical investigations revealed three underground manmade reinforced concrete tanks and a complicated network of buried steel pipes in addition to other unidentified buried objects. The depths and dimensions of the discovered objects were determined. Geophysical investigations also revealed the presence of a north-south oblique slip fault running through the eastern part of the studied area. Excavations, conducted later on, confirmed the presence of one of the tanks delineated by the geophysical surveys.

  2. RADIO FREQUENCY ENHANCED DECONTAMINATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been considerable effort in the development of innovative treatment technologies for the clean up of sites containing hazardous wastes such as hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Typical examples of such waste material are: chlorinated solvents, polychlorinated b...

  3. Impact of bacterial biomass on contaminant sorption and transport in a subsurface soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bellin, C.A.; Rao, P.S. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Bioremediation practices attempt to increase microbial activity or populations to degrade organic contaminants present in soils or aquifers. Growth or addition of bacteria may drastically alter the chemical and physical characteristics of solid surfaces. Therefore, the impact of bacterial biomass on contaminant behavior in porous media near hazardous waste sites is of interest. This paper investigates the impact of bacterial biomass (Pseudomonas sp.) on the sorption and transport of three solutes (naphthalene, [sup 45]Ca, and quinoline) in a subsurface, fine-textured silt loam soil. 55 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Bioremediation Assessment of Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils from the High Arctic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lyle G. Whyte; Luc Bourbonnière; Claude Bellerose; Charles W. Greer

    1999-01-01

    The bioremediation potential of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from the most northerly inhabited station in the world, Canadian Forces Station - Alert, was assessed. Microbial enumeration, by both viable plate counts and direct counts, combined with molecular analysis (polymerase chain reaction and colony hybridization) for hydrocarbon catabolic genes (alkB, ndoB, xylE), demonstrated the presence of significant numbers of cold-adapted hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms. The

  5. ASSESSING UST CORRECTIVE ACTION TECHNOLOGY: A SCIENTIFIC EVALUATION OF THE MOBILITY AND DEGRADABILITY OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The problems associated with leakage of motor fuels and organic chemicals from underground storage tanks (USTs) are compounded by a general lack of understanding of the partitioning, retention, transformation, and transport of these contaminants in the subsurface environment. he ...

  6. STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

  7. FINAL REPORT. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS FROM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN THE ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, act as hormones or anti- hormones in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. The three major components of the research included: 1)a biotechnology based screening system ...

  8. Hydrochemical and Isotopic Evidence of Natural Attenuation at the Gas Station Contaminated with Fuel Hydrocarbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Ko; I. Oh; H. Suk; K. Lee

    2005-01-01

    Groundwater flow, hydrochemistry and the carbon isotope composition (d13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were measured to know the effect of natural attenuation which is induced by biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon at the abandoned gas station contaminated fuel hydrocarbons. The aquifer sediment consists of 4 to 5 m of unconsolidated and weathered soils overlying granite. The monitoring results of water

  9. Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Moffit, Alfred Edward

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated...

  10. Factors affecting the distribution of hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters in a shallow sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Cheon, J Y; Lee, K K; Lee, S Y; Lee, M H

    2001-07-01

    The distributions of hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters were investigated in a shallow sand aquifer highly contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons leaked from solvent storage tanks. For these purposes, a variety of field investigations and studies were performed, which included installation of over 100 groundwater monitoring wells and piezometers at various depths, soil logging and analyses during well and piezometer installation, chemical analysis of groundwater, pump tests, and slug tests. Continuous water level monitoring at three selected wells using automatic data-logger and manual measuring at other wells were also conducted. Based on analyses of the various investigations and tests, a number of factors were identified to explain the distribution of the hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters. These factors include indigenous biodegradation, hydrostratigraphy, preliminary pump-and-treat remedy, recharge by rainfall, and subsequent water level fluctuation. The permeable sandy layer, in which the mean water table elevation is maintained, provided a dominant pathway for contaminant transport. The preliminary pump-and-treat action accelerated the movement of the hydrocarbon contaminants and affected the redox evolution pattern. Seasonal recharge by rain, together with indigenous biodegradation, played an important role in the natural attenuation of the petroleum hydrocarbons via mixing/dilution and biodegradation. The water level fluctuations redistributed the hydrocarbon contaminants by partitioning them into the soil and groundwater. The identified factors are not independent but closely inter-correlated. PMID:11475158

  11. Bioremediation of Poly-Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)Contaminated Soil by Composting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadine Loick; Phil J. Hobbs; Mike D. C. Hale; Davey L. Jones

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive and critical review of research on different co-composting approaches to bioremediate hydrocarbon contaminated soil, organisms that have been found to degrade PAHs, and PAH breakdown products. Advantages and limitations of using certain groups of organisms and recommended areas of further research effort are identified. Studies investigating the use of composting techniques to treat contaminated soil

  12. Occurrence and Phylogenetic Diversity of Sphingomonas Strains in Soils Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natalie M. E. J. Leys; Annemie Ryngaert; Leen Bastiaens; Willy Verstraete; Eva M. Top; Dirk Springael

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial strains of the genus Sphingomonas are often isolated from contaminated soils for their ability to use polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as the sole source of carbon and energy. The direct detection of Sphingomonas strains in contaminated soils, either indigenous or inoculated, is, as such, of interest for bioremediation purposes. In this study, a culture-independent PCR-based detection method using specific

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS FROM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN THE ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disrupters. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals an...

  14. Geoelectrical characterization of a site with hydrocarbon contamination caused by pipeline leakage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Omar Delgado-Rodríguez; Vladimir Shevnin; Jesús Ochoa-Valdés; Albert Ryjov

    Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) method is used extensively in environmental impact studies including hydrocarbon contamination. In this work, the results of the geoelectrical characterization of a contaminated site caused by pipeline leakage are presented. Geoelectrical study was performed with multi-electrode technology and 2D profile data interpretation. VES results from six parallel profiles were presented in resistivity sections and maps. Layered

  15. Denitrifying bacteria from the terrestrial subsurface exposed to mixed waste contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Stefan [Florida State University; Prakash, Om [Florida State University; Gihring, Thomas [Florida State University; Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

    2010-01-01

    In terrestrial subsurface environments where nitrate is a critical groundwater contaminant, few cultivated representatives are available with which to verify the metabolism of organisms that catalyze denitrification. In this study, five species of denitrifying bacteria from three phyla were isolated from subsurface sediments exposed to metal radionuclide and nitrate contamination as part of the U.S. Department of Energy s Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (OR-IFRC). Isolates belonged to the genera Afipia and Hyphomicrobium (Alphaproteobacteria), Rhodanobacter (Gammaproteobacteria), Intrasporangium (Actinobacteria) and Bacillus (Firmicutes). Isolates from the phylum Proteobacteria were confirmed as complete denitrifiers, whereas the Gram-positive isolates reduced nitrate to nitrous oxide. Ribosomal RNA gene analyses reveal that bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter comprise a diverse population of circumneutral to moderately acidophilic denitrifiers at the ORIFRC site, with a high relative abundance in areas of the acidic source zone. Rhodanobacter species do not contain a periplasmic nitrite reductase and have not been previously detected in functional gene surveys of denitrifying bacteria at the OR-IFRC site. Sequences of nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase genes were recovered from the isolates and from the terrestrial subsurface by designing primer sets mined from genomic and metagenomic data and from draft genomes of two of the isolates. We demonstrate that a combination of cultivation, genomic and metagenomic data are essential to the in situ characterization of denitrifiers and that current PCR-based approaches are not suitable for deep coverage of denitrifying microorganisms. Our results indicate that the diversity of denitrifiers is significantly underestimated in the terrestrial subsurface.

  16. The use of plant-transpired water to monitor subsurface tritium contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Monheit, S.G. [Univ. of San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The experimental technique of sampling plant-transpired water to detect and monitor subsurface tritium contamination in soil water and groundwater was implemented in an area surrounding the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Data collected using the transpiration technique were compared with data collected by conventional soil water and groundwater sampling methods, to evaluate its application as an environmental monitoring tool. Tritium activity in the different ecological waters were compared for thirteen delineated areas. For statistical analysis of spatial and temporal trends, plant sampling stations were categorized as either deep or shallow rooted. Plant-transpired water samples were found to have consistently higher tritium activity than soil water or groundwater in leach localized area. Tritium activity in plant-transpired water diminished with distance from the emission source. Wet season plant-transpired water samples registered statistically significantly higher tritium activity than dry season samples, with the greatest variation from shallow rooted plants. The results of this study indicate that plant-transpired water sampling is a valuable tool in environmental monitoring and may be more sensitive in the detection of subsurface tritium contamination than conventional lysimeter or monitoring well sampling. Plant-transpired water sampling is a promising tool for investigating tritium distribution and concentration in contaminated soil water and groundwater.

  17. Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy

    2004-06-01

    This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophoreproducing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system, as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by increased chelation of actinides, which may increase actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

  18. Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy

    2005-06-01

    This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by these plants through increased chelation of actinides that increase in actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

  19. Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team

    SciTech Connect

    Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Lesperance, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L. [EnvironIssues (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

  20. Augmented In Situ Subsurface Bioremediation Process?BIO-REM, Inc. - Demonstration Bulletin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Augmented In Situ Subsurface Bioremediation Process? developed by BIO-REM, Inc., uses microaerophilic bacteria and micronutrients (H-10) and surface tension depressants/penetrants for the treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater. The bacteria utilize hydroc...

  1. [Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by cold-adapted microorganisms: research advance].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-jie; Wang, Xiang; Lu, Gui-lan; Wang, Qun-hui; Li, Fa-sheng; Guo, Guan-lin

    2011-04-01

    Cold-adapted microorganisms such as psychrotrophs and psychrophiles widely exist in the soils of sub-Arctic, Arctic, Antarctic, alpine, and high mountains, being the important microbial resources for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperature. Using the unique advantage of cold-adapted microorganisms to the bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in low temperature region has become a research hotspot. This paper summarized the category and cold-adaptation mechanisms of the microorganisms able to degrade petroleum hydrocarbon at low temperature, biodegradation characteristics and mechanisms of different petroleum fractions under the action of cold-adapted microorganisms, bio-stimulation techniques for improving biodegradation efficiency, e. g., inoculating petroleum-degrading microorganisms and adding nutrients or bio-surfactants, and the present status of applying molecular biotechnology in this research field, aimed to provide references to the development of bioremediation techniques for petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. PMID:21774336

  2. Subsurface contaminant monitoring by laser fluorescence excitation-emission spectroscopy in a cone penetrometer probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie; Hart, Sean J.; Wang, Wumin; Namytchkine, Denis; Kenny, Jonathan E.

    1995-10-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation-emission matrix (EEM) probe has been developed for subsurface monitoring of fluorescent organic contaminants. The fourth harmonic of a flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser (at 266 nm) is used to pump a Raman shifter. Up to ten laser beams (in the wavelength region of 258 to 379 nm) from the raman shifter are launched into optical fibers that conduct the light to the probe near the tip of the cone penetrometer. The fluorescence emission is excited through ten separate sapphire windows and collected by ten collection fibers that conduct the fluorescence to a spectrograph/CCD detection system. This probe allows real-time collection of LIF-EEMs of contaminants adsorbed on solids or dissolved in groundwater. LIF-EEMs provide a substantial amount of spectral information that can be used to determine the composition and quantity of contaminants in soils. The system was tested and calibrated in the laboratory. Spectra of different organic contaminants were measured in aqueous solutions, in organic solvents, and in different types of soils.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Estonian soil: contamination and profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Trapido

    1999-01-01

    The distribution and accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in soil as well as PAH profiles have been investigated in areas with different anthropogenic pollution such as the city of Tallinn, the towns of Pärnu and Kohtla-Järve and some rural areas. PAH were identified in 147 soil samples (0–10 cm upper layer) collected in September 1996. The typical ? PAH

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Glavina Del Rio, T; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Sims, D; Brettin, T; Bruce, D C; Detter, J C; Han, C S; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F W; Land, M L; Hauser, L J; Kyrpides, N; Lykidis, A; Richardson, P; Belieav, A; Sanford, R A; Löeffler, F E; Fields, M W

    2015-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium's genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation. PMID:25614562

  5. Monitoring the bio-stimulation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by measurements of soil electrical properties, and CO2 content and its 13C/12C isotopic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, C.; Gourry, J.; Ignatiadis, I.; Colombano, S.; Dictor, M.; Guimbaud, C.; Chartier, M.; Dumestre, A.; Dehez, S.; Naudet, V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminated soils represent an environmental issue as it impacts on ecosystems and aquifers. Where significant subsurface heterogeneity exists, conventional intrusive investigations and groundwater sampling can be insufficient to obtain a robust monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants, as the information they provide is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations, with no information between sampling points. In order to obtain wider information in space volume on subsurface modifications, complementary methods can be used like geophysics. Among geophysical methods, geoelectrical techniques such as electrical resistivity (ER) and induced polarization (IP) seem the more promising, especially to study the effects of biodegradation processes. Laboratory and field geoelectrical experiments to characterize soils contaminated by oil products have shown that mature hydrocarbon-contaminated soils are characterized by enhanced electrical conductivity although hydrocarbons are electrically resistive. This high bulk conductivity is due to bacterial impacts on geological media, resulting in changes in the chemical and physical properties and thus, to the geophysical properties of the ground. Moreover, microbial activity induced CO2 production and isotopic deviation of carbon. Indeed, produced CO2 will reflect the pollutant isotopic signature. Thus, the ratio ?13C(CO2) will come closer to ?13C(hydrocarbon). BIOPHY, project supported by the French National Research Agency (ANR), proposes to use electrical methods and gas analyses to develop an operational and non-destructive method for monitoring in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons in order to optimize soil treatment. Demonstration field is located in the South of Paris (France), where liquid fuels (gasoline and diesel) leaked from some tanks in 1997. In order to stimulate biodegradation, a trench has been dug to supply oxygen to the water table and thus stimulate aerobic metabolic bioprocesses. ER and IP surveys are performed regularly to monitor the stimulated biodegradation and progress of remediation until soil cleanup. Microbial activity is characterized by CO2 production increase and ?13C isotopic deviation, in the produced CO2 measured by infrared laser spectroscopy, and by an evolution of electrical conductivity and IP responses in correlation with microbiological and chemical analyses.

  6. Phospholipid fatty acids of a marine sedimentary microbial community in a laboratory microcosm: Responses to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A.D. Syakti; N. Mazzella; D. Nerini; M. Guiliano; J.C. Bertrand; P. Doumenq

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory microcosm experiments were performed to evaluate petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition in either non-contaminated (NC) or contaminated (C) sedimentary microcosms with a crude oil. An analytical procedure was developed to extract both hydrocarbons and PLFAs from the same culture. PLFAs were analyzed over time during an aerobic microcosm experiment (0–21 days) to obtain a better

  7. EFFECTS OF BREATHING AIR CONTAINING CONTAMINANTS SUCH AS CO2, CO AND HYDROCARBONS AT 1 AND 5 ATMOSPHERES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neural and behavioral effects of air contaminants such as CO2, CO and hydrocarbons are reviewed. Each contaminant or contaminant class is reviewed separately and then an attempt is made to estimate effects of combinations of contaminants. The effects are reviewed for both nor...

  8. Subsurface Organics in Aseptic Cores From the MARTE Robotic Drilling Experiment: Ground truth and Contamination Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Stoker, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    The subsurface is the key environment for searching for life on planets lacking surface life. This includes the search for past/present life on Mars where possible subsurface life could exist [1]. The Mars-Analog-Rio-Tinto-Experiment (MARTE) performed a simulation of a Mars robotic drilling at the RT Borehole#7 Site ~6.07m, atop a massive-pyrite deposit from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. The RT site is considered an important analog of Sinus Meridiani on Mars, an ideal model analog for a subsurface Martian setting [2], and a relevant example of deep subsurface microbial community including aerobic and anaerobic chemoautotrophs [4-5]. Searching for microbes or bulk organics of biological origin in a subsurface sample from a planet is a key scientific objective of Robotic drilling missions. During the 2005 Field experiment 28 minicores were robotically handled and subsampled for life detection experiments under anti-contamination protocols. Ground truth included visual observation of cores and lab based Elemental and Isotope Ratios Mass Spectrometry analysis (EA-IRMS) of bulk organics in Hematite and Gohetite-rich gossanized tuffs, gossan and clay layers within 0-6m-depth. C-org and N-tot vary up to four orders of magnitude among the litter (~11Wt%, 0-1cm) and the mineralized (~3Wt%, 1-3cm) layers, and the first 6 m-depth (C-org=0.02-0.38Wt%). Overall, the distribution/ preservation of plant and soil-derived organics (d13C-org = 26 per mil to 24 per mil) is ten times higher (C-org=0.33Wt%) that in hematite-poor clays, or where rootlets are present, than in hematite- rich samples (C-org=<0.01Wt%). This is consistent with ATP assay (Lightning-MVP, Biocontrol) for total biomass in subsurface (Borehole#7 ~6.07m, ~avg. 153RLU) vs. surface soil samples (~1,500-81,449RLU) [5]. However, the in-situ ATP assay failed in detecting presence of roots during the in-situ life detection experiment. Furthermore, cm-sized roots were overlooked during remote observations. Finally, ATP Luminometry provided insights for potential contamination from core-handling and environmental dust loadings on cleaned/sterilized control surfaces (e.g., 6,782-36,243RLU/cm2). Cleanliness/sterility can be maintained by applying a simple sterile protocol under field conditions. Science results from this research will support future Astrobiology driven drilling mission planned on Mars. Specifically, ground truth offers relevant insights to assess strengths and limits of in-situ/remote observations vs. laboratory measurements. Results from this experiment will also aid the debate on advantages/ disadvantages of manned vs. robotic drilling missions on Mars or other planets. [1] Boston et al., 1997; [2] http://marte.arc.nasa.gov; [3] Stoker, C., et al., 2006 AbSciCon, [4] Stoker et al., submitted; [5] Bonaccorsi., et al., 2006 AbSciCon.

  9. Bioslurry treatment of a soil contaminated with low concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark E. Zappi; Brad A. Rogers; Cynthia L. Teeter; Douglas Gunnison; Rakesh Bajpai

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the degradation patterns of petroleum hydrocarbons during bioremediation of soils containing low levels of contaminants. The study was conducted in pilot-scale bioslurry reactors (70 l) under aerobic conditions. The reactors were equipped with a process-gas-recirculation system to ensure complete containment and eventually complete degradation of all contaminants. The concentrations of benzene, toluene,

  10. Ecotoxicological and microbiological characterization of soils from heavy-metal- and hydrocarbon-contaminated sites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gra?yna A. P?aza; Grzegorz Na??cz-Jawecki; Onruthai Pinyakong; Paul Illmer; Rosa Margesin

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize soils from industrial sites by combining physicochemical, microbiological, and\\u000a ecotoxicological parameters and to assess the suitability of these assays for evaluation of contaminated sites and ecological\\u000a risk assessment. The soil samples were taken from long-term contaminated sites containing high amounts of heavy metals (sites\\u000a 1 and 2) or petroleum hydrocarbons (site 3)

  11. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  12. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

  13. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated aqueous and sediment environments 

    E-print Network

    Mills, Marc Allyn

    1994-01-01

    temperatures in an aqueous environment, the hydrophilic head forms hydrogen . a@'i(h gob 5'ypl Slraurfaetbnt t, Anionic Hydrophobic Cationic Hydrophobic Hydrophthc Alkylbenzene su Ifonates Alcohol sulfates Phosphate eaters Quaternary ammonium salts...BIODEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAIVHNATED AQUEOUS AND SEDIMENT ENVIRONMENTS A Thesis by MARC ALLYN MILLS Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  14. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated aqueous and sediment environments

    E-print Network

    Mills, Marc Allyn

    1994-01-01

    , respectively), a polyoxyethylene, or both positive and negative charges (defined as nonionic and amphoteric) (Figure 4). Typically, the hydrophobic tail is a fiexible-chain hydrocarbon where the longer the chain, the more effective the surfactant. However... micelle concentration (CMC), the surfactant will tend to form submicroscopic association colloids in the aqueous phase. These micelles are spherical aggregates of about 100 inolecules per micelle (Kalweit, 1988). The hydrophilic heads are turned toward...

  15. Bioremediation of hydrocarbons contaminating sewage effluent using man-made biofilms: effects of some variables.

    PubMed

    Al-Mailem, D M; Kansour, M K; Radwan, S S

    2014-11-01

    Biofilm samples were established on glass slides by submerging them in oil-free and oil-containing sewage effluent for a month. In batch cultures, such biofilms were effective in removing crude oil, pure n-hexadecane, and pure phenanthrene contaminating sewage effluent. The amounts of the removed hydrocarbons increased with increasing biofilm surface area exposed to the effluent. On the other hand, addition of the reducing agent thioglycollate dramatically inhibited the hydrocarbon bioremediation potential of the biofilms. The same biofilm samples removed contaminating hydrocarbons effectively in three successive batch bioremediation cycles but started to become less effective in the cycles thereafter, apparently due to mechanical biofilm loss during successive transfers. As major hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, the biofilms harbored species belonging to the genera Pseudomonas, Microvirga, Zavarzinia, Mycobacterium, Microbacterium, Stenotrophomonas, Gordonia, Bosea, Sphingobium, Brachybacterium, and others. The nitrogen fixer Azospirillum brasilense and the microalga Ochromonas distigma were also present; they seemed to enrich the biofilms, with nitrogenous compounds and molecular oxygen, respectively, which are known to enhance microbiological hydrocarbon degradation. It was concluded that man-made biofilms based upon sewage microflora are promising tools for bioremediation of hydrocarbons contaminating sewage effluent. PMID:25146193

  16. Variations in the biodegradation potential of subsurface environments for organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.T.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the rates, patterns, and pathways involved in the biodegradation of organic contaminants in subsurface environments. Subsurface material was obtained from ten sites in six geographical locations representing diverse environmental conditions. The overall goal was to gain a general understanding of biodegradative mechanisms rather than making site-specific measurements. The biodegradation rates of methanol, phenol, and t-butanol (TBA) were evaluated in static soil/water microcosms. Biodegradation assays were conducted under ambient anoxic conditions, and with the addition of potential electron acceptors (nitrate, nitrite, sulfate) or metabolic inhibitors (molybdate, BESA) to promote different pathways of anaerobic microbial metabolism (nitrate respiration/denitrification, sulfate reduction, or methanogenesis). In unamended systems, biodegradation rates varied considerably between sit. Methanol and phenol were degraded fairly readily. Rates generally ranged from 0.5 to 1.0 mgL{sup {minus}1}d{sup {minus}1} for 20 C incubation. Disappearance of methanol and phenol followed zero- to first-order kinetics and was usually immediate, requiring no acclimation period. TBA was relatively recalcitrant in subsurface soils, disappearing at a rate of 0.1-0.3 mgL{sup {minus}1}d{sup {minus}1} (20 C). No biodegradation was evident, relative to sterile controls, in certain soils. The pattern of TBA degradation was typically biphasic: a long lag period of slow, linear removal was followed by an abrupt increase in removal rate (albeit still slow), Biodegradation rates were positively correlated with bacterial density for 12 soil samples from 3 sites within a localized area at Blacksburg, Virginia. However, this relationship did not exist between soils from diverse locations.

  17. Contrasts between subsurface microbial communities and their metabolic adaptation to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a forested and an urban coal-tar disposal site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eugene L. Madsen; Anne Winding; Kenneth Malachowsky; Constance T. Thomas; William C. Ghiorse

    1992-01-01

    The abundance and distribution of microorganisms and their potential for mineralizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in subsurface sediment samples at two geographically separate buried coal-tar sites. At a relatively undisturbed forested site in the northeastern United States, metabolic adaptation to the PAHs was evident: Radiolabeled naphthalene and phenanthrene were converted to 14CO2 in core material from inside but

  18. Geophysical and geochemical evidence for subsurface hydrocarbon leakage in southern Bering Sea, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, M.A.

    1989-03-01

    Geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted in the southern Bering Sea to investigate whether hydrocarbons found in the surficial sediments, particularly in association with certain geophysical events, indicate the presence and nature of more deeply reservoirs oil and gas deposits. Surface sediment samples were obtained at 1000 sites where high-resolution seismic data indicated the presence of gas, active seepage, and/or surface faulting. In addition, sites for background measurements were chosen away from areas of gas seepage. Sediment samples were frozen to inhibit bacterial action and sent to Houston for analysis. Each sample was examined for free light hydrocarbons, adsorbed light hydrocarbons, liquid hydrocarbons, nonhydrocarbon gas (carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen), and the isotopic composition of methane and carbon dioxide. Results of the geophysical survey showed seismic wipeout zones present throughout the southern Bering Sea. Sediment samples obtained within the shallow wipeout zones confirmed these features are caused by gas. In addition, compositional and isotopic analyses indicated the gas is of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. The thermogenic leakage appears to be related to localized faulting and shallow structuring. Therefore, the high-resolution seismic data provided an excellent tool for locating leakage points, thereby enhancing the opportunity for finding migrated thermogenic hydrocarbons in surficial sediments.

  19. Modeling discrete gas bubble formation and mobilization during subsurface heating of contaminated zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Magdalena M.; Mumford, Kevin G.; Johnson, Richard L.; Sleep, Brent E.

    2011-04-01

    During thermal remediation the increase in subsurface temperature can lead to bubble formation and mobilization. In order to investigate the effect of gas formation on resulting aqueous concentrations, a 2D finite difference flow and mass transport model was developed which incorporates a macroscopic invasion percolation (MIP) model to simulate bubble expansion and movement. The model was used to simulate three soil scenarios with different permeabilities and entry pressures at various operating temperatures and groundwater velocities. It was observed that discrete bubble formation occurred in all three soils, upward mobility being limited by lower temperatures and higher entry pressures. Bubble mobilization resulted in a different aqueous mass distribution than if no discrete gas formation was modeled, especially at higher temperatures. This was a result of bubbles moving upwards to cooler areas, then collapsing, and contaminating previously clean zones. The cooling effect also led to possible non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) formation which was not predicted using a model without discrete bubble formation.

  20. Assessing of Conceptual Models for Subsurface Reactive Transport of Inorganic Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, James A.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Steefel, Carl I.; Zachara, John M.; Curtis, Gary P.; Redden, George D.; Criscenti, Louise J.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2004-11-01

    In many subsurface situations where human health and environmental quality are at risk (e.g., contaminant hydrogeology, petroleum extraction, carbon sequestration, etc.), scientists and engineers are being asked by federal agency decision-makers to predict the fate of chemical species under conditions where both reactions and transport are processes of first-order importance. In 2002, a working group (WG) was formed by representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Agriculture, and Army Engineer Research and Development Center to assess the role of reactive transport modeling (RTM) in addressing these situations. Specifically, the goals of the WG are to (1) evaluate the state of the art in conceptual model development and parameterization for RTM, as applied to soil, vadose zone, and groundwater systems, and (2) prioritize research directions that would enhance the practical utility of RTM.

  1. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in feces of river otters from the southern Pacific

    E-print Network

    hydrocarbon contaminants in coastal river otters (Lontra canadensis) were evaluated by sampling feces (scats.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv #12;The North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) inhabits coastal regions of the Georgia Basin spatial trends in residues. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: River otter Lontra

  2. Hydrocarbon contamination affects deep-sea benthic oxygen uptake and microbial community composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, C. E.; Ruhl, H. A.; Jones, D. O. B.; Yool, A.; Thornton, B.; Mayor, D. J.

    2015-06-01

    Accidental oil well blowouts have the potential to introduce large quantities of hydrocarbons into the deep sea and disperse toxic contaminants to midwater and seafloor areas over ocean-basin scales. Our ability to assess the environmental impacts of these events is currently impaired by our limited understanding of how resident communities are affected. This study examined how two treatment levels of a water accommodated fraction of crude oil affected the oxygen consumption rate of a natural, deep-sea benthic community. We also investigated the resident microbial community's response to hydrocarbon contamination through quantification of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and their stable carbon isotope (?13C) values. Sediment community oxygen consumption rates increased significantly in response to increasing levels of contamination in the overlying water of oil-treated microcosms, and bacterial biomass decreased significantly in the presence of oil. Multivariate ordination of PLFA compositional (mol%) data showed that the structure of the microbial community changed in response to hydrocarbon contamination. However, treatment effects on the ?13C values of individual PLFAs were not statistically significant. Our data demonstrate that deep-sea benthic microbes respond to hydrocarbon exposure within 36 h.

  3. BIOGEOCHEMICAL EVIDENCE FOR MICROBIAL COMMUNITY CHANGE IN A JET FUEL HYDROCARBONS-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A glacio-fluvial aquifer located at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, had been contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons released after the crash of a tanker aircraft in October of 1988 Microbial biomass and community structure, associated with the aquifer sediments, were chara...

  4. EARLY WARNING MARINE WATER SUPPLY PROTECTION STRATEGY: THE THREAT OF OIL SPILL (PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON) CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oil spills resulting from the twice-grounded freighter New Carissa on the Central Oregon coast in the spring of 1999 caused substantial concern regarding potential petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contamination of Coos Bay, Alsea Bay and Yaquina Bay estuaries and resident seawater fac...

  5. Petroleum–hydrocarbon contamination and remediation by microbioventing at subAntarctic Macquarie Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John L. Rayner; Ian Snape; James L. Walworth; Paul Mc A. Harvey; Susan H. Ferguson

    2007-01-01

    Natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons in polar and subpolar soils is limited by low nutrients, low temperatures, and water availability. This study investigated three sites contaminated with diesel fuel and the use of aeration to remediate one of the sites at sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island. These sites were of differing ages and had different soil–water regimes. The most recent spill (New

  6. Intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa M. Gieg; R. S. Tanner; S. H. Jr. Harris; K. L. Sublette; J. M. Suflita; R. V. Kolhatkar

    1999-01-01

    A study was designed to determine if the intrinsic bioremediation of gas condensate hydrocarbons represented an important fate process in a shallow aquifer underlying a natural gas production site. For over 4 yr, changes in the groundwater, sediment, and vadose zone chemistry in the contaminated portion of the aquifer were interpreted relative to a background zone. Changes included decreased dissolved

  7. A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF USING A GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR FOR MORE EFFECTIVE REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted (1) to assess the capability of groundpenetrating radar (GPR) to identify natural subsurface features, detect man-made objects burled in the soil, and both detect and define the extent of contaminated soil or ground water due to a toxic spill, and (2) to det...

  8. Denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter dominate bacterial communities in the highly contaminated subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Green; Om Prakash; Puja Jasrotia; Will Overholt; Erick Cardenas; Daniela Hubbard; James M. Tiedje; David B Watson; Christopher Warren Schadt; Scott C Brooks; Joel Kostka

    2011-01-01

    The effect of long-term mixed-waste contamination, particularly uranium and nitrate, on the microbial community in the terrestrial subsurface was investigated at the field scale at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site in Oak Ridge, TN. The abundance, community composition, and distribution of groundwater microorganisms were examined across the site during two seasonal sampling events. At representative locations,

  9. Genome Sequences for Three Denitrifying Bacterial Strains Isolated from a Uranium- and Nitrate-Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramanan, Raghavee; Prakash, Om; Woyke, Tanja; Chain, Patrick; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Watson, David; Brooks, Scott; Kostka, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequences for three strains of denitrifying bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria—Afipia sp. strain 1NLS2 and Hyphomicrobium denitrificans strain 1NES1; Firmicutes—Bacillus sp. strain 1NLA3E) isolated from the nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN, are reported. PMID:23833140

  10. Enumeration and Characterization of Iron(III)-Reducing Microbial Communities from Acidic Subsurface Sediments Contaminated with Uranium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Lainie; North, Nadia N.; Dollhopf, Sherry L.; Balkwill, David L.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2003-01-01

    Iron(III)-reducing bacteria have been demonstrated to rapidly catalyze the reduction and immobilization of uranium(VI) from contaminated subsurface sediments. Thus, these organisms may aid in the development of bioremediation strategies for uranium contamination, which is prevalent in acidic subsurface sediments at U.S. government facilities. Iron(III)-reducing enrichment cultures were initiated from pristine and contaminated (high in uranium, nitrate; low pH) subsurface sediments at pH 7 and pH 4 to 5. Enumeration of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria yielded cell counts of up to 240 cells ml?1 for the contaminated and background sediments at both pHs with a range of different carbon sources (glycerol, acetate, lactate, and glucose). In enrichments where nitrate contamination was removed from the sediment by washing, MPN counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria increased substantially. Sediments of lower pH typically yielded lower counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in lactate- and acetate-amended enrichments, but higher counts were observed when glucose was used as an electron donor in acidic enrichments. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences extracted from the highest positive MPN dilutions revealed that the predominant members of Fe(III)-reducing consortia from background sediments were closely related to members of the Geobacteraceae family, whereas a recently characterized Fe(III) reducer (Anaeromyxobacter sp.) and organisms not previously shown to reduce Fe(III) (Paenibacillus and Brevibacillus spp.) predominated in the Fe(III)-reducing consortia of contaminated sediments. Analysis of enrichment cultures by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) strongly supported the cloning and sequencing results. Dominant members of the Fe(III)-reducing consortia were observed to be stable over several enrichment culture transfers by T-RFLP in conjunction with measurements of Fe(III) reduction activity and carbon substrate utilization. Enrichment cultures from contaminated sites were also shown to rapidly reduce millimolar amounts of U(VI) in comparison to killed controls. With DNA extracted directly from subsurface sediments, quantitative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences with MPN-PCR indicated that Geobacteraceae sequences were more abundant in pristine compared to contaminated environments,whereas Anaeromyxobacter sequences were more abundant in contaminated sediments. Thus, results from a combination of cultivation-based and cultivation-independent approaches indicate that the abundance/community composition of Fe(III)-reducing consortia in subsurface sediments is dependent upon geochemical parameters (pH, nitrate concentration) and that microorganisms capable of producing spores (gram positive) or spore-like bodies (Anaeromyxobacter) were representative of acidic subsurface environments. PMID:14660400

  11. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants in marine habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian M Head; Richard PJ Swannell

    1999-01-01

    Bioremediation is being increasingly seen as an effective, environmentally benign treatment for shorelines contaminated as a result of marine oil spills. Despite a relatively long history of research on oil-spill bioremediation, it remains an essentially empirical technology and many of the factors that control bioremediation have yet to be adequately understood. Nutrient amendment is a widely accepted practice in oil-spill

  12. BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN MARINE HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation is being increasingly seen as an effective environmentally benign treatment for shorelines contaminated as a result of marine oil spills. Despite a relatively long history of research on oil-spill bioremediation, it remains an essentially empirical technology and m...

  13. Denitrifying Bacteria from the Genus Rhodanobacter Dominate Bacterial Communities in the Highly Contaminated Subsurface of a Nuclear Legacy Waste Site

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stefan J.; Prakash, Om; Jasrotia, Puja; Overholt, Will A.; Cardenas, Erick; Hubbard, Daniela; Tiedje, James M.; Watson, David B.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of long-term mixed-waste contamination, particularly uranium and nitrate, on the microbial community in the terrestrial subsurface was investigated at the field scale at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site in Oak Ridge, TN. The abundance, community composition, and distribution of groundwater microorganisms were examined across the site during two seasonal sampling events. At representative locations, subsurface sediment was also examined from two boreholes, one sampled from the most heavily contaminated area of the site and another from an area with low contamination. A suite of DNA- and RNA-based molecular tools were employed for community characterization, including quantitative PCR of rRNA and nitrite reductase genes, community composition fingerprinting analysis, and high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of rRNA genes. The results demonstrate that pH is a major driver of the subsurface microbial community structure and that denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter (class Gammaproteobacteria) dominate at low pH. The relative abundance of bacteria from this genus was positively correlated with lower-pH conditions, and these bacteria were abundant and active in the most highly contaminated areas. Other factors, such as the concentration of nitrogen species, oxygen level, and sampling season, did not appear to strongly influence the distribution of Rhodanobacter bacteria. The results indicate that these organisms are acid-tolerant denitrifiers, well suited to the acidic, nitrate-rich subsurface conditions, and pH is confirmed as a dominant driver of bacterial community structure in this contaminated subsurface environment. PMID:22179233

  14. Spatial variations of hydrocarbon contamination and soil properties in oil exploring fields across China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuting; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Jian; Li, Guanghe

    2012-11-30

    Successful site remediation is critically based on a comprehensive understanding of distribution of contaminants, soil physico-chemical and microbial properties in oil contaminated sites. One hundred and ten topsoils were sampled from seven typical oil fields in different geoclimate regions across north to south China to investigate the spatial variances of oil contaminations and soil parameters. Oil concentrations and compositions, soil geochemical properties and microbial populations were analyzed and statistic analysis methods were used to analyze the spatial pattern of soil variables. The results indicated that oil contaminations were serious in most oil exploring areas in China, especially with high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from petrogenic origin. Ordination analyses indicated a relatively distinct spatial pattern that all soil samples grouped mainly by geographic locations, instead of distributing along contamination or other geochemical variable gradient. Microbial populations were found to be statistically positively correlated with soil nitrogen, phosphorus and water content, and negatively correlated with salt pH and soluble salts (P<0.05). This study provided insights into the spatial variability of soil variables in hydrocarbon-contaminated fields across large spatial scales, which is important for the environmental protection and further remediation in oil contaminated sites according to local conditions. PMID:23069331

  15. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: The perspectives of history and hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Bioremediation, the use of microbial degradation processes to detoxify environmental contamination, was first applied to petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water systems in the early 1970s. Since that time, these technologies have evolved in some ways that were clearly anticipated early investigators, and in other ways that were not foreseen. The expectation that adding oxidants and nutrients to contaminated aquifers would enhance biodegradation, for example, has been born out subsequent experience. Many of the technologies now in common use such as air sparging, hydrogen peroxide addition, nitrate addition, and bioslurping, are conceptually similar to the first bioremediation systems put into operation. More unexpected, however, were the considerable technical problems associated with delivering oxidants and nutrients to heterogeneous ground water systems. Experience has shown that the success of engineered bioremediation systems depends largely on how effectively directions and rates of ground water flow can be controlled, and thus how efficiently oxidants and nutrients can be delivered to contaminated aquifer sediments. The early expectation that injecting laboratory-selected or genetically engineered cultures of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria into aquifers would be a useful bioremediation technology has not been born out subsequent experience. Rather, it appears that petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in ground water systems and that bacterial addition is usually unnecessary. Perhaps the technology that was least anticipated early investigators was the development of intrinsic bioremediation. Experience has shown that natural attenuation mechanisms - biodegradation, dilution, and sorption - limit the migration of contaminants to some degree in all ground water systems. Intrinsic bioremediation is the deliberate use of natural attenuation processes to treat contaminated ground water to specified concentration levels at predetermined points in the aquifer. In current practice, intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons requires a systematic assessment to show that ambient natural attenuation mechanisms are efficient enough to meet regulatory requirements and a monitoring program to verify that performance requirements are met in the future.

  16. CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Johnson, Jr.

    2003-06-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV. Also conducted was screening of 13 chemicals to determine their relative effectiveness and the selection of three chemicals for further testing.

  17. Applying model abstraction techniques to optimize monitoring networks for detecting subsurface contaminant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Guber, A.; Gish, T. J.; Yakirevich, A.; Nicholson, T. J.; Cady, R.

    2012-12-01

    Improving strategies for monitoring subsurface contaminant transport includes performance comparison of competing models, developed independently or obtained via model abstraction. Model comparison and parameter discrimination involve specific performance indicators selected to better understand subsurface contaminant transport to optimize groundwater monitoring networks (GMN). Three abstraction techniques were validated for GMN design: (1) using pedotransfer functions, (2) profile aggregation, and (3) limiting the input domain by ignoring the unsaturated zone. Data were collected in the tracer experiment at the USDA-ARS OPE3 integrated research site. A pulse of a potassium chloride solution was applied to a 13m x14 m irrigation plot, and chloride concentrations were measured in the groundwater at three sampling depths in 12 observations wells installed at distances of 7 m and 14 m from the irrigation plot. The spatial distribution of soil materials was obtained from cores taken at 0.2 m increments to the depth of 2 m during installation of the observation wells. Soil hydraulic conductivity values were obtained from the HYDRUS-3D calibration with chloride concentration time series measured in the observation wells, and soil water retention was estimated from pedotransfer functions. The model abstraction techniques were evaluated using HYDRUS-3D simulations performed for different hydrologic scenarios. These scenarios included three weather, two ground-water depth, and two groundwater slope scenarios, as well as two different locations of the contaminant release selected within the irrigation plot. The weather scenarios were based on 25%, 50% and 75% of the 10-year probability of mean annual precipitation. The monitoring locations for GMN were selected based on three performance indicators: the peak concentration (Cpeak), the time to the peak concentration (Tpeak) and total chemical flux (QC). The monitoring locations were selected based on (a) more frequent, and (b) more probable and persistent appearance of maximum or minimum values of the above performance indicators. Cpeak and QC appeared to be more reliable performance indicators compared to Tpeak. The profile aggregation method was found to be the only abstraction technique that generated a GMN differed from the network obtained using the calibrated HYDRUS-3D model based on Cpeak and QC performance indicators. The outcome of this study provides reasonable assurance that model abstraction techniques can be used to optimize monitoring network strategies, and can provide specific the information for the future data collection and abstraction efforts to optimize a GMN.

  18. Aerobic biodegradation potential of subsurface microorganisms from a jet fuel-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aelion, C.M.; Bradley, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    In 1975, a leak of 83,000 gallons (314,189 liters) of jet fuel (JP-4) contaminated a shallow water-table aquifer near North Charleston, S.C. Laboratory experiments were conducted with contaminated sediments to assess the aerobic biodegradation potential of the in situ microbial community. Sediments were incubated with 14C-labeled organic compounds, and the evolution of 14CO2 was measured over time. Gas chromatographic analyses were used to monitor CO2 production and O2 consumption under aerobic conditions. Results indicated that the microbes from contaminated sediments remained active despite the potentially toxic effects of JP-4. 14CO2 was measured from [14C]glucose respiration in unamended and nitrate-amended samples after 1 day of incubation. Total [14C]glucose metabolism was greater in 1 mM nitrate-amended than in unamended samples because of increased cellular incorporation of 14C label. [14C]benzene and [14C]toluene were not significantly respired after 3 months of incubation. With the addition of 1 mM NO3, CO2 production measured by gas chromatographic analysis increased linearly during 2 months of incubation at a rate of 0.099 ??mol g-1 (dry weight) day-1 while oxygen concentration decreased at a rate of 0.124 ??mol g-1 (dry weight) day-1. With no added nitrate, CO2 production was not different from that in metabolically inhibited control vials. From the examination of selected components of JP-4, the n-alkane hexane appeared to be degraded as opposed to the branched alkanes of similar molecular weight. The results suggest that the in situ microbial community is active despite the JP-4 jet fuel contamination and that biodegradation may be compound specific. Also, the community is strongly nitrogen limited, and nitrogen additions may be required to significantly enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  19. Biological indicators capable of assessing thermal treatment efficiency of hydrocarbon mixture-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangang; Zhan, Xinhua; Zhou, Lixiang; Lin, Yusuo

    2010-08-01

    In China, there are many special sites for recycling and washing the used drums, which release a variety of C5-C40 hydrocarbon mixture into the soil around the site. The remediation of these contaminated sites by thermal treatment is adopted ubiquitously and needs to be assessed. Here we report the feasibility of biological indicators applied to assess thermal treatment efficiency in such contaminated soil. A series of biological indicators, including seed germination index (SGI), root elongation index (REI), plant growth height, biomass, carbon dioxide evolved (CDE), soil respiration inhibition (SRI) and soil enzymatic activities, were employed to monitor or assess hydrocarbon mixture removal in thermal treated soil. The results showed that residual hydrocarbon mixture content correlated strongly negatively with SGI for sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.), plant height, and biomass for ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) in the concentration ranges of 0-3990, 0-3170 and 0-2910 mg kg(-1), respectively. In contrast, REI for sesamum was positively correlated with residual hydrocarbon mixture content from 0 to 1860 mg kg(-1). In addition, both CDE and SRI demonstrated that 600 mg kg(-1) of residual hydrocarbon mixture content caused the highest amount of soil carbon dioxide emission and inhabitation of soil respiration. The results of soil enzymes indicated that 1000 mg kg(-1) of residual hydrocarbon mixture content was the threshold value of stimulating or inhibiting the activities of phosphatase and catalase, or completely destroying the activities of dehydrogenase, invertase, and urease. In conclusion, these biological indicators can be used as a meaningful complementation for traditional chemical content measurement in evaluating the environmental risk of the contaminated sites before and after thermal treatment. PMID:20598340

  20. Subsurface structure and hydrocarbon occurrence, cretaceous rocks of Maxie and Pistol Ridge Fields, Southeastern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.; Meylan, M.A. (Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Maxie and Pistol Ridge fields are located along the southern boundary of the Mississippi Salt basin and northern edge of the Wiggins arch in Forrest and Pearl River counties, Mississippi. Together, the fields have produced about 12 million bbl of oil and 600 mcf of gas to date, primarily from the lower Tuscaloosa Formation. Production ranges from the Hosston to the Wilcox. A field study using 281 electric logs was done to determine controls on hydrocarbon distribution, emphasizing the Dantzler and Upper Cretaceous section. Almost all hydrocarbon traps at the fields are related to the Maxie-Pistol Ridge fault, a northward-dipping normal fault extending about 18 mi in an east-west direction. Maximum throw along the fault is about 300 ft (at the Dantzler and Lower Tuscaloosa Formation horizons), and it dies out upward into the lower part of the Tertiary. Several smaller antithetic and synthetic faults occur parallel to subparallel to the main fault. On the downthrown side of the fault, hydrocarbons occur in two rollover structures designated here as the Maxie anticline and the Pistol Ridge faulted anticline. The former, slightly higher, has trapped mostly lower Tuscaloosa gas, while the latter, structurally lower, contain dominantly oil, spread stratigraphically from the Paluxy to the Eutaw/upper Tuscaloosa. Upthrown structural traps are low-relief simple closures of fault-closed noses on what are designated as the East and West Wiggins anticlines. Hosston and Rodessa pay in the latter is referred to as West Pistol Ridge field.

  1. Low salinity hydrocarbon water disposal through deep subsurface drip irrigation: leaching of native selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Engle, Mark A.; Boehlke, Adam R.; Zupancic, John W.

    2013-01-01

    A subsurface drip irrigation system is being used in Wyoming’s Powder River Basin that treats high sodium, low salinity, coal bed methane (CBM) produced water with sulfuric acid and injects it into cropped fields at a depth of 0.92 m. Dissolution of native gypsum releases calcium that combats soil degradation that would otherwise result from high sodium water. Native selenium is leached from soil by application of the CBM water and traces native salt mobilization to groundwater. Resulting selenium concentrations in groundwater at this alluvial site were generally low (0.5–23 ?g/L) compared to Wyoming’s agricultural use suitability standard (20 ?g/L).

  2. Occurrence of atrazine and degradates as contaminants of subsurface drainage and shallow groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Jayachandran, K.; Steinheimer, T.R.; Moorman, T.B. [National Soil Tilth Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Atrazine is a commonly used herbicide in corn (Zea mays L.) growing areas of the USA. Because of its heavy usage, moderate persistence, and mobility in soil, monitoring of atrazine movement under field conditions is essential to assess its potential to contaminate groundwater. Concentrations of atrazine, deisopropylatrazine (DIA), and deethlatraaine (DEA) were measured in subsurface drainage and shallow groundwater beneath continuous, no-till corn. Water samples were collected from the subsurface drain (tile) outlets and suction lysimeters in the growing seasons of 1990 and 1991, and analyzed for atrazine and two principle degradates won solid-phase extraction and HPLC. In 1990, atrazine concentration ranged from 1.3 to 5.1{mu}g L{sup -1} in tile-drain water and from 0.5 to 20.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} in lysimeter water. In general, concentrations of parent and degradates in solution were atrazine > DEA > DIA. Lesser levels of atrazine were measured in 1991 from Plots 2 and 4; however, greater concentrations of atrazine (6.0-8.4 {mu}g L{sup -1}) were measured from plot 5. Throughout the two growing seasons, atrazine concentration in Plot 5 tile-drain water was greater than that of Plots 2 and 4, suggesting a preferential movement of atrazine. Concentrations of DIA and DEA ranged from 0.1 to 2.2 and 0.9 to 3.2 {mu}g L{sup -1} respectively, indicating that the degradation products by themselves or in combination with parent atrazine can exceed the maximum contaminant level (mcl) of 3 {mu}g L{sup -1} even though atrazine by itself may be <3 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The deethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratio (DAR) is an indicator of residence time in soil during transport of atrazine to groundwater. In Plots 2 and 4, DAR values for tile-drain water ranged from 0.43 to 2.70 and 0.50 to 2.66 respectively. By comparison, a DAR of 0.38 to 0.60 was observed in Plot 5, suggesting less residence time in the soil. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Effects of Heterogeneities, Sampling Frequencies, Tools and Methods on Uncertainties in Subsurface Contaminant Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.; McNab, W. W.

