Science.gov

Sample records for hydrocarbon contaminated subsurface

  1. Using Geophysical Signatures to Investigate Temporal Changes Due to Source Reduction in the Subsurface Contaminated with Hydrocarbons

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the geophysical response to subsurface hydrocarbon contamination source removal. Source removal by natural attenuation or by engineered bioremediation is expected to change the biological, chemical, and physical environment associated with the contaminated matrix....

  2. Potential impact of soil microbial heterogeneity on the persistence of hydrocarbons in contaminated subsurface soils.

    PubMed

    Aleer, Sam; Adetutu, Eric M; Weber, John; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2014-04-01

    In situ bioremediation is potentially a cost effective treatment strategy for subsurface soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, however, limited information is available regarding the impact of soil spatial heterogeneity on bioremediation efficacy. In this study, we assessed issues associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation and soil spatial heterogeneity (samples designated as FTF 1, 5 and 8) from a site in which in situ bioremediation was proposed for hydrocarbon removal. Test pit activities showed similarities in FTF soil profiles with elevated hydrocarbon concentrations detected in all soils at 2 m below ground surface. However, PCR-DGGE-based cluster analysis showed that the bacterial community in FTF 5 (at 2 m) was substantially different (53% dissimilar) and 2-3 fold more diverse than communities in FTF 1 and 8 (with 80% similarity). When hydrocarbon degrading potential was assessed, differences were observed in the extent of (14)C-benzene mineralisation under aerobic conditions with FTF 5 exhibiting the highest hydrocarbon removal potential compared to FTF 1 and 8. Further analysis indicated that the FTF 5 microbial community was substantially different from other FTF samples and dominated by putative hydrocarbon degraders belonging to Pseudomonads, Xanthomonads and Enterobacteria. However, hydrocarbon removal in FTF 5 under anaerobic conditions with nitrate and sulphate electron acceptors was limited suggesting that aerobic conditions were crucial for hydrocarbon removal. This study highlights the importance of assessing available microbial capacity prior to bioremediation and shows that the site's spatial heterogeneity can adversely affect the success of in situ bioremediation unless area-specific optimizations are performed. PMID:24553295

  3. Use of dissolved and vapor-phase gases to investigate methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the subsurface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, R.T.; Mayer, K.U.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Williams, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] At many sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, methanogenesis is a significant degradation pathway. Techniques to estimate CH4 production, consumption, and transport processes are needed to understand the geochemical system, provide a complete carbon mass balance, and quantify the hydrocarbon degradation rate. Dissolved and vapor-phase gas data collected at a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated site near Bemidji, Minnesota, demonstrate that naturally occurring nonreactive or relatively inert gases such as Ar and N2 can be effectively used to better understand and quantify physical and chemical processes related to methanogenic activity in the subsurface. In the vadose zone, regions of Ar and N2 depletion and enrichment are indicative of methanogenic and methanotrophic zones, and concentration gradients between the regions suggest that reaction-induced advection can be an important gas transport process. In the saturated zone, dissolved Ar and N2 concentrations are used to quantify degassing driven by methanogenesis and also suggest that attenuation of methane along the flow path, into the downgradient aquifer, is largely controlled by physical processes. Slight but discernable preferential depletion of N2 over Ar, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones near the free-phase oil, suggests reactivity of N2 and is consistent with other evidence indicating that nitrogen fixation by microbial activity is taking place at this site. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Integration of various subsurface exploration techniques to solve problems at sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, J.C.; Hatheway, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    As a result of both regulatory and property transfer driven investigations of petroleum distribution and storage sites, countless contamination issues have been identified. Thoughtful selection and use of different geochemical, geologic, and geophysical subsurface exploration techniques can significantly increase the cost effectiveness of investigation, remedial design/implementation, and post-closure monitoring programs. Three case histories highlighting the approach are presented. In each case, careful consideration of data needs, methods capabilities and limitations resulted in the sequenced integration of specific investigatory tools to generate the required information. These are: (1) First discussed will be the use of ground penetrating radar, seismic refraction, active and passive soil vapor surveys, installation of monitoring wells, and use of lineament/fracture trace analysis to guide the remedial investigation and system design meant to evaluate and correct gasoline and diesel releases at a major highway truck stop. (2) The use of a passive soil vapor survey, grab soil and groundwater sampling, and traditional monitoring well program at a former retail gasoline distribution site in Colorado will be presented next. Data generated by this integrated investigation were used in support of a risk assessment and remediation system design. (3) Lastly, the use of an active soil vapor survey, grab sampling and field analyses and integration with results from previous remedial investigations and emergency response measures at a commercial truck leasing facility will be overviewed. The results identified areas of residual soil contamination not addressed during the emergency response measures.

  5. Integration of various subsurface exploration techniques to solve problems at sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, J.C.; Hatheway, M.H. ); Tingley, A.C. )

    1996-01-01

    As a result of both regulatory and property transfer driven investigations of petroleum distribution and storage sites, countless contamination issues have been identified. Thoughtful selection and use of different geochemical, geologic, and geophysical subsurface exploration techniques can significantly increase the cost effectiveness of investigation, remedial design/implementation, and post-closure monitoring programs. Three case histories highlighting the approach are presented. In each case, careful consideration of data needs, methods capabilities and limitations resulted in the sequenced integration of specific investigatory tools to generate the required information. These are: (1) First discussed will be the use of ground penetrating radar, seismic refraction, active and passive soil vapor surveys, installation of monitoring wells, and use of lineament/fracture trace analysis to guide the remedial investigation and system design meant to evaluate and correct gasoline and diesel releases at a major highway truck stop. (2) The use of a passive soil vapor survey, grab soil and groundwater sampling, and traditional monitoring well program at a former retail gasoline distribution site in Colorado will be presented next. Data generated by this integrated investigation were used in support of a risk assessment and remediation system design. (3) Lastly, the use of an active soil vapor survey, grab sampling and field analyses and integration with results from previous remedial investigations and emergency response measures at a commercial truck leasing facility will be overviewed. The results identified areas of residual soil contamination not addressed during the emergency response measures.

  6. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Yuan

    2001-11-16

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  7. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  8. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  9. DELINEATION OF SUBSURFACE HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION USING A DIRECT PUSH RESISTIVITY METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct push resistivity method was evaluated as a complementary screening tool to provide rapid in-situ contaminant detection to aid in better defining locations for drilling, sampling, and monitoring well installation at hazardous waste sites. Nine continuous direct push resi...

  10. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODELING FOR HYDROCARBON SPILLS INTO THE SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrocarbons which enter the subsurface through spills or leaks may create serious, long-lived ground-water contamination problems. onventional finite difference and finite element models of multiphase, multicomponent flow often have extreme requirements for both computer time an...

  11. UNDERSTANDING THE FATE OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN THE SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To achieve effective remediation of subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, definite scientific and technical knowledge of their fate after they are spilled onto the ground surface or leaked from underground storage tanks is essential. his paper provides extensive details...

  12. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  13. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  14. Effect of vegetation in pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands treating sulphate rich groundwater contaminated with a low and high chlorinated hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbing; Wu, Shubiao; Braeckevelt, Mareike; Paschke, Heidrun; Kstner, Matthias; Kser, Heinz; Kuschk, Peter

    2012-10-01

    In order to characterize the effect of vegetation on performance of constructed wetlands (CWs) treating low and high chlorinated hydrocarbon, two pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) CWs (planted with Phragmites australis and unplanted) treating sulphate rich groundwater contaminated with MCB (monochlorobenzene, as a low chlorinated hydrocarbon), (about 10 mg L(-1)), and PCE (perchloroethylene, as a high chlorinated hydrocarbon), (about 2 mg L(-1)), were examined. With mean MCB inflow load of 299 mg m(-2) d(-1), the removal rate was 58 and 208 mg m(-2) d(-1) in the unplanted and planted wetland, respectively, after 4 m from the inlet. PCE was almost completely removed in both wetlands with mean inflow load of 49 mg m(-2) d(-1). However, toxic metabolites cis-1,2-DCE (dichloroethene) and VC (vinyl chloride) accumulated in the unplanted wetland; up to 70% and 25% of PCE was dechlorinated to cis-1,2-DCE and VC after 4 m from the inlet, respectively. Because of high sulphate concentration (around 850 mg L(-1)) in the groundwater, the plant derived organic carbon caused sulphide formation (up to 15 mg L(-1)) in the planted wetland, which impaired the MCB removal but not statistically significant. The results showed significant enhancement of vegetation on the removal of the low chlorinated hydrocarbon MCB, which is probably due to the fact that aerobic MCB degraders are benefited from the oxygen released by plant roots. Vegetation also stimulated completely dechlorination of PCE due to plant derived organic carbon, which is potentially to provide electron donor for dechlorination process. The plant derived organic carbon also stimulated dissimilatory sulphate reduction, which subsequently have negative effect on MCB removal. PMID:22832338

  15. In situ sensing of subsurface contamination--part I: near-infrared spectral characterization of alkanes, aromatics, and chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Klavarioti, Maria; Kostarelos, Konstantinos; Pourjabbar, Anahita; Ghandehari, Masoud

    2014-05-01

    There is an imperative need for a chemical sensor capable of remote, in situ, long-term monitoring of chemical species at sites containing toxic chemical spills, specifically at chemical waste dumps, landfills, and locations with underground storage tanks. In the current research, a series of experiments were conducted measuring the near-infrared optical absorption of alkanes, aromatics, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. A spectral library was then developed to characterize the optical spectra of liquid hydrocarbons. Near-infrared analysis was chosen due to compatibility with optical fibers. The goal was to differentiate between classes of hydrocarbons and to also discriminate between compounds within a class of similar molecular structures. It was observed that unique absorption spectra can be obtained for each hydrocarbon, and this uniqueness can be used to discriminate between hydrocarbons from different families. Statistical analyses, namely, principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation coefficient (Spearman and Pearson methods), were attempted to match absorption spectra from an unknown hydrocarbon with the database with limited success. An algorithm was subsequently written to identify the characteristic peaks of each hydrocarbon that could be used to match data from an unknown chemical species with the database. PMID:24445930

  16. Hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Kostecki, P.T.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater. Topics covered include: Perspectives on hydrocarbon contamination; regulations; environmental fate and modeling; sampling and site assessment; remediation assessment and design; and remediation case studies.

  17. Subsurface fate of spilled petroleum hydrocarbons in continuous permafrost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, K.; Walker, L.; Vigoren, L.

    2004-01-01

    Accidental releases of approximately 2000 m3 of fuel have resulted in subsurface contamination adjacent to Imikpuk Lake, a drinking-water source near Barrow, AK. This paper presents a conceptual model of the distribution and transport of subsurface free-phase hydrocarbons at this site. The mean annual temperature in Barrow is -13 ??C, and average monthly temperatures exceed 0 ??C only during the months of June, July, and August. As a result, the region is underlain by areally continuous permafrost that extends to depths of up to 300 m and constrains subsurface hydrologic processes to a shallow zone that temporarily thaws each summer. During the 1993 and 1994 thaw seasons, the measured depth of thaw varied across the site from approximately 0.5 to 2 m. However, exploratory borings in 1995 showed that free-phase hydrocarbons were present at depths greater than 3 m, indicating that permafrost at this site is not a barrier to the vertical migration of nonaqueous-phase liquids. In 1996, a subsurface containment barrier was installed to prevent lateral movement of contaminated water to Imikpuk Lake, and a recovery trench was excavated upgradient of the barrier to facilitate removal of free-phase hydrocarbons. Free-phase hydrocarbons were recovered from the trench during 1996, 1997, and 1998. Recovery rates diminished over this time, and in 1999, no further product was recovered and the recovery operation was halted. Subsequent exploratory borings in 2001 and 2002 have revealed that some product remains in the subsurface. Data indicate that this remaining product exists in small discrete pockets or very thin layers of hydrocarbon floating on brine. These small reservoirs appear to be isolated from one another by relatively impermeable permafrost. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Emulsification of hydrocarbons by subsurface bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, D.S.; Thomas, J.M.; Raymond, R.L.; Ward, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions indicating the high probability of biosurfactant production.Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions, indicating a high probability of biosurfactant production.

  19. Modeling subsurface contamination at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.W.; Flinn, J.C.; Ruwe, P.R.

    1994-09-13

    The Department of Energy`s Fernald site is located about 20 miles northwest of Cincinnati. Fernald produced refined uranium metal products from ores between 1953 and 1989. The pure uranium was sent to other DOE sites in South Carolina, Tennessee, Colorado,and Washington in support of the nation`s strategic defense programs. Over the years of large-scale uranium production, contamination of the site`s soil and groundwater occurred.The contamination is of particular concern because the Fernald site is located over the Great Miami Aquifer, a designated sole-source drinking water aquifer. Contamination of the aquifer with uranium was found beneath the site, and migration of the contamination had occurred well beyond the site`s southern boundary. As a result, Fernald was placed on the National Priorities (CERCLA/Superfund) List in 1989. Uranium production at the site ended in 1989,and Fernald`s mission has been changed to one of environmental restoration. This paper presents information about computerized modeling of subsurface contamination used for the environmental restoration project at Fernald.

  20. OPPORTUNITIES FOR BIORECLAMATION OF AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons are an important class of ground water contaminants. Spills of hydrocarbons often produce regions in the subsurface that retain the spilled material trapped as an oily phase. When ground water infiltrates the oily material, the more water-soluble hy...

  1. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    In support of its vision for technological excellence, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) has identified three strategic goals. The three goals of the SCFA are: Contain and/or stabilize contamination sources that pose an imminent threat to surface and ground waters; Delineate DNAPL contamination in the subsurface and remediate DNAPL-contaminated soils and ground water; and Remove a full range of metal and radionuclide contamination in soils and ground water. To meet the challenges of remediating subsurface contaminants in soils and ground water, SCFA funded more than 40 technologies in fiscal year 1997. These technologies are grouped according to the following product lines: Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids; Metals and Radionuclides; Source Term Containment; and Source Term Remediation. This report briefly describes the SCFA 1997 technologies and showcases a few key technologies in each product line.

  2. In situ bioremediation of contaminated unsaturated subsurface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.L.; Sims, R.C.; Dupont, R.R.; Matthews, J.E.; Russell, H.H.

    1993-05-01

    An emerging technology for the remediation of unsaturated subsurface soils involves the use of microorganisms to degrade contaminants which are present in such soils. Understanding the processes which drive in situ bioremediation, as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of the utilization of these systems, are issues which have been identified by the Regional Superfund Engineering Forum as concerns of Superfund decision makers. Although in situ bioremediation has been used for a number of years in the restoration of ground water contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons, it has only been in recent years that in situ systems have been directed toward contaminants in unsaturated subsurface soils. Research has contributed greatly to understanding the biotic, chemical, and hydrologic parameters which contribute to or restrict the application of in-situ bioremediation and has been successful at a number of locations in demonstrating its effectiveness at field scale.

  3. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Rossabi, J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere. 7 figs.

  4. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere.

  5. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-09-19

    FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code for simulating isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably and/or fully saturated subsurface porous media. Both single and dual-domain transport formulations are available. Transport mechanisms considered include advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, linear adsorption, mobile/immobile mass transfer and first-order degradation. A wide range of acquifier conditions and remediation systems commonly encountered in the field can be simulated. Notable boundary condition (BC) options include, a combined rechargemore » and drain BC for simulating recirculation wells, and a head dependent well BC that computes flow based on specified drawdown. The code is designed to handle highly heterogenous, multi-layer, acquifer systems in a numerically efficient manner. Subsurface structure is represented with vertically distorted rectangular brick elements in a Cartesian system. The groundwater flow equation is approximated using the Bubnov-Galerkin finite element method in conjunction with an efficient symmetric Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) ICCG matrix solver. The solute transport equation is approximated using an upstream weighted residual finite element method designed to alleviate numerical oscillation. An efficient asymmetric PCG (ORTHOMIN) matrix solver is employed for transport. For both the flow and transport equations, element matrices are computed from either influence coefficient formulas for speed, or two point Gauss-Legendre quadrature for accuracy. Non-linear flow problems can be solved using either Newton-Ralphson linearization or Picard iteration, with under-relaxation formulas to further enhance convergence. Dynamic memory allocation is implemented using Fortran 90 constructs. FACT coding is clean and modular.« less

  6. UNDERSTANDING THE FATE OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN THE SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sinca a significant number of the two or more million underground storage tank (UST) systems used for petroleum products leak, their cleanup poses a major environmental challenge. Our understnading of the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in the subsurface environment is critical t...

  7. Anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation in deep subsurface oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Carolyn M; Jones, D M; Larter, S R

    2004-09-16

    Biodegradation of crude oil in subsurface petroleum reservoirs is an important alteration process with major economic consequences. Aerobic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at the surface is well documented and it has long been thought that the flow of oxygen- and nutrient-bearing meteoric waters into reservoirs was necessary for in-reservoir petroleum biodegradation. The occurrence of biodegraded oils in reservoirs where aerobic conditions are unlikely, together with the identification of several anaerobic microorganisms in oil fields and the discovery of anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation mechanisms, suggests that anaerobic degradation processes could also be responsible. The extent of anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation processes in the world's deep petroleum reservoirs, however, remains strongly contested. Moreover, no organism has yet been isolated that has been shown to degrade hydrocarbons under the conditions found in deep petroleum reservoirs. Here we report the isolation of metabolites indicative of anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation from a large fraction of 77 degraded oil samples from both marine and lacustrine sources from around the world, including the volumetrically important Canadian tar sands. Our results therefore suggest that anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation is a common process in biodegraded subsurface oil reservoirs. PMID:15372028

  8. Tool samples subsurface soil free of surface contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerer, W. W.; Wooley, B. C.

    1967-01-01

    Sampling device obtains pure subsurface soil that is free of any foreign substance that may exist on the surface. It is introduced through a contaminated surface area in a closed condition, opened, and a subsurface sample collected, sealed while in the subsurface position, and then withdrawn.

  9. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. )

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  10. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE`s Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  11. Methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in subsurface environments remediation, heavy oil formation, and energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Hubert, C; Dolfing, J; Head, I M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are common constituents of surface, shallow, and deep-subsurface environments. Under anaerobic conditions, hydrocarbons can be degraded to methane by methanogenic microbial consortia. This degradation process is widespread in the geosphere. In comparison with other anaerobic processes, methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation is more sustainable over geological time scales because replenishment of an exogenous electron acceptor is not required. As a consequence, this process has been responsible for the formation of the world's vast deposits of heavy oil, which far exceed conventional oil assets such as those found in the Middle East. Methanogenic degradation is also a potentially important component of attenuation in hydrocarbon contamination plumes. Studies of the organisms, syntrophic partnerships, mechanisms, and geochemical signatures associated with methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation have identified common themes and diagnostic markers for this process in the subsurface. These studies have also identified the potential to engineer methanogenic processes to enhance the recovery of energy assets as biogenic methane from residual oils stranded in petroleum systems. PMID:20602990

  12. Plant-enhanced subsurface bioremediation of nonvolatile hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.Y.; Corapcioglu, M.Y.

    1998-02-01

    In recent years, phytoremediation, i.e., the use of plants to clean up soils contaminated with organics, has become a promising new area of research, particularly for in-situ cleanup of large volumes of slightly contaminated soils. A model that can be used as a predictive tool in phytoremediation operations was developed to simulate the transport and fate of a residual hydrocarbon contaminant interacting with plant roots in a partially saturated soil. Time-specific distribution of root quantity through soil, as well as root uptake of soil water and hydrocarbon, was incorporated into the model. In addition, the microbial activity in the soil rhizosphere was modeled with a biofilm theory. A sandy loam, which is dominate in soils of agricultural importance, was selected for simulations. Cotton, which has well-documented plant properties, was used as the model plant. Model parameters involving root growth and root distribution were obtained from the actual field data reported in the literature and ranges of reported literature values were used to obtain a realistic simulation of a phytoremediation operation. Following the verification of the root growth model with published experimental data, it has been demonstrated that plant characteristics such as the root radius are more dominant than contaminant properties in the overall rate of phytoremediation operation. The simulation results showed enhanced biodegradation of a hydrocarbon contaminant mostly because of increased biofilm metabolism of organic contaminants in a growing root system of cotton. Simulations also show that a high mean daily root-water uptake rate increases the contaminant retardation factors because of the resulting low water content. The ability to simulate the fate of a hydrocarbon contaminant is essential in designing technically efficient and cost-effective, plant-aided remedial strategies and in evaluating the effectiveness of a proposed phytoremediation scheme.

  13. Distinguishing natural hydrocarbons from anthropogenic contamination in ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Lesage, S.; Xu, H.; Novakowski, K.S.

    1997-01-01

    Differentiation between natural and anthropogenic sources of ground-water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons is necessary in areas where natural hydrocarbons may be present in the subsurface. Because of the similarity in composition between natural and refined petroleum, the use of statistical techniques to discern trends is required. In this study, both multivariate plotting techniques and principal component analysis were used to investigate the origin of hydrocarbons from a variety of study sites. Ground-water and gas samples were collected from the Niagara Falls area and from three gasoline stations where leaking underground storage tanks had been found. Although soil gas surveys are used to indicate the presence of hydrocarbons, they were not useful in differentiating between natural and anthropogenic sources of contamination in ground water. Propane and pentene were found to be the most useful chemical parameters in discriminating between the natural and anthropogenic sources. These chemicals are not usually measured in investigations of ground-water contamination, yet analysis can be conducted by most environmental laboratories using conventional methods.

  14. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of environmental parameters on bioremediation is important in designing a bioremediation system to reduce petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in impacted soils.

  15. Enhanced bioremediation of subsurface contamination: Enzyme recruitment and redesign

    SciTech Connect

    Brockman, F.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    Subsurface systems containing radionuclide, heavy metal, and organic wastes must be carefully attended to avoid further impacts to the environment or exposures to human populations. It is appropriate, therefore, to invest in basic research to develop the requisite tools and methods for addressing complex cleanup problems. The rational modification of subsurface microoganisms by enzyme recruitment and enzyme design, in concert with engineered systems for delivery of microorganisms and nutrients to the contaminated zone, are potentially useful tools in the spectrum of approaches that will be required for successful remediation of deep subsurface contamination.

  16. Characterization of hydrocarbon contaminated areas by multivariate statistical analysis: Case studies.

    PubMed

    Saenz, G; Pingitore, N E

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of soil gases is a relatively rapid and inexpensive method to delineate and measure hydrocarbon contamination in the subsurface caused by diesel or gasoline. Techniques originally developed for petroleum exploration have been adapted to tracking hydrocarbons which have leaked or spilled at or below the earth's surface.Discriminant analysis (a multivariate statistical technique) is used to classify soil gas samples of C1 to C7 hydrocarbons as biogenic (natural soil gases) or thermogenic (contaminant hydrocarbons). Map plots of C1 to C7 total interstitial hydrocarbons, C2 to C7 interstitial hydrocarbons, and C1/?C n rations are used to further delineate and document the extent and migration of contamination.Three case studies of the technique are presented: each involves leakage of hydrocarbons from underground storage tanks. Soil gas analysis clearly defines the spread of contamination and can serve as the basis for the correct placement of monitoring wells. The method proved to be accurate, rapid, and cost-effective; it therefore has potential for widespread application to the identification of soil and groundwater contaminated by hydrocarbons. PMID:24233510

  17. IMPACT OF REDOX DISEQUILIBRIA ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REMEDIATION IN SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning to mineral surfaces exerts significant control on inorganic contaminant transport in subsurface systems. Remedial technologies for in-situ treatment of subsurface contamination are frequently designed to optimize the efficiency of contaminant partitioning to solid s...

  18. The Stimulation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs with Subsurface Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    LORENZ,JOHN C.

    2000-12-08

    Between 1965 and 1979 there were five documented and one or more inferred attempts to stimulate the production from hydrocarbon reservoirs by detonating nuclear devices in reservoir strata. Of the five documented tests, three were carried out by the US in low-permeability, natural-gas bearing, sandstone-shale formations, and two were done in the USSR within oil-bearing carbonates. The objectives of the US stimulation efforts were to increase porosity and permeability in a reservoir around a specific well by creating a chimney of rock rubble with fractures extending beyond it, and to connect superimposed reservoir layers. In the USSR, the intent was to extensively fracture an existing reservoir in the more general vicinity of producing wells, again increasing overall permeability and porosity. In both countries, the ultimate goals were to increase production rates and ultimate recovery from the reservoirs. Subsurface explosive devices ranging from 2.3 to about 100 kilotons were used at depths ranging from 1208 m (3963 ft) to 2568 m (8427 ft). Post-shot problems were encountered, including smaller-than-calculated fracture zones, formation damage, radioactivity of the product, and dilution of the BTU value of tie natural gas with inflammable gases created by the explosion. Reports also suggest that production-enhancement factors from these tests fell short of expectations. Ultimately, the enhanced-production benefits of the tests were insufficient to support continuation of the pro-grams within increasingly adversarial political, economic, and social climates, and attempts to stimulate hydrocarbon reservoirs with nuclear devices have been terminated in both countries.

  19. Subsurface Contamination Focus Area technical requirements. Volume 1: Requirements summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

    1996-10-01

    This document summarizes functions and requirements for remediation of source term and plume sites identified by the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area. Included are detailed requirements and supporting information for source term and plume containment, stabilization, retrieval, and selective retrieval remedial activities. This information will be useful both to the decision-makers within the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) and to the technology providers who are developing and demonstrating technologies and systems. Requirements are often expressed as graphs or charts, which reflect the site-specific nature of the functions that must be performed. Many of the tradeoff studies associated with cost savings are identified in the text.

  20. ANAEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic conditions predominate in contaminated aquifers and are not uncommon in noncontaminated areas. Comparatively little is known about degradative processes and nutrient cycling under anaerobic conditions. However, it is apparent these processes are fundamentally differen...

  1. ``Phytomonitoring'': A Screening Tool For Detection Of Subsurface VOC Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, E. R.; Ronen, D.; Laor, Y.; Tandlich, R.; Atzmon, N.

    2004-12-01

    In highly urbanized areas, characterizing the distribution of subsurface contamination is complicated by the dense urban underground and surface infrastructure. Drilling and monitoring in such settings requires extensive and complex coordination, and, for widespread problems extending over many square kilometers, high monetary outlays. When we encountered extensive groundwater contamination of the Central Coastal Plain aquifer of Israel underlying the Tel Aviv metropolis by volatile organic contaminants (VOCs), such problems rapidly became insurmountable. In this 200 km2 region, the average thickness of the vadose zone is about 30 m, and of the underlying freshwater saturated aquifer, about 130 m. As the ground surface is mainly impermeable due to urban development, volatile VOC vapors may build up to high levels in the vadose zone, and travel throughout long distances. As such, we were highly motivated to find an alternative, non-invasive, inexpensive means of scanning the vadose zone for VOCs, which would provide the basis for more traditional surveys at the predetermined sites. Specifically, we asked ourselves if it would be possible to exploit the VOC uptake ability of trees and shrubs for detecting subsurface vadose zone contamination below an urban environment. Preliminary laboratory tests showed that trees take up VOCs from unsaturated sediments. Further, VOCs were found in trees sampled at a former industrial site where the subsurface is heavily contaminated with chlorinated solvents (i.e., trichloroethene TCE; tetrachloroethene PCE), at the heart of our study area. As such, trees at numerous sites in the Tel Aviv area were sampled and analyzed for VOC content in tree trunk cores. Compounds detected in the tree cores include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, TCE, PCE, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. A good correlation between subsurface contamination and positive detection of contaminant VOCs in tree cores was found. The results support the idea that phytomonitoring can be implemented for preliminary screening of potentially contaminated sites in extensive urban areas where monitoring the unsaturated zone can prove problematic, time-consuming and expensive.

  2. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED UNSATURATED SUBSURFACE SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology for the remediation of unsaturated subsurface soils involves the use of microorganisms to degrade contaminants which are present in such soils. nderstanding the processes which drive in situ bioremediation, as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of the...

  3. ENGINEERING ISSUE: IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED UNSATURATED SUBSURFACE SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology for the remediation of unsaturated subsurface soils involves the use of microorganisms to degrade contaminants which are present in such soils. Understanding the processes which drive in situ bioremediation, as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of th...

  4. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE: APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in the application of passive technologies to reduce or remove contaminants from the subsurface environment including soil and ground water. In most cases, the impetus for this interest lies in a perceived savings compared with...

  5. A BIOVENTING APPROACH TO REMEDIATE A GASONLINE CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioventing is a subsurface process using an air stream to enhance biodegradation of oily contaminants. wo pilot-scale bioventing systems were installed at a field site. rocess operations began in October 1990. he field site is located at an air station. pill in 1969 of about 100,...

  6. Control and assessment of the hydrocarbon contamination of Ukrainian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, N. N.

    2008-05-01

    Regularities governing the self-purification of soils from oil hydrocarbons, as well as migration of hydrocarbons, and the effect on the water-physical properties and fertility of soils were revealed in a series of experiments. A system of ecological, economic, and reclamation standards was proposed for regulating economic activities in the case of soil contamination with hydrocarbons.