    2007-12-01

    Long-term monitoring (LTM) is particularly important for contaminants which are mitigated by natural processes of dilution, dispersion, and degradation. At many sites, LTM can require decades of expensive sampling at tens or even hundreds of existing monitoring wells, resulting in hundreds of thousands, or millions of dollars per year for sampling and data management. Therefore, contaminant sampling tools, methods and frequencies are chosen to minimize waste and data management costs while ensuring a reliable and informative time-history of contaminant measurement for regulatory compliance. The interplay play between cause (i.e. subsurface heterogeneities, sampling techniques, measurement frequencies) and effect (unreliable data and measurements gap) has been overlooked in many field applications which can lead to inconsistencies in time- histories of contaminant samples. In this study we address the relationship between cause and effect for different hydrogeological sampling settings: porous and fractured media. A numerical model has been developed using AMR-FEM to solve the physicochemical processes that take place in the aquifer and the monitoring well. In the latter, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations while in the former the flow is governed by the diffusivity equation; both are fully coupled to mimic stressed conditions and to assess the effect of dynamic sampling tool on the formation surrounding the monitoring well. First of all, different sampling tools (i.e., Easy Pump, Snapper Grab Sampler) were simulated in a monitoring well screened in different homogeneous layered aquifers to assess their effect on the sampling measurements. Secondly, in order to make the computer runs more CPU efficient the flow in the monitoring well was replaced by its counterpart flow in porous media with infinite permeability and the new model was used to simulate the effect of heterogeneities, sampling depth, sampling tool and sampling frequencies on the uncertainties in the concentration measurements. Finally, the models and results were abstracted using a simple mixed-tank approach to further simplify the models and make them more accessible to field hydrogeologists. During the abstraction process a novel method was developed for mapping streamlines in the fractures as well within the monitoring well to illustrate mixing and mixing zones. Applications will be demonstrated for both sampling in porous and fractured media. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) and remediation of aquifers contaminated with hydrophobic contaminants require insitu production of biosurfactants for mobilization of entrapped hydrophobic liquids. Most of the biosurfactant producing microorganisms produce them under aerobic condition and hence surfactant production is limited in subsurface condition due to lack of oxygen. Currently bioremediation involves expensive air sparging or excavation followed by exsitu biodegradation. Use of microorganisms which can produce biosurfactants under anaerobic conditions can cost effectively expedite the process of insitu bioremediation or mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of anaerobic biosurfactant production in three mixed anaerobic cultures prepared from groundwater and soil contaminated with chlorinated compounds and municipal sewage sludge was investigated. The cultures were previously enriched under complete anaerobic conditions in the presence of Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for more than a year before they were studied for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant production under anaerobic conditions was simulated using two methods: i) induction of starvation in the microbial cultures and ii) addition of complex fermentable substrates. Positive result for biosurfactant production was not observed when the cultures were induced with starvation by adding PCE as blobs which served as the only terminal electron acceptor. However, slight reduction in interfacial tension was noticed which was caused by the adherence of microbes to water-PCE interface. Biosurfactant production was observed in all the three cultures when they were fed with complex fermentable substrates and surface tension of the liquid medium was lowered below 35 mN/m. Among the fermentable substrates tested, vegetable oil yielded highest amount of biosurfactant in all the cultures. Complete biodegradation of PCE to ethylene at a faster rate was also observed when vegetable oil was amended to the microbial cultures. The microorganisms responsible for biosurfactant production was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas Sp (designated as Pseudomonas Sp ANBIOSURF-1, Gene bank no: FJ930079), Pseudomonas stutzeri (MTCC 10033), Pseudomonas Sp (MTCC 10032) from groundwater, soil and municipal sewage sludge enrichments respectively. This study confirms that biosurfactants can be produced under anaerobic conditions and also in sufficient quantities. The cultures were also able to cometabolically degrade PCE to Ethylene. The isolated microorganisms can be used for remediation of DNAPL contaminated sites by in-situ biosurfactant production.

  5. Coupling of Groundwater Recharge and Biodegradation of Subsurface Crude-Oil Contamination (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Hostettler, F. D.; Delin, G. N.; Herkelrath, W. N.; Warren, E.; Campbell, P.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Cozzarelli, I.

    2010-12-01

    Surface hydrologic properties controlling groundwater recharge can have a large effect on biodegradation rates in the subsurface. Two studies of crude oil contamination show that degradation rates are dramatically increased where recharge rates are enhanced. The first site, located near Bemidji, Minnesota, was contaminated in August, 1979 when oil from a pipeline rupture infiltrated into a surficial glacial outwash aquifer. Discrete oil phases form three separate pools at the water table, the largest of which is 25x75 m at a depth of 6-8 m. Gas and water concentrations and microbial community data show that methanogenic conditions prevail in this oil pool. There is extreme spatial dependence in the degradation rates such that most of the n-alkanes have been degraded in the upgradient end, but in the downgradient end n-alkane concentrations are nearly unaltered from the original spill. Recharge rates through the two ends of the oil body were estimated using a water table fluctuation method. In 2002, the more degraded end received 15.2 cm of recharge contrasted to 10.7 cm at the less degraded end. The enhanced recharge is caused by topographic focusing of runoff toward a local depression. Microbial data using the Most Probable Number method show that the methanogen concentrations are 10-100 times greater in the more degraded end of the oil body suggesting that a growth nutrient is supplied by recharge. A decrease in partial pressure of N2 compared to Ar in the soil gas indicates nitrogen fixation probably meets N requirements (Amos et al., 2005, WRR, doi:10.1029/2004WR003433). Organic phosphorus is the main form of P in infiltrating pore water and concentration decreases with depth. The second site is located 40 km southeast of the Bemidji site at an oil pipeline pumping station near Cass Lake, Minnesota. This site was contaminated by oil leaking from a pipe coupling for an unknown duration of time between 1971 and 2002. The oil body at this site lies under a fenced area of the pumping station and is comparable in size to the largest Bemidji site oil pool. The oil is heavily degraded with complete loss of the n-alkane fraction suggesting that degradation is accelerated at this site. The pumping station is flat, gravel-covered, devoid of vegetation, and surrounded by a berm. Thus, the combined effects of no runoff, rapid infiltration, and zero transpiration all enhance recharge to the oil body. Recharge rates through the gravel yard and the adjacent forested area were estimated using a water table fluctuation method. Data for the first six months of 2010 showed that recharge below the gravel yard was 40% greater than below the forested area. Groundwater ammonia concentrations increase from 0.02 to 0.5 mmol/L under the oil body, while background NO3 is only 0.01 mmol/L and there is negligible N in the oil, again suggesting that N fixation meets N requirements. Combined, these studies suggest that enhanced transport of a limiting nutrient other than N from the surface may accelerate degradation of subsurface contamination.

  6. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  7. Contamination of soils in the urbanized areas of Belarus with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukharchyk, T. I.; Khomich, V. S.; Kakareka, S. V.; Kurman, P. V.; Kozyrenko, M. I.

    2013-02-01

    The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soils of urbanized areas, including the impact zones of Belarus, were studied. The concentrations of 16 PAHs in the soils were determined for individual and high-rise building zones, forests, and forest parks of Belarus. The levels of the PAH accumulation in the soils of different industrial enterprises and boiler stations were analyzed. Possible sources of soil contamination with PAHs were considered, and the structure of the PAHs in the soils was shown. The levels of the soil contamination were determined from the regulated parameters for individual compounds and the sum of 16 PAHs.

  8. Pyrosequence Analysis of Unamplified and Whole Genome Amplified DNA from Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Groundwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathlee S. Abbai; Algasan Govender; Rehana Shaik; Balakrishna Pillay

    Pyrosequence data was used to analyze the composition and metabolic potential of a metagenome from a hydrocarbon-contaminated\\u000a site. Unamplified and whole genome amplified (WGA) sequence data was compared from this source. According to MG-RAST, an additional\\u000a 2,742,252 bp of DNA was obtained with the WGA, indicating that WGA has the ability to generate a large amount of DNA from\\u000a a

  9. Analysis of hydrocarbon contamination with membrane-assisted solvent extraction: Comparison of agitation and sonication methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Szekeres; Zs. Eke; T. Rikker; K. Torkos

    2009-01-01

    Membrane-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) coupled to large volume injection was applied to the determination of (gasoline-type) hydrocarbon contamination in water samples. Hexane was used as acceptor phase. 50?L extract was injected in the programmed temperature vaporizer injector using combined split–splitless evaporation. The extraction conditions were optimized both for MASE with agitation and for MASE with sonication. In the course of

  10. Effects of enrichment with phthalate on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Singleton; Stephen D. Richardson; Michael D. Aitken

    2008-01-01

    The effect of enrichment with phthalate on the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was tested with bioreactor-treated\\u000a and untreated contaminated soil from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. Soil samples that had been treated in a bioreactor\\u000a and enriched with phthalate mineralized 14C-labeled phenanthrene and pyrene to a greater extent than unenriched samples over a 22.5-h incubation, but

  11. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated-oil field drill-cuttings with bacterial isolates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reuben N. Okparanma; Josiah M. Ayotamuno; Peremelade P. Arak

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of 2 bacterial isolates (Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in the restoration of oil-field drill-cuttings contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was studied. A mixture of 4 kg of the drill-cuttings and 0.67 kg of top-soil were charged into triplicate plastic reactors labeled A1 to A3, B1 to B3, C1 to C3 and O1 to O3. These were

  12. Bioremediation of a soil contaminated by hydrocarbon mixtures: the residual concentration problem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Nocentini; D Pinelli; F Fava

    2000-01-01

    The phenomenon of residual concentration was investigated in the aerobic biodegradation of three different petroleum commercial products (i.e., kerosene, diesel fuel and a lubricating mineral oil) in static microcosms. Two different soils exhibiting different physical-chemical characteristics were used (i.e., a biologically treated hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and a pristine soil). Residual concentrations were observed and a simple way to take this phenomenon

  13. Leaching and microbial treatment of a soil contaminated by sulphide ore ashes and aromatic hydrocarbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alessandro D’Annibale; Vanessa Leonardi; Ermanno Federici; Franco Baldi; Fulvio Zecchini; Maurizio Petruccioli

    2007-01-01

    Contaminated soil from a historical industrial site and containing sulfide ore ashes and aromatic hydrocarbons underwent sequential\\u000a leaching by 0.5 M citrate and microbial treatments. Heavy metals leaching was with the following efficiency scale: Cu (58.7%)\\u000a > Pb (55.1%) > Zn (44.5%) > Cd (42.9%) > Cr (26.4%) > Ni (17.7%) > Co (14.0%) > As (12.4%) > Fe (5.3%) >

  14. Amanzi and Akuna: Two New Community Codes for Subsurface Contaminant Flow and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, P. R.; Moulton, J. D.; Gorton, I.; Meza, J.; Freshley, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) program is developing a modular and extensible open-source set of tools for understanding the fate and transport of contaminants in natural and engineered systems. These tools not only support a fundamental shift toward standardized assessments of performance and risk for the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) cleanup and closure decisions, but establish a modern high-quality code base for a growing interdisciplinary community. Specifically, ASCEM is leveraging advances and expertise from applied mathematics, computer and computational sciences, and the geosciences, in this new development. A toolset named Akuna will provide capabilities for data management, visualization, conceptual model development, uncertainty quantification, parameter estimation, risk analysis, and decision support. Akuna will integrate with Amanzi, a flexible high performance computing simulator, which is designed to leverage the growing parallelism in modern systems. This talk will describe the approach that we have taken to develop this new open-source capability, including issues of intellectual property, licensing, the developers tool chain, and the users tool chain. The modular and extensible design will be discussed, highlighting the potential for collaboration and inclusion of recent modeling and algorithmic advances. In addition, it will discuss the advantages and challenges of relying on an open-source model that leverages a wide variety of open-source efforts from other programs. Results from early prototype development will be presented to highlight the potential of these new tools to contaminated subsurface environments, including calculations for variably saturated flow, advection of non-reactive species and the reactive-transport of 17 different chemical species on both structured and unstructured meshes.

  15. Application of BGPR tomography investigate the Soil and Groundwater Contaminated with Chlorinated Hydrocarbon:Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. C.; Lin, C. P.; Dong, T. H.; Yang, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The success of an environmental contaminated project is often determined by the extent to which it is able to ascertain and control subsurface conditions. At present, site managers have limited tools to gain detailed information on the distribution of possible underground barriers or anomalous bodies. The technology employed in Taiwan to evaluate or confirm subsurface anomalies relies primarily on surface geophysical surveys, borehole drillings, or past records. Surface ground-penetrating radar GPR survey is among the most popular of these methods. Surface GPR technique can be used in many ways, but this method is not always the best suited to Taiwan's conditions. Surface GPR surveys are adversely affected by the conductivity of silty/clayey sediment and cultural noises. As a result, when surface GPR surveys are used, both detection and resolution of subsurface anomalies will decrease with depth. In order to overcome these obstacles, the use of borehole GPR BGPR with a few boreholes may provide a more direct and effective way to detect an underground target. Recent improvement in the quality of BGPR contributes to the suitability of this type of survey work when implemented on construction sites. This paper ues the BGPR geophysical technology has been developed to overcome above limitations. The information of multi-wells logging could be used to interpret the permeability of subsurface, the dominate flow path and the hot-spot for evaluating the distribution of pollution and the efficiency of remediation in different time sequences.

  16. Managing long-term polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soils: a risk-based approach.

    PubMed

    Duan, Luchun; Naidu, Ravi; Thavamani, Palanisami; Meaklim, Jean; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2015-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a family of contaminants that consist of two or more aromatic rings fused together. Soils contaminated with PAHs pose significant risk to human and ecological health. Over the last 50 years, significant research has been directed towards the cleanup of PAH-contaminated soils to background level. However, this achieved only limited success especially with high molecular weight compounds. Notably, during the last 5-10 years, the approach to remediate PAH-contaminated soils has changed considerably. A risk-based prioritization of remediation interventions has become a valuable step in the management of contaminated sites. The hydrophobicity of PAHs underlines that their phase distribution in soil is strongly influenced by factors such as soil properties and ageing of PAHs within the soil. A risk-based approach recognizes that exposure and environmental effects of PAHs are not directly related to the commonly measured total chemical concentration. Thus, a bioavailability-based assessment using a combination of chemical analysis with toxicological assays and nonexhaustive extraction technique would serve as a valuable tool in risk-based approach for remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. In this paper, the fate and availability of PAHs in contaminated soils and their relevance to risk-based management of long-term contaminated soils are reviewed. This review may serve as guidance for the use of site-specific risk-based management methods. PMID:24271723

  17. PHOTOACTIVATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON TOXICITY IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) EMBRYOS: RELEVANCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL RISK IN CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hazard for photoactivated toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been clearly demonstrated; however, to our knowledge, the risk in contaminated systems has not been characterized. To address this question, a median lethal dose (LD50) for fluoranthene photoa...

  18. Use of the FIDLER Scintillation Probe for the Characterization of Subsurface Radionuclide Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.L.; Murray, M.E.

    1999-11-14

    The Measurement Applications and Development Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has used a FIDLER to characterize a site where numerous localized and dispersed concentrations of uranium had been previously discovered beneath a poured concrete floor. The thick floor impeded the evaluation of the distribution of regions containing uranium without boring numerous holes through the concrete. The purpose of this study was to perform a radiological assessment of the building in preparation for remediation of the site. Integrated counts were taken with the FIDLER probes fixed in place on a systematic grid across the area to be evaluated. The results were then superimposed on a drawing of the area of evaluation. This approach allowed the boundaries of the regions with subsurface contamination to be resolved much better than by using standard survey techniques and decreased the number of borehole samples and subsequent analyses. The study demonstrated that this survey technique provides rapid and essential characterization information and reduces sampling, analytical, and remediation costs.

  19. The prediction of the effectiveness of interceptor trenches in the remediation of ground-water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons 

    E-print Network

    Mast, Mary Katherine

    1991-01-01

    THE PREDICTION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INTERCEPTOR TRENCHES IN THE REMEDIATION OF GROUND-WATER CONTAMINATION BY PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS A Thesis by MARY KATHERINE MAST Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A@M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Geology THE PREDICTION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INTERCEPTOR TRENCHES IN THE REMEDIATION OF GROUND-WATER CONTAMINATION BY PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS A...

  20. Three-dimensional self-potential inversion for subsurface DNAPL contaminant detection at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Burke J. Minsley; John Sogade; F. Dale Morgan

    2007-01-01

    Self-potential (SP) data are collected over an area of approximately 250 m2 at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site where there is known subsurface dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination. Nonpolarizing electrodes are used to measure the SP signal on a two-dimensional (2-D) surface grid with 2-m spacing in both horizontal directions, and four borehole arrays with 3.7-m electrode

  1. Advanced Numerical Tools Applied to Geo-environmental Engineering - Soils Contaminated by Petroleum Hydrocarbons, a Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Cristina Vila; J. M. Soeiro de Carvalho; Antynio Fiúza

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a Contaminated soils can be considered as a heterogeneous, anisotropic and discontinuous geo-system, whose properties vary in\\u000a time and space. Focusing on the remediation of a real contaminated site (a refinery located in northern Portugal), soil samples\\u000a contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons were subject to laboratory studies. The results of contaminant degradation kinetics\\u000a tests led to the development of a distributed parameter

  2. Mobile hydrocarbon microspheres from >2-billion-year-old carbon-bearing seams in the South African deep subsurface.

    PubMed

    Wanger, G; Moser, D; Hay, M; Myneni, S; Onstott, T C; Southam, G

    2012-11-01

    By ~2.9 Ga, the time of the deposition of the Witwatersrand Supergroup, life is believed to have been well established on Earth. Carbon remnants of the microbial biosphere from this time period are evident in sediments from around the world. In the Witwatersrand Supergroup, the carbonaceous material is often concentrated in seams, closely associated with the gold deposits and may have been a mobile phase 2 billion years ago. Whereas today the carbon in the Witwatersrand Supergroup is presumed to be immobile, hollow hydrocarbon spheres ranging in size from <1 ?m to >50 ?m were discovered emanating from a borehole drilled through the carbon-bearing seams suggesting that a portion of the carbon may still be mobile in the deep subsurface. ToF-SIMS and STXM analyses revealed that these spheres contain a suite of alkane, alkenes, and aromatic compounds consistent with the described organic-rich carbon seams within the Witwatersrand Supergroup's auriferous reef horizons. Analysis by electron microscopy and ToF-SIMS, however, revealed that these spheres, although most likely composed of biogenic carbon and resembling biological organisms, do not retain any true structural, that is, fossil, information and were formed by an abiogenic process. PMID:22901282

  3. Effects of oxygen supply on the biodegradation rate in oil hydrocarbons contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawierucha, I.; Malina, G.

    2011-04-01

    Respirometry studies using the 10-chamber Micro-Oxymax respirometer (Columbus, Ohio) were conducted to determine the effect of biostimulation (by diverse ways of O2 supply) on enhancing biodegradation in soils contaminated with oil hydrocarbons. Soil was collected from a former military airport in Kluczewo, Poland. Oxygen was supplied by means of aerated water, aqueous solutions of H2O2 and KMnO4. The biodegradation was evaluated on the basis of O2 uptake and CO2 production. The O2 consumption and CO2 production rates during hydrocarbons biodegradation were estimated from the slopes of cumulative curve linear regressions. The pertinent intrinsic and enhanced biodegradation rates were calculated on the basis of mass balance equation and O2 uptake and CO2 production rates. The biodegradation rates of 5-7 times higher as compared to a control were observed when the aqueous solution of KMnO4 in concentration of 20 g L-1 was applied. Permanganate is known to readily oxidize alkene carbon - carbon double bonds; so it can be successfully applied in remediation technology for soils contaminated with oil hydrocarbons. While hydrocarbons are not completely mineralized by permanganate oxidation reactions, their structure is altered by polar functional groups providing vast improvements in aqueous solubility and availability for biodegradation. The 3% aqueous solution of H2O2 caused significant improvement of the biodegradation rates as compared to a control (on average about 260%). Aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons can benefit from the presence of oxygen released during H2O2 decomposition. Adding of aerated water resulted in an increase of biodegradation rates (about 114 - 229%) as compared to a control. The aerated water can both be the source of oxygen for microorganisms and determine the transport of substrate to bacteria cells.

  4. Characterization of the bacterial archaeal diversity in hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, De-Chao; Mörtelmaier, Christoph; Margesin, Rosa

    2012-04-01

    A polyphasic approach combining culture-based methods with molecular methods is useful to expand knowledge on microbial diversity in contaminated soil. Microbial diversity was examined in soil samples from a former industrial site in the European Alps (mainly used for aluminum production and heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons) by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The physiologically active eubacterial community, as revealed by fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization (FISH), accounted for 6.7% of the total (DAPI-stained) bacterial community. 4.4% and 2.0% of the DAPI-stained cells could be attributed to culturable, heterotrophic bacteria able to grow at 20°C and 10°C, respectively. The majority of culturable bacterial isolates (34/48) belonged to the Proteobacteria (with a predominance of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria), while the remaining isolates were affiliated with the Actinobacteria, Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides and Firmicutes. A high fraction of the culturable, heterotrophic bacterial population was able to utilize hydrocarbons. Actinobacteria were the most versatile and efficient degraders of diesel oil, n-alkanes, phenol and PAHs. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library contained 390 clones that grouped into 68 phylotypes related to the Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Spirochaetes. The archaeal 16S rRNA gene library contained 202 clones and 15 phylotypes belonging to the phylum Euryarchaeota; sequences were closely related to those of methanogenic archaea of the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales and Thermoplasmatales. A number of bacterial and archaeal phylotypes in the clone libraries shared high similarities with strains previously described to be involved in hydrocarbon biodegradation. Knowledge of the bacterial and archaeal diversity in the studied soil is important in order to get a better insight into the microbial structure of contaminated environments and to better exploit the bioremediation potential by identifying potential hydrocarbon degraders and consequently developing appropriate bioremediation strategies. PMID:22386232

  5. Hydrochemical and Isotopic Evidence of Natural Attenuation at the Gas Station Contaminated with Fuel Hydrocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, K.; Oh, I.; Suk, H.; Lee, K.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater flow, hydrochemistry and the carbon isotope composition (d13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were measured to know the effect of natural attenuation which is induced by biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon at the abandoned gas station contaminated fuel hydrocarbons. The aquifer sediment consists of 4 to 5 m of unconsolidated and weathered soils overlying granite. The monitoring results of water level showed the immediate response of that to rainfall. This implies that the site is an unconfined aquifer or is located at the near of groundwater recharge area. The contaminant transport modeling using GMS showed that the contaminants, BTEX, transported to two main directions, south and southwest from UST and pipeline. These results were proved by the filed observation of the BTEX from the groundwater seepage at the streams of south and southwest area. The geochemical indicator of natural attenuation, red iron precipitate, was also observed at the groundwater seepage. The hydrochemical indicators, Fe(II), Mn(II), sufides, and methane, of terminal electron accepting processes represented the sulfate reducing and methanogenesis environment of the site. d13C values of DIC ranged from -20.2 to -9.3 permil and increased in the source zone by the microbial degradation of hydrocarbon under methanogenic condition. The enrichment of isotopically heavy C is caused by the production of light 12CH4 from microbial respiration. The molar ratio of Ca to HCO3 is about 2.5 and this indicates the contribution of microbial oxidation of fuel hydrocarbon to DIC in groundwater. The geochemical modeling using PHREEQC showed the oversaturation of siderite, rhodocrosite and goethite and the saturation index of calcite increased as the increase of bicarbonate, indicating the enhanced microbial degradation. From the research results, the mineralogical, hydrological and microbiological factors can exert influence on groundwater chemistry and d13C of DIC.

  6. Hydrocarbon contamination and plant species determine the phylogenetic and functional diversity of endophytic degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vanessa; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide; Silva, Artur M S; Simões, Mário M Q; Smalla, Kornelia; Cunha, Ângela

    2014-03-01

    Salt marsh sediments are sinks for various anthropogenic contaminants, giving rise to significant environmental concern. The process of salt marsh plant survival in such environment is very intriguing and at the same time poorly understood. The plant–microbe interactions may play a key role in the process of environment and in planta detoxification.In this study, a combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent molecular approaches [enrichment cultures, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), DNA sequencing] were used to investigate the effect of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) contamination on the structure and function[polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dioxygenase genes] of endophytic bacterial communities of salt marsh plant species (Halimione portulacoides and Sarcocornia perennis)in the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro (Portugal). Pseudomonads dominated the cultivable fraction of the endophytic communities in the enrichment cultures. In a set of fifty isolates tested, nine were positive for genes encoding for PAH dioxygenases (nahAc)and four were positive for plasmid carrying genes encoding PAH degradation enzymes(nahAc). Interestingly, these plasmids were only detected in isolates from most severely PH-polluted sites. The results revealed site-specific effects on endophytic communities,related to the level of PH contamination in the sediment, and plant-species-specific ‘imprints’ in community structure and in genes encoding for PAH dioxygenases. These results suggest a potential ecological role of bacterial plant symbiosis in the process of plant colonization in urban estuarine areas exposed to PH contamination. PMID:24765659

  7. Using radon as environmental tracer for the assessment of subsurface Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) contamination - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.

    2015-05-01

    The radioactive noble gas radon has an ambivalent nature: on the one hand is it of main concern with regard to radiation protection, on the other hand can it be applied as powerful tracer tool in various fields of applied geosciences. Due to its omnipresence in nature, its chemical and physical properties, and its uncomplicated detectability radon fulfils all requirements for being used as environmental tracer. This application is discussed in the paper with focus on the use of radon as tracer for subsurface contamination with Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPL). After a short introduction in the ambivalence and ubiquitous presence of radon in nature, the theoretical background of its suitability as NAPL tracer is summarized. Finally three potential applications are discussed. Background information and practical examples are given for (i) the investigation of residual NAPL contamination in soils, (ii) the investigation of residual NAPL contamination in aquifers and (iii) the monitoring of the remediation of dissolved NAPL contamination in groundwater. The presented information reveals that radon is an ideal tracer for the assessment of a wide range of subsurface NAPL contamination. Still, its application is not without restrictions. Problems may occur due to mineralogical heterogeneity of the soil or aquifer matrix. Furthermore, local changes in the permeability of the subsurface may be associated with preferential groundwater or soil gas flow paths bypassing isolated sub-domains of an investigated NAPL source zone. Moreover, NAPL aging may result in alterations in the composition of a complex NAPL mixture thus giving rise to significant changes of the radon partition coefficient between NAPL and water or soil gas. However, since radon shows a strong affinity to NAPLs in general, semi-quantitative results will always be possible.

  8. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    'The overall objective of the basic research grant is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. The three major lines of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects. and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at a variety of DOE sites that need to be examined for endocrine disrupting effects. By relating results obtained from this research project to contamination problems at various DOE sites. CBR will provide data and information on endocrine disrupting contaminants to DOE for consideration in risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities needed at the sites.'

  9. Detection and remediation of soil and aquifer systems contaminated with petroleum products: an overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Farhad Nadim; George E Hoag; Shili Liu; Robert J Carley; Peter Zack

    2000-01-01

    Fate of organic chemicals in the subsurface strata is not very well understood. It has only been a decade or two that environmental scientists are focusing their attentions on remediating sites that are contaminated with organic chemicals. Different routes of soil and groundwater contamination by petroleum hydrocarbon compounds and their partitioning into gaseous, aqueous and pure phases in the subsurface

  10. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  11. Screening of extremotolerant fungi for the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyntner, Caroline; Blasi, Barbara; Prenafeta, Francesc; Sterflinger, Katja

    2015-04-01

    Bioremediation can be used to treat contaminated sites, by taking advantage of microorganisms which have the potential to degrade a wide range of contaminants. While research has been focused mainly on bacteria, the knowledge on other microorganisms, especially fungal communities, is still limited. However, the use of fungi may have advantages compared to bacteria. Extremophile fungi like the black yeasts can withstand high levels of environmental stress (e.g. range of pH, water availability and temperature, presence of toxic chemicals). Therefore they might be applicable in situations, where bacterial communities show limited performance. In order to identify fungi which are good candidates for bioremediation application, a selection of 163 fungal strains, mostly from the group of the black yeasts, was tested for their capability to degrade three different pollutants: hexadecane, toluene, and polychlorinated biphenyl 126, which were used as model compounds for aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. These chemicals are frequently found in sites contaminated by oil, gas and coal. The screening was based on a two-step selection approach. As a first step, a high throughput method was developed to screen the relatively large amount of fungal strains regarding their tolerance to the contaminants. A microtiter plate based method was developed for monitoring fungal growth in the presence of the selected contaminants photometrically with a Tecan reader. Twenty five strains out of 163, being species of the genera Cladophilaophora, Scedosporium and Exophiala, showed the ability to grow on at least 2 hydrocarbons, and are therefore the most promising candidates for further tests. In a second step, degradation of the contaminants was investigated in more detail for a subset of the screened fungi. This was done by closing the carbon balance in sealed liquid cultures in which the selected pollutant was introduce as the sole source of carbon and energy. Substrate depletion and CO2 accumulation in the headspace were monitored chromatographically. In the course of these experiments, two strains showed a good capacity to grow on toluene. In summary, the presented screening method can be used to identify potential candidates for the fungal degradation of contaminants. Further research is necessary to investigate the potential use of the identified fungal strains for remediation purposes.

  12. Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-06

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic contaminants. The results from a study with TCE contaminated-clay indicate that electrochemically inducing reductive dechlorination of TCE in a saturated matrix may offer an effective and viable alternative to remediation TCE and other contaminants with potential of being reduced. Another study focused on steel wool oxidation to electrochemically increase population of hydrocarbon-degrading denitrifying bacteria. Significantly larger denitrifying activity was observed in the cathode chamber of a treatment unit setup like an MFC with steel wool as the anode. This enhanced nitrate reduction could be due to direct electron utilization by denitrifying bacteria on the cathode, thereby stimulating microbial denitrification or a combination of electron transfer directly to NO{sub 3}{sup -} and electron transfer to nitrate reducing bacteria, which may serve as a type of bio-catalyst on the cathode for nitrate reduction. Overall, the studies conducted under Task 72 demonstrated different innovative methods to enhance petroleum hydrocarbon degradation and associated contaminants.

  13. Migration of selected hydrocarbon contaminants into dry pasta packaged in direct contact with recycled paperboard.

    PubMed

    Barp, Laura; Suman, Michele; Lambertini, Francesca; Moret, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the migration of selected hydrocarbon contaminants, namely mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOH), diisopropyl naphthalenes (DIPN) and polyalphaolefins (PAO) from adhesives into dry semolina and egg pasta packaged in direct contact with recycled paperboard. Migration was monitored during its shelf life (for up to two years) simulating storage in a supermarket (packs on shelves) and conditions preventing exchange with the surrounding environment (packs wrapped in aluminium foil). Migration from the secondary packaging (transport boxes of corrugated board) was also studied for semolina pasta. After 24 months of exposure, semolina pasta stored on shelves reached 3.2 and 0.6 mg kg(-1) of MOSH and MOAH, respectively, Migration from the adhesives used to close the boxes and from the transport boxes contributed about 30% and 25% of the total contamination, respectively. The highest contamination levels (14.5 and 2.0 mg kg(-1) of MOSH and MOAH, respectively, after 24 months) were found in egg pasta stored on shelves (no adhesives), and seemed due to the highest contribution from the external environment. PMID:25571955

  14. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Franck O. P.; Bell, Terrence H.; Marchand, Charlotte; de la Providencia, Ivan E.; El Yassimi, Abdel; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA) with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media) techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:26053848

  15. Remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by ex situ microwave treatment: technical, energy and economic considerations.

    PubMed

    Falciglia, P P; Vagliasindi, F G A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the remediation of diesel-polluted soils was investigated by simulating an ex situ microwave (MW) heating treatment under different conditions, including soil moisture, operating power and heating duration. Based on experimental data, a technical, energy and economic assessment for the optimization of full-scale remediation activities was carried out. Main results show that the operating power applied significantly influences the contaminant removal kinetics and the moisture content in soil has a major effect on the final temperature reachable during MW heating. The first-order kinetic model showed an excellent correlation (r2 > 0.976) with the experimental data for residual concentration at all operating powers and for all soil moistures tested. Excellent contaminant removal values up to 94.8% were observed for wet soils at power higher than 600 W for heating duration longer than 30 min. The use of MW heating with respect to a conventional ex situ thermal desorption treatment could significantly decrease the energy consumption needed for the removal of hydrocarbon contaminants from soils. Therefore, the MW treatment could represent a suitable cost-effective alternative to the conventional thermal treatment for the remediation of hydrocarbon-polluted soil. PMID:25145181

  16. Assessment of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination in the surficial sediments and ground water at three former underground storage tank locations, Fort Jackson, South Carolina, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water and sediment contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons resulting from leaks and overfills was detected during tank removal activities at three former underground storage tank locations at Fort Jackson, near Columbia, South Carolina. Investigations were initiated to assess the effect of contamination to the surficial aquifer at Sites 1062, 2438, and 2444. These investigations involved the installation of permanent monitoring wells and the collection and analysis of sediment and ground-water samples at the three sites. Water-level data were collected at all sites to determine hydraulic gradients and the direction of ground-water flow. In addition, aquifer tests were made at Site 1062 to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the surficial aquifer at that site. Sediment borings were made at the three sites to collect subsurface-sediment samples for lithologic description and laboratory analyses, and for the installation of ground-water monitoring wells. Laboratory analyses of sediment samples collected from boreholes at Site 1062 indicated elevated concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons at three locations. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons - Diesel Range Organics were detected at one borehole at a concentration of 388,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene concentrations in sediment from the site ranged from less than 350 to over 100,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total lead was detected at concentrations ranging from 2,900 to 5,900 micrograms per kilogram. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected at Site 2438 in one borehole at a trace concentration of 112 micrograms per kilogram of para- and meta-xylenes. No concentrations exceeding the detection limits were reported for petroleum hydrocarbons in sediment samples collected from Site 2444; however, total lead was detected in sediment samples from two boreholes, each at concentrations of 600 micrograms per kilogram. Ground-water samples were collected from each site for laboratory analysis and field-property determinations. Petroleum hydrocarbons and lead were detected at concentrations exceeding regulatory limits for drinking water in ground water from Site 1062 only. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in ground water from three wells at Site 1062, with the highest concentrations occurring in the area of the former underground storage tanks. Benzene was detected at concentrations as much as 28 micrograms per liter; toluene as much as 558 micrograms per liter; para- and meta-xylenes as much as 993 micrograms per liter; and naphthalene as much as 236 micrograms per liter. Ethylbenzene and ortho-xylene were detected in one well at concentrations of 70 and 6 micrograms per liter, respectively. Dissolved lead was detected in ground water from four wells at concentrations from 5 to 152 micrograms per liter. Analysis of ground-water samples collected from Sites 2438 and 2444 showed little evidence of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination. Petroleum hydrocarbons were not detected in any of the ground-water samples collected from Site 2438. With the exception of a low concentration of naphthalene (11 micrograms per liter) detected in ground water from one well, petroleum hydrocarbons and lead were not detected in ground water collected from Site 2444.

  17. COMPARISON OF METHODS TO DETERMINE OXYGEN DEMAND FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF A FUEL CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four analytical methods were compared for estimating concentrations of fuel contaminants in subsurface core samples. he methods were total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, oil and grease, and a solvent extraction of fuel hydrocarbons combined with a gas chromatographic tec...

  18. COMPARISON OF METHODS TO DETERMINE OXYGEN DEMAND FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF A FUEL CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four analytical methods were compared for estimating concentrations of fuel contaminants in subsurface core samples. The methods were total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, oil and grease, and a solvent extraction of fuel hydrocarbons combined with a gas chromatographic te...

  19. Effects of humic acid on phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil simultaneously contaminated with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyoung; Kim, Ki Seob; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Kang, Daeseok; Sung, Kijune

    2011-01-01

    The use of humic acid (HA) to enhance the efficiency of phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel was evaluated in this study. A sample of soil was artificially contaminated with commercially available diesel fuel to an initial total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) concentration of 2300 mg/kg and four heavy metals with concentrations of 400 mg/kg for Pb, 200 mg/kg for Cu, 12 mg/kg for Cd, and 160 mg/kg for Ni. Three plant species, Brassica campestris, Festuca arundinacea, and Helianthus annuus, were selected for the phytodegradation experiment. Percentage degradation of TPH in the soil in a control pot supplemented with HA increased to 45% from 30% without HA. The addition of HA resulted in an increases in the removal of TPH from the soil in pots planted with B. campestris, E arundinacea, and H. annuus, enhancing percentage degradation to 86%, 64%, and 85% from 45%, 54%, and 66%, respectively. The effect of HA was also observed in the degradation of n-alkanes within 30 days. The rates of removal of n-alkanes in soil planted with B. campestris and H. annuus were high for n-alkanes in the range of C11-C28. A dynamic increase in dehydrogenase activity was observed during the last 15 days of a 30-day experimental period in all the pots amended with HA. The enhanced biodegradation performance for TPHs observed might be due to an increase in microbial activities and bioavailable TPH in soils caused by combined effects of plants and HA. The results suggested that HA could act as an enhancing agent for phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel and heavy metals. PMID:22432335

  20. RESEARCH PROJECT -- IN SITU CO-OXIDATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS DURING BIOVENTING OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS (SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a large number of sites containing both petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. Fire training pits at military bases are the most common example. These were often used to dispose of waste oils and solvents. Incomplete burning resulted in releases of contamin...

  1. Reduction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from petroleum-contaminated soil using thermal desorption technology

    SciTech Connect

    Silkebakken, D.M.; Davis, H.A.; Ghosh, S.B. [Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Beardsley, G.P. [Air Force Base Conversion Agency, Rantoul, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The remediation of petroleum-contaminated soil typically requires the selection of a treatment option that addresses the removal of both volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) compounds, can be readily removed from the soil by a variety of well-established technologies. The semivolatile organic compounds, especially the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) that are characteristic of petroleum-contaminated soil, are not as amenable to conventional treatment. Low temperature thermal volatilization (LTTV) can be a viable treatment technology depending on the initial contaminant concentrations present and applicable cleanup objectives that must be attained. A-two-phase treatability study was conducted at 14 former underground storage tank (UST) sites to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness of LTTV for remediation of approximately 31,000 tons of PAH-contaminated soil. The PAHs of primary concern included benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene, dibenz(a,h) anthracene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene. During Phase 1, LTTV operational parameters were varied by trial-and-error and changes in soil treatment effectiveness were monitored. Phase B of the treatability study incorporated the appropriate treatment regime established during Phase 1 to efficiently remediate the remaining contaminated soil.

  2. Transport and degradation of semivolatile hydrocarbons in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer, Bemidji, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, E.T. [National Water Quality Lab., Arvada, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Hydrophobic semivolatile organic compounds are unlikely to be transported substantial distances in ground water because of rapid partitioning onto aquifer material. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been identified as a potential medium for transporting hydrophobic semivolatile organic compounds by cosolvation. In this study, the role of oil-derived DOC, formed in situ, is assessed to determine its effect on the transport of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAM) in ground water. The site of this study is a petroleum-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minn.

  3. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Singleton; Stephen D. Richardson; Michael D. Aitken

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons\\u000a (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous\\u000a (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified\\u000a PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a

  4. Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated soil with Monilinia sp.: degradation and microbial community analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yucheng Wu; Yongming Luo; Dexun Zou; Jinzhi Ni; Wuxin Liu; Ying Teng; Zhengao Li

    2008-01-01

    Microcosms were set up with a PAHs-contaminated soil using biostimulation (addition of ground corn cob) and bioaugmentation\\u000a (inoculated with Monilinia sp. W5-2). Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and microbial community were examined at the end of incubation\\u000a period. After 30 days, bioaugmented microcosms showed a 35 ± 0% decrease in total PAHs, while biostimulated and control microcosms\\u000a showed 16 ± 9% and 3 ± 0% decrease in

  5. Studying contaminant transport and chem ical reduction in subsurface sediment by modeling flow in porous media

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rostyslav Boutchko; Vitaliy Rayz; James O'Neil; Nicholas T. Vandehey; Peter S. Nico; Jennifer Druhan; Thomas F. Budinger; David Saloner; Grant T. Gullberg; William W. Moses

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents imaging and modeling aspects of an interdisciplinary study of subsurface pollution and environmental remediation. F18 — FDG PET and Tc99m — NaTcO4 SPECT studie s were performed to follow dynamic changes in the radiotracer distribution in model systems. Radioisotope solution was pumped through the test columns filled with sand or sediment in order to reproduce subsurface conditions

  6. In situ biogeochemical reduction of hydrocarbon contamination of ground water by injecting hydrogen peroxide: A case study in a Montana aquifer contaminated by wood preservatives

    SciTech Connect

    Piotrowski, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The site is an active lumber mill that has been contaminated by long-term releases of creosote and pentachlorophenol. Two aquifers underlying the site have become contaminated, and large contaminant plumes have developed. The shallower (upper) aquifer poses the greatest risk to public and environmental health, and was a focus of restoration investigations. Among the restoration options for upper aquifer remediation was in situ bioremediation. This option involves enhancement of subsurface biogeochemical (primarily microbial) processes to produce contaminant destruction, and offers a number of potential benefits, including rapid aquifer restoration, low economic impact, and minimal site disruption. Biogeochemical parameters in the groundwater were examined in wells along a transect that extended into the contaminant plume. A pilot-scale study was initiated in July 1987, in which a source of oxygen (hydrogen peroxide) was continuously injected into a contaminated region of the upper aquifer. This study is the first field-verification that hydrogen peroxide injection into a contaminated aquifer can create large-scale oxic conditions in groundwater. Oxygen supplementation resulted in significant reductions in contaminated concentrations within the contaminant plume via enhancement of subsurfaces microbial activity, indicating that this approach can be effective for aquifer restoration.

  7. RESEARCH PROJECT -- NITRATE AS AN ALTERNATE ELECTRON ACCEPTOR FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF FUEL-CONTAMINATED AQUIFERS (SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the past several years, an extensive investigation has been conducted into the feasibility of using nitrate as an alternate electron acceptor for stimulating anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons for in situ bioremediation of contaminated aquifers. This has invo...

  8. Acute toxicity of PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) contaminated sediments to the estuarine fish, Leiostomus xanthurus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.H. Jr.; Hargis, W.J. Jr.; Strobel, C.J.; De Lisle, P.F.

    1989-01-01

    High concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) have been found in the Elizabeth River, Virginia, especially in the Southern Branch near a former creosote wood preservation plant. Although acute mortality of fish directly attributable to high PAH concentrations in sediment and water is unreported in the Elizabeth River, fish of several species often exhibit fin erosion and other external lesions. During previous laboratory experiments with spot (Leiostomus xanthurus) exposed to naturally contaminated sediments from Elizabeth River Station 217 the authors observed acute mortalities within 8 days as well as fin erosion, ulceration of the lateral body surface, and several types of lesions of internal organs. Exposure to effluent from primary exposure tanks resulted in ulcerations and cataracts, but no mortalities. The present study was conducted to determine (1) the concentration of contaminated sediment causing an acute lethal effect on L. xanthurus exposed either to sediment or to water which had been in contact with sediment.

  9. Application of data fusion in human health risk assessment for hydrocarbon mixtures on contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Roberta; Islam, M Shafiqul; Zargar, Amin; Mohapatra, Asish; Sadiq, Rehan

    2013-11-16

    The exposure and toxicological data used in human health risk assessment are obtained from diverse and heterogeneous sources. Complex mixtures found on contaminated sites can pose a significant challenge to effectively assess the toxicity potential of the combined chemical exposure and to manage the associated risks. A data fusion framework has been proposed to integrate data from disparate sources to estimate potential risk for various public health issues. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed data fusion framework, an illustrative example for a hydrocarbon mixture is presented. The Joint Directors of Laboratories Data Fusion architecture was selected as the data fusion architecture and Dempster-Shafer Theory (DST) was chosen as the technique for data fusion. For neurotoxicity response analysis, neurotoxic metabolites toxicological data were fused with predictive toxicological data and then probability-boxes (p-boxes) were developed to represent the toxicity of each compound. The neurotoxic response was given a rating of "low", "medium" or "high". These responses were then weighted by the percent composition in the illustrative F1 hydrocarbon mixture. The resulting p-boxes were fused according to DST's mixture rule of combination. The fused p-boxes were fused again with toxicity data for n-hexane. The case study for F1 hydrocarbons illustrates how data fusion can help in the assessment of the health effects for complex mixtures with limited available data. PMID:23219588

  10. Mutagenic hazards of complex polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures in contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, C.L.; Lambert, A.B.; Lundstedt, S.; Tysklind, M.; White, P.A. [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Safe Environment Program

    2008-04-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate hazard/risk assessment methods for complex environmental mixtures that involve a targeted, priority chemical approach based on the cumulative hazard/risk of known mixture components or analyses of sufficiently similar mixtures. Ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils were separated into nonpolar and semipolar fractions, and both fractions elicited positive responses on the Salmonella reverse mutation assay. Targeted and nontargeted methods of hazard prediction routinely overestimated mutagenic activities for the nonpolar soil fractions, suggesting nonadditive interactions of PAHs in complex mixtures. This suggests that current risk assessment methods for complex mixtures may provide conservative estimates regarding soils contaminated with priority PAHs alone. Significant underestimations of total risk, however, will be obtained if the soils also contain unidentified PAHs as well as polycyclic aromatic compounds and related compounds that contribute to the total mutagenic activity. Furthermore, estimates of excess lifetime cancer risk associated with the nondietary ingestion of the PAH-contaminated soils studied here indicate that a traditional risk assessment model based on identified priority PAHs and an assumption of additivity generally underestimates the risk associated with the nonpolar soil fractions (in comparison to bioassay-derived risk estimates). Additional cancer risk may be associated with the more polar compounds that also are found at these contaminated sites and that rarely are included in the standard risk assessment methodology.

  11. Characterization of the relationship between microbial degradation processes at a hydrocarbon contaminated site using isotopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feisthauer, Stefan; Seidel, Martin; Bombach, Petra; Traube, Sebastian; Knöller, Kay; Wange, Martin; Fachmann, Stefan; Richnow, Hans H.

    2012-05-01

    Decisions to employ monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation strategy at contaminated field sites require a comprehensive characterization of the site-specific biodegradation processes. In the present study, compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis (CSIA) was used to investigate intrinsic biodegradation of benzene and ethylbenzene in an aquifer with high levels of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon contamination. Hydrochemical data and isotope fractionation analysis of sulfate and methane was used complementarily to elucidate microbial degradation processes over the course of a three year period, consisting of six sampling campaigns, in the industrial area of Weißandt-Gölzau (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany). Enrichment of 13C and 2H isotopes in the residual benzene and ethylbenzene pool downgradient from the pollution sources provided evidence of biodegradation of BTEX compounds at this site, targeting both compounds as the key contaminants of concern. The enrichment of heavy sulfur isotopes accompanied by decreasing sulfate concentrations and the accumulation of isotopically light methane suggested that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic processes are the major contributors to overall biodegradation in this aquifer. Along the contaminant plume, the oxidation of methane with ?13CCH4 values of up to + 17.5‰ was detected. This demonstrates that methane formed in the contaminant source can be transported along groundwater flow paths and be oxidized in areas with higher redox potentials, thereby competing directly with the pollutants for electron acceptors. Hydrochemical and isotope data was summarized in a conceptual model to assess whether MNA can be used as viable remediation strategy in Weißandt-Gölzau. The presented results demonstrate the benefits of combining different isotopic methods and hydrochemical approaches to evaluate the fate of organic pollutants in contaminated aquifers.

  12. Subsurface contaminant transport in the presence of colloids: Effect of nonlinear and nonequilibrium interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hesham M. Bekhit; Ahmed E. Hassan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of kinetic nonlinear sorption of contaminants in the presence of colloids is the focus of this study. Different sorption isotherms are considered where contaminant sorption and colloid deposition are assumed to be linear or nonlinear (Freundlich), and contaminant attachment to mobile and immobile colloids is assumed to follow either linear or Langmuir isotherms. Varying combinations accounting for different

  13. Microbial Diversity and Bioremediation of a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Martinex, Enid M. [University of Puerto Rico; Perez, Ernie [University of Puerto Rico; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Massol-Deya, Arturo A. [University of Puerto Rico

    2006-01-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources has become a major environmental and human health concern in many parts of the world. Our objectives were to employ both culture and culture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbial community structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate a diesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normal operating conditions, 97 to 99% of total hydrocarbons were removed with only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultures were isolated from the treatment unit (96% which utilized diesel constituents as sole carbon source). Approximately 20% of the isolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with most belonging to the {infinity}, {beta} and {gamma} subdivision of the Proteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the genetic constitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple time points with a Functional Gene Array (FGA) containing over 12,000 probes for genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemical cycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using an isothermal {phi}29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, and hybridized to the arrays in 50% formimide overnight at 50 C. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course of treatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbial community. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation (including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane, biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene); and 333 genes involved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases [nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB], potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase [pmoA]) were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE, nitroaromatics and chlorinated compounds were also present, indicating a broad catabolic potential of the treatment unit. FGA's demonstrated the early establishment of a diverse community with concurrent aerobic and anaerobic processes contributing to the bioremediation process.

  14. Microbial Diversity and Bioremediation of aHydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Martinez, E.M.; Perez, Ernie X.; Schadt, ChristopherW.; Zhou, Jizhong; Massol-Deya, Arturo A.

    2006-09-30

    Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources hasbecome a major environmental and human health concern in many parts ofthe world. Our objectives were to employ both culture andculture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbialcommunity structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate adiesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normaloperating conditions, 97 to 99 percent of total hydrocarbons were removedwith only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultureswere isolated from the treatment unit (96 percent which utilized dieselconstituents as sole carbon source). Approximately 20 percent of theisolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas.Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with mostbelonging to the infinity, beta and gamma subdivision of theProteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the geneticconstitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple timepoints with a Functional Gene Array (FGA) containing over 12,000 probesfor genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemicalcycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using anisothermal phi29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, andhybridized to the arrays in 50 percent formimide overnight at 50 degreesC. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course oftreatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbialcommunity. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation(including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane,biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene); and 333 genesinvolved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases[nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB],potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase[pmoA]) were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE,nitroaromatics and chlorinated compounds werealso present, indicating abroad catabolic potential of the treatment unit. FGA's demonstrated theearly establishment of a diverse community with concurrent aerobic andanaerobic processes contributing to the bioremediationprocess.

  15. Modelling of iron cycling and its impact on the electron balance at a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated site in Hnevice, Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Vencelides, Zbynek; Sracek, Ondra; Prommer, Henning

    2007-01-30

    Over a period of several decades multiple leaks of large volumes from storage facilities located near Hnevice (Czech Republic) have caused the underlying Quaternary aquifer to be severely contaminated with nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) petroleum hydrocarbons. Beginning in the late 1980's the NAPL plume started to shrink as a consequence of NAPL dissolution exceeding replenishment and due to active remediation. The subsurface was classified geochemically into four different zones, (i) a contaminant-free zone never occupied by NAPL or dissolved contaminants, (ii) a re-oxidation zone formerly occupied by NAPL, (iii) a zone currently occupied by NAPL, and (iv) a lower fringe zone between the overlying NAPL and the deeper underlying contaminant-free zone. The study investigated the spatial and temporal variability of the redox zonation at the Hnevice site and quantified the influence of iron-cycling on the overall electron balance. As a first step inverse geochemical modelling was carried out to identify possible reaction models and mass transfer processes. In a subsequent step, two-dimensional (forward) multi-component reactive transport modelling was performed to evaluate and quantify the major processes that control the geochemical evolution at the site. The study explains the observed enrichment of the lower fringe zone with ferrihydrite as a result of the re-oxidation of ferrous iron. It suggests that once the NAPL zone started to shrink the dissolution of previously formed siderite and FeS by oxygen and nitrate consumed a significant part of the oxidation capacity for a considerable time period and therefore limited the penetration of electron acceptors into the NAPL contaminated zone. PMID:17070964

  16. Response of the microbial community to seasonal groundwater level fluctuations in petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ai-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Dong, Tian-Zi; Lin, Xue-Yu; Su, Xiao-Si

    2015-07-01

    The effects of seasonal groundwater level fluctuations on the contamination characteristics of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soils, groundwater, and the microbial community were investigated at a typical petrochemical site in northern China. The measurements of groundwater and soil at different depths showed that significant TPH residue was present in the soil in this study area, especially in the vicinity of the pollution source, where TPH concentrations were up to 2600 mg kg(-1). The TPH concentration in the groundwater fluctuated seasonally, and the maximum variation was 0.8 mg L(-1). The highest TPH concentrations were detected in the silty clay layer and lied in the groundwater level fluctuation zones. The groundwater could reach previously contaminated areas in the soil, leading to higher groundwater TPH concentrations as TPH leaches into the groundwater. The coincident variation of the electron acceptors and TPH concentration with groundwater-table fluctuations affected the microbial communities in groundwater. The microbial community structure was significantly different between the wet and dry seasons. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) results showed that in the wet season, TPH, NO3 (-), Fe(2+), TMn, S(2-), and HCO3 (-) were the major factors correlating the microbial community. A significant increase in abundance of operational taxonomic unit J1 (97 % similar to Dechloromonas aromatica sp.) was also observed in wet season conditions, indicating an intense denitrifying activity in the wet season environment. In the dry season, due to weak groundwater level fluctuations and low temperature of groundwater, the microbial activity was weak. But iron and sulfate-reducing were also detected in dry season at this site. As a whole, groundwater-table fluctuations would affect the distribution, transport, and biodegradation of the contaminants. These results may be valuable for the control and remediation of soil and groundwater pollution at this site and in other petrochemical-contaminated areas. Furthermore, they are probably helpful for reducing health risks to the general public from contaminated groundwater. PMID:25687607

  17. Chemical Fate of Contaminants in the Environment: Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in the Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, Donald G.; Cramer, Christopher; Gao, Jiali; Garrett, Bruce C.; Dupuis, Michel; Straatsma, TP; Morokuma, Keiji; Dunning, Thomas H.; Borisov, Yurii A.; Arcia, Edgar E.; Thompson, Jacob S.

    2006-09-21

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) are the most common contaminant found at hazardous waste sites and are the most prevalent contaminants on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons production sites. Many of the CHCs are either known or suspected carcinogens and thus pose health risks to the public and/or site workers. Unlike simple hydrocarbons, CHCs are resistant to biodegradation, but can degrade by abiotic processes such as hydrolysis, nucleophilic substitution, and dehydrochlorination. Unfortunately, few studies of the reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons have been reported in literature, and disagreement still exists about the mechanisms and rates of many of the key reactions. In this work, we modeled the reactions involved in the degradation of CHCs in the groundwater. The goals of the research proposed are: • development of a computational approach that will allow reaction pathways and rate constants to be accurately calculated • development of more approximate approaches, evaluated against the more accurate approach, which will lay the groundwork for exploratory studies of more complex CHCs • application of these approaches to study the degradation pathways of CHCs in aqueous liquids • application of the more approximate approaches to study the mechanism of forming complex CHC polychlorinated benzene compounds and dioxins. We examined elementary reactions involved in the aqueous-phase chemistry of chlorinated methanes and ethylenes in an attempt to obtain a detailed understanding of the abiotic processes involved in the degradation of this important class of contaminants. We began by studying the reactions of CHnCl(4-n) and C2HnCl(4-n) with OH¯, as these are thought to be the dominant processes involved in the degradation of these chlorinated species. We used state-of-the-art theoretical techniques to model the elementary reactions of CHCs important in the groundwater. We employed high-accuracy electronic structure methods (e.g., perturbation theory and coupled cluster methods with correlation-consistent basis sets) to determine the energies of the various stable species, intermediates, and transition states involved in the elementary reactions of CHCs. Effects of solvation on the reaction energetics were studied by including small numbers of solvent molecules (microsolvation). Our own N-layered molecular orbital + molecular mechanics (ONIOM) method was used because it allows the number of solvent molecules to be increased, and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods and continuum solvation models were used to estimate the effects of bulk solvation. Rate constants for the gas-phase, microsolvated, and bulk-phase reactions were computed using variational transition state theory (VTST).

  18. Influence of ultraviolet light in the toxicity of sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States); Monson, P.D. [UWS, Duluth, MN (United States); Kosian, P.A. [ILS, Duluth, MN (United States); Collyard, S.A. [SAIC, Duluth, MN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Standard 10-d toxicity tests were conducted with freshwater benthic invertebrates using sediments containing a range of concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The assays were performed both under normal laboratory fluorescent light and ultraviolet (UV) light which mimicked wavelengths present in sunlight at about 10% of ambient solar intensity. Additionally, field experiments used an in situ apparatus to evaluate the phototoxic response of the aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus to sediments contaminated with PAHs. Those experiments were conducted using both sunlight exposed and shaded test chambers. In addition to a PAH contaminated site, a reference site lacking in PAHs also was tested as a control. Laboratory tests conducted with PAH contaminated sediments exposed to UV light resulted in significantly greater mortality of Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus than tests performed under otherwise comparable conditions with fluorescent light. Results from field experiments corroborated this trend. The results suggest that failure to consider photoactivation of PAHs by sunlight could result in sediment toxicity test methods or criteria which are underprotective of benthic organisms.

  19. Phototoxic response of Lumbriculus variegatus to sediments contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, P.D. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Superior, Duluth, MN (United States); Ankley, G.T. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States); Kosian, P.A. [Integrated Lab. Systems, Duluth, MN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The toxicity of certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to aquatic organisms can be greatly increased upon exposure of the organisms to ultraviolet (UV) radiation present in sunlight. The phenomenon of photoactivation of PAHs had received some attention in the laboratory; however, evaluation of the photoinduced toxicity of PAHs in field settings has been limited. In these studies, in situ chambers made from Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tubes were used to evaluate the phototoxic response of laboratory-cultured oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) in sediments contaminated with PAHs. These experiments were conducted using both sunlight-exposed and shaded test chambers. In addition to the PAH-contaminated site, a reference site lacking PAHs was tested as a control. Survival of L. variegatus at the PAH-contaminated site was significantly less in chambers exposed to sunlight than in chambers held in the dark, or chambers from the reference site. Concurrent laboratory studies with sediment collected from the two sites and an artificial source of UV light corroborated observations made in the field. Although a number of PAHs were present at elevated concentrations in the test sample, further work is required to determine exactly which were responsible for the observed phototoxicity.

  20. Role of Autochthonous Filamentous Fungi in Bioremediation of a Soil Historically Contaminated with Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    D'Annibale, A.; Rosetto, F.; Leonardi, V.; Federici, F.; Petruccioli, M.

    2006-01-01

    Nine fungal strains isolated from an aged and heavily contaminated soil were identified and screened to assess their degradative potential. Among them, Allescheriella sp. strain DABAC 1, Stachybotrys sp. strain DABAC 3, and Phlebia sp. strain DABAC 9 were selected for remediation trials on the basis of Poly R-478 decolorization associated with lignin-modifying enzyme (LME) production. These autochthonous fungi were tested for the abilities to grow under nonsterile conditions and to degrade various aromatic hydrocarbons in the same contaminated soil. After 30 days, fungal colonization was clearly visible and was confirmed by ergosterol determination. In spite of subalkaline pH conditions and the presence of heavy metals, the autochthonous fungi produced laccase and Mn and lignin peroxidases. No LME activities were detected in control microcosms. All of the isolates led to a marked removal of naphthalene, dichloroaniline isomers, o-hydroxybiphenyl, and 1,1?-binaphthalene. Stachybotrys sp. strain DABAC 3 was the most effective isolate due to its ability to partially deplete the predominant contaminants 9,10-anthracenedione and 7H-benz[DE]anthracen-7-one. A release of chloride ions was observed in soil treated with either Allescheriella sp. strain DABAC 1 or Stachybotrys sp. strain DABAC 3, suggesting the occurrence of oxidative dehalogenation. The autochthonous fungi led to a significant decrease in soil toxicity, as assessed by both the Lepidium sativum L. germination test and the Collembola mortality test. PMID:16391021

  1. Benzo(a)pyrene-blood protein adducts in wild woodchucks used as biological sentinels of environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Odette Blondin; Claude Viau I

    1992-01-01

    Levels of benzo(a)pyrene-diolepoxide (BaPDE)-albumin and BaPDE-hemoglobin adducts in wild woodchucks (Marmota monax) have been measured to evaluate the potential usefulness of these parameters in the assessment of environmental contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Blood was obtained from nine woodchucks living near an aluminum electrolysis plant, contaminated area (Saguenay region, Québec, Canada), and from eight living in a control area

  2. HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT ON RESIDENTS EXPOSED TO CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS CONTAMINATED IN GROUNDWATER OF A HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lukas Jyuhn-Hsiarn Lee; Chang-Chuan Chan; Chih-Wen Chung; Yee-Chung Ma; Gan-Shuh Wang; Jung-Der Wang

    2002-01-01

    We conducted this study to estimate residents' chronic hazard and carcinogenic risk in a groundwater-contaminated community after on-site remediation in Taiwan during 1999-2000. We followed guidelines for assessing hazardous waste sites of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and used empirically measured contaminant levels and exposure parameters to perform health risk assessment on seven chlorinated hydrocarbons. We measured groundwater concentrations

  3. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by Cladosporium sphaerospermum isolated from an aged PAH contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Potin, Olivier; Veignie, Etienne; Rafin, Catherine

    2004-12-27

    The ability of a Deuteromycete fungus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, previously isolated from soil of an aged gas manufacturing plant, to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was investigated. This strain was able to degrade PAHs in non-sterile soils (average 23%), including high molecular weight PAHs, after 4 weeks of incubation. In a microcosm experiment, PAH depletion was clearly correlated to fungal establishment. In liquid culture, this strain degraded rapidly benzo(a)pyrene during its early exponential phase of growth (18% after 4 days of incubation). Among extracellular ligninolytic enzyme activities tested, only laccase activity was detected in liquid culture in the absence or in presence of benzo(a)pyrene. C. sphaerospermum might be a potential candidate for an effective bioremediation of aged PAH-contaminated soils. PMID:16329856

  4. Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated sewage sludge by different composting processes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui; Wu, Qi-Tang; Zeng, Qiao-Yun; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Férard, Jean-François

    2007-04-01

    The efficiency of four different composting processes to bioremediate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated sewage sludge was investigated. Prior to composting, sewage sludge coming from the Datansha wastewater treatment plant, Guangzhou, China, was mixed with rice straw to obtain a C/N ratio of 13:1. After 56 days of composting, the total concentrations of 16 PAHs (Sigma(PAHs)) ranged from 1.8 to 10.2 mg kg(-1) dry weight, decreasing in order of inoculated-manual turned compost (IMTC)>manual turned compost (MTC)>continuous aerated compost (CAC)>intermittent aerated compost (IAC), exhibiting removal rates of 64%, 70%, 85% and 94%, respectively. Individual PAHs were generally removed in similar rates. IAC treatment showed a higher removal rate of high molecular weight PAHs and carcinogenic PAHs comparing to the other composting processes. PMID:17029776

  5. Changes in toxicity during in situ bioremediation of weathered drill wastes contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Steliga, Teresa; Jakubowicz, Piotr; Kapusta, Piotr

    2012-12-01

    Bioremediation of weathered drill wastes severely contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) (90,000-170,000 mg kg(-1)) and BTEX (51.2-95.5 mg kg(-1)) to soil standards was achieved over a 3-year period in three phases: initial remediation, basic bioremediation and inoculation with a biopreparation. Fourteen non-pathogenic indigenous bacteria species belonging mainly to the Actinomycetales were identified and shown to be able to degrade 63-75% of nC(9)-nC(20), 36-51% of nC(21)-nC(36), 36% of BTEX and 20% of PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). Addition of five non-pathogenic fungi species to the bacterial consortium allowed degradation of 69-89% of nC(9)-nC(20), 47-80% of nC(21)-nC(36), 76% of BTEX, and 68% of PAHs. Microtox, Ostacodtoxkit, Phytotoxkit and Ames tests indicated that changes in toxicity were not connected with the decrease in TPH contents, possibly due to the formation of toxic indirect metabolites during bioremediation. No toxicity was found in the soil after bioremediation. PMID:23018157

  6. Analysis of hydrocarbon contamination with membrane-assisted solvent extraction: comparison of agitation and sonication methods.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, Z; Eke, Zs; Rikker, T; Torkos, K

    2009-10-01

    Membrane-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) coupled to large volume injection was applied to the determination of (gasoline-type) hydrocarbon contamination in water samples. Hexane was used as acceptor phase. 50 microL extract was injected in the programmed temperature vaporizer injector using combined split-splitless evaporation. The extraction conditions were optimized both for MASE with agitation and for MASE with sonication. In the course of optimization the effect of extraction time, extraction temperature, agitation speed, solvent volume, pH, ionic strength and the addition of methanol were tested. Over 75% recovery was accomplished in the range of diesel oil hydrocarbons (n-C(9)-n-C(24)). The developed method was validated. Linearity, accuracy and precision were tested. The method showed excellent linearity between 1 and 1000 microgL(-1) for n-alkanes and between 0.05 and 50 mgL(-1) for gasoline. The method was tested with comprehensive GCxGC as well and found to be non-discriminative to all major compounds of diesel oil. PMID:19744659

  7. Comparison of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions and sedimentary organic matter characteristics in contaminated, coastal sediments from Pensacola Bay, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Myrna J. Simpson; Benny Chefetz; Ashish P. Deshmukh; Patrick G. Hatcher

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we examined the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a contaminated coastal area and the characteristics of the natural organic matter in tandem. We present a detailed study of PAH concentration, distribution, and organic matter characteristics of three core samples from Pensacola Bay, Florida. Solid-state 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), pyrolysis gas chromatography coupled with mass

  8. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in feces of river otters from the southern Pacific coast of Canada, 1998–2004

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John E. Elliott; Daniel A. Guertin; Jennifer M. E. Balke

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in coastal river otters (Lontra canadensis) were evaluated by sampling feces (scats) collected on the south coast of British Columbia, Canada. A broad survey of industrialized areas of the Strait of Georgia region was conducted in 1998, and a subsequent survey of working harbours in 2004. Samples from 1998 were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC)

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in agricultural soils in Poland: preliminary proposals for criteria to evaluate the level of soil contamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Maliszewska-Kordybach

    1996-01-01

    The contamination of agricultural soils in the Upper Silesia region of Poland with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was evaluated on the basis of three criteria: the sum of PAH content; the number of exceeded reference values for individual PAH (according Dutch regulations); the author's preliminary proposals for agricultural lands in Poland (the sum of PAH content normalized to “average soil”

  10. Effect of soil structure on the bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons within aggregates of a contaminated soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N Amellal; J.-M Portal; J Berthelin

    2001-01-01

    Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) was investigated in the whole matrix and in the different aggregate size fractions of a sandy soil contaminated by a mixture of 8 PAHs and incubated at water holding capacity. The distribution of PAHs and of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were determined in the bulk soil and in 4 size aggregate fractions corresponding to sand, coarse

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination of American lobster, Homarus americanus , in the proximity of a coal-coking plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Uthe; C. J. Musial

    1986-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants resulting predominantly from anthropogenic pyrolytic and combustion processes (NRCC 1983). In addition to the usual methods of aerial and aqueous transport to the coastal marine environment substantial amounts of PAH are added through the use of products such as creosote, coal tar and coal tar pitch as preservative and antifouling agents in

  12. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Contamination in Osprey Eggs and Nestlings from the Canadian Great Lakes Basin, 1991–1995

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela A. Martin; Shane R. De Solla; Peter Ewins

    2003-01-01

    Populations of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) in the Great Lakes basin declined dramatically during the 1950s–1970s due largely to adverse effects of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons, ingested in their fish prey, on eggshell thickness and adult survival. Nevertheless, these contaminants were not measured in osprey tissues during the decades of decline on the Canadian Great Lakes. Between 1991 and 1995, we monitored

  13. A case study of bioremediation of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated soil at a crude oil spill site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. K. Gogoi; N. N. Dutta; P. Goswami; T. R. Krishna Mohan

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory and field pilot studies were carried out on the bioremediation of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons in the Borhola oil fields, Assam, India. The effects of aeration, nutrients (i.e. nitrogen and phosphorus) and inoculation of extraneous microbial consortia on the bioremediation process were investigated. The beneficial effects of these parameters on the bioremediation rate were realised equally in laboratory

  14. Chemical and ecotoxicological assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon—contaminated sediments of the Niger Delta, Southern Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abass A. Olajire; Rolf Altenburger; Eberhard Küster; Werner Brack

    2005-01-01

    The extent of environmental contamination and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compounds to sediments of the Niger Delta, Nigeria were assessed using combined chemical analysis and toxicity bioassay techniques. Concentrations of two- to six-ring PAHs of molecular mass 128–278 and toxicity to Vibrio fischeri and Lemna minor are considered in this investigation. Levels of the sum of the 16

  15. Identification of anthraquinone-degrading bacteria in soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A; Zhang, Zhenfa; Adrion, Alden C; Gold, Avram; Aitken, Michael D

    2015-06-01

    Quinones and other oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) are toxic and/or genotoxic compounds observed to be cocontaminants at PAH-contaminated sites, but their formation and fate in contaminated environmental systems have not been well studied. Anthracene-9,10-dione (anthraquinone) has been found in most PAH-contaminated soils and sediments that have been analyzed for oxy-PAHs. However, little is known about the biodegradation of oxy-PAHs, and no bacterial isolates have been described that are capable of growing on or degrading anthraquinone. PAH-degrading Mycobacterium spp. are the only organisms that have been investigated to date for metabolism of a PAH quinone, 4,5-pyrenequinone. We utilized DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) with [U-(13)C]anthraquinone to identify bacteria associated with anthraquinone degradation in PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site both before and after treatment in a laboratory-scale bioreactor. SIP with [U-(13)C]anthracene was also performed to assess whether bacteria capable of growing on anthracene are the same as those identified to grow on anthraquinone. Organisms closely related to Sphingomonas were the most predominant among the organisms associated with anthraquinone degradation in bioreactor-treated soil, while organisms in the genus Phenylobacterium comprised the majority of anthraquinone degraders in the untreated soil. Bacteria associated with anthracene degradation differed from those responsible for anthraquinone degradation. These results suggest that Sphingomonas and Phenylobacterium species are associated with anthraquinone degradation and that anthracene-degrading organisms may not possess mechanisms to grow on anthraquinone. PMID:25819957

  16. Magnetic Parameter Changes in Soil and Sediments in the Presence of Hydrocarbon Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, E.; Porsch, K.; Rijal, M. L.; Ameen, N. N.; Kappler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic proxies were successfully used for fast and non-destructive detection of fly ash related heavy metal pollution. Correlations of magnetic signals with organic contaminants in soils and sediments were also reported; however, their significance is unclear because of co-existing heavy metal pollution. At a hydrocarbon (HC) contaminated former military airbase (Hradcany, Czech Rep.), where heavy metal contents are insignificant, we detected clearly higher magnetic concentrations at the top of the groundwater fluctuation (GWF) zone. Frequent GWF by up to ca. one meter was caused through remediation by air sparging. In this study and all previous ones magnetite was identified as the dominant phase for higher magnetic concentrations. To determine the importance of microbial activity and soil parameters on changes in magnetic susceptibility (MS) laboratory batch experiments with different microbially active and sterile soils without carbon addition and with gasoline amendment were setup. MS of these microcosms was followed weekly. Depending on the soil MS either increased or decreased by up to ~7% and remained constant afterwards. The main findings were that MS changes were mainly microbially driven and influenced by the bioavailable Fe content, the initial MS and the organic carbon content of the soils. Moreover, we tested magnetic changes in laboratory columns, filled with sand from the field site Hradcany, by simulating water level changes. The observed changes were small and hardly statistically significant. Our laboratory studies revealed that different factors influence changes in magnetic properties of soil/sediments after HC contamination, with much smaller effects than expected from anomalies observed at field sites. With the present results, the ambitious goal of using magnetic monitoring for detecting HC contaminations by oil spills seem far from practical application.

  17. Release of colloids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a contaminated soil under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jann, S.; Totsche, K. U.; Kögel-Knabner, I.

    2003-04-01

    Mobile colloidal particles play an important role in the carrier-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing solutes. They act as a possible sorbent for contaminants and are possible pollutant carriers. Knowledge on the release and transport of soil-borne colloidal particles is mandatory for the understanding of the mobility of hydrophobic or surface-complexing contaminants. In soils, the major fraction of colloidal phase particles is of organic provenience. Their mobility in soils is controlled by the release from and the interactions with the immobile solid phase, by microbial formation processes as well as by the flow regime. Important factors of the release and transport are the site-specific meteorological conditions like groundwater recharge, temperature and moisture regime, and amount and distribution of precipitation. We studied the release of natural organic colloids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from a coarse textured, calcareous porous media under field conditions. Three natural gradient lysimeters and nine precipitation gauges were installed at a contaminated site. Sampling of the seepage water was triggered by rainfall events. Analysis of the samples comprised the determination of the 16 EPA-PAH in the liquid phase and in the colloidal and suspended particle fraction, dissolved and colloidal phase organic carbon (DCOC), pH, electrolytic conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results show a direct response of the release of colloids to strong rainfall events. The amount of seepage corresponds directly with the precipitation rate. Mean concentrations of DCOC in the seepage water range between 2 and 6 mg/l. PAH concentrations are very low in the liquid phase but reach up to 660 mg/kg in the colloidal and suspended particle fraction. This points to the importance of colloid-facilitated transport of the contaminant through the unsaturated soil zone.

  18. Activity and Diversity of Methanogens in a Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Kleikemper, Jutta; Pombo, Silvina A.; Schroth, Martin H.; Sigler, William V.; Pesaro, Manuel; Zeyer, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Methanogenic activity was investigated in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer by using a series of four push-pull tests with acetate, formate, H2 plus CO2, or methanol to target different groups of methanogenic Archaea. Furthermore, the community composition of methanogens in water and aquifer material was explored by molecular analyses, i.e., fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes amplified with the Archaea-specific primer set ARCH915 and UNI-b-rev, and sequencing of DNA from dominant DGGE bands. Molecular analyses were subsequently compared with push-pull test data. Methane was produced in all tests except for a separate test where 2-bromoethanesulfonate, a specific inhibitor of methanogens, was added. Substrate consumption rates were 0.11 mM day?1 for methanol, 0.38 mM day?1 for acetate, 0.90 mM day?1 for H2, and 1.85 mM day?1 for formate. Substrate consumption and CH4 production during all tests suggested that at least three different physiologic types of methanogens were present: H2 plus CO2 or formate, acetate, and methanol utilizers. The presence of 15 to 20 bands in DGGE profiles indicated a diverse archaeal population. High H2 and formate consumption rates agreed with a high diversity of methanogenic Archaea consuming these substrates (16S rRNA gene sequences related to several members of the Methanomicrobiaceae) and the detection of Methanomicrobiaceae by using FISH (1.4% of total DAPI [4?,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole]-stained microorganisms in one water sample; probe MG1200). Considerable acetate consumption agreed with the presence of sequences related to the obligate acetate degrader Methanosaeata concilii and the detection of this species by FISH (5 to 22% of total microorganisms; probe Rotcl1). The results suggest that both aceticlastic and CO2-type substrate-consuming methanogens are likely involved in the terminal step of hydrocarbon degradation, while methanogenesis from methanol plays a minor role. DGGE profiles further indicate similar archaeal community compositions in water and aquifer material. The combination of hydrogeological and molecular methods employed in this study provide improved information on the community and the potential activity of methanogens in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. PMID:15640182

  19. Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

  20. Contamination of stream fishes with chlorinated hydrocarbons from eggs of Great Lakes salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Merna, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. have been stocked in the Great Lakes where they accumulate body burdens of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The transport of these contaminants to resident communities in spawning streams was studied in two tributaries of Lake Michigan accessible to anadromous spawners and one control tributary blocked to them. No polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT, or dieldrin were detected in the sediments or biota of the control stream, or in sediments of the test streams. However, trout Salmo spp. and, to a lesser extent, sculpins Cottus spp. accumulated PCBs and DDT as a result of eating contaminated salmon eggs. Eggs constituted as much as 87% (by weight) of the total stomach contents of trout collected during the salmon spawning season early October to early January. Salmon eggs contained 0.46-9.50 mg PCBs/kg,. and 0.14-1.80 mg DDT/kg. Consumption of eggs varied greatly among individual trout, and there was a strong correlation between numbers of eggs in the stomachs and PCB and DDT concentrations in the fillets.

  1. Bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a historically contaminated sediment core

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A.; Van Hoof, P.L.; Landrum, P.F. [Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    To determine changes in bioavailability of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with sediment aging, Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed for 4 weeks to sediment core sections taken from a contaminated lake. Core depths included surficial (0 to 4 cm), 4- to 8-, 12- to 16-, 28- to 32-, and 44- to 48-cm sections deposited for approximately 1899 to 1993, and were known to be historically contaminated with PAHs. Bioaccumulation was maximal at the 12- to 16-cm depth (circa 1967) where sediment PAH concentrations were greatest. Accumulation was generally below detection limits in the 0- to 4-cm depths, even though sediment concentrations of some compounds were comparable to those at the 12- to 16-cm depth where accumulation was great enough to generate accurate kinetics curves. Accumulation peaked at about 96 h, then declined over the remainder of the study for the lower-molecular-weight PAHs. For most higher-molecular-weight PAHs, accumulation peaked at about 2 weeks, then declined only slightly after 4 weeks. The differential bioavailability observed between surficial and at-depth core sections raises questions concerning the adequacy of results generated from toxicity and bioaccumulation tests routinely conducted surficial sediments.

  2. The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    David Watson

    2005-04-18

    Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies.

  3. Microbial diversity and bioremediation of a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Enid M; Pérez, Ernie X; Schadt, Christopher W; Zhou, Jizhong; Massol-Deyá, Arturo A

    2006-09-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources has become a major environmental and human health concern in many parts of the world. Our objectives were to employ both culture and culture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbial community structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate a diesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normal operating conditions, 97 to 99% of total hydrocarbons were removed with only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultures were isolated from the treatment unit (96% which utilized diesel constituents as sole carbon source). Approximately 20% of the isolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with most belonging to the infinity, beta and gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the genetic constitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple time points with a Functional Gene Array (FGA) containing over 12,000 probes for genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemical cycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using an isothermal phi29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, and hybridized to the arrays in 50% formimide overnight at 50 degrees C. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course of treatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbial community. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation (including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane, biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene); and 333 genes involved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases [nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB], potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase [pmoA]) were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE, nitroaromatics and chlorinated compounds were also present, indicating a broad catabolic potential of the treatment unit. FGA's demonstrated the early establishment of a diverse community with concurrent aerobic and anaerobic processes contributing to the bioremediation process. PMID:16968977

  4. ANNUAL REPORT. FIXATION MECHANISMS AND DESORPTION RATES OF SORBED CS IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS: IMPLICATIONS TO FUTURE BEHAVIOR AND IN-GROUND STABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research is investigating mineralogic and geochemical factors controlling the desorption rate of 137Cs+ from subsurface sediments on the Hanford Site contaminated with different types of high-level waste. The project will develop kinetic data and models that describe the release ...

  5. Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond cryogenic barrier technology demonstration: Pre-barrier subsurface hydrology and contaminant transport investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Moline, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    The Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond is the site of a former impoundment for radioactive wastes that has since been drained, filled with soil, and covered with an asphalt cap. The site is bordered to the east and south by a tributary that empties into Melton Branch Creek and that contains significant concentrations of radioactive contaminants, primarily {sup 90}Sr. Because of the proximity of the tributary to the HRE disposal site and the probable flow of groundwater from the site to the tributary, it is hypothesized that the HRE Pond is a source of contamination to he creek. As a means for temporary containment of contaminants within the impoundment, a cryogenic barrier technology demonstration was initiated in FY96 with a background hydrologic investigation that continued through FY97. Cryogenic equipment installation was completed in FY97, and freezing was initiated in September of 1997. This report documents the results of a hydrologic and geologic investigation of the HRE Pond/cryogenic barrier site. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the hydrologic conditions within and around the impoundment in order to meet the following objectives: (1) to provide a pre-barrier subsurface hydrologic baseline for post-barrier performance assessment; (2) to confirm that the impoundment is hydraulically connected to the surrounding sediments; and (3) to determine the likely contaminant exit pathways from the impoundment. The methods of investigation included water level and temperature monitoring in a network of wells and standpipes in and surrounding the impoundment, a helium tracer test conducted under ambient flow conditions, and geologic logging during the drilling of boreholes for installation of cryogenic probes and temperature monitoring wells.

  6. Bacterial communities of surface and deep hydrocarbon-contaminated waters of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Nigro, L. M.; McKay, L.; Ziervogel, K.; Gutierrez, T.; Teske, A.

    2010-12-01

    We performed a 16S rRNA gene sequencing survey of bacterial communities within oil-contaminated surface water, deep hydrocarbon plume water, and deep water samples above and below the plume to determine spatial and temporal patterns of oil-degrading bacteria growing in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. In addition, we are reporting 16S rRNA sequencing results from time series incubation, enrichment and cultivation experiments. Surface oil slick samples were collected 3 nautical miles from ground zero, (5/6/10, RV Pelican) and were added to uncontaminated surface water (collected within a 30 nautical mile radius of ground zero, 5/6/10 - 5/9/10, RV Pelican). This mixture was incubated for 20 days in a rolling bottle at 25°C. 16S rRNA clone libraries from marine snow-like microbial flocs that had formed during the incubation yielded a highly diverse bacterial community, predominately composed of the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, and a smaller number of Planktomycetes and other bacterial lineages. The most frequently recovered proteobacterial sequences were closely related to cultured species of the genus Cycloclasticus, specialists in aerobic oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. These time series incubation results will be compared to the microbial community structure of contaminated surface water, sampled on the same cruise with RV Pelican (5/6/10-5/9/10) and frozen immediately. Stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments with C13-labelled alkanes and polycyclic aromatic substrates and gulf water samples have yielded different enrichments. With naphthalene, predominantly Alteromonas-related clones and a smaller share of Cycloclasticus clones were recovered; phenanthrene yielded predominantly clones related to Cycloclasticus, and diverse other Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria. Analyses of SIP experiments with hexadecane are in progress. The microbial community composition of the deep hydrocarbon plume was characterized using water column profile samples taken with RV Walton Smith on May 30, at station WS 46 near the leak (28°N659.35; 88°W.43498). Water was collected and filtered from above the plume (800 m), within the plume (1170 m and 1210 m) and below the plume (1320 m) as indicated by Color Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) measurements. Clone libraries of both plume samples were dominated by a cluster of closely related 16S rRNA clones within the Oceanospirillales. The closest relatives were aerobic alkane oxidizers of the genera Oleispira and Thalassolituus. In contrast, the water samples above and below the plume showed distinct, diverse bacterial communities that lacked the characteristic clones of the hydrocarbon plume. Analysis of additional water samples from different locations and time points will further resolve spatial and temporal dynamics of oil degrading microbes in the water column. Thus far, our results indicate a stratified bacterial community in the oil-polluted water column with distinct types of oil-degrading bacteria in surface oil slicks and finely dispersed deepwater plumes.

  7. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin [Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Wellman, Dawn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth [ARCADIS U.S., Inc., Emeryville, CA 94608 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites. (authors)

  8. Microbial diversity in a hydrocarbon- and chlorinated-solvent- contaminated aquifer undergoing intrinsic bioremediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dojka, M.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Haack, S.K.; Pace, N.R.

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic approach was used to survey constituents of microbial communities associated with an aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons (mainly jet fuel) and chlorinated solvents undergoing intrinsic bioremediation. Samples were obtained from three redox zones: methanogenic, methanogenic-sulfate reducing, and iron or sulfate reducing. Small-subunit rRNA genes were amplified directly from aquifer material DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria- or Archaea-specific primers and were cloned. A total of 812 clones were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), approximately 50% of which were unique. All RFLP types that occurred more than once in the libraries, as well as many of the unique types, were sequenced. A total of 104 (94 bacterial and 10 archaeal) sequence types were determined. Of the 94 bacterial sequence types, 10 have no phylogenetic association with known taxonomic divisions and are phylogenetically grouped in six novel division level groups (candidate divisions WS1 to WS6); 21 belong to four recently described candidate divisions with no cultivated representatives (OPS, OP8, OP10, and OP11); and 63 are phylogenetically associated with 10 well-recognized divisions. The physiology of two particularly abundant sequence types obtained from the methanogenic zone could be inferred from their phylogenetic association with groups of microorganisms with a consistent phenotype. One of these sequence types is associated with the genus Syntrophus; Syntrophus spp. produce energy from the anaerobic oxidation of organic acids, with the production of acetate and hydrogen. The organism represented by the other sequence type is closely related to Methanosaeta spp., which are known to be capable of energy generation only through aceticlastic methanogenesis. We hypothesize, therefore, that the terminal step of hydrocarbon degradation in the methanogenic zone of the aquifer is aceticlastic methanogenesis and that the microorganisms represented by these two sequence types occur in syntrophic association.

  9. [Contamination and source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in epikarst spring water].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Chuan; Shen, Li-Cheng; Yuan, Dao-Xian

    2014-06-01

    The water samples were collected from four typical epikarst springs in Nanchuan District, Chongqing Municipality between October 2010 and October 2011. Sixteen priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in epikarst spring waters were quantitatively analyzed by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The objectives of this study were to investigate the seasonal variations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons' concentration, composition, source and contamination characterization in epikarst springs water. The results showed that the detection ratios of 16 PAHs in four springs were 100%. The total concentrations of 16 PAHs fluctuated greatly in epikarst spring water during one year observation, and the concentration ranged from 341 to 4 968 ng x L(-1), with a mean value of 1772 ng x L(-1). The total concentrations of 7 carcinogenic PAHs in rain season were all higher than those in dry season in four epikarst springs. The PAHs profiles were dominated by (2-3) rings PAHs in spring water, which accounted for more than 50% of 16 PAHs. The PAHs in spring water mainly originated from the combustion of coal, biomass and petroleum, and during June to October 2011, PAHs originated from the combustion of coal and biomass had a larger contribution. The ratios of Ant/( Ant + Phe) and Fla/( Fla + Pyr) changing with seasons showed that Ant, Phe, Fla and Pyr were easy to migrate in epikarst soils. In 4 isomeric ratios, the ratios of Fla/(Fla + Pyr) were more sensitive to reflect the information of sources. Compared to other areas in the world, the concentration of 16 PAHs in epikarst spring water is at a higher level, which shows the epikarst spring water has been suffered the PAHs pollution. PMID:25158482

  10. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Martian (SNC) Meteorite ALH 84001: Hydrocarbons from Mars, Terrestrial Contaminants, or Both?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. L. Thomas; S. J. Clemett; C. S. Romanek; C. R. Macheling; E. K. Gibson; D. S. McKay; R. Score; R. N. Zare

    1995-01-01

    Previous work has shown that pre-terrestrial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exist in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and certain meteorites [1-3]. We previously reported the first observation of PAHs in the newest member of the SNC group, Allan Hills 84001 [4] and determined that particular types of organic compounds are indigenous to ALH 84001 because they are associated with certain mineralogical

  11. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  12. Intrinsic bioremediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater at a petroleum-hydrocarbon spill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. F.; Kao, C. M.; Chen, T. Y.; Weng, C. H.; Tsai, C. T.

    2006-06-01

    An oil-refining plant site located in southern Taiwan has been identified as a petroleum-hydrocarbon [mainly methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)] spill site. In this study, groundwater samples collected from the site were analyzed to assess the occurrence of intrinsic MTBE biodegradation. Microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of biodegrading MTBE by indigenous microorganisms under aerobic, cometabolic, iron reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results from the field investigation and microbial enumeration indicate that the intrinsic biodegradation of MTBE and BTEX is occurring and causing the decrease in MTBE and BTEX concentrations. Microcosm results show that the indigenous microorganisms were able to biodegrade MTBE under aerobic conditions using MTBE as the sole primary substrate. The detected biodegradation byproduct, tri-butyl alcohol (TBA), can also be biodegraded by the indigenous microorganisms. In addition, microcosms with site groundwater as the medium solution show higher MTBE biodegradation rate. This indicates that the site groundwater might contain some trace minerals or organics, which could enhance the MTBE biodegradation. Results show that the addition of BTEX at low levels could also enhance the MTBE removal. No MTBE removal was detected in iron reducing and methanogenic microcosms. This might be due to the effects of low dissolved oxygen (approximately 0.3 mg/L) within the plume. The low iron reducers and methanogens (<1.8×103 cell/g of soil) observed in the aquifer also indicate that the iron reduction and methanogenesis are not the dominant biodegradation patterns in the contaminant plume. Results from the microcosm study reveal that preliminary laboratory study is required to determine the appropriate substrates and oxidation-reduction conditions to enhance the biodegradation of MTBE. Results suggest that in situ or on-site aerobic bioremediation using indigenous microorganisms would be a feasible technology to clean up this MTBE-contaminated site.

  13. Properties of hydrocarbon- and salt-contaminated flare pit soils in northeastern British Columbia (Canada).

    PubMed

    Arocena, J M; Rutherford, P M

    2005-07-01

    Many contaminated sites in Canada are associated with flare pits generated during past petroleum extraction operations. Flare pits are located adjacent to well sites, compressor stations and batteries and are often subjected to the disposal of wastes from the flaring of gas, liquid hydrocarbons and brine water. This study was conducted to evaluate the physical, chemical, electrical and mineral properties of three flare pit soils as compared to adjacent control soils. Results showed that particle size distribution, pH, total N, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable Mg(2+), and sodium adsorption ratio were similar in soils from flare pits and control sites. Total C, exchangeable Ca(2+), K(+) and Na(+), soluble Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+) and Na(+) and electrical conductivity were higher in flare pit soils compared to control soils. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopic analyses showed the presence of gypsum [CaSO(4).2H(2)O], dolomite [CaMg(CO(3))(2)], pyrite [FeS(2)], jarosite [KFe(3)(OH)(6)(SO(4))(2)], magnesium sulphate, oxides of copper and iron+copper in salt efflorescence observed in flare pit soils. Soils from both flare pits and control sites contained mica, kaolonite and 2:1 expanding clays. The salt-rich materials altered the ionic equilibria in the flare pit soils; K(Mg-Ca) selectivity coefficients in control soils were higher compared to contaminated soils. The properties of soils (e.g., high electrical conductivity) affected by inputs associated with oil and gas operations might render flare pit soils less conducive to the establishment and growth of common agricultural crops and forest trees. PMID:15950049

  14. Residual indoor contamination from world trade center rubble fires as indicated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon profiles.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Funk, William E; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2006-02-15

    The catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on Sept. 11, 2001 (9/11) created an immense dust cloud followed by fires that emitted smoke and soot into the air of New York City (NYC) well into December. Outdoor pollutant levels in lower Manhattan returned to urban background levels after about 200 days as the fires were put out and the debris cleanup was completed. However, particulate matter (PM) from the original collapse and fires also penetrated into commercial and residential buildings. This has created public concern because WTC dust is thought to cause adverse pulmonary symptoms including "WTC cough" and reduced lung capacity. Additionally, some recent studies have suggested a possible link between exposure to WTC contamination and other adverse health effects. Distinguishing between normal urban pollutant infiltration and residual WTC dust remaining in interior spaces is difficult; efforts are underway to develop such discriminator methods. Some progress has been made in identifying WTC dust by the content of fibers believed to be associated with the initial building collapse. There are also contaminants created by the fires that burned for 100 days in the debris piles of the building rubble. Using WTC ambient air samples, we have developed indicators for fire related PM based on the relative amounts of specific particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the mass fraction of PAHs per mass of PM. These two parameters are combined, and we show a graphical method for discriminating between fire sources and urban particulate sources as applied to samples of settled dusts. We found that our PAHs based discriminator method can distinguish fire source contributions to WTC related particulate matter and dusts. Other major building fires or large open burn events could have similar PAHs characteristics. We found that random samples collected approximately 3.5 years after the WTC event from occupied indoor spaces (primarily residential) in the New York area are not statistically distinguishable from contemporary city background. PMID:16572771

  15. Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation in Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects On Contaminant Fate and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Redden, George D.; Yoshiko Fujita; Scheibe, Tim; Smith, Robert; Reddy, Michael; Kelly, Shelly

    2006-06-01

    Reactive mixing fronts can occur at large scales, e.g. when chemical amendments are injected in wells, or at small scales (pore-scales) when reactive intermediates are being generated in situ at grain boundaries, cell surfaces and adjacent to biofilms. The product of the reactions such as mineral precipitates, biofilms or filtered colloids modifies permeability leading to the complex coupling between flow and reactions and precipitation. The objectives are to determine how precipitates are distributed within large and small scale mixing fronts, how permeability and flow is modified by precipitation, how the mobility of a representative contaminant, strontium, is affected by the precipitation of carbonates, and how subsequent dissolution of the carbonates result in mobilization of Sr and increased flow. The desired outcomes of the project are to help develop methods leading to sequestration of metal contaminants, and to determine how macroscopic field-scale modeling can be applied to predict the outcome of remediation activities.

  16. Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons at a petroleum-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Victoria A; Brubaker, Gaylen R; Zenker, Matthew J; Prince, Roger C; Gieg, Lisa M; Da Silva, Marcio L B; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2009-03-01

    Field metabolomics and laboratory assays were used to assess the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underlying a former refinery. Benzene, ethylbenzene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1,2,4- and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were targeted as contaminants of greatest regulatory concern (COC) whose intrinsic remediation has been previously reported. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization of alkylbenzenes, including the trimethylbenzene COC, PAHs and several n-alkanes in the contaminated portions of the aquifer. Anaerobic biodegradation experiments designed to mimic in situ conditions showed no loss of exogenously amended COC; however, a substantive rate of endogenous electron acceptor reduction was measured (55 ± 8 µM SO(4) day(-1)). An assessment of hydrocarbon loss in laboratory experiments relative to a conserved internal marker revealed that non-COC hydrocarbons were being metabolized. Purge and trap analysis of laboratory assays showed a substantial loss of toluene, m- and o-xylene, as well as several alkanes (C(6)-C(12)). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that benzene is persistent under the prevailing site anaerobic conditions. We could find no in situ benzene intermediates (phenol or benzoate), the parent molecule proved recalcitrant in laboratory assays and low copy numbers of Desulfobacterium were found, a genus previously implicated in anaerobic benzene biodegradation. This study also showed that there was a reasonable correlation between field and laboratory findings, although with notable exception. Thus, while the intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation was clearly evident at the site, non-COC hydrocarbons were preferentially metabolized, even though there was ample literature precedence for the biodegradation of the target molecules. PMID:21261914

  17. Distribution of petroleum hydrocarbons and organochlorinated contaminants in marine biota and coastal sediments from the ROPME Sea Area during 2005.

    PubMed

    de Mora, Stephen; Tolosa, Imma; Fowler, Scott W; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre; Cassi, Roberto; Cattini, Chantal

    2010-12-01

    The composition and spatial distribution of various petroleum hydrocarbons (PHs), comprising both aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and selected chlorinated pesticides and PCBs were measured in biota and coastal sediments from seven countries in the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman (Bahrain, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates). Evidence of extensive marine contamination with respect to organochlorinated compounds and PHs was not observed. Only one site, namely the BAPCO oil refinery in Bahrain, was considered to be chronically contaminated. Comparison of the results from this survey for ? DDTs and ? PCBs in rock oysters from the Gulf of Oman with similar measurements made at the same locations over the past two decades indicates a temporal trend of overall decreasing ? PCB concentrations in oysters, whereas ? DDTs levels have little changed during that period. PMID:20965523

  18. Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namocatcat, J. A.; Fang, J.; Barcelona, M. J.; Quibuyen, A. T. O.; Abrajano, T. A.

    2003-12-01

    Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer.

  19. Anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments under sulfate-reducing and artificially imposed iron-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The potential use of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in-situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments was investigated. Previous studies have indicated that Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) can oxidize some electron donors more effectively than sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB). In contrast to previous results in freshwater sediments, the addition of Fe(III) to marine sediments from San Diego Bay, CA did not switch the terminal electron-accepting process (TEAP) from sulfate reduction to Fe-(III) reduction. Addition of Fe(III) also did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III)] followed by anaerobic incubation of the sediments, resulted in Fe-(III) reduction as the TEAP, but contaminant degradation was not stimulated and in some instances was inhibited. The difference in the ability of FeRB to compete with the SRB in the different sediment treatments was related to relative population sizes. Although the addition of Fe(III) did not stimulate hydrocarbon degradation, the results presented here as well as other recent studies demonstrate that there may be significant anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments.

  20. Anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments under sulfate-reducing and artificially imposed iron-reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, J.D.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)] [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Anderson, R.T.; Lovley, D.R. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)] [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The potential use of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in-situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments was investigated. Previous studies have indicated that Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) can oxidize some electron donors more effectively than sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In contrast to previous results in freshwater sediments, the addition of Fe(III) to marine sediments from San Diego Bay, CA did not switch the terminal electron-accepting process (TEAP) from sulfate reduction to Fe(III) reduction. Addition of Fe(III) also did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III)] followed by anaerobic incubation of the sediments, resulted in Fe(III) reduction as the TEAP, but contaminant degradation was not stimulated and in some instances was inhibited. The difference in the ability of FeRB to compete with the SRB in the different sediment treatments was related to relative population sizes. Although the addition of Fe(III) did not stimulate hydrocarbon degradation, the results presented here as well as other recent studies demonstrate that there may be significant anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Influence of ultraviolet light on the toxicity of sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Collyard, S.A. (Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States)); Monson, P.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Superior, WI (United States)); Kosian, P.A. (Integrated Lab. Systems, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1994-11-01

    Standard 10-d toxicity tests were conducted with freshwater benthic invertebrates using sediments containing a range of concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The assays were performed both under normal laboratory fluorescent light and ultraviolet (UV) light, which mimicked wavelengths present in sunlight, at about 10% of ambient solar intensity. In sediments with elevated PAH concentrations, tests conducted with UV light resulted in significantly greater mortality of Hyalella azteca (amphipods) and Lumbriculus variegatus (oligochaetes) than tests performed under otherwise comparable conditions with fluorescent light. There also was increased mortality of these two species, relative to controls, when surviving organisms from the 10-d exposures to the PAH-contaminated sediments were placed in clean water under UV light for 2 h. These results suggest that the organisms accumulated PAHs from the test sediments, which were subsequently photoactivated by UV light to excited states more toxic than the ground-state molecules. The phenomenon of photoactivation has been examined for pelagic species exposed to PAHs, but not for benthic organisms exposed to sediment-associated PAHs. The results suggest that failure to consider photoactivation of PAHs by sunlight could result in sediment toxicity test methods or criteria that are underprotective of benthic organisms.