  7. Subsurface sediment contamination during borehole drilling with an air-actuated down-hole hammer.

    PubMed

    Malard, Florian; Datry, Thibault; Gibert, Janine

    2005-10-01

    Drilling methods can severely alter physical, chemical, and biological properties of aquifers, thereby influencing the reliability of water samples collected from groundwater monitoring wells. Because of their fast drilling rate, air-actuated hammers are increasingly used for the installation of groundwater monitoring wells in unconsolidated sediments. However, oil entrained in the air stream to lubricate the hammer-actuating device can contaminate subsurface sediments. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons, heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Cr, Zn, Pb, and Cd), and nutrients (particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) were measured in continuous sediment cores recovered during the completion of a 26-m deep borehole drilled with a down-hole hammer in glaciofluvial deposits. Total hydrocarbons, Cu, Ni, Cr and particulate organic carbon (POC) were all measured at concentrations far exceeding background levels in most sediment cores. Hydrocarbon concentration averaged 124 +/- 118 mg kg(-1) dry sediment (n = 78 samples) with peaks at depths of 8, 14, and 20 m below the soil surface (maximum concentration: 606 mg kg(-1)). The concentrations of hydrocarbons, Cu, Ni, Cr, and POC were positively correlated and exhibited a highly irregular vertical pattern, that probably reflected variations in air loss within glaciofluvial deposits during drilling. Because the penetration of contaminated air into the formation is unpreventable, the representativeness of groundwater samples collected may be questioned. It is concluded that air percussion drilling has strong limitations for well installation in groundwater quality monitoring surveys. PMID:16091299

  8. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Sphingomonas strains isolated from the terrestrial subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, T; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Balkwill, David L.

    2001-05-01

    Several strains of Sphingomonas isolated from deep Atlantic coastal plain aquifers at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were shown to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbons in a liquid culture medium. Sphingomonas aromaticivorans strain B0695 was the most versatile of the five strains examined. This strain was able to degrade acenaphthene, anthracene, phenanthrene, 2,3-benzofluorene, 2-methyl naphthalene, 2,3-dimethylnaphthalene, and fluoranthene in the presence of 400 mg l(-1) Tween 80. Studies involving microcosms composed of aquifer sediments showed that S. aromaticivorans B0695 could degrade phenanthrene effectively in sterile sediment and could enhance the rate at which this compound was degraded in nonsterile sediment. These findings indicate that it may be feasible to carry out (or, at least, to enhance) in situ bioremediation of phenanthrene-contaminated soils and subsurface environments with S. aromaticivorans B0695. In contrast, stra in B0695 was unable to degrade fluoranthene in microcosms containing aquifer sediments, even though it readily degraded this polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in a defined liquid growth medium.

  9. Geophysical techniques in the study of Hydrocarbon contamination: lab experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampaolo, Valeria; Rizzo, Enzo; Straface, Salvatore; Votta, Mario; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Remediation of sites contaminated by hydrocarbon, due to blow out, leakage from tank or pipe and oil spill, is an environmental problem because infiltrated oil can persist in the ground for a long time and the actual method are invasive and expansive . In the last years there was a growing interest in the use of geophysical methods for environmental monitoring (Greenhouse et al., 1993; Daily and Ramirez, 1995; Lendvay et al., 1998; Atekwana et al., 2000; Chambers et al., 2004; Song et al., 2005; French et al., 2009), and there have been several recent study that relate self-potential measurements to subsurface contaminants (Perry et al., 1996; Naudet et al., 2003; Naudet et al., 2004). Infact, this method is a valid tool for site characterization and monitoring because it is sensitive to contaminant chemistry and redox processes generated by bacteria during the biodegradation phase (Atekwana et al., 2004; Naudet and Revil, 2005). Therefore the goal of this investigation is to characterize underground contaminant distributions using minimally invasive geophysical methods (electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential), in combination with hydrochemical measurements, and to develop fundamental constitutive relations between soil physical and degradation activity parameters and geophysically measurable parameters, in order to improve site remediation efficiency. These tests have been realized at a PVC pool situated in the Hydrogeosite Laboratory of CNR-IMAA. The pool is completely filled with ~ 0.80 m3 of an homogeneous medium (quartz-rich sand with a medium-high hydraulic conductivity in the order of 10-5 m/s), to simulate the space and time dynamics of an artificial aquifer; besides it has been endowed of a sensors network at surface and in borehole, to measure self-potential and electrical resistivity. The experiments consist in geophysical measurements to monitor a simulated oil spill into sand-box following by water rain. The experiment was able to obtain information about contaminant distribution and biodegradation in the subsurface. Besides combining measurements from multiple geophysical and/or hydrochemical measurements allow us to obtain more accurate characterization of spatial variability. The work is part of the research project ModelPROBE (Model-Driven soil probing, site assessment and evaluation, Grant No. 213161 in the framework of the EC-FP7 funded).

  10. Experimental investigations of the entrapment and persistence of organic liquid contaminants in the subsurface environment.

    PubMed Central

    Abriola, L M; Bradford, S A

    1998-01-01

    Organic liquids are common polluters of the subsurface environment. Once released, these nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) tend to become entrapped within soils and geologic formations where they may serve as long-term contaminant reservoirs. The interphase mass transfer from such entrapped residuals will ultimately control environmental exposure levels as well as the persistence and/or remedial recovery of these contaminants in the subsurface. This paper summarizes National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences-sponsored research designed to investigate and quantify NAPL entrapment and interphase mass transfer in natural porous media. Results of soil column and batch experiments are presented that highlight research findings over the past several years. These experiments explore dissolution and volatilization of hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents in sandy porous media. Initial concentration levels and long-term recovery rates are shown to depend on fluid flow rate, soil structure, NAPL composition, and soil wetting characteristics. These observations are explained in the context of conceptual models that describe entrapped NAPL morphology and boundary layer transport. The implications of these laboratory findings on the subsurface persistence and recovery of entrapped NAPLs are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 9 PMID:9703497

  11. Numerical modelling on fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in an unsaturated subsurface system for varying source scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, M.; Vasudevan, M.; Kumar, G. Suresh; Nambi, Indumathi M.

    2015-04-01

    The vertical transport of petroleum hydrocarbons from a surface spill through an unsaturated subsurface system is of major concern in assessing the vulnerability of groundwater contamination. A realistic representation on fate and transport of volatile organic compounds at different periods after spill is quite challenging due to the variation in the source behaviour at the surface of spill as well as the variation in the hydrodynamic parameters and the associated inter-phase partitioning coefficients within the subsurface. In the present study, a one dimensional numerical model is developed to simulate the transport of benzene in an unsaturated subsurface system considering the effect of volatilization, dissolution, adsorption and microbial degradation of benzene for (i) constant continuous source, (ii) continuous decaying source, and (iii) residual source. The numerical results suggest that volatilization is the important sink for contaminant removal considering the soil air migration within the unsaturated zone. It is also observed that the coupled effect of dissolution and volatilization is important for the decaying source at the surface immediately after the spill, whereas rate-limited dissolution from residually entrapped source is responsible for the extended contamination towards later period.

  12. FIELD TRAPPING OF SUBSURFACE VAPOR PHASE PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil gas samples from intact soil cores were collected on adsorbents at a field site, then thermally desorbed and analyzed by laboratory gas chromatography (GC). ertical concentration profiles of predominant vapor phase petroleum hydrocarbons under ambient conditions were obtaine...

  13. Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Jay Grate; Jungbae Kim

    2007-02-19

    The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation. Research at Rensselaer focused on the development of haloalkane dehalogenase as a critical enzyme in the dehalogenation of contaminated materials (ultimately trichloroethylene and related pollutants). A combination of bioinformatic investigation and experimental work was performed. The bioinformatics was focused on identifying a range of dehalogenase enzymes that could be obtained from the known proteomes of major microorganisms. This work identified several candidate enzymes that could be obtained through relatively straightforward gene cloning and expression approaches. The experimental work focused on the isolation of haloalkane dehalogenase from a Xanthobacter species followed by incorporating the enzyme into silicates to form biocatalytic silicates. These are the precursors of SENs. At the conclusion of the study, dehalogenase was incorporated into SENs, although the loading was low. This work supported a single Ph.D. student (Ms. Philippa Reeder) for two years. The project ended prior to her being able to perform substantive bioinformatics efforts that would identify more promising dehalogenase enzymes. The SEN synthesis, however, was demonstrated to be partially successful with dehalogenases. Further work would provide optimized dehalogenases in SENs for use in pollution remission.

  14. Distribution of subsurface hydrocarbon seepage in near surface marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, M.A. )

    1993-02-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps in surficial marine sediments are of two types: ACTIVE: Where gas bubbles, pockmarks, or bright spots are visible on seismic records and/or the presence of chemosynthetic communities in conjunction with large concentrations of migrated-hydrocarbons. Generally in areas where generation and migration of hydrocarbons from the source rock is ongoing today (i.e., maximum burial) and/or where significant migration pathways have developed from tectonic activity. PASSIVE: Where concentrations of migrated hydrocarbons are so low that few or no geophysical anomalies are seen. Typically in areas where generation and expulsion is relict (no longer at maximum burial) and/or regional seals prevent significant vertical migration. The type of seep strongly controls the distribution of migrated hydrocarbons in the near surface sediments and should dictate the sampling equipment and approach required to detect seeps. Active seeps or macroseeps, usually can be detected near the water-sediment interface, within the water column, and at relatively large distances from major leak points. Most conventional sediment and water samplers will capture active seeps, Precise location of sampling is typically not critical to detect active seeps. The Gulf of Mexico, Santa Barbara Channel, and parts of the North Sea have active hydrocarbon seeps.

  15. ORGANIC ACID DERIVATIZATION TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON TRANSFORMATIONS IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence for the natural microbial remediation of subsurface fuel contamination situations should include identification and analysis of transformation or degradation products. In this way. u mass balance between fuel constituents and end products may be approached to monitor cle...

  16. ORGANIC ACID DERIVATIZATION TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON TRANSFORMATIONS IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence for the natural microbial remediation of subsurface fuel contamination situations should include identification and analysis of transformation or degradation products. n this way, a mass balance between fuel constituents and end products may be approached to monitor clea...

  17. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.E.

    1999-07-28

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogeneous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally, 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problems are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates.

  18. Contaminant Transport Through Subsurface Material from the DOE Hanford Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, M.N.; Mayes, M.A.; Jardine, P.M.; Fendorf, S.E.; Nehlhorn, T.L.; Yin, X.P.; Ladd, J.; Teerlink, J.; Zachara, J.M.

    2003-03-26

    Accelerated migration of contaminants in the vadose zone has been observed beneath tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation. This paper focuses on the geochemical processes controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in the sediments beneath the Hanford tank farms. Laboratory scale batch sorption experiments and saturated transport experiments were conducted using reactive tracers U(VI), Sr, Cs, Co and Cr(VI) to investigate geochemical processes controlling the rates and mechanisms of sorption to Hanford subsurface material. Results indicate that the rate of sorption is influenced by changes in solution chemistry such as ionic strength, pH and presence of competing cations. Sediment characteristics such as mineralogy, iron content and cation/anion exchange capacity coupled with the dynamics of flow impact the number of sites available for sorption. Investigative approaches using a combination of batch and transport experiments will contribute to the conceptual and Hanford vadose zone.

  19. Microbial Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminants: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nilanjana; Chandran, Preethy

    2011-01-01

    One of the major environmental problems today is hydrocarbon contamination resulting from the activities related to the petrochemical industry. Accidental releases of petroleum products are of particular concern in the environment. Hydrocarbon components have been known to belong to the family of carcinogens and neurotoxic organic pollutants. Currently accepted disposal methods of incineration or burial insecure landfills can become prohibitively expensive when amounts of contaminants are large. Mechanical and chemical methods generally used to remove hydrocarbons from contaminated sites have limited effectiveness and can be expensive. Bioremediation is the promising technology for the treatment of these contaminated sites since it is cost-effective and will lead to complete mineralization. Bioremediation functions basically on biodegradation, which may refer to complete mineralization of organic contaminants into carbon dioxide, water, inorganic compounds, and cell protein or transformation of complex organic contaminants to other simpler organic compounds by biological agents like microorganisms. Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. This paper presents an updated overview of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by microorganisms under different ecosystems. PMID:21350672

  20. Modeling subsurface contaminant reactions and transport at the watershed scale

    SciTech Connect

    Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; D`Azevedo, E.F.; Wilson, G.V.

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to numerically examine the multiscale effects of physical and chemical mass transfer processes on watershed scale, variably saturated subsurface contaminant transport, and (2) to conduct numerical simulations on watershed scale reactive solute transport and evaluate their implications to uncertainty characterization and cost benefit analysis. Concurrent physical and chemical nonequilibrium caused by inter aggregate gradients of pressure head and solute concentration and intra-aggregate geochemical and microbiological processes, respectively, may arise at various scales and flowpaths. To this date, experimental investigations of these complex processes at watershed scale remain a challenge and numerical studies are often needed for guidance of water resources management and decision making. This research integrates the knowledge bases developed during previous experimental and numerical investigations at a proposed waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the concurrent effects of physical and chemical nonequilibrium. Comparison of numerical results with field data indicates that: (1) multiregion, preferential flow and solute transport exist under partially saturated condition and can be confirmed theoretically, and that (2) mass transfer between pore regions is an important process influencing contaminant movement in the subsurface. Simulations of watershed scale, multi species reactive solute transport suggest that dominance of geochemistry and hydrodynamics may occur simultaneously at different locales and influence the movement of one species relative to another. Execution times on the simulations of the reactive solute transport model also indicate that the model is ready to assist the selection of important parameters for site characterization.

  1. Rapid in-situ subsurface characterization of a petroleum-contaminated site using laser induced fluorescence and cone penetrometer testing

    SciTech Connect

    Boorse, S.C.

    1996-09-01

    In-situ sampling techniques used to characterize the stratigraphy and extent of subsurface contamination are becoming increasingly common in environmental site investigations. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) combined with Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT) is a new in-situ technology that provides real-time data on the extent to Aromatic Petroleum Hydrocarbons and stratigraphy in the subsurface. Integrated LIF/CPT data can rapidly provide contaminant and geologic information necessary to define plume boundaries and design efficient and effective remediation plans. The Rapid Optical Screening Tool (ROST{trademark}, a trademark of the Loral Corporation) combines state-of-the-art LIF technology in conjunction with CPT equipment. The combined ROST{trademark}/CPT system provides a two centimeter resolution which quickly and accurately delineates the vertical and horizontal extent of petroleum contamination. The system distinguishes between specific fuel types by obtaining wavelength-time matrices, which are three-dimensional representations of the fluorescence data. By performing the test in-situ, the combined system eliminates cuttings disposal and the cost and time of extensive laboratory analysis associated with other subsurface screening techniques. The ROST{trademark}/CPT system was used at a former refinery to investigate the extent of petroleum hydrocarbons in the subsurface. The ROST{trademark}/CPT tool was hydraulically advanced to an average depth of 30 feet below grade at 150 grid locations in two separate areas. The results provided a clear real-time characterization of the vertical and horizontal extent of three separate plumes and the potential contamination migration pathways. Due to the rapid, continuous subsurface characterization, on-site decision making enabled a 50% reduction in the planned scope of work and significantly reduced the investigation costs to the client.

  2. INVESTIGATING THE GEOELECTRICAL RESPONSE OF HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION UNDERGOING BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A newly proposed geoelectrical model for hydrocarbon contaminated sites predicts high
    conductivities coincident with t he Contaminated zone a s opposed t o t he traditionally accepted low conductivity. The model attributes the high conductivities to mineral weathering resulti...

  3. A study of the dissolution rate-limited bioremediation of soils contaminated by residual hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Erickson, L.E.; Fan, L.T.

    1994-12-31

    Since many petroleum components are barely soluble in water, they are frequently present as nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in subsurface soils. Bioremediation of soils contaminated by such residual hydrocarbons appears to be cost-effective under various situations. More often than not, however, bioremediation can be rate-limited by dissolution, solute transport or biotransformation in a four-phase system comprising the NAPL, aqueous, solid and microbial phases. This paper proposes a model elucidating the microbial assimilation of hydrocarbon contaminants on the solid surface and in the aqueous phase. It focuses on those situations in which dissolution is the main rate-limiting factor. An investigation has been carried out on the rates of biodegradation of some common petroleum components such as benzene, ethyl-benzene, toluene and xylene in the four-phase system. The effects considered are those of the mass-transfer area, specific growth rate of biomass, and velocity of pore-water flow.

  4. INTERNET COURSE ON MODELING SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of leaks from underground storage tanks relies on knowledge of contaminant fate and transport, hydrology and in some cases modeling. EPA is developing an interactive, on-line training course to provide states with a low-cost training opportunity for these areas. Two ...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A DATA EVALUATION/DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subsurface contamination frequently originates from spatially distributed sources of multi-component nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Such chemicals are typically persistent sources of ground-water contamination that are difficult to characterize. This work addresses the feasi...

  6. Chemical contamination and transformation of soils in hydrocarbon production regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamotaev, I. V.; Ivanov, I. V.; Mikheev, P. V.; Nikonova, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    The current concepts of soil pollution and transformation in the regions of hydrocarbon production have been reviewed. The development of an oil field creates extreme conditions for pedogenesis. Tendencies in the radial migration, spatial distribution, metabolism, and accumulation of pollutants (oil, oil products, and attendant heavy metals) in soils of different bioclimatic zones have been analyzed. The radial and lateral mobility of pollution halos is a universal tendency in the technogenic transformation of soils and soil cover in the regions of hydrocarbon production. The biodegradation time of different hydrocarbon compounds strongly varies under different landscape conditions, from several months to several tens of years. The transformation of original (mineral and organic) soils to their technogenic modifications (mechanically disturbed, chemically contaminated, and chemo soils and chemozems) occurs in the impact zone of technogenic hydrocarbon fluxes under any physiographical conditions. The integrated use of the existing methods for the determination of the total content and qualitative composition of bituminous substances and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in combination with the chromatographic determination of normal alkanes and hydrocarbon gases, as well as innovative methods of studies, allows revealing new processes and genetic relationships in soils and studying the functioning of soils and soil cover. The study of the hydrocarbon contamination of soils is important for development of restoration measures and lays the groundwork for the ecological and hygienic regulation based on the zonation of soil and landscape resistance to different pollutants.

  7. Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolofsky, S.A.; Adams, E.E.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolofsky, Scott A.; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m.

  9. Characterization of subsurface polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at the Deepwater Horizon site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diercks, Arne-R.; Highsmith, Raymond C.; Asper, Vernon L.; Joung, DongJoo; Zhou, Zhengzhen; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Teske, Andreas P.; Guinasso, Norman; Wade, Terry L.; Lohrenz, Steven E.

    2010-10-01

    Here, we report the initial observations of distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in subsurface waters near the Deepwater Horizon oil well site (also referred to as the Macondo, Mississippi Canyon Block 252 or MC252 well). Profiles of in situ fluorescence and beam attenuation conducted during 9-16 May 2010 were characterized by distinct peaks at depths greater than 1000 m, with highest intensities close to the wellhead and decreasing intensities with increasing distance from the wellhead. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses of water samples coinciding with the deep fluorescence and beam attenuation anomalies confirmed the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at concentrations reaching 189 ?g L-1 (ppb). Subsurface exposure to PAH at levels considered to be toxic to marine organisms would have occurred in discrete depth layers between 1000 and 1400 m in the region southwest of the wellhead site and extending at least as far as 13 km.

  10. Subsurface Cycling of Nitrogen and Anaerobic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation Revealed by Nucleic Acid and Metabolic Biomarkers▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Jane M.; Suflita, Joseph M.; Gieg, Lisa M.; DeRito, Christopher M.; Jeon, Che-Ok; Madsen, Eugene L.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial processes are crucial for ecosystem maintenance, yet documentation of these processes in complex open field sites is challenging. Here we used a multidisciplinary strategy (site geochemistry, laboratory biodegradation assays, and field extraction of molecular biomarkers) to deduce an ongoing linkage between aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation and nitrogen cycling in a contaminated subsurface site. Three site wells were monitored over a 10-month period, which revealed fluctuating concentrations of nitrate, ammonia, sulfate, sulfide, methane, and other constituents. Biodegradation assays performed under multiple redox conditions indicated that naphthalene metabolism was favored under aerobic conditions. To explore in situ field processes, we measured metabolites of anaerobic naphthalene metabolism and expressed mRNA transcripts selected to document aerobic and anaerobic microbial transformations of ammonia, nitrate, and methylated aromatic contaminants. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection of two carboxylated naphthalene metabolites and transcribed benzylsuccinate synthase, cytochrome c nitrite reductase, and ammonia monooxygenase genes indicated that anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds and both dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) and nitrification occurred in situ. These data link formation (via DNRA) and destruction (via nitrification) of ammonia to in situ cycling of nitrogen in this subsurface habitat, where metabolism of aromatic pollutants has led to accumulation of reduced metabolic end products (e.g., ammonia and methane). PMID:20348302

  11. Biodegradation and sorption of organic solvents and hydrocarbon fuel constituents in subsurface environments. Final report, October 1983-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.T.; Henson, J.M.; Piwoni, M.D.; Wilson, B.H.; Banerjee, P.

    1988-03-01

    The biodegradation and sorption of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents and hydrocarbon fuel constituents in subsurface environments were investigated to provide information for development of optimal strategies for decontamination of polluted ground water. Biodegradation studies revealed that subsurface microorganisms growing aerobically on light aliphatic hydrocarbons can co-metabolically degrade trichloroethylene and related compounds which are normally recalcitrant to biodegradation in aerobic subsurface environments. This process has high potential as a basis for ground-water reclamation methodologies, as illustrated by further studies employing laboratory-scale fixed film bioreactors. Other biodegradation work indicated that light aromatic hydrocarbons, which are usually considered not to biodegrade under anaerobic conditions, can have a biological fate in anoxic subsurface environments.

  12. Bacterial and archaeal communities in long-term contaminated surface and subsurface soil evaluated through coextracted RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Mikkonen, Anu; Santalahti, Minna; Lappi, Kaisa; Pulkkinen, Anni-Mari; Montonen, Leone; Suominen, Leena

    2014-10-01

    Soil RNA and DNA were coextracted along a contamination gradient at a landfarming field with aged crude oil contamination to investigate pollution-dependent differences in 16S rRNA and rRNA gene pools. Microbial biomass correlated with nucleic acid yields as well as bacterial community change, indicating that the same factors controlled community size and structure. In surface soil, bacterial community evenness, estimated through length heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR) fingerprinting, appeared higher for RNA-based than for DNA-based communities. The RNA-based community profiles resembled the DNA-based communities of soil with a lower contamination level. Cloning-based identification of bacterial hydrocarbon-degrading taxa in the RNA pool, representing the viable community with high protein synthesis potential, indicated that decontamination processes still continue. Analyses of archaea revealed that only Thaumarchaeota were present in the aerobic samples, whereas more diverse communities were found in the compacted subsurface soil with more crude oil. For subsurface bacteria, hydrocarbon concentration explained neither the community structure nor the difference between RNA-based and DNA-based communities. However, rRNA of bacterial taxa associated with syntrophic and sulphate-reducing alkane degradation was detected. Although the same prokaryotic taxa were identified in DNA and RNA, comparison of the two nucleic acid pools can aid in the assessment of past and future restoration success. PMID:24986450

  13. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Copenhaver, Sally C.; Aines, Roger D.

    2000-01-01

    In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

  14. Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

    2007-02-26

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reactive membrane barriers--a new and flexible technique to contain and stabilize subsurface contaminants. Polymer membranes will leak once a contaminant is able to diffuse through the membrane. By incorporating a reactive material in the polymer, however, the contaminant is degraded or immobilized within the membrane. These processes increase the time for contaminants to breakthrough the barrier (i.e. the lag time) and can dramatically extend barrier lifetimes. In this work, reactive barrier membranes containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) or crystalline silicotitanate (CST) were developed to prevent the migration of chlorinated solvents and cesium-137, respectively. These studies were complemented by the development of models quantifying the leakage/kill time of reactive membranes and describing the behavior of products produced via the reactions within the membranes. First, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} and CST were prepared and tested. Although PVA is not useful in practical applications, it allows experiments to be performed rapidly and the results to be compared to theory. For copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}) and carbon tetrachloride, the barrier was effective, increasing the time to breakthrough over 300 times. Even better performance was expected, and the percentage of the iron used in the reaction with the contaminants was determined. For cesium, the CST laden membranes increased lag times more than 30 times, and performed better than theoretical predictions. A modified theory was developed for ion exchangers in reactive membranes to explain this result. With the PVA membranes, the effect of a groundwater matrix on barrier performance was tested. Using Hanford groundwater, the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers decreased compared to solutions containing a pH buffer and high levels of chloride (both of which promote iron reactivity). For the CST bearing membrane, performance improved by a factor of three when groundwater was used in place of deionized water. The performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} was then evaluating using carbon tetrachloride as the target contaminant. Only with a hydrophilic additive (glycerol), was the iron able to extend lag times. Lag times were increased by a factor of 15, but only 2-3% of the iron was used, likely due to formation of oxide precipitates on the iron surface, which slowed the reaction. With thicker membranes and lower carbon tetrachloride concentrations, it is expected that performance will improve. Previous models for reactive membranes were also extended. The lag time is a measurement of when the barrier is breached, but contaminants do slowly leak through prior to the lag time. Thus, two parameters, the leakage and the kill time, were developed to determine when a certain amount of pollutant has escaped (the kill time) or when a given exposure (concentration x time) occurs (the leakage). Finally, a model was developed to explain the behavior of mobile reaction products in reactive barrier membranes. Although the goal of the technology is to avoid such products, it is important to be able to predict how these products will behave. Interestingly, calculations show that for any mobile reaction products, one half of the mass will diffuse into the containment area and one half will escape, assuming that the volumes of the containment area and the surrounding environment are much larger than the barrier membrane. These parameters/models will aid in the effective design of barrier membranes.

  15. Imaging of subsurface contaminations using dipole EM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Verma, S. K.

    1994-04-01

    Major contemporary applications of the dipole EM methods deal with the problems of imaging subsurface contaminated or polluted zones, mapping of saline-water incursion zones in coastal areas, foundation engineering and waste disposal etc. Because such problems are mostly encountered in populated and/or industrialized areas, inductive electromagnetic (EM) methods employing small dipolar transmit-receive (T-R) systems provide efficient tools to tackle them. A number of T-R orientations, measuring different primary and resultant fields, are currently employed in EM exploration.In most of the above problems the target zone can be simulated by a thin conductive or resistive layer. The present work quantifies the resolving capabilities of various dipole EM systems for such a target layer. The target layer is considered embedded in different types of commonly occuring geoelectrical situations. Comparative study of the resolutions obtained for the target layer by different dipole systems reveals that the perpendicular loop system provides the best resolution due to its unique advantage of being free from primary field interference.

  16. Subsurface contamination focus area technical requirements. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

    1996-10-01

    This is our vision, a vision that replaces the ad hoc or {open_quotes}delphi{close_quotes} method which is to get a group of {open_quotes}experts{close_quotes} together and make decisions based upon opinion. To fulfill our vision for the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), it is necessary to generate technical requirements or performance measures which are quantitative or measurable. Decisions can be supported if they are based upon requirements or performance measures which can be traced to the origin (documented) and are verifiable, i.e., prove that requirements are satisfied by inspection (show me), demonstration, analysis, monitoring, or test. The data from which these requirements are derived must also reflect the characteristics of individual landfills or plumes so that technologies that meet these requirements will necessarily work at specific sites. Other subjective factors, such as stakeholder concerns, do influence decisions. Using the requirements as a basic approach, the SCFA can depend upon objective criteria to help influence the areas of subjectivity, like the stakeholders. In the past, traceable requirements were not generated, probably because it seemed too difficult to do so. There are risks that the requirements approach will not be accepted because it is new and represents a departure from the historical paradigm.

  17. Geochemical and isotopic characteristics associated with high electrical conductivities in a shallow hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legall, F.; Atekwana, E.; Atekwana, E.; Krishnamurthy, R.; Sauck, W.

    2003-04-01

    Data collected from a network of in-situ vertical resistivity probes (VRPs) deployed within a hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer showed high soil conductivities associated with zones where residual and dissolved phase hydrocarbons (RDH) occur and zones where these phases coexist with free phase hydrocarbons (RDFH). Bulk soil conductivities were highest (12 to 30 mS/m) in the RDFH zone compared to the RDH zone (10 to 25 mS/m). Groundwater from closely spaced multi-level piezometers (MLPs) installed in the aquifer was analyzed to investigate the role of mineral weathering as the source of ions responsible for the high soil conductivity. Evidence for mineral weathering in the aquifer was assessed using major inorganic ions, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), stable carbon isotope ratio of DIC (?13CDIC), and bulk soil conductivity. The link between bulk soil conductivity and ?13CDIC in contaminant plumes has never been reported in the literature. The results show higher Na, Ca, and Mg in the contaminated zone compared to background. The higher TDS in the contaminated zones is consistent with the weathering of carbonates and Na and Ca feldspars, the dominant minerals in the aquifer. Higher TDS at the contaminated locations was also coincident with higher DIC. The ?13CDIC values of 16.9 to 9.5 ppm suggest that DIC evolution within this zone is controlled by carbonate dissolution through enhanced CO_2 production related to microbial hydrocarbon degradation. Within the range of ?13CDIC values reported for groundwater at the RDH locations, the more positive ?13CDIC values were observed in zones where reduction of NO_3, Mn(IV), Fe(III), and SO_4 was occurring and was coincident with higher bulk soil conductivity. Within the portion of the aquifer with RDFH, ?13CDIC ranged from +6.5 to 4.4 ppm, suggesting that methanogenesis is the dominant redox process at this location. High DIC within the methanogenic zone is also coincident with higher bulk soil conductivity. Thus the subsurface expression of microbial hydrocarbon mineralization is recorded in the TDS, DIC, ?13CDIC, and bulk soil conductivity. It also appears that the bulk soil conductivity records an integrated summary of process-driven biogeochemical changes reflected in the changing pattern of redox zonation. This suggests that high soil conductivities measured at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites could be used to assess the potential for natural attenuation and to monitor intrinsic bioremediation at these sites.

  18. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1995-01-01

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  19. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  20. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1996-02-13

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  1. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-10-03

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  2. Chemical fingerprinting of hydrocarbon-contamination in soil.

    PubMed

    Boll, Esther S; Nejrup, Jens; Jensen, Julie K; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-03-01

    Chemical fingerprinting analyses of 29 hydrocarbon-contaminated soils were performed to assess the soil quality and determine the main contaminant sources. The results were compared to an assessment based on concentrations of the 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pointed out by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPAPAH16) and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH). The chemical fingerprinting strategy proposed in this study included four tiers: (i) qualitative analysis of GC-FID chromatograms, (ii) comparison of the chemical composition of both un-substituted and alkyl-substituted polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs), (iii) diagnostic ratios of selected PACs, and (iv) multivariate data analysis of sum-normalized PAC concentrations. The assessment criteria included quantitative analysis of 19 PACs and C1-C4 alkyl-substituted homologues of naphthalene, fluorene, dibenzothiophene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and chrysene; and 13 oxygenated polycyclic aromatic compounds (O-PACs). The chemical composition of un-substituted and alkyl-substituted PACs and visual interpretation of GC-FID chromatograms were in combination successful in differentiating pyrogenic and petrogenic hydrocarbon sources and in assessing weathering trends of hydrocarbon contamination in the soils. Multivariate data analysis of sum-normalized concentrations could as a stand-alone tool distinguish between hydrocarbon sources of petrogenic and pyrogenic origin, differentiate within petrogenic sources, and detect weathering trends. Diagnostic ratios of PACs were not successful for source identification of the heavily weathered hydrocarbon sources in the soils. The fingerprinting of contaminated soils revealed an underestimation of PACs in petrogenic contaminated soils when the assessment was based solely on EPAPAH16. As alkyl-substituted PACs are dominant in petrogenic sources, the evaluation of the total load of PACs based on EPAPAH16 was not representative. Likewise, the O-PACs are not represented in soil quality assessments based on EPAPAH16 and TPH. The ?O-PACs ranged between contaminated soils contained considerable amount of O-PACs corresponding to between 6 and 18% of the ?EPAPAH16. PMID:25625139

  3. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. A. Jr.; Corey, J. C.

    2002-02-27

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total of 269 deployments of 83 innovative technologies. Until recently, the primary thrust of the program has been to develop, demonstrate, and deploy those remediation technology alternatives that are solutions to technology needs identified by the DOE Sites. Over the last several years, the DOE Sites began to express a need not only for innovative technologies, but also for technical assistance. In response to this need, DOE-HQ EM-50, in collaboration with and in support of a Strategic Lab Council recommendation directed each of its Focus Areas to implement a Lead Laboratory Concept to enhance their technical capabilities. Because each Focus Area is unique as defined by the contrast in either the type of contaminants involved or the environments in which they are found, the Focus Areas were given latitude in how they set up and implemented the Lead Lab Concept. The configuration of choice for the SCFA was a Lead-Partner Lab arrangement. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) teamed with the SCFA as the Focus Area's Lead Laboratory. SRTC then partnered with the DOE National Laboratories to create a virtual consulting function within DOE. The National Laboratories were established to help solve the Nation's most difficult problems, drawing from a resource pool of the most talented and gifted scientists and engineers. Following that logic, SRTC, through the Lead-Partner Lab arrangement, has that same resource base to draw from to provide assistance to any SCFA DOE customer throughout the Complex. This paper briefly describes how this particular arrangement is organized and provides case histories that illustrate its strengths in solving problems and offering solutions. The program is designed to minimize red tape, maximize value, and to rapidly and cost effectively disseminate solutions to common problems facing the DOE.

  4. Subsurface transport of hydrocarbon fuel additives and a dense chlorinated solvent. Final report, 1 July 1993-30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Guven, O.; Dane, J.H.; Hill, W.E.; Hofstee, C.; Walker, R.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides a description of the work done at Auburn University for the research project `Subsurface Transport of Hydrocarbon Fuel additives and a Chlorinated Solvent`, supported by Armstrong Laboratory, Headquarters Air Force Civil Engineering Support Agency, Environics Directorate, under contract F08635-93-C-0071. The project is focused on the subsurface environmental behavior of quadricyclane, which is a light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) cyclic hydrocarbon fuel additive, and on the behavior of tetrachloroethylene (or perchloroethylene), which is a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent.

  5. Bioremediation: Technology for treating hydrocarbon-contaminated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Towprayoon, S.; Kuntrangwattana, S.

    1996-12-31

    Cutting oil wastewater from an iron and steel factory was applied to the soil windrow. Self-remediation was then compared with remediation with acclimatized indigenous microbes. The incremental reduction rate of the microorganisms and hydrocarbon-degradable microbes was slower in self-remediation than in the latter treatment. Within 30 days, when the acclimatized indigenous microbes were used, there was a significant reduction of the contaminated hydrocarbons, while self-remediation took longer to reduce to the same concentration. Various nitrogen sources were applied to the soil pile, namely, organic compost, chemical fertilizer, ammonium sulfate, and urea. The organic compost induced a high yield of hydrocarbon-degradable microorganisms, but the rate at which the cutting oil in the soil decreased was slower than when other nitrogen sources were used. The results of cutting oil degradation studied by gas chromatography showed the absence of some important hydrocarbons. The increment of the hydrocarbon-degradable microbes in the land treatment ecosystem does not necessarily correspond to the hydrocarbon reduction efficiency. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Time-lapse 3-D seismic imaging of shallow subsurface contaminant flow.

    PubMed

    McKenna, J; Sherlock, D; Evans, B

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents a physical modelling study outlining a technique whereby buoyant contaminant flow within water-saturated unconsolidated sand was remotely monitored utilizing the time-lapse 3-D (TL3-D) seismic response. The controlled temperature and pressure conditions, along with the high level of acquisition repeatability attainable using sandbox physical models, allow the TL3-D seismic response to pore fluid movement to be distinguished from all other effects. TL3-D seismic techniques are currently being developed to monitor hydrocarbon reserves within producing reservoirs in an endeavour to improve overall recovery. However, in many ways, sandbox models under atmospheric conditions more accurately simulate the shallow subsurface than petroleum reservoirs. For this reason, perhaps the greatest application for analogue sandbox modelling is to improve our understanding of shallow groundwater and environmental flow mechanisms. Two fluid flow simulations were conducted whereby air and kerosene were injected into separate water-saturated unconsolidated sand models. In both experiments, a base 3-D seismic volume was recorded and compared with six later monitor surveys recorded while the injection program was conducted. Normal incidence amplitude and P-wave velocity information were extracted from the TL3-D seismic data to provide visualization of contaminant migration. Reflection amplitudes displayed qualitative areal distribution of fluids when a suitable impedance contrast existed between pore fluids. TL3-D seismic reflection tomography can potentially monitor the change in areal distribution of fluid contaminants over time, indicating flow patterns. However, other research and this current work have not established a quantifiable relationship between either normal reflection amplitudes and attenuation and fluid saturation. Generally, different pore fluids will have unique seismic velocities due to differences in compressibility and density. The predictable relationships that exist between P-wave velocity and fluid saturation can allow a quantitative assessment of contaminant migration. PMID:11816991

  7. FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.E.

    2000-05-05

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

  8. THE ONSITE ON-LINE CALCULATORS AND TRAINING FOR SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a suite of on-line calculators called "OnSite" for assessing transport of environmental contaminants in the subsurface. The purpose of these calculators is to provide methods and data for common calculations used in assessing impacts from subsurface contaminatio...

  9. GEOCHEMISTRY OF SUBSURFACE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive barriers that couple subsurface fluid flow with a passive chemical treatment zone are emerging, cost effective approaches for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. Factors such as the build-up of surface precipitates, bio-fouling, and changes in subsurface tr...

  10. New barrier fluids for subsurface containment of contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Persoff, P.; Holman, H.Y.; Muller, S.J.; Pruess, K.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01

    In some situations, containment of contaminants in the subsurface may be preferable to removal or treatment in situ. In these cases, it maybe possible to form barriers by injecting fluids (grouts) that set in place and reduce the formation permeability. This paper reports laboratory work to develop two types of fluids for this application: colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX). Falling-head permeameter tests of grouted Hanford sand, lasting 50 days, showed hydraulic conductivities of order 10{sup -7} cm/sec for these two materials. Low initial viscosity of the grout is necessary to permit injection without causing fracturing or surface uplift. Experiments with crosslinked polysiloxanes showed that they could be diluted to achieve adequately low viscosity without losing their ability to cure. Control of the gel time is important for grout emplacement. Gel time of CS grouts increased with increasing pH (above 6.5) and with decreasing ionic strength. Salt solutions were added to the colloid-to increase the ionic strength and control gel time. When injected into Hanford sand, the CS grout gelled much more quickly than the same formula without sand. This effect results from salinity that is present in pore water and from multi-valent ions that are desorbed from clays and ion-exchanged for mono-valent ions in the grout. Ion-exchange experiments showed that most of the multi-valent ions could be removed-by flushing the sand with 15 PV of 4% NaCl and sand treated in this manner did not accelerate the gelling of the grout. When grout is injected into unsaturated soil it slumps, leaving the soil only partially saturated and achieving less permeability reduction upon gelling. Multiple injections of CS grout in 1-D sand columns demonstrated that by accumulating the residual gelled grout saturations from several injections, low permeability can be achieved.

  11. Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Santosh R.; Kollah, Bharati; Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2008-06-15

    A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted with uranium contaminated subsurface sediment to assess the geochemical and microbial community response to ethanol amendment. A classical sequence of TEAPs was observed in ethanol-amended slurries, with NO3- reduction, Fe(III) reduction, SO4 2- reduction, and CH4 production proceeding in sequence until all of the added 13C-ethanol (9 mM) was consumed. Approximately 60% of the U(VI) content of the sediment was reduced during the period of Fe(III) reduction. No additional U(VI) reduction took place during the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic phases of the experiment. Only gradual reduction of NO3 -, and no reduction of U(VI), took place in ethanol-free slurries. Stimulation of additional Fe(III) or SO4 2- reduction in the ethanol-amended slurries failed to promote further U(VI) reduction. Reverse transcribed 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed major increases in the abundance of organisms related to Dechloromonas, Geobacter, and Oxalobacter in the ethanolamended slurries. PLFAs indicative of Geobacter showed a distinct increase in the amended slurries, and analysis of PLFA 13C/12C ratios confirmed the incorporation of ethanol into these PLFAs. A increase in the abundance of 13C-labeled PLFAs indicative of Desulfobacter, Desulfotomaculum, and Desulfovibrio took place during the brief period of sulfate reduction which followed the Fe(III) reduction phase. Our results show that major redox processes in ethanol-amended sediments can be reliably interpreted in terms of standard conceptual models of TEAPs in sediments. However, the redox speciation of uranium is complex and cannot be explained based on simplified thermodynamic considerations.

  12. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for Subsurface Immobilization of Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.; Fujita, Y.; Ginn, T. R.; Hubbard, S. S.; Dafflon, B.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Henriksen, J. R.; Peterson, J.; Taylor, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of the greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have found that calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr can be accelerated by the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms, that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning, and that nutrient additions can stimulate ureolytic activity. To extend our understanding of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) in an aquifer setting a continuous recirculation field experiment evaluating MICP was conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO. In this experiment, groundwater extracted from an onsite well was amended with urea (total mass of 42.5 kg) and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into a well approximately 4 meters up-gradient for a period of 12 days followed by 10 months of groundwater sampling and monitoring. Crosshole radar and electrical tomographic data were collected prior, during, and after the MICP treatment. The urea and molasses treatment resulted in an enhanced population of sediment associated urea hydrolyzing organisms as evidenced by increases in the number of ureC gene copies, increases in 14C urea hydrolysis rates, and long-term observations of ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) in the injection, extraction and down gradient monitoring wells. Permeability changes and increases in the calcite saturation indexes in the well field suggest that mineral precipitation has occurred; ongoing analysis of field samples seeks to confirm this. Changes in dielectric constant and electrical conductivity were used to interpret the spatiotemporal distribution of the injectate and subsequent calcite precipitation. Modeling activities are underway to define field-scale urea hydrolysis rates.

  13. Biogeochemical Stability of Contaminants in the Subsurface Following In Situ Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, innovative treatment technologies have emerged to meet groundwater cleanup goals. In many cases these methods take advantage of the redox behavior of contaminant species. For example, remedial technologies that strategically manipulate subsurface redox conditio...

  14. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE: APPLICATIONS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-00329 Azadpour-Keeley**, A., Keeley, J.W., Russell, H.H., and Sewell*, G.W. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Contaminants in the Subsurface: Applications. Ground Water Monitoring and Reme...

  15. Applying model abstraction techniques to optimize monitoring networks for detecting subsurface contaminant transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving strategies for monitoring subsurface contaminant transport includes performance comparison of competing models, developed independently or obtained via model abstraction. Model comparison and parameter discrimination involve specific performance indicators selected to better understand s...

  16. PREDICTING SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND TRANSFORMATION: CONSIDERATIONS FOR MODEL SELECTION AND FIELD VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting subsurface contaminant transport and transformation requires mathematical models based on a variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes. The mathematical model is an attempt to quantitatively describe observed processes in order to permit systematic forecas...

  17. Novel method for cleaning a vacuum chamber from hydrocarbon contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Wanzenboeck, H. D.; Roediger, P.; Hochleitner, G.; Bertagnolli, E.; Buehler, W.

    2010-11-15

    A novel method for cleaning a high vacuum chamber is presented. This method is based on concurrent in situ high-energetic UV light activation of contaminants located in the residual gas and at the vacuum chamber surfaces as well as the in situ generation of highly reactive ozone. Ozone oxidizes the contaminants to volatile species. Investigations by energy-dispersive x-ray analysis of residual gas depositions and mass-spectroscopy measurements of the residual gas in the vacuum chamber identify the contaminant species as hydrocarbons. After a cleaning period of 8 h, a decrease in measured chamber contamination by about 90% could be achieved according to atomic force microscope analysis. Mass spectroscopy measurements using a residual gas analyzer indicate the creation of volatile, carbonaceous species during the cleaning process.

  18. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Distribution and Modification in the Sub-surface Plume Near the Deepwater Horizon Wellhead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, A. M.; Joung, D.; Wade, T.

    2011-12-01

    A significant concern associated with oil spills is the toxicity associated with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) component. Ratios of various PAH's have also been used as indicators of oil sources. During a late May/early June cruise, 57 samples for PAH analysis were collected in the vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead. Most samples were from the previously reported sub-surface oil plume, centered near 1100 m depth. PAH concentrations ranged up to 117 ?g/L and rapidly diminished in the subsurface with distance from the wellhead. The Macondo well oil was observed to be rich in naphthalenes. Within a few km of the wellhead, the percentage of methyl-naphthalenes in the sub-surface plume was generally higher than in the source, suggesting preferential solubilization of this low molecular weight fraction. However, the percentage rapidly decreased away from the well also suggesting rapid destruction or removal of the naphthalenes. The pyrogenic index (Wang et al.) was <0.05 for all samples, indicating a petroleum origin. For a few samples, some other PAH ratios (e.g., MP/P and P/A ratios) suggested a combustion origin. However, these ratios also tended to vary both with percent methyl-naphthalenes and distance from the wellhead, suggesting anomalous ratios originating from solubilization/degradation effects. We also obtained a more limited set of surface water samples, generally avoiding the most contaminated areas as well as areas of oil burning. For these surface water samples, similar trends were observed as at depth, probably resulting from selective volatilization and photo-degradation. Overall, the data illustrate how environmental factors lead both to reduced concentrations and fractionation of the PAH's.

  19. Organic acid derivatization techniques applied to petroleum hydrocarbon transformations in subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barcelona, M.J.; Lu, J.; Tomczak, D.M.

    1995-07-01

    Evidence for the natural microbial remediation of subsurface fuel contamination situations should include identification and analysis of transformation or degradation products. In this way, a mass balance between fuel constituents and end products may be approached to monitor cleanup progress. Application of advanced organic acid metabolite derivatization techniques to several know sites of organic compounds and fuel mixture contamination provide valuable information on the pathways and progress of microbial transformation. Good correlation between observed metabolites and transformation pathways of aromatic fuel constituents were observed at the sites.

  20. A cone penetrometer X-ray fluorescence tool for the analysis of subsurface heavy metal contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, B. J.; Unsell, C. W.; Elam, W. T.; Hudson, K. R.; Adams, J. W.

    1999-02-01

    Past use of X-ray fluorescence for the analysis of heavy metal contamination in soil was limited to analyzing either collected samples or soil on an exposed surface. To investigate subsurface contamination at even shallow depths, extensive and often expensive drilling or excavation was required to obtain either a sample or an exposed surface. A cone penetrometer X-ray fluorescence tool has been developed by the US Army, Navy and Air Force Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) to analyze subsurface metal contamination in situ. Using this tool, subsurface metal contamination can be investigated in real time without sampling or excavation. A schematic diagram of the penetrometer tool is provided and operating capabilities are discussed. The results of bench testing and a calibration for lead contaminated standards are presented.

  1. The role of biominerals in enhancing the geophysical response at hydrocarbon contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewafy, Farag Mohamed

    There are several source mechanisms by which microbial activity in the subsurface can change geophysical signatures. To date the source mechanisms generating the geophysical signatures in microbially active environments remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the link between the biogeochemical processes resulting in biotransformation of metallic iron mineral phases and the associated biogeophysical signatures. Hydrocarbon contaminated environments provide excellent laboratories for investigating iron mineral biotransformation. In particular, we investigated the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the complex conductivity (CC) signatures of a hydrocarbon contaminated site near Bemidji, Minnesota. For the MS study, we investigated the changes in the MS response for cores retrieved from the site as well as down boreholes. The contaminated location revealed two enriched MS zones. The first MS lies within the hydrocarbon smear zone, which is limited to the zone of water table fluctuation with high concentrations of dissolved Fe(II) and organic carbon content. Magnetite and siderite were the dominant minerals formed during this process. However, magnetite was responsible for the bulk of MS changes. The second zone of MS enhancement lies within the vadose zone which is characterized by methane depletion suggesting that aerobic or anaerobic oxidation of methane is coupled to iron-reduction resulting in magnetite precipitation. For the CC work, we conducted laboratory CC measurements along four cores in addition to field CC survey. We found that the real (sigma?) and imaginary (sigma?) conductivity are higher for samples from within the oil plume especially within the smear zone compared to background uncontaminated samples. Using magnetite as an example of the biometallic minerals in the smear zone at the site, a clear increase in the sigma? response with increasing magnetite content was observed suggesting that the presence of bio-metallic mineral phases as well as electroactive Fe(II) within the smear zone impacts the imaginary conductivity. Our results suggest that the biogeochemical processes leading to the precipitation of metallic iron mineral phases impacts the geophysical signatures at hydrocarbon contaminated sites undergoing active biodegradation. These bio-metallic minerals (e.g., magnetite) provide us with another source mechanism which has not been considered in previous studies. Therefore, the recognition of the zone of enriched bio-metallic iron mineral phases within the water table fluctuating zone calls for a reevaluation of biogeophysical signatures observed at hydrocarbon contaminated sites commonly attributed to an enhancement of pore water conductivity related to the production of metabolic byproducts.

  2. The stability and utility of diagnostic ratio hydrocarbon fingerprinting for soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, G.S.; Sara McMillen

    1996-12-31

    In order to recover costs for oil spill cleanup and restoration regulatory agencies and trustees of natural resources are interested in identifying parties responsible for hydrocarbon releases, and for associated environmental damages. Chemical analyses of contaminated soil and groundwater samples are currently used to identify the sources of contamination in soil and groundwater systems. However, conventional hydrocarbon fingerprinting approaches such as EPA Method 8015, EPA Method 8270, and ASTM Method 3328-91 afford a low resolution fingerprint that is easily degraded in the environment. The challenge to the hydrocarbon chemist is to develop an analytical approach that minimizes the impact of environmental weathering and biodegradation on the oil signature and improves the accuracy of oil source identification. An advanced chemical fingerprinting strategy is presented that combines sensitive and hydrocarbon specific analytical methods with a detailed interpretive strategy designed to minimize the impacts of environmental weathering and biodegradation. Data will be presented from a series of oil biodegradation studies in soil that clearly demonstrate the utility and stability of source ratio analysis over a wide range of oil degradation states and oil types. Using principal component analysis, stable source ratios of C{sub 3}-dibenzothiophenes/C{sub 3}-phenanthrenes, and C{sub 2}-dibenzothiophenes/C{sub 2}-phenanthrenes were identified and evaluated. These source ratios retain their characteristic source ratio signature even after 95 percent of the PAH and dibenzothiophene target analytes and 70 percent of the total oil has been biodegraded.

  3. The stability and utility of diagnostic ratio hydrocarbon fingerprinting for soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, G.S.; Sara McMillen

    1996-01-01

    In order to recover costs for oil spill cleanup and restoration regulatory agencies and trustees of natural resources are interested in identifying parties responsible for hydrocarbon releases, and for associated environmental damages. Chemical analyses of contaminated soil and groundwater samples are currently used to identify the sources of contamination in soil and groundwater systems. However, conventional hydrocarbon fingerprinting approaches such as EPA Method 8015, EPA Method 8270, and ASTM Method 3328-91 afford a low resolution fingerprint that is easily degraded in the environment. The challenge to the hydrocarbon chemist is to develop an analytical approach that minimizes the impact of environmental weathering and biodegradation on the oil signature and improves the accuracy of oil source identification. An advanced chemical fingerprinting strategy is presented that combines sensitive and hydrocarbon specific analytical methods with a detailed interpretive strategy designed to minimize the impacts of environmental weathering and biodegradation. Data will be presented from a series of oil biodegradation studies in soil that clearly demonstrate the utility and stability of source ratio analysis over a wide range of oil degradation states and oil types. Using principal component analysis, stable source ratios of C[sub 3]-dibenzothiophenes/C[sub 3]-phenanthrenes, and C[sub 2]-dibenzothiophenes/C[sub 2]-phenanthrenes were identified and evaluated. These source ratios retain their characteristic source ratio signature even after 95 percent of the PAH and dibenzothiophene target analytes and 70 percent of the total oil has been biodegraded.

  4. Estimation of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in gasoline-contaminated sediment from measured respiration rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, R.J.; Baehr, A.L.; Lahvis, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    An open microcosm method for quantifying microbial respiration and estimating biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in gasoline-contaminated sediment samples has been developed and validated. Stainless-steel bioreactors are filled with soil or sediment samples, and the vapor-phase composition (concentrations of oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and selected hydrocarbons) is monitored over time. Replacement gas is added as the vapor sample is taken, and selection of the replacement gas composition facilitates real-time decision-making regarding environmental conditions within the bioreactor. This capability allows for maintenance of field conditions over time, which is not possible in closed microcosms. Reaction rates of CO2 and O2 are calculated from the vapor-phase composition time series. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation are either measured directly from the hydrocarbon mass balance, or estimated from CO2 and O2 reaction rates and assumed reaction stoichiometries. Open microcosm experiments using sediments spiked with toluene and p-xylene were conducted to validate the stoichiometric assumptions. Respiration rates calculated from O2 consumption and from CO2 production provide estimates of toluene and p- xylene degradation rates within about ??50% of measured values when complete mineralization stoichiometry is assumed. Measured values ranged from 851.1 to 965.1 g m-3 year-1 for toluene, and 407.2-942.3 g m-3 year-1 for p- xylene. Contaminated sediment samples from a gasoline-spill site were used in a second set of microcosm experiments. Here, reaction rates of O2 and CO2 were measured and used to estimate hydrocarbon respiration rates. Total hydrocarbon reaction rates ranged from 49.0 g m-3 year-1 in uncontaminated (background) to 1040.4 g m-3 year-1 for highly contaminated sediment, based on CO2 production data. These rate estimates were similar to those obtained independently from in situ CO2 vertical gradient and flux determinations at the field site. In these experiments, aerobic conditions were maintained in the microcosms by using air as the replacement gas, thus preserving the ambient aerobic environment of the subsurface near the capillary zone. This would not be possible with closed microcosms.

  5. Water Protects Graphitic Surface from Airborne Hydrocarbon Contamination.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiting; Kozbial, Andrew; Nioradze, Nikoloz; Parobek, David; Shenoy, Ganesh Jagadeesh; Salim, Muhammad; Amemiya, Shigeru; Li, Lei; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-26

    The intrinsic wettability of graphitic materials, such as graphene and graphite, can be readily obscured by airborne hydrocarbon within 5-20 min of ambient air exposure. We report a convenient method to effectively preserve a freshly prepared graphitic surface simply through a water treatment technique. This approach significantly inhibits the hydrocarbon adsorption rate by a factor of ca. 20, thus maintaining the intrinsic wetting behavior for many hours upon air exposure. Follow-up characterization shows that a nanometer-thick ice-like water forms on the graphitic surface, which remains stabilized at room temperature for at least 2-3 h and thus significantly decreases the adsorption of airborne hydrocarbon on the graphitic surface. This method has potential implications in minimizing hydrocarbon contamination during manufacturing, characterization, processing, and storage of graphene/graphite-based devices. As an example, we show that a water-treated graphite electrode maintains a high level of electrochemical activity in air for up to 1 day. PMID:26673269

  6. Geophysical investigation of anomalous conductivity at a hydrocarbon contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, M.S.; Atekwana, E.; Sauck, W.A.

    1997-10-01

    The intuitive geoelectric model for hydrocarbon light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) plumes treats the plume as a resistive body in the subsurface. Results of field studies have shown that plume bodies can develop conductive attributes over time, and that this dichotomous nature of electrical conductivity varies over time. A comprehensive geophysical survey was undertaken to evaluate the electrical nature of an older plume as well as to evaluate the methods best suited for characterization. Dipole-dipole resistivity profiling, self potential, electromagnetic induction, and ground penetrating radar were all used to characterize the conductive plume. Ground penetrating radar located conductive plume boundaries best, while the dipole-dipole resistivity and self potential methods located the plume but did not resolve the boundaries of the plume.

  7. SORPTION OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS TO A LOW CARBON SUBSURFACE CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, o-chlorotoluene and dimethylphthalate to a series of subsurface samples collected with depth is reported. Desorption of sorbate from the sorbent matrix provides better precision than conventional solution phase concentration differences when so...

  8. Hydrocarbon Contamination Decreases Mating Success in a Marine Planktonic Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Seuront, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The mating behavior and the mating success of copepods rely on chemoreception to locate and track a sexual partner. However, the potential impact of the water-soluble fraction of hydrocarbons on these aspects of copepod reproduction has never been tested despite the widely acknowledged acute chemosensory abilities of copepods. I examined whether three concentrations of the water-soluble fraction of diesel oil (0.01%, 0.1% and 1%) impacts (i) the swimming behavior of both adult males and females of the widespread calanoid copepod Temora longcornis, and (ii) the ability of males to locate, track and mate with females. The three concentrations of the water-soluble fraction of diesel oil (WSF) significantly and non-significantly affect female and male swimming velocities, respectively. In contrast, both the complexity of male and female swimming paths significantly decreased with increasing WSF concentrations, hence suggesting a sex-specific sensitivity to WSF contaminated seawater. In addition, the three WSF concentrations impacted both T. longicornis mating behavior and mating success. Specifically, the ability of males to detect female pheromone trails, to accurately follow trails and to successfully track a female significantly decreased with increasing WSF concentrations. This led to a significant decrease in contact and capture rates from control to WSF contaminated seawater. These results indicate that hydrocarbon contamination of seawater decreases the ability of male copepods to detect and track a female, hence suggest an overall impact on population fitness and dynamics. PMID:22053187

  9. Ecological risk assessment of a site contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Starodub, M.E.; Feniak, N.A.; Willes, R.F.; Moore, C.E.; Mucklow, L.

    1995-12-31

    The aquatic and terrestrial health risks associated with petroleum contamination on a decommissioned military base, contaminated with products ranging from Bunker C oil to aviation fuel, were assessed using a methodology whereby an analytical measurement of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) could be correlated with compositional characterization and thus with toxicity. The constituents of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination represent wide ranges of physical-chemical properties, environmental fate, and toxicity. The composition of TPH can vary greatly, dependent on the sources or fuel types and the interaction of age as well as site- and chemical-specific characteristics in determining the impact of weathering processes. Therefore, a bulk sum analysis of TPH cannot be related to toxicity without characterization of its composition and association of the constituents, and therefore composition, with actual toxicity data. To address this need, the constituents of TPH were represented by surrogate chemicals, with selection based on structure-activity relationships and available toxicity data. Toxicological profiles were developed from governmental regulations and on the published literature for both the aquatic and terrestrial media. Risk characterization consisted of a comparison of water concentration limits and exposure limits, developed for each surrogate, to estimated surrogate concentrations throughout the site. The concentrations of surrogates were extrapolated from TPH composition characterization analyses, conducted at a select number of sampling locations, to bulk sum analyses of TPH at related sampling locations.