  2. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Zedelius, Johannes; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5 × 0.8 ?m. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkane n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes. PMID:25806023

  3. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which achieved total PAH removal of 76%. Molecular analyses, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, revealed significant shifts in the soil bacterial communities after introduction to the bioreactors and differences in the abundance and types of bacteria in each of the bioreactors. The weekly-fed bioreactor displayed a more stable bacterial community with gradual changes over time, whereas the monthly-fed bioreactor community was less consistent and may have been more strongly influenced by the influx of untreated soil during feeding. Phylogenetic groups containing known PAH-degrading bacteria previously identified through stable-isotope probing of the untreated soil were differentially affected by bioreactor conditions. Sequences from members of the Acidovorax and Sphingomonas genera, as well as the uncultivated ‘‘Pyrene Group 2’’ were abundant in the bioreactors. However, the relative abundances of sequences from the Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, and Pseudoxanthomonas genera, as well as from a group of unclassified anthracene degraders, were much lower in the bioreactors compared to the untreated soil. PMID:21369833

  4. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Zedelius, Johannes; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5 × 0.8 ?m. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkane n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes. PMID:25806023

  5. Biostimulation Reveals Functional Redundancy of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Dunlevy, Sage R.; Singleton, David R.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Stable-isotope probing was previously used to identify bacterial anthracene-degraders in untreated soil from a former manufactured gas plant site. However, subsequent pyrosequence analyses of total bacterial communities and quantification of 16S rRNA genes indicated that relative abundances of the predominant anthracene-degrading bacteria (designated Anthracene Group 1) diminished as a result of biological treatment conditions in lab-scale, aerobic bioreactors. This study identified Alphaproteobacterial anthracene-degrading bacteria in bioreactor-treated soil which were dissimilar to those previously identified. The largest group of sequences was from the Alterythrobacter genus while other groups of sequences were associated with bacteria within the order Rhizobiales and the genus Bradyrhizobium. Conditions in the bioreactor enriched for organisms capable of degrading anthracene which were not the same as those identified as dominant degraders in the untreated soil. Further, these data suggest that identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in contaminated but untreated soil may be a poor indicator of the most active degraders during biological treatment. PMID:24302851

  6. Enumeration and characterization of the soil microflora from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil sites able to mineralize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kästner; M. Breuer-Jammali; B. Mahro

    1994-01-01

    The use of a plate screening technique allowed the direct isolation and quantification of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria from different soil sites. Bacteria that were able to grow on anthracene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene or pyrene as a sole carbon source were found with numbers between 103 and 105 colony-forming units (cfu)\\/g of soil dry weight, but only in samples that

  7. Metabolic and phylogenetic analysis of microbial communities during phytoremediation of soil contaminated with weathered hydrocarbons and heavy metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marja R. T. Palmroth; Perttu E. P. Koskinen; Anna H. Kaksonen; Uwe Münster; John Pichtel; Jaakko A. Puhakka

    2007-01-01

    In the current study, the microbial ecology of weathered hydrocarbon and heavy metal contaminated soil undergoing phytoremediation\\u000a was studied. The relationship of functional diversity, measured as carbon source utilisation in Biolog plates and extracellular\\u000a enzymatic activities, and genetic diversity of bacteria was evaluated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used for\\u000a community analyses at the species level. Bulk soil and rhizosphere

  8. Plant and soil properties determine microbial community structure of shared Pinus - Vaccinium rhizospheres in petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated forest soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan J. Robertson; P. Michael Rutherford; Hugues B. Massicotte

    Rhizosphere communities are critical to plant and ecosystem function, yet our understanding of the role of disturbance in\\u000a structuring these communities is limited. We tested the hypothesis that soil contamination with petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs)\\u000a alters spatial patterns of ecto- (ECM) and ericoid (ERM) mycorrhizal fungal and root-associated bacterial community structure\\u000a in the shared rhizosphere of pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia)

  9. Utilization of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons individually and in mixture by bacteria isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gra?yna A. P?aza; Jacek Wypych; Christopher Berry; Robin L. Brigmon

    2007-01-01

    The fate of benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different\\u000a bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. PCR and\\u000a Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. In this study, BTEX biodegradation, applied as a mixture\\u000a or

  10. Soil pollution in the railway junction Niš (Serbia) and possibility of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Larisa; Aleksic, Gorica; Radosavljevic, Milan; Onjia, Antonije

    2015-04-01

    Mineral oil leaking from vehicles or released during accidents is an important source of soil and ground water pollution. In the railway junction Niš (Serbia) total 90 soil samples polluted with mineral oil derivatives were investigated. Field work at the railway Niš sites included the opening of soil profiles and soil sampling. The aim of this work is the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons concentration in the soil samples and the investigation of the bioremediation technique for treatment heavily contaminated soil. For determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil samples method of gas-chromatography was carried out. On the basis of measured concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil it can be concluded that: Obtained concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in 60% of soil samples exceed the permissible values (5000 mg/kg). The heavily contaminated soils, according the Regulation on the program of systematic monitoring of soil quality indicators for assessing the risk of soil degradation and methodology for development of remediation programs, Annex 3 (Official Gazette of RS, No.88 / 2010), must be treated using some of remediation technologies. Between many types of phytoremediation of soil contaminated with mineral oils and their derivatives, the most suitable are phytovolatalisation and phytostimulation. During phytovolatalisation plants (poplar, willow, aspen, sorgum, and rye) absorb organic pollutants through the root, and then transported them to the leaves where the reduced pollutants are released into the atmosphere. In the case of phytostimulation plants (mulberry, apple, rye, Bermuda) secrete from the roots enzymes that stimulates the growth of bacteria in the soil. The increase in microbial activity in soil promotes the degradation of pollutants. Bioremediation is performed by composting the contaminated soil with addition of composting materials (straw, manure, sawdust, and shavings), moisture components, oligotrophs and heterotrophs bacteria.

  11. Activity and Diversity of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in a Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Kleikemper, Jutta; Schroth, Martin H.; Sigler, William V.; Schmucki, Martina; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Zeyer, Josef

    2002-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is an important metabolic activity in petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC)-contaminated aquifers. We quantified carbon source-enhanced microbial SO42? reduction in a PHC-contaminated aquifer by using single-well push-pull tests and related the consumption of sulfate and added carbon sources to the presence of certain genera of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We also used molecular methods to assess suspended SRB diversity. In four consecutive tests, we injected anoxic test solutions (1,000 liters) containing bromide as a conservative tracer, sulfate, and either propionate, butyrate, lactate, or acetate as reactants into an existing monitoring well. After an initial incubation period, 1,000 liters of test solution-groundwater mixture was extracted from the same well. Average total test duration was 71 h. We measured concentrations of bromide, sulfate, and carbon sources in native groundwater as well as in injection and extraction phase samples and characterized the SRB population by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Enhanced sulfate reduction concomitant with carbon source degradation was observed in all tests. Computed first-order rate coefficients ranged from 0.19 to 0.32 day?1 for sulfate reduction and from 0.13 to 0.60 day?1 for carbon source degradation. Sulfur isotope fractionation in unconsumed sulfate indicated that sulfate reduction was microbially mediated. Enhancement of sulfate reduction due to carbon source additions in all tests and variability of rate coefficients suggested the presence of specific SRB genera and a high diversity of SRB. We confirmed this by using FISH and DGGE. A large fraction of suspended bacteria hybridized with SRB-targeting probes SRB385 plus SRB385-Db (11 to 24% of total cells). FISH results showed that the activity of these bacteria was enhanced by addition of sulfate and carbon sources during push-pull tests. However, DGGE profiles indicated that the bacterial community structure of the dominant species did not change during the tests. Thus, the combination of push-pull tests with molecular methods provided valuable insights into microbial processes, activities, and diversity in the sulfate-reducing zone of a PHC-contaminated aquifer. PMID:11916663

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace metal contamination of coastal sediment and biota from Togo.

    PubMed

    Gnandi, Kissao; Musa Bandowe, Benjamin A; Deheyn, Dimitri D; Porrachia, Magali; Kersten, Michael; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2011-07-01

    The state of contamination of tropical environments, particularly in Africa, remains a relatively under explored subject. Here, we determined polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and trace metal concentrations in coastal sediment and biota samples (fish and mussels) from Togo (West Africa). In the sediments, the ?21 PAH concentrations ranged from <4 ng g(-1) to 257 ng g(-1), averaging 92 ng g(-1). Concentration ratios of low molecular weight PAHs (2-3 rings) versus high molecular weight PAHs (?4 rings) were always lower than 1 (ranging from 0.08 to 0.46) indicating that high molecular weight PAHs were dominant in all sediment samples, and that PAHs originated mainly from anthropogenic combustion activities. The sediments were also analyzed for major elements and a total of 15 trace metals, which were found in elevated concentrations. The calculated enrichment factor (EF) values relative to the Earth's crust show that the contamination is extremely severe for Cd (EF = 191), severe for Cr (EF = 18) and U (EF = 17.8), moderately severe for Zr (EF = 8.8), for Ni (EF = 6.8), Sr (EF = 5.9) and Ba (EF = 5.4), and moderate for V (EF = 3.6) and Zn (EF = 3.4). Sediments sampled in areas affected by the dumping of phosphorite mine tailings showed particularly high concentrations of trace metals. Overall, concentrations of both PAHs and trace metals in sediment tend to increase from the coastline to the open sea (2 km offshore). This is attributable to the increasingly finer texture of coastal sediment found offshore, which has a terrigenous origin and appears loaded with various contaminants through adsorption processes. Such high loads of trace metals were also found in the biota (fish and mussels). The ratio of measured trace metal concentrations in biota to threshold limits set by the World Health Organization herein defined as relative health factor (RHF) was high. Average RHF values in fish were highest for Se (470), As (250), Ag (97), Ni (78), Mn (63), Fe (53), Pb (36), Cd (10), and Cr (7) while lowest for Cu (0.08) and Zn (0.03). Cd and Al did not bioaccumulate in the analyzed fish species. In mussels, the RHF values were highest for Fe (9,108), As (295), Pb (276), Se (273), Mn (186), Ni (71), Ag (70), Cd (14), and Cu (4). PMID:21655572

  13. Activity and diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Kleikemper, Jutta; Schroth, Martin H; Sigler, William V; Schmucki, Martina; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Zeyer, Josef

    2002-04-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is an important metabolic activity in petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC)-contaminated aquifers. We quantified carbon source-enhanced microbial SO(4)(2-) reduction in a PHC-contaminated aquifer by using single-well push-pull tests and related the consumption of sulfate and added carbon sources to the presence of certain genera of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We also used molecular methods to assess suspended SRB diversity. In four consecutive tests, we injected anoxic test solutions (1,000 liters) containing bromide as a conservative tracer, sulfate, and either propionate, butyrate, lactate, or acetate as reactants into an existing monitoring well. After an initial incubation period, 1,000 liters of test solution-groundwater mixture was extracted from the same well. Average total test duration was 71 h. We measured concentrations of bromide, sulfate, and carbon sources in native groundwater as well as in injection and extraction phase samples and characterized the SRB population by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Enhanced sulfate reduction concomitant with carbon source degradation was observed in all tests. Computed first-order rate coefficients ranged from 0.19 to 0.32 day(-1) for sulfate reduction and from 0.13 to 0.60 day(-1) for carbon source degradation. Sulfur isotope fractionation in unconsumed sulfate indicated that sulfate reduction was microbially mediated. Enhancement of sulfate reduction due to carbon source additions in all tests and variability of rate coefficients suggested the presence of specific SRB genera and a high diversity of SRB. We confirmed this by using FISH and DGGE. A large fraction of suspended bacteria hybridized with SRB-targeting probes SRB385 plus SRB385-Db (11 to 24% of total cells). FISH results showed that the activity of these bacteria was enhanced by addition of sulfate and carbon sources during push-pull tests. However, DGGE profiles indicated that the bacterial community structure of the dominant species did not change during the tests. Thus, the combination of push-pull tests with molecular methods provided valuable insights into microbial processes, activities, and diversity in the sulfate-reducing zone of a PHC-contaminated aquifer. PMID:11916663

  14. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-06-01

    This annual report summarizes the progress of three years of a three-year grant awarded to the Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) at Tulane and Xavier Universities. The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. The three major areas of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects; and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular focus in this study are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The focus of the literature research was to provide an analysis of the contaminants located on or around various Department of Energy (DOE) sites that are or have the potential to function as endocrine disruptors and to correlate the need for studying endocrine disruptors to DOE's programmatic needs. Previous research within the Center for Bioenvironmental Research at Tulane and Xavier Universities has focused on understanding the effects of environmental agents on the human and wildlife health and disease. In particular this research has focused on how exogenous agents can function to mimic or disrupt normal endocrine signaling, i.e. estrogen, thyroid within various systems from whole animal studies with fish, amphibians and insects to human cancer cell lines. Significant work has focused on the estrogenic and anti-estrogenic action of both synthetic organochlorine chemicals and naturally produced phytochemicals. Recent projects have extended these research objectives to examination of these environmental agents on the symbiotic relationship between nitrogen fixing rhizobial bacteria and leguminous plants. This research will form the foundation for future experiments into the genetic manipulation of plants to potentially promote greater or more specific symbiotic relationships between plant and Rhizobium allowing this biological phenomenon to be used in a greater number of crop types. Future technology developments could include the genetic engineering of crops suitable for in situ vadose zone 2 bioremediation (via microbes) and phytoremediation (through the crop, itself) in contaminated DOE sites.

  15. Microbial metabolism and community structure in response to bioelectrochemically enhanced remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Huggins, Tyler; Jin, Song; Zuo, Yi; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates that electrodes in a bioelectrochemical system (BES) can potentially serve as a nonexhaustible electron acceptor for in situ bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The deployment of BES not only eliminates aeration or supplement of electron acceptors as in contemporary bioremediation but also significantly shortens the remediation period and produces sustainable electricity. More interestingly, the study reveals that microbial metabolism and community structure distinctively respond to the bioelectrochemically enhanced remediation. Tubular BESs with carbon cloth anode (CCA) or biochar anode (BCA) were inserted into raw water saturated soils containing petroleum hydrocarbons for enhancing in situ remediation. Results show that total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal rate almost doubled in soils close to the anode (63.5-78.7%) than that in the open circuit positive controls (37.6-43.4%) during a period of 64 days. The maximum current density from the BESs ranged from 73 to 86 mA/m(2). Comprehensive microbial and chemical characterizations and statistical analyses show that the residual TPH has a strongly positive correlation with hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (HDM) numbers, dehydrogenase activity, and lipase activity and a negative correlation with soil pH, conductivity, and catalase activity. Distinctive microbial communities were identified at the anode, in soil with electrodes, and soil without electrodes. Uncommon electrochemically active bacteria capable of hydrocarbon degradation such as Comamonas testosteroni, Pseudomonas putida, and Ochrobactrum anthropi were selectively enriched on the anode, while hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria were dominant in soil samples. Results from genus or phylum level characterizations well agree with the data from cluster analysis. Data from this study suggests that a unique constitution of microbial communities may play a key role in BES enhancement of petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation in soils. PMID:24628095

  16. Borehole Calibration Facilities to Support Gamma Logging for Hanford Subsurface Investigation and Contaminant Monitoring - 13516

    SciTech Connect

    McCain, R.G.; Henwood, P.D.; Pope, A.D.; Pearson, A.W. [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Repeated gamma logging in cased holes represents a cost-effective means to monitor gamma-emitting contamination in the deep vadose zone over time. Careful calibration and standardization of gamma log results are required to track changes and to compare results over time from different detectors and logging systems. This paper provides a summary description of Hanford facilities currently available for calibration of logging equipment. Ideally, all logging organizations conducting borehole gamma measurements at the Hanford Site will take advantage of these facilities to produce standardized and comparable results. (authors)

  17. Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy

    2003-06-01

    This project seeks to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is hereby investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes.

  18. Biodegradation of organic contaminants in subsurface systems: Kinetic and metabolic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Groundwater contaminated by organic chemicals from industrial spills, leaking underground gasoline storage tanks and landfills has caused concern about the future of a major source of drinking water. A potential alternative to expensive groundwater reclamation projects is the use of natural soil bacteria to degrade organic contaminants. This study was designed to measure the kinetic response of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA), determine the biological degradation rates of methanol, ethanol, propanol, l-butanol, TBA, pentanol, phenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol; describe site specific conditions which enhance or inhibit degradation and compare biodegradation rates with thermodynamic predictions. Each of the test compounds except TBA was readily degraded in the Blacksburg soil. Inhibition of sulfate reduction by the addition of molybdate stimulated degradation of all compounds including TBA, whereas, inhibition of methanogenesis with BESA slowed the degradation rates. The addition of nitrate did not affect the biodegradation in Blacksburg soil. In the Newport News soil, all of the test compounds were biodegraded at substantially higher rates than was observed in the Blacksburg soil. The presence of the metabolic inhibitors did not affect degradation, however, the addition of nitrate increased the degradation rates of the alcohols but not the phenols. The degradation rates in each of the soils did not correlate with the bacterial population size or free energies of the reactions.

  19. The effect of subsurface military detonations on vadose zone hydraulic conductivity, contaminant transport and aquifer recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Burman, Jan; Edlund, Christina; Simonsson, Louise; Berglind, Rune; Leffler, Per; Qvarfort, Ulf; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Meuken, Denise; Duvalois, Willem; Martel, Richard; Sjöström, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Live fire military training involves the detonation of explosive warheads on training ranges. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the hydrogeological changes to the vadose zone caused by military training with high explosive ammunition. In particular, this study investigates artillery ammunition which penetrates underground prior to exploding, either by design or by defective fuze mechanisms. A 105 mm artillery round was detonated 2.6 m underground, and hydraulic conductivity measurements were taken before and after the explosion. A total of 114 hydraulic conductivity measurements were obtained within a radius of 3 m from the detonation point, at four different depths and at three different time periods separated by 18 months. This data was used to produce a three dimensional numerical model of the soil affected by the exploding artillery round. This model was then used to investigate potential changes to aquifer recharge and contaminant transport caused by the detonating round. The results indicate that an exploding artillery round can strongly affect the hydraulic conductivity in the vadose zone, increasing it locally by over an order of magnitude. These variations, however, appear to cause relatively small changes to both local groundwater recharge and contaminant transport.

  20. Coupled Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 and Contaminants from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs on Groundwater Quality.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongbo; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Lawter, Amanda R; Bowden, Mark E; Brown, Christopher F

    2015-07-01

    The leakage of CO2 and the concomitant brine from deep storage reservoirs to overlying groundwater aquifers is considered one of the major potential risks associated with geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS). In this work both batch and column experiments were conducted to determine the fate of trace metals in groundwater in the scenarios of CO2 and metal-contaminated brine leakage. The sediments for this study were from an unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifer in Kansas, containing 0-4 wt % carbonates. Cd (114 ?g/L) and As (40 ?g/L) were spiked into the reaction system to represent potential contaminants from the reservoir brine. Through this research we demonstrated that Cd and As were adsorbed on the sediments, in spite of the lowered pH due to CO2 dissolution in the groundwater. Cd concentrations in the effluent were below the Cd MCL, even for sediments without detectable carbonate to buffer the pH. Arsenic concentrations in the effluent were also significantly lower than the influent concentration, suggesting that the sediments tested have the capacity to mitigate the coupled adverse effects of CO2 leakage and brine intrusion. The mitigation capacity of sediment is a function of its geochemical properties (e.g., the presence of carbonate minerals, adsorbed As, and phosphate). PMID:26039150

  1. Two- and Three-Dimensional Depiction of Subsurface Geology Using Commercial Software for Support of Groundwater Contaminant Fate and Transport Analysis - 13345

    SciTech Connect

    Ivarson, Kristine A. [North Wind, Inc. Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [North Wind, Inc. Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Miller, Charles W.; Arola, Craig C. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other nuclear reactor operation-related contaminants has resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas (the Hanford Site 100 Area). The large geographic extent of the resultant contaminant plumes requires an extensive level of understanding of the aquifer structure, characteristics, and configuration to support assessment and design of remedial alternatives within the former 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K reactor areas. The authors have prepared two- and three-dimensional depictions of the key subsurface geologic structures at two Hanford Site reactor operable units (100-K and 100-D/H). These depictions, prepared using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) visualization software, provide a basis for expanding the understanding of groundwater contaminant migration pathways, including identification of geologically-defined preferential groundwater flow pathways. These identified preferential flow pathways support the conceptual site model and help explain both historical and current contaminant distribution and transport. (authors)

  2. Apparent Contradiction: Psychrotolerant Bacteria from Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Arctic Tundra Soils That Degrade Diterpenoids Synthesized by Trees

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongtang; Stewart, Gordon R.; Mohn, William W.

    2000-01-01

    Resin acids are tricyclic terpenoids occurring naturally in trees. We investigated the occurrence of resin acid-degrading bacteria on the Arctic tundra near the northern coast of Ellesmere Island (82°N, 62°W). According to most-probable-number assays, resin acid degraders were abundant (103 to 104 propagules/g of soil) in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, but they were undetectable (<3 propagules/g of soil) in pristine soils from the nearby tundra. Plate counts indicated that the contaminated and the pristine soils had similar populations of heterotrophs (106 to 107 propagules/g of soil). Eleven resin acid-degrading bacteria belonging to four phylogenetically distinct groups were enriched and isolated from the contaminated soils, and representative isolates of each group were further characterized. Strains DhA-91, IpA-92, and IpA-93 are members of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain DhA-95 is a member of the genus Sphingomonas. All four strains are psychrotolerant, with growth temperature ranges of 4°C to 30°C (DhA-91 and DhA-95) or 4°C to 22°C (IpA-92 and IpA-93) and with optimum temperatures of 15 to 22°C. Strains DhA-91 and DhA-95 grew on the abietanes, dehydroabietic and abietic acids, but not on the pimaranes, isopimaric and pimaric acids. Strains IpA-92 and IpA-93 grew on the pimaranes but not the abietanes. All four strains grew on either aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons, which is unusual for described resin acid degraders. Eleven mesophilic resin acid degraders did not use hydrocarbons, with the exception of two Mycobacterium sp. strains that used aliphatic hydrocarbons. We conclude that hydrocarbon contamination in Arctic tundra soil indirectly selected for resin acid degraders, selecting for hydrocarbon degraders that coincidentally use resin acids. Psychrotolerant resin acid degraders are likely important in the global carbon cycle and may have applications in biotreatment of pulp and paper mill effluents. PMID:11097882

  3. Methods for characterizing subsurface volatile contaminants using in-situ sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-21

    An inverse analysis method for characterizing diffusion of vapor from an underground source of volatile contaminant using data taken by an in-situ sensor. The method uses one-dimensional solutions to the diffusion equation in Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates for isotropic and homogenous media. If the effective vapor diffusion coefficient is known, then the distance from the source to the in-situ sensor can be estimated by comparing the shape of the predicted time-dependent vapor concentration response curve to the measured response curve. Alternatively, if the source distance is known, then the effective vapor diffusion coefficient can be estimated using the same inverse analysis method. A triangulation technique can be used with multiple sensors to locate the source in two or three dimensions. The in-situ sensor can contain one or more chemiresistor elements housed in a waterproof enclosure with a gas permeable membrane.

  4. Enhancement and inhibition of microbial activity in hydrocarbon- contaminated arctic soils: Implications for nutrient-amended bioremediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braddock, J.F.; Ruth, M.L.; Catterall, P.H.; Walworth, J.L.; McCarthy, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    Bioremediation is being used or proposed as a treatment option at many hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. One such site is a former bulk-fuel storage facility near Barrow, AK, where contamination persists after approximately 380 m3 of JP-5 was spilled in 1970. The soil at the site is primarily coarse sand with low organic carbon (<1%) end low moisture (1-3%) contents. We examined the effects of nutrient additions on microorganisms in contaminated soil from this site in laboratory microcosms and in mesocosms incubated for 6 weeks in the field. Nitrogen was the major limiting nutrient in this system, but microbial populations and activity were maximally enhanced by additions of both nitrogen and phosphorus. When nutrients were added to soil in the field at three levels of N:P (100:45, 200:90, and 300:135 mg/kg soil), the greatest stimulation in microbial activity occurred at the lowest, rather than the highest, level of nutrient addition. The total soil-water potentials ranged from -2 to -15 bar with increasing levels of fertilizer. Semivolatile hydrocarbon concentrations declined significantly only in the soils treated at the low fertilizer level. These results indicate that an understanding of nutrient effects at a specific site is essential for successful bioremediation.Bioremediation is being used or proposed as a treatment option at many hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. One such site is a former bulk-fuel storage facility near Barrow, AK, where contamination persists after approximately 380 m3 of JP-5 was spilled in 1970. The soil at the site is primarily coarse sand with low organic carbon (<1%) and low moisture (1-3%) contents. We examined the effects of nutrient additions on microorganisms in contaminated soil from this site in laboratory microcosms and in mesocosms incubated for 6 weeks in the field. Nitrogen was the major limiting nutrient in this system, but microbial populations and activity were maximally enhanced by additions of both nitrogen and phosphorus. When nutrients were added to soil in the field at three levels of N:P (100:45, 200:90, and 300:135 mg/kg soil), the greatest stimulation in microbial activity occurred at the lowest, rather than the highest, level of nutrient addition. The total soil-water potentials ranged from -2 to -15 bar with increasing levels of fertilizer. Semi-volatile hydrocarbon concentrations declined significantly only in the soils treated at the low fertilizer level. These results indicate that an understanding of nutrient effects at a specific site is essential for successful bioremediation.

  5. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, J.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

  6. Evaluation of a bioslurry remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated sediments using chemical, mathematical and microscopic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasser M. Moustafa; Mohamed A. K. Barakat; Samiha F. Deriase

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the bioremediation of three petroleum hydrocarbon polluted sediment samples collected from the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The study used a bioslurry system inoculated with Staphylococcus gallinarum NK1, which showed good bioremediation capability regardless of the type of pollutant hydrocarbon and its concentration.

  7. Ability of Cold-Tolerant Plants to Grow in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diana Bizecki Robson; J. Diane Knight; Richard E. Farrell; James J. Germida

    2003-01-01

    Phytoremediation of hydrocarbons in soil involves plants and their associated microorganisms. Differences in environmental conditions and restrictions on species importation mean that each country may need to identify indigenous plants to use for phytoremediation. Screening plants for hydrocarbon tolerance before screening for degradation ability may prove more economical than screening directly for degradation. Thirty-nine cold-tolerant plants native, or exotic and

  8. Linkage between bacterial and fungal rhizosphere communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is related to plant phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Terrence H; El-Din Hassan, Saad; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Al-Otaibi, Fahad; Hijri, Mohamed; Yergeau, Etienne; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to excavating and chemically treating contaminated soils. Certain plants can directly bioremediate by sequestering and/or transforming pollutants, but plants may also enhance bioremediation by promoting contaminant-degrading microorganisms in soils. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region to compare the community composition of 66 soil samples from the rhizosphere of planted willows (Salix spp.) and six unplanted control samples at the site of a former petrochemical plant. The Bray–Curtis distance between bacterial communities across willow cultivars was significantly correlated with the distance between fungal communities in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils but not in highly contaminated (HC) soils (>2000?mg?kg?1 hydrocarbons). The mean dissimilarity between fungal, but not bacterial, communities from the rhizosphere of different cultivars increased substantially in the HC blocks. This divergence was partly related to high fungal sensitivity to hydrocarbon contaminants, as demonstrated by reduced Shannon diversity, but also to a stronger influence of willows on fungal communities. Abundance of the fungal class Pezizomycetes in HC soils was directly related to willow phylogeny, with Pezizomycetes dominating the rhizosphere of a monophyletic cluster of cultivars, while remaining in low relative abundance in other soils. This has implications for plant selection in phytoremediation, as fungal associations may affect the health of introduced plants and the success of co-inoculated microbial strains. An integrated understanding of the relationships between fungi, bacteria and plants will enable the design of treatments that specifically promote effective bioremediating communities. PMID:23985744

  9. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, Wei (New Milford, NJ); Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY)

    1998-01-01

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

  10. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

    1998-08-25

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

  11. CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON DEGRADATION IN PLANTS: MECHANISMS AND ENHANCEMENT OF PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a...

  12. Novel application of cyclolipopeptide amphisin: feasibility study as additive to remediate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Groboillot, Anne; Portet-Koltalo, Florence; Le Derf, Franck; Feuilloley, Marc J G; Orange, Nicole; Poc, Cécile Duclairoir

    2011-01-01

    To decontaminate dredged harbor sediments by bioremediation or electromigration processes, adding biosurfactants could enhance the bioavailability or mobility of contaminants in an aqueous phase. Pure amphisin from Pseudomonas fluorescens DSS73 displays increased effectiveness in releasing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) strongly adsorbed to sediments when compared to a synthetic anionic surfactant. Amphisin production by the bacteria in the natural environment was also considered. DSS73's growth is weakened by three model PAHs above saturation, but amphisin is still produced. Estuarine water feeding the dredged material disposal site of a Norman harbor (France) allows both P. fluorescens DSS73 growth and amphisin production. PMID:21673923

  13. FORENSIC ANALYSIS AND SOURCE PARTITIONING OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION IN LAKE MARUIT AQUATIC SEDIMENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TAREK A. KASSIM

    Investigations of natural and\\/or engineered environmental systems require achieving a comprehensive characterization and identification of contaminants of concern. The differentiation of contaminant molecular markers (MMs) that originate from various sources is difficult when simply based only on their chemical compositions. Thus, a comprehensive forensic analysis coupled with source partitioning modeling is needed for characterizing contaminant compositions, predicting their possible transport,

  14. Reproductive and morphological condition of wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lutra canadensis) in relation to chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.

    PubMed

    Harding, L E; Harris, M L; Stephen, C R; Elliott, J E

    1999-02-01

    We assessed chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of mink and river otters on the Columbia and Fraser River systems of northwestern North America, in relation to morphological measures of condition. We obtained carcasses of mink and river otters from commercial trappers during the winters 1994-1995 and 1995-1996. Necropsies included evaluation of the following biological parameters: sex, body mass and length, age, thymus, heart, liver, lung, spleen, pancreas, kidney, gonad, omentum, adrenal gland and baculum masses, baculum length, and stomach contents. Livers were analyzed, individually or in pools, for residues of organochlorine (OC) pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans. Contaminant levels were relatively low compared to those documented in other North American populations, although they ranged higher than those detected during an earlier survey (1990-1992) of these regional populations. Body condition varied slightly among collection regions, but showed no relationship with contaminant burden. Mink from the upper Fraser River had less fat stores and also had some of the lowest OC contamination levels observed. Similarly, a few individuals with enlarged livers and kidneys had low contaminant levels. Although a few individual animals with gross abnormalities of reproductive systems did not show high levels of contamination, there was a significant negative correlation between total PCB concentrations (as Aroclor 1260) and baculum length in juvenile mink (r = 0.707; p = 0.033; n = 8). The association of juvenile baculum length with eventual reproductive success is unknown, but further characterization of reproductive organ morphology and relationship to contaminants should be undertaken in a larger subset of these populations. PMID:9924010

  15. Reproductive and morphological condition of wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lutra canadensis) in relation to chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, L E; Harris, M L; Stephen, C R; Elliott, J E

    1999-01-01

    We assessed chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of mink and river otters on the Columbia and Fraser River systems of northwestern North America, in relation to morphological measures of condition. We obtained carcasses of mink and river otters from commercial trappers during the winters 1994-1995 and 1995-1996. Necropsies included evaluation of the following biological parameters: sex, body mass and length, age, thymus, heart, liver, lung, spleen, pancreas, kidney, gonad, omentum, adrenal gland and baculum masses, baculum length, and stomach contents. Livers were analyzed, individually or in pools, for residues of organochlorine (OC) pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans. Contaminant levels were relatively low compared to those documented in other North American populations, although they ranged higher than those detected during an earlier survey (1990-1992) of these regional populations. Body condition varied slightly among collection regions, but showed no relationship with contaminant burden. Mink from the upper Fraser River had less fat stores and also had some of the lowest OC contamination levels observed. Similarly, a few individuals with enlarged livers and kidneys had low contaminant levels. Although a few individual animals with gross abnormalities of reproductive systems did not show high levels of contamination, there was a significant negative correlation between total PCB concentrations (as Aroclor 1260) and baculum length in juvenile mink (r = 0.707; p = 0.033; n = 8). The association of juvenile baculum length with eventual reproductive success is unknown, but further characterization of reproductive organ morphology and relationship to contaminants should be undertaken in a larger subset of these populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9924010

  16. FEDERAL STAFF INFORMATION: SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION BRANCH (SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Remediation Branch in NRMRL's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division conducts research into defining the chemical, physical and biological processes that affect the fate, transport, and remediation of contaminants in the subsurface. The Branch's focus is o...

  17. Hydrocarbon Exploration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    elhamy Tarabees

    To detect the hydrocarbon reservoir, structure traps should be detected. Seismic reflection profiles can be used to illustrate the structure image for the subsurface layers and hence, find out structure traps for oil. key words: Seismic reflection profiles, structural traps, oil potentialities,...

  18. Increased mortality odds ratio of male liver cancer in a community contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Lee, L; Chung, C; Ma, Y; Wang, G; Chen, P; Hwang, Y; Wang, J

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the association between cancer mortality risk and exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater of a downstream community near a contaminated site. Methods: Death certificates inclusive for the years 1966–97 were collected from two villages in the vicinity of an electronics factory operated between 1970 and 1992. These two villages were classified into the downstream (exposed) village and the upstream (unexposed) according to groundwater flow direction. Exposure classification was validated by the contaminant levels in 49 residential wells measured with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Mortality odds ratios (MORs) for cancer were calculated with cardiovascular-cerebrovascular diseases as the reference diseases. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to estimate the effects of exposure and period after adjustment for age. Results: Increased MORs were observed among males for all cancer, and liver cancer for the periods after 10 years of latency, namely, 1980–89, and 1990–97. Adjusted MOR for male liver cancer was 2.57 (95% confidence interval 1.21 to 5.46) with a significant linear trend for the period effect. Conclusion: The results suggest a link between exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons and male liver cancer risk. However, the conclusion is limited by lack of individual information on groundwater exposure and potential confounding factors. PMID:12709523

  19. Inhibitory effect of aged-petroleum hydrocarbons on the survival of inoculated microorganism in a crude-oil contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Park, Youn Jong; Jung, Jaejoon; Park, Woojun

    2009-12-01

    We studied the effects of aged total petroleum hydrocarbons (aged TPH) on the survival of allochthonous diesel-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain YS-7 in both laboratory and field investigations. The aged TPH extracted from a crude oil-contaminated site were fractionized by thin-layer chromatography/flame ionization detection (TLC/FID). The three fractions identified were saturated aliphatic (SA), aromatic hydrocarbon (AH), and asphaltene-resin (AR). The ratio and composition of the separated fractions in the aged TPH were quite different from the crude-oil fractions. In the aged TPH, the SA and AH fractions were reduced and the AR fraction was dramatically increased compared to crude oil. The SA and AH fractions (2 mg/L each) of the aged TPH inhibited the growth of strain YS-7. Unexpectedly, the AR fraction had no effect on the survival of strain YS-7. However, crude oil (1,000 mg/L) did not inhibit the growth of strain YS-7. When strain YS-7 was inoculated into an aged crude oil-contaminated field and its presence was monitored by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we discovered that it had disappeared on 36 days after the inoculation. For the first time, this study has demonstrated that the SA and AH fractions in aged TPH are more toxic to an allochthonous diesel-degrading strain than the AR fraction. PMID:20075636

  20. Avoidance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments by the freshwater invertebrates Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus.

    PubMed

    De Lange, Hendrika J; Sperber, Veerle; Peeters, Edwin T H M

    2006-02-01

    Contamination of sediments is a serious problem in most industrialized areas. Sediments are often contaminated with trace metals and organic contaminants like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Bioassays are often used to determine the effect of contaminants on biota. However, survival or growth may not be the most sensitive endpoints. Behavioral changes often occur at much lower concentrations. Our study aimed to assess the effect of PAHs on habitat choice of two common freshwater invertebrates, the amphipod Gammarus pulex and the isopod Asellus aquaticus. We spiked clean field sediment with a mixture of four PAHs, fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and benzo[k]fluoranthene, to a total concentration of 30 mg PAH/kg dry weight. Both species were offered a choice between PAH-spiked sediments and clean sediments in laboratory experiments. Results show that both species avoid PAH-spiked sediment. Origin of the population, either from a clean reference site or from a polluted site, did not affect habitat choice of either species. PMID:16519306

  1. Phytoremediation of abandoned crude oil contaminated drill sites of Assam with the aid of a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial formulation.

    PubMed

    Yenn, R; Borah, M; Boruah, H P Deka; Roy, A Sarma; Baruah, R; Saikia, N; Sahu, O P; Tamuli, A K

    2014-01-01

    Environmental deterioration due to crude oil contamination and abandoned drill sites is an ecological concern in Assam. To revive such contaminated sites, afield study was conducted to phytoremediate four crude oil abandoned drill sites of Assam (Gelakey, Amguri, Lakwa, and Borholla) with the aid of two hydrocarbon-degrading Pseudomonas strains designated N3 and N4. All the drill sites were contaminated with 15.1 to 32.8% crude oil, and the soil was alkaline in nature (pH8.0-8.7) with low moisture content, low soil conductivity and low activities of the soil enzymes phosphatase, dehydrogenase and urease. In addition, N, P, K, and C contents were below threshold limits, and the soil contained high levels of heavy metals. Bio-augmentation was achieved by applying Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains N3 and N4 followed by the introduction of screened plant species Tectona grandis, Gmelina arborea, Azadirachta indica, and Michelia champaca. The findings established the feasibility of the phytoremediation of abandoned crude oil-contaminated drill sites in Assam using microbes and native plants. PMID:24933892

  2. Potential of vetiver (vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) for phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Regine; Merkl, Nicole; Schultze-Kraft, Rainer; Infante, Carmen; Broll, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Venezuela is one of the largest oil producers in the world. For the rehabilitation of oil-contaminated sites, phytoremediation represents a promising technology whereby plants are used to enhance biodegradation processes in soil. A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the tolerance of vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) to a Venezuelan heavy crude oil in soil. Additionally, the plant's potential for stimulating the biodegradation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons was tested under the application of two fertilizer levels. In the presence of contaminants, biomass and plant height were significantly reduced. As for fertilization, the lower fertilizer level led to higher biomass production. The specific root surface area was reduced under the effects of petroleum. However, vetiver was found to tolerate crude-oil contamination in a concentration of 5% (w/w). Concerning total oil and grease content in soil, no significant decrease under the influence of vetiver was detected when compared to the unplanted control. Thus, there was no evidence of vetiver enhancing the biodegradation of crude oil in soil under the conditions of this trial. However, uses of vetiver grass in relation to petroleum-contaminated soils are promising for amelioration of slightly polluted sites, to allow other species to get established and for erosion control. PMID:17305302

  3. A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This is the second volume of this comprehensive report of the inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Appendix B contains a complete printout of contaminant inventory and other information from the CIDRA Database and is presented in volumes 2 and 3 of the report.

  4. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil by composting in biopiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Jørgensen; J. Puustinen; A.-M. Suortti

    2000-01-01

    Composting of contaminated soil in biopiles is an ex situ technology, where organic matter such as bark chips are added to contaminated soil as a bulking agent. Composting of lubricating oil-contaminated soil was performed in field scale (5×40 m3) using bark chips as the bulking agent, and two commercially available mixed microbial inocula as well as the effect of the

  5. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON BIODEGRADATION AS A FUNCTION OF OXYGEN TENSION IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pyrene and nonspiked 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in the soil. The soil used for the evaluation was...

  6. Phototoxic response of Lumbriculus variegatus to sediments contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip D. Monson; Gerald T. Ankley; Patricia A. Kosian

    1995-01-01

    The toxicity of certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to aquatic organisms can be greatly increased upon exposure of the organisms to ultraviolet (UV) radiation present in sunlight. The phenomenon of photoactivation of PAHs had received some attention in the laboratory; however, evaluation of the photoinduced toxicity of PAHs in field settings has been limited. In these studies, in situ chambers

  7. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by Cladosporium sphaerospermum isolated from an aged PAH contaminated soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Potin; Etienne Veignie; Catherine Rafin

    2004-01-01

    The ability of a Deuteromycete fungus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, previously isolated from soil of an aged gas manufacturing plant, to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was investigated. This strain was able to degrade PAHs in non-sterile soils (average 23%), including high molecular weight PAHs, after 4 weeks of incubation. In a microcosm experiment, PAH depletion was clearly correlated to fungal establishment. In

  8. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination in osprey eggs and nestlings from the Canadian Great Lakes basin, 1991-1995.

    PubMed

    Martin, Pamela A; De Solla, Shane R; Ewins, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Populations of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) in the Great Lakes basin declined dramatically during the 1950s-1970s due largely to adverse effects of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons, ingested in their fish prey, on eggshell thickness and adult survival. Nevertheless, these contaminants were not measured in osprey tissues during the decades of decline on the Canadian Great Lakes. Between 1991 and 1995, we monitored recovering osprey populations on the Great Lakes, including Georgian Bay and the St. Marys River area on Lake Huron and the St. Lawrence Islands National Park, as well as at two inland sites within the basin. Current OC levels, even from the most contaminated lakes, were typically lower than those associated with reproductive effects. DDE levels in fresh eggs averaged 1.2-2.9 microg/g, well below the 4.2 microg/g level associated with significant eggshell thinning and shell breakage. Nevertheless, a proportion of eggs from all study areas did exceed this level. PCB levels in eggs seldom exceeded 5 microg/g except in one lake of high breeding density in the Kawartha Lakes inland study area, where the mean sum PCB level was 7.1 microg/g and the maximum concentration measured was 26.5 microg/g. On average, mean reproductive output (0.78-2.75 young per occupied nest) of breeding populations in Great Lakes basin study areas exceeded the threshold of 0.8 young thought necessary to maintain stable populations. We concluded that, although eggs and especially nestling plasma, are useful in reflecting local contaminant levels, ospreys are relatively insensitive, at least at the population level, to health effects of current levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the Canadian Great Lakes. PMID:12739869

  9. Evidence for microbial enhanced electrical conductivity in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Estella A. Atekwana; Eliot A. Atekwana; D. Dale Werkema; Jonathan P. Allen; Laura A. Smart; Joseph W. Duris; Daniel P. Cassidy; William A. Sauck; Silvia Rossbach

    2004-01-01

    Bulk electrical conductivity of sediments during microbial mineralization of diesel was investigated in a mesoscale laboratory experiment consisting of biotic contaminated and uncontaminated columns. Population numbers of oil degrading microorganisms increased with a clear pattern of depth zonation within the contaminated column not observed in the uncontaminated column. Microbial community structure determined from ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer analysis showed a

  10. Remediation Trials For Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Sludge From A Soil Washing Process: Evaluation Of Bioremediation Technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. J. García Frutos; R. Pérez; O. Escolano; A. Rubio; A. Gimeno; M. D. Fernandez; G. Carbonell; C. Perucha; J. Laguna

    The usual fate of highly contaminated fine products (silt-clay fractions) from soil washing plants is disposal in a dump or thermal destruction (organic contaminants), with consequent environmental impacts. Alternative treatments for these fractions with the aim of on-site reuse are needed. Therefore, the feasibility of two technologies, slurry bioremediation and landfarming, has been studied for the treatment of sludge samples

  11. PHOTOACTIVATED TOXICITY IN AMPHIPODS COLLECTED FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk of photo-activated PAH toxicity in contaminated aquatic systems has not been well characterized. To better indicate this potential, amphipods (Gammarus spp.) were collected from two PAH contaminated sites (Hog Island and USX), as well as a reference site (Chipmunk Cove)...

  12. Identification of Sediment Organic Carbon Location and Association with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Contaminated Sediment

    E-print Network

    long-term issue confronting sediment bioremediation is the lack of understanding of contaminant successful sediment bioremediation is the availability of contaminants to microorganisms for degradation to sediment material is necessary to assess the efficacy of sediment bioremediation and to correlate

  13. Evidence of hydrocarbon contamination from the Burgan oil field, Kuwait: interpretations from thermal remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    ud Din, Saif; Al Dousari, Ahmad; Literathy, Peter

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents the application of thermal remote sensing for mapping hydrocarbon polluted sites. This has been achieved by mono-window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) measurements, using multi-date band 6 data of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The emissivity, transmittance and mean atmospheric temperature were used as critical factors to estimate LST. The changes in the surface emissivity due to oil pollution alter the apparent temperature, which was used as a recognition element to map out oil polluted surfaces. The LST contrast was successfully used to map spatial distribution of hydrocarbon pollution in the Burgan Oil field area of Kuwait. The methodology can be positively used to detect waste dumping, oil spills in oceans and ports, besides environmental management of oil pollution at or near the land surface. PMID:17291680

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the urban topsoils of Shenyang, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuebing Sun; Guohong Sun; Qixing Zhou; Yingming Xu; Lin Wang; Xuefeng Liang; Yang Sun; Xu Qin

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the surface urban soils of Shenyang in Northeastern China were investigated. The total concentration of the PAHs ranged from 0.09 to 8.35 mg kg, with an average value of 1.51 ± 1.64 mg kg. 3–5-ring PAHs accounted for 90% of total PAHs. The functional areas, such as the industrial regions (4.95 mg kg) and main roads (1.56 mg kg),

  15. Intrinsic bioremediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater at a petroleum-hydrocarbon spill site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. F. Chen; C. M. Kao; T. Y. Chen; C. H. Weng; C. T. Tsai

    2006-01-01

    An oil-refining plant site located in southern Taiwan has been identified as a petroleum-hydrocarbon [mainly methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)] spill site. In this study, groundwater samples collected from the site were analyzed to assess the occurrence of intrinsic MTBE biodegradation. Microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of biodegrading MTBE by indigenous

  16. Composition and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in surficial marine sediments from Kitimat Harbor, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher D. Simpson; Andrew A. Mosi; William R. Cullen; Kenneth J. Reimer

    1996-01-01

    Surficial marine sediments from 20 sites within the Kitimat fjord system were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Levels of the sum of the 16 USEPA priority pollutant PAHs varied from below detection limits (ca. 1 ?g·g?1) to over 10000 ?g·g?1. Sediment PAH levels were highest in the immediate vicinity of a large aluminum smelter at the head of Kitimat

  17. Contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Jiulong River Estuary and Western Xiamen Sea, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Maskaoui; J. L Zhou; H. S Hong; Z. L Zhang

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined in water, sediment and pore water of the Jiulong River Estuary and Western Xiamen Sea, China. Total PAH concentrations varied from 6.96 to 26.9 ?g\\/l in water, 59–1177 ng\\/g dry weight in surficial sediments, and 158–949 ?g\\/l in pore water. The PAHs were present in higher levels in pore water

  18. Investigation of Microbes in the Rhizosphere of Selected Grasses for Rhizoremediation of Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Yateem; T. Al-Sharrah; A. Bin-Haji

    2007-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (HDM) associated with the rhizosphere of Paspalum vaginatum and Zoysia tenuifolia grown in bioremediated soil were isolated under controlled laboratory conditions. The isolation process was conducted at 30°C and 45°C to isolate mesophilic and thermotolerant microorganisms, respectively, under aerobic conditions. The isolated HDMs were identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Although

  19. Distribution and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sites of Hisar (India)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kiran Bishnoi; Umashanker Sain; Rajender Kumar; Rajesh Singh; Narsi R Bishnoi

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-two soil samples were collected from various location of the Hisar city. These samples were analysed for six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, acenaphthene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene). Total mean concentration of six PAHs varied from 51.79 to 148.82 mg kg-1 dry weight of the soil, PAH concentration was higher in soil samples from local auto market while lower concentration

  20. Evaluation of sediment contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Gironde estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Budzinski; I. Jones; J. Bellocq; C. Piérard; P. Garrigues

    1997-01-01

    Surface sediments, collected in the Gironde estuary during February and October 1993, were analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The aromatic fractions were separated by liquid chromatography of the extracts and analysed by gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry (GC\\/MS). Total PAH concentrations ranged among 1000 to 2000 ng\\/g of dry sediment. The resulting distributions and molecular ratios of specific aromatic compounds (phenanthrene,

  1. There are many locations throughout the world where sub-surface contamination impacts the natural environment, with

    E-print Network

    Knight, Rosemary

    of contaminated soil, groundwater and other envi- ronmental media" (DOE Environmental Management Science ProgramThere are many locations throughout the world where sub- surface contamination impacts the natural announcement 02-03). One of the initial steps in deal- ing with a contaminated site is that referred to as site

  2. Effects of hydrocarbon contamination on ozone generation with dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose L.; Vezzu, Guido; Freilich, Alfred; Paolini, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    The increasing usage of the feed gases of lower grade liquid oxygen (LOX) containing higher levels of trace hydrocarbon impurities in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) for ozone generation requires a better understanding of the kinetics of the by-product formation resulting from reactions involving these hydrocarbon impurities. As a case study of hydrocarbon impurities, the kinetics of CH4 conversion in DBDs and the subsequent HNO3 formation were investigated by means of gas-phase plasma diagnostics, supported by detailed process modeling, and extensive in-situ and ex-situ by-product analysis. The by-products formation in the plasma with the presence of CH4, were found to differ significantly in oxygen-fed generators as compared to generators fed with oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. The amount of HNO3 formed depends on the concentration of NOx formed in the plasma and the amount of CH4 that is converted, but not on the O3 concentration. In the present work we have investigated CH4 concentrations of up to 1.95 wt% of the feed gas. The rate of deterioration of the overall ozone generator performance was found to be affected by the concentration of nitrogen in the oxygen/nitrogen mixture.

  3. Soil-Water Repellency and Critical Humidity as Cleanup Criteria for Remediation of a Hydrocarbon Contaminated Mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Francisco Javier; Adams, Randy H.

    2010-05-01

    The majority of soil remediation programs focus mainly on reducing the hydrocarbon concentration, based on the assumption that the primary impact is toxicity and/or leachates and that these are directly proportional to concentration. None-the-less, interference with natural soil-water interactions are frequently more damaging, especially for sites contaminated with very viscous, weathered hydrocarbons. Therefore, the kind of hydrocarbons present in the soil and their interactions with soil surfaces may be more important than the overall hydrocarbon concentration in terms of soil restoration. One recently patented technology, the Chemical-Biological Stabilization process, focuses specifically on restoring soil fertility as the main objective for remediation of sites with agricultural use. This method was recently validated at an industrial scale by the treatment of 150 cubic meters of bentonitic drilling muds (70,5% fines) from an old sulphur mine, which were contaminated with very weathered oil (4° API), consisting of 31% asphaltenes. This material was treated by adding 4% (w/w, dry) of calcium hydroxide, followed by 4% (w/w, dry) of sugar cane cachasse (a fine fibered agricultural waste), thoroughly mixing between additions using an excavator. After the soil had dried sufficiently and the pH was <8, a fine-rooted, C-4 tropical grass (Brachiaria humidicola) was planted by seed. Over a two year period this material was monitored for several factors including field moisture (%H), field capacity (FC), and soil water repellency. MED was measured on air dried soil and WDPT values were calculated from the extrapolation of penetration time vs. ethanol molarity functions (Rx=0,99). Additionally, water penetration times were measured at different humidities to determine critical moisture levels for absorption in <5s and <60s. Initially, the FC increased from 24,9%H to 33,8%H (in 4½ months), probably due to the addition of the organic amendment. Over the next 6½ months, the FC dropped to 25,6% H, likely due to organic matter decomposition. However, during the following year+ (13½ months) the FC increased to 33,8%H probably due to an increase of soil humic substances while a vigorous vegetative growth was established. During two years of treatment the MED values were reduced 30% from 5,13 to 3,58M, and WDPT values were reduced over 25 times (from 10 exp5,6 s to 10 exp4,2 s). Critical humidity values varied from ~16,9 - 19,5%H for penetration in <5 s and from ~15,1 - 15,5%H for penetration in <60 s, in both treated and untreated material. During the driest part of the year, in May before the first rains, the soil humidity was 20,3%, and thus values below the critical levels were not experienced. This permitted the development of a complete vegetative cover, vigorous growth, and transformation of a geologic substrate (bentonitic drilling muds) into a soil-like material apt for agricultural use. This focus on soil-water relationships and the use of soil fertility parameters in general is important in establishing cleanup criteria for the real remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites in agricultural areas. As seen in this study, relatively high WDPT and MED values may not necessarily indicate soil moisture problems and these need to be complemented with actual site information on soil humidity during the annual cycle and with determinations of critical humidity. Additionally, the augmentation of field capacity using organic conditioners may effectively mitigate potential critical humidity problems.