  10. Magnetic properties changes due to hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater table fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameen, Nawrass

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to understand the mechanisms and conditions which control the formation and transformation of ferro(i)magnetic minerals caused by hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater, in particular in the zone of fluctuating water levels. The work extends previous studies conducted at the same site. The study area is a former military air base at Hrad?any, Czech Republic (5037'22.71"N, 1445'2.24"E). The site was heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, due to leaks in petroleum storage tanks and jet fuelling stations over years of active use by the Soviet Union, which closed the base in 1991. The site is one of the most important sources of high quality groundwater in the Czech Republic. In a previous study, Rijal et al. (2010) concluded that the contaminants could be flushed into the sediments as the water level rose due to remediation processes leading to new formation of magnetite. In this previous study three different locations were investigated; however, from each location only one core was obtained. In order to recognize significant magnetic signatures versus depth three cores from each of these three locations were drilled in early 2012, penetrating the unsaturated zone, the groundwater fluctuation (GWF) zone and extending to about one meter below the groundwater level (~2.3 m depth at the time of sampling). Magnetic susceptibility (MS) profiles combined with other magnetic properties were analyzed to obtain a significant depth distribution of the ferro(i)magnetic concentration. Sediment properties, hydrocarbon content and bacterial activity were additionally studied. The results show that the highest ferrimagnetic mineral concentrations exist between 1.4-1.9 m depth from the baseline which is interpreted as the top of the GWF zone. Spikes of MS detected in the previous studies turned out to represent small-scale isolated features, but the trend of increasing MS values from the lowermost position of the groundwater table upward was verified. Mineral magnetic parameters indicate that magnetite is responsible for the MS signal which confirms the previous results (Rijal et al., 2010). The so far existing uncertainty of the groundwater level position could be solved. Bacterial activity is studied at particular depth horizons as it is assumed to be responsible for iron mineralogy changes. References: Rijal M.L., Appel E., Petrovsk E. and Blaha U., 2010. Change of magnetic properties due to fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater in unconsolidated sediments. Environ.Pollut., 158, 1756-1762.

  11. Review of Geophysical Techniques to Define the Spatial Distribution of Subsurface Properties or Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Truex, Michael J.

    2005-08-22

    This is a letter report to Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this report is to summarize state-of-the-art, minimally intrusive geophysical techniques that can be used to clarify subsurface geology, structure, moisture, and chemical composition. The technology review focused on geophysical characterization techniques that provide two- or three-dimensional information about the spatial distribution of subsurface properties and/or contaminants.

  12. PERMEABLE REACTIVE SUBSURFACE BARRIERS FOR THE INTERCEPTION AND REMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON AND CHROMIUM (VI) PLUMES IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document concerns the use of permeable reactive subsurface barriers for the remediation of plumes of chlorinated hydrocarbons and Cr(VI) species in ground water, using zero-valent iron (Fe0) as the reactive substrate. Such systems have undergone thorough laboratory research,...

  13. INNOVATIVE PROCESSES FOR RECLAMATION OF CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research to better assess the capabilities and limitations of fixed-film bioreactors for removing selected organic contaminants from ground water or from contaminated vapor streams produced by air stripping of polluted ground water and by soil venting operations is described. ...

  14. INNOVATIVE PROCESS FOR RECLAMATION OF CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research to better assess the capabilities and limitations of fixed-film bioreactors for removing selected organic contaminants from ground water or from contaminated vapor streams produced by air stripping of polluted ground water and by soil venting operations is described. ork...

  15. Eco-toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingchun; Wang, Min; Wang, Fei; Sun, Qing; Zhou, Qixing

    2011-01-01

    Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) contaminated soil samples were collected from Shengli Oilfield of China. Toxicity analysis was carried out based on earthworm acute toxicity, plant growth experiment and luminescent bacteria test. The soil was contaminated by-petroleum hydrogcarbons with TPH concentration of 10.57%. With lethal and sub-lethal rate as endpoint, earthworm test showed that the LD50 (lethal dose 50%) values in 4 and 7 days were 1.45% and 1.37% respectively, and the inhibition rate of earthworm body weight increased with higher oil concentration. TPH pollution in the soil inhibited seed germination in both wheat and maize experiment when the concentration of petroleum was higher than 0.1%. The EC50 (effective concentration 50%) for germination is 3.04% and 2.86% in maize and wheat, respectively. While lower value of EC50 for root elongation was to be 1.11% and 1.64% in maize and wheat, respectively, suggesting higher sensitivity of root elongation on petroleum contamination in the soil. The EC50 value in luminescent bacteria test was 0.47% for petroleum in the contaminated soil. From the experiment result, it was concluded that TPH content of 1.5% is considered to be a critical value for plant growth and living of earthworm and 0.5% will affect the activity of luminescent bacteria. PMID:21790059

  16. USE OF APATITE FOR CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William D. Bostick

    2003-05-01

    Groundwater at many Federal and civilian industrial sites is often contaminated with toxic metals at levels that present a potential concern to regulatory agencies. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has some unique problems associated with radionuclides (primarily uranium), but metal contaminants most likely drive risk-based cleanup decisions, from the perspective of human health, in groundwater at DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Sites include lead (Pb), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni). Thus, the regulatory ''drivers'' for toxic metals in contaminated soils/groundwaters are very comparable for Federal and civilian industrial sites, and most sites have more than one metal above regulatory action limits. Thus improving the performance of remedial technologies for metal-contaminated groundwater will have ''dual use'' (Federal and civilian) benefit.

  17. FIELD-DRIVEN APPROACHES TO SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT MODELING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations from field sites provide a means for prioritizing research activities. In the case of petroleum releases, observations may include spiking of concentration distributions that may be related to water table fluctuation, co-location of contaminant plumes with geochemi...

  18. FIELD SCREENING OF POLYCYCLIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION IN SOIL USING A PORTABLE SYNCHRONOUS SCANNING SPECTROFLUOROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination is a considerable problem at various hazardous waste sites. sources of PAH contamination include: incomplete combustion processes, wood preservatives, and the fuel industry. he development of rapid, cost-effective field screenin...

  19. Characterization of the methanotrophic bacterial community present in a trichloroethylene-contaminated subsurface groundwater site.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J P; Jimnez, L; Rosario, I; Hazen, T C; Sayler, G S

    1993-01-01

    Groundwater, contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), was collected from 13 monitoring wells at Area M on the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site near Aiken, S.C. Filtered groundwater samples were enriched with methane, leading to the isolation of 25 methanotrophic isolates. The phospholipid fatty acid profiles of all the isolates were dominated by 18:1 omega 8c (60 to 80%), a signature lipid for group II methanotrophs. Subsequent phenotypic testing showed that most of the strains were members of the genus Methylosinus and one isolate was a member of the genus Methylocystis. Most of the methanotroph isolates exhibited soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) activity. This was presumptively indicated by the naphthalene oxidation assay and confirmed by hybridization with a gene probe encoding the mmoB gene and by cell extract assays. TCE was degraded at various rates by most of the sMMO-producing isolates, whereas PCE was not degraded. Savannah River Area M and other groundwaters, pristine and polluted, were found to support sMMO activity when supplemented with nutrients and then inoculated with Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. The maximal sMMO-specific activity obtained in the various groundwaters ranged from 41 to 67% compared with maximal rates obtained in copper-free nitrate mineral salts media. This study partially supports the hypothesis that stimulation of indigenous methanotrophic communities can be efficacious for removal of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons from subsurface sites and that the removal can be mediated by sMMO. PMID:8368829

  20. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

  1. Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-02-29

    This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

  2. Control of Subsurface Contaminant Migration by Vertical Engineered Barriers

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Fact Sheet is intended to provide remedial project managers (RPMs), on-scene coordinators (OSCs), contractors, and other remediation stakeholders with a basic overview of hazardous waste containment systems constructed to prevent or limit the migration of contamination in gr...

  3. Stimulating in situ surfactant production to increase contaminant bioavailability and augment bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haws, N. W.; Bentley, H. W.; Yiannakakis, A.; Bentley, A. J.; Cassidy, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    The effectiveness of a bioremediation strategy is largely dependent on relationships between contaminant sequestration (geochemical limitations) and microbial degradation potential (biological limitations). As contaminant bioavailability becomes mass transfer limited, contaminant removal will show less sensitivity to biodegradation enhancements without concurrent enhancements to rates of mass transfer into the bioavailable phase. Implementing a strategy that can simultaneously address geochemical and biological limitations is motivated by a subsurface zone of liquid petroleum hydrocarbons (LPH) contamination that is in excess of 10 acres (40,000 sq. meters). Biodegradation potential at the site is high; however, observed biodegradation rates are generally low, indicative of bioavailability limitations (e.g., low aqueous solubilities, nutrient deficiencies, and/or mass transfer limitations), and estimates indicate that bioremediation (i.e., biosparging/bioventing) with unaugmented biodegradation may be unable to achieve the remedial objectives within an acceptable time. Bench-scale experiments using soils native to the site provide evidence that, in addition to nutrient additions, a pulsed oxygen delivery can increase biodegradation rates by stimulating the microbial production of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids), leading to a reduction in surface tension and an increase in contaminant bioavailability. Pilot-scale tests at the field site are evaluating the effectiveness of stimulating in situ biosurfactant production using cyclic biosparging. The cyclic sparging creates extended periods of alternating aerobic and oxygen-depleted conditions in the submerged smear zone. The increased bioavailability of LPH and the resulting biodegradation enhancements during the test are evaluated using measurements of surface tension (as confirmation of biosurfactant accumulation) and nitrate concentrations (as substantiation of anaerobic biodegradation during shut-off periods). The successful promotion of in situ biosurfactant production during biosparging is expected to provide a cost effective solution to site remediation requirements.

  4. SPECIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS BY CONE PENETROMETRY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R826184)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chroma tography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collec...

  5. PROTOZOA IN SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FROM SITES CONTAMINATED WITH AVIATION GASOLINE OR JET FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numbers of protozoa in the subsurface of aviation gasoline and jet fuel spill areas at a Coast Guard base at Traverse City, Mich., were determined. oreholes were drilled in an uncontaminated location, in contaminated but untreated parts of the fuel plumes, and in the aviation gas...

  6. Three-dimensional geologic modeling to determine the spatial attributes of hydrocarbon contamination, Noval Facility Fuel Farm, El Centro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Mutch, S.; Padgett, D.; Roche, L. )

    1994-04-01

    An investigation was conducted at the Naval Air Facility located in El Centro (NAFEC), to determine the vertical and horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the facilities fuel farm. The fuel products are the result of tank and pipeline leakage, past tank cleaning, and past disposal of fuel dispensing and filter cleaning practices. Subsurface soil and groundwater data was collected via soil borings, monitoring wells, and CPT probes. Soil, groundwater, and analytical data were integrated using the LYNX geoscience modeling system (GMS). Interactive sessions with the data visualizer helped guide the modeling and identify data gaps. Modeling results indicate a continuous surface confining clay layer to a depth of about 12 to 15 ft. Groundwater is confined beneath this clay layer and monitoring wells indicate about 3 to 5 ft of artesian head. Hydrocarbon contamination is concentrated within this clay layer from about 5 to 12 ft below the ground surface. Residual fuel products located in the groundwater are attributed to slow leakage through the confirming clay layer. LYNX was also used to compute volumes of contaminated soil to aid in remediation cost analysis. Preliminary figures indicate about 60,000 yards[sup 3] of contaminated soil. Since the contamination is primarily confined to relatively impermeable clayey soils, site remediation will likely be ex-situ land farming.

  7. Bioremediation treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated Arctic soils: influencing parameters.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Masoud; Barabadi, Abbas; Barabady, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The Arctic environment is very vulnerable and sensitive to hydrocarbon pollutants. Soil bioremediation is attracting interest as a promising and cost-effective clean-up and soil decontamination technology in the Arctic regions. However, remoteness, lack of appropriate infrastructure, the harsh climatic conditions in the Arctic and some physical and chemical properties of Arctic soils may reduce the performance and limit the application of this technology. Therefore, understanding the weaknesses and bottlenecks in the treatment plans, identifying their associated hazards, and providing precautionary measures are essential to improve the overall efficiency and performance of a bioremediation strategy. The aim of this paper is to review the bioremediation techniques and strategies using microorganisms for treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated Arctic soils. It takes account of Arctic operational conditions and discusses the factors influencing the performance of a bioremediation treatment plan. Preliminary hazard analysis is used as a technique to identify and assess the hazards that threaten the reliability and maintainability of a bioremediation treatment technology. Some key parameters with regard to the feasibility of the suggested preventive/corrective measures are described as well. PMID:24903252

  8. Induced Polarization methodology: application to a hydrocarbon contaminated site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondel, Amelie; Schmutz, Myriam; Tichane, Frederic; Franceschi, Michel; Carles, Margaux

    2013-04-01

    Induced Polarization (IP) is a promising method for environmental studies (Vaudelet et al., 2011; Abdel Aal et al., 2006). This method has already been successful for the study of contaminations in the laboratory scale (Vanhala, 1997; Revil et al., 2011; Schmutz et al., 2012) but is still not trivial on the field. Temporal IP seems relatively common for field studies. When contamination implies a significative change of the polarization parameters, successful studies have been lead (Fiandaca et al. 2012; Dahlin et al., 2002 on landfills). Otherwise hydrocarbon contamination may induce small changes on IP parameters (Vaudelet et al., 2011). Spectral induced polarization has not been widely used for field application yet: this method is sensitive to coupling effects and time consuming. Moreover, all the phenomenon responsible of the signal is not completely understood yet (Kemna et al., 2012). The main aim of our presentation is about IP methodology, applied on site affected by a hydrocarbon contamination. In this case, precautions have to be taken to get explicit answers from the contamination. Field investigations have been made: chargeability measurements in order to delineate the free phase contamination extension and spectral induced polarization soundings in order to characterize more precisely the contamination. We would like to provide recommendations to improve induced polarization measurements especially on three aspects, (i) propose a different measurement sequence to make chargeability measurements and (ii) evaluate the influence of the current injection time on chargeability measurements (iii) give general precautions to achieve SIP measurements. A different new chargeability sequence is proposed integrating the use of separated injection and measure cables to avoid coupling phenomena in multicore cables. Indeed, this kind of coupling can significantly decrease the signal / noise ratio (Dahlin et al., 2012). Direct and reverse measurements have been made in order to evaluate if the data and data quality are comparable. Different times of injection have also been tested to evaluate their influence on chargeability measurements: long injection times (4 and 8 seconds) indicate the same high chargeability trend, to the contrary to small injection time (2 seconds). Long injection time generate (i) the polarization of more elements (ii) a stronger polarization of polarizable elements. For environmental purposes, long injection times are recommended. Spectral induced polarization soundings have been made using the SIP Fuchs device, with an amplifier in order to stabilize the injected current (Radic 2004). Unpolarizable measurement electrodes have been connected to the apparatus with optic fiber and metallic injection electrodes have been link with a specific cable arrangement, both to reduce coupling effect with the ground (Vaudelet et al., 2011; Ghorbani et al., 2007). These precautions give good quality result and allow the inversion of the data to obtain Cole Cole parameters (Ghorbani et al., 2007), useful for hydrogeological interpretations.

  9. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovley, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to destroy organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing them to carbon dioxide. Some Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can also reductively dechlorinate chlorinated contaminants. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can reduce a variety of contaminant metals and convert them from soluble forms to forms that are likely to be immobilized in the subsurface. Studies in petroleum-contaminated aquifers have demonstrated that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be effective agents in removing aromatic hydrocarbons from groundwater under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to remove uranium from contaminated groundwaters. The activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be stimulated in several ways to enhance organic contaminant oxidation and metal reduction. Molecular analyses in both field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that microorganisms of the genus Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination. Des micro-organismes simulant la réduction du fer ont la capacité de détruire des polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies en les oxydant en dioxyde de carbone. Certains micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent aussi dé-chlorer par réduction des polluants chlorés. Des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent réduire tout un ensemble de métaux polluants et les faire passer de formes solubles à des formes qui sont susceptibles d'être immobilisées dans le milieu souterrain. Des études d'aquifères pollués par du pétrole ont montré que des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent être des agents efficaces pour éliminer les hydrocarbures aromatiques des eaux souterraines dans des conditions anérobies. Des études en laboratoire ont montré que des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer avaient la capacité d'éliminer l'uranium d'eaux souterraines polluées. L'activité de micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peut être stimulée de différentes manières pour augmenter l'oxydation de polluants organiques et la réduction de métaux. Des analyses moléculaires concernant des études de terrain et de laboratoire ont montré que des micro-organismes du genre Geobacter deviennent les membres dominants de la communauté microbienne quand les conditions de réduction en Fe(III) sont réalisées à la suite d'une pollution organique, ou lorsque la réduction en Fe(III) est stimulée artificiellement. Ces résultats laissent penser que des connaissances supplémentaires sur l'écophysiologie des espèces Geobacter devraient aider à une meilleure prédiction de la diminution naturelle des teneurs en polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies, ainsi qu'à la définition de stratégies de dépollution biologique de pollutions souterraines par les métaux. Algunos microorganismos Fe(III)-reductores son capaces de destruir selectivamente determinados contaminantes orgánicos en condiciones anaerobias, oxidándolos a dióxido de carbono. Otros de estos microorganismos Fe(III)-reductores pueden reducir, bien compuestos clorados, bien una gran variedad de metales, que dejan de ser solubles y se inmovilizan en el subsuelo. Estudios realizados en acuéferos contaminados por petróleo muestran que los microorganismos Fe(III)-reductores pueden ser unos agentes muy eficientes para eliminar los hidrocarburos aromáticos de las aguas subterráneas en condiciones anaerobias, mientras que estudios de laboratorio muestran el potencial de estos microorganismos para eliminar uranio. La actividad de los microorganismos Fe(III)-reductores se puede estimular para conseguir una mayor eficiencia en la oxidación de contaminantes orgánicos y en la reducción de metales. Diversos análisis moleculares en estudios de campo y de laboratorio muestran que los microorganismos del género Geobacter se convierten en los miembros dominantes de la comunidad microbiana cuando se desarrollan condiciones Fe(III)-reductoras, bien como resultado de la contaminación orgánica, bien por estimulación artificial. En consecuencia, se hace necesario un mayor entendimiento de la ecofisiologéa de los microorganismos del género Geobacter para mejorar las predicciones sobre atenuación natural de los contaminantes orgánicos bajo condiciones anaerobias y para el diseño de estrategias de biorremediación del subsuelo en los casos de contaminación por metales.

  10. Time series analysis of contaminant transport in the subsurface: applications to conservative tracer and engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunmei; Li, Yusong

    2014-08-01

    Accurately predicting the transport of contaminants in the field is subject to multiple sources of uncertainty due to the variability of geological settings, the complexity of field measurements, and the scarcity of data. Such uncertainties can be amplified when modeling some emerging contaminants, such as engineered nanomaterials, when a fundamental understanding of their fate and transport is lacking. Typical field work includes collecting concentration at a certain location for an extended period of time, or measuring the movement of plume for an extended period time, which would result in a time series of observation data. This work presents an effort to evaluate the possibility of applying time series analysis, particularly, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, to forecast contaminant transport and distribution in the subsurface environment. ARIMA modeling was first assessed in terms of its capability to forecast tracer transport at two field sites, which had different levels of heterogeneity. After that, this study evaluated the applicability of ARIMA modeling to predict the transport of engineered nanomaterials at field sites, including field measured data of nanoscale zero valent iron and (nZVI) and numerically generated data for the transport of nano-fullerene aggregates (nC60). This proof-of-concept effort demonstrates the possibility of applying ARIMA to predict the contaminant transport in the subsurface environment. Like many other statistical models, ARIMA modeling is only descriptive and not explanatory. The limitation and the challenge associated with applying ARIMA modeling to contaminant transport in the subsurface are also discussed. PMID:24987973

  11. Persistence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination in a California marine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.R.; Gossett, R.W.; Heesen, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Despite major reductions in the dominant DDT and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) input off Los Angeles (California, U.S.A.) in the early 1970s, the levels of these pollutants decreased only slightly from 1972 to 1975 both in surficial bottom sediments and in a flatfish bioindicator (Dover sole, Microstomus pacificus) collected near the submarine outfall. Concentrations of these pollutants in the soft tissues of the mussel Mytilus californianus, collected intertidally well inshore of the highly contaminated bottom sediments, followed much more closely the decreases in the outfall discharges. These observations suggest that contaminated sediments on the seafloor were the principal (although not necessarily direct) cause of the relatively high and persistent concentrations of DDT and PCB residues in tissues. The study indicated that residues of the higher-molecular-weight chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as DDT and PCB, can be highly persistent once released to coastal marine ecosystems and that their accumulation in surficial bottom sediments is the most likely cause of this persistence observed in the biota of the discharge zone.

  12. Surface and subsurface characterization of uranium contamination at the Fernald environmental management site

    SciTech Connect

    Schilk, A.J.; Perkins, R.W.; Abel, K.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    The past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils, and the three-dimensional distribution of the uranium at these sites must be thoroughly characterized before any effective remedial protocols can be established. To this end, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the DOE`s Office of Technology Development with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies for the measurement of uranium in surface and subsurface soils at the Fernald Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration site. These studies are detailed in this report.

  13. RADIO FREQUENCY ENHANCED DECONTAMINATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been considerable effort in the development of innovative treatment technologies for the clean up of sites containing hazardous wastes such as hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Typical examples of such waste material are: chlorinated solvents, polychlorinated b...

  14. Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

    2002-02-27

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

  15. Integrated magnetic, gravity, and GPR surveys to locate the probable source of hydrocarbon contamination in Sharm El-Sheikh area, south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsy, Mona; Rashed, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Sharm El-Sheikh waters were suddenly hit by hydrocarbon spills which created a serious threat to the prosperous tourism industry in and around the city. Analysis of soil samples, water samples, and seabed samples collected in and around the contaminated bay area showed anomalous levels of hydrocarbons. An integrated geophysical investigation, using magnetic, gravity, and ground penetrating radar geophysical tools, was conducted in the headland overlooking the contaminated bay in order to delineate the possible subsurface source of contamination. The results of the geophysical investigations revealed three underground manmade reinforced concrete tanks and a complicated network of buried steel pipes in addition to other unidentified buried objects. The depths and dimensions of the discovered objects were determined. Geophysical investigations also revealed the presence of a north-south oblique slip fault running through the eastern part of the studied area. Excavations, conducted later on, confirmed the presence of one of the tanks delineated by the geophysical surveys.

  16. Review on subsurface colloids and colloid-associated contaminant transport in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Kanti Sen, Tushar; Khilar, Kartic C

    2006-02-28

    In this review article, the authors present up-to-date developments on experimental, modeling and field studies on the role of subsurface colloidal fines on contaminant transport in saturated porous media. It is a complex phenomenon in porous media involving several basic processes such as colloidal fines release, dispersion stabilization, migration and fines entrapment/plugging at the pore constrictions and adsorption at solid/liquid interface. The effects of these basic processes on the contaminant transport have been compiled. Here the authors first present the compilation on in situ colloidal fines sources, release, stabilization of colloidal dispersion and migration which are a function of physical and chemical conditions of subsurface environment and finally their role in inorganic and organic contaminants transport in porous media. The important aspects of this article are as follows: (i) it gives not only complete compilation on colloidal fines-facilitated contaminant transport but also reviews the new role of colloidal fines in contaminant retardation due to plugging of pore constrictions. This plugging phenomenon also depends on various factors such as concentration of colloidal fines, superficial velocity and bead-to-particle size ratio. This plugging-based contaminant transport can be used to develop containment technique in soil and groundwater remediation. (ii) It also presents the importance of critical salt concentration (CSC), critical ionic strength for mixed salt, critical shear stressor critical particle concentration (CPC) on in situ colloidal fines release and migration and consequently their role on contaminant transport in porous media. (iii) It also reviews another class of colloidal fines called biocolloids and their transport in porous media. Finally, the authors highlight the future research based on their critical review on colloid-associated contaminant transport in saturated porous media. PMID:16324681

  17. FINAL REPORT. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS FROM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN THE ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to determine howenvironmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, act as hormones or anti- hormones in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. The three major components of the research included:1)a biotechnology based screening system ...

  18. STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

  19. QUANTITATIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROBIAL BIOMASS AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN SUBSURFACE MATERIAL: A PROKARYOTIC CONSORTIUM RESPONSIVE TO ORGANIC CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of quantitative methods for microbial biomass, community structure, and nutritional status to the subsurface samples collected with careful attention to contamination reveals a group of microbes. The microbiota are sparse by several measures of biomass compared to sur...

  20. ASSESSING UST CORRECTIVE ACTION TECHNOLOGY: A SCIENTIFIC EVALUATION OF THE MOBILITY AND DEGRADABILITY OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The problems associated with leakage of motor fuels and organic chemicals from underground storage tanks (USTs) are compounded by a general lack of understanding of the partitioning, retention, transformation, and transport of these contaminants in the subsurface environment. he ...

  1. Subsurface transport of hydrocarbon fuel additives and a dense chlorinated solvent. Final technical report, 1 July 1993-30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Guven, O.; Dane, J.H.; Hill, W.E.; Hofstee, C.; Mamballikalathil, R.

    1995-01-01

    This interim report provides a description of the work done at Auburn University during the first year of the research project `Subsurface Transport of Hydrocarbon Fuel Additives and a Chlorinated Solvent`, supported by Armstrong Laboratory, Headquarters Air Force Civil Engineering Support Agency, Environics Directorate, under contract F08635-93-C-0071. The project is focused on the subsurface environmental behavior of quadricyclane, which is a light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) cyclic hydrocarbon fuel additive, and on the behavior of tetrachloroethylene (or, perchloroethylene), which is a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent.

  2. Hydrocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.; Lorenson, T. D.

    2005-12-01

    Gas hydrates in permafrost regions are believed to be a significant high-latitude reservoir for hydrocarbon gases, including methane which is a ``greenhouse" gas that may play a significant role in global climate warming. Melting permafrost and associated gas hydrates may contribute hydrocarbon ``greenhouse" gases to the atmosphere, however, little is known about the composition or distribution of the natural gases within permafrost. The primary objective of this presentation is to document and compare the composition and source of the hydrocarbon gases associated with gas hydrates both within and immediately below the zone of permafrost in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area of northern Alaska. This study included two major geochemical sampling programs in northern Alaska. In the first program the in-situ composition of the gas within and below the zone of permafrost in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area was determined, and in the second, a series of surficial geochemical surveys were made over the area of known surficial gas seepage. Geochemical analyses of drill cuttings collected from 11 petroleum industry wells indicate that methane is the principal hydrocarbon gas in the near-surface (0-1,500 m) strata of the North Slope. Stable methane-carbon isotopic analyses of gaseous drill cuttings from several wells suggest that the methane within the permafrost zone is from both microbial and thermogenic sources. To further examine shallow subsurface gas migration and potential atmospheric methane fluxes from permafrost regions, we analyzed the molecular and methane-carbon isotopic composition of the gas from 105 shallow (<2 m) permafrost cores collected across the Eileen fault zone, an area of known surficial gas seepage and more deeply buried gas hydrate occurrence in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. Analyses of these samples yielded high concentrations of methane and other hydrocarbon gases over the surface trace of the Eileen fault zone. Isotopic analysis of methane in the samples collected near the main fault yielded evidence of thermogenic gas. The data from shallow cores, together with the subsurface geochemical data obtained from northern Alaska, confirm that permafrost does control the distribution, volume, and composition of hydrocarbon gases in Arctic regions. In some areas the hydrocarbon gases in ice-bonded permafrost are exclusively microbial in origin, whereas thermogenic gases only occur beneath the ice-bonded interval. In such cases the base of ice-bonded permafrost may act as a trap for free gas accumulations. In other areas, where unique geologic conditions such as faulting occur, thermogenic gases originating from deep hydrocarbon reservoirs may occur within permafrost even at shallow depths. The abundance of both microbial- and thermogenic-sourced gases and their apparent mobility suggests that the melting of permafrost and associated gas hydrate accumulations could release significant volumes of hydrocarbon ``greenhouse" gases to the atmosphere.

  3. Subsurface Biofilm Barriers: An Emerging Technology For Containment and Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, A.

    2002-05-01

    This paper will summarize emerging biotechnology methods for manipulating microbial processes in the subsurface with the aim of developing improved remediation strategies for dissolved contaminants. Specific topics will include: 1) novel methods for controlling (i.e. enhancing) subsurface transport of injected bacteria for bioaugmentation, and 2) methods for manipulating growth of microbial biofilms to form subsurface biofilm barriers for the containment and bioremediation of contaminant plumes. Starvation of bacteria (for periods of several weeks) has been shown to improve bacterial transport through porous media and thereby provides a useful method for controlling subsurface transport of injected bacteria for bioaugmentation. Injection and resuscitation of starved bacteria has led to successful field testing of a technology which uses microbial biofilms to form subsurface barriers for the containment and bioremediation of contaminant plumes. A field demonstration of biofilm barrier technology was conducted at the MSE facility in Butte, Montana, USA to develop a comprehensive data set for evaluation of biofilm barrier performance. the test bed consisted of a 130 foot wide, 180 foot long, 20 foot deep lysimeter. A flow field was established across the lysimeter by injecting supply water at the up-gradient, while simultaneously pumping from recovery wells located down-gradient. The goal of the field test was to build a denitrifying biofilm barrier which reduces media hydraulic conductivity by at least two orders of magnitude. Maintaining barrier integrity was also a priority. Bacteria capable of producing large quantities of extracellular polymeric substances (eps) were injected into the subsurface, along with an inexpensive nutrient solution. The resulting microbial biomass substantially decreased the free pore space in the formation, thereby reducing the hydraulic conductivity by up to 97%. Because the biofilm inoculum chosen was a denitrifying species the biofilm barrier also represented a potential means for in_situ denitrification. After the barrier was in place a sustained concentration of 100 mg/l nitrate nitrogen, along with a 100 mg/l concentration of conservative (chloride) tracer, was added to the test cell influent over a 6 month period. At the test cell effluent the concentration of chloride gradually increased over the test period while the nitrate concentration remained relative low (less that 10 mg/l), indicating removal of nitrate by the biofilm barrier.

  4. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site's microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog [reg sign] evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog[reg sign] activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  5. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site`s microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog {reg_sign} evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog{reg_sign} activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  6. Remediation of contaminated subsurface materials by a metal-reducing bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Gorby, Y.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    A biotic approach for remediating subsurface sediments and groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chromium was evaluated. Cells of the Fe(iii)-reducing bacterium strain BrY were added to sealed, anoxic flasks containing Hanford groundwater, natural subsurface sediments, and either carbon tetrachloride, CT, or oxidized chromium, Cr(VI). With lactate as the electron donor, BrY transformed CT to chloroform (CF), which accumulated to about 1 0 % of the initial concentration of CT. The remainder of the CT was transformed to unidentified, nonvolatile compounds. Transformation of CT by BrY was an indirect process Cells reduced solid phase Fe(ill) to chemically reactive FE(II) that chemically transformed the chlorinated contaminant. Cr(VI), in contrast, was reduced by a direct enzymatic reaction in the presence or absence of Fe(III)-bearing sediments. These results demonstrate that Fe(ill)-reducing bacteria provide potential for transforming CT and for reducing CR(VI) to less toxic Cr(III). Technologies for stimulating indigenous populations of metal-reducing bacteria or for introducing specific metal-reducing bacteria to the subsurface are being investigated.

  7. Surfactant enhanced remediation of subsurface petroleum contamination: Results of a field test

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, D.A.; Knox, R.C.; Shiau, B.J.

    1996-10-01

    Pump-and-treat remediation of petroleum contaminated ground water is frequently limited by the presence of residual saturation; surfactant enhanced subsurface remediation is one approach for overcoming this limitation. A field test of surfactant enhanced solubilization was conducted at a U.S. Coast Guard in Traverse City, Michigan. The contaminants of interest were jet fuel and tetrachloroethylene (PCE); micellar solubilization was evaluated at this site using 60 mM Dowfax 8390. Excellent surfactant recovery was realized in the field test using a vertical circulation well system - the regulatory permit was based on 95% surfactant recovery with the actual results exceeding this level. During the test the contaminant mass removal increased by a factor of seven relative to water alone. This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy.

  8. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  9. Correlation between index properties and electrical resistivity of hydrocarbon contaminated periodic marine clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, P.; Shah, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination is a measure issue of concern as it adversely affects the soil inherent properties viz. index properties and strength properties.The main objective of this research work is to determine Electrical resistivity to study and correlate with soil index properties and engineering propertiescontaminated with hydrocarbon at the rate of 3%, 6% and 9% for the period of 15, 30 45 and 60 days and compare it with the results obtained for non-contaminated marine clay. Electrical resistivity of virgin marine clay (bentonite which is expansive in nature) and hydrocarbon contaminated clay for each percent of contamination is obtained in the laboratory for each period and its co-relation with index properties and engineering properties is proposed. CEC, EDAX tests were performed to evaluate the effect of ions of montmorillonite clays and their penetrability into hydrocarbon- clay matrix. The correlations at the end of each period for each percentage of contamination thus enabled to integrate index properties of non-contaminated and hydrocarbon contaminated marine clays with Electrical resistivity.

  10. Organic contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface: Evolution of knowledge and understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaid, Hedeff I.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2015-07-01

    Toxic organic contaminants may enter the subsurface as slightly soluble and volatile nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) or as dissolved solutes resulting in contaminant plumes emanating from the source zone. A large body of research published in Water Resources Research has been devoted to characterizing and understanding processes controlling the transport and fate of these organic contaminants and the effectiveness of natural attenuation, bioremediation, and other remedial technologies. These contributions include studies of NAPL flow, entrapment, and interphase mass transfer that have advanced from the analysis of simple systems with uniform properties and equilibrium contaminant phase partitioning to complex systems with pore-scale and macroscale heterogeneity and rate-limited interphase mass transfer. Understanding of the fate of dissolved organic plumes has advanced from when biodegradation was thought to require oxygen to recognition of the importance of anaerobic biodegradation, multiple redox zones, microbial enzyme kinetics, and mixing of organic contaminants and electron acceptors at plume fringes. Challenges remain in understanding the impacts of physical, chemical, biological, and hydrogeological heterogeneity, pore-scale interactions, and mixing on the fate of organic contaminants. Further effort is needed to successfully incorporate these processes into field-scale predictions of transport and fate. Regulations have greatly reduced the frequency of new point-source contamination problems; however, remediation at many legacy plumes remains challenging. A number of fields of current relevance are benefiting from research advances from point-source contaminant research. These include geologic carbon sequestration, nonpoint-source contamination, aquifer storage and recovery, the fate of contaminants from oil and gas development, and enhanced bioremediation.

  11. Microbial Community Responses to Organophosphate Substrate Additions in Contaminated Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Robert J.; Wu, Cindy H.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Andersen, Gary L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Hazen, Terry C.; Taillefert, Martial; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radionuclide- and heavy metal-contaminated subsurface sediments remain a legacy of Cold War nuclear weapons research and recent nuclear power plant failures. Within such contaminated sediments, remediation activities are necessary to mitigate groundwater contamination. A promising approach makes use of extant microbial communities capable of hydrolyzing organophosphate substrates to promote mineralization of soluble contaminants within deep subsurface environments. Methodology/Principal Findings Uranium-contaminated sediments from the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC) Area 2 site were used in slurry experiments to identify microbial communities involved in hydrolysis of 10 mM organophosphate amendments [i.e., glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) or glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P)] in synthetic groundwater at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8. Following 36 day (G2P) and 20 day (G3P) amended treatments, maximum phosphate (PO43?) concentrations of 4.8 mM and 8.9 mM were measured, respectively. Use of the PhyloChip 16S rRNA microarray identified 2,120 archaeal and bacterial taxa representing 46 phyla, 66 classes, 110 orders, and 186 families among all treatments. Measures of archaeal and bacterial richness were lowest under G2P (pH 5.5) treatments and greatest with G3P (pH 6.8) treatments. Members of the phyla Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria demonstrated the greatest enrichment in response to organophosphate amendments and the OTUs that increased in relative abundance by 2-fold or greater accounted for 9%50% and 3%17% of total detected Archaea and Bacteria, respectively. Conclusions/Significance This work provided a characterization of the distinct ORFRC subsurface microbial communities that contributed to increased concentrations of extracellular phosphate via hydrolysis of organophosphate substrate amendments. Within subsurface environments that are not ideal for reductive precipitation of uranium, strategies that harness microbial phosphate metabolism to promote uranium phosphate precipitation could offer an alternative approach for in situ sequestration. PMID:24950228

  12. Geophysical Responses of Hydrocarbon-impacted Zones at the Various Contamination Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Ko, K.; Son, J.; Kim, J.

    2008-12-01

    One controlled experiment and two field surveys were conducted to investigate the geoelectrical responses of hydrocarbon-contaminated zones, so called smeared zone, on the geophysical data at the hydrocarbon- contaminated sites with various conditions. One controlled physical model experiment with GPR using fresh gasoline and two different 3-D electrical resistivity investigations at the aged sites. One field site (former military facilities for arms maintenance) was mainly contaminated with lubricating oils and the other (former gas station) was contaminated with gasoline and diesel, respectively. The results from the physical model experiment show that GPR signals were enhanced when LNAPL was present as a residual saturation in the water-saturated system due to less attenuation of the electromagnetic energy through the soil medium of the hydrocarbon-impacted zone (no biodegradation), compared to when the medium was saturated with only water (no hydrocarbon impaction). In the former gas station site, 3-D resistivity results demonstrate that the highly contaminated zones were imaged with low resistivity anomalies since the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons has been undergone for many years, causing the drastic increase in the TDS at the hydrocarbon-impacted zones. Finally, 3-D resistivity data obtained from the former military maintenance site show that the hydrocarbon-contaminated zones show high resistivity anomalies since the hydrocarbons such as lubricating oils at the contaminated soils were not greatly influenced by microbial degradation and has relatively well kept their original physical properties of high electrical resistivity. The results of the study illustrated that the hydrocarbon-impacted zones under various contamination conditions yielded various geophysical responses which include (1) enhanced GPR amplitudes at the fresh LNAPL (Gasoline to middle distillates) spill sites, (2) low electrical resistivity anomalies due to biodegradation at the aged LNAPL- impacted sites, and (3) high electrical resistivity anomalies at the fresh or aged sites contaminated with residual products of crude oils (lubricating oils). The study results also show that the geophysical methods, as a non-invasive sounding technique, can be effectively applied to mapping hydrocarbon-contaminated zones.

  13. Denitrifying bacteria from the terrestrial subsurface exposed to mixed waste contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Stefan; Prakash, Om; Gihring, Thomas; Akob, Denise M.; Jasrotia, Puja; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B; Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Kostka, Joel

    2010-01-01

    In terrestrial subsurface environments where nitrate is a critical groundwater contaminant, few cultivated representatives are available with which to verify the metabolism of organisms that catalyze denitrification. In this study, five species of denitrifying bacteria from three phyla were isolated from subsurface sediments exposed to metal radionuclide and nitrate contamination as part of the U.S. Department of Energy s Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (OR-IFRC). Isolates belonged to the genera Afipia and Hyphomicrobium (Alphaproteobacteria), Rhodanobacter (Gammaproteobacteria), Intrasporangium (Actinobacteria) and Bacillus (Firmicutes). Isolates from the phylum Proteobacteria were confirmed as complete denitrifiers, whereas the Gram-positive isolates reduced nitrate to nitrous oxide. Ribosomal RNA gene analyses reveal that bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter comprise a diverse population of circumneutral to moderately acidophilic denitrifiers at the ORIFRC site, with a high relative abundance in areas of the acidic source zone. Rhodanobacter species do not contain a periplasmic nitrite reductase and have not been previously detected in functional gene surveys of denitrifying bacteria at the OR-IFRC site. Sequences of nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase genes were recovered from the isolates and from the terrestrial subsurface by designing primer sets mined from genomic and metagenomic data and from draft genomes of two of the isolates. We demonstrate that a combination of cultivation, genomic and metagenomic data are essential to the in situ characterization of denitrifiers and that current PCR-based approaches are not suitable for deep coverage of denitrifying microorganisms. Our results indicate that the diversity of denitrifiers is significantly underestimated in the terrestrial subsurface.

  14. Denitrifying Bacteria Isolated from Terrestrial Subsurface Sediments Exposed to Mixed-Waste Contamination?

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stefan J.; Prakash, Om; Gihring, Thomas M.; Akob, Denise M.; Jasrotia, Puja; Jardine, Philip M.; Watson, David B.; Brown, Steven D.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2010-01-01

    In terrestrial subsurface environments where nitrate is a critical groundwater contaminant, few cultivated representatives are available to verify the metabolism of organisms that catalyze denitrification. In this study, five species of denitrifying bacteria from three phyla were isolated from subsurface sediments exposed to metal radionuclide and nitrate contamination as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (OR-IFRC). Isolates belonged to the genera Afipia and Hyphomicrobium (Alphaproteobacteria), Rhodanobacter (Gammaproteobacteria), Intrasporangium (Actinobacteria), and Bacillus (Firmicutes). Isolates from the phylum Proteobacteria were complete denitrifiers, whereas the Gram-positive isolates reduced nitrate to nitrous oxide. rRNA gene analyses coupled with physiological and genomic analyses suggest that bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter are a diverse population of denitrifiers that are circumneutral to moderately acidophilic, with a high relative abundance in areas of the acidic source zone at the OR-IFRC site. Based on genome analysis, Rhodanobacter species contain two nitrite reductase genes and have not been detected in functional-gene surveys of denitrifying bacteria at the OR-IFRC site. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase gene sequences were recovered from the isolates and from the terrestrial subsurface by designing primer sets mined from genomic and metagenomic data and from draft genomes of two of the isolates. We demonstrate that a combination of cultivation and genomic and metagenomic data is essential to the in situ characterization of denitrifiers and that current PCR-based approaches are not suitable for deep coverage of denitrifiers. Our results indicate that the diversity of denitrifiers is significantly underestimated in the terrestrial subsurface. PMID:20305024

  15. Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy

    2005-06-01

    This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by these plants through increased chelation of actinides that increase in actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

  16. Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy

    2004-06-01

    This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophoreproducing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system, as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by increased chelation of actinides, which may increase actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS FROM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN THE ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disrupters. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals an...

  18. Continuous 'Passive' Registration of Non-Point Contaminant Loads Via Agricultural Subsurface Drain Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozemeijer, J.; Jansen, S.; de Jonge, H.; Lindblad Vendelboe, A.

    2014-12-01

    Considering their crucial role in water and solute transport, enhanced monitoring and modeling of agricultural subsurface tube drain systems is important for adequate water quality management. For example, previous work in lowland agricultural catchments has shown that subsurface tube drain effluent contributed up to 80% of the annual discharge and 90-92% of the annual NO3 loads from agricultural fields towards the surface water. However, existing monitoring techniques for flow and contaminant loads from tube drains are expensive and labor-intensive. Therefore, despite the unambiguous relevance of this transport route, tube drain monitoring data are scarce. The presented study aimed developing a cheap, simple, and robust method to monitor loads from tube drains. We are now ready to introduce the Flowcap that can be attached to the outlet of tube drains and is capable of registering total flow, contaminant loads, and flow-averaged concentrations. The Flowcap builds on the existing SorbiCells, a modern passive sampling technique that measures average concentrations over longer periods of time (days to months) for various substances. By mounting SorbiCells in our Flowcap, a flow-proportional part of the drain effluent is sampled from the main stream. Laboratory testing yielded good linear relations (R-squared of 0.98) between drainage flow rates and sampling rates. The Flowcap was tested in practice for measuring NO3 loads from two agricultural fields and one glasshouse in the Netherlands. The Flowcap registers contaminant loads from tube drains without any need for housing, electricity, or maintenance. This enables large-scale monitoring of non-point contaminant loads via tube drains, which would facilitate the improvement of contaminant transport models and would yield valuable information for the selection and evaluation of mitigation options to improve water quality.

  19. AN EVALUATION OF HANFORD SITE TANK FARM SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION FY2007

    SciTech Connect

    MANN, F.M.

    2007-07-10

    The Tank Farm Vadose Zone (TFVZ) Project conducts activities to characterize and analyze the long-term environmental and human health impacts from tank waste releases to the vadose zone. The project also implements interim measures to mitigate impacts, and plans the remediation of waste releases from tank farms and associated facilities. The scope of this document is to report data needs that are important to estimating long-term human health and environmental risks. The scope does not include technologies needed to remediate contaminated soils and facilities, technologies needed to close tank farms, or management and regulatory decisions that will impact remediation and closure. This document is an update of ''A Summary and Evaluation of Hanford Site Tank Farm Subsurface Contamination''. That 1998 document summarized knowledge of subsurface contamination beneath the tank farms at the time. It included a preliminary conceptual model for migration of tank wastes through the vadose zone and an assessment of data and analysis gaps needed to update the conceptual model. This document provides a status of the data and analysis gaps previously defined and discussion of the gaps and needs that currently exist to support the stated mission of the TFVZ Project. The first data-gaps document provided the basis for TFVZ Project activities over the previous eight years. Fourteen of the nineteen knowledge gaps identified in the previous document have been investigated to the point that the project defines the current status as acceptable. In the process of filling these gaps, significant accomplishments were made in field work and characterization, laboratory investigations, modeling, and implementation of interim measures. The current data gaps are organized in groups that reflect Components of the tank farm vadose zone conceptual model: inventory, release, recharge, geohydrology, geochemistry, and modeling. The inventory and release components address residual wastes that will remain in the tanks and tank-farm infrastructure after closure and potential losses from leaks during waste retrieval. Recharge addresses the impacts of current conditions in the tank farms (i.e. gravel covers that affect infiltration and recharge) as well as the impacts of surface barriers. The geohydrology and geochemistry components address the extent of the existing subsurface contaminant inventory and drivers and pathways for contaminants to be transported through the vadose zone and groundwater. Geochemistry addresses the mobility of key reactive contaminants such as uranium. Modeling addresses conceptual models and how they are simulated in computers. The data gaps will be used to provide input to planning (including the upcoming C Farm Data Quality Objective meetings scheduled this year).

  20. Innovative technology for expedited site remediation of extensive surface and subsurface contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Audibert, J.M.E.; Lew, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    Large scale surface and subsurface contamination resulted from numerous releases of feed stock, process streams, waste streams, and final product at a major chemical plant. Soil and groundwater was contaminated by numerous compounds including lead, tetraethyl lead, ethylene dibromide, ethylene dichloride, and toluene. The state administrative order dictated that the site be investigated fully, that remedial alternative be evaluated, and that the site be remediated within a year period. Because of the acute toxicity and extreme volatility of tetraethyl lead and other organic compounds present at the site and the short time frame ordered by the regulators, innovative approaches were needed to carry out the remediation while protecting plant workers, remediation workers, and the public.

  1. Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team

    SciTech Connect

    Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H.; Lesperance, A.; Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L.

    1996-09-01

    The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

  2. Phytosiderophore effects on subsurface actinide contaminants: potential for phytostabilization and phytoextraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, C. E.; Twary, S. N.; Deladurantaye, E.

    2003-01-01

    In recognition of the need for a safe, effective technology for long term Pu/Th/Actinide stabilization or removal from soils, we have begun an investigation of the potential for phytoremediation (phytostabilization and/or phytoextraction) of Pu and other actinide soil contaminants at DOE sites using phytosiderophore producing plants, and are investigating the contribution of phytosiderophores to actinide mobility in the subsurface environment. Phytoremediation and Phytostabilization have been proven to be a cost-effective, safe, efficient, and publicly acceptable technology for clean up and/or stabilization of contaminant metals . However, no phyto-based technologies have been developed for stabilization or removal of plutonium from soils and groundwater, and very few have been investigated for other actinides . Current metal-phytostabilization and phytoremediation techniques, predominately based around lead, nickel, and other soft-metal phytoextraction, will almost certainly be inadequate for plutonium due its distinct chemical properties . Phytosiderophore-based phytoremediation may provide technically and financially practical methods for remediation and long-term stewardship of soils that have low to moderate, near surface actinide contamination . We plan to demonstrate potential benefits of phytosiderophore-producing plants for long-term actinide contaminant stabilization by the plant's prevention of soil erosion and actinide migration through hydraulic control and/or through actinide removal through phytoextraction . We may also show possible harm caused by these plants through increased presence of actinide chelators that could increase actinide mobilization and migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies .

  3. Denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter dominate bacterial communities in the highly contaminated subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Stefan; Prakash, Om; Jasrotia, Puja; Overholt, Will; Cardenas, Erick; Hubbard, Daniela; Tiedje, James M.; Watson, David B; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Kostka, Joel

    2011-01-01

    The effect of long-term mixed-waste contamination, particularly uranium and nitrate, on the microbial community in the terrestrial subsurface was investigated at the field scale at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site in Oak Ridge, TN. The abundance, community composition, and distribution of groundwater microorganisms were examined across the site during two seasonal sampling events. At representative locations, subsurface sediment was also examined from two boreholes, one sampled from the most heavily contaminated area of the site and another from an area with low contamination. A suite of DNA- and RNA-based molecular tools were employed for community characterization, including quantitative PCR of ribosomal RNA and nitrite reductase genes, community composition fingerprinting analysis, and high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of rRNA genes. The results demonstrate that pH is a major driver of the subsurface microbial community structure, and denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter (class Gammaproteobacteria) dominate at low pH. The relative abundance of bacteria from this genus was positively correlated with lower pH conditions, and these bacteria were abundant and active in the most highly contaminated areas. Other factors, such as concentration of nitrogen species, oxygen and sampling season did not appear to strongly influence the distribution of Rhodanobacter. Results indicate that these organisms are acid-tolerant denitrifiers, well suited to the acidic, nitrate-rich subsurface conditions, and pH is confirmed as a dominant driver of bacterial community structure in this contaminated subsurface environment.

  4. Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation of Uranium in Multi–element Contaminated, Organic–rich Subsurface Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noemie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.

    2014-03-02

    Alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing mineral phases have been identified through drilling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at Rifle, CO. Regions of the subsurface from which such sediments are derived are referred to as Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZ). We conducted a study with NRZ sediments with the objective to: i.) Characterize solid phase contamination of U and other co-contaminants; ii.) Document the occurrence of potential U host minerals; iii.) Determine U valence state and micron scale spatial association with co-contaminants. Macroscopic (wet chemical batch extractions and a column experiment), microscopic (SEM-EDS), and spectroscopic (Mössbauer, µ-XRF and XANES) techniques were employed. Results showed that sediments’ solid phase had significant concentrations of U, S, As, Zn, V, Cr, Cu and Se, and a remarkable assortment of potential U hosts (sorbents and/or electron donors), such as Fe oxides (hematite, magnetite, Al-substituted goethite), siderite, reduced Fe(II) bearing clays, sulfides of different types, Zn sulfide framboids and multi – element sulfides. Multi-contaminants, micron size (ca. 5 to 30 µm) areas of mainly U(IV) and some U(VI), and/or other electron scavengers or donors such as Se, As, Cr, and V were discovered in the sediments, suggesting complex micron-scale system responses to transient redox conditions, and different extent and rates of competing U redox reactions than those of single contaminant systems. Collectively, the results improve our understanding and ability to predict U and NRZ’s complex behavior and will delineate future research directions to further study both the natural attenuation and persistence of contaminant plumes and their contribution to groundwater contamination.

  5. Subsurface contaminant monitoring by laser excitation-emission matrix/cone penetrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Jane W.; Chen, Yu-Min; Wright, Andrew O.; Kenny, Jonathan E.

    1999-02-01

    We have recently developed instrumentation capable of quickly characterizing or monitoring a site using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements made through a sapphire window near the tip of a cone penetrometer (CPT) probe as it advances through the subsurface. By incorporating ten laser wavelengths simultaneously and collecting a full three-dimensional fingerprint of the soil sample at a vertical resolution of approximately 2 cm, we have made advances in site characterization using this technique, which enjoys all the advantages of in situ measurements: no exposure to, handling, custody or generation of hazardous waste is involved, and results are available in near real time. This report presents the results of recent work at Otis Air National Guard Base. First, a simple one-dimensional measure of the fluorescence fingerprints was correlated with laboratory results for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), as a potentially convenient way for an operator of our instrument to monitor the results of the LIF measurements in real time, as the probe advances. Second, and more importantly, results are presented to demonstrate the potential of the instrumentation to identify individual target species and to quantify their concentrations approximately. The samples collected on site for conventional laboratory analysis were also measured by LIF and the resulting excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) were analyzed for ten target polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Qualitative and semi-quantitative agreement between these two sets of results was obtained. The agreements were extended to the in situ LIF data taken 2 - 3 feet away.

  6. Soil ventilation: Effects on microbial populations in gasoline-contaminated subsurface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, W.J.

    1995-07-01

    Short- and long-term effects of vapor extraction (VE) in an unsaturated subsurface soil and in situ biodegradation of gasoline were evaluated in a field study. Subsurface temperature, moisture, solid- and gas-phase contaminant levels, atmospheric gases, nutrient levels, and microbial population densities were measured during and after soil VE for 462 d. Microbial activity, based on in situ O{sub 2} consumption rates, measured 7 d after VE started averaged 3.8% O{sub 2} d{sup -1}; by Day 62 these rates dropped to 0.2% O{sub 2} d{sup -1}. Soil VE was stopped on Day 180 and about 70 d elapsed before renewed, low-level (0.05% O{sub 2} d{sup -1}) activity was detectable. Following a second round of VE, average O{sub 2} consumption rates increased to 0.11% O{sub 2} d{sup -1}. Microbial population densities did not consistently reflect activity changes measured by O{sub 2} consumption. Activity increases in the latter part of the study were not adequately accounted for by changes in subsurface moisture levels, temperature, or contaminant vapor concentrations. At the study`s completion, 400 kg of gasoline was volatilized from the soil and another 139 kg estimated to be biodegraded in situ. A two-phase process is proposed to account for the effects of VE on microbial activity. The initial phase is characterized by declining microbial activity levels in response to substrate reduction. Microbial activity slowly increases as a result of interactions between gasoline vapor concentrations and possibly changes in degradative activities of the microbial population. More work is needed to identify the gasoline constituents serving as substrates for microbial populations before and after ventilation. 31 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Treatment of hydrocarbon contamination under flow through conditions by using magnetite catalyzed chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Usman, M; Faure, P; Lorgeoux, C; Ruby, C; Hanna, K

    2013-01-01

    Soil pollution by hydrocarbons (aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons) is a major environmental issue. Various treatments have been used to remove them from contaminated soils. In our previous studies, the ability of magnetite has been successfully explored to catalyze chemical oxidation for hydrocarbon remediation in batch slurry system. In the present laboratory study, column experiments were performed to evaluate the efficiency of magnetite catalyzed Fenton-like (FL) and activated persulfate (AP) oxidation for hydrocarbon degradation. Flow-through column experiments are intended to provide a better representation of field conditions. Organic extracts isolated from three different soils (an oil-contaminated soil from petrochemical industrial site and two soils polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) originating from coking plant sites) were spiked on sand. After solvent evaporation, spiked sand was packed in column and was subjected to oxidation using magnetite as catalyst. Oxidant solution was injected at a flow rate of 0.1 mL min(-1) under water-saturated conditions. Organic analyses were performed by GC-mass spectrometry, GC-flame ionization detector, and micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Significant abatement of both types of hydrocarbons (60-70 %) was achieved after chemical oxidation (FL and AP) of organic extracts. No significant by-products were formed during oxidation experiment, underscoring the complete degradation of hydrocarbons. No selective degradation was observed for FL with almost similar efficiency towards all hydrocarbons. However, AP showed less reactivity towards higher molecular weight PAHs and aromatic oxygenated compounds. Results of this study demonstrated that magnetite-catalyzed chemical oxidation can effectively degrade both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons (enhanced available contaminants) under flow-through conditions. PMID:22684901

  8. Colloid characterization and colloidal phase partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in two creosote-contaminated aquifers in Denmark

    SciTech Connect

    Villholth, K.G.

    1999-03-01

    Colloidal matter inherent in the subsurface may provide a favorable phase for contaminant partitioning and furthermore act as agents for facilitated contaminant transport. The objectives of the present study were to determine the abundance and properties of intrinsically mobile colloids in the anoxic groundwater from two creosote-contaminated aquifers and to determine the in situ distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) between the dissolved phase and two colloidal fractions. The experimental procedure comprising field sampling of bulk groundwater and a sequential laboratory fractionation scheme consisting of a centrifugation and an ultrafiltration step was designed and performed to maintain groundwater chemical and physical integrity. The colloids were identified as clay minerals, Fe-oxides, Fe-sulfides, and quartz particles containing significant amounts of organic carbon. The PAH partitioning to the coarse colloid fraction was linearly correlated with the corresponding PAH octanol-water partitioning coefficient, indicating a hydrophobic partitioning. The K{sub oc} values agreed with literature information of PAH sorption to soil organic matter.

  9. An integrated subsurface modeling and risk assessment approach for managing the petroleum-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Huang, G H; Hao, R X; Cheng, S Y

    2004-01-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination can lead to a variety of impacts and risks to the communities. Identifications of management schemes with sound environmental and socio-economic efficiencies is desired. In fact, before any decisions regarding site remediation actions can be made, three major questions may have to be answered. They include "What happened underground, and what will happen in the future under the given remediation scenarios?," "Are there specific risks on the surrounding community?" and "What remediation alternatives are suitable for the site?" In this study, an integrated subsurface modeling and risk assessment method for petroleum-contaminated site management is proposed. It incorporates multi-phase flow multi-component transport modeling and ELCR-based human health risk assessment into a general framework. The proposed method is applied to a case study within a western Canada context for identifying effective management schemes with improved environmental and socio-economic efficiencies. Given conditions at the study site, six remediation alternatives based on combinations of several technologies are recommended, with the provision of analyses for equipment/manpower requirements, system designs, operations, efficiencies, and costs. These alternatives can be categorized into two groups: hybrid ex situ and in situ remediation approaches, and integrated in situ remediation approaches. This study is a new attempt that integrates issues of subsurface-contamination simulation, risk assessment, and site remediation for a real-world problem within a general research framework. The research outputs are directly useful for the industry to gain insight of the site and to make decisions of the relevant remediation actions. PMID:15533023

  10. Estimation of subsurface formation temperature in the Tarim Basin, northwest China: implications for hydrocarbon generation and preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Feng, Changge; Hao, Chunyan

    2015-10-01

    Subsurface formation temperature in the Tarim Basin, northwest China, is vital for assessment of hydrocarbon generation and preservation, and of geothermal energy potential. However, it has not previously been well understood, due to poor data coverage and a lack of highly accurate temperature data. Here, we combined recently acquired steady-state temperature logging data with drill stem test temperature data and measured rock thermal properties, to investigate the geothermal regime and estimate the subsurface formation temperature at depth in the range of 1000-5000 m, together with temperatures at the lower boundary of each of four major Lower Paleozoic marine source rocks buried in this basin. Results show that heat flow of the Tarim Basin ranges between 26.2 and 66.1 mW/m2, with a mean of 42.5 ± 7.6 mW/m2; the geothermal gradient at depth of 3000 m varies from 14.9 to 30.2 °C/km, with a mean of 20.7 ± 2.9 °C/km. Formation temperature estimated at the depth of 1000 m is between 29 and 41 °C, with a mean of 35 °C, while 63-100 °C is for the temperature at the depth of 3000 m with a mean of 82 °C. Temperature at 5000 m ranges from 97 to 160 °C, with a mean of 129 °C. Generally spatial patterns of the subsurface formation temperature at depth are basically similar, characterized by higher temperatures in the uplift areas and lower temperatures in the sags, which indicates the influence of basement structure and lateral variations in thermal properties on the geotemperature field. Using temperature to identify the oil window in the source rocks, most of the uplifted areas in the basin are under favorable condition for oil generation and/or preservation, whereas the sags with thick sediments are favorable for gas generation and/or preservation. We conclude that relatively low present-day geothermal regime and large burial depth of the source rocks in the Tarim Basin are favorable for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. In addition, it is found that the oil and gas fields discovered in the Tarim Basin are usually associated with relatively high-temperature anomalies, and the upward migration and accumulation of hot geofluids along faults as conduit from below could explain this coincidence. Accordingly, this thermal anomaly could be indicative of hydrocarbon exploration targets in the basin.