  4. Application of computational fluid dynamics to the biopile treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated soil 

    E-print Network

    Wu, Tong

    2009-06-30

    Biopiles are a common treatment for the ex-situ remediation of contaminated soil. Much research has been carried out on understanding and modelling of bioremediation techniques related to biopiles, but hitherto no study ...

  5. EVIDENCE FOR MICROBIAL ENHANCED ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical conductivity of sediments during microbial mineralization of diesel was investigated in a mesoscale column experiment consisting of biotic contaminated and uncontaminated columns. Microbial population numbers increased with a clear pattern of depth zonation within the ...

  6. Relation between bioavailability and fuel oil hydrocarbon composition in contaminated soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. de Jonge; J. I. Freijer; J. M. Verstraten; J. W. Westerveld; Wielen van der F. W. M

    1997-01-01

    Bioavailability of oil components in contaminated soils is an important regulating factor for biodegradation rates. Changes in the composition of mineral oil can provide information regarding the bioavailability restrictions in contaminated soils. The fate of oil components was studied in a lysimeter experiment and laboratory incubations. A shift in the n-alkane ratios in the range n-C16:n-C20 was observed around 4.0

  7. Food contamination by hydrocarbons from packaging materials determined by coupled LC-GC.

    PubMed

    Grob, K; Biedermann, M; Artho, A; Egli, J

    1991-09-01

    Paraffins from raw extracts of foods and packing materials were isolated by LC and directly transferred to GC, applying concurrent eluent evaporation and a loop-type interface. Paraffins from various packing materials have been characterized: sisal bags, cardboard boxes, plastic films, wax-coated paper and cardboard as well as paraffin coatings. Important food contamination was found for sisal bags, cardboard boxes, and wax-coated paper/cardboard. Contamination by paraffin coatings on cheese was surprisingly small. PMID:1962505

  8. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H. [Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (United States)] [Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Evaluation of the total petroleum hydrocarbon standard at jet fuel contaminated Air Force sites. Final report for period ending January 1994

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. H. Youngren; E. A. McKenna; T. B. Piccin; J. R. Schroeder; S. R. Baker

    1994-01-01

    This document evaluates the scientific strength of chemicals other then total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as a basis for establishing risk-based cleanup standards at fuel-contaminated sites. The appropriateness of using benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) as substitutes for TPH was evaluated, including examination of the basis for current federal and state TPH and BTEX cleanup levels. The suitability of specific

  10. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ángeles, Martínez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p < 0.019) between TPH concentration (mg/kg) and surface tension (mN/m), When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p < 0.009) was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil. PMID:24294259

  11. Hydrocarbon wastes at petroleum- and creosote-contaminated sites. Rapid characterization of component classes by thin-layer chromatography with flame ionization detection

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, S.J.; Hrudey, S.E. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Fuhr, B.J.; Alex, R.F.; Holloway, L.R.; Tosto, F. (Oil Sands and Hydrocarbon Recovery Analytical Lab., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

    1992-12-01

    Adaptation of thin-layer chromatography with flame ionization detection for the semiquantitative characterization of residual hydrocarbon contamination at petroleum and wood-preserving hazardous waste sites is described. Soils collected from an abandoned oilfield battery site and a former creosote wood treatment facility in Alberta were solvent extracted and the residues characterized using two mobile-phase systems, one capable of separating polar waste components and the other of separating constituent aromatics according to ring number. The method provides a rapid component class fingerprint of the saturate, aromatic, and polar components of heavy hydrocarbon wastes, is analogous to column chromatography, and is useful for estimating the extent of weathering experienced by aged hydrocarbon wastes in the soil environment. As such, it can be useful for preliminary screening of the potential biotreatability or inherent recalcitrance of hydrocarbon waste mixtures. 34 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Accumulation and bioconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a nearshore estuarine environment near a Pensacola (Florida) creosote contamination site.

    PubMed

    Elder, J F; Dresler, P V

    1988-01-01

    Long-term accumulation of creosote wastes at a wood-preserving facility near Pensacola, Florida, has produced high levels of organic contamination of groundwaters near Pensacola Bay. Impacts of this contamination on the nearshore environment of the bay were examined by analysis of water, sediment and tissues of two mollusc species. One of the species (Thais haemastoma) was native to the study area. Individuals of the other test species (Crassostrea virginica) were placed in cages at the test sites for a 6-week period. Contamination at the nearshore estuarine sites was assessed by comparison to a control site in an uncontaminated area of the bay, as well as a small stream which forms a direct surface-water link between the creosote storage ponds and the bay. The study focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the primary components of creosote. Very little PAH in water or in the surface layer of estuarine sediments was detected, despite heavy pollution of the stream sediments. This is attributed to various degradation processes which attack the PAH compounds once they discharge into the estuary, and to the likelihood of intermittent and localised release of contaminants to the estuary. Examination of sediment cores and mollusc tissues, which provide a record integrated over time and space, revealed some accumulation of a few PAH, notably fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene and phenanthrene. In the sediments, the highest concentrations of these compounds appeared below the surface, within a depth range of 8-13 cm. Bioaccumulation of fluoranthene, pyrene and phenanthrene in both mollusc species was up to ten times greater at test sites than at the control site. This contrasts with naphthalene, the bioaccumulation of which was no greater at test sites than at the control site. These differences in bioaccumulation factors relate to structural chemistry of the compounds which control their solubility, bioavailability, susceptibility to degradation and capacity for depuration by the organism. PMID:15092667

  13. Determination of petroleum hydrocarbon toxicity with Microtox reg sign

    SciTech Connect

    Eisman, M.P.; Landon-Arnold, S.; Swindoll, C.M. (Naval Civil Engineering Lab., Port Hueneme, CA (United States))

    1991-12-01

    The goal of this toxicity investigation was to determine the toxicity of petroleum fuels and fuel components which are likely to contaminate the subsurface environment. Various fuels and individual components, water soluble fractions of fuels, and soil leachates were tested for toxicity using the Microtox{reg sign}. The fuels used included diesel, unleaded gas, and the aviation fuels JP4 and JP5. Individual components were chosen from the following chemical groups: alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkylbenzenes, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.

  14. Effects of Nonionic Surfactant Addition on Populations of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria in a Bioreactor Treating Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongbo; Singleton, David; Aitken, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effects of two polyethoxylated nonionic surfactants, Brij 30 and C12E8, on populations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon- (PAH-) degrading bacteria from a bioreactor treating PAH-contaminated soil. Each surfactant was evaluated at doses that corresponded to aqueous-phase concentrations both above and below the critical micelle concentration (CMC) after mixing with reactor slurry. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to quantify 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences representing degraders of salicylate, naphthalene, phenanthrene or pyrene previously identified in the bioreactor community by stable-isotope probing. Sequences representing two groups of organisms associated with degradation of naphthalene and/or salicylate in the bioreactor increased in abundance by more than an order of magnitude after incubation with either surfactant at each dose tested. In contrast, the abundance of a group of uncultivated pyrene-degrading bacteria, whose relative abundance in the soil without surfactant addition was up to 9% of the total 16S rRNA genes, decreased by an order of magnitude or more in the presence of each surfactant at each dose. These results indicate that surfactant addition can have substantial, differential effects on populations of organisms responsible for contaminant degradation within a microbial community. PMID:20707373

  15. Most hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria in the total environment are diazotrophic, which highlights their value in the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminants.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Narjes; Ali, Nedaa; Eliyas, Mohamed; Khanafer, Majida; Sorkhoh, Naser A; Radwan, Samir S

    2015-01-01

    Eighty-two out of the 100 hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species that have been already isolated from oil-contaminated Kuwaiti sites, characterized by 16S rRNA nucleotide sequencing, and preserved in our private culture collection, grew successfully in a mineral medium free of any nitrogenous compounds with oil vapor as the sole carbon source. Fifteen out of these 82 species were selected for further study based on the predominance of most of the isolates in their specific sites. All of these species tested positive for nitrogenase using the acetylene reduction reaction. They belonged to the genera Agrobacterium, Sphingomonas, and Pseudomonas from oily desert soil and Nesiotobacter, Nitratireductor, Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Arthrobacter, Marinobacter, Pseudoalteromonas, Vibrio, Diatzia, Mycobacterium, and Microbacterium from the Arabian/Persian Gulf water body. A PCR-DGGE-based sequencing analysis of nifH genes revealed the common occurrence of the corresponding genes among all the strains tested. The tested species also grew well and consumed crude oil effectively in NaNO3 -containing medium with and without nitrogen gas in the top space. On the other hand, these bacteria only grew and consumed crude oil in the NaNO3 -free medium when the top space gas contained nitrogen. We concluded that most hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are diazotrophic, which allows for their wide distribution in the total environment. Therefore, these bacteria are useful for the cost-effective, environmentally friendly bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminants. PMID:25740314

  16. Most Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacteria in the Total Environment are Diazotrophic, which Highlights Their Value in the Bioremediation of Hydrocarbon Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Narjes; Ali, Nedaa; Eliyas, Mohamed; Khanafer, Majida; Sorkhoh, Naser A.; Radwan, Samir S.

    2015-01-01

    Eighty-two out of the 100 hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species that have been already isolated from oil-contaminated Kuwaiti sites, characterized by 16S rRNA nucleotide sequencing, and preserved in our private culture collection, grew successfully in a mineral medium free of any nitrogenous compounds with oil vapor as the sole carbon source. Fifteen out of these 82 species were selected for further study based on the predominance of most of the isolates in their specific sites. All of these species tested positive for nitrogenase using the acetylene reduction reaction. They belonged to the genera Agrobacterium, Sphingomonas, and Pseudomonas from oily desert soil and Nesiotobacter, Nitratireductor, Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Arthrobacter, Marinobacter, Pseudoalteromonas, Vibrio, Diatzia, Mycobacterium, and Microbacterium from the Arabian/Persian Gulf water body. A PCR-DGGE-based sequencing analysis of nifH genes revealed the common occurrence of the corresponding genes among all the strains tested. The tested species also grew well and consumed crude oil effectively in NaNO3 -containing medium with and without nitrogen gas in the top space. On the other hand, these bacteria only grew and consumed crude oil in the NaNO3 -free medium when the top space gas contained nitrogen. We concluded that most hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are diazotrophic, which allows for their wide distribution in the total environment. Therefore, these bacteria are useful for the cost-effective, environmentally friendly bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminants. PMID:25740314

  17. Contamination of animal feed and food from animal origin with mineral oil hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Grob, K; Vass, M; Biedermann, M; Neukom, H P

    2001-01-01

    Oils and fats used for the production of animal feed can become contaminated with mineral oil material originating from gas oils (C18-C35) or synthetic oils (poly-alpha olefins, C25 to beyond C45). An important cause is assumed to be the discharge of waste oils, such as motor oil and hydraulic oils. Mineral oil material was analysed by on-line LC-GC-FID directly in the fat or in a raw extract from animal feed or foodstuffs. In Switzerland in summer/autumn 1999 concentrations in oils and fats for feed production were often found to be between 100 and 1000 mg/kg. In the feeds, the average concentration was around 100 mg/kg with values ranging up to a maximum of 1000 mg/kg; few samples were free of contamination. In animal body fat, the average concentration determined in summer 1999 was 25 mg/kg, with a maximum of 150 mg/kg, although in samples from December 1999, contamination was substantially lower. In the fat phase of eggs, the average concentration was 30 mg/kg, with a maximum of 80 mg/kg. Paraffin oil is used for feed production, which may account for part of the contamination problem (e.g. eggs). PMID:11212542

  18. Monitoring the Natural Recovery of Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Sediments with Chemical Fingerprinting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott A. Stout; Allen D. Uhler; Gregory S. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Drs. Scott A. Stout, Gregory S. Douglas, and Allen D. Uhler are principals at NewFields Environmental Forensics Practice, LLC, in Rockland, Massachusetts. They each have over 15 years experience in the chemical characterization of petroleum and related contaminants in the environment. Their firm specializes in the application of chemical fingerprinting and other forensic tools in assessing liability associated with environmental

  19. The physiology of mycorrhizal Lolium multiflorum in the phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil 

    E-print Network

    Alarcon, Alejandro

    2009-06-02

    ???????????????????????.. 80 81 82 83 V BIOREMEDIATION AND PHYTOREMEDIATION OF BENZO[a]PYRENE CONTAMINATED SAND ???????... Introduction ??????????????????????.. Materials and Methods ??????????????????. Growth and Physiological Responses of Lolium multiflorum... in the Phytoremediation of BaP ? Effect of Rhizosphere Microorganisms ?.....????????????????? Bioremediation and Phytoremediation of BaP with Free-Living Hydrocarbonoclastic Microorganisms ?.....????????. Results...

  20. RISK OF CONTAMINATION FOR EDIBLE VEGETABLES GROWING ON SOILS POLLUTED BY POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joëlle Fismes; Christophe Schwartz; Corinne Perrin-Ganier; Jean Louis Morel; Anne-Marie Charissou; Marie-José Jourdain

    2004-01-01

    Former industrial sites represent a potential source for food chain contamination if they are converted to residential use where garden practices may be undertaken. In order to assess the risk for human health through vegetable consumption, two research programs were initiated to evaluate the bioavailability of selected PAHs and their potential transfer to edible parts of different vegetables. With this

  1. Bioremediation Of Groundwater Contaminated Wtih Gasoline Hydrocarbons And Oxygenates Using A Membrane-Based Reactor

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to operate a novel, field-scale, aerobic bioreactor and assess its performance in the ex situ treatment of groundwater contaminated with gasoline from a leaking underground storage tank in Pascoag, RI. The groundwater contained elevated concentrat...

  2. Characterization of EPA's 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tank bottom solids and associated contaminated soils at oil exploration and production sites in Texas.

    PubMed

    Bojes, Heidi K; Pope, Peter G

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the concentration and types of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a group of environmentally toxic and persistent chemicals, at contaminated oil exploration and production (E&P) sites located in environmentally sensitive and geographically distinct areas throughout Texas. Samples of tank bottom solids, the oily sediment that collects at the bottom of the tanks, were collected from inactive crude oil storage tanks at E&P sites and hydrocarbon contaminated soil samples were collected from the area surrounding each tank that was sampled. All samples were analyzed for the 16 PAH priority pollutant listed by US EPA and for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). The results demonstrate that overall average PAH concentrations were significantly higher in tank bottom solids than in contaminated soils. Total PAH concentrations decreased predictably with diminishing hydrocarbon concentrations; but the percent fraction of carcinogenic PAHs per total measured PAH content increased from approximately 12% in tank bottom solids to about 46% in the contaminated soils. These results suggest that the PAH content found in tank bottom solids cannot reliably be used to predict the PAH content in associated contaminated soil. Comparison of PAHs to conservative risk-based screening levels for direct exposure to soil and leaching from soil to groundwater indicate that PAHs are not likely to exceed default risk-based thresholds in soils containing TPH of 1% (10,000mg/kg) or less. These results show that the magnitude of TPH concentration may be a useful indicator of potential risk from PAHs in crude oil-contaminated soils. The results also provide credibility to the 1% (10,000mg/kg) TPH cleanup level, used in Texas as a default management level at E&P sites located in non-sensitive areas, with respect to PAH toxicity. PMID:17291653

  3. Composition of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants among major adipose tissue depots of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Canadian high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Jonathan; Norstrom, Ross J; Ramsay, Malcolm A; Mulvihill, Michael; Letcher, Robert J

    2006-11-01

    Monitoring of environmental contaminants in Canadian Arctic polar bears (Ursus maritimus) typically has used superficial adipose tissue samples collected as part of controlled native subsistence hunts. However, little attention has been paid to the compositional difference in contaminants that may exist among the major adipose depots that are routinely collected. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated the profiles and concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs), including major polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and organochlorine (OC) pesticides and metabolites, in six major adipose depots (i.e. superficial, inter-muscular and intra-abdominal regions) obtained from adult male polar bears in the vicinity of Resolute Bay, Canadian high Arctic. Concentrations and congener patterns of PCBs (20 congeners) and OCs (14 compounds; chlordanes and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes and metabolites, chlorinated benzenes, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, octachlorostyrene and dieldrin) were found to be relatively uniform throughout the adipose tissue of male polar bears. The only exception was the inter-muscular adipose depot from the cervical region, which was characterized, compared to other major depots routinely sampled, by lower proportions of higher-chlorinated and recalcitrant congeners such as CB170/190, 180, 194 and 206, and higher contribution of the lower-chlorinated PCBs, CB47, 74 and 99. No difference in the OC makeup and concentrations was found among the adipose depots investigated. In view of this, we conclude that the determination of CHCs in adipose tissue of polar bears from any major depots, with the potential exception of the fat under the neck muscles, would give a representative picture of the overall CHC composition and concentrations in polar bear fat for purpose of trend monitoring. PMID:16978684

  4. Impact of erosion and transfer processes in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon contamination of water bodies in the Seine River basin (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateuille, David; Evrard, Olivier; Moreau-Guigon, Elodie; Chevreuil, Marc; Mouchel, Jean-Marie

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) reach problematic concentrations in water and sediment of numerous streams of the world. In the Seine River (France), they prevent to achieve the good chemical status enforced by European law. However, the provenance and the fate of PAHs found in rivers are still poorly understood. Here, we combined chemical and fallout radionuclide measurements conducted on a large number of suspended sediment (SS) (n = 231) and soil (n = 37) samples collected at 62 sites during an entire hydrological year. A model was developed to estimate mean PAH concentration in sediment from the population density in the drainage area and good relationships were found during both low stage and flood periods. Influence of human population also appeared to be stronger during the latter period. However, some discrepancies between measured and modeled PAH concentrations were observed and the role of the origin of SS was investigated. During the low flow period, the observed differences were explained by the provenance of river sediment (agricultural topsoil vs. eroded channel banks). Time-averaged PAH concentrations measured in suspended sediment collected in the catchments where erosion of agricultural topsoil dominated were systematically higher than the predicted values. On the contrary, in the catchments where erosion mainly occurred in deep soil or river embankment, the supply of particles protected from atmospheric fallout contamination led to measure concentrations below the predicted values. As this relationship between population density and SS contamination was no longer valid during the flood period, the role of transfer times was also investigated. The percentages of freshly eroded sediment in samples were determined by comparing the 7Be/210Pb ratio in rainfall and SS. An annual turn-over cycle of sediment was observed but no relationship was found between PAH contamination and residence times of particles within rivers. This result suggested that the impact of PAH exchanges between aqueous and particulate phases was negligible. Finally, results derived from PAH diagnostic ratios showed that the contamination signature vary between rural soil and urban signatures therefore suggesting that the temporal changes in riverine pollution mainly depend on the variations of contribution of both pools. More specifically, the low flow period is characterized by background signal provided by erosion and mainly driven by the origin of SS and the stocks accumulated in the vicinity of anthropogenic activities. During the flood period, an additional signal of contamination is provided by direct urban releases due to the increase in PAH emissions (household heating) and impervious surface leaching.

  5. Geophysical Signatures of Microbial Activity at Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Estella A. Atekwana; Eliot A. Atekwana

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms participate in a variety of geologic processes that alter the chemical and physical properties of their environment.\\u000a Understanding the geophysical signatures of microbial activity in the environment has resulted in the development of a new\\u000a sub-discipline in geophysics called “biogeophysics”. This review focuses primarily on literature pertaining to biogeophysical\\u000a signatures of sites contaminated by light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL),

  6. Biostimulation of petroleum-hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediment with co-substrate: involved metabolic process and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Lo, Irene M C

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of acetate and methanol as co-substrates on anaerobic biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs, C10-C40) in marine sediment. The findings evidenced that the degradation of TPH can be enhanced by adding acetate or methanol. The addition of acetate was generally more favorable than the addition of methanol for the TPH degradation. Both sulfate reduction and methanogenesis occurred in the acetate-treated sediment. However, the depletion of SO4 (2-) inhibited sulfate reduction over the incubation period. Only methanogenesis was prevalent in the methanol-treated sediment within the whole incubation period. The degradation of TPH fractions with higher carbon number ranges (C31-C40) was speculated to be more favored under sulfate-reducing condition, while TPH fractions with lower carbon number ranges (C10-C20) were preferentially degraded under methanogenic condition. The 16S rRNA clone library-based analysis revealed that the addition of different co-substrates led to distinct structures of the microbial community. Clones related to sulfate-reducing Desulfobacterales were the most abundant in the sediment dosed with acetate. Clones related to Clostridiales predominated in the sediment dosed with methanol. Acetoclastic methanogens were found to be the predominant archaeal species in the sediment dosed with acetate, while both acetoclastic methanogens and hydrogenotrophic methanogens accounted for large proportions in the sediment dosed with methanol. The results obtained in this study will contribute to more comprehensive knowledge on the role of acetate and methanol as co-substrates in biostimulation of petroleum-hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediment. PMID:25661814

  7. A case study simulation of DBCP groundwater contamination in Fresno County, California 2. Transport in the saturated subsurface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Loague; Robert H. Abrams; Stanley N. Davis; Anh Nguyen; Iris T. Stewart

    1998-01-01

    This paper is the second installment of a multipaper series concerned with simulating regional-scale groundwater contamination in Fresno County, CA as the result of long-term nonpoint source applications of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP). In the first part of this study [Loague, K., Lloyd, D., Nguyen, A., Davis, S.N., Abrams, R.H., 1997. A case study simulation of DBCP groundwater contamination in Fresno County,

  8. Vertical-flow constructed wetlands treating domestic wastewater contaminated by hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Al-Isawi, R H K; Sani, A; Almuktar, S A A A N; Scholz, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare the impact of different design (aggregate size) and operational (contact time, empty time and chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading) variables on the long-term and seasonal performance of vertical-flow constructed wetland filters operated in tidal flow mode before and after a one-off spill of diesel. Ten different vertical-flow wetland systems were planted with Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. (common reed). Approximately 130 g of diesel fuel was poured into four wetland filters. Before the spill, compliance with secondary wastewater treatment standards was achieved by all wetlands regarding ammonia-nitrogen (NH4-N), nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) and suspended solids (SS), and non-compliance was recorded for biochemical oxygen demand and ortho-phosphate-phosphorus (PO4-P). Higher COD inflow concentrations had a significantly positive impact on the treatment performance for COD, PO4-P and SS. The wetland with the largest aggregate size had the lowest mean NO3-N outflow concentration. However, the results were similar regardless of aggregate size and resting time for most variables. Clear seasonal outflow concentration trends were recorded for COD, NH4-N and NO3-N. No filter clogging was observed. The removal efficiencies dropped for those filters impacted by the diesel spill. The wetlands system shows a good performance regarding total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal. PMID:25812105

  9. Enhancement of nitrate-induced bioremediation in marine sediments contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons by using microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Zheng, Guanyu; Lo, Irene M C

    2015-06-01

    The effect of microemulsion on the biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in nitrate-induced bioremediation of marine sediment was investigated in this study. It was shown that the microemulsion formed with non-ionic surfactant polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), 1-pentanol, linseed oil, and either deionized water or seawater was stable when subjected to dilution by seawater. Desorption tests revealed that microemulsion was more effective than the Tween 80 solution or the solution containing Tween 80 and 1-pentanol to desorb TPH from marine sediment. In 3 weeks of bioremediation treatment, the injection of microemulsion and NO3 (-) seems to have delayed the autotrophic denitrification between NO3 (-) and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) in sediment compared to the control with NO3 (-) injection alone. However, after 6 weeks of treatment, the delaying effect of microemulsion on the autotrophic denitrification process was no longer observed. In the meantime, the four injections of microemulsion and NO3 (-) resulted in as high as 29.73 % of TPH degradation efficiency, higher than that of two injections of microemulsion and NO3 (-) or that of four or two injections of NO3 (-) alone. These results suggest that microemulsion can be potentially applied to enhance TPH degradation in the nitrate-induced bioremediation of marine sediment. PMID:25529494

  10. Contamination and distribution of parent, nitrated, and oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smoked meat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanchen; Shen, Guofeng; Su, Shu; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Li, Tongchao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yanyan; Lu, Yan; Chen, Han; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Nan; Zhu, Ying; Fu, Xiaofang; Liu, Wenxin; Wang, Xilong; Tao, Shu

    2014-10-01

    Smoked meat is widely consumed in many areas, particularly in rural southwest China. High concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smoked meat could lead to adverse dietary exposure and health risks. In this study, 27 parent PAHs (pPAHs), 12 nitrated PAHs (nPAHs), and 4 oxygenated PAHs (oPAHs) were measured in coal- and wood-smoked meats. The median concentrations of pPAHs, nPAHs, and oPAHs were as high as 1.66 × 10(3), 4.29, and 20.5 ng/g in the coal-smoked meat and 2.54 × 10(3), 7.32, and 9.26 ng/g in the wood-smoked meat, respectively. Based on the relative potency factors of individual PAHs, the calculated toxic equivalent (TEQ) values of all pPAHs were 22.1 and 75.1 ng TEQ/g for the wood- and coal-smoked meats, respectively. The highest concentrations of PAHs can be found in the surface layer of skin and decrease exponentially with depth. Surface PAH concentrations correlated with concentrations of PAHs in household air and with the concentration in emission exhaust. Migration of PAHs from surface to interior portions of meat is faster in lean than in fat or skin, and oPAHs and pPAHs can penetrate deeper than pPAHs. The penetration ability of PAHs is negatively correlated with the molecular weight. PMID:24910314

  11. [Contamination and ecological risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediment in karst underground river].

    PubMed

    Lan, Jia-Cheng; Sun, Yu-Chuan; Shi, Yang; Liang, Zuo-Bing

    2015-03-01

    In order to understand pollution characteristics and ecological risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediment from Laolongdong underground river, the concentration and composition of 16 priority PAHs were analyzed. The results showed that the total concentrations of PAHs ranged from 58.2 to 3 598 ng x g(-1), and most of the values were between 100 and 5 000 ng x g(-1). It means that sediments in the river were moderately and heavily polluted by PAHs. The PAH composition were dominated by 2-4 rings (accounted for 75.1%) compounds in Laolongdong, while 4-6 rings PAHs accounted for 56.6% in Xiannvdong. Sediments in Laolongdong mainly came from the transportation of the upstream water and surface soil. 2 - 3 rings PAHs had higher transport capability with farther migration distance, while 4-6 rings PAHs had lower transport capability and shorter migration distance in the conduit, because 4-6 rings PAHs could be easily absorbed by sediments. The result of ecological assessment of PAHs showed that the ecological risk level in Laolongdong was low, leading to little negative ecological impact. However, the level in Xiannvdong was high. Once PAHs migrated from upstream to downstream, it would result in ecological threat for the downstream area. PMID:25929051

  12. Influence of mature compost amendment on total and bioavailable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guozhong; Kechavarzi, Cedric; Li, Xingang; Sui, Hong; Pollard, Simon J T; Coulon, Frédéric

    2013-02-01

    A laboratory microcosm study was carried out to assess the influence of compost amendment on the degradation and bioavailability of PAHs in contaminated soils. Three soils, contaminated with diesel, coal ash and coal tar, respectively, were amended with two composts made from contrasting feedstock (green waste and predominantly meat waste) at two different rates (250 and 750 t ha(-1)) and incubated for 8 months. During this period the treatments were sampled for PAH analysis after 0, 3, 6 and 8 months. Total and bioavailable fractions were obtained by sequential ultrasonic solvent extraction and hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin extraction, respectively, and PAHs were identified and quantified by GC-MS. Bioavailability decrease due to sorption was only observed at the first 3 months in the diesel spiked soil. After 8 months, compost addition resulted in over 90% loss of total PAHs irrespective of soil types. Desorption and degradation contributed to 30% and 70%, respectively, of the PAH loss in the spiked soil, while PAH loss in the other two soils resulted from 40% enhanced desorption and 60% enhanced degradation. Compost type and application rates had little influence on PAH bioavailability, but higher PAH removal was observed at higher initial concentration during the early stage of incubation. The bioavailable fraction of PAH was inversely correlated to the number of benzene rings and the octanol-water partition coefficient. Further degradation was not likely after 8-month although over 30% of the residual PAHs were bioavailable, which highlighted the application of bioavailability concept during remediation activities. PMID:23141842

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in an urban area assessed by Quercus ilex leaves and soil.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, F; Alfani, A; Maisto, G

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the PAH contamination of Naples urban area, densely populated and with high traffic flow, by analyses of environmental matrices: soil and Quercus ilex leaves. Being some PAHs demonstrated to have hazardous effects on human health, the accumulation of carcinogenic and toxic PAHs (expressed as B(a)Peq) was evaluated in the leaves and soil. The main sources of the PAHs were discriminated by the diagnostic ratios in the two matrices. The urban area appeared heavily contaminated by PAHs, showing in soil and leaves total PAH concentrations also fivefold higher than those from the remote area. The soil mainly accumulated heavy PAHs, whereas leaves the lightest ones. Median values of carcinogenic PAH concentrations were higher in soil (440 ng g(-1) d.w.) and leaves (340 ng g(-1) d.w.) from the urban than the remote area (60 and 70 ng g(-1) d.w., respectively, for soil and leaves). Also, median B(a)Peq concentrations were higher both in soil and leaves from the urban (137 and 63 ng g(-1) d.w., respectively) than those from the remote area (19 and 49 ng g(-1) d.w., respectively). Different from the soils, the diagnostic ratios found for the leaves discerned PAH sources in the remote and urban areas, highlighting a great contribution of vehicular traffic emission as main PAH source in the urban area. PMID:24604269

  14. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

    2003-09-01

    This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched. The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

  15. 2D Electrical Imaging of an LNAPL Contamination, Al Amiriyya Fuel Station, Jordan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Awni T. Batayneh

    2005-01-01

    The detection of organic contaminants such as light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) in the subsurface using geophysical methods, particularly electrical resistivity methods has been the subject of considerable interest in recent years. Their detection is based principally upon the electrical properties of the hydrocarbons. During 2002, direct current resistivity data were collected with the Iris Syscal R2 resistivity instrument at

  16. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in feces of river otters from the southern Pacific coast of Canada, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John E; Guertin, Daniel A; Balke, Jennifer M E

    2008-07-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in coastal river otters (Lontra canadensis) were evaluated by sampling feces (scats) collected on the south coast of British Columbia, Canada. A broad survey of industrialized areas of the Strait of Georgia region was conducted in 1998, and a subsequent survey of working harbours in 2004. Samples from 1998 were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides, and polychlorinated dioxins (PCDDs) and furans (PCDFs), while in 2004, chemistry was confined to summation operatorPCBs and OC pesticides. Concentrations of OC pesticides were low in both years, with only dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE; range: 0.01-2.12 mg/kg lw) and hexachlorocyclobenzene (HCB; range: 0.003-0.25 mg/kg lw) detected in all samples. In 1998, octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) and other higher chlorinated PCDD/Fs were found in most samples, with OCDD ranging from 120 ng/kg lw in Clayoquot Sound to 19,100 ng/kg lw in a pooled sample from two latrines in Nanaimo. PCBs were present in all samples. In 1998 geometric mean concentrations of the sum of 59 PCB congeners ranged from 0.49 mg/kg lw in Nanaimo to 12.3 mg/kg lw in Victoria Harbour. Six years later, mean summation operatorPCBs remained elevated (geometric mean 9.5 mg/kg lw) in Victoria Harbour. Geometric mean concentrations of summation operatorPCBs from Victoria Harbour in 1998 and 2004 were >9 mg/kg lw, a published adverse effect level for reproduction. At some latrines in both Victoria and Esquimalt Harbours, concentrations of TCDD-toxic equivalents exceeded 1500 ng/kg lw, a value for health effects in otters that we derived using published information. As shown in previous studies, analysis of scats provides an efficient and non-intrusive approach to assessing contaminant threats to otter populations, and to documenting spatial trends in residues. PMID:18433835

  17. Distribution of Endophytic Bacteria in Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L. from Soils Contaminated by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yanzheng; Chen, Zeyou

    2013-01-01

    The distributions of endophytic bacteria in Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L. grown in soils contaminated with different levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated with polymerase chain reaction followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technology (PCR-DGGE) and cultivation methods. Twelve types of PAHs, at concentrations varying from 0.16 to 180 mg·kg?1, were observed in the roots and shoots of the two plants. The total PAH concentrations in Alopecurus aequalis Sobol obtained from three different PAH-contaminated stations were 184, 197, and 304 mg·kg?1, and the total PAH concentrations in Oxalis corniculata L. were 251, 346, and 600 mg·kg?1, respectively. The PCR-DGGE results showed that the endophytic bacterial communities in the roots and shoots of the two plants were quite different, although most bacteria belonged to Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A total of 68 endophytic bacterial strains were isolated from different tissues of the two plants and classified into three phyla: Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. In both plants, Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were the dominant cultivable populations. With an increase in the PAH pollution level, the diversity and distribution of endophytic bacteria in the two plants changed correspondingly, and the number of cultivable endophytic bacterial strains decreased rapidly. Testing of the isolated endophytic bacteria for tolerance to each type of PAH showed that most isolates could grow well on Luria-Bertani media in the presence of different PAHs, and some isolates were able to grow rapidly on a mineral salt medium with a single PAH as the sole carbon and energy source, indicating that these strains may have the potential to degrade PAHs in plants. This research provides the first insight into the characteristics of endophytic bacterial populations under different PAH pollution levels and provides a species resource for the isolation of PAH-degrading endophytic bacteria. PMID:24358247

  18. Salix purpurea Stimulates the Expression of Specific Bacterial Xenobiotic Degradation Genes in a Soil Contaminated with Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Pagé, Antoine P.; Yergeau, Étienne; Greer, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to uncover Salix purpurea-microbe xenobiotic degradation systems that could be harnessed in rhizoremediation, and to identify microorganisms that are likely involved in these partnerships. To do so, we tested S. purpurea‘s ability to stimulate the expression of 10 marker microbial oxygenase genes in a soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. In what appeared to be a detoxification rhizosphere effect, transcripts encoding for alkane 1-monooxygenases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, laccase/polyphenol oxidases, and biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase small subunits were significantly more abundant in the vicinity of the plant's roots than in bulk soil. This gene expression induction is consistent with willows' known rhizoremediation capabilities, and suggests the existence of S. purpurea-microbe systems that target many organic contaminants of interest (i.e. C4-C16 alkanes, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, biphenyl, polychlorinated biphenyls). An enhanced expression of the 4 genes was also observed within the bacterial orders Actinomycetales, Rhodospirillales, Burkholderiales, Alteromonadales, Solirubrobacterales, Caulobacterales, and Rhizobiales, which suggest that members of these taxa are active participants in the exposed partnerships. Although the expression of the other 6 marker genes did not appear to be stimulated by the plant at the community level, signs of additional systems that rest on their expression by members of the orders Solirubrobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Actinomycetales, and Sphingobacteriales were observed. Our study presents the first transcriptomics-based identification of microbes whose xenobiotic degradation activity in soil appears stimulated by a plant. It paints a portrait that contrasts with the current views on these consortia's composition, and opens the door for the development of laboratory test models geared towards the identification of root exudate characteristics that limit the efficiency of current willow-based rhizoremediation applications. PMID:26161539

  19. Uptake and acropetal translocation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in field-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yuqiang; Zhang, Shuzhen; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Christie, Peter

    2009-05-15

    Uptake and acropetal translocation of 14 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in 15 field-contaminated soils were investigated in a growth chamber. PAH concentrations in roots correlated positively with the corresponding concentrations in soils and negatively with the contents of soil organic carbon (p < 0.01). No clear linear relationship was found between log RCF (root concentration factor, microg g(-1) root/microg g(-1) soil on dry weight basis) and log Kow of these PAHs. Four-ring PAHs had the highest tendency to be taken up by roots. PAH concentrations in shoots correlated well with their concentrations in soils and roots. Furthermore, distribution profiles of PAHs in shoots were fairly similar to those in soils. Acropetal translocation of 10 PAHs (with log Kow varying from 3.45 to 5.78) was also implicated by Rt (ratio of PAH from root-to-shoot translocation to the total accumulation in shoots) ranging from 53.6 to 72.6%. A negative linear relationship was found between log Rt and log Kow of these PAHs (p < 0.01), and acropetal translocation of PAHs depended on their chemical properties. PMID:19544854

  20. Biosurfactant production by Serratia rubidaea SNAU02 isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil and its physico-chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Nalini, S; Parthasarathi, R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize and optimize the growth media for biosurfactant production from Serratia rubidaea SNAU02 isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil from Cuddalore district, Tamilnadu, India. The biosurfactant produced by S. rubidaea SNAU02, was able to reduce the surface tension to 34.4 mN m(-1) in MSM medium. The biosurfactant was characterized by FT-IR and GC-MS analysis. The GC-MS analysis shows that dirhamnolipid was detected in abundance as predominant congener than monorhamnolipid. The response surface methodology (RSM) -central composite design (CCD) was performed to optimize the media for biosurfactant production. The maximum emulsification index was obtained under the optimal condition of 29.31 g L(-1) mannitol; 2.06 g L(-1) yeast extract, medium pH 6.97 and 5.69 g L(-1) NaCl. The biosurfactant produced by S. rubidaea recovered 92% of used engine oil adsorbed to a sand sample, suggested the potential application in microbial enhanced oil recovery and bioremediation. PMID:23993704

  1. Final Report Coupling in silico microbial models with reactive transport models to predict the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-10-31

    This project successfully accomplished its goal of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with hydrological and geochemical models to predict the activity of subsurface microorganisms during uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated how this modeling approach can be used to develop new strategies to optimize bioremediation. The approach of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with reactive transport modeling is now well enough established that it has been adopted by other DOE investigators studying uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, the basic principles developed during our studies will be applicable to much broader investigations of microbial activities, not only for other types of bioremediation, but microbial metabolism in diversity of environments. This approach has the potential to make an important contribution to predicting the impact of environmental perturbations on the cycling of carbon and other biogeochemical cycles.

  2. Accumulation and degradation of dead-end metabolites during treatment of soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with five strains of white-rot fungi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. E. Andersson; T. Henrysson

    1996-01-01

    The white-rot fungi Trametes versicolor PRL 572, Trametes versicolor MUCL 28407, Pleurotus ostreatus MUCL 29527, Pleurotus sajor-caju MUCL 29757 and Phanerochaete chrysosporium DSM 1556 were investigated for their ability to degrade the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) anthracene, benz[a]anthracene and dibenz[a,h]anthracene in soil. The fungi were grown on wheat straw and mixed with artificially contaminated soil. The results of this\\u000a study

  3. The influence of different temperature programmes on the bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a coal-tar contaminated soil by in-vessel composting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blanca Antizar-Ladislao; Angus J. Beck; Katarina Spanova; Joe Lopez-Real; Nicholas J. Russell

    2007-01-01

    The biodegradation of 16 US. EPA-listed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (?PAHs), with accompanying humification and microbial community structure changes during simulated in-vessel composting-bioremediation of an aged coal-tar-contaminated soil amended with green waste were studied over 56 days. The experimental design compared one constant temperature profile (TC=38°C) with three variable temperature profiles (TP1, TP2 and TP3), including treatment at 70°C to comply

  4. An experimental design approach for optimizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analysis in contaminated soil by pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Buco; M. Moragues; M. Sergent; P. Doumenq; G. Mille

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to analyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil without preliminary extraction. Experimental research methodology was used to obtain optimal performance of the system. After determination of the main factors (desorption time, Curie point temperature, carrier gas flow), modeling was done using a Box–Behnken matrix. Study of the response surface led to factor values that optimize

  5. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-09-14

    The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites.

  6. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Evaluation of Residual Chromium Contamination in the Subsurface Soil at 100-C-7

    SciTech Connect

    W. S. Thompson

    2007-02-15

    This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) provides the requirements for sample collection and laboratory analysis to evaluate the extent of hexavalent chromium contamination present in the soil below the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 remedial action waste site excavations.

  7. Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation In Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects on Contaminant Fate and Transport (Project no. 99272)

    SciTech Connect

    Redden, G.D.; Fujita, Y.; Scheibe, T.D.; Tartakovsky, A.M.; Smith, R.W.; Reddy, M.M.; Kelly, S.D.

    2006-04-05

    This project is aimed at understanding how contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media is impacted by precipitation and dissolution events through chemical interactions with precipitates and as a consequence of coupling between precipitation and flow. We hypothesize that precipitation/coprecipitation, encapsulation, isolation from flow and alteration of reactive surfaces will contribute to altering contaminant mobility during precipitation events, and that predicting the release of contaminants during precipitate dissolution requires an understanding of how precipitates are distributed and how contaminants are released from the different compartments over time. Using calcium carbonate as a model system, physical experiments and modeling at the pore-scale and continuum-scale will be used to improve the conceptual approach to predicting the impact of flow-precipitation coupling on solute migration. Column and 2-dimensional intermediate-scale experiments with constructed physical and chemical heterogeneities will be used to investigate the movement of fluids and reactive solutes during different types of mixing events that lead to calcium carbonate supersaturation and precipitation. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling will be used to simulate pore-scale mixing and precipitation in heterogeneous porous media and estimate continuum-scale parameters. Continuum-scale modeling will be used to test conceptual models and associated effective parameters that simulate the macroscopic behavior of the experimental domains.

  8. STUDY TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF USING A GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR FOR MORE EFFECTIVE REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of hazardous material spills is often costly and entails cumbersome procedures. he traditional method is to drill core samples in the area where the contaminant is thought to be present and then analyze these samples in a laboratory. he denser the sampling grid, the m...

  9. Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial community profile data and a nonparametric decision-making process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Andrea R.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Mouser, Paula J.

    2011-06-01

    Microbial biodiversity in groundwater and soil presents a unique opportunity for improving characterization and monitoring at sites with multiple contaminants, yet few computational methods use or incorporate these data because of their high dimensionality and variability. We present a systematic, nonparametric decision-making methodology to help characterize a water quality gradient in leachate-contaminated groundwater using only microbiological data for input. The data-driven methodology is based on clustering a set of molecular genetic-based microbial community profiles. Microbes were sampled from groundwater monitoring wells located within and around an aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate. We modified a self-organizing map (SOM) to weight the input variables by their relative importance and provide statistical guidance for classifying sample similarities. The methodology includes the following steps: (1) preprocessing the microbial data into a smaller number of independent variables using principal component analysis, (2) clustering the resulting principal component (PC) scores using a modified SOM capable of weighting the input PC scores by the percent variance explained by each score, and (3) using a nonparametric statistic to guide selection of appropriate groupings for management purposes. In this landfill leachate application, the weighted SOM assembles the microbial community data from monitoring wells into groupings believed to represent a gradient of site contamination that could aid in characterization and long-term monitoring decisions. Groupings based solely on microbial classifications are consistent with classifications of water quality from hydrochemical information. These microbial community profile data and improved decision-making strategy compliment traditional chemical groundwater analyses for delineating spatial zones of groundwater contamination.

  10. The Use of Numerical Modeling to Address Surface and Subsurface Water Contamination due to Fracwater Spills in Larry's Creek, Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, C. A.; Arjmand, S.; Abad, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Because of its relatively low carbon dioxide emissions, natural gas is considered to be more efficient and environmentally friendly than other non-renewable fuels. As a result of this, among other factors, in recent years natural gas has become one of the world's primary energy sources. In the United States, drilling to extract natural gas has substantially increased over the past few years. In the Marcellus Shale, unconventional gas is currently extracted by using two new techniques: horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Today, fracking fluids which have been applied as part of the hydraulic fracturing process to fracture the shale rock and release the gas, pose a major environmental concern. These fluids are highly contaminated with radionuclides and toxic metals and any exposure of this highly polluted water to surface water or soil could heavily contaminate the media. The area selected for the current study is the Larry's Creek, located in Lycoming County in Pennsylvania. Larry's Creek Watershed was adversely affected by coal and iron mines activities in the 19th century. Though, the water quality in this creek was considered to be good as of 2006. Recently, oil and gas drilling activities have raised concerns about the creek's water quality again. A major environmental hazard is the freshwater contamination by frac/flowback water. Drilling companies are using impoundments on site to keep fracwater, and to store and evaporate flowback water. However, these ponds may fail or leak due to construction problems and/or accidents. Close to Saladasburg, Larry's Creek's stream was observed running rich with clay in October 19, 2011. Historical measurements show very high turbidity during this period which has raised questions about water contamination by the gas industry activities in the upper stream of the watershed. An interstate watershed agency has reported spills in Wolf Run in different drilling sites in the Larry's Creek basin. The focus of this study is to develop a numerical model of the surface and groundwater contaminant transport due to potential spills in the creek. It is important to analyze and understand the migration of pollutants throughout the watershed. In order to do so, the use and development of proper computer models to predict migration of contaminants based on available data is required. Data collected by the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC) from a station near Saladasburg town will be used to validate and test the accuracy of the model.

  11. Linking Specific Heterotrophic Bacterial Populations to Bioreduction of Uranium and Nitrate in Contaminated Subsurface Sediments by Using Stable Isotope Probing?†

    PubMed Central

    Akob, Denise M.; Kerkhof, Lee; Küsel, Kirsten; Watson, David B.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2011-01-01

    Shifts in terminal electron-accepting processes during biostimulation of uranium-contaminated sediments were linked to the composition of stimulated microbial populations using DNA-based stable isotope probing. Nitrate reduction preceded U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction in [13C]ethanol-amended microcosms. The predominant, active denitrifying microbial groups were identified as members of the Betaproteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria dominated under metal-reducing conditions. PMID:21948831

  12. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-print Network

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  13. Functional Diversity and Electron Donor Dependence of Microbial Populations Capable of U(VI) Reduction in Radionuclide-Contaminated Subsurface Sediments?

    PubMed Central

    Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kerkhof, Lee; Stucki, Joseph W.; Anastácio, Alexandre S.; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Küsel, Kirsten; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Watson, David B.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2008-01-01

    In order to elucidate the potential mechanisms of U(VI) reduction for the optimization of bioremediation strategies, the structure-function relationships of microbial communities were investigated in microcosms of subsurface materials cocontaminated with radionuclides and nitrate. A polyphasic approach was used to assess the functional diversity of microbial populations likely to catalyze electron flow under conditions proposed for in situ uranium bioremediation. The addition of ethanol and glucose as supplemental electron donors stimulated microbial nitrate and Fe(III) reduction as the predominant terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs). U(VI), Fe(III), and sulfate reduction overlapped in the glucose treatment, whereas U(VI) reduction was concurrent with sulfate reduction but preceded Fe(III) reduction in the ethanol treatments. Phyllosilicate clays were shown to be the major source of Fe(III) for microbial respiration by using variable-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy. Nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) were abundant throughout the shifts in TEAPs observed in biostimulated microcosms and were affiliated with the genera Geobacter, Tolumonas, Clostridium, Arthrobacter, Dechloromonas, and Pseudomonas. Up to two orders of magnitude higher counts of FeRB and enhanced U(VI) removal were observed in ethanol-amended treatments compared to the results in glucose-amended treatments. Quantification of citrate synthase (gltA) levels demonstrated a stimulation of Geobacteraceae activity during metal reduction in carbon-amended microcosms, with the highest expression observed in the glucose treatment. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the active FeRB share high sequence identity with Geobacteraceae members cultivated from contaminated subsurface environments. Our results show that the functional diversity of populations capable of U(VI) reduction is dependent upon the choice of electron donor. PMID:18378664

  14. Modeling geochemical reactions in contaminated aquifers: Transformation of aromatic hydrocarbons by bacteria and concomitant inorganic chemical evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Herman; W. R. Kelly; A. L. Mills; G. M. Hornberger

    1992-01-01

    The physical environment of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, the chemical environment of contaminant-water-rock interactions, and the biological environment of microbially mediated processes act to influence the fate of groundwater contaminants in a complex and interconnected way. Prediction of the chemical evolution of groundwater in the complex environment of a contaminated aquifer is necessary to address environmental contamination and remediation

  15. Emerging organic contaminants in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands: influence of media size, loading frequency and use of active aeration.