  11. Hydrocarbon precombusting catalyst survey and optimization for perfluorocarbon tracer analysis in subsurface tracer applications

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Cote, E.A.; D'Ottavio, T.W.; Dietz, R.N.

    1989-05-01

    The extension of the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology, as developed for atmospheric dispersion and transport studies to petroleum reservoir characterization studies, required the development of a more robust catalyst to remove analysis interferents caused by the adsorption of 5 liter hydrocarbon reservoir gas samples containing PFT onto carbonaceous adsorbent samplers. Two approaches were studied: (1) replacement of the present internal laboratory PFT analysis system catalyst with a more effective catalyst and, if this was not viable, (2) development of an external preprocessing catalyst train, to significantly reduce the hydrocarbon levels in the sample, without affecting the perfluorocarbon tracers. 13 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Mhiri, Najla; Karray, Fatma; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:26339653

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Mhiri, Najla; Karray, Fatma; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:26339653

  14. Potential of phytoremediation for the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated salt marsh sediments.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Mucha, Ana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2014-05-01

    Degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in colonized and un-colonized sediments by salt marsh plants Juncus maritimus and Phragmites australis collected in a temperate estuary was investigated during a 5-month greenhouse experiment. The efficiency of two bioremediation treatments namely biostimulation (BS) by the addition of nutrients, and bioaugmentation (BA) by addition of indigenous microorganisms was tested in comparison with hydrocarbon natural attenuation in un-colonized and with rhizoremediation in colonized sediments. Hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms and root biomass were assessed as well as hydrocarbon degradation levels. During the study, hydrocarbon degradation in un-colonized sediments was negligible regardless of treatments. Rhizoremediation proved to be an effective strategy for hydrocarbon removal, yielding high rates in most experiments. However, BS treatments showed a negative effect on the J.maritimus potential for hydrocarbon degradation by decreasing the root system development that lead to lower degradation rates. Although both plants and their associated microorganisms presented a potential for rhizoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated salt marsh sediments, results highlighted that nutrient requirements may be distinct among plant species, which should be accounted for when designing cleanup strategies. PMID:24584003

  15. Subsurface Organics in Aseptic Cores From the MARTE Robotic Drilling Experiment: Ground truth and Contamination Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Stoker, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    The subsurface is the key environment for searching for life on planets lacking surface life. This includes the search for past/present life on Mars where possible subsurface life could exist [1]. The Mars-Analog-Rio-Tinto-Experiment (MARTE) performed a simulation of a Mars robotic drilling at the RT Borehole#7 Site ~6.07m, atop a massive-pyrite deposit from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. The RT site is considered an important analog of Sinus Meridiani on Mars, an ideal model analog for a subsurface Martian setting [2], and a relevant example of deep subsurface microbial community including aerobic and anaerobic chemoautotrophs [4-5]. Searching for microbes or bulk organics of biological origin in a subsurface sample from a planet is a key scientific objective of Robotic drilling missions. During the 2005 Field experiment 28 minicores were robotically handled and subsampled for life detection experiments under anti-contamination protocols. Ground truth included visual observation of cores and lab based Elemental and Isotope Ratios Mass Spectrometry analysis (EA-IRMS) of bulk organics in Hematite and Gohetite-rich gossanized tuffs, gossan and clay layers within 0-6m-depth. C-org and N-tot vary up to four orders of magnitude among the litter (~11Wt%, 0-1cm) and the mineralized (~3Wt%, 1-3cm) layers, and the first 6 m-depth (C-org=0.02-0.38Wt%). Overall, the distribution/ preservation of plant and soil-derived organics (d13C-org = 26 per mil to 24 per mil) is ten times higher (C-org=0.33Wt%) that in hematite-poor clays, or where rootlets are present, than in hematite- rich samples (C-org=<0.01Wt%). This is consistent with ATP assay (Lightning-MVP, Biocontrol) for total biomass in subsurface (Borehole#7 ~6.07m, ~avg. 153RLU) vs. surface soil samples (~1,500-81,449RLU) [5]. However, the in-situ ATP assay failed in detecting presence of roots during the in-situ life detection experiment. Furthermore, cm-sized roots were overlooked during remote observations. Finally, ATP Luminometry provided insights for potential contamination from core-handling and environmental dust loadings on cleaned/sterilized control surfaces (e.g., 6,782-36,243RLU/cm2). Cleanliness/sterility can be maintained by applying a simple sterile protocol under field conditions. Science results from this research will support future Astrobiology driven drilling mission planned on Mars. Specifically, ground truth offers relevant insights to assess strengths and limits of in-situ/remote observations vs. laboratory measurements. Results from this experiment will also aid the debate on advantages/ disadvantages of manned vs. robotic drilling missions on Mars or other planets. [1] Boston et al., 1997; [2] http://marte.arc.nasa.gov; [3] Stoker, C., et al., 2006 AbSciCon, [4] Stoker et al., submitted; [5] Bonaccorsi., et al., 2006 AbSciCon.

  16. Augmented In Situ Subsurface Bioremediation ProcessBIO-REM, Inc. - Demonstration Bulletin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Augmented In Situ Subsurface Bioremediation Process developed by BIO-REM, Inc., uses microaerophilic bacteria and micronutrients (H-10) and surface tension depressants/penetrants for the treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater. The bacteria utilize hydroc...

  17. Augmented In Situ Subsurface Bioremediation Process™BIO-REM, Inc. - Demonstration Bulletin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Augmented In Situ Subsurface Bioremediation Process™ developed by BIO-REM, Inc., uses microaerophilic bacteria and micronutrients (H-10) and surface tension depressants/penetrants for the treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater. The bacteria utilize hydroc...

  18. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; et al

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium’s genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; Brettin, T.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. C.; Han, Cliff F.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, F.; Land, M.; Hauser, L.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Richardson, P. M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Sanford, Robert A.; Loeffler, Frank E.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacteriums genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  20. In situ measurements of subsurface contaminants with a multi-channel laser-induced fluorescence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu Pepper, Jane; Wright, Andrew O.; Kenny, Jonathan E.

    2002-01-01

    A new multi-channel laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) probe with novel optical fiber probe geometry has been designed and integrated into a cone penetrometer testing (CPT) system for in situ contamination detection. The system is capable of collecting excitation and emission matrices (EEMs) of subsurface contaminants as a function of depth in seconds. Compared to our previous multi-channel LIF-CPT system, the new system is faster and more compact, with reduced probe size and sampling area. This article describes the first field demonstration of the system at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts. One contaminated site within the base was characterized through in situ measurements of 26 LIF-CPT pushes. To validate the LIF results, core samples taken at five locations were analyzed by both on-site LIF measurements and by off-site laboratory analyses with EPA methods. The comparison of the LIF and laboratory results is presented, along with the results of the in situ measurements.

  1. In situ measurements of subsurface contaminants with a multi-channel laser-induced fluorescence system.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Jane Wu; Wright, Andrew O; Kenny, Jonathan E

    2002-01-15

    A new multi-channel laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) probe with novel optical fiber probe geometry has been designed and integrated into a cone penetrometer testing (CPT) system for in situ contamination detection. The system is capable of collecting excitation and emission matrices (EEMs) of subsurface contaminants as a function of depth in seconds. Compared to our previous multi-channel LIF-CPT system, the new system is faster and more compact, with reduced probe size and sampling area. This article describes the first field demonstration of the system at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts. One contaminated site within the base was characterized through in situ measurements of 26 LIF-CPT pushes. To validate the LIF results, core samples taken at five locations were analyzed by both on-site LIF measurements and by off-site laboratory analyses with EPA methods. The comparison of the LIF and laboratory results is presented, along with the results of the in situ measurements. PMID:11808737

  2. Monitoring the bio-stimulation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by measurements of soil electrical properties, and CO2 content and its 13C/12C isotopic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, C.; Gourry, J.; Ignatiadis, I.; Colombano, S.; Dictor, M.; Guimbaud, C.; Chartier, M.; Dumestre, A.; Dehez, S.; Naudet, V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminated soils represent an environmental issue as it impacts on ecosystems and aquifers. Where significant subsurface heterogeneity exists, conventional intrusive investigations and groundwater sampling can be insufficient to obtain a robust monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants, as the information they provide is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations, with no information between sampling points. In order to obtain wider information in space volume on subsurface modifications, complementary methods can be used like geophysics. Among geophysical methods, geoelectrical techniques such as electrical resistivity (ER) and induced polarization (IP) seem the more promising, especially to study the effects of biodegradation processes. Laboratory and field geoelectrical experiments to characterize soils contaminated by oil products have shown that mature hydrocarbon-contaminated soils are characterized by enhanced electrical conductivity although hydrocarbons are electrically resistive. This high bulk conductivity is due to bacterial impacts on geological media, resulting in changes in the chemical and physical properties and thus, to the geophysical properties of the ground. Moreover, microbial activity induced CO2 production and isotopic deviation of carbon. Indeed, produced CO2 will reflect the pollutant isotopic signature. Thus, the ratio δ13C(CO2) will come closer to δ13C(hydrocarbon). BIOPHY, project supported by the French National Research Agency (ANR), proposes to use electrical methods and gas analyses to develop an operational and non-destructive method for monitoring in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons in order to optimize soil treatment. Demonstration field is located in the South of Paris (France), where liquid fuels (gasoline and diesel) leaked from some tanks in 1997. In order to stimulate biodegradation, a trench has been dug to supply oxygen to the water table and thus stimulate aerobic metabolic bioprocesses. ER and IP surveys are performed regularly to monitor the stimulated biodegradation and progress of remediation until soil cleanup. Microbial activity is characterized by CO2 production increase and δ13C isotopic deviation, in the produced CO2 measured by infrared laser spectroscopy, and by an evolution of electrical conductivity and IP responses in correlation with microbiological and chemical analyses.

  3. Temporal biogeophysical signatures at hydrocarbon contaminated sites associated with long-term remediation efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E.; Che-Alota, V.; Atekwana, E.; Werkema, D. D.

    2009-05-01

    Biogeophysical signatures of hydrocarbon contaminated sites provide ideal laboratories for investigating microbial-geophysical relationships as the excess organic carbon present at these sites stimulates microbial activity. As such geophysical investigations have documented characteristic changes associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation in both field and laboratory experiments. The conceptual model that results from almost a decade of studies from these environments is one in which over time, the geophysical signatures due to bio-physicochemical changes imparted on the aquifer by the microbial activity reach some maximum or minimum related to the availability of terminal electron acceptors, the organic carbon source concentration, and microbial activity. However, with continuous removal of the contaminant mass either by natural attenuation (e.g., intrinsic bioremediation) or engineered (bio) remediation, a decrease in the microbial activity is predicted to cause associated changes in the geophysical properties (i.e., geophysical signatures revert to original conditions). This paper will present the results of repeated geophysical investigations at a hydrocarbon contaminated site acquired over an eleven-year period documenting changes in geophysical signatures associated with removal of hydrocarbon mass in the contaminated zone. Initial investigations at the site showed that relative to background, the contaminated area was characterized by higher bulk electrical conductivity, positive SP anomaly, and attenuated GPR reflections. Over time, the contaminated zone bulk electrical conductivity had reverted to near background conditions, the positive SP anomaly became more negative, and the zone of attenuated GPR reflections showed increased signal strength. The removal of hydrocarbon mass in the vadose zone over the plume by a soil vapor extraction system decreased the level of biological activity and therefore the magnitude of the geophysical signatures. We conclude that the attenuation of microbial activity due to organic carbon mass reduction by natural or engineered (bio)remediation can be effectively imaged by temporal geophysical surveys.

  4. TAILORING CATALYSTS FOR HYDRODECHLORINATING CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER. (R825689C078)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A palladium-on-zeolite catalyst has been optimized for treating groundwater contaminated with halogenated hydrocarbon compounds (HHCs) by hydrodechlorination with dissolved hydrogen. Aqueous sulfite was used as the model poison and the dechlorination of 1,2-di...

  5. TAILORING CATALYSTS FOR HYDRODECHLORINATING CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER. (R825689C093)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A palladium-on-zeolite catalyst has been optimized for treating groundwater contaminated with halogenated hydrocarbon compounds (HHCs) by hydrodechlorination with dissolved hydrogen. Aqueous sulfite was used as the model poison and the dechlorination of 1,2-di...

  6. The occurrence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa on hydrocarbon-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Kaszab, Edit; Kriszt, Balzs; Atzl, Bla; Szab, Gabriella; Szab, Istvn; Harkai, Pter; Szoboszlay, Sndor

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this paper was the comprehensive estimation of the occurrence rate and the antibiotic-resistance conditions of opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hydrocarbon-contaminated environments. From 2002 to 2007, 26 hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of Hungary were screened for the detection of environmental isolates. Altogether, 156 samples were collected and examined for the determination of appearance, representative cell counts, and antibiotic-resistance features of P. aeruginosa. The detected levels of minimal inhibitory concentrations of ten different drugs against 36 environmental strains were compared to the results of a widely used reference strain ATCC 27853 and four other clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Based on our long-term experiment, it can be established that species P. aeruginosa was detectable in case of 61.5% of the investigated hydrocarbon-contaminated sites and 35.2% of the examined samples that shows its widespread occurrence in polluted soil-groundwater systems. In the course of the antibiotic-resistance assay, our results determined that 11 of the examined 36 environmental strains had multiple drug-resistance against several clinically effective antimicrobial classes: cephalosporins, wide spectrum penicillins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides. The fact that these multiresistant strains were isolated from 8 different hydrocarbon-contaminated sites, mainly from outskirts, confirms that multiple drug-resistance of P. aeruginosa is widespread not only in clinical, but also in natural surroundings as well. PMID:19597862

  7. BIOGEOCHEMICAL EVIDENCE FOR MICROBIAL COMMUNITY CHANGE IN A JET FUEL HYDROCARBONS-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A glacio-fluvial aquifer located at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, had been contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons released after the crash of a tanker aircraft in October of 1988 Microbial biomass and community structure, associated with the aquifer sediments, were chara...

  8. STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF A SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER CONTAMINATED WITH FUEL HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground-water chemistry and the stable C isotope composition ( 13CDIC) of dissolved C (DIC) were measured in a sand aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Results show that ground water in the upgradient zone was characterized by DIC content of 14-20 mg C/L and 13CDIC...

  9. Hydrocarbon contamination affects deep-sea benthic oxygen uptake and microbial community composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, C. E.; Ruhl, H. A.; Jones, D. O. B.; Yool, A.; Thornton, B.; Mayor, D. J.

    2015-06-01

    Accidental oil well blowouts have the potential to introduce large quantities of hydrocarbons into the deep sea and disperse toxic contaminants to midwater and seafloor areas over ocean-basin scales. Our ability to assess the environmental impacts of these events is currently impaired by our limited understanding of how resident communities are affected. This study examined how two treatment levels of a water accommodated fraction of crude oil affected the oxygen consumption rate of a natural, deep-sea benthic community. We also investigated the resident microbial community's response to hydrocarbon contamination through quantification of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and their stable carbon isotope (?13C) values. Sediment community oxygen consumption rates increased significantly in response to increasing levels of contamination in the overlying water of oil-treated microcosms, and bacterial biomass decreased significantly in the presence of oil. Multivariate ordination of PLFA compositional (mol%) data showed that the structure of the microbial community changed in response to hydrocarbon contamination. However, treatment effects on the ?13C values of individual PLFAs were not statistically significant. Our data demonstrate that deep-sea benthic microbes respond to hydrocarbon exposure within 36 h.

  10. EARLY WARNING MARINE WATER SUPPLY PROTECTION STRATEGY: THE THREAT OF OIL SPILL (PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON) CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oil spills resulting from the twice-grounded freighter New Carissa on the Central Oregon coast in the spring of 1999 caused substantial concern regarding potential petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contamination of Coos Bay, Alsea Bay and Yaquina Bay estuaries and resident seawater fac...

  11. Analysis of hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater metagenomes as revealed by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Abbai, Nathlee S; Pillay, Balakrishna

    2013-07-01

    The tendency for chlorinated aliphatics and aromatic hydrocarbons to accumulate in environments such as groundwater and sediments poses a serious environmental threat. In this study, the metabolic capacity of hydrocarbon (aromatics and chlorinated aliphatics)-contaminated groundwater in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa has been elucidated for the first time by analysis of pyrosequencing data. The taxonomic data revealed that the metagenomes were dominated by the phylum Proteobacteria (mainly Betaproteobacteria). In addition, Flavobacteriales, Sphingobacteria, Burkholderiales, and Rhodocyclales were the predominant orders present in the individual metagenomes. These orders included microorganisms (Flavobacteria, Dechloromonas aromatica RCB, and Azoarcus) involved in the degradation of aromatic compounds and various other hydrocarbons that were present in the groundwater. Although the metabolic reconstruction of the metagenome represented composite cell networks, the information obtained was sufficient to address questions regarding the metabolic potential of the microbial communities and to correlate the data to the contamination profile of the groundwater. Genes involved in the degradation of benzene and benzoate, heavy metal-resistance mechanisms appeared to provide a survival strategy used by the microbial communities. Analysis of the pyrosequencing-derived data revealed that the metagenomes represent complex microbial communities that have adapted to the geochemical conditions of the groundwater as evidenced by the presence of key enzymes/genes conferring resistance to specific contaminants. Thus, pyrosequencing analysis of the metagenomes provided insights into the microbial activities in hydrocarbon-contaminated habitats. PMID:23307295

  12. Subsurface microbial community structure correlates with uranium redox phases during in situ field manipulation in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Kostka, Joel; Green, Stefan; Wu, Wei-min; Criddle, Craig; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M

    2009-07-01

    Long-term field manipulation experiments investigating the effects of subsurface redox conditions on the fate and transport of soluble uranium(VI) were conducted over a 3 year period at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Center (OR-IFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. In the highly contaminated source zone, introduction of ethanol to the subsurface stimulated native denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, iron-reducing and fermentative microorganisms and reduced U to below 0.03 mg/L. Subsequently, oxygen and nitrate were experimentally re-introduced into the subsurface to examine the potential for re-oxidation and re-mobilization of U(IV). Introduction of oxygen or nitrate caused changes in subsurface geochemistry and re-oxidation of U. After reoxidation, the subsurface experienced several months of starvation conditions before ethanol injection was restored to reduce the treatment zone. Subsurface microorganisms were characterized by community fingerprinting, targeted population analyses, and quantitative PCR of key functional groups in 50 samples taken during multiple phases of field manipulation. Statistical analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the microbial community would co-vary with the shifts in the subsurface geochemistry. The level of hydraulic connectivity of sampling wells to the injection well was readily tracked by microbial community analysis. We demonstrate quantitatively that specific populations, especially Desulfosporosinus, are heavily influenced by geochemical conditions and positively correlate with the immobilization of uranium. Following nitrate reoxidation, populations of Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate reducing organisms (Thiobacillus) showed an increase in relative abundance.

  13. Subsurface structure and hydrocarbon occurrence, cretaceous rocks of Maxie and Pistol Ridge Fields, Southeastern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.; Meylan, M.A. )

    1993-09-01

    Maxie and Pistol Ridge fields are located along the southern boundary of the Mississippi Salt basin and northern edge of the Wiggins arch in Forrest and Pearl River counties, Mississippi. Together, the fields have produced about 12 million bbl of oil and 600 mcf of gas to date, primarily from the lower Tuscaloosa Formation. Production ranges from the Hosston to the Wilcox. A field study using 281 electric logs was done to determine controls on hydrocarbon distribution, emphasizing the Dantzler and Upper Cretaceous section. Almost all hydrocarbon traps at the fields are related to the Maxie-Pistol Ridge fault, a northward-dipping normal fault extending about 18 mi in an east-west direction. Maximum throw along the fault is about 300 ft (at the Dantzler and Lower Tuscaloosa Formation horizons), and it dies out upward into the lower part of the Tertiary. Several smaller antithetic and synthetic faults occur parallel to subparallel to the main fault. On the downthrown side of the fault, hydrocarbons occur in two rollover structures designated here as the Maxie anticline and the Pistol Ridge faulted anticline. The former, slightly higher, has trapped mostly lower Tuscaloosa gas, while the latter, structurally lower, contain dominantly oil, spread stratigraphically from the Paluxy to the Eutaw/upper Tuscaloosa. Upthrown structural traps are low-relief simple closures of fault-closed noses on what are designated as the East and West Wiggins anticlines. Hosston and Rodessa pay in the latter is referred to as West Pistol Ridge field.

  14. BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN MARINE HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation is being increasingly seen as an effective environmentally benign treatment for shorelines contaminated as a result of marine oil spills. Despite a relatively long history of research on oil-spill bioremediation, it remains an essentially empirical technology and m...

  15. A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF USING A GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR FOR MORE EFFECTIVE REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted (1) to assess the capability of groundpenetrating radar (GPR) to identify natural subsurface features, detect man-made objects burled in the soil, and both detect and define the extent of contaminated soil or ground water due to a toxic spill, and (2) to det...

  16. Remediation of sandy soils contaminated with hydrocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons by soil vapour extraction.

    PubMed

    Albergaria, Jos Toms; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria da Conceio M; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2012-08-15

    This paper presents the study of the remediation of sandy soils containing six of the most common contaminants (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene) using soil vapour extraction (SVE). The influence of soil water content on the process efficiency was evaluated considering the soil type and the contaminant. For artificially contaminated soils with negligible clay contents and natural organic matter it was concluded that: (i) all the remediation processes presented efficiencies above 92%; (ii) an increase of the soil water content led to a more time-consuming remediation; (iii) longer remediation periods were observed for contaminants with lower vapour pressures and lower water solubilities due to mass transfer limitations. Based on these results an easy and relatively fast procedure was developed for the prediction of the remediation times of real soils; 83% of the remediation times were predicted with relative deviations below 14%. PMID:22561947

  17. Protozoa in Subsurface Sediments from Sites Contaminated with Aviation Gasoline or Jet Fuel

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, James L.; Kampbell, Don H.; Cook, Mike L.; Wilson, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Numbers of protozoa in the subsurface of aviation gasoline and jet fuel spill areas at a Coast Guard base at Traverse City, Mich., were determined. Boreholes were drilled in an uncontaminated location, in contaminated but untreated parts of the fuel plumes, and in the aviation gasoline source area undergoing H2O2 biotreatment. Samples were taken from the unsaturated zone to depths slightly below the floating free product in the saturated zone. Protozoa were found to occur in elevated numbers in the unsaturated zone, where fuel vapors mixed with atmospheric oxygen, and below the layer of floating fuel, where uncontaminated groundwater came into contact with fuel. The same trends were noted in the biotreatment area, except that numbers of protozoa were higher. Numbers of protozoa in some contaminated areas equalled or exceeded those found in surface soil. The abundance of protozoa in the biotreatment area was high enough that it would be expected to significantly reduce the bacterial community that was degrading the fuel. Little reduction in hydraulic conductivity was observed, and no bacterial fouling of the aquifer was observed during biotreatment. PMID:16348871

  18. Evaluation of the total petroleum hydrocarbon standard for cleanup of petroleum contaminated sites. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Blaisdell, R.A.; Smallwood, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    This study evaluated the TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon) cleanup standard for petroleum contaminated soils (PCS). A survey of 13 state regulators was performed to characterize current standards and regulatory viewpoints on the use of a TPH versus a BTEX cleanup standard. The regulatory community considers the BTEX constituents the greatest threat to groundwater, yet expressed concern that the use of a compound specific standard, without an accompanying analysis for TPH, might result in residual soil contamination that may present risk. This study also evaluated the ratio of BTEX TPH in soil over time. Based on JP-4 contaminated site soil data, this study demonstrated that the ratio of BTEX to TPH declines with time. The results indicate that the constant ratio of BTEX to TPH assumed by the California LUFT manual and Stokman and Dime's research is not valid for soils contaminated with JP-4. Lastly, this research identifies the cost savings potential that would result if a BTEX based standard, versus a TPH standard, were required at all Air Force sites. The research shows that only 13% of sites which would require cleanup under a TPH standard would require cleanup under a BTEX based standard. Soil cleanup standards, Petroleum hydrocarbons, Total petroleum hydrocarbons, TPH, Bezene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Ethyl-benzene, Xylene, BTEX, Petroleum contamination, JP-4.

  19. Aerobic biodegradation potential of subsurface microorganisms from a jet fuel-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aelion, C.M.; Bradley, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    In 1975, a leak of 83,000 gallons (314,189 liters) of jet fuel (JP-4) contaminated a shallow water-table aquifer near North Charleston, S.C. Laboratory experiments were conducted with contaminated sediments to assess the aerobic biodegradation potential of the in situ microbial community. Sediments were incubated with 14C-labeled organic compounds, and the evolution of 14CO2 was measured over time. Gas chromatographic analyses were used to monitor CO2 production and O2 consumption under aerobic conditions. Results indicated that the microbes from contaminated sediments remained active despite the potentially toxic effects of JP-4. 14CO2 was measured from [14C]glucose respiration in unamended and nitrate-amended samples after 1 day of incubation. Total [14C]glucose metabolism was greater in 1 mM nitrate-amended than in unamended samples because of increased cellular incorporation of 14C label. [14C]benzene and [14C]toluene were not significantly respired after 3 months of incubation. With the addition of 1 mM NO3, CO2 production measured by gas chromatographic analysis increased linearly during 2 months of incubation at a rate of 0.099 ??mol g-1 (dry weight) day-1 while oxygen concentration decreased at a rate of 0.124 ??mol g-1 (dry weight) day-1. With no added nitrate, CO2 production was not different from that in metabolically inhibited control vials. From the examination of selected components of JP-4, the n-alkane hexane appeared to be degraded as opposed to the branched alkanes of similar molecular weight. The results suggest that the in situ microbial community is active despite the JP-4 jet fuel contamination and that biodegradation may be compound specific. Also, the community is strongly nitrogen limited, and nitrogen additions may be required to significantly enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  20. Bioremediation of soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons using bioslurry reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Banerji, S.K.; Zappi, M.E.; Teeter, C.L.; Gunnison, D.; Cullinane, M.J.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Defense has over 12,000 sites contaminated from military activities. This report presents data from two bench-scale and two pilot-scale studies that evaluated the suitability of the bioslurry process to bioremediate soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. Soils from two contaminated sites were studied. The first soil contained polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) compounds, ketones, and chlorinated ethanes; the second soil contained gasoline and associated compounds. Conceptual designs and costs of bioslurry processes for field applications are also presented. Bench-scale studies were performed in 5-L batch reactors, equipped with aeration and mixing equipment. Various nutrient amendments, surfactants, and selected microbial consortia were evaluated during the bench-scale studies. Several reactors were also operated using only native microbes.

  1. Investigations on potential bacteria for the bioremediation treatment of environments contaminated with hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lazar, I.; Voicu, A.; Dobrota, S.; Stefanescu, M.

    1995-12-31

    In Romania after more than 135 years of oil production and processing, some severe environmental pollution problems have accumulated. In this context a joint research group from Institute of Biology Bucharest and S.C. Petrostar S.A. Ploiesti became involved in a research project on bioremediation of an environment contaminated with hydrocarbon waste. In the first stage of this project, investigations on microbial communities occurring in environments contaminated with oil were carried out. In the second stage, the hundreds of bacterial strains and populations isolated from soils, slops, and water sites contaminated with waste oil and water waste oil mix were submitted to a screening program, to select a naturally occurring mixed culture with a high ability to degrade hydrocarbons.