    PubMed

    Avila, Cristina; Nivala, Jaime; Olsson, Linda; Kassa, Kinfe; Headley, Tom; Mueller, Roland A; Bayona, Josep Maria; García, Joan

    2014-10-01

    Four side-by-side pilot-scale vertical flow (VF) constructed wetlands of different designs were evaluated for the removal of eight widely used emerging organic contaminants from municipal wastewater (i.e. ibuprofen, acetaminophen, diclofenac, tonalide, oxybenzone, triclosan, ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A). Three of the systems were free-draining, with one containing a gravel substrate (VGp), while the other two contained sand substrate (VS1p and VS2p). The fourth system had a saturated gravel substrate and active aeration supplied across the bottom of the bed (VAp). All beds were pulse-loaded on an hourly basis, except VS2p, which was pulse-loaded every 2h. Each system had a surface area of 6.2m(2), received a hydraulic loading rate of 95 mm/day and was planted with Phragmites australis. The beds received an organic loading rate of 7-16 gTOC/m(2)d. The sand-based VF (VS1p) performed significantly better (p<0.05) than the gravel-based wetland (VGp) both in the removal of conventional water quality parameters (TSS, TOC, NH4-N) and studied emerging organic contaminants except for diclofenac (85 ± 17% vs. 74 ± 15% average emerging organic contaminant removal for VS1p and VGp, respectively). Although loading frequency (hourly vs. bi-hourly) was not observed to affect the removal efficiency of the cited conventional water quality parameters, significantly lower removal efficiencies were found for tonalide and bisphenol A for the VF wetland that received bi-hourly dosing (VS2p) (higher volume per pulse), probably due to the more reducing conditions observed in that system. However, diclofenac was the only contaminant showing an opposite trend to the rest of the compounds, achieving higher elimination rates in the wetlands that exhibited less-oxidizing conditions (VS2p and VGp). The use of active aeration in the saturated gravel bed (VAp) generally improved the treatment performance compared to the free-draining gravel bed (VGp) and achieved a similar performance to the free-draining sand-based VF wetlands (VS1p). PMID:25046612

  16. Real-Time and Delayed Analysis of Tree and Shrub Cores as Indicators of Subsurface Volatile Organic Compound Contamination, Durham Meadows Superfund Site, Durham, Connecticut, August 29, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Willey, Richard E.; Clifford, Scott; Murphy, James J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined volatile organic compound concentrations in cores from trees and shrubs for use as indicators of vadose-zone contamination or potential vapor intrusion by volatile organic compounds into buildings at the Durham Meadows Superfund Site, Durham, Connecticut. The study used both (1) real-time tree- and shrub-core analysis, which involved field heating the core samples for 5 to 10 minutes prior to field analysis, and (2) delayed analysis, which involved allowing the gases in the cores to equilibrate with the headspace gas in the sample vials unheated for 1 to 2 days prior to analysis. General correspondence was found between the two approaches, indicating that preheating and field analysis of vegetation cores is a viable approach to real-time monitoring of subsurface volatile organic compounds. In most cases, volatile organic compounds in cores from trees and shrubs at the Merriam Manufacturing Company property showed a general correspondence to the distribution of volatile organic compounds detected in a soil-gas survey, despite the fact that most of the soil-gas survey data in close proximity to the relevant trees were collected about 3 years prior to the tree-core collection. Most of the trees cored at the Durham Meadows Superfund Site, outside of the Merriam Manufacturing Company property, contained no volatile organic compounds and were in areas where indoor air sampling and soil-gas sampling showed little or no volatile organic compound concentrations. An exception was tree DM11, which contained barely detectable concentrations of trichloroethene near a house where previous investigations found low concentrations of trichloroethene (0.13 to 1.2 parts per billion by volume) in indoor air and 7.7 micrograms per liter of trichloroethene in the ground water. The barely detectable concentration of trichloroethene in tree DM11 and the lack of volatile organic compound detection in nearby tree DM10 (adjacent to the well having 7.7 micrograms of trichloroethene) may be attributable to the relatively large depth to water (17.6 feet), the relatively low soil-vapor trichloroethene concentration, and the large amount of rainfall during and preceding the tree-coring event. The data indicate that real-time and delayed analyses of tree cores are viable approaches to examining subsurface volatile organic compound soil-gas or vadose-zone contamination at the Durham Meadows Superfund Site and other similar sites. Thus, the methods may have application for determining the potential for vapor intrusion into buildings.

  17. Succession of Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Metabolic Community Characteristics during In Vitro Bioslurry Treatment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Ringelberg, David B.; Talley, Jeffrey W.; Perkins, Edward J.; Tucker, Samuel G.; Luthy, Richard G.; Bouwer, Edward J.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.

    2001-01-01

    Dredged harbor sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was removed from the Milwaukee Confined Disposal Facility and examined for in situ biodegradative capacity. Molecular techniques were used to determine the successional characteristics of the indigenous microbiota during a 4-month bioslurry evaluation. Ester-linked phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), multiplex PCR of targeted genes, and radiorespirometry techniques were used to define in situ microbial phenotypic, genotypic, and metabolic responses, respectively. Soxhlet extractions revealed a loss in total PAH concentrations of 52%. Individual PAHs showed reductions as great as 75% (i.e., acenapthene and fluorene). Rates of 14C-PAH mineralization (percent/day) were greatest for phenanthrene, followed by pyrene and then chrysene. There was no mineralization capacity for benzo[a]pyrene. Ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid analysis revealed a threefold increase in total microbial biomass and a dynamic microbial community composition that showed a strong correlation with observed changes in the PAH chemistry (canonical r2 of 0.999). Nucleic acid analyses showed copies of genes encoding PAH-degrading enzymes (extradiol dioxygenases, hydroxylases, and meta-cleavage enzymes) to increase by as much as 4 orders of magnitude. Shifts in gene copy numbers showed strong correlations with shifts in specific subsets of the extant microbial community. Specifically, declines in the concentrations of three-ring PAH moieties (i.e., phenanthrene) correlated with PLFA indicative of certain gram-negative bacteria (i.e., Rhodococcus spp. and/or actinomycetes) and genes encoding for naphthalene-, biphenyl-, and catechol-2,3-dioxygenase degradative enzymes. The results of this study suggest that the intrinsic biodegradative potential of an environmental site can be derived from the polyphasic characterization of the in situ microbial community. PMID:11282603

  18. Uranium Biomineralization As a Result of Bacterial Phosphatase Activity: Insights From Bacterial Isolates From a Contaminated Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Beazley, M.J.; Martinez, R.J.; Sobecky, P.A.; Webb, S.M.; Taillefert, M.; /Georgia Tech /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-10-31

    Uranium contamination is an environmental concern at the Department of Energy's Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In this study, we investigated whether phosphate biomineralization, or the aerobic precipitation of U(VI)-phosphate phases facilitated by the enzymatic activities of microorganisms, offers an alternative to the more extensively studied anaerobic U(VI) bioreduction. Three heterotrophic bacteria isolated from FRC soils were studied for their ability to grow and liberate phosphate in the presence of U(VI) and an organophosphate between pH 4.5 and 7.0. The objectives were to determine whether the strains hydrolyzed sufficient phosphate to precipitate uranium, to determine whether low pH might have an effect on U(VI) precipitation, and to identify the uranium solid phase formed during biomineralization. Two bacterial strains hydrolyzed sufficient organophosphate to precipitate 73-95% total uranium after 120 h of incubation in simulated groundwater. The highest rates of uranium precipitation and phosphatase activity were observed between pH 5.0 and 7.0. EXAFS spectra identified the uranyl phosphate precipitate as an autunite/meta-autunite group mineral. The results of this study indicate that aerobic heterotrophic bacteria within a uranium-contaminated environment that can hydrolyze organophosphate, especially in low pH conditions, may play an important role in the bioremediation of uranium.

  19. Escherichia coli contamination and health aspects of soil and tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) subsurface drip irrigated with on-site treated domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Forslund, A; Ensink, J H J; Markussen, B; Battilani, A; Psarras, G; Gola, S; Sandei, L; Fletcher, T; Dalsgaard, A

    2012-11-15

    Faecal contamination of soil and tomatoes irrigated by sprinkler as well as surface and subsurface drip irrigation with treated domestic wastewater were compared in 2007 and 2008 at experimental sites in Crete and Italy. Wastewater was treated by Membrane Bio Reactor (MBR) technology, gravel filtration or UV-treatment before used for irrigation. Irrigation water, soil and tomato samples were collected during two cropping seasons and enumerated for the faecal indicator bacterium Escherichia coli and helminth eggs. The study found elevated levels of E. coli in irrigation water (mean: Italy 1753 cell forming unit (cfu) per 100 ml and Crete 488 cfu per 100 ml) and low concentrations of E. coli in soil (mean: Italy 95 cfu g(-1) and Crete 33 cfu g(-1)). Only two out of 84 tomato samples in Crete contained E. coli (mean: 2700 cfu g(-1)) while tomatoes from Italy were free of E. coli. No helminth eggs were found in the irrigation water or on the tomatoes from Crete. Two tomato samples out of 36 from Italy were contaminated by helminth eggs (mean: 0.18 eggs g(-1)) and had been irrigated with treated wastewater and tap water, respectively. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis DNA fingerprints of E. coli collected during 2008 showed no identical pattern between water and soil isolates which indicates contribution from other environmental sources with E. coli, e.g. wildlife. A quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) model with Monte Carlo simulations adopted by the World Health Organization (WHO) found the use of tap water and treated wastewater to be associated with risks that exceed permissible limits as proposed by the WHO (1.0 × 10(-3) disease risk per person per year) for the accidental ingestion of irrigated soil by farmers (Crete: 0.67 pppy and Italy: 1.0 pppy). The QMRA found that the consumption of tomatoes in Italy was deemed to be safe while permissible limits were exceeded in Crete (1.0 pppy). Overall the quality of tomatoes was safe for human consumption since the disease risk found on Crete was based on only two contaminated tomato samples. It is a fundamental limitation of the WHO QMRA model that it is not based on actual pathogen numbers, but rather on numbers of E. coli converted to estimated pathogen numbers, since it is widely accepted that there is poor correlation between E. coli and viral and parasite pathogens. Our findings also stress the importance of the external environment, typically wildlife, as sources of faecal contamination. PMID:22944202

  20. In vitro evaluation of germination and growth of five plant species on medium supplemented with hydrocarbons associated with contaminated soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Reynoso-Cuevas; M. E. Gallegos-Martínez; F. Cruz-Sosa; M. Gutiérrez-Rojas

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a hydrocarbon mixture (HCM) of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Maya crude oil on germination, growth and survival of four grasses (Bouteloua curtipendula, Cenchrus ciliaris, Echinochloa crusgalli and Rhynchelytrum repens) was studied and compared to a control (Festuca arundinacea) under in vitro conditions. The species were cultured on MS medium with different HCM initial concentrations. Germination

  1. On using rational enzyme redesign to improve enzyme-mediated microbial dehalogenation of recalcitrant substances in deep-subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    Heavily halogenated hydrocarbons are one of the most prevalent classes of man-made recalcitrant environmental contaminants and often make their way into subsurface environments. Biodegradation of heavily chlorinated compounds in the deep subsurface often occurs at extremely slow rates because native enzymes of indigenous microbes are unable to efficiently metabolize such synthetic substances. Cost-effective engineering solutions do not exist for dealing with disperse and recalcitrant pollutants in the deep subsurface (i.e., ground water, soils, and sediments). Timely biodegradation of heavily chlorinated compounds in the deep subsurface may be best accomplished by rational redesign of appropriate enzymes that enhance the ability of indigenous microbes to metabolize these substances. The isozyme family cytochromes P450 are catalytically very robust and are found in all aerobic life forms and may be active in may anaerobes as well. The author is attempting to demonstrate proof-of-principle rational enzyme redesign of cytochromes P450 to enhance biodehalogenation.

  2. Environmental projects. Volume 5, part 1: Study of subsurface contamination. Part 2: Guide to implement environmental compliance programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengelsdorf, I.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the national goal for the preservation of the environment and the protection of human health and safety, NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex have adopted the position that their operating installations shall maintain a high level of compliance in regard to regulations concerning environmental hazards. An investigation carried out by Engineering Science, Inc. focused on possible underground contamination that may have resulted from leaks and/or spills from storage facilities at the Goldstone Communications Complex. It also involved the cleanup of a non-hazardous waste dumpsite at the Mojave Base Site at the Goldstone complex. The report also includes details of the management duties and responsibilities needed to maintain compliance with environmental laws and regulations.

  3. MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF THE SUBSURFACE AT AN ABANDONED CREOSOTE WASTE SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial ecology of pristine, slightly contaminated, and heavily contaminated subsurface materials, and four subsurface materials on the periphery of the plume at an abandoned creosote waste site was investigated. xcept for the unsaturated zone of the heavily contaminated ma...

  4. Halomonas sulfidaeris-dominated microbial community inhabits a 1.8?km-deep subsurface Cambrian Sandstone reservoir.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yiran; Kumar, Charu Gupta; Chia, Nicholas; Kim, Pan-Jun; Miller, Philip A; Price, Nathan D; Cann, Isaac K O; Flynn, Theodore M; Sanford, Robert A; Krapac, Ivan G; Locke, Randall A; Hong, Pei-Ying; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Liu, Wen-Tso; Mackie, Roderick I; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Wright, Chris L; Mikel, Mark A; Walker, Jared L; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Yannarell, Anthony C; Fouke, Bruce W

    2014-06-01

    A low-diversity microbial community, dominated by the ?-proteobacterium Halomonas sulfidaeris, was detected in samples of warm saline formation porewater collected from the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone in the Illinois Basin of the North American Midcontinent (1.8?km/5872?ft burial depth, 50°C, pH?8, 181 bars pressure). These highly porous and permeable quartz arenite sandstones are directly analogous to reservoirs around the world targeted for large-scale hydrocarbon extraction, as well as subsurface gas and carbon storage. A new downhole low-contamination subsurface sampling probe was used to collect in situ formation water samples for microbial environmental metagenomic analyses. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that this H.?sulfidaeris-dominated subsurface microbial community is indigenous and not derived from drilling mud microbial contamination. Data to support this includes V1-V3 pyrosequencing of formation water and drilling mud, as well as comparison with previously published microbial analyses of drilling muds in other sites. Metabolic pathway reconstruction, constrained by the geology, geochemistry and present-day environmental conditions of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, implies that H.?sulfidaeris-dominated subsurface microbial community may utilize iron and nitrogen metabolisms and extensively recycle indigenous nutrients and substrates. The presence of aromatic compound metabolic pathways suggests this microbial community can readily adapt to and survive subsurface hydrocarbon migration. PMID:24238218

  5. Pore-scale experimental study of multiphase flow relevant to CO2 sequestration and biogeochemical reactive transport relevant to contaminant fate in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Oostrom, M.; Liu, C.

    2012-12-01

    Pore-scale micromodel experiments are being conducted at EMSL PNNL to gain better understanding of i) fundamental interfacial processes that control multiphase flow relevant to CO2 sequestration, and ii) biogeochemical reactive transport that affect the fate of contaminants in the subsurface. During the main drainage process, unstable capillary and viscous fingering mechanisms were observed in a nearly homogeneous micromodel and a dual-permeability micromodel that affect supercritical CO2 (scCO2, 9 MPa, 41 degree C) displacement of water from the pore space. During primary imbibition, water flooding of a micromodel partially saturated with scCO2 resulted in preferential dissolution of scCO2 (i.e., dissolution fingering). Micromodel experiments were also performed to investigate kinetics of reductive dissolution of hematite coating on grain surfaces when coupled with pore diffusion. Results showed hematite reduction rate in micropores where transport is dominated by diffusion is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than macropores where transport is controlled by advection.

  6. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants and metabolites in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Alaska, Canada, East Greenland, and Svalbard: 1996-2002.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Jonathan; Muir, Derek C G; Norstrom, Ross J; Stirling, Ian; Fisk, Aaron T; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Derocher, Andrew E; Evans, Thomas J; Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Sandala, Gregory M; Gebbink, Wouter; Riget, Frank F; Born, Erik W; Taylor, Mitch K; Nagy, John; Letcher, Robert J

    2005-12-01

    A suite of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and by-products, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and methyl sulfone (MeSO2) PCB and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) metabolites were determined in adipose tissue of 107 adult and sub-adult polar bears, almost exclusively females, sampled between 1996 and 2002 from populations spanning Arctic and Subarctic regions of Alaska, Canada, East Greenland, and Svalbard. The East Greenland and Svalbard populations of polar bears were distinguished by higher proportions of dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDT)-related compounds, nonachlors, oxychlordane, and higher-chlorinated and persistent PCB congeners (hepta- to nona-chlorinated). Conversely, Alaska, the westernmost population of the North American Arctic, was characterized by higher proportions of relatively volatile compounds such as hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and pentachlorobenzene (PnCBz), lower-chlorinated PCB congeners (tri- to penta-chlorinated), and lower proportions of oxychlordane. Geometric mean (GM) with 95% confidence limits (CL) SigmaHCH concentrations were highest in Alaska male polar bear fat samples (GM 593; CL 363-909 ng g-1 lipid weight), SigmaDDT concentration were highest in East Greenland female samples (GM 309; CL 249-490 ng g-1 l.w.), and Sigma42PCB (GM 5972; CL 4637-9129 ng g-1 l.w.) and SigmaMeSO2-PCB (GM 198; CL 162-279 ng g-1 l.w.) concentrations were highest in female samples collected from Svalbard. The distribution of Sigma-chlordane-related compounds (SigmaCHL), SigmaCBz, mirex, and dieldrin was relatively uniform among the populations of polar bears investigated. The present 1996-2002 data of female polar bear fat samples was compared to spatial assessments of female polar bear fat samples collected between 1989 and 1993 from comparable populations. The two-point temporal comparisons showed a general decrease for age-adjusted mean concentrations of SigmaCHL, p,p'-DDE, Sigma42PCB, SigmaMeSO2-PCB and 3-MeSO2-p,p'-DDE over a period of approximately 10 years. However, concentrations of dieldrin were comparatively unchanged. Comparisons of present 2001-2002 concentrations in fat of female polar bears from Western Hudson Bay showed great consistency with temporal trends (1991-1999) previously reported for the same region, i.e. the apparent non-decreasing trend of SigmaCHL, beta-HCH, SigmaHCH and dieldrin, and the apparent declining trend for SigmaPCB. However, present concentrations of alpha-HCH and SigmaCBz were elevated, and SigmaDDT was notably lower in Western Hudson Bay samples compared to the last measurements in fat samples collected in 1999, which was not in accord with reported temporal trends for this region. As a result of their relatively high degree of contamination, East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears are at higher health risk of contaminant exposure among Arctic and Subarctic populations. In addition to continued biomonitoring, further research on health and population status is needed to evaluate the impact from chronic exposure of polar bear populations to CHCs and their metabolites. PMID:16115663

  7. Characterisation of weathered hydrocarbon wastes at contaminated sites by GC-simulated distillation and nitrous oxide chemical ionisation GC-MS, with implications for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Simon J T; Hrudey, Steve E; Rawluk, Marv; Fuhr, Bryan J

    2004-08-01

    An extended analytical characterisation of weathered hydrocarbons isolated from historically contaminated sites in Alberta is presented. The characterisation of soil extracts, chromatographically separated into component classes, by GC-simulated distillation and nitrous oxide (N2O) chemical ionisation (CI) GC-MS provides new insights into the composition of the residual oil at these sites, the principal partition medium for risk critical components. The combined polar and asphaltene content of representative soil extracts ranged from 40% w/w to 70% w/w of the oils encountered. An abundance of C14-C22 2-4 ring alicyclics, alkylbenzenes and benzocycloparaffins is prevalent within the saturate fractions of site soils. Implications for the partitioning of risk critical compounds at sites with weathered hydrocarbons and the practical application of bioremediation technologies are discussed. PMID:15292955

  8. Using Video to Communicate Scientific Findings -- Parking lot sealcoat as a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harned, D. A.; Moorman, M.; Van Metre, P. C.; Mahler, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) provides information about (1) water-quality conditions and how those conditions vary locally, regionally, and nationally, (2) water-quality trends, and (3) factors that affect those trends and conditions. Video is one tool being used to communicate the relevance of scientific findings of the NAWQA program to general audiences, such as resource managers, educational groups, public officials, and the general public. One hundred twenty scientists and educators attending the 2010 and 2011 Fall meetings of the American Geophysical Union and the 2012 meeting of the National Monitoring Council viewed USGS videos and answered surveys using Likert response-scaling to identify the important elements of science videos. The most important elements identified from the surveys were style, including strong visuals and an engaging story with a simple message, as well as elements of substance including a take-home message, clarity, and believability. Deemed least important were journalistic elements showing different points of view and obstacles overcome. Viewers also identified the inclusion of the hypothesis statement and study methods as unimportant to include in a science video. As part of the NAWQA assessment of water-quality conditions and the factors that affect those conditions, parking-lot sealcoat is being studied as a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination. A film documenting a study to quantify the transport of PAHs from a parking-lot area coated with coal-tar sealcoat aims to make the study understandable to a lay audience. The film, titled "Paint it Black," documents the experimental site preparation, sealcoat application, and air and water sampling, with commentary by the principal scientists. Methods for sampling are described and shown in the video, and results from previous coal-tar sealcoat studies are summarized. The film provides a website address with links to additional information about PAHs and coal-tar sealcoat. The website and film are an example of USGS efforts aimed at improving science communication to a general audience.

  9. IMPORTANCE OF BLACK CARBON IN DISTRIBUTION AND BIOACCUMULATION MODELS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The roles and relative importance of nonpyrogenic organic carbon (NPOC) and black carbon (BC) as binding phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed by their ability to estimate pore water concentrations and biological uptake in various marine sediments. Sedim...

  10. Evaluating the Effects of Bioremediation on Genotoxicity of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil Using Genetically Engineered, Higher Eukaryotic Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Nakamura, Jun; Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation is one of the commonly applied remediation strategies at sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, remediation goals are typically based on removal of the target contaminants rather than on broader measures related to health risks. We investigated changes in the toxicity and genotoxicity of PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site before and after two simulated bioremediation processes: a sequencing batch bioreactor system and a continuous-flow column system. Toxicity and genotoxicity of the residues from solvent extracts of the soil were determined by the chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic cell line and its DNA-repair-deficient mutants. Although both bioremediation processes significantly removed PAHs from the contaminated soil (bioreactor 69% removal; column 84% removal), bioreactor treatment resulted in an increase in toxicity and genotoxicity over the course of a treatment cycle, whereas long-term column treatment resulted in a decrease in toxicity and genotoxicity. However, when screening with a battery of DT40 mutants for genotoxicity profiling, we found that column treatment induced DNA damage types that were not observed in untreated soil. Toxicity and genotoxicity bioassays can supplement chemical analysis-based risk assessment for contaminated soil when evaluating the efficacy of bioremediation. PMID:22443351

  11. Low-concentration tailing and subsequent quicklime-enhanced remediation of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by mechanical soil aeration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Du, Xiaoming; Shi, Yi; Xu, Zhu; Fang, Jidun; Li, Zheng; Li, Fasheng

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical soil aeration has long been regarded as an effective ex-situ remediation technique and as suitable for remediation of large-scale sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at low cost. However, it has been reported that the removal efficiency of VOCs from soil is relatively low in the late stages of remediation, in association with tailing. Tailing may extend the remediation time required; moreover, it typically results in the presence of contaminants residues at levels far exceeding regulations. In this context, the present study aimed to discuss the tailing that occurs during the process of remediation of soils contaminated artificially with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs) and to assess possible quicklime-enhanced removal mechanisms. The results revealed the following conclusions. First, temperature and aeration rate can be important controls on both the timing of appearance of tailing and the levels of residual contaminants. Furthermore, the addition of quicklime to soil during tailing can reduce the residual concentrations rapidly to below the remedial target values required for site remediation. Finally, mechanical soil aeration can be enhanced using quicklime, which can improve the volatilization of VCHs via increasing soil temperature, reducing soil moisture, and enhancing soil permeability. Our findings give a basic understanding to the elimination of the tailing in the application of mechanical soil aeration, particularly for VOCs-contaminated soils. PMID:25433980

  12. Aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace elements as indicators of contamination status near oil and gas platforms in the Sergipe-Alagoas Basin (Southwest Atlantic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, Rafael A.; Araujo Júnior, Marcus A. G.; Meireles Júnior, Ruy O.; Macena, Leandro F.; de A. Lima, Eleine Francioni; Carneiro, Maria Eulalia R.

    2013-12-01

    Oil and gas platforms from Sergipe-Alagoas Basin located in the northeastern region of Brazil do not discharge produced water. However, those platforms can be a potential source of contaminants to the marine environment due to their producing activities. In this study, sediment samples were collected in the vicinity of two offshore oil and gas platforms located in Sergipe-Alagoas Basin (PCM-9 and PGA-1) to evaluate the source and levels of hydrocarbons and trace elements (As, Fe, Al, Ti, Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni, Mn, Ba, V, Cr and Hg). Also, the potential impact of those platforms on the sediment quality was investigated. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons diagnostic ratios observed in the sediment samples indicated hydrocarbons from pyrogenic source, specifically from biomass combustion. Trace elements As, Cd and Ba recorded concentrations higher than Threshold Effect Levels (TEL) in the sediment nearby the platforms. Also, there was evidence of some samples enriched by barium. Although As, Cd and Ba concentrations were higher than TEL, they most likely corresponded to background levels. The obtained results indicated that activities of the PCM-9 and PGA-1 platforms may not be affecting the quality of nearby sediment.

  13. Assessment of the distortions caused by a pipe and an excavation in the electric and electromagnetic responses of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, Hilda Patricia; Robledo, Fabiana Elizabeth; Osella, Ana María; de la Vega, Matías

    2012-02-01

    Here, we present the results of a geophysical survey performed to characterize a hydrocarbon contamination plume, arising from a puncture in a master crude oil pipe in Argentina. This pipe was buried in an inhabited suburban yard with flat topography. At the moment of the event a stretch of the duct was uncovered and the leaked oil flooded the terrain up to several meters around the puncture. The contamination was produced by infiltration from the surface and also by flowing through the inner layers. The first steps in the treatment of the spill were to pump the oil, excavate the sector nearby the puncture and repair the pipe. Around one year later, we preformed the geophysical prospecting, which goal was to determine the extent of the contaminant plume, required for selecting adequate remediation strategies. We combined dual-coil, frequency domain electromagnetic induction surveys and 2D dipole-dipole geoelectrical profiling. Besides, we performed Wenner soundings at several positions on the walls of the excavation, where contaminated and clean sediments were exposed. From the 1D inversion of the electromagnetic data, 2D inversion of the dipole-dipole data, and Wenner data, we found that, in general, the contamination decreased the resistivity of the affected subsoil volumes. However, three of the geoelectrical profiles exhibited localized, very resistive anomalies, which origin was not clear. They did not seem to be associated to the presence of high concentrations of poorly or non-degraded hydrocarbon, since two of these profiles crossed the more contaminated area, but the other was located quite further away. As an attempt to identify the cause of these anomalies, we carried out a 3D numerical simulation of the effects of the pipe and the excavation on the 2D dipole-dipole images. From this study, we could effectively determine that they were mainly distortions generated by those structures. This allowed for providing a proper interpretation of the images of the three profiles, consistent with the other results. Thus, we could finally delimit the impacted zone and ascertain the main features of the contaminant plume.

  14. In vitro evaluation of germination and growth of five plant species on medium supplemented with hydrocarbons associated with contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Reynoso-Cuevas, L; Gallegos-Martínez, M E; Cruz-Sosa, F; Gutiérrez-Rojas, M

    2008-09-01

    The effect of a hydrocarbon mixture (HCM) of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Maya crude oil on germination, growth and survival of four grasses (Bouteloua curtipendula, Cenchrus ciliaris, Echinochloa crusgalli and Rhynchelytrum repens) was studied and compared to a control (Festuca arundinacea) under in vitro conditions. The species were cultured on MS medium with different HCM initial concentrations. Germination was not affected for any assayed concentration; however, the length of the stems and roots decreased when HCM increased and the survival of the four species also diminished. Except for F. arundinacea, a direct link between hydrocarbon concentration and plant survival was observed. In vitro studies are clean and easy to handle techniques allowing isolation of the plant activity from that derived from associations with microorganisms in non-sterile cultures. To our knowledge, this is the first work towards phytoremediation assisted by in vitro plant cultivation. PMID:18222086

  15. Estimation of uncertainty in the sampling and analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil in Brighton, UK.

    PubMed

    Zhou, John L; Siddiqui, Ertan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneity of environmental samples is increasingly recognised, yet rarely examined in organic contamination investigations. In this study soil samples from an ex-landfill site in Brighton, UK were analysed for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination by using a balanced sampling protocol. The analytical technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was found to be fit for purpose by the use of duplicate samples and the statistical analysis of variances, as well as of certified reference materials. The sampling uncertainty was found to significantly overweigh the analytical uncertainty, by a factor of 3 and 6 for PCBs and PAHs, respectively. The soil samples showed a general trend of PCB concentration that was under the recommended target level of 20 ng/g dry weight. It is possible that one site alongside the main road may exceed the 20 ng/g target level, after taking into consideration the overall measurement uncertainty (70.8%). The PAH contamination was more severe, with seven sites potentially exceeding the effect-range medium concentrations. The soil samples with relatively high PCB and PAH concentrations were all taken from the grass verge, which also had the highest soil organic carbon content. The measurement uncertainty which was largely due to sampling can be reduced by sampling at a high resolution spacing of 17 m, which is recommended in future field investigations of soil organic contamination. PMID:25128886

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain 10-1B, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degrader in Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Bello-Akinosho, Maryam; Adeleke, Rasheed; Swanevelder, Dirk; Thantsha, Mapitsi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain 10-1B was isolated from artificially polluted soil after selective enrichment. Its draft genome consists of several predicted genes that are involved in the hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, which is the rate-limiting step in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:25953172

  17. Evidence of hydrocarbon contamination from the Burgan oil field, Kuwait—Interpretations from thermal remote sensing data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saif ud din; Ahmad Al Dousari; Peter Literathy

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the application of thermal remote sensing for mapping hydrocarbon polluted sites. This has been achieved by mono-window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) measurements, using multi-date band 6 data of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The emissivity, transmittance and mean atmospheric temperature were used as critical factors to estimate LST. The changes in the surface emissivity due to

  18. The genome of Geobacter bemidjiensis, exemplar for the subsurface clade of Geobacter species that predominate in Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Aklujkar, Muktak [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Young, Nelson D [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Holmes, Dawn [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Chavan, Milind [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Risso, Carla [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Kiss, Hajnalka [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2010-01-01

    Background. Geobacter species in a phylogenetic cluster known as subsurface clade 1 are often the predominant microorganisms in subsurface environments in which Fe(III) reduction is the primary electron-accepting process. Geobacter bemidjiensis, a member of this clade, was isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments in Bemidji, Minnesota, and is closely related to Geobacter species found to be abundant at other subsurface sites. This study examines whether there are significant differences in the metabolism and physiology of G. bemidjiensis compared to non-subsurface Geobacter species. Results. Annotation of the genome sequence of G. bemidjiensis indicates several differences in metabolism compared to previously sequenced non-subsurface Geobacteraceae, which will be useful for in silico metabolic modeling of subsurface bioremediation processes involving Geobacter species. Pathways can now be predicted for the use of various carbon sources such as propionate by G. bemidjiensis. Additional metabolic capabilities such as carbon dioxide fixation and growth on glucose were predicted from the genome annotation. The presence of different dicarboxylic acid transporters and two oxaloacetate decarboxylases in G. bemidjiensis may explain its ability to grow by disproportionation of fumarate. Although benzoate is the only aromatic compound that G. bemidjiensis is known or predicted to utilize as an electron donor and carbon source, the genome suggests that this species may be able to detoxify other aromatic pollutants without degrading them. Furthermore, G. bemidjiensis is auxotrophic for 4-aminobenzoate, which makes it the first Geobacter species identified as having a vitamin requirement. Several features of the genome indicated that G. bemidjiensis has enhanced abilities to respire, detoxify and avoid oxygen. Conclusion. Overall, the genome sequence of G. bemidjiensis offers surprising insights into the metabolism and physiology of Geobacteraceae in subsurface environments, compared to non-subsurface Geobacter species, such as the ability to disproportionate fumarate, more efficient oxidation of propionate, enhanced responses to oxygen stress, and dependence on the environment for a vitamin requirement. Therefore, an understanding of the activity of Geobacter species in the subsurface is more likely to benefit from studies of subsurface isolates such as G. bemidjiensis than from the non-subsurface model species studied so far.

  19. The genome of Geobacter bemidjiensis, exemplar for the subsurface clade of Geobacter species that predominate in Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments.

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Geobacter species in a phylogenetic cluster known as subsurface clade 1 are often the predominant microorganisms in subsurface environments in which Fe(III) reduction is the primary electron-accepting process. Geobacter bemidjiensis, a member of this clade, was isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments in Bemidji, Minnesota, and is closely related to Geobacter species found to be abundant at other subsurface sites. This study examines whether there are significant differences in the metabolism and physiology of G. bemidjiensis compared to non-subsurface Geobacter species. Results Annotation of the genome sequence of G. bemidjiensis indicates several differences in metabolism compared to previously sequenced non-subsurface Geobacteraceae, which will be useful for in silico metabolic modeling of subsurface bioremediation processes involving Geobacter species. Pathways can now be predicted for the use of various carbon sources such as propionate by G. bemidjiensis. Additional metabolic capabilities such as carbon dioxide fixation and growth on glucose were predicted from the genome annotation. The presence of different dicarboxylic acid transporters and two oxaloacetate decarboxylases in G. bemidjiensis may explain its ability to grow by disproportionation of fumarate. Although benzoate is the only aromatic compound that G. bemidjiensis is known or predicted to utilize as an electron donor and carbon source, the genome suggests that this species may be able to detoxify other aromatic pollutants without degrading them. Furthermore, G. bemidjiensis is auxotrophic for 4-aminobenzoate, which makes it the first Geobacter species identified as having a vitamin requirement. Several features of the genome indicated that G. bemidjiensis has enhanced abilities to respire, detoxify and avoid oxygen. Conclusion Overall, the genome sequence of G. bemidjiensis offers surprising insights into the metabolism and physiology of Geobacteraceae in subsurface environments, compared to non-subsurface Geobacter species, such as the ability to disproportionate fumarate, more efficient oxidation of propionate, enhanced responses to oxygen stress, and dependence on the environment for a vitamin requirement. Therefore, an understanding of the activity of Geobacter species in the subsurface is more likely to benefit from studies of subsurface isolates such as G. bemidjiensis than from the non-subsurface model species studied so far. PMID:20828392

  20. Sequestration of Sr-90 Subsurface Contamination in the Hanford 100-N Area by Surface Infiltration of a Ca-Citrate-Phosphate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Oostrom, Martinus; Moore, R. C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Williams, Mark D.; Zhong, Lirong; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; McKinley, James P.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Covert, Matthew A.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Garcia, Ben J.

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a method to emplace apatite precipitate in the 100N vadose zone, which results in sorption and ultimately incorporation of Sr-90 into the apatite structure. The Ca-citrate-PO4 solution can be infiltrated into unsaturated sediments to result in apatite precipitate to provide effective treatment of Sr-90 contamination. Microbial redistribution during solution infiltration and a high rate of citrate biodegradation for river water microbes (water used for solution infiltration) results in a relatively even spatial distribution of the citrate biodegradation rate and ultimately apatite precipitate in the sediment. Manipulation of the Ca-citrate-PO4 solution infiltration strategy can be used to result in apatite precipitate in the lower half of the vadose zone (where most of the Sr-90 is located) and within low-K layers (which are hypothesized to have higher Sr-90 concentrations). The most effective infiltration strategy to precipitate apatite at depth (and with sufficient lateral spread) was to infiltrate a high concentration solution (6 mM Ca, 15 mM citrate, 60 mM PO4) at a rapid rate (near ponded conditions), followed by rapid, then slow water infiltration. Repeated infiltration events, with sufficient time between events to allow water drainage in the sediment profile can be used to buildup the mass of apatite precipitate at greater depth. Low-K heterogeneities were effectively treated, as the higher residual water content maintained in these zones resulted in higher apatite precipitate concentration. High-K zones did not receive sufficient treatment by infiltration, although an alternative strategy of air/surfactant (foam) was demonstrated effective for targeting high-K zones. The flow rate manipulation used in this study to treat specific depths and heterogeneities are not as easy to implement at field scale due to the lack of characterization of heterogeneities and difficulty tracking the wetting front over a large subsurface area. However, the use of real-time surface and cross-borehole geophysics can be used to track the infiltrating Ca-citrate-PO4 front so some adjustments can be made in the infiltration rate to precipitate apatite in desired zones. In addition, the reactive transport code used in this study with field scale physical parameters for sediments can be used to evaluate infiltration strategies along with preliminary water infiltration tests at field scale.

  1. Biostimulation of the autochthonous bacterial community and bioaugmentation of selected bacterial strains for the depletion of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a historically contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, Simona; Ruffini Castglione, Monica; Gentini, Alessandro; Lorenzi, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a large group of organic contaminants causing hazards to organisms including humans. The objective of the study was (1) to validate the biostimulation of the autochthonous bacterial population by the amendment of lignocellulosic matrices inoculated with white rot fungi, to be exploited for the depletion of PAHs (5687 ppm) in a historical contaminated soil. (2) to validate the isolation of autochthonous bacterial strains capable to use PAHs as sole carbon source and their massive bioaugmentation for PAH depletion in a historical contaminated soil. The validation has been performed at mesocosm and pilot scale (7 tons of soil in a biopile). The two approaches end up with the complete depletion of the PAHs. A genotoxicological assessment of the process and of the soil at the end of the process of decontamination has been performed. The process of soil decontamination showed an increase in the genotoxicity of either the soil and the deriving elutriates. The bioaugmetation of selected bacterial strains determined the complete detoxification of the decontaminated soil after 21 weeks. The microbial ecology of the system during the process of decontamination has been monitored.

  2. The use of coarse, separable, condensed-phase organic carbon particles to characterize desorption resistance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Y.Z.; Kochetkov, A.; Reible, D.D. [University of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Physical separations were employed to characterize the source of desorption-resistant behavior for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laboratory- and field-contaminated sediments. Size and density separation of laboratory-contaminated sediments did not effectively separate the amorphous-phase (volatile) and condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon as measured by thermal oxidation at 375 {sup o}C. These separations also did not result in sediment fractions with significantly different desorption characteristics as measured by apparent partition coefficients. Coarse particles from a field-contaminated sediment from Utica Harbor (UH; Utica, NY, USA), however, could be directly separated into sandy fractions and organic fractions that were composed of woody organic matter, charcoal or charred vegetative matter, and coal-like and coal-cinder particles. Chemical analysis showed that coal-like (glassy, nonporous) and coal-cinder (porous, sintered) particles exhibited very high PAH concentrations and high apparent partition coefficients. These particles also exhibited significantly higher condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon contents as defined by thermal oxidation at 375{sup o}C. The apparent partition coefficients of PAHs in the coal-cinder particles were a good indication of the apparent partition coefficients in the desorption-resistant fraction of UH sediment, indicating that the coarse particles provided a reasonable characterization of the desorption-resistance phenomena in these sediments even though the coarse fractions represented less than 25% of the organic carbon in the whole sediment.

  3. Adding sodium dodecyl sulfate and Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2 biosurfactants inhibits polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in a weathered creosote-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Deschênes, L; Lafrance, P; Villeneuve, J P; Samson, R

    1996-12-01

    The effect of two anionic surfactants was assessed during biodegradation of 13 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in a wood-preserving soil contaminated with creosote and pentacholorophenol for a period of at least 20 years. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and biosurfactants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2 were utilized at concentrations of 10, 100 and 500 micrograms/g soil. Because both surfactants are readily biodegradable, the microcosms received a fresh spike of surfactant every 2 weeks. Biodegradation of aged PAH residues was monitored by GC/MS for a period of 45 weeks. Results indicated that the biodegradation of the three-ring PAH was rapid and almost complete but was slowed by the addition of 100 micrograms/g and 500 micrograms/g chemical surfactant. Similarly, at the same concentrations, the two surfactants significantly decreased the biodegradation rate of the four-ring PAH. In this case, the inhibition was more pronounced with SDS. High-molecular-mass PAH (more than four rings) were not biodegraded under the test conditions. It was suggested that the preferential utilization of surfactants by PAH degraders was responsible for the inhibition observed in the biodegradation of the hydrocarbons. The high biodegradability and the inhibitory effect of these two surfactants would have a significant impact on the development of both above-ground and in situ site reclamation processes. PMID:9008894

  4. Hydrocarbon entrapment in Alberta deep basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gies

    1984-01-01

    Entrapment of hydrocarbon accumulations in the deepest region of the Alberta sedimentary basin is linked to certain principles of subsurface fluid flow behavior in generally tight sandstones, and to active hydrocarbon generation in adjacent source beds. Similar geologic conditions and associated deep-basin-type hydrocarbon accumulations no doubt exist in the deeper portions of other sedimentary basins. Deep-basin concepts of hydrocarbon entrapment

  5. Investigating the Influence of Remedial Capping on the Hydrological, Geochemical, and Microbial Processes that Control Subsurface Contaminant Migration at WAG 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation: Implications toward Long-Term Stewardship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, P. M.; Mehlhorn, T. L.

    2006-05-01

    The following research investigated the effectiveness of an aggressive, large scale remedial action that is occurring to subsurface waste trenches containing radioactive and organic waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The site is being remediated as one of the top cleanup prioritization for the Oak Ridge Accelerated Remediation endeavor. Site landlords, Bechtel Jacobs Co., LLC (BJC) are installing a minimal RCRA cap with the primary objective of controlling the infiltration of storm water into the hundreds of unconfined waste trenches containing radioactive and organic waste. The site now offers a unique scientific opportunity to track the kinetic evolution of post-cap processes influencing contaminant migration and immobilization, because we have many years of pre-cap coupled processes information and knowledge. Since the cap is certain to disrupt the near steady-state contaminant discharge profiles that have existed for many years from the site, we have been quantifying the influence of post-cap hydrological, geochemical, and microbial processes on contaminant discharge as a function of scale and time in an effort to assess local-scale cap influences versus regional scale groundwater flow influences on contaminant discharge. We have been allowed to maintain numerous groundwater monitoring wells at a field site and these have a rich historical data set with regard to hydrology, geochemistry, microbiology, and contaminant flux. Our objectives are to investigate cap induced changes in (1) groundwater and surface hydrology and contaminant flux, (2) geochemistry and contaminant speciation, and (3) microbial community structure and organic contaminant degradation and inorganic contaminant immobilization. Our approach monitors coupled processes during base-flow and during storm events in both the groundwater and surface water discharge from the site and the surrounding watershed. Pre- and post-cap data will than be modeled with a multiprocess, multicomponent, transport model which is linked to pre- and post-cap surface water hydrograph analysis from the site and the surrounding watershed. Our goal is to provide an improved fundamental understanding of the long-term fate and transport of contaminants and an improved ability to predict system response to remedial actions. The experimental and numerical results from this investigation will provide knowledge and information in previously unexplored areas of cap performance with regard to coupled hydrology, geochemistry, microbiology, and contaminant flux in humid regimes. The products will support DOE's mission of long-term stewardship of contaminated environments and be transferable to other site where similar remediation exists or is planned.

  6. Biodegradation of polyacyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil by biostimulation and bioaugmentation in the presence of copper(II) ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harrison Ifeanyichukwu Atagana

    2006-01-01

    The effect of a combination of biostimulation, bioaugmentation and the presence of CuSO4 on the biodegradation of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dibenzofuran 210 mg kg?1, benzo(a)anthracene 200 mg kg?1, dibenzo-p-dioxine 100 mg kg?1 and 9-fluorenone 100 mg kg?1 in a sandy loam soil was studied. The pH of the soil was raised from 5 to 7 with agricultural lime. The soil was then divided into two sets

  7. Process for recovering uranium from waste hydrocarbon oils containing the same. [Uranium contaminated lubricating oils from gaseous diffusion compressors

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, M.C.; Getz, P.A.; Hickman, J.E.; Payne, L.D.

    1982-06-29

    The invention is a process for the recovery of uranium from uranium-bearing hydrocarbon oils containing carboxylic acid as a degradation product. In one aspect, the invention comprises providing an emulsion of water and the oil, heating the same to a temperature effecting conversion of the emulsion to an organic phase and to an acidic aqueous phase containing uranium carboxylate, and recovering the uranium from the aqueous phase. The process is effective, simple and comparatively inexpensive. It avoids the use of toxic reagents and the formation of undesirable intermediates.

  8. Microbial ecology of the subsurface at an abandoned creosote waste site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Thomas; M. D. Lee; M. J. Scott; C. H. Ward

    1989-01-01

    Summary The microbial ecology of pristine, slightly contaminated, and heavily contaminated subsurface materials, and four subsurface materials on the periphery of the plume at an abandoned creosote waste site was investigated. Except for the unsaturated zone of the heavily contaminated material, mineralization of glucose (13.5 ppb) indicated a metabolically active microflora in all subsurface materials. However, mineralization (<40%) of naphthalene,

  9. Subsurface Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Target areas for sinking base holes, underground pipelines, etc., can be identified with the assistance of NASA Ames developed technology, by Airborne Pipeline Services, Inc. Subsurface features are computer processed; the system can cover 250 miles a day and was first developed by Applied Science, Inc.

  10. Performance and cost evaluation of ULTROX d-tox(trademark) UV/oxidation system for the treatment of hydrocarbon vapors from fuel-contaminated soils. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Archabal, S.R.; Downey, D.C.; Malone, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    This technology demonstration was completed to determine the feasibility of using an ultraviolet (UV) oxidizing catalyst in the presence of ozone to treat non-chlorinated, fuel hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The soil vapor extraction (SVE) and treatment demonstration was conducted at the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site SS-20 located at Myrtle Beach Air Force Base (AFB), Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Site SS-20, locally known as the MOGAS site, was previously investigated under the IRP and known to be contaminated with gasoline residuals. This demonstration was conducted from 10 November to 20 December 1996 and was performed as part of an ongoing innovative technologies evaluation program sponsored by the Air Force in order to promote cost-effective vapor treatment technologies at contaminated sites. The technology demonstration was performed in accordance with the `Treatability Study Test Design for ULTROX(registered) UV/Oxidation System Pilot Scale Treatability Testing at Myrtle Beach AFB, Myrtle Beach, SC.` (Zimpro, ULTROX Division, September, 1995) as approved by the Air Force and regulatory agencies.

  11. Clonal variation in survival and growth of hybrid poplar and willow in an in situ trial on soils heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zalesny, Ronald S; Bauer, Edmund O; Hall, Richard B; Zalesny, Jill A; Kunzman, Joshua; Rog, Chris J; Riemenschneider, Don E

    2005-01-01

    Species and hybrids between species belonging to the genera Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) have been used successfully for phytoremediation of contaminated soils. Our objectives were to: 1) evaluate the potential for establishing genotypes of poplar and willow on soils heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and 2) identify promising genotypes for potential use in future systems. We evaluated height, diameter, and volume after first year budset by testing 20 poplar clones and two willow clones. Unrooted cuttings, 20 cm long, were planted in randomized complete blocks at 0.91- x 0.91-m spacing at Gary, IN, USA (41.5 degrees N, 87.3 degrees W). Four commercial poplar clones (NM6, DN5, DN34, and DN182) were planted as 20- and 60-cm cuttings. Sixty-cm cuttings exhibited greater height and diameter than 20-cm cuttings; however, we recommend continued use and testing of different combinations of genotype and cutting length. We identified promising genotypes for potential use in future systems and we recommend allocating the majority of resources into commercial poplar clones, given their generalist growth performance. However, further utilization and selection of experimental clones is needed. Specific clones rather than genomic groups should be selected based on the geographic location and soil conditions of the site. PMID:16285410

  12. A STUDY OF DISSOLUTION RATE-LIMITED BIOREMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL HYDROCARBONS. (R825549C039)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread release of organic chemicals in the environment frequently leads to ground-water contamination with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) because many of these organic chemicals are barely soluble in water. Understanding the mechanisms of transport and biotic transf...

  13. DELTA-13C VALUES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) COLLECTED FROM TWO CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater samples were collected from the American Creosote Works (ACW) Superfund site in Pensacola, Florida in June and September 1994. Sampling wells were located along a transect leading away from the most contaminated area. PAHs were extracted from the groundwater samples w...