  2. Biomarkers for Great Lakes priority contaminants: halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed Central

    Feeley, M M

    1995-01-01

    One of the major goals of the Great Lakes Action Plan is to actively accumulate and assess toxicological information on persistent toxic substances found in the Great Lakes basin. As part of Health Canada's commitment to this plan, a review of biomarkers for the environmental contaminants polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) was conducted. In general, while food consumption was identified as the major source of human exposure to both contaminant groups, certain commodities, such as fish, milk and dairy products, and meat, were found to predominate. Due to the ubiquitous nature of these environmental contaminants and their propensity to bioaccumulate, all humans will have detectable body burdens, which in certain cases can be positively associated with the consumption of particular foods (i.e., PCBs and freshwater fish from the Great Lakes). When dealing with environmental exposure only, relating specific effect biomarkers to contaminant exposure or tissue levels was difficult, due in part to the complex nature of the exposure and the nonspecific nature of the effect. For PCBs, the most likely biomarkers of effect included some form of alteration in lipid metabolism (serum triglyceride/cholesterol levels) and elevation of hepatic-related enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Cross-species extrapolation also indicates the potential for neurotoxicologic effects to occur in humans. For PCDDs/PCDFs, dermatologic lesions (chloracne) and indications of hepatic enzyme induction have been documented, but primarily due to occupational or high acute accidental exposures. Recent evidence suggests that neonates may represent a potential at-risk population due to relatively high exposure to PCDDs/PCDFs, as with PCBs, during breast feeding as compared to standard adult dietary intake. Future areas of potential benefit for biomarker development include immunologic and endocrine effects, primarily based on biologic plausibility from experimental animal research. PMID:8635442

  3. Biomarkers for Great Lakes priority contaminants: halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Feeley, M M

    1995-12-01

    One of the major goals of the Great Lakes Action Plan is to actively accumulate and assess toxicological information on persistent toxic substances found in the Great Lakes basin. As part of Health Canada's commitment to this plan, a review of biomarkers for the environmental contaminants polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) was conducted. In general, while food consumption was identified as the major source of human exposure to both contaminant groups, certain commodities, such as fish, milk and dairy products, and meat, were found to predominate. Due to the ubiquitous nature of these environmental contaminants and their propensity to bioaccumulate, all humans will have detectable body burdens, which in certain cases can be positively associated with the consumption of particular foods (i.e., PCBs and freshwater fish from the Great Lakes). When dealing with environmental exposure only, relating specific effect biomarkers to contaminant exposure or tissue levels was difficult, due in part to the complex nature of the exposure and the nonspecific nature of the effect. For PCBs, the most likely biomarkers of effect included some form of alteration in lipid metabolism (serum triglyceride/cholesterol levels) and elevation of hepatic-related enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Cross-species extrapolation also indicates the potential for neurotoxicologic effects to occur in humans. For PCDDs/PCDFs, dermatologic lesions (chloracne) and indications of hepatic enzyme induction have been documented, but primarily due to occupational or high acute accidental exposures. Recent evidence suggests that neonates may represent a potential at-risk population due to relatively high exposure to PCDDs/PCDFs, as with PCBs, during breast feeding as compared to standard adult dietary intake. Future areas of potential benefit for biomarker development include immunologic and endocrine effects, primarily based on biologic plausibility from experimental animal research. PMID:8635442

  4. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, Edward J.; Anderson, Brian L.; Wijesinghe, Ananda M.; Viani, Brian E.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

  5. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  6. CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Johnson, Jr.

    2003-06-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV. Also conducted was screening of 13 chemicals to determine their relative effectiveness and the selection of three chemicals for further testing.

  7. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: The perspectives of history and hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Bioremediation, the use of microbial degradation processes to detoxify environmental contamination, was first applied to petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water systems in the early 1970s. Since that time, these technologies have evolved in some ways that were clearly anticipated early investigators, and in other ways that were not foreseen. The expectation that adding oxidants and nutrients to contaminated aquifers would enhance biodegradation, for example, has been born out subsequent experience. Many of the technologies now in common use such as air sparging, hydrogen peroxide addition, nitrate addition, and bioslurping, are conceptually similar to the first bioremediation systems put into operation. More unexpected, however, were the considerable technical problems associated with delivering oxidants and nutrients to heterogeneous ground water systems. Experience has shown that the success of engineered bioremediation systems depends largely on how effectively directions and rates of ground water flow can be controlled, and thus how efficiently oxidants and nutrients can be delivered to contaminated aquifer sediments. The early expectation that injecting laboratory-selected or genetically engineered cultures of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria into aquifers would be a useful bioremediation technology has not been born out subsequent experience. Rather, it appears that petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in ground water systems and that bacterial addition is usually unnecessary. Perhaps the technology that was least anticipated early investigators was the development of intrinsic bioremediation. Experience has shown that natural attenuation mechanisms - biodegradation, dilution, and sorption - limit the migration of contaminants to some degree in all ground water systems. Intrinsic bioremediation is the deliberate use of natural attenuation processes to treat contaminated ground water to specified concentration levels at predetermined points in the aquifer. In current practice, intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons requires a systematic assessment to show that ambient natural attenuation mechanisms are efficient enough to meet regulatory requirements and a monitoring program to verify that performance requirements are met in the future.

  8. Prediction of ecotoxicity of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using physicochemical parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.C.L.; Chai, E.Y.; Chu, K.K.; Dorn, P.B.

    1999-11-01

    The physicochemical properties of eight hydrocarbon-contaminated soils were used to predict toxicity to earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and plants. The toxicity of these preremediated soils was assessed using earthworm avoidance, survival, and reproduction and seed germination and root growth in four plant species. No-observed-effect and 25% inhibitory concentrations were determined from the earthworm and plant assays. Physical property measurements and metals analyses of the soils were conducted. Hydrocarbon contamination was characterized by total petroleum hydrocarbons, oil and grease, and GC boiling-point distribution. Univariate and multivariate statistical methods were used to examine relationships between physical and chemical properties and biological endpoints. Soil groupings based on physicochemical properties and toxicity from cluster and principal component analyses were generally similar. Correlation analysis identified a number of significant relationships between soil parameters and toxicity that were used in univariate model development. Total petroleum hydrocarbons by gas chromatography and polars were identified as predictors of earthworm avoidance and survival and seed germination, explaining 65 to 75% of the variation in the data. Asphaltenes also explained 83% of the variation in seed germination. Gravimetric total petroleum hydrocarbons explained 40% of the variation in earthworm reproduction, whereas 43% of the variation in plant root growth was explained by asphaltenes. Multivariate one-component partial least squares models, which identified predictors similar to those identified by the univariate models, were also developed for worm avoidance and survival and seed germination and had predictive powers of 42 and 29%, respectively.

  9. Efficiency of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-10-01

    This study describes the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from the soil samples collected from industrial dumping site. High concentrations of heavy metals (like iron, lead, nickel, cadmium, copper, cobalt and zinc) and petroleum hydrocarbons were present in the contaminated soil samples. Lipopeptide biosurfactant, consisting of surfactin and fengycin was obtained from Bacillus subtilis A21. Soil washing with biosurfactant solution removed significant amount of petroleum hydrocarbon (64.5 %) and metals namely cadmium (44.2 %), cobalt (35.4 %), lead (40.3 %), nickel (32.2 %), copper (26.2 %) and zinc (32.07 %). Parameters like surfactant concentration, temperature, agitation condition and pH of the washing solution influenced the pollutant removing ability of biosurfactant mixture. Biosurfactant exhibited substantial hydrocarbon solubility above its critical micelle concentration. During washing, 50 % of biosurfactant was sorbed to the soil particles decreasing effective concentration during washing process. Biosurfactant washed soil exhibited 100 % mustard seed germination contradictory to water washed soil where no germination was observed. The results indicate that the soil washing with mixture of lipopeptide biosurfactants at concentrations above its critical micelle concentration can be an efficient and environment friendly approach for removing pollutants (petroleum hydrocarbon and heavy metals) from contaminated soil. PMID:23681773

  10. Creation of a subsurface permeable treatment zone for aqueous chromate contamination using in situ redox manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, J.S.; Cole, C.R.; Williams, M.D.; Vermeul, V.R.; Amonette, J.E.; Szecsody, J.E.; Istok, J.D.; Humphrey, M.D.

    2000-03-31

    An in situ redox manipulation (ISRM) method for creating a permeable treatment zone in the subsurface has been developed at the laboratory bench and intermediate scales and deployed at the field scale for reduction/immobilization of chromate contamination. At other sites, the same redox technology is currently being tested for dechlorination of TCE. The reduced zone is created by injected reagents that reduce iron naturally present in the aquifer sediments from Fe(III) to surface-bound and structural Fe(II) species. Standard ground water wells are used, allowing treatment of contaminants too deep below the ground surface for conventional trench-and-fill technologies. A proof-of-principle field experiment was conducted in September 1995 at a chromate (hexavalent chromium) contaminated ground water site on the Hanford Site in Washington. The test created a 15 m diameter cylindrical treatment zone. The three phases of the test consisted of (1) injection of 77,000 L of buffered sodium dithionite solution in 17.1 hours, (2) reaction for 18.5 hours, and (3) withdrawal of 375,000 L in 83 hours. The withdrawal phase recovered 87% to 90% of the reaction products. Analysis of post-experimental sediment cores indicated that 60% to 100% of the available reactive iron in the treated zone was reduced. The longevity of the reduced zone is estimated between seven and 12 years based on the post-experiment core samples. Three and half years after the field test, the treatment zone remains anoxic, and hexavalent chromium levels have been reduced from 0.060 mg/L to below detection limits (0.008 mg/L). Additionally, no significant permeability changes have been detected during any phase of the experiment.

  11. Biological indicators capable of assessing thermal treatment efficiency of hydrocarbon mixture-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangang; Zhan, Xinhua; Zhou, Lixiang; Lin, Yusuo

    2010-08-01

    In China, there are many special sites for recycling and washing the used drums, which release a variety of C5-C40 hydrocarbon mixture into the soil around the site. The remediation of these contaminated sites by thermal treatment is adopted ubiquitously and needs to be assessed. Here we report the feasibility of biological indicators applied to assess thermal treatment efficiency in such contaminated soil. A series of biological indicators, including seed germination index (SGI), root elongation index (REI), plant growth height, biomass, carbon dioxide evolved (CDE), soil respiration inhibition (SRI) and soil enzymatic activities, were employed to monitor or assess hydrocarbon mixture removal in thermal treated soil. The results showed that residual hydrocarbon mixture content correlated strongly negatively with SGI for sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.), plant height, and biomass for ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) in the concentration ranges of 0-3990, 0-3170 and 0-2910 mg kg(-1), respectively. In contrast, REI for sesamum was positively correlated with residual hydrocarbon mixture content from 0 to 1860 mg kg(-1). In addition, both CDE and SRI demonstrated that 600 mg kg(-1) of residual hydrocarbon mixture content caused the highest amount of soil carbon dioxide emission and inhabitation of soil respiration. The results of soil enzymes indicated that 1000 mg kg(-1) of residual hydrocarbon mixture content was the threshold value of stimulating or inhibiting the activities of phosphatase and catalase, or completely destroying the activities of dehydrogenase, invertase, and urease. In conclusion, these biological indicators can be used as a meaningful complementation for traditional chemical content measurement in evaluating the environmental risk of the contaminated sites before and after thermal treatment. PMID:20598340

  12. Low salinity hydrocarbon water disposal through deep subsurface drip irrigation: leaching of native selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Engle, Mark A.; Boehlke, Adam R.; Zupancic, John W.

    2013-01-01

    A subsurface drip irrigation system is being used in Wyoming’s Powder River Basin that treats high sodium, low salinity, coal bed methane (CBM) produced water with sulfuric acid and injects it into cropped fields at a depth of 0.92 m. Dissolution of native gypsum releases calcium that combats soil degradation that would otherwise result from high sodium water. Native selenium is leached from soil by application of the CBM water and traces native salt mobilization to groundwater. Resulting selenium concentrations in groundwater at this alluvial site were generally low (0.5–23 μg/L) compared to Wyoming’s agricultural use suitability standard (20 μg/L).

  13. Processes affecting the fate of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in an aquifer contaminated by crude oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eganhouse, R.P.; Dorsey, T.F.; Phinney, C.S.; Westcott, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Crude oil spilled from a subsurface pipeline in north-central Minnesota has dissolved in the groundwater, resulting in the formation of a plume of aliphatic, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons. Comparison of paired oil and groundwater samples collected along the central axis of the residual oil body shows that the trailing edge of the oil is depleted in the more soluble aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., benzene, toluene, etc.) when compared with the leading edge. At the same time, concentrations of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in groundwater beneath the oil increase as the water moves toward the leading edge of the oil. Immediately downgradient from the leading edge of the oil body, certain aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., benzene) are found at concentrations near those expected of a system at equilibrium, and the concentrations exhibit little variation over time (???8-20%). Other compounds (e.g., toluene) appear to be undersaturated, and their concentrations show considerably more temporal variation (???20-130%). The former are persistent within the anoxic zone downgradient from the oil, whereas concentrations of the latter decrease rapidly. Together, these observations suggest that the volatile hydrocarbon composition of the anoxic groundwater near the oil body is controlled by a balance between dissolution and removal rates with only the most persistent compounds reaching saturation. Examination of the distributions of homologous series and isomeric assemblages of alkylbenzenes reveals that microbial degradation is the dominant process controlling the fate of these compounds once groundwater moves away from the oil. For all but the most persistent compounds, the distal boundary of the plume at the water table extends no more than 10-15 m down-gradient from the oxic/anoxic transition zone. Thus, transport of the monoaromatic hydrocarbons is limited by redox conditions that are tightly coupled to biological degradation processes.

  14. Biogeochemical evidence for subsurface hydrocarbon occurrence, Recluse oil field, Wyoming; preliminary results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalziel, Mary C.; Donovan, Terrence J.

    1980-01-01

    Anomalously high manganese-to-iron ratios occurring in pine needles and sage leaves over the Recluse oil field, Wyoming, suggest effects of petroleum microseepage on the plants. This conclusion is supported by iron and manganese concentrations in soils and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in rock samples. Seeping hydrocarbons provided reducing conditions sufficient to enable divalent iron and manganese to be organically complexed or adsorbed on solids in the soils. These bound or adsorped elements in the divalent state are essential to plants, and the plants readily assimilate them. The magnitude of the plant anomalies, combined with the supportive isotopic and chemical evidence confirming petroleum leakage, makes a strong case for the use of plants as a biogeochemical prospecting tool.

  15. Enzymatic bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons by fungal consortia enriched from petroleum contaminated soil and oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Balaji, V; Arulazhagan, P; Ebenezer, P

    2014-05-01

    The present study focuses on fungal strains capable of secreting extracellular enzymes by utilizing hydrocarbons present in the contaminated soil. Fungal strains were enriched from petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil samples collected from Chennai city, India. The potential fungi were isolated and screened for their enzyme secretion such as lipase, laccase, peroxidase and protease and also evaluated fungal enzyme mediated PAHs degradation. Total, 21 potential PAHs degrading fungi were isolated from PAHs contaminated soil, which belongs to 9 genera such as Aspergillus, Curvularia, Drechslera, Fusarium, Lasiodiplodia, Mucor Penicillium, Rhizopus, Trichoderma, and two oilseed-associated fungal genera such as Colletotrichum and Lasiodiplodia were used to test their efficacy in degradation of PAHs in polluted soil. Maximum lipase production was obtained with P. chrysogenum, M. racemosus and L. theobromae VBE1 under optimized cultural condition, which utilized PAHs in contaminated soil as sole carbon source. Fungal strains, P. chrysogenum, M. racemosus and L. theobromae VBE1, as consortia, used in the present study were capable of degrading branched alkane isoprenoids such as pristine (C17) and pyrene (C18) present in PAHs contaminated soil with high lipase production. The fungal consortia acts as potential candidate for bioremediation of PAHs contaminated environments. PMID:24813008

  16. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) and remediation of aquifers contaminated with hydrophobic contaminants require insitu production of biosurfactants for mobilization of entrapped hydrophobic liquids. Most of the biosurfactant producing microorganisms produce them under aerobic condition and hence surfactant production is limited in subsurface condition due to lack of oxygen. Currently bioremediation involves expensive air sparging or excavation followed by exsitu biodegradation. Use of microorganisms which can produce biosurfactants under anaerobic conditions can cost effectively expedite the process of insitu bioremediation or mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of anaerobic biosurfactant production in three mixed anaerobic cultures prepared from groundwater and soil contaminated with chlorinated compounds and municipal sewage sludge was investigated. The cultures were previously enriched under complete anaerobic conditions in the presence of Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for more than a year before they were studied for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant production under anaerobic conditions was simulated using two methods: i) induction of starvation in the microbial cultures and ii) addition of complex fermentable substrates. Positive result for biosurfactant production was not observed when the cultures were induced with starvation by adding PCE as blobs which served as the only terminal electron acceptor. However, slight reduction in interfacial tension was noticed which was caused by the adherence of microbes to water-PCE interface. Biosurfactant production was observed in all the three cultures when they were fed with complex fermentable substrates and surface tension of the liquid medium was lowered below 35 mN/m. Among the fermentable substrates tested, vegetable oil yielded highest amount of biosurfactant in all the cultures. Complete biodegradation of PCE to ethylene at a faster rate was also observed when vegetable oil was amended to the microbial cultures. The microorganisms responsible for biosurfactant production was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas Sp (designated as Pseudomonas Sp ANBIOSURF-1, Gene bank no: FJ930079), Pseudomonas stutzeri (MTCC 10033), Pseudomonas Sp (MTCC 10032) from groundwater, soil and municipal sewage sludge enrichments respectively. This study confirms that biosurfactants can be produced under anaerobic conditions and also in sufficient quantities. The cultures were also able to cometabolically degrade PCE to Ethylene. The isolated microorganisms can be used for remediation of DNAPL contaminated sites by in-situ biosurfactant production.

  17. Coupling of Groundwater Recharge and Biodegradation of Subsurface Crude-Oil Contamination (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Hostettler, F. D.; Delin, G. N.; Herkelrath, W. N.; Warren, E.; Campbell, P.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Cozzarelli, I.

    2010-12-01

    Surface hydrologic properties controlling groundwater recharge can have a large effect on biodegradation rates in the subsurface. Two studies of crude oil contamination show that degradation rates are dramatically increased where recharge rates are enhanced. The first site, located near Bemidji, Minnesota, was contaminated in August, 1979 when oil from a pipeline rupture infiltrated into a surficial glacial outwash aquifer. Discrete oil phases form three separate pools at the water table, the largest of which is 25x75 m at a depth of 6-8 m. Gas and water concentrations and microbial community data show that methanogenic conditions prevail in this oil pool. There is extreme spatial dependence in the degradation rates such that most of the n-alkanes have been degraded in the upgradient end, but in the downgradient end n-alkane concentrations are nearly unaltered from the original spill. Recharge rates through the two ends of the oil body were estimated using a water table fluctuation method. In 2002, the more degraded end received 15.2 cm of recharge contrasted to 10.7 cm at the less degraded end. The enhanced recharge is caused by topographic focusing of runoff toward a local depression. Microbial data using the Most Probable Number method show that the methanogen concentrations are 10-100 times greater in the more degraded end of the oil body suggesting that a growth nutrient is supplied by recharge. A decrease in partial pressure of N2 compared to Ar in the soil gas indicates nitrogen fixation probably meets N requirements (Amos et al., 2005, WRR, doi:10.1029/2004WR003433). Organic phosphorus is the main form of P in infiltrating pore water and concentration decreases with depth. The second site is located 40 km southeast of the Bemidji site at an oil pipeline pumping station near Cass Lake, Minnesota. This site was contaminated by oil leaking from a pipe coupling for an unknown duration of time between 1971 and 2002. The oil body at this site lies under a fenced area of the pumping station and is comparable in size to the largest Bemidji site oil pool. The oil is heavily degraded with complete loss of the n-alkane fraction suggesting that degradation is accelerated at this site. The pumping station is flat, gravel-covered, devoid of vegetation, and surrounded by a berm. Thus, the combined effects of no runoff, rapid infiltration, and zero transpiration all enhance recharge to the oil body. Recharge rates through the gravel yard and the adjacent forested area were estimated using a water table fluctuation method. Data for the first six months of 2010 showed that recharge below the gravel yard was 40% greater than below the forested area. Groundwater ammonia concentrations increase from 0.02 to 0.5 mmol/L under the oil body, while background NO3 is only 0.01 mmol/L and there is negligible N in the oil, again suggesting that N fixation meets N requirements. Combined, these studies suggest that enhanced transport of a limiting nutrient other than N from the surface may accelerate degradation of subsurface contamination.

  18. State of subsoil in a former petrol station: physicochemical characterization and hydrocarbon contamination evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mara Rosales, Rosa; Martinez-Pagn, Pedro; Faz, ngel; Bech, Jaume

    2013-04-01

    Former petrol stations are, possibly, potential hydrocarbon contaminated soil areas due to leakage in Underground Storage Tanks and fuel dispensing activities. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in gasoline, like benzene and semi-volatile organics in diesel, are carcinogenic and very toxic substances which can involve a serious risk for ecosystem and human health. Based on Electrical Resistivity Tomography 2D results from a previous work, there have been selected three potentially contaminated goal areas in a former petrol station located in SE Spain in order to obtain soil samples by drilling and to assess the gasoline and diesel contamination. A special sampling design was carried out and soil samples for VOCs were preserved at field with a KCl solution to minimize volatilization losses. It had been chosen Headspace-GC-MS as the better technique to quantify individual VOCs and GC-FID to get a Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) assessment after a solid/fluid pressurized extraction. The physicochemical characterization of the subsoil was performed to know how humidity, clay content or pH data could be related to the presence of hydrocarbons in the soil samples. Results show that VOCs concentrations in subsoil samples of the petrol station are around ppb levels. TPH ranged between 17 mg/kg soil and 93 mg/kg soil (ppm levels) what involves diesel and gasoline leaks due to these detected residual concentrations in the subsoil. The maximum value was found at 6 m deep in an intermediate zone between Underground Storage Tanks positions (located at 4 m deep). Therefore, these results confirm that organic compounds transference with strong vertical component has taken place. It has been observed that humidity minimum values in the subsoil are related to TPH maximum values that could be explained because of the vapour phase and the retention of hydrocarbon in soil increases when humidity goes down. Adsorption of hydrocarbons in the subsoil tend to be pH-dependent and clay content dependent: maximum of adsorption taken place at minimum pH what encourage protonation and minimum clay content in the subsoil make organic compounds infiltration downstream easier. It could be noticed the importance of physicochemical subsoil characterization and contamination assessment in the subsoil of petrol stations in order to avoid the hydrocarbons pollution of the groundwater. Then plan the best remediation technique according to this characterization taking into account the residual hydrocarbon concentration in the subsoil and the associated risk for human and ecosystems.

  19. Amanzi and Akuna: Two New Community Codes for Subsurface Contaminant Flow and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, P. R.; Moulton, J. D.; Gorton, I.; Meza, J.; Freshley, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) program is developing a modular and extensible open-source set of tools for understanding the fate and transport of contaminants in natural and engineered systems. These tools not only support a fundamental shift toward standardized assessments of performance and risk for the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) cleanup and closure decisions, but establish a modern high-quality code base for a growing interdisciplinary community. Specifically, ASCEM is leveraging advances and expertise from applied mathematics, computer and computational sciences, and the geosciences, in this new development. A toolset named Akuna will provide capabilities for data management, visualization, conceptual model development, uncertainty quantification, parameter estimation, risk analysis, and decision support. Akuna will integrate with Amanzi, a flexible high performance computing simulator, which is designed to leverage the growing parallelism in modern systems. This talk will describe the approach that we have taken to develop this new open-source capability, including issues of intellectual property, licensing, the developers tool chain, and the users tool chain. The modular and extensible design will be discussed, highlighting the potential for collaboration and inclusion of recent modeling and algorithmic advances. In addition, it will discuss the advantages and challenges of relying on an open-source model that leverages a wide variety of open-source efforts from other programs. Results from early prototype development will be presented to highlight the potential of these new tools to contaminated subsurface environments, including calculations for variably saturated flow, advection of non-reactive species and the reactive-transport of 17 different chemical species on both structured and unstructured meshes.

  20. Effects of nutrient and temperature on degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated sub-Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Frdric; Pelletier, Emilien; Gourhant, Lnaick; Delille, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Mesocosm studies using sub-Antarctic soil artificially contaminated with diesel or crude oil were conducted in Kerguelen Archipelago (49 degrees 21' S, 70 degrees 13' E) in an attempt to evaluate the potential of a bioremediation approach in high latitude environments. All mesocosms were sampled on a regular basis over six months period. Soils responded positively to temperature increase from 4 degrees C to 20 degrees C, and to the addition of a commercial oleophilic fertilizer containing N and P. Both factors increased the hydrocarbon-degrading microbial abundance and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) degradation. In general, alkanes were faster degraded than polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). After 180 days, total alkane losses of both oils reached 77-95% whereas total PAHs never exceeded 80% with optimal conditions at 10 degrees C and fertilizer added. Detailed analysis of naphthalenes, dibenzothiophenes, phenanthrenes, and pyrenes showed a clear decrease of their degradation rate as a function of the size of the PAH molecules. During the experiment there was only a slight decrease in the toxicity, whereas the concentration of TPH decreased significantly during the same time. The most significant reduction in toxicity occurred at 4 degrees C. Therefore, bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sub-Antarctic soil appears to be feasible, and various engineering strategies, such as heating or amending the soil can accelerate hydrocarbon degradation. However, the residual toxicity of contaminated soil remained drastically high before the desired cleanup is complete and it can represent a limiting factor in the bioremediation of sub-Antarctic soil. PMID:15686763

  1. Use of the FIDLER Scintillation Probe for the Characterization of Subsurface Radionuclide Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.L.; Murray, M.E.

    1999-11-14

    The Measurement Applications and Development Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has used a FIDLER to characterize a site where numerous localized and dispersed concentrations of uranium had been previously discovered beneath a poured concrete floor. The thick floor impeded the evaluation of the distribution of regions containing uranium without boring numerous holes through the concrete. The purpose of this study was to perform a radiological assessment of the building in preparation for remediation of the site. Integrated counts were taken with the FIDLER probes fixed in place on a systematic grid across the area to be evaluated. The results were then superimposed on a drawing of the area of evaluation. This approach allowed the boundaries of the regions with subsurface contamination to be resolved much better than by using standard survey techniques and decreased the number of borehole samples and subsequent analyses. The study demonstrated that this survey technique provides rapid and essential characterization information and reduces sampling, analytical, and remediation costs.

  2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) of microorganisms in hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Karolin; Zeder, Michael; Klug, Rebecca; Pernthaler, Jakob; Schattenhofer, Martha; Harms, Hauke; Wendeberg, Annelie

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater ecosystems are the most important sources of drinking water worldwide but they are threatened by contamination and overexploitation. Petroleum spills account for the most common source of contamination and the high carbon load results in anoxia and steep geochemical gradients. Microbes play a major role in the transformation of petroleum hydrocarbons into less toxic substances. To investigate microbial populations at the single cell level, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is now a well-established technique. Recently, however, catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH has been introduced for the detection of microbes from oligotrophic environments. Nevertheless, petroleum contaminated aquifers present a worst case scenario for FISH techniques due to the combination of high background fluorescence of hydrocarbons and the presence of small microbial cells caused by the low turnover rates characteristic of groundwater ecosystems. It is therefore not surprising that studies of microorganisms from such sites are mostly based on cultivation techniques, fingerprinting, and amplicon sequencing. However, to reveal the population dynamics and interspecies relationships of the key participants of contaminant degradation, FISH is an indispensable tool. In this study, a protocol for FISH was developed in combination with cell quantification using an automated counting microscope. The protocol includes the separation and purification of microbial cells from sediment particles, cell permeabilization and, finally, CARD-FISH in a microwave oven. As a proof of principle, the distribution of Archaea and Bacteria was shown in 60 sediment samples taken across the contaminant plume of an aquifer (Leuna, Germany), which has been heavily contaminated with several ten-thousand tonnes of petroleum hydrocarbons since World War II. PMID:22425347

  3. Geochemical and isotopic characteristics associated with high soil conductivities in a shallow hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legall, Franklyn David

    Data collected from a network of in-situ vertical resistivity probes (VRPs) deployed at a hydrocarbon-contaminated site in SW Michigan showed high conductivities associated with the zone of contamination. Within the contaminated portion of the aquifer, different phases of hydrocarbon impact are recognized, namely, zones with residual and dissolved phase hydrocarbons (RDH) and zones where these phases coexist with free product (RDFH). Bulk soil conductivities were highest (12 to 30 mS/m) in the RDFH zone compared to the RDH zone (10 to 25 mS/m). Geochemical and isotopic data from closely spaced vertical samples within the high conductive zones were used to provide geochemical evidence for biodegradation and to investigate redox processes occurring within the conductive zones. Depth distribution of TEAs and educts showed evidence of reduction of nitrate, iron, manganese, and sulfate across steep vertical gradients. Within the portion of the plume characterized by RDH, SO4 reduction has supplanted denitrification via dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and the reduction of Fe (III) and Mn(IV) as the major observed redox process. This zone was also characterized by the highest DIC. The delta 13CDIC values of -16.9 to -9.5 suggest that DIC evolution within this zone is controlled by carbonate dissolution through enhanced CO2 production related to microbial hydrocarbon degradation. Within the portion of the aquifer with RDFH, DIC was lower compared to the RDH location with an associated delta13CDIC in the range of +6.5 to -4.4. Both the DIC and delta 13CDIC suggest that methanogenesis is the dominant redox process. With respect to mineral weathering as a possible source of ions contributing to high conductivities, the results show higher concentrations of Na, Ca, and Mg in the contaminated portion of the aquifer compared to uncontaminated parts. This is consistent with the weathering of carbonate and Na and Ca feldspars, the dominant minerals in the aquifer. Higher TDS at the contaminated locations were also coincident with higher DIC, and increased CO2 production. In general, both TDS and bulk soil conductivity increased with depth at the contaminated and uncontaminated locations. TDS and bulk conductivity were positively correlated at the uncontaminated location, suggesting that TDS was a good predictor of bulk conductivity. However, at the contaminated locations, the correlation between the bulk conductivity and the TDS was poorer, the lack of correlation being more so in portions of the aquifer with free phase hydrocarbons (RDFH). This may suggest that the TDS may not reliably predict the bulk conductivities of hydrocarbon-impacted soils. The present study seeks to provide a likely interrelationship between redox processes, biomineralization of hydrocarbons, and high bulk soil conductivities. Moreover, high conductivities measured at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites may be useful in assessing the potential for natural attenuation and to monitor intrinsic bioremediation at these sites.