  14. Modulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor target genes in circulating lymphocytes from dairy cows bred in a dioxin-like PCB contaminated area.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Flavia; Spalenza, Veronica; Carletti, Monica; Sacchi, Paola; Rasero, Roberto; Nebbia, Carlo

    2013-04-15

    Animal productions (i.e. fish, eggs, milk and dairy products) represent the major source of exposure to dioxins, furans, and dioxin-like (DL) polychlorobiphenyls for humans. The negative effects of these highly toxic and persistent pollutants are mediated by the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) that elicits the transcriptional induction of several genes, including those involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Previously we demonstrated the presence and functioning of the AHR signaling pathway in primary cultures of bovine blood lymphocytes. The aim of the present study was to investigate by real time PCR the expression and the inducibility of selected target genes (i.e. AHR, AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), AHR repressor, CYP1A1 and CYP1B1) in uncultured cells from dairy cows naturally exposed to DL-compounds. The study was carried out on two groups of animals bred in a highly polluted area and characterized by a different degree of contamination, as assessed by bulk milk TEQ values, and a control group reared in an industry free area. Bovine lymphocytes expressed only AHR, ARNT and CYP1B1 genes to a detectable level; moreover, only CYP1B1 expression appeared to be correlated to TEQ values, being higher in the most contaminated group, and decreasing along with animal decontamination. Finally, lymphocytes from exposed cows displayed a lower inducibility of both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 after the in vitro treatment with a specific AHR ligand. In conclusion, our results indicate that DL-compound contaminated cows may display significant changes in AHR-target gene expression of circulating lymphocytes. PMID:23454571

  15. Effects of different compost amendments on the abundance and composition of alkB harboring bacterial communities in a soil under industrial use contaminated with hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Wallisch, Stefanie; Gril, Tjasa; Dong, Xia; Welzl, Gerd; Bruns, Christian; Heath, Ester; Engel, Marion; Suhadolc, Marjetka; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Alkane degrading microorganisms play an important role for the bioremediation of petrogenic contaminated environments. In this study, we investigated the effects of compost addition on the abundance and diversity of bacteria harboring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in an oil-contaminated soil originated from an industrial zone in Celje, Slovenia (Technosol). Soil without any amendments (control soil) and soil amended with two composts differing in their maturation stage and nutrient availability, were incubated under controlled conditions in a microcosm experiment and sampled after 0, 6, 12, and 36 weeks of incubation. As expected the addition of compost stimulated the degradation of alkanes in the investigated soil shortly after the addition. By using quantitative real-time PCR higher number of alkB genes were detected in soil samples amended with compost compared to the control soils. To get an insight into the composition of alkB harboring microbial communities, we performed next generation sequencing of amplicons of alkB gene fragment. Richness and diversity of alkB gene harboring prokaryotes was higher in soil mixed with compost compared to control soils with stronger effects of the less maturated, nutrient poor compost. The phylogenetic analysis of communities suggested that the addition of compost stimulated the abundance of alkB harboring Actinobacteria during the experiment independent from the maturation stage of the compost. AlkB harboring ?-proteobacteria like Shewanella or Hydrocarboniphaga as well as ?-proteobacteria of the genus Agrobacterium responded also positively to the addition of compost to soil. The amendment of the less maturated, nutrient poor compost resulted in addition in a large increase of alkB harboring bacteria of the Cytophaga group (Microscilla) mainly at the early sampling time points. Our data indicates that compost amendments significantly change abundance and diversity pattern of alkB harboring microbes in Technosol and might be a useful agent to stimulate bioremediation of hydrocarbons in contaminated soils. PMID:24659987

  16. Evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in a contaminated aquifer by combined application of in situ and laboratory microcosms using (13)C-labelled target compounds.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Arne; Fischer, Anko; Vogt, Carsten; Bombach, Petra

    2015-02-01

    The number of approaches to evaluate the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) within contaminated aquifers is limited. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of a novel method based on the combination of in situ and laboratory microcosms using (13)C-labelled PAHs as tracer compounds. The biodegradation of four PAHs (naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene) was investigated in an oxic aquifer at the site of a former gas plant. In situ biodegradation of naphthalene and fluorene was demonstrated using in situ microcosms (BACTRAP(®)s). BACTRAP(®)s amended with either [(13)C6]-naphthalene or [(13)C5/(13)C6]-fluorene (50:50) were incubated for a period of over two months in two groundwater wells located at the contaminant source and plume fringe, respectively. Amino acids extracted from BACTRAP(®)-grown cells showed significant (13)C-enrichments with (13)C-fractions of up to 30.4% for naphthalene and 3.8% for fluorene, thus providing evidence for the in situ biodegradation and assimilation of those PAHs at the field site. To quantify the mineralisation of PAHs, laboratory microcosms were set up with BACTRAP(®)-grown cells and groundwater. Naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, or acenaphthene were added as (13)C-labelled substrates. (13)C-enrichment of the produced CO2 revealed mineralisation of between 5.9% and 19.7% for fluorene, between 11.1% and 35.1% for acenaphthene, between 14.2% and 33.1% for phenanthrene, and up to 37.0% for naphthalene over a period of 62 days. Observed PAH mineralisation rates ranged between 17 ?g L(-1) d(-1) and 1639 ?g L(-1) d(-1). The novel approach combining in situ and laboratory microcosms allowed a comprehensive evaluation of PAH biodegradation at the investigated field site, revealing the method's potential for the assessment of PAH degradation within contaminated aquifers. PMID:25437342

  17. Desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from field-contaminated soil to a two-dimensional hydrophobic surface before and after bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Aitken, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Dermal exposure can represent a significant health risk in settings involving potential contact with soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, there is limited work on the ability of PAHs in contaminated soil to reach the skin surface via desorption from the soil. We evaluated PAH desorption from a field-contaminated soil to a two-dimensional hydrophobic surface (C18 extraction disk) as a measure of potential dermal exposure as a function of soil loading (5 to 100 mg dry soil/cm2), temperature (20 °C to 40 °C), and soil moisture content (2% to 40%) over periods up to 16 d. The efficacy of bioremediation in removing the most readily desorbable PAH fractions was also evaluated. Desorption kinetics were described well by an empirical two-compartment kinetic model. PAH mass desorbed to the C18 disk kept increasing at soil loadings well above the estimated monolayer coverage, suggesting mechanisms for PAH transport to the surface other than by direct contact. Such mechanisms were reinforced by observations that desorption occurred even with dry or moist glass microfiber filters placed between the C18 disk and the soil. Desorption of all PAHs was substantially reduced at a soil moisture content corresponding to field capacity, suggesting that transport through pore air contributed to PAH transport to the C18 disk. The lower molecular weight PAHs had greater potential to desorb from soil than higher molecular weight PAHs. Biological treatment of the soil in a slurry-phase bioreactor completely eliminated PAH desorption to the C18 disks. PMID:22704210

  18. Development, calibration, and predictive results of a simulator for subsurface pathway fate and transport of aqueous- and gaseous-phase contaminants in the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, S.O.; Sondrup, A.J.

    1998-07-01

    This document presents the development, calibration, and predictive results of a simulation study of fate and transport of waste buried in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) (which is hereafter referred to as the SDA simulation study). This report builds on incorporates a previous report that dealt only with the calibration of a flow model for simulation of water movement beneath the SDA (Magnuson and Sondrup 1996). The primary purpose of the SDA simulation study was to perform fate and transport calculations to support the IRA. A secondary purpose of the SDA simulation study was to be able to use the model to evaluate possible remediation strategies and their effects on flow and transport in the OU 7-13/14 feasibility study.

  19. The potential for intrinsic bioremediation of BTEX hydrocarbons in soil\\/ground water contaminated with gas condensate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abhijeet P. Borole; Kerry L. Sublette; Kevin T. Raterman; Minoo Javanmardian; J. Berton Fisher

    1997-01-01

    Gas condensate liquids contaminate soil and ground water at two gas production sites in the Denver Basin, CO. A detailed field\\u000a study was carried out at these sites to determine the applicability of intrinsic bioremediation as a remediation option. Ground\\u000a water monitoring at the field sites and analysis of soil cores suggested that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the\\u000a sites

  20. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from creosote-contaminated soil in selected plants and the oligochaete worm Enchytraeus crypticus

    SciTech Connect

    Ann-Sofie Allard; Marianne Malmberg; Alasdair H. Neilson; Mikael Remberger [IVL, Stockholm (Sweden). Swedish Environmental Research Institute

    2005-07-01

    The accumulation of PAHs from a creosote-contaminated soil was examined in laboratory experiments using English ryegrass (Lolium perenne), white clover (Trifolium repens) and radish (Raphanus sativus), and the oligochaete worm Enchytraeus crypticus. Toxicity to the plants and the worms was assessed, and a soil sample mixed with calcined sand was used for accumulation experiments to avoid interference from toxicity in the soil. Accumulation of potentially carcinogenic PAHs varied among the plants, and there was a linear relation between concentrations of PAHs in the soil and in the plants. Correlations between values of the biota-soil accumulation factors and octanol-water partition coefficients, or water solubility varied among the plants and were rather weak, so that lipophilic character or water solubility of the PAHs alone cannot explain PAH accumulation. Accumulation of carcinogenic PAHs from the soil, in the presence of the other PAHs was greatest for Trifolium repens. PAHs were accumulated in the oligochaete worm (Enchytraeus crypticus), and biota-soil accumulation factors exceeded those for the plants. It is suggested that site-specific evaluation of contaminated sites should include not only chemical analysis and evaluation of toxicity but also accumulation of contaminants into biota such as plants and worms.

  1. Environmental projects. Volume 14: Removal of contaminated soil and debris

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, L.

    1992-03-01

    Numerous diverse activities at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) are carried out in support of six parabolic dish antennas. Some of these activities can result in possible spills or leakages of hazardous materials and wastes stored both above ground in steel drums and below ground in underground storage tanks (UST's). These possible leaks or spills, along with the past practice of burial of solid debris and waste in trenches and pits, could cause local subsurface contamination of the soil. In 1987, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), retained Engineering-Science, Inc. (E-S), Pasadena, California, to identify the specific local areas within the GDSCC with subsurface soil contamination. The E-S study determined that some of the soils at the Apollo Site and the Mars Site were contaminated with hydrocarbons, while soil at a nonhazardous waste dumpsite at the Mojave Base site was contaminated with copper. This volume is a JPL-expanded version of the PE209 E-S report, and it also reports that all subsurface contaminated soils at the GDSCC were excavated, removed, and disposed of in an environmentally acceptable way, and the excavations were backfilled and covered in accordance with accepted Federal, State, and local environmental rules and regulations.

  2. Environmental projects. Volume 14: Removal of contaminated soil and debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushner, Len

    1992-01-01

    Numerous diverse activities at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) are carried out in support of six parabolic dish antennas. Some of these activities can result in possible spills or leakages of hazardous materials and wastes stored both above ground in steel drums and below ground in underground storage tanks (UST's). These possible leaks or spills, along with the past practice of burial of solid debris and waste in trenches and pits, could cause local subsurface contamination of the soil. In 1987, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), retained Engineering-Science, Inc. (E-S), Pasadena, California, to identify the specific local areas within the GDSCC with subsurface soil contamination. The E-S study determined that some of the soils at the Apollo Site and the Mars Site were contaminated with hydrocarbons, while soil at a nonhazardous waste dumpsite at the Mojave Base site was contaminated with copper. This volume is a JPL-expanded version of the PE209 E-S report, and it also reports that all subsurface contaminated soils at the GDSCC were excavated, removed, and disposed of in an environmentally acceptable way, and the excavations were backfilled and covered in accordance with accepted Federal, State, and local environmental rules and regulations.

  3. Technical Note The Use of a Very Large Constructed SubSurface Flow Wetland to Treat Glycol-Contaminated Stormwater from Aircraft De-Icing Operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JAMES HIGGINS; MICHAEL MACLEAN

    All of the pollutants found in stormwater runoff at airports, including surface and aircraft de-icing\\/anti-icing glycols, can be treated and removed to low lev- els in well-designed sub-surface flow (SSF) constructed wetland systems. There are two common forms of constructed wetlands used for pollution control: those where water flows over the surface among wetland plants (free water sur- face or

  4. Effects of polyhalogenated hydrocarbons and related contaminants on common tern reproduction: Integration of (bio)chemical and ecological responses

    SciTech Connect

    Murk, A.J. [Agricultural Univ., Wageningen (Netherlands); Boudewijn, T.J.; Dirksen, S. [Bureau Waardenburg, Culemborg (Netherlands); Bosveld, A.T.C. [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands); Rossaert, G.; Ysebaert, T.; Meire, P. [Inst. for Nature Management, Hasselt (Belgium); Meininger, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated ecotoxicological study was made to establish the possible effects of polyhalogenated hydrocarbons (PHAHs) on common tern (Stema hirundo) reproduction. In eight Dutch or Belgian colonies, breeding biology and food choice were determined. In all colonies 15 second eggs from three-egg clutches were collected for artificial incubation and (bio)chemical analysis. Results from these analyses were combined with biological data from the remaining eggs of the clutches. A relationship was found between yolksac mono-ortho PCB levels and main food species (fish or insects) of the adult terns before egg-laying. Colony average breeding data differed only slightly, and were difficult to relate to PHAH levels. When the colonies were grouped after yolksac PHAH-patterns and main food species, significant differences in average egg laying date, egg laying period, incubation period, egg volume and chick weight could be related to differences in yolksac PHAH and retinoid levels, and hepatic EROD activity. The data from all colonies also were used as one dataset and correlated with the (bio)chemical parameters. In summary there were significant correlations or clear trends between yolksac PHAHs or hepatic EROD-activity and prolonged egg laying and incubation period, and smaller eggs and chicks. Lower yolksac retinoid and plasma thyroid hormone levels, and a higher ratio of plasma retinol over yolksac retinoids correlated with longer egg laying and incubation periods, and smaller chicks and eggs (only with thyroid hormone).

  5. Field note: successful establishment of a phytoremediation system at a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated shallow aquifer: trends, trials, and tribulations.

    PubMed

    Cook, Rachel L; Landmeyer, James E; Atkinson, Brad; Messier, Jean-Pierre; Nichols, Elizabeth Guthrie

    2010-09-01

    We report the establishment of a mixed hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.) phytoremediation system at a fuel-contaminated site. Several approaches were used to balance competing goals of cost-effectiveness yet successful tree establishment without artificial irrigation or trenching. Bare root and unrooted cuttings were installed using either: (1) 1.2 m deep holes excavated with an 8 cm diameter auger using a direct-push rig and backfilled with the excavated, in situ soil; (2) 1.2 m deep holes created with a 23 cm diameter auger attached to a Bobcat rig and backfilled with clean topsoil from offsite; and (3) shallow holes between 15-30 cm deep that were created with a 1.3 cm diameter rod and no backfill. Tree mortality from initial plantings indicated contaminated zones not quantified in prior site investigations and remedial actions. Aquifer heterogeneity, underground utilities, and prior remediation infrastructure hampered the ability of the site to support a traditional experimental design. Total stem length and mortality were measured for all planted trees and were incorporated into a geographic information system. Planting early in the growing season, augering a larger diameter hole, and backfilling with clean, uncontaminated topsoil was cost effective and allowed for greater tree cutting growth and survival. PMID:21166278

  6. Diversity, distribution and hydrocarbon biodegradation capabilities of microbial communities in oil-contaminated cyanobacterial mats from a constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Abed, Raeid M M; Al-Kharusi, Samiha; Prigent, Stephane; Headley, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Various types of cyanobacterial mats were predominant in a wetland, constructed for the remediation of oil-polluted residual waters from an oil field in the desert of the south-eastern Arabian Peninsula, although such mats were rarely found in other wetland systems. There is scarce information on the bacterial diversity, spatial distribution and oil-biodegradation capabilities of freshwater wetland oil-polluted mats. Microbial community analysis by Automated Ribosomal Spacer Analysis (ARISA) showed that the different mats hosted distinct microbial communities. Average numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUsARISA) were relatively lower in the mats with higher oil levels and the number of shared OTUsARISA between the mats was <60% in most cases. Multivariate analyses of fingerprinting profiles indicated that the bacterial communities in the wetland mats were influenced by oil and ammonia levels, but to a lesser extent by plant density. In addition to oil and ammonia, redundancy analysis (RDA) showed also a significant contribution of temperature, dissolved oxygen and sulfate concentration to the variations of the mats' microbial communities. Pyrosequencing yielded 282,706 reads with >90% of the sequences affiliated to Proteobacteria (41% of total sequences), Cyanobacteria (31%), Bacteriodetes (11.5%), Planctomycetes (7%) and Chloroflexi (3%). Known autotrophic (e.g. Rivularia) and heterotrophic (e.g. Azospira) nitrogen-fixing bacteria as well as purple sulfur and non-sulfur bacteria were frequently encountered in all mats. On the other hand, sequences of known sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) were rarely found, indicating that SRBs in the wetland mats probably belong to yet-undescribed novel species. The wetland mats were able to degrade 53-100% of C12-C30 alkanes after 6 weeks of incubation under aerobic conditions. We conclude that oil and ammonia concentrations are the major key players in determining the spatial distribution of the wetland mats' microbial communities and that these mats contribute directly to the removal of hydrocarbons from oil field wastewaters. PMID:25514025

  7. Diversity, Distribution and Hydrocarbon Biodegradation Capabilities of Microbial Communities in Oil-Contaminated Cyanobacterial Mats from a Constructed Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Raeid M. M.; Al-Kharusi, Samiha; Prigent, Stephane; Headley, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Various types of cyanobacterial mats were predominant in a wetland, constructed for the remediation of oil-polluted residual waters from an oil field in the desert of the south-eastern Arabian Peninsula, although such mats were rarely found in other wetland systems. There is scarce information on the bacterial diversity, spatial distribution and oil-biodegradation capabilities of freshwater wetland oil-polluted mats. Microbial community analysis by Automated Ribosomal Spacer Analysis (ARISA) showed that the different mats hosted distinct microbial communities. Average numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUsARISA) were relatively lower in the mats with higher oil levels and the number of shared OTUsARISA between the mats was <60% in most cases. Multivariate analyses of fingerprinting profiles indicated that the bacterial communities in the wetland mats were influenced by oil and ammonia levels, but to a lesser extent by plant density. In addition to oil and ammonia, redundancy analysis (RDA) showed also a significant contribution of temperature, dissolved oxygen and sulfate concentration to the variations of the mats’ microbial communities. Pyrosequencing yielded 282,706 reads with >90% of the sequences affiliated to Proteobacteria (41% of total sequences), Cyanobacteria (31%), Bacteriodetes (11.5%), Planctomycetes (7%) and Chloroflexi (3%). Known autotrophic (e.g. Rivularia) and heterotrophic (e.g. Azospira) nitrogen-fixing bacteria as well as purple sulfur and non-sulfur bacteria were frequently encountered in all mats. On the other hand, sequences of known sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) were rarely found, indicating that SRBs in the wetland mats probably belong to yet-undescribed novel species. The wetland mats were able to degrade 53–100% of C12–C30 alkanes after 6 weeks of incubation under aerobic conditions. We conclude that oil and ammonia concentrations are the major key players in determining the spatial distribution of the wetland mats’ microbial communities and that these mats contribute directly to the removal of hydrocarbons from oil field wastewaters. PMID:25514025

  8. Evaluation of Dairy Whey as a Subsurface Reactive Barrier Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkiw, E.; Barcelona, M.; Kim, M.

    2006-05-01

    Subsurface permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) in remediation of contaminated ground water are currently being utilized and refined as an alternative/supplement to costly pump-and-treat remediation. Identification of efficient reactive materials that are effective in the long-term is essential for the ultimate success of PRBs in ground water remediation. A variety of enhancements have been used: oxidants, reductants or sorbents. Electron donors create/strengthen reducing conditions that are favorable for microbial degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Inexpensive, food-grade electron donors effectively enhance dechlorination activity, and those that are solids that can be slurried and then pressure grouted are the best candidates for maintaining an active biobarrier at low cost. Dried dairy whey (~70% alpha-lactose), a slowly dissolving solid, is a prime candidate. To determine the efficiency of whey in promoting dechlorination, it is essential to identify the aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways and perform quantitative analysis of breakdown products. We hypothesize that dissolved whey will undergo microbial degradation (aerobic and anaerobic) to form carboxylic acids, and that in a suboxic/reducing environment the anaerobic products will stimulate the microbial dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons PCE, TCE, and DCE. Analysis of the breakdown products in the absence as well as the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbons will result in the calculation of rate constants. Kinetics will, in turn, provide us with residence time, loading (whey mass), and projected lifetime of the whey PRB under estimated loads of total chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination. Early results from our field-scale effort to treat a TCE-contaminated site show increased concentrations of cis- DCE and VC downgradient from the whey PRBs, indicative of enhanced TCE dechlorination. Results from an initial microcosm experiment show complete disappearance of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of whey. Carboxylic acids appear to be the major products of whey degradation. We will attempt to draw metabolic pathways according to field as well as laboratory results and, ultimately, to apply laboratory reaction kinetics to the field and arrive at more reliable design criteria.

  9. Pyrene biotransformation products as biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in terrestrial Isopoda: concentration-response relationship, and field study in a contaminated forest.

    PubMed

    Stroomberg, Gerard J; Ariese, Freek; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; van Hattum, Bert; Velthorst, Nel H; van Straalen, Nico M

    2003-01-01

    In this study, biotransformation products of pyrene were measured in the hepatopancreas of terrestrial isopods as biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure. These products--pyrene-1-glucoside, pyrene-1-sulfate, an unknown pyrene conjugate, and 1-hydroxypyrene--were quantitated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. In a controlled exposure experiment, a linear relationship was established between pyrene exposure and pyrene metabolite concentrations in the hepatopancreas of Porcellio scaber Latr. To this end, isopods of the species P. scaber were exposed to a range of pyrene concentrations spiked to their food. A linear response was found for all pyrene conjugates in the range 0.67 to 67 microg/g of pyrene (dry wt). Hepatopancreatic pyrene metabolite concentrations were also measured in isopods (P. scaber and Oniscus asellus L.) from PAH-contaminated field sites. The sites and the inhabiting isopods were located in a gradient of atmospheric PAH deposition caused by a nearby blast furnace plant. The highest levels of conjugated 1-hydroxypyrene in the hepatopancreas were 3.8 pmol/g fresh weight (pyrene-1-glucoside) and 2.8 pmol/g fresh weight (pyrene-1-sulfate) (expressed on whole-body basis). The levels of the pyrene metabolites correlate with reported pyrene concentrations in spite of these sites. As pyrene is one of the most predominant PAHs, analysis of its metabolites provides a good tool for environmental risk assessment of ecosystems with regard to PAH exposure, bioavailability, and biotransformation. PMID:12503769

  10. Bioconcentration, biotransformation, and elimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) exposed to contaminated seawater.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Grete; Bechmann, Renee K; Bamber, Shaw D; Baussant, Thierry

    2004-06-01

    Sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were continuously exposed to two concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dissolved in seawater (sigma PAH = 7.57 and 72.31 microg/L) for 36 d, followed by 8 d of depuration. The PAHs studied were naphthalene (NPH or C0-NPH), phenanthrene (PHE or C0-PHE), pyrene (PYR), 2-methylnaphthalene (C1-NPH), 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene (C2-NPH), 2-isopropylnaphthalene (C3-NPH), 9-methylphenanthrene (C1-PHE), and 9-ethylphenanthrene (C2-PHE). Uptake rate constants (k1) for NPHs increased with increasing degree of alkylation and log value of the octanol/water partition coefficient (Kow), whereas k1 values for three- and four-ring PAHs were lower despite their high log Kow values. Elimination rate constants (k2) for the homologue series of NPHs and PHEs generally increased with decreasing degree of alkylation and log Kow values. However, the depuration time did not directly correlate with the molecular size for nonalkylated PAHs. Bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were estimated from the ratio of k1 to k2 and also directly from PAH concentrations in fish tissue and water samples, and the factors generated by the two methods were very similar. A significant positive correlation was determined between log BCFs and log Kow values for the series of C0- through C3-NPH at both low (r2 = 0.985, p = 0.0077) and high (r2 = 0.956, p = 0.022) exposures, although this correlation was not determined for all the PAHs studied. As a result of increased metabolism and/ or reduced bioavailability with increasing lipophilic character, the estimated BCFs for C0- through C2-PHE and PYR were generally lower than those for C0- through C3-NPH. The two exposure levels revealed minor variations in k1 and k2 values for parent PAHs and in the temporal pattern of PAH metabolite concentrations in bile. The present results indicate that the presence and nature of alkyl groups have a significant influence on the kinetics and metabolism of PAHs in fish. PMID:15376540

  11. Assessment of occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons via involuntary ingestion of soil from contaminated soils in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adetunde, Oluwatoyin T; Mills, Graham A; Olayinka, Kehinde O; Alo, Babajide I

    2014-01-01

    Soils from 12 sites in Lagos area, Nigeria impacted by anthropogenic activities were extracted by ultrasonication and analysed for the concentration of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The concentration of the sum of PAHs ranged from 0.2 to 254 ?g/g at these sites. The sum benzo[a]pyrene-equivalent dose (BaPeq) at the sites ranged from 0.0 (K, forest soil) to 16.7 ?g/g (C, the lubricating oil depot soil). Mean daily intake (MDI) for the composite soils samples when compared that of food revealed that some of the individual PAH in samples from sites A (Dump site), C (Depot and loading point for used for black oil), F (Dump site), G(petroleum depot), H (Roadside) and L (Car park) exceeded the recommended the recommended MDI threshold for food, indicating some risk associated with activities on these sites based on this ingestion estimate exceeded value. 8.2 × 10(-6), 7.1 × 10(-7), 1.2 × 10(-4), 4.9 × 10(-7), 7.3 × 10(-7), 1.4 × 10(-5), 7.9 × 10(-5), 4.6 × 10(-6), 3.4 × 10(-7), 2.4 × 10(-7), 2.2 × 10(-7) and 1.1 × 10(-4) estimated theoretical cancer risk (ER) for an adult with a body weight of 70 kg working on sites were composite soil samples A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K and L respectively were sampled. The ER from occupational exposure to surface soil based on oral ingestion were all higher than the target risk of 1 × 10(-6) for normal exposure but were all within the 1 × 10(-4) for extreme exposure for most of the sites except for site C and L. The differences in concentration and risk were related to the different activities (e.g., handling of petroleum products, open burning, bush burning) undertaken at these locations. However, it should be noted here that the resultant risk could be overestimated, since these calculations were based on an exhaustive extraction technique which may be different from uptake by the human guts (bioavailability study). PMID:25320853

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Subsurface clade of Geobacteraceae

    E-print Network

    Lovley, Derek

    undergoing in situ bioremediation; (2) an acetate-impacted aquifer that serves as an analog for the long-term acetate amendments proposed for in situ uranium bioremediation and (3) a petroleum-contaminated aquifer subsurface bioremediation of metal and organic contaminants. The ISME Journal (2007) 1, 663­677; doi:10

  13. Application of a fiber-optic NIR-EFA sensor system for in situ monitoring of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Buerck, J; Roth, S; Kraemer, K; Scholz, M; Klaas, N

    2001-05-01

    Interaction of analyte molecules with the evanescent wave of light guided in optical fibers is among the most promising novel sensing schemes that can be applied for environmental monitoring and on-line process analysis. By combining this measuring principle with the solid-phase extraction of analyte molecules into the polymer cladding of a fiber, it is possible to perform direct absorption measurements in the cladding, if the fiber is adapted to a conventional spectrometer/photometer. A big advantage of this arrangement is that the measurement is scarcely disturbed by matrix effects (background absorption of water in IR measurements, stray light due to turbidity in the sample). By using near-infrared (NIR) evanescent field absorption (EFA) measurements in quartz glass fibers coated with a hydrophobic silicone membrane it is possible to design and construct sensors for monitoring apolar hydrocarbons (HCs) in aqueous matrices.The paper presents a fiber-optic sensor system for the determination of aromatic HCs in groundwater or industrial wastewater. Generally, this instrument is suitable for quantitative in situ monitoring of pollutants such as aromatic solvents, fuels, mineral oils or chlorinated HCs with relatively low water saturation solubility (typically between 0.01 and 10 g l(-1)). The sensor probe is connected via all-silica fibers to a filter photometer developed at the IFIA, thus, allowing even remote analysis in a monitoring well. This portable instrument provides a total concentration signal of the organic compounds extracted into the fiber cladding by measuring the integral absorption at the 1st C--H overtone bands in the NIR spectral range. In situ measurements with the sensor system were performed in a groundwater circulation well at the VEGAS research facility of the University of Stuttgart (Germany). The NIR-EFA sensor system was tested within the frame of an experiment that was carried through in a tank containing sandy gravel with a groundwater-saturated aquifer, where soil and groundwater were contaminated with technical grade xylene. The goal of this experiment was to model and optimize the groundwater circulation well used for the remediation of the aquifer and soil surrounding the well. The sensor proved to trace reliably the total hydrocarbon concentration in the process water pumped from the well to a stripper column. Measurements were performed continuously over 4 months with C8 HC sum concentrations in the process water between 80 mg l(-1) down to the limit of detection, which is around 200 microg l(-1). It could be demonstrated that the fiber-optic sensor system is a valuable tool for near-real-time control of a remedial action technique and verification and documentation of its success. PMID:11267742

  14. Mantle hydrocarbons: Abiotic or biotic?

    SciTech Connect

    Sugisaki, Ryuichi; Mimura, Koichi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)] [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) and peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro and granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from field contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here {open_quotes}mantle hydrocarbons.{close_quotes} The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) {delta}{sup 13}C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about {minus}27{per_thousand}). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were inorganically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH{sub 4} at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C{sub 4}H{sub 10}. 76 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10. PMID:11541663

  16. Performance evaluation of different horizontal subsurface flow wetland types by characterization of flow behavior, mass removal and depth-dependent contaminant load.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Eva M; Maier, Uli; Grathwohl, Peter; Kuschk, Peter; Kaestner, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    For several pilot-scale constructed wetlands (CWs: a planted and unplanted gravel filter) and a hydroponic plant root mat (operating at two water levels), used for treating groundwater contaminated with BTEX, the fuel additive MTBE and ammonium, the hydrodynamic behavior was evaluated by means of temporal moment analysis of outlet tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs): hydraulic indices were related to contaminant mass removal. Detailed investigation of flow within the model gravel CWs allowed estimation of local flow rates and contaminant loads within the CWs. Best hydraulics were observed for the planted gravel filter (number of continuously stirred tank reactors N = 11.3, dispersion number = 0.04, Péclet number = 23). The hydroponic plant root mat revealed lower N and pronounced dispersion tendencies, whereby an elevated water table considerably impaired flow characteristics and treatment efficiencies. Highest mass removals were achieved by the plant root mat at low level: 98% (544 mg m?² d?¹), 78% (54 mg m?² d?¹) and 74% (893 mg m?² d?¹) for benzene, MTBE and ammonium-nitrogen, respectively. Within the CWs the flow behavior was depth-dependent, with the planting and the position of the outlet tube being key factors resulting in elevated flow rate and contaminant flux immediately below the densely rooted porous media zone in the planted CW, and fast bottom flow in the unplanted reference. PMID:23200508

  17. THE DOE COMPLEX-WIDE VADOSE ZONE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP: CHARACTERIZATION MODELING AND SIMULATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT FATE AND TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Lab (INEEL) was charged by DOE EM to develop a complex-wide science and technology roadmap for the characterization, modeling and simulation of the fate and transport of contamination in the vadose zone. Various types of hazardous, r...

  18. Sediment contamination of residential streams in the metropolitan Kansas City area, USA: Part I. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and pesticide-related compounds.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Huggins, D; Welker, G; Dias, J R; Ingersoll, C G; Murowchick, J B

    2010-10-01

    This is the first part of a study that evaluates the influence of nonpoint-source contaminants on the sediment quality of five streams within the metropolitan Kansas City area, central United States. Surficial sediment was collected in 2003 from 29 sites along five streams with watersheds that extend from the core of the metropolitan area to its development fringe. Sediment was analyzed for 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 3 common polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures (Aroclors), and 25 pesticiderelated compounds of eight chemical classes. Multiple PAHs were detected at more than 50% of the sites, and concentrations of total PAHs ranged from 290 to 82,150 microg/kg (dry weight). The concentration and frequency of detection of PAHs increased with increasing urbanization of the residential watersheds. Four- and five-ring PAH compounds predominated the PAH composition (73-100%), especially fluoranthene and pyrene. The PAH composition profiles along with the diagnostic isomer ratios [e.g., anthracene/(anthracene + phenanthrene), 0.16 +/- 0.03; fluoranthene/(fluoranthene + pyrene), 0.55 +/- 0.01)] indicate that pyrogenic sources (i.e., coal-tar-related operations or materials and traffic-related particles) may be common PAH contributors to these residential streams. Historicaluse organochlorine insecticides and their degradates dominated the occurrences of pesticide-related compounds, with chlordane and dieldrin detected in over or nearly 50% of the samples. The occurrence of these historical organic compounds was associated with past urban applications, which may continue to be nonpoint sources replenishing local streams. Concentrations of low molecular weight (LMW; two or three rings) and high molecular weight (HMW; four to six rings) PAHs covaried along individual streams but showed dissimilar distribution patterns between the streams, while the historical pesticide-related compounds generally increased in concentration downstream. Correlations were noted between LMW and HMW PAHs for most of the streams and between historical-use organochlorine compounds and total organic carbon and clay content of sediments for one of the streams (Brush Creek). Stormwater runoff transport modes are proposed to describe how the two groups of contaminants migrated and distributed in the streambed. PMID:20390412

  19. Immunoquantitation and microsomal monooxygenase activities of hepatic cytochromes P4501A and P4502B and chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant levels in polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Letcher, R J; Norstrom, R J; Lin, S; Ramsay, M A; Bandiera, S M

    1996-04-01

    Contamination of the Arctic ecosystem by anthropogenic compounds has resulted in exposure of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) to lipophilic chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) accumulated through the marine food web. Liver samples were collected from 16 adult male polar bears in the Canadian arctic and subjected to chemical analysis for CHCs and metabolites, determination of alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activities, and immunoquantitation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) protein levels. We report on the relationships between the hepatic microsomal levels of immunoreactive CYP1A and CYP2B isozymes, catalytic activities, and hepatic CHC and metabolite concentrations in polar bear. We specifically explored the influence of several CHCs on the induction of hepatic CYP in polar bear and the potential use of immunoassay quantitation as a bioindicator of CHC exposure. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) classed as CYP1A and mixed CYP1A/CYP2B inducers accounted for about 25% of the total PCB residues present (18,680 +/- 5053 ng/g lipid). CYP1A protein content correlated strongly with hepatic levels of PCBs, PCDDs (0.032 +/- 0.018 ng/g lipid, and PCDFs (0.011 +/- 0.007 ng/g lipid) and their corresponding toxic equivalents (TEQ, 0.377 +/- 0.182 ng/g lipid). Mono-ortho-CB-156, CB-157, and CB-105 were the predominant TEQ contributors. Correlations between CYP2B protein content and CHC residue levels in polar bear liver suggested that ortho-chlorine-substituted PCBs and chlordanes were the major contributors to CYP2B induction. CYP1A and CYP2B contents were therefore good indicators of CHC exposure in polar bear liver. Ethoxyresorufin, pentoxyresorufin, and benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylase activities increased with increasing CYP1A protein content up to protein levels of approximately 5 pmol/mg, suggesting that all three activities were primarily CYP1A-mediated. These results were substantiated by antibody inhibition experiments. In summary, immunoquantitated CYP1A and CYP2B isozymes are a more reliable measure of exposure to CHC inducers than alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activities in polar bear. PMID:8661337

  20. Ground Water Contamination by Crude Oil near Bemidji, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delin, G.N.; Essaid, H.I.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Lahvis, M.H.; Bekins, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-water contamination by crude oil, and other petroleum-based liquids, is a widespread problem. An average of 83 crude-oil spills occurred per year during 1994-96 in the United States, each spilling about 50,000 barrels of crude oil (U.S. Office of Pipeline Safety, electronic commun., 1997). An understanding of the fate of organic contaminants (such as oil and gasoline) in the subsurface is needed to design innovative and cost-effective remedial solutions at contaminated sites. A long-term, interdisciplinary research project sponsored by the U.G. Geological Survey (USGS) Toxic Substances Hydrology Program began in 1983 at a crude-oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota (fig. 1). The project involves research by scientists from the USGS and several academic institutions. This research is directed toward understanding the physical, chemical, and biological processes controlling the migration and fate of hydrocarbon contaminants in the subsurface. The goal is to provide information and methods to help evaluate the potential for, and long-term performance of, natural and enhanced bioremediation of hydrocarbon contamination across the nation. The crude-oil spill site near Bemidji is one of the better characterized sites of its kind in the world. Results of research conducted on processes affecting the migration and fate of crude oil in the environment have provided fundamental knowledge that has been used to remediate similar sites worldwide. The Bemidji research project was the first to document that the extent of crude-oil contamination at a site can be largely limited by natural attenuation. Scientists studying and documenting natural attenuation at other contaminated sites have used many of the methods and approaches developed at the Bemidji site.

  1. The DOE Vadose Zone Science and Technology Roadmap: A National Program to Address Characeterization, Monitoring and Simulation of Subsurface Contaminant Fate and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kowall, Stephen Jacob

    2001-02-01

    The vadose zone comprises the region lying between the earth’s surface and the top of the regional seasonal aquifer. Until recently contamination in the vadose zone was believed to remain relatively immobile. Thus, little attention was paid to understanding the nature of the vadose zone or the potential pathways for contaminants to migrate through it to the water table or other accessible environments. However, recent discoveries of contaminants migrating considerable distances through the vadose zone at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have changed many assumptions both about the nature and function of the vadose zone and the importance we place on understanding this region. As a result of several vadose zone surprises, DOE Environmental Management (EM) tasked the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to lead the development of a vadose zone science and technology roadmap. The roadmap is focused on identifying research spanning the next 25 years necessary to be able to better predict the fate and transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. This in turn will provide the basis for reducing scientific uncertainty in environmental remediation and, especially, vadose zone related long-term stewardship decisions across the DOE complex. Vadose zone issues are now recognized as a national problem affecting other federal agencies as well as state and municipal sites with similar problems. Over the next few decades, dramatic and fundamental advances in computing, communication, electronics and micro-engineered systems will transform our understanding of many aspects of the scientific and technical challenges we face today. The roadmap will serve to develop a common perspective on possible future science and technology needs in an effort to help make better R&D investment decisions.

  2. Self-potential and Complex Conductivity Monitoring of In Situ Hydrocarbon Remediation in Microbial Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Revil, A.; Ren, Z.; Karaoulis, M.; Mendonca, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater in both non-aqueous phase liquid and dissolved forms generated from spills and leaks is a wide spread environmental issue. Traditional cleanup of hydrocarbon contamination in soils and ground water using physical, chemical, and biological remedial techniques is often expensive and ineffective. Recent studies show that the microbial fuel cell (MFC) can simultaneously enhance biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil and groundwater and yield electricity. Non-invasive geophysical techniques such as self-potential (SP) and complex conductivity (induced polarization) have shown the potential to detect and characterize the nature of electron transport mechanism of in situ bioremediation of organic contamination plumes. In this study, we deployed both SP and complex conductivity in lab scale MFCs to monitor time-laps geophysical response of degradation of hydrocarbons by MFC. Two different sizes of MFC reactors were used in this study (DI=15 cm cylinder reactor and 94.5cm x 43.5 cm rectangle reactor), and the initial hydrocarbon concentration is 15 g diesel/kg soil. SP and complex conductivity measurements were measured using non-polarizing Ag/AgCl electrodes. Sensitivity study was also performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to test different electrode configurations. The SP measurements showed stronger anomalies adjacent to the MFC than locations afar, and both real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity are greater in areas close to MFC than areas further away and control samples without MFC. The joint use of SP and complex conductivity could in situ evaluate the dynamic changes of electrochemical parameters during this bioremediation process at spatiotemporal scales unachievable with traditional sampling methods. The joint inversion of these two methods to evaluate the efficiency of MFC enhanced hydrocarbon remediation in the subsurface.

  3. SUBSURFACE SOIL CONDITIONS BENEATH AND NEAR BUILDINGS AND THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON SOIL VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion. Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and enter indoor air spaces of overlying buildings. T...

  4. BLT-EC (Breach, Leach and Transport-Equilibrium Chemistry) data input guide. A computer model for simulating release and coupled geochemical transport of contaminants from a subsurface disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, R.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); [Ecodynamic Research Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sullivan, T.M.; Kinsey, R.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The BLT-EC computer code has been developed, implemented, and tested. BLT-EC is a two-dimensional finite element computer code capable of simulating the time-dependent release and reactive transport of aqueous phase species in a subsurface soil system. BLT-EC contains models to simulate the processes (container degradation, waste-form performance, transport, chemical reactions, and radioactive production and decay) most relevant to estimating the release and transport of contaminants from a subsurface disposal system. Water flow is provided through tabular input or auxiliary files. Container degradation considers localized failure due to pitting corrosion and general failure due to uniform surface degradation processes. Waste-form performance considers release to be limited by one of four mechanisms: rinse with partitioning, diffusion, uniform surface degradation, and solubility. Transport considers the processes of advection, dispersion, diffusion, chemical reaction, radioactive production and decay, and sources (waste form releases). Chemical reactions accounted for include complexation, sorption, dissolution-precipitation, oxidation-reduction, and ion exchange. Radioactive production and decay in the waste form is simulated. To improve the usefulness of BLT-EC, a pre-processor, ECIN, which assists in the creation of chemistry input files, and a post-processor, BLTPLOT, which provides a visual display of the data have been developed. BLT-EC also includes an extensive database of thermodynamic data that is also accessible to ECIN. This document reviews the models implemented in BLT-EC and serves as a guide to creating input files and applying BLT-EC.

  5. Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.

    2005-09-01

    The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation.

  6. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

    1998-05-19

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

  7. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Robert T. (Livermore, CA); Jackson, Kenneth J. (San Leandro, CA); Duba, Alfred G. (Livermore, CA); Chen, Ching-I (Danville, CA)

    1998-01-01

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

  8. Hydrocarbon entrapment in Alberta deep basin

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, R.M.

    1984-04-01

    Entrapment of hydrocarbon accumulations in the deepest region of the Alberta sedimentary basin is linked to certain principles of subsurface fluid flow behavior in generally tight sandstones, and to active hydrocarbon generation in adjacent source beds. Similar geologic conditions and associated deep-basin-type hydrocarbon accumulations no doubt exist in the deeper portions of other sedimentary basins. Deep-basin concepts of hydrocarbon entrapment are opposed to conventional ideas. Hydrocarbon-bearing sands in deep basin regions grade laterally updip into permeable water-bearing sands without reservoir barriers to segregate the fluids. Water-over-hydrocarbon contacts appear at the updip limits of the accumulations and generally are absent downdip. Original hydrocarbon accumulation pressures are usually less than projected formation-water pressures at common depth points. Deep-basin accumulations fed by active downdip source rocks may be in a dynamic state of slow, updip hydrocarbon migration. Hydrocarbons lost across the updip water/gas contact are replaced by new hydrocarbon influx from downdip source rocks. Prolonged hydrocarbon flux through deep-basin reservoirs may result in exceptionally low residual water saturations and favorable hydrocarbon relative permeabilities in tight sandstones. These unusual physical principles of the Alberta deep-basin hydrocarbon accumulations are illustrated by Elmworth field examples and by physical fluid flow models.

  9. Comprehensive re-analysis of archived herring gull eggs reconstructs historical temporal trends in chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination in Lake Ontario and Green Bay, Lake Michigan, 1971-1982.

    PubMed

    Norstrom, Ross J; Hebert, Craig E

    2006-08-01

    Herring gull egg homogenates collected between 1971 and 1982 from a colony in central Lake Ontario (Scotch Bonnet Island) and from a colony in central Green Bay, Lake Michigan (Big Sister Island) were archived in the Canadian Wildlife Service Specimen Bank. Pooled samples (N = 10) were exhaustively analyzed in 1993 for a wide range of individual chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant (CHC) compounds: DDT, mirex and chlordane compounds and metabolites, chlorobenzenes (CBzs), dieldrin, chlorostyrenes (CSs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and 87 PCB congeners, including the TCDD-like non-ortho and mono-ortho congeners. PCBs and DDTs were the dominant residues in eggs from both Lake Ontario (31-242 mg kg(-1) and 9-64 mg kg(-1)) and Green Bay (34-133 mg kg(-1) and 14-91 mg kg(-1)). SigmaPCBs declined by a factor of 4-5 and DDTs a factor of 4-7 at both colonies between 1971 and 1982. Lake Ontario eggs had significantly higher residues of 2,3,7,8-TCDD (0.2-2.0 microg kg(-1)), HCBz (0.1-4.7 mg kg(-1)), OCS (0.03-0.45 mg kg(-1)), three HpCSs (0.13-0.97 mg kg(-1)), mirex and mirex photodegradation products (2.1-9.2 mg kg(-1)) than Green Bay eggs. HCBz levels in Lake Ontario eggs declined a factor of 40, TCDD and chlorostyrenes a factor of 8-10, and mirex a factor of 4 between 1971-1978. Green Bay eggs had slightly higher levels of chlordane-related compounds, dieldrin and beta-HCH than Lake Ontario eggs. There were no consistent or strong trends in residue levels of these pesticides, PCDDs (except TCDD) and PCDFs in either lake, indicating that rates of input and removal of these CHCs in the lakes were much closer in the early 1970s than was the case for the other compounds. PMID:16896467

  10. Chemical characterization and bioactivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from non-oxidative thermal treatment of pyrene-contaminated soil at 250-1,000 degrees C.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, H; Risoul, V; Lafleur, A L; Plummer, E F; Howard, J B; Peters, W A

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we report yields, identities, and mutagenicities of products from heating a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated, Superfund-related synthetic soil matrix without exogenous oxygen. We heated batch samples of soil pretreated with 5.08 wt% (by weight) pyrene in a tubular furnace under a constant flow of helium gas at 250, 500, 750, and 1,000 +/- 20 degrees C. Dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of cooled residues of heated soil and of volatiles condensed on a cold finger after 1 sec residence time at furnace temperature were assayed gravimetrically and analyzed for PAH by HPLC, HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. All four temperatures volatilized pyrene and generated other PAHs, including alkylated pyrenes. We detected bioactive PAHs in the product volatiles: cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) at 750 and 1,000 degrees C and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) at 1,000 degrees C. We found a clean soil residue, i.e., no pyrene or other DCM extracts, only at 750 degrees C. Control experiments with uncontaminated soil, pyrene, and Ottawa sand plus 4.89 wt% pyrene revealed no CPP or BaP production from soil itself, but these experiments imply that pyrene interactions with soil, e.g., soil-bound silica, stimulate CPP and BaP production. We detected mutagenicity to human diploid lymphoblasts (in vitro) in volatiles from 1,000 degrees C heating of soil plus pyrene and sand plus pyrene, and in the residue from 500 degrees C heating of soil plus pyrene. Three plausible pathways for pyrene conversion to other PAHs are a) a reaction with light gas species, e.g., soil- or pyrene-derived acetylene; b) loss of C(2)-units followed by reaction with a PAH; and c) dimerization with further molecular weight growth via cyclodehydrogenation. This study shows that thermal treatment of PAH-polluted soil may generate toxic by-products that require further cleanup by oxidation or other measures. Images Figure 2 PMID:10964790

  11. Mineralogic Residence and Desorption Rates of Sorbed 90Sr in Contaminated Subsurface Sediments: Implications to Future Behavior and In-Ground Stability

    SciTech Connect

    PIs: John M. Zachara; Jim P. McKinley; S. M. Heald; Chongxuan Liu; Peter C. Lichtner

    2006-06-01

    The project is investigating the adsorption/desorption process of 90Sr in coarse-textured pristine and contaminated Hanford sediment with the goal to define a generalized reaction-based model for use in reactive transport calculations. While it is known that sorbed 90Sr exists in an ion exchangeable state, the mass action relationships that control the solid-liquid distribution and the mineral phases responsible for adsorption have not been defined. Many coarse-textured Hanford sediment display significant sorptivity for 90Sr, but contain few if any fines that may harbor phyllosilicates with permanent negative charge and associated cation exchange capacity. Moreover, it is not known whether the adsorption-desorption process exhibits time dependence within context of transport, and if so, the causes for kinetic behavior.

  12. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of micro

  13. Ground-water, surface-water, and bottom-sediment contamination in the O-field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and the possible effects of selected remedial actions on ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Oliveros, James P.

    1995-01-01

    Disposal of munitions and chemical-warfare substances has introduced inorganic and organic contaminants to the ground water, surface water, and bottom sediment at O-Field, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contaminants include chloride, arsenic, transition metals, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, and organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds. The hydrologic effects of several remedial actions were estimated by use of a ground-water-flow model. The remedial actions examined were an impermeable covering, encapsulation, subsurface barriers, a ground-water drain, pumping of wells to manage water levels or to remove contaminated ground water for treatment, and no action.

  14. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  15. Natural attenuation: What does the subsurface have in store?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilfred F. M. Röling; Henk W. van Verseveld

    2002-01-01

    Throughout the world, organic and inorganic substances leach intothe subsurface as a result of human activities and accidents. There, the chemicals pose director indirect threats to the environment and to increasingly scarce drinking water resources.At many contaminated sites the subsurface is able to attenuate pollutants which, potentially,lowers the costs of remediation. Natural attenuation comprises a wide range of processesof which

  16. Probabilistic Risk Assessment in Subsurface Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present a general framework for probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for subsurface modeling. PRA provides a natural venue for the rigorous quantification of structural (model) and parametric uncertainties inherent in predictions of subsurface flow and transport. A typical PRA starts by identifying relevant components of a subsurface system (e.g., a buried solid-waste tank, an aquitard, a remediation effort) and proceeds by using uncertainty quantification techniques to estimate the probabilities of their failure. These probabilities are then combined by means of fault-tree analyses to yield probabilistic estimates of the risk of system failure (e.g., aquifer contamination). To illustrate this general PRA framework, we discuss several examples ranging from subsurface remediation to underground excavation.

  17. Contamination status and possibility of toxic effects of co-planar polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane in large japanese field mouse (Apodemus speciosus) collected from Hokkaido and Aomori.

    PubMed

    Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Fujita, Shoichi; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2014-08-01

    Contamination levels of coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Co-PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs) were measured in the entire body of the large Japanese field mouse (Apodemus speciosus) collected from Hokkaido (Ishikari and Rankoshi) and Aomori prefecture (Takko) in Japan. Higher concentrations of PCBs including Co-PCBs, were observed in the mice collected from Ishikari than those from Rankoshi. The concentration of PAHs in the soil from Ishikari was also higher than that in the other sampling sites. The findings suggest that Ishikari is the most polluted area, probably because of human activities, depending on the population distribution. However, the observed contaminant levels were extremely lower compared to those in previous studies. The ratio of testis weight to body weight (TW/BW) was the lowest in the mice collected from Ishikari, which is the area contaminated with PAHs and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE). However, the serum testosterone levels of mice from the Ishikari area were higher than those from the non-contaminated other areas although no significant differences. Previous studies have shown that a low-level exposure to dioxin related compounds (DRCs) disturbances in sexual function, resulting in the production of testosterone. This study showed that POPs exposure is one of the possibility of the high testosterone concentration in the mice of the Ishikari area in addition to a cause of biological and environmental factors such as habitat density, age, temperatures and/or food riches. PMID:25282952

  18. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, S.S.; Chang, Y.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Funk, E.W.

    1988-06-14

    Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

  19. Biological Remediation of Petroleum Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhad, Ramesh Chander; Gupta, Rishi

    Large volumes of hazardous wastes are generated in the form of oily sludges and contaminated soils during crude oil transportation and processing. Although many physical, chemical and biological treatment technologies are available for petroleum contaminants petroleum contaminants in soil, biological methods have been considered the most cost-effective. Practical biological remediation methods typically involve direct use of the microbes naturally occurring in the contaminated environment and/or cultured indigenous or modified microorganisms. Environmental and nutritional factors, including the properties of the soil, the chemical structure of the hydrocarbon(s), oxygen, water, nutrient availability, pH, temperature, and contaminant bioavailability, can significantly affect the rate and the extent of hydrocarbon biodegradation hydrocarbon biodegradation by microorganisms in contaminated soils. This chapter concisely discusses the major aspects of bioremediation of petroleum contaminants.

  20. Using NMR decay-time measurements to monitor and characterize DNAPL and moisture in subsurface porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy A. White; Russel C. Hertzog; Christian Straley

    2007-12-01

    Knowing how environmental properties affect dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) solvent flow in the subsurface is essential for developing models of flow and transport in the vadose zone necessary for designing remediation and long-term stewardship strategies. For example, one must know if solvents are flowing in water-wetted or solvent-wetted environments, the pore-size distribution of the region containing DNAPLs, and the impact of contaminated plumes and their transport mechanisms in porous media. Our research investigates the capability and limitations of low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation decay-rate measurements for determining environmental properties affecting DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface. The measurements that can be performed with the laboratory low-field system can also be performed in situ in the field with the current generation of commercial borehole logging tools. The oil and gas industry uses NMR measurements in deep subsurface, consolidated formations to determine porosity and hydrocarbon content and to estimate formation permeability. These determinations rely on the ability of NMR to distinguish between water and hydrocarbons in the pore space and to obtain the distribution of pore sizes from relaxation decay-rate distributions. In this paper we will show how NMR measurement techniques can be used to characterize, monitor, and evaluate the dynamics of mixed-fluids (water-DNAPL) in unconsolidated near-surface porous environments and describe the use of proton NMR T2 (spin-spin relaxation time) measurements in unconsolidated sandy-soil samples to identify and characterize the presence of DNAPLs in these environments. The potential of NMR decay-rate distributions for characterizing DNAPL fluids in the subsurface and understanding their flow mechanisms has not previously been exploited; however, near-surface unsaturated vadose zone environments do provide unique challenges for using NMR measurements. These challenges are addressed through systematic laboratory experiments and a program of research to extend and adapt current field NMR measurements to near-surface environmental problems.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) burden of mussels ( Mytilus sp.) in different marine environments in relation with sediment PAH contamination, and bioavailability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Baumard; H Budzinski; P Garrigues; J. F Narbonne; T Burgeot; X Michel; J Bellocq

    1999-01-01

    Sediments and mussels (Mytilus edulis, Mytilus galloprovincialis) were sampled in different European coastal environments (Germany, France, Spain) and analysed for their polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content by Gas Chromatography\\/Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Bioaccumulation factors of individual compounds from the sediment were calculated and discussed according to the compound solubility. The mussels showed different accumulation patterns according to the pollution source they

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND MONITORING: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE USE OF NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The collective processes that constitute the broadly used term Anatural attenuation,@ as it relates to subsurface remediation of contaminants, refer to the physical, chemical, and biological interactions that, without human intervention, reduce or contain contaminants in the sub...

  3. Advances in Understanding Sorption and Transport Processes Affecting the Fate of Environmental Pollutants in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapanagioti, H. K.; Werner, D.; Werth, C.

    2012-04-01

    The results of a call for a special issue that is now in press by the Journal of Contaminant Hydrology will be presented. This special issue is edited by the authors and is entitled "Sorption and Transport Processes Affecting the Fate of Environmental Pollutants in the Subsurface". A short abstract of each paper will be presented along with the most interesting results. Nine papers were accepted. Pollutants studied include: biocolloids, metals (arsenic, chromium, nickel), organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, micropollutants (PAHs, PCBs), pesticides (glyphosate, 2,4-D). Findings presented in the papers include a modified batch reactor system to study equilibrium-reactive transport problems of metals. Column studies along with theoretical approximations evaluate the combined effects of grain size and pore water velocity on the transport in water saturated porous media of three biocolloids. A polluted sediment remediation method is evaluated considering site-specific conditions through monitoring results and modelling. A field study points to glogging and also sorption as mechanisms affecting the effectiveness of sub-surface flow constructed wetlands. A new isotherm model combining modified traditionally used isotherms is proposed that can be used to simulate pH-dependent metal adsorption. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) demonstrate ability to predict slight isotope shifts into the groundwater due to sorption. Possible modifications that improve the reliability of kinetic models and parameter values during the evaluation of experiments that assess the sorption of pesticides on soils are tested. Challenges in selecting groundwater pollutant fate and transport models that account for the effect of grain-scale sorption rate limitations are evaluated based on experimental results and are discussed based on the Damköhler number. Finally, a thorough review paper presents the impact of mineral micropores on the transport and fate of organic contaminants especially when the porous geological media have very low organic carbon contents.

  4. PREDICTING BIOTRANSFORMATIONS IN THE SUBSURFACE: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE ATP (ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE) CONTENT OF SUBSURFACE MATERIAL AND THE CAPACITY OF SUBSURFACE ORGANISMS TO DEGRADE TOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deeper subsurface material was collected in a manner that prevented contamination by surface microorganisms. This material was analyzed for ATP content, and for its capacity to degrade toluene, a common organic contaminant of ground water originating from release of petroleum pro...

  5. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  6. Microcosm studies of subsurface PAH-degrading bacteria from a former manufactured gas plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neal D. Durant; Liza P. Wilson; Edward J. Bouwer

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the potential for natural in situ biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) in the subsurface at the site of a former manufactured gas plant. Fifty-seven samples of unconsolidated subsurface sediments were aseptically obtained from five boreholes across the site. Bacteria capable of aerobically degrading PAH's without an acclimation period were detected throughout shallow (2.7

  7. Assays of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in actually contaminated soils using transgenic tobacco plants carrying a recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated ?-glucuronidase reporter gene expression system

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Hideyuki; Gion, Keiko; Utani, Yasushi; Wakai, Taketo; Kodama, Susumu; Eun, Heesoo; Kim, Yun-Seok; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 carrying the recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor XD4V-mediated ?-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene expression system was used for assay of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds consisting of polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Co-PCBs) in actually contaminated soils. The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 showed a significant dose-dependent induced GUS activity when cultured on MS medium containing PCB126 [toxic equivalency factor (TEF) = 0.1]. In contrast, PCB169 and PCB180, which have 0.03 of TEF and unassigned TEF values, respectively, did not significantly induce GUS activity under the same conditions as with PCB126. When the tobacco plants were cultivated for up to 5 weeks on actually contaminated soils with dioxins and dioxin-like compounds collected from the periphery of an incinerator used for disposal of life and industrial wastes, GUS activity in the leaves was dose-dependently increased. The plants clearly detected 360 pg-TEQ g?1 of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in this assay. There was a positive correlation between GUS activity and TEQ value of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in the plants. This assay does not require any extraction and purification processes for the actually contaminated soil samples. PMID:22428884

  8. Oxygenated gasoline release in the unsaturated zone, Part 2: Downgradient transport of ethanol and hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Juliana G.; Doulatyari, Behnam; Molson, John W.; Barker, James F.

    2011-07-01

    In the event of a gasoline spill containing oxygenated compounds such as ethanol and MTBE, it is important to consider the impacts these compounds might have on subsurface contamination. One of the main concerns commonly associated with ethanol is that it might decrease the biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, leading to an increase in the hydrocarbon dissolved plume lengths. The first part of this study (Part 1) showed that when gasoline containing ethanol infiltrates the unsaturated zone, ethanol is likely to partition to and be retained in the unsaturated zone pore water. In this study (Part 2), a controlled field test is combined with a two-dimensional laboratory test and three-dimensional numerical modelling to investigate how ethanol retention in the unsaturated zone affects the downgradient behaviour of ethanol and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds. Ethanol transport downgradient was extremely limited. The appearance of ethanol in downgradient wells was delayed and the concentrations were lower than would be expected based on equilibrium dissolution. Oscillations in the water table resulted in minor flushing of ethanol, but its effect could still be perceived as an increase in the groundwater concentrations downgradient from the source zone. Ethanol partitioning to the unsaturated zone pore water reduced its mass fraction within the NAPL thus reducing its anticipated impact on the fate of the hydrocarbon compounds. A conceptual numerical simulation indicated that the potential ethanol-induced increase in benzene plume length after 20 years could decrease from 136% to 40% when ethanol retention in the unsaturated zone is considered.

  9. Manganese peroxidase mRNA and enzyme activity levels during bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil with Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, B.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Schoenike, B.; Lamar, R.T.; Cullen, D. [Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-07-01

    mRNA extraction from soil and quantitation by competitive reverse transcription-PCR were combined to study the expression of three manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes during removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium grown in presterilized soil. Periods of high mnp transcript levels and extractable MnP enzyme activity were temporally correlated, although separated by a short (1- to 2-day) lag period. This time frame also coincided with maximal rates of fluorene oxidation and chrysene disappearance in soil cultures, supporting the hypothesis that high ionization potential polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are oxidized in soil via MnP-dependent mechanisms. The patterns of transcript abundance over time in soil-grown P. chrysosporium were similar for all three of the mnp mRNAs studied, indicating that transcription of this gene family may be coordinately regulated under these growth conditions. 47 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Reproductive success and chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination in tree swallows ( Tachycineta bicolor) nesting along rivers receiving pulp and paper mill effluent discharges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L Harris; J. E Elliott

    2000-01-01

    The insectivorous tree swallow was chosen as an indicator species to investigate the uptake of pulp mill-related chlorinated hydrocarbons from emergent aquatic insects. Nest box populations were monitored for reproductive success at locations upstream and downstream of pulp mills on two river systems in British Columbia, Canada. Also, 16-day-old nestlings were collected and analysed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins

  11. Field Measurements of Electro-osmotic Transport of Ground Water Contaminants in a Lithologically Heterogeneous Alluvial-Fan Setting

    SciTech Connect

    McNab,W; Karachewski,J; Weismann,G

    2001-07-31

    Remediation of contaminated ground water by pump-and-treat approaches is often problematic because the heterogeneous distributions of lithologies, and hence hydraulic conductivities, characterizing many aquifers result in complex flow paths. Consequently, contaminants are removed readily from the most permeable regions of the subsurface but the less permeable sediments, rich in clay and silt, remain largely undisturbed. These continue to act as diffusion-limited sources for further contamination of the permeable sediments. Under certain circumstances, specialized technologies, such as electrokinetic approaches, may be useful for enhancing the removal of ground water from low-permeability sediments. These circumstances generally include high contaminant concentrations--hence posing a chronic source threat--and a relatively small area requiring treatment. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California, electro-osmosis (EO) is being evaluated as a means for extracting ground water containing trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chlorinated hydrocarbons from fine-grained sediments in a plume source area.

  12. BIOPLUME MODEL FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY OXYGEN LIMITED BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of the organic pollutants entering ground water are potentially biodegradable in the subsurface. This potential has been demonstrated in aquifers contaminated by wood-creosoting process wastes. The persistence of many of these organic compounds in the subsurface indicated ...

  13. PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN COASTAL GREAT LAKES WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoinduced toxicity is the exacerbated toxicity of environmental contaminants by UV radiation. Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been well established in the laboratory for numerous aquatic species including larval fish. The contaminants sub-p...

  14. Utilizing of hydrocarbon contamination for prevention of the surface charge-up at electron-beam assisted chemical etching of a diamond chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Miyamoto, Iwao; Ohno, Naoto; Honda, Satoshi

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam assisted chemical etching (EBACE) with oxygen gas is not applicable for direct fine patterning of diamond devices, because the diamond is an electrical insulator and electron beam impingement of the diamond causes the surface charge-up. It is possible to form conductive layer of hydrocarbon on the diamond surface by electron beam irradiation in the atmosphere of diffusion pump oil vapors. In this paper, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with oxygen gas introduction system was used for EBACE of the diamond. It was found by in-situ SEM observation that rectangular patterns with several ?m 2 area and sub-?m depth were formed on the diamond chip.

  15. Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE)

    1985-12-31

    A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

  16. Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

    1984-09-29

    A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

  17. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or solvents. These hydrocarbons have a very low viscosity. This means that they are very very thin ... signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure. The following tests may be done: Blood gas ...

  18. Dispersants as Used in Response to the MC252-Spill Lead to Higher Mobility of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Oil-Contaminated Gulf of Mexico Sand

    PubMed Central

    Zuijdgeest, Alissa; Huettel, Markus

    2012-01-01

    After the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, large volumes of crude oil were washed onto and embedded in the sandy beaches and sublittoral sands of the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Some of this oil was mechanically or chemically dispersed before reaching the shore. With a set of laboratory-column experiments we show that the addition of chemical dispersants (Corexit 9500A) increases the mobility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in saturated permeable sediments by up to two orders of magnitude. Distribution and concentrations of PAHs, measured in the solid phase and effluent water of the columns using GC/MS, revealed that the mobility of the PAHs depended on their hydrophobicity and was species specific also in the presence of dispersant. Deepest penetration was observed for acenaphthylene and phenanthrene. Flushing of the columns with seawater after percolation of the oiled water resulted in enhanced movement by remobilization of retained PAHs. An in-situ benthic chamber experiment demonstrated that aromatic hydrocarbons are transported into permeable sublittoral sediment, emphasizing the relevance of our laboratory column experiments in natural settings. We conclude that the addition of dispersants permits crude oil components to penetrate faster and deeper into permeable saturated sands, where anaerobic conditions may slow degradation of these compounds, thus extending the persistence of potentially harmful PAHs in the marine environment. Application of dispersants in nearshore oil spills should take into account enhanced penetration depths into saturated sands as this may entail potential threats to the groundwater. PMID:23209777

  19. Bacteria associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi within roots of plants growing in a soil highly contaminated with aliphatic and aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Iffis, Bachir; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) belong to phylum Glomeromycota, an early divergent fungal lineage forming symbiosis with plant roots. Many reports have documented that bacteria are intimately associated with AMF mycelia in the soil. However, the role of these bacteria remains unclear and their diversity within intraradical AMF structures has yet to be explored. We aim to assess the bacterial communities associated within intraradical propagules (vesicles and intraradical spores) harvested from roots of plant growing in the sediments of an extremely petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted basin. Solidago rugosa roots were sampled, surface-sterilized, and microdissected. Eleven propagules were randomly collected and individually subjected to whole-genome amplification, followed by PCRs, cloning, and sequencing targeting fungal and bacterial rDNA. Ribotyping of the 11 propagules showed that at least five different AMF OTUs could be present in S. rugosa roots, while 16S rRNA ribotyping of six of the 11 different propagules showed a surprisingly high bacterial richness associated with the AMF within plant roots. Most dominant bacterial OTUs belonged to Sphingomonas sp., Pseudomonas sp., Massilia sp., and Methylobacterium sp. This study provides the first evidence of the bacterial diversity associated with AMF propagules within the roots of plants growing in extremely petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted conditions. PMID:25039790

  20. Spreadsheet log analysis in subsurface geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doveton, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Most of the direct knowledge of the geology of the subsurface is gained from the examination of core and drill-cuttings recovered from boreholes drilled by the petroleum and water industries. Wireline logs run in these same boreholes generally have been restricted to tasks of lithostratigraphic correlation and thee location of hydrocarbon pay zones. However, the range of petrophysical measurements has expanded markedly in recent years, so that log traces now can be transformed to estimates of rock composition. Increasingly, logs are available in a digital format that can be read easily by a desktop computer and processed by simple spreadsheet software methods. Taken together, these developments offer accessible tools for new insights into subsurface geology that complement the traditional, but limited, sources of core and cutting observations.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shigeaki Harayama

    1997-01-01

    Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to be mutagenic or carcinogenic, and their contamination in soil and aquifer is of great environmental concern. Limited numbers of microorganisms including mycobacteria, Sphingomonas and white rot fungi were found to be capable of degrading PAHs with four or more fused aromatic rings. In white rot fungi, lignin peroxidases are believed to be

  2. In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon and other organic compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. Alleman; A. Leeson

    1999-01-01

    From supertanker oil spills to the leaking underground storage tank at the corner gas station, contamination from petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and other organic compounds is an environmental concern that affects nearly every small hamlet and major metropolis throughout the world. Moreover, the world`s rivers, estuaries, and oceans are threatened by contamination from petroleum leaks and spills. Fortunately, most petroleum hydrocarbons

  3. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-06-30

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

  4. Chemical data quantify Deepwater Horizon hydrocarbon flow rate and environmental distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ryerson, Thomas B.; Camilli, Richard; Kessler, John D.; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Valentine, David L.; Atlas, Elliot; Blake, Donald R.; de Gouw, Joost; Meinardi, Simone; Parrish, David D.; Peischl, Jeff; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Warneke, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Detailed airborne, surface, and subsurface chemical measurements, primarily obtained in May and June 2010, are used to quantify initial hydrocarbon compositions along different transport pathways (i.e., in deep subsurface plumes, in the initial surface slick, and in the atmosphere) during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Atmospheric measurements are consistent with a limited area of surfacing oil, with implications for leaked hydrocarbon mass transport and oil drop size distributions. The chemical data further suggest relatively little variation in leaking hydrocarbon composition over time. Although readily soluble hydrocarbons made up ?25% of the leaking mixture by mass, subsurface chemical data show these compounds made up ?69% of the deep plume mass; only ?31% of the deep plume mass was initially transported in the form of trapped oil droplets. Mass flows along individual transport pathways are also derived from atmospheric and subsurface chemical data. Subsurface hydrocarbon composition, dissolved oxygen, and dispersant data are used to assess release of hydrocarbons from the leaking well. We use the chemical measurements to estimate that (7.8 ± 1.9) × 106 kg of hydrocarbons leaked on June 10, 2010, directly accounting for roughly three-quarters of the total leaked mass on that day. The average environmental release rate of (10.1 ± 2.0) × 106 kg/d derived using atmospheric and subsurface chemical data agrees within uncertainties with the official average leak rate of (10.2 ± 1.0) × 106 kg/d derived using physical and optical methods. PMID:22233807

  5. Enhanced Hydrocarbons Degradation in the Rhizosphere of Mangrove Plants by a Halophilic Bacillus Subtilis Subtilis Strain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Yateem; T. Al-Sharrah

    2011-01-01

    Sulaibikhat Embayment is a severely contaminated coastline in the State of Kuwait. The contaminating pollutants include hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and suspended particles. The objective of this study is to assess the ability of mangroves planted in the Sulaibikhat Embayment to enhance hydrocarbons degradation by the activities of rhizospheric hydrocarbon degrading bacteria (HDB). Accordingly, samples were collected from the rhizosphere of

  6. Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Calle

    2000-11-01

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements.

  7. Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Fletcher, Madilyn

    2001-05-01

    Jim contributed a chapter to this book, in addition to co-editing it with Madilyn Fletcher. Fredrickson, J. K., and M. Fletcher. (eds.) 2001 Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry. Wiley-Liss, Inc., New York.

  8. FINAL REPORT FOR GRANT NUMBER DE-FG02-06ER64244 TO THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO (RW SMITH) - COUPLING BETWEEN FLOW AND PRECIPITATION IN HETEROGENEOUS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS AND EFFECTS ON CONTAMINANT FATE AND TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert, W.; Beig, Mikala, S.; Gebrehiwet, Tsigabu; Corriveau, Catherine, E.; Redden, George; Fujita, Yoshiko

    2010-06-18

    Engineered remediation strategies for inducing mineral precipitation in the subsurface typically involve the introduction of at least one reactant either by direct injection or by in situ generation. The localization of reactant sources means a wide range of saturation states and ion ratios will be created as reactants are mixed: These conditions together can result in a wide range of precipitation rates, as well as impact which mineral phase precipitates. This is potentially important for the capacity of the precipitates to take up of trace metal contaminants, for their long term stability. Aragonite, for example, is able to sequester a larger amount of Sr than calcite. However, aragonite is less stable under typical groundwater conditions, and so may release sequestered Sr over time as the aragonite transforms to a more stable phase. In addition, previous experimental studies have indicated that other system constituents may influence calcium carbonate precipitation and consequently the Sr uptake potential of a system. For example, dissolved organic carbon (at levels typical of groundwaters) can suppress crystal growth. As a result, the continuous nucleation of small crystals, rather than growth of existing crystals, may be the dominant mode of precipitation. This has the potential for greater uptake of Sr because the smaller crystal sizes associated with nucleated calcite may more readily accommodate the distortion resulting from substitution of the larger Sr ion for Ca ions than can larger crystals. However, these smaller crystals may also be less stable and over the long term release Sr as a result of Ostwald ripening. To better understand the formation and composition of relevant calcium carbonate mineral phases two related series of mineral precipitation experiments were conducted. The first series of experiments, conducted using a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) operated at steady state rates of precipitation was focused on understanding the influence of pH and ammonium carbonate (the hydrolysis product of urea: ureolytically driven calcium carbonate precipitation has been demonstrated to be a promising method of inducing mineral precipitation in the field) on calcium carbonate polymorph and Sr co-precipitation. The second series of experiments, conducted at constant pH and saturation state, was focused on understanding the influence of aqueous carbonate to calcium ratios on the precipitation rate of calcite. In 12 CSTR experiments (three pH levels, two ammonium carbonate levels, and two strontium levels) we found that lower pH values and ammonium carbonate concentration promoted the precipitation of calcite and the higher pH values and ammonium carbonate concentration promoted the precipitation of aragonite (as determined by X-ray diffraction). Overall, the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation increased with increasing pH and ammonium carbonate concentration, consistent with increasing values of Q/K. Intermediate conditions resulted in the precipitation of a mixture of calcite and aragonite. There was no discernible effect of strontium on the rate of precipitation or the phase precipitated. In our experiments we precipitated rhombohedral calcite, lath-shaped aragonite and inter-grown calcite-aragonite mixtures. Using Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer we characterized the composition of solids from an experiment in which both calcite and aragonite precipitates were identified by X-ray diffraction. We found a range in composition from a high Sr and low Mg phase (inferred to be aragonite) to a coexisting lower Sr and higher but variable Mg phase (inferred to be calcite). Values of the distribution coefficient for strontium of 1.1 and 0.2 for aragonite and calcite, respectively were estimated from the data. These values compare to values of 1.1 and 0.1 for aragonite and calcite, respectively, determined from bulk analysis of precipitates from experiments in which only calcite or only aragonite were detected. In our experiments to assess the influence of solution composition on p

  9. Microbial Diversity in the Columbia River Basalt Group and the Context for Life in Subsurface Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalleur, H. J.; Smith, A.; Fisk, M. R.; Colwell, F. S.

    2012-12-01

    Large igneous provinces constitute a sizable volume of porous and fractured materials in the Earth's crust and many of these environments exist within the boundaries of survival for subsurface life. The results of microbiological studies of basalts and other igneous materials in subsurface settings hint at the types of microbes that dwell in these environments. We investigated the microbes in aquifers in the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and also considered the microbial communities in subsurface basalts more broadly to determine if there are recurrent themes in the types of microbes and the nature of diversity present in these geological systems. Bacteria and Archaea collected from five intervals in the CRBG were examined using high-throughput DNA sequencing directed at the 16S rRNA genes. The highest bacterial biomass and the highest bacterial diversity were observed in the deepest samples (>1018 meters below land surface) whereas the highest archaeal diversity was detected in the shallowest samples (<449 mbls). Microbes classified as Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria dominated the aquifers. These findings are generally consistent with earlier cultivation- and clone library-based studies performed on microbes from the CRBG and the Snake River Plain aquifer. Microbes associated with marine basalts are similar to those found in terrestrial settings and include Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, candidate division bacterium OP1, Euryarchaeota, and Crenarchaeota. Based on 16S rRNA sequence similarities to known microbes, both basaltic regions have taxa with representative physiologies likely to include hydrogen oxidation, iron and sulfur metabolism, acetogenesis, and hydrocarbon metabolism. Research on the microbiology of basalt rich provinces on the planet has informed our understanding of biogeochemical cycling where igneous rocks dominate. The knowledge gained in these investigations also promotes our ability to verify the remediation of contaminants and the sequestration of carbon in basalts.

  10. Evaluation of heavy metal and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons accumulation in plants from typical industrial sites: potential candidate in phytoremediation for co-contamination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; Liao, Xiaoyong; Yan, Xiulan; Zhu, Ganghui; Ma, Dong

    2014-11-01

    The heavy metal and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contents were evaluated in surface soil and plant samples of 18 wild species collected from 3 typical industrial sites in South Central China. The accumulative characteristics of the plant species for both heavy metal and PAHs were discussed. The simultaneous accumulation of heavy metal and PAHs in plant and soil was observed at all the investigated sites, although disparities in spatial distributions among sites occurred. Both plant and soil samples were characterized by high accumulation for heavy metal at smelting site, moderate enrichment at coke power and coal mining sites, whereas high level of PAHs (16 priority pollutants according to US Environmental Protection Agency) at coke power site, followed sequentially by coal mining and smelting sites. Based on the differences of heavy metal and PAH accumulation behaviors of the studied plant species, heavy metal and PAH accumulation strategies were suggested: Pteris vittata L. and Pteris cretica L. for As and PAHs, Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud for Pb, As, and PAHs, and Miscanthus floridulu (Labnll.) Warb for Cu and PAHs. These native plant species could be proposed as promising materials for heavy metal and PAHs combined pollution remediation. PMID:24946706

  11. Toxic effects in C57B1/6 and DBA/2 mice following consumption of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated Great Lakes coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch Walbaum)

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, G.B.; Leatherland, J.F.; Sonstegard, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    Diets containing coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch Walbaum) from the Pacific Ocean or from Lakes Erie, Michigan, and Ontario (containing a gradation from low to high of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, (HAHs)) were fed to C57B1/6 and DBA/2 mice. Following a 4-month dietary exposure to Lake Ontario salmon, both strains of mice demonstrated hepatomegaly. The ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (ERR) enzyme levels were elevated in livers of C57B1/6 mice fed diets of salmon from all of the Great Lakes studied, with exceptionally high levels detected in C57B1/6 mice fed Lake Ontario salmon. Induction of ERR enzyme levels was detected in DBA/2 mice only following dietary exposure to Lake Ontario salmon. Serum levels of L-thyroxine (T4) and triiodo-L-thryonine (T3) were suppressed in C57B1/6 mice following consumption of Lake Ontario coho salmon, but T3 and T4 levels remained unchanged in DBA/2 mice. In general, pathobiological effects correlated with both dietary HAH exposure level and Ah receptor status.

  12. Human health risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from consumption of blood cockle and exposure to contaminated sediments and water along the Klang Strait, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tavakoly Sany, Seyedeh Belin; Hashim, Rosli; Rezayi, Majid; Salleh, Aishah; Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Safari, Omid; Sasekumar, A

    2014-07-15

    The concentration of carcinogenic poly aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs) present in water and sediment of Klang Strait as well as in the edible tissue of blood cockle (Anadara granosa) was investigated. The human health risk of c-PAHs was assessed in accordance with the standards of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The cancer risks of c-PAHs to human are expected to occur through the consumption of blood cockles or via gastrointestinal exposure to polluted sediments and water in Kalng Strait. The non-carcinogenic risks that are associated with multiple pathways based on ingestion rate and contact rates with water were higher than the US EPA safe level at almost all stations, but the non-carcinogenic risks for eating blood cockle was below the level of US EPA concern. A high correlation between concentrations of c-PAHs in different matrices showed that the bioaccumulation of c-PAHs by blood cockles could be regarded as a potential health hazard for the consumers. PMID:24855978

  13. Assessment of the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine contaminants in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from the Eastern Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, Natalia; Boada, Luis D; Fernández, Antonio; Zumbado, Manuel; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Xuriach, Aina; Almunia, Javier; Camacho, María; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2014-09-01

    The concentrations of 18 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 23 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in the blubber and liver of 27 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) stranded along the Canary Islands coasts from 1997 to 2011. DDTs (mean of 60,960 and 445 ng/g lw., respectively) and PCBs (mean of 47,168 and 628 ng/g lw., respectively) were the predominant compounds in both tissues. Among PCBs the highly chlorinated PCB 180, 153 and 138 were the predominant congeners. We found a p,p'-DDE/?DDTs ratio of 0.87 in blubber and 0.88 in liver, which is indicative of DDT ageing. All the samples showed detectable values of any of the 16 PAH studied. Phenanthrene was the most frequently detected and at the highest concentration. According to our results, concentrations of OCPs, and especially PCBs, are still at toxicologically relevant levels in blubber of bottlenose dolphins of this geographical area. PMID:24726510

  14. Spatial and temporal analysis of the risks posed by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, polychlorinated biphenyl and metal contaminants in sediments in UK estuaries and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Manuel Nicolaus, E E; Law, Robin J; Wright, Serena R; Lyons, Brett P

    2015-06-15

    The environmental risks of 22 contaminants, comprising 6 metals, 10 PAHs and 6 PCB congeners occurring in UK estuaries and coastal waters were assessed as single substances. Sediment samples were taken within 12 nautical miles of the English and Welsh coastlines between 1999 and 2011. The measured environmental concentrations were compared to quality standards including ERL, ERM and EAC, all of which have been established internationally. Out of a total of 38,031 individual samples analysed, 42.6% and 7.7% exceeded the ERL/EAC and ERM values, respectively. The highest Risk Characterisation Ratios (RCRs) for metals, PAHs and PCBs were observed for copper, fluorene and CB118 (2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl). In general, the highest concentrations of PAHs and PCBs were observed in 2011 in the Lower Medway indicating a potential risk to the aquatic environment. This study suggests that re-suspension of contaminants banned over 20years ago is still an ongoing issue. PMID:25813718

  15. Reproductive success and chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of resident great blue herons (Ardea herodias) from coastal British Columbia, Canada, 1977 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Harris, M L; Elliott, J E; Butler, R W; Wilson, L K

    2003-01-01

    Over the period 1977-2000, eggs of Pacific great blue heron (Ardea herodias fannini) were collected from 23 colonies along the southern coast of British Columbia, Canada, and analyzed for persistent organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Concentrations of OC pesticides in eggs declined sharply in the late 1970s, after which there were minimal changes. The sums of PCB congeners were not reduced appreciably during the 1980s and 1990s, but Aroclor 1260 concentrations suggested a sharp decline in PCB contamination of eggs in the late 1970s, similar to that shown for OC pesticides. Eggs collected along or near the Fraser River delta showed higher levels of most pesticides compared to other monitored colonies. Although the delta lands support a long-standing agricultural economy, the primary factors influencing OC levels in the delta colonies were thought to be driven by estuarine processes. We suggest two possible influencing factors were: 1) a greater rate of bioaccumulation in the estuary due to the deposition of particulates collected over a vast area encompassed by the Fraser River watershed; or 2) a higher rate of biomagnification in the estuary due to species differences at lower trophic levels of the heron food chain. Eggs from urban colonies contained higher levels of PCBs. The congener pattern was not clearly different from that observed in less contaminated eggs from rural and pulp mill-influenced colonies, except that colonies in Vancouver had greater proportions of PCB-66, suggesting a local source of Aroclor 1242. Productivity in the coastal heron colonies was highly variable over the period of study, with 71% of recorded colony-wide reproductive failures occurring in colonies near pulp mills. However, the predominant factors influencing reproductive success were probably disturbance by humans and bald eagles, combined with loss and degradation of nesting habitat, and not sublethal toxicity. PMID:12521109

  16. Characterization and monitoring of contaminated sites by multi-geophysical approach (IP, ERT and GPR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampaolo, Valeria; Capozzoli, Luigi; Votta, Mario; Rizzo, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    The contamination of soils and groundwater by hydrocarbons, due to blow out, leakage from tank or pipe and oil spill, is a heavy environmental problem because infiltrated oil can persist in the ground for a long time leading to important changes on soils and physical and biogeochemical properties, which impact on ecosystems and shallow aquifers. The existing methods used for the characterization of hydrocarbon contaminated sites are invasive, time consuming and expensive. Therefore, in the last years, there was a growing interest in the use of geophysical methods for environmental monitoring (Börner et al., 1993; Vanhala, 1997; Atekwana et al., 2000; Chambers et al., 2004; Song et al., 2005; French et al., 2009). The goal of this work is to characterize underground contaminant distributions and monitoring a remediation activity using a multi-geophysical approach (cross-hole IP and ERT, GPR). The experiments consist in geophysical measurements both in surface and boreholes, to monitor a simulated hydrocarbon leachate into a ~1 m3 box. The tank is filled with quartz-rich sand (k = 1.16 x 10-12 m2) and it is equipped with six boreholes and 72 stainless steel ring electrodes, at 5 cm spacing, for cross-hole electrical resistivity and time-domain IP measurements. 25 additional stainless steel electrodes were installed at the surface of the tank. Two measurement phases were realized: first, we monitored electrical resistivity, IP, and dielectric conductivity of the uncontaminated soil; the second experimental phase consists in the geophysical monitoring of a crude oil controlled spill. Results showed significant changes in the responses of geoelectrical measurements in presence of a crude oil contamination. Instead IP results give a phase angle distribution related to the presence of hydrocarbon in the system but not so clear in the location of plume. Therefore, to clearly delineate the areas interested by contamination, we estimate the imaginary component of electrical resistivity. Finally, the electrical behaviour of the medium from GPR data, compared to geoelectrical measurements, was investigated by the analysis of the strength of EM-reflections and absorption of EM signal. In particular, the most contaminated areas are characterized by a variation of soil permittivity dielectric value. Furthermore, the frequency analysis show a significant downshift of the frequency in correspondence of contaminated areas. In conclusion, the experiment was able to obtain information about contaminant distribution in the subsurface. Besides combining measurements from multiple geophysical measurements allow us to obtain more accurate characterization of contamination spatial variability. Finally, the estimation of geophysical parameters in frequency domain gave a supplementary information to increase quality of acquired data.

  17. Ecological risk assessment for river sediments contaminated by creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.A.; Sampson, J.R.; Jacobson, M.A. (PTI Environmental Services, Bellevue, WA (United States)); Peek, D.C. (PTI Environmental Services, Lake Oswego, OR (United States))

    1994-12-01

    An ecological risk assessment was conducted for sediments of the lower Willamette River near a wood-treatment (creosote) facility. Both surface ad subsurface sediments near the facility are contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Limited contamination of sediments by dioxins/furans, chlorinated phenols, and arsenic was also observed. Sediment bioassays based on amphipod (Hyalella azteca) mortality and Microtox[reg sign] (Photobacterium phosphoreum) bioluminescence showed toxicity within approximately 300 ft of the shoreline, with a highly toxic area (i.e., possible acute lethal effects in sedentary benthic species) near a dock used for creosote off-loading. The relatively low concentrations of contaminants measured in crayfish muscle tissue and the absence of serious lesions in livers of large-scale sucker collected near the site suggest that excess risk to mobile species from chronic contamination is low. Cursory observations indicate that acute toxic effects on crayfish may be associated with creosote seeps. There is no evidence of adverse biological effects throughout most of the main channel of the river. Evaluation of sediment chemistry data for PAHs relative to available sediment-quality criteria proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency supports this conclusion.

  18. PERFORMANCE MONITORING OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  19. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  20. Bacterial Community Dynamics and Hydrocarbon Degradation during a Field-Scale Evaluation of Bioremediation on a Mudflat Beach Contaminated with Buried Oil

    PubMed Central

    Röling, Wilfred F. M.; Milner, Michael G.; Jones, D. Martin; Fratepietro, Francesco; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Daniel, Fabien; Head, Ian M.

    2004-01-01

    A field-scale experiment with a complete randomized block design was performed to study the degradation of buried oil on a shoreline over a period of almost 1 year. The following four treatments were examined in three replicate blocks: two levels of fertilizer treatment of oil-treated plots, one receiving a weekly application of liquid fertilizer and the other treated with a slow-release fertilizer; and two controls, one not treated with oil and the other treated with oil but not with fertilizer. Oil degradation was monitored by measuring carbon dioxide evolution and by chemical analysis of the oil. Buried oil was degraded to a significantly greater extent in fertilized plots, but no differences in oil chemistry were observed between the two different fertilizer treatments, although carbon dioxide production was significantly higher in the oil-treated plots that were treated with slow-release fertilizer during the first 14 days of the experiment. Bacterial communities present in the beach sediments were profiled by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and 16S rRNA amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR. Similarities between the DGGE profiles were calculated, and similarity matrices were subjected to statistical analysis. These analyses showed that although significant hydrocarbon degradation occurred both in plots treated with oil alone and in the plots treated with oil and liquid fertilizer, the bacterial community structure in these plots was, in general, not significantly different from that in the control plots that were not treated with oil and did not change over time. In contrast, the bacterial community structure in the plots treated with oil and slow-release fertilizer changed rapidly, and there were significant differences over time, as well as between blocks and even within plots. The differences were probably related to the higher concentrations of nutrients measured in interstitial water from the plots treated with slow-release fertilizer. Bacteria with 16S rRNA sequences closely related (>99.7% identity) to Alcanivorax borkumensis and Pseudomonas stutzeri sequences dominated during the initial phase of oil degradation in the plots treated with slow-release fertilizer. Field data were compared to the results of previous laboratory microcosm experiments, which revealed significant differences. PMID:15128509

  1. Characterization of Preferential Ground-Water Seepage From a Chlorinated Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer to West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 2002-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majcher, Emily H.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Lorah, Michelle M.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands act as natural transition zones between ground water and surface water, characterized by the complex interdependency of hydrology, chemical and physical properties, and biotic effects. Although field and laboratory demonstrations have shown efficient natural attenuation processes in the non-seep wetland areas and stream bottom sediments of West Branch Canal Creek, chlorinated volatile organic compounds are present in a freshwater tidal creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volatile organic compound concentrations in surface water indicate that in some areas of the wetland, preferential flow paths or seeps allow transport of organic compounds from the contaminated sand aquifer to the overlying surface water without undergoing natural attenuation. From 2002 through 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division of the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, characterized preferential ground-water seepage as part of an ongoing investigation of contaminant distribution and natural attenuation processes in wetlands at this site. Seep areas were discrete and spatially consistent during thermal infrared surveys in 2002, 2003, and 2004 throughout West Branch Canal Creek wetlands. In these seep areas, temperature measurements in shallow pore water and sediment more closely resembled those in ground water than those in nearby surface water. Generally, pore water in seep areas contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds had lower methane and greater volatile organic compound concentrations than pore water in non-seep wetland sediments. The volatile organic compounds detected in shallow pore water in seeps were spatially similar to the dominant volatile organic compounds in the underlying Canal Creek aquifer, with both parent and anaerobic daughter compounds detected. Seep locations characterized as focused seeps contained the highest concentrations of chlorinated parent compounds, relatively low concentrations of chlorinated daughter compounds, and insignificant concentrations of methane in shallow pore water samples. These seeps were primarily along the creek edge or formed a dendritic-like pattern between the wetland and creek channel. In contrast, seep locations characterized as diffuse seeps contained relatively high concentrations of chlorinated daughter compounds (or a mixture of daughter and parent compounds) and detectable methane concentrations in shallow pore water samples. These seeps were primarily along the wetland boundary. Qualitative thermal infrared surveys coupled with quantitative verification of temperature differences, and screening for volatile organic compound and methane concentrations proved to be effective tools in determining the overall extent of preferential seepage. Hydrologic and physical properties of wetland sediments were characterized at two focused and one diffuse seep location. In the seeps with focused discharge, measured seepage was consistent over the tidal cycle, whereas more variability with tidal fluctuation was measured in the diffuse seep location. At all locations, areas were identified within the general seep boundaries where discharge was minimal. In all cases, the geometric mean of non-zero vertical flux measurements was greater than those previously reported in the non-seep wetland sediments using flow-net analysis. Flux was greater in the focused discharge areas than in the diffuse discharge area, and all fluxes were within the range reported in the literature for wetland discharge. Vertical hydraulic conductivity estimated from seepage flux and a mean vertical gradient at seeps with focused discharge resulted in a minimum hydraulic conductivity two orders of magnitude greater than those estimated in the non-seep sediment. In contrast, vertical conductivity estimates at a diffuse seep were similar to estimates along a nearby line of section through a non-seep area. Horizontal hydraulic cond

  2. NMR in well logging and hydrocarbon exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. Prammer

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has become a versatile tool for the evaluation of underground hydrocarbon reservoirs. Formation\\u000a attributes such as rock porosity and rock pore size distributions, as well as the relative concentrations of water, oil and\\u000a gas, can be inferred from subsurface NMR. The hydrogen NMR signal encodes porosity as amplitude, pore sizes as relaxation\\u000a times and fluid properties

  3. Natural attenuation: what does the subsurface have in store?

    PubMed

    Röling, Wilfred F M; van Verseveld, Henk W

    2002-01-01

    Throughout the world, organic and inorganic substances leach into the subsurface as a result of human activities and accidents. There, the chemicals pose direct or indirect threats to the environment and to increasingly scarce drinking water resources. At many contaminated sites the subsurface is able to attenuate pollutants which, potentially, lowers the costs of remediation. Natural attenuation comprises a wide range of processes of which the microbiological component, which is responsible for intrinsic bioremediation, can decrease the mass and toxicity of the contaminants and is, therefore, the most important. Reliance on intrinsic bioremediation requires methods to monitor the process. The subject of this review is how knowledge of subsurface geology and hydrology, microbial ecology and degradation processes is used and can be used to monitor the potential and capacity for intrinsic bioremediation in the subsurface and to verify degradation in situ. As research on natural attenuation in the subsurface has been rather fragmented and limited and often allows only conclusions to be drawn of the site under investigation, we provide a concept based on Environmental Specimen Banking which will contribute to further understanding subsurface natural attenuation processes and will help to develop and implement new monitoring techniques. PMID:12222955

  4. Contaminant geochemistry--a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Yaron, Bruno; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2010-01-01

    To date, the field of contaminant geochemistry--which deals with the study of chemical interactions in soil and aquifer environments--has focused mainly on pollutant toxicity, retention, persistence, and transport and/or on remediation of contaminated sites. Alteration of subsurface physicochemical properties by anthropogenic chemicals, which reach the land surface as a result of human activity, has been essentially neglected. Contaminant-induced changes in subsurface properties are usually considered as deviations from a normal geological environment, which will disappear under natural attenuation or following remediation procedures. However, contaminants may in many cases cause irreversible changes in both structure and properties of the soil-subsurface geosystem between the land surface and groundwater. The time scales associated with these changes are on a "human time scale", far shorter than geological scales relevant for geochemical processes. In this review, we draw attention to a new perspective of contaminant geochemistry, namely, irreversible changes in the subsurface as a result of anthropogenic chemical pollution. We begin by briefly reviewing processes governing contaminant-subsurface interactions. We then survey how chemical contamination causes irreversible changes in subsurface structure and properties. The magnitude of the anthropogenic impact on the soil and subsurface is linked directly to the amounts of chemical contaminants applied and/or disposed of on the land surface. This particular aspect is of major importance when examining the effects of humans on global environmental changes. Consideration of these phenomena opens new perspectives for the field of contaminant geochemistry and for research of human impacts on the soil and subsurface regimes. PMID:19641894

  5. 32 CFR 644.533 - Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Recommendation for reacquisition of contaminated lands will be limited to those which involve full restrictions of both surface and subsurface uses. Where subsurface use of lands only is to be restricted, it is preferable to...

  6. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 3: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences on the Release of Contaminants to the Subsurface Environment from Waste Source Terms at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul L. Wichlacz

    2003-09-01

    This source-term summary document is intended to describe the current understanding of contaminant source terms and the conceptual model for potential source-term release to the environment at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), as presented in published INEEL reports. The document presents a generalized conceptual model of the sources of contamination and describes the general categories of source terms, primary waste forms, and factors that affect the release of contaminants from the waste form into the vadose zone and Snake River Plain Aquifer. Where the information has previously been published and is readily available, summaries of the inventory of contaminants are also included. Uncertainties that affect the estimation of the source term release are also discussed where they have been identified by the Source Term Technical Advisory Group. Areas in which additional information are needed (i.e., research needs) are also identified.

  7. Hydrocarbon release investigations in Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Fels, J.B. [LUST Unit, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Hydrocarbon releases are among the most common environmental problems in Missouri, as well as across the country. Old, unprotected underground storage tanks and buried piping from the tanks to pumps are notorious sources of petroleum contamination at LUST (leaking underground storage tank) sites. Missouri has an estimated 5000 LUST sites across the state with the majority being simple spills into clay-rich soils or into a shallow perched water system. However, in the southern half of the state, where residual soils and karst bedrock are not conducive to trapping such releases, significant groundwater supplies are at risk. This article discusses the process used to identify the source of contamination.

  8. Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-28

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

  9. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Howson, Paul E. (Latham, NY); Mackenzie, Patricia D. (Clifton Park, NY); Horney, David P. (Mayfield, NY)

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons.

  10. RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AT U.S. GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IN SUBSURFACE REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of contaminants in the environment is controlled by both chemical reactions and transport phenomena in the subsurface. Our ability to understand the significance of these processes over time requires an accurate conceptual model that incorporates the various mechanisms ...

  11. SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE MODIFICATIONS TO REDUCE NITRATE LOSSES IN DRAINAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate in water leaving subsurface drain ('tile') systems often exceeds the 10 mg-N/ L maximum contaminant level (MCL) set by the U.S. EPA for drinking water and has been implicated in contributing to the hypoxia problem within the Gulf of Mexico. Much of the nitrate present in surface waters with...

  12. EFFECT OF FENTON'S REAGENT ON SUBSURFACE MICROBIOLOGY AND BIODEGRADATION CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosm studies were conducted to determine the effect of Fenton's reagent on subsurface microbiology and biodegradation capacity in a DNAPL (PCE/TCE) contaminated aquifer previously treated with the reagent. Groundwater pH declined from 5 to 2.4 immediately after the treatmen...

  13. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  14. An Approach that Uses the Concentrations of Hydrocarbon Compounds in Soil Gas at the Source of Contamination to Evaluate the Potential for Intrusion of Petroleum Vapors into Buildings (PVI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    If motor fuels are spilled from underground storage tanks, petroleum hydrocarbons can vaporize from the spill and move as a vapor through the unsaturated zone. If a building is sited above or near the spill, the hydrocarbons may intrude into the air space of the building. This ...

  15. Biodegradation and bioremediation of hydrocarbons in extreme environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Margesin; F. Schinner

    2001-01-01

    Many hydrocarbon-contaminated environments are characterized by low or elevated temperatures, acidic or alkaline pH, high salt concentrations, or high pressure. Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, adapted to grow and thrive in these environments, play an important role in the biological treatment of polluted extreme habitats. The biodegradation (transformation or mineralization) of a wide range of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated and nitrated compounds,

  16. Karst hydrology and chemical contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ground-water flow in karst aquifers is very different from flow in granular or fractured aquifers. Chemical contamination may be fed directly to a karst aquifer via overland flow to a sinkhole with little or no attenuation and may contaminate downgradient wells, springs, and sinkholes within a few hours or a few days. Contaminants may also become temporarily stored in the epikarstic zone for eventual release to the aquifer. Flood pulses may flush the contaminants to cause transiently higher levels of contamination in the aquifer and discharge points. The convergent nature of flow in karst aquifers may result in contaminants becoming concentrated in conduits. Once contaminants have reached the subsurface conduits, they are likely to be rapidly transported to spring outlets. Traditional aquifer remediation techniques for contaminated aquifers are less applicable to karst aquifers.

  17. Biodegradability of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pah) mixtures 

    E-print Network

    Desai, Anuradha M.

    2007-04-25

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmentally significant because of their ubiquity and the toxicity of some. Their recalcitrance and persistence makes them problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered...

  18. Applications of Subsurface Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene [ORNL; Passian, Ali [ORNL; Farahi, R H [ORNL; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the interior of a cell is of tremendous importance in order to assess the effects of nanomaterials on biological systems. Outside of a controlled laboratory environment, nanomaterials will most likely not be conveniently labeled or tagged so that their translocation within a biological system cannot be easily identified and quantified. Ideally, the characterization of nanomaterials within a cell requires a nondestructive, label-free, and subsurface approach. Subsurface nanoscale imaging represents a real challenge for instrumentation. Indeed the tools available for high resolution characterization, including optical, electron or scanning probe microscopies, mainly provide topography images or require tagants that fluoresce. Although the intercellular environment holds a great deal of information, subsurface visualization remains a poorly explored area. Recently, it was discovered that by mechanically perturbing a sample, it was possible to observe its response in time with nanoscale resolution by probing the surface with a micro-resonator such as a microcantilever probe (Figure 1). Microcantilevers are used as the force-sensing probes in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), where the nanometer-scale probe tip on the microcantilever interacts with the sample in a highly controlled manner to produce high-resolution raster-scanned information of the sample surface. Taking advantage of the existing capabilities of AFM, we present a novel technique, Mode Synthesizing Atomic Force Microscopy (MSAFM) (Figure 1), which has the ability to probe subsurface structures such as non-labeled nanoparticles embedded in a cell. In MSAFM mechanical actuators (PZTs) excite the probe and the sample at different frequencies as depicted in Figure 1. The nonlinear nature of the tip-sample interaction, at the point of contact of the probe and the surface of the sample, in the contact mode AFM configuration permits the mixing of the elastic waves. The new dynamic system comprises new synthesized imaging modes, resulting from sum- and difference-frequency generation of the driving frequencies. The specific electronics of MSAFM allows the selection of individual modes and the monitoring of their amplitude and phase. From these quantities of various synthesized modes a series of images can be acquired. The new images contain subsurface information, thus revealing the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells.

  19. AMENDMENT OF SEDIMENTS WITH A CARBONACEOUS RESIN REDUCES BIOAVAILABILITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of laboratory and field test studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Ambersorb, a carbonaceous resin, in reducing bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated sediments collected from the field. Amending contaminated sediment...

  20. In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon and other organic compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. Alleman; A. Leeson

    1999-01-01

    From supertanker oil spills to the leaking underground storage tank at the corner gas station, contamination from petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and other organic compounds is an environmental concern that affects nearly every small hamlet and major metropolis throughout the world. Most petroleum hydrocarbons are amenable to biodegradation, and a considerable body of experience has been built up over the past