  4. Environmental assessment of aromatic hydrocarbons-contaminated sediments of the Mexican Salina Cuz Bay.

    PubMed

    Gonzlez-Macas, C; Schifter, I; Lluch-Cota, D B; Mndez-Rodrguez, L; Hernndez-Vzquez, S

    2007-10-01

    Concentrations of total aromatic hydrocarbons and extractable organic matter in the water column and sediment were determined in samples collected in the course of the last 20 years from the Salina Cruz Harbor, Mxico, to assess the degree of organic contamination. In sediments, organic compounds accumulate in shallow areas mostly associated with extractable organic matter and fine fractions. Calculated geocumulation index and enrichment factors suggest that contamination could be derived from anthropogenic activities attributed to harbor and ship scrapping activities, as well as transboundary source. Concentration of total aromatic hydrocarbons (as chrysene equivalents) ranged from 0.01 to 534 microg l(-1) in water, and from 0.10 to 2,160 microg g(-1) in sediments. Total aromatic concentration of 5 microg g(-1) is proposed as background concentration. PMID:17295107

  5. Looking For a Needle in the Haystack: Deciphering Indigenous 1.79 km Deep Subsurface Microbial Communities from Drilling Mud Contaminants Using 454 Pyrotag Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Cann, I.; Mackie, R.; Price, N.; Flynn, T. M.; Sanford, R.; Miller, P.; Chia, N.; Kumar, C. G.; Kim, P.; Sivaguru, M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge of the composition, structure and activity of microbial communities that live in deeply buried sedimentary rocks is fundamental to the future of subsurface biosphere stewardship as it relates to hydrocarbon exploration and extraction, carbon sequestration, gas storage and groundwater management. However, the study of indigenous subsurface microorganisms has been limited by the technical challenges of collecting deep formation water samples that have not been heavily contaminated by the mud used to drill the wells. To address this issue, a “clean-sampling method” deploying the newly developed Schlumberger Quicksilver MDT probe was used to collect a subsurface sample at a depth of 1.79 km (5872 ft) from an exploratory well within Cambrian-age sandstones in the Illinois Basin. This yielded a formation water sample that was determined to have less than 4% drilling mud contamination based on tracking changes in the aqueous geochemistry of the formation water during ~3 hours of pumping at depth prior to sample collection. A suite of microscopy and culture-independent molecular analyses were completed using the DNA extracted from microbial cells in the formation water, which included 454 amplicon pyrosequencing that targeted the V1-V3 hypervariable region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Results demonstrated an extremely low diversity microbial community living in formation water at 1.79 km-depth. More than 95 % of the total V1-V3 pyrosequencing reads (n=11574) obtained from the formation water were affiliated with a halophilic γ-proteobacterium and most closely related to the genus Halomonas. In contrast, about 3 % of the V1-V3 sequences in the drilling mud library (n=13044) were classified as genus Halomonas but were distinctly different and distantly related to the formation water Halomonas detected at 1.79 km-depth. These results were consistent with those obtained using a suite of other molecular screens (e.g., Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) and the initial full length 16S rRNA amplicon libraries) and bioinformatic analyses (e.g., 16S rRNA and Open Reading Frame (ORF) calls established from the 454 metagenomic community analyses). Functional pathway modeling is underway to evaluate the adaptation of this indigenous microbial community to the hydrologic and geologic history of the deep subsurface environment of the Illinois Basin.

  6. Calcium hypochlorite removal of mercury and petroleum hydrocarbons from co-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Renneberg, Adrian J; Dudas, Marvin J

    2002-10-01

    Former oil and gas processing sites are often contaminated with both mercury and petroleum hydrocarbons. Traditional methods for treating these co-contaminated soils include thermal treatments and placement in landfills (Stepan et al. 1993). This study examines a chemical oxidation treatment, calcium hypochlorite, and its effectiveness in reducing both the petroleum and mercury content of several industrial soils. A sequential extraction method was used to determine the forms of mercury removed through the hypochlorite treatment. The forms included five organic forms of mercury, mercury associated with the mineral phase, ion exchangeable mercury, water phase mercury, and mercury associated with the petroleum hydrocarbons. The hypochlorite treatment did lower the mercury content of all five soils, but failed to remove the petroleum hydrocarbons from the soils. Prior to the hypochlorite treatment the dominant form of mercury was that associated with soil organic matter while after treatment most of the mercury remaining in the soil was associated with either the petroleum hydrocarbons or the mineral phase. PMID:12498483

  7. Pilot-scale feasibility of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Walker, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    An environmental project was conducted to evaluate in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils on Kwajalein Island, a US Army Kwajalein Atoll base in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Results of laboratory column studies determined that nutrient loadings stimulated biodegradation rates and that bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils at Kwajalein was possible using indigenous microbes. The column studies were followed by an {approximately}10-month on-site demonstration at Kwajalein to further evaluate in situ bioremediation and to determine design and operating conditions necessary to optimize the process. The demonstration site contained low levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel fuel) in the soil near the ground surface, with concentrations increasing to {approximately}10,000 mg/kg in the soil near the groundwater. The demonstration utilized 12 in situ plots to evaluate the effects of various combinations of water, air, and nutrient additions on both the microbial population and the hydrocarbon concentration within the treatment plots as a function of depth from the ground surface.

  8. Occurrence and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface microlayer and subsurface seawater of Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Benson, Nsikak U; Essien, Joseph P; Asuquo, Francis E; Eritobor, Adeola L

    2014-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface microlayer (SML) and subsurface water (SSW) of Lagos Lagoon were investigated using gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) technique to ascertain their occurrence and spatial distribution, origin, enrichment, and carcinogenicity. Total PAH (?PAH) concentrations ranged from 9.10 to 16.20 ?g L(-1) in the SML and 8.90 to 13.30 ?g L(-1) in the SSW. ?PAH concentrations were relatively higher in the SML than the underlying SSW samples. The enrichment factors (EFs) of ?PAHs ranged from 0.76 to 1.74 while the EFs of the individual PAHs varied from 0.50 to 2.09. In general, the EFs values calculated in this study were consistent or slightly less than the EFs reported for similar coastal seawater ecosystems. A correlation between the EFs of fluoranthene and pyrene indicated a positive significant value (R?=?0.9828, p?

  9. Mobile hydrocarbon microspheres from >2-billion-year-old carbon-bearing seams in the South African deep subsurface.

    PubMed

    Wanger, G; Moser, D; Hay, M; Myneni, S; Onstott, T C; Southam, G

    2012-11-01

    By ~2.9 Ga, the time of the deposition of the Witwatersrand Supergroup, life is believed to have been well established on Earth. Carbon remnants of the microbial biosphere from this time period are evident in sediments from around the world. In the Witwatersrand Supergroup, the carbonaceous material is often concentrated in seams, closely associated with the gold deposits and may have been a mobile phase 2 billion years ago. Whereas today the carbon in the Witwatersrand Supergroup is presumed to be immobile, hollow hydrocarbon spheres ranging in size from <1 ?m to >50 ?m were discovered emanating from a borehole drilled through the carbon-bearing seams suggesting that a portion of the carbon may still be mobile in the deep subsurface. ToF-SIMS and STXM analyses revealed that these spheres contain a suite of alkane, alkenes, and aromatic compounds consistent with the described organic-rich carbon seams within the Witwatersrand Supergroup's auriferous reef horizons. Analysis by electron microscopy and ToF-SIMS, however, revealed that these spheres, although most likely composed of biogenic carbon and resembling biological organisms, do not retain any true structural, that is, fossil, information and were formed by an abiogenic process. PMID:22901282

  10. Contamination of soils in the urbanized areas of Belarus with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukharchyk, T. I.; Khomich, V. S.; Kakareka, S. V.; Kurman, P. V.; Kozyrenko, M. I.

    2013-02-01

    The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soils of urbanized areas, including the impact zones of Belarus, were studied. The concentrations of 16 PAHs in the soils were determined for individual and high-rise building zones, forests, and forest parks of Belarus. The levels of the PAH accumulation in the soils of different industrial enterprises and boiler stations were analyzed. Possible sources of soil contamination with PAHs were considered, and the structure of the PAHs in the soils was shown. The levels of the soil contamination were determined from the regulated parameters for individual compounds and the sum of 16 PAHs.

  11. Detection of heavy metal and hydrocarbon contamination using a miniature resistivity probe.

    PubMed

    Ahn, T; Allouche, E N; Yanful, E K

    2007-06-01

    The usefulness of the electrical resistivity method for characterization of contaminated sites has been studied in many ways. The most commonly used device is a cone penetrometer that utilizes two or four electrodes to measure electrical resistivity (or conductivity) during a cone penetration test (CPT) along a vertical or horizontal alignment. This paper introduces a new miniature resistivity probe (MRP) that can potentially be deployed from a sampling platform to detect contaminant plumes prior to collecting soil samples. Following bench-scale tests aimed at quantifying the sensitivity of the MRP to various operating and environmental parameters, the response of the MRP in sandy soil containing various concentrations of tour heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni) and two hydrocarbons (phenol and gasoline) is evaluated. The test data revealed that the MRP has the potential to serve as an indexing tool for rapidly delineating contaminant plumes where heavy metals are present. The results for hydrocarbons were less conclusive, ranging from moderate ability to differentiate contaminated and non-contaminated soils for phenol to poor differentiation ability for gasoline. PMID:17624110

  12. Iron reduction in the sediments of a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuccillo, M.E.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Herman, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Sediments sampled at a hydrocarbon-contaminated, glacial-outwash, sandy aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, were analyzed for sediment-associated Fe with several techniques. Extraction with 0.5 M HCl dissolved poorly crystalline Fe oxides and small amounts of Fe in crystalline Fe oxides, and extracted Fe from phyllosilicates. Use of Ti-citrate-EDTA-bicarbonate results in more complete removal of crystalline Fe oxides. The average HCl-extractable Fe(III) concentration in the sediments closest to the crude-oil contamination (16.2 ??mol/g) has been reduced by up to 30% from background values (23.8 ??mol/g) as a result of Fe(III) reduction in contaminated anoxic groundwater. Iron(II) concentrations are elevated in sediments within an anoxic plume in the aquifer. Iron(II) values under the oil body (19.2 ??mol/g) are as much as 4 times those in the background sediments (4.6 ??mol/g), indicating incorporation of reduced Fe in the contaminated sediments. A 70% increase in total extractable Fe at the anoxic/oxic transition zone indicates reoxidation and precipitation of Fe mobilized from sediment in the anoxic plume. Scanning electron microscopy detected authigenic ferroan calcite in the anoxic sediments and confirmed abundant Fe(III) oxyhydroxides at the anoxic/oxic boundary. The redox biogeochemistry of Fe in this system is coupled to contaminant degradation and is important in predicting processes of hydrocarbon degradation.

  13. Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

    2004-11-14

    Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this manuscript is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following manuscript we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of-the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

  14. Horizontal arrangement of anodes of microbial fuel cells enhances remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yueyong; Wang, Xin; Li, Xiaojing; Cheng, Lijuan; Wan, Lili; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-02-01

    With the aim of in situ bioremediation of soil contaminated by hydrocarbons, anodes arranged with two different ways (horizontal or vertical) were compared in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Charge outputs as high as 833 and 762C were achieved in reactors with anodes horizontally arranged (HA) and vertically arranged (VA). Up to 12.5 % of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was removed in HA after 135 days, which was 50.6 % higher than that in VA (8.3 %) and 95.3 % higher than that in the disconnected control (6.4 %). Hydrocarbon fingerprint analysis showed that the degradation rates of both alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in HA were higher than those in VA. Lower mass transport resistance in the HA than that of the VA seems to result in more power and more TPH degradation. Soil pH was increased from 8.26 to 9.12 in HA and from 8.26 to 8.64 in VA, whereas the conductivity was decreased from 1.99 to 1.54 mS/cm in HA and from 1.99 to 1.46 mS/cm in VA accompanied with the removal of TPH. Considering both enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon and generation of charge in HA, the MFC with anodes horizontally arranged is a promising configuration for future applications. PMID:25189807

  15. Application of BGPR tomography investigate the Soil and Groundwater Contaminated with Chlorinated Hydrocarbon:Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. C.; Lin, C. P.; Dong, T. H.; Yang, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The success of an environmental contaminated project is often determined by the extent to which it is able to ascertain and control subsurface conditions. At present, site managers have limited tools to gain detailed information on the distribution of possible underground barriers or anomalous bodies. The technology employed in Taiwan to evaluate or confirm subsurface anomalies relies primarily on surface geophysical surveys, borehole drillings, or past records. Surface ground-penetrating radar GPR survey is among the most popular of these methods. Surface GPR technique can be used in many ways, but this method is not always the best suited to Taiwan's conditions. Surface GPR surveys are adversely affected by the conductivity of silty/clayey sediment and cultural noises. As a result, when surface GPR surveys are used, both detection and resolution of subsurface anomalies will decrease with depth. In order to overcome these obstacles, the use of borehole GPR BGPR with a few boreholes may provide a more direct and effective way to detect an underground target. Recent improvement in the quality of BGPR contributes to the suitability of this type of survey work when implemented on construction sites. This paper ues the BGPR geophysical technology has been developed to overcome above limitations. The information of multi-wells logging could be used to interpret the permeability of subsurface, the dominate flow path and the hot-spot for evaluating the distribution of pollution and the efficiency of remediation in different time sequences.

  16. Subsurface resistivity images of the Belik area, Purbalingga based on magnetotelluric data, implication for hydrocarbon exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffar, Eddy Z.

    2016-02-01

    The study area is an area of hydrocarbon potential located in Belik Area, Central Java. From the results of seismic survey, it seen that the depth of about 2000 meters is still visible, but the signal of the seismic instrument could not penetrate deeper than 2000 meters. Therefore, Research Center for Geotechnology did an alternative method of magnetoteluric with trending north-south trajectory. Based on Djuri 1996, the stratigraphy of the study area consists of Tertiary to the Quaternary rocks. From the oldest is Pemali Formation, Rambatan Formation, Halang Formation, Kumbang Formation, Tapak Formation, Kalibiuk Formation, Ligung Formation and Alluvial. Pemali Formation consists of marl, Rambatan Formation consists of shale, marl and calcareous sandstone, Halang Formation consists of sandstone, conglomerate and marl, Kumbang Formation consists of breccia, andesite lava and tuff, Tapak Formation consists of breccia and limestone, Kalibiuk Formation consists of silty marl and sandstone Ligung Formation consists of agglomerates, breccias, tuffs and clays. Kumbang Formation is an igneous rock as sill with a thickness of up to 2000 meters and is a breakthrough that layered rocks parallel to the rock above and below. Resistivity image of the north-south trajectory is seen a layer with high resistivity more than 1000 OhmM. It is interpreted as Kumbang Formation and underneath there is a layer with resistivity values lower than Kumbang Formation is interpreted as Halang Formation, Rambatan Formation and Pemali Formation. It is concluded that magnetotelluric method could penetrate very high resistivity layer and thick enough where seismic method can not penetrate.

  17. Numerical Assessment of Indoor Air Exposure Risk from Subsurface NAPL Contamination under Hydrologic Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, A.; Yu, S.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the risk of indoor air exposure to residual contaminants in the subsurface following the redevelopment of contaminated land redevelopment project is a central issue at many brownfield sites. In this study, we examine various mechanisms controlling vapor phase intrusion into the indoor air of a typical residential dwelling from a NAPL source located below the water table, and consequently assess the indoor air exposure risk under multiple hydrologic uncertainties. For this purpose, a multi-phase multi-component numerical model, CompFlow Bio is used to simulate the evolution of a TCE source zone and dissolved plume in a variably saturated heterogeneous aquifer, along with the transport of dissolved TCE upwards through the capillary fringe with subsequent migration of TCE vapors in the vadose zone subject to barometric pressure fluctuations. The TCE vapors then enter the basement of the residential dwelling through a crack in the foundation slab, driven by a slight vacuum within the basement relative to the ambient atmosphere as well as the barometric pressure fluctuations. Hydrologic uncertainties affecting the indoor air concentration of TCE include the vacuum in the basement, the aperture of the crack in the foundation slab, the heterogeneous permeability field, the thickness of the capillary fringe, barometric fluctuations, recharge rates and the location of the TCE source zone. CompFlow Bio is then used to determine the future concentration of TCE into the basement as a consequence of imperfect knowledge in the various hydrologic parameters, and to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative remedial and foundation design options to minimize the exposure risk to the indoor air conditional upon the available data collected at the site. The outcome of this approach is two-fold. First, the owner of the site can reasonably evaluate the future indoor air exposure risk following the redevelopment of a formerly contaminated site following remediation activities. Second, the owner/developer of the site can then effectively price the risk that some residential dwellings will exceed an indoor air exposure regulatory limit assuming that the owner/developer of the site takes immediate actions to repurchase the residential dwelling where the regulatory limit was exceeded. Consequently, appropriate financial products (such as insurance or building a contingency fund) can be developed to enable the owner/developer to effectively hedge their risk and ensure solvency.

  18. COMPARISON OF IMMUNOASSAY AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are frequently encountered in the environment and may pose health concerns due to their carcinogenicity. A commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was evaluated as a screening method for monitoring PAHs at contaminated site...

  19. PHOTOACTIVATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON TOXICITY IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) EMBRYOS: RELEVANCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL RISK IN CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hazard for photoactivated toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been clearly demonstrated; however, to our knowledge, the risk in contaminated systems has not been characterized. To address this question, a median lethal dose (LD50) for fluoranthene photoa...

  20. CROSS-INDUCTION OF PYRENE AND PHENANTHRENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM SP. ISOLATED FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED RIVER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading culture enriched from contaminated river sediments and a Mycobacterium sp. isolated from the enrichment were tested to investigate the possible synergistic and antagonistic interactions affecting the degradation of pyrene in the p...

  1. Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T.; Drozhko, E.G.; Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N.

    1994-06-01

    The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

  2. Environmental forensics evaluation of sources of sediment hydrocarbon contamination in Milford Haven Waterway.

    PubMed

    Little, David I; Galperin, Yakov; Bullimore, Blaise; Camplin, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Current and historic petroleum-related activities in Milford Haven Waterway (MHW; Wales, UK) contribute to hydrocarbon contamination of surficial sediments. Three main hydrocarbon components of sediments were analyzed: (1) aliphatic hydrocarbons of predominantly biogenic origin, representing about 5-15% of total hydrocarbons (THC); (2) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from recent petrogenic and mainly older pyrogenic sources, representing about 2-6% of THC; (3) unresolved complex mixture from spill-related and heavily-weathered petrogenic sources, representing as much as 70-85% of THC. Environmental forensics evaluation of the data demonstrate that although 72,000 tonnes (t) crude oil spilled from the Sea Empress in 1996, the Forties blend cargo was not identified in 2010. However, using biomarkers, heavy fuel oil (HFO) from Sea Empress' bunkers (480 t spilled) was detected further upstream and more widely than previously. Iranian crude (100 t) spilled by the El Omar in 1988 and fuel (130,000 t) lost during bombing in 1940 also were tentatively identified. The PAH source ratios demonstrate that the historic pyrogenic PAHs come mainly from biomass and coal combustion. The distribution pattern of PAHs appeared more pyrogenic in 2012 than in 1996, as if recovering from the more petrogenic signature, in places, of the Sea Empress. The heavier PAH distributions were pyrogenic at most stations, and similar to those in sediments from oil terminal berths up to 2006, when dredging operations peaked. Partly as a result of this, in 2007 the concentrations of PAHs peaked throughout the waterway. Apart from effluent, atmospheric and runoff inputs, most of the identified inputs to the surficial sediments are historic. Therefore, likely processes include disturbance by construction (e.g. pile-driving) and dredging of contaminants sequestered in sediments, followed by their wide redistribution via suspended sediment transport. PMID:25536472

  3. Hydrochemical and Isotopic Evidence of Natural Attenuation at the Gas Station Contaminated with Fuel Hydrocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, K.; Oh, I.; Suk, H.; Lee, K.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater flow, hydrochemistry and the carbon isotope composition (d13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were measured to know the effect of natural attenuation which is induced by biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon at the abandoned gas station contaminated fuel hydrocarbons. The aquifer sediment consists of 4 to 5 m of unconsolidated and weathered soils overlying granite. The monitoring results of water level showed the immediate response of that to rainfall. This implies that the site is an unconfined aquifer or is located at the near of groundwater recharge area. The contaminant transport modeling using GMS showed that the contaminants, BTEX, transported to two main directions, south and southwest from UST and pipeline. These results were proved by the filed observation of the BTEX from the groundwater seepage at the streams of south and southwest area. The geochemical indicator of natural attenuation, red iron precipitate, was also observed at the groundwater seepage. The hydrochemical indicators, Fe(II), Mn(II), sufides, and methane, of terminal electron accepting processes represented the sulfate reducing and methanogenesis environment of the site. d13C values of DIC ranged from -20.2 to -9.3 permil and increased in the source zone by the microbial degradation of hydrocarbon under methanogenic condition. The enrichment of isotopically heavy C is caused by the production of light 12CH4 from microbial respiration. The molar ratio of Ca to HCO3 is about 2.5 and this indicates the contribution of microbial oxidation of fuel hydrocarbon to DIC in groundwater. The geochemical modeling using PHREEQC showed the oversaturation of siderite, rhodocrosite and goethite and the saturation index of calcite increased as the increase of bicarbonate, indicating the enhanced microbial degradation. From the research results, the mineralogical, hydrological and microbiological factors can exert influence on groundwater chemistry and d13C of DIC.

  4. Ecotoxicological and analytical assessment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and application to ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Saterbak, A.; Toy, R.J.; Wong, D.C.L.; McMain, B.J.; Williams, M.P.; Dorn, P.B.; Brzuzy, L.P.; Chai, E.Y.; Salanitro, J.P.

    1999-07-01

    Ecotoxicological assessments of contaminated soil aim to understand the effect of introduced chemicals on the soil flora and fauna. Ecotoxicity test methods were developed and conducted on hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and on adjacent uncontaminated control soils from eight field locations. Tests included 7-d, 14-d, and chronic survival tests and reproduction assays for the earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and seed germination, root length, and plant growth assays for corn, lettuce, mustard, and wheat. Species-specific responses were observed with no-observed effect concentrations (NOECs) ranging from <1 to 100% contaminated soil. The 14-d earthworm survival NOEC was equal to or greater than the reproduction NOEC values for numbers of cocoons and juveniles, which were similar to one another. Cocoon and juvenile production varied among the control soils. Germination and root length NOECs for mustard and lettuce were less than NOECs for corn and wheat. Root length NOECs were similar to or less than seed germination NOECs. Statistically significant correlations for earthworm survival and seed germination as a function of hydrocarbon measurements were found. The 14-d earthworm survival and the seed germination tests are recommended for use in the context of a risk-based framework for the ecological assessment of contaminated sites.

  5. Potential benefit of surfactants in a hydrocarbon contaminated soil washing process: fluorescence spectroscopy based assessment.

    PubMed

    Uhmann, Amandine; Aspray, Thomas J

    2012-06-15

    Soil washing is an ex situ soil remediation treatment process. The purpose of soil washing is to clean the major gravel and sand fractions, concentrating contamination into the fine silt and clay fractions. The addition of surfactants can improve the efficiency of this method. Here we report the use of UV fluorescence spectroscopy to assess the hydrocarbon cleaning process as a rapid and cost effective alternative to gas chromatography. Three wash solutions were tested on a total petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil: water, Sea Power 101 (SP101) at 1% (v/v) and Tween80 at 0.5% (w/v). The most effective to wash the gravel and sand was SP101 (54 and 65% improvement over the water only wash, respectively) which moved contamination to the silt fraction (94% of contaminants). Tween80 appeared not to enhance TPH removal efficiency from the gravel and sand fractions but did concentrate TPH in the effluent (95% more than water wash). In addition to TPH removal from gravel and sand, SP101 also showed potential benefit in the soil washing sedimentation process, enhancing sludge/water volume separation by 10% over the water only wash. In summary, fluorescence spectroscopy proved an effective technique to compare TPH removal efficiencies as part of soil washing laboratory based treatability testing. PMID:22503218

  6. Coupling methodology and application of a fully integrated model for contaminant transport in the subsurface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan; Shi, Liangsheng; Yang, Jinzhong; Wu, Jingwei; Mao, Deqiang

    2013-09-01

    An efficient integrated modeling approach is developed to simulate the contaminant transport in the subsurface system. The unsaturated zone is divided into a number of horizontal sub-areas according to the atmospheric boundary conditions, land use types and hydrological conditions. Solute migration through the unsaturated zone of each sub-area is assumed to be vertical and can be represented by the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation, which is then coupled to the three-dimensional advection-dispersion equation representing the subsequent groundwater transport. The finite element method is adopted to discretize the vertical solute equation, while the hybrid finite element and finite difference method is used to discretize the three-dimensional saturated solute transport equation, which is split into the horizontal and vertical equations based on the concept of the horizontal/vertical splitting. The unsaturated and saturated solute transport equations are combined into a unified matrix by the mass balance analysis for the adjacent nodes located at the one-dimensional soil column and at the water table. Two hypothetical cases and two field cases are simulated to test the validity of the model with the results compared with those from HYDRUS-1D, SWMS2D and the measured data. The limitations of the model are discussed as well. The analysis of the four cases demonstrates that the proposed model can calculate the water flow and solute transport reasonably even with complex boundary and variable topography conditions. It also shows that the model is efficient to simulate the water flow and solute transport in regional-scale areas with small computational costs. However, the model will lose accuracy when the lateral dispersion effect is dominant in the unsaturated zone.

  7. Using radon as environmental tracer for the assessment of subsurface Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) contamination - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.

    2015-05-01

    The radioactive noble gas radon has an ambivalent nature: on the one hand is it of main concern with regard to radiation protection, on the other hand can it be applied as powerful tracer tool in various fields of applied geosciences. Due to its omnipresence in nature, its chemical and physical properties, and its uncomplicated detectability radon fulfils all requirements for being used as environmental tracer. This application is discussed in the paper with focus on the use of radon as tracer for subsurface contamination with Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPL). After a short introduction in the ambivalence and ubiquitous presence of radon in nature, the theoretical background of its suitability as NAPL tracer is summarized. Finally three potential applications are discussed. Background information and practical examples are given for (i) the investigation of residual NAPL contamination in soils, (ii) the investigation of residual NAPL contamination in aquifers and (iii) the monitoring of the remediation of dissolved NAPL contamination in groundwater. The presented information reveals that radon is an ideal tracer for the assessment of a wide range of subsurface NAPL contamination. Still, its application is not without restrictions. Problems may occur due to mineralogical heterogeneity of the soil or aquifer matrix. Furthermore, local changes in the permeability of the subsurface may be associated with preferential groundwater or soil gas flow paths bypassing isolated sub-domains of an investigated NAPL source zone. Moreover, NAPL aging may result in alterations in the composition of a complex NAPL mixture thus giving rise to significant changes of the radon partition coefficient between NAPL and water or soil gas. However, since radon shows a strong affinity to NAPLs in general, semi-quantitative results will always be possible.

  8. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    'The overall objective of the basic research grant is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. The three major lines of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects. and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at a variety of DOE sites that need to be examined for endocrine disrupting effects. By relating results obtained from this research project to contamination problems at various DOE sites. CBR will provide data and information on endocrine disrupting contaminants to DOE for consideration in risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities needed at the sites.'

  9. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.; Fliermans, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  10. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  11. Pyrolytic Treatment and Fertility Enhancement of Soils Contaminated with Heavy Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Vidonish, Julia E; Zygourakis, Kyriacos; Masiello, Caroline A; Gao, Xiaodong; Mathieu, Jacques; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2016-03-01

    Pyrolysis of contaminated soils at 420 °C converted recalcitrant heavy hydrocarbons into "char" (a carbonaceous material similar to petroleum coke) and enhanced soil fertility. Pyrolytic treatment reduced total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) to below regulatory standards (typically <1% by weight) within 3 h using only 40-60% of the energy required for incineration at 600-1200 °C. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was not observed, with post-pyrolysis levels well below applicable standards. Plant growth studies showed a higher biomass production of Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa (Simpson black-seeded lettuce) (80-900% heavier) in pyrolyzed soils than in contaminated or incinerated soils. Elemental analysis showed that pyrolyzed soils contained more carbon than incinerated soils (1.4-3.2% versus 0.3-0.4%). The stark color differences between pyrolyzed and incinerated soils suggest that the carbonaceous material produced via pyrolysis was dispersed in the form of a layer coating the soil particles. Overall, these results suggest that soil pyrolysis could be a viable thermal treatment to quickly remediate soils impacted by weathered oil while improving soil fertility, potentially enhancing revegetation. PMID:26284736

  12. Plant performance, dioxygenase-expressing rhizosphere bacteria, and biodegradation of weathered hydrocarbons in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liste, Hans-Holger; Prutz, Ines

    2006-03-01

    Two greenhouse pot experiments were conducted to investigate the potential of 13 plant species (grasses, cruciferes, legumes, herbs) to thrive in a long-term contaminated soil from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site, to promote the proliferation of total and aromatic ring dioxygenase-expressing bacteria (ARDB) in the root zone, and to foster the biodegradation of petrol hydrocarbons (PHCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PHCs at 23200 mg kg(-1) and PAHs at 2194 mg kg(-1) reduced seed germination, plant survival, and shoot yields for most plants. Total bacteria and ARDB were generally more abundant in contaminated soil and were most numerous in the rhizosphere of mustard. During 68 d, the loss of total petrol hydrocarbons (TPHs) and total US EPA priority PAHs (TPAHs) was greatest in soil planted with hemp and mustard. Pea, cress, and pansy increased the amounts of PAHs extracted from soil, including an almost 60% increase for dibenzo(ah)anthracene. Plants may enhance the chemical extractability and perhaps biological availability of initially unextractable molecules. PMID:15996713

  13. XPS study of the effect of hydrocarbon contamination on polytetrafluoroethylene (teflon) exposed to atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Cormia, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of hydrocarbon contamination on the surface of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) markedly affects the oxygen uptake, and hence the wettability, of this polymer when exposed to an oxygen plasma. As revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, the oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C) for such a polymer can increase sharply, and correspondingly the fluorine-to-carbon ratio (F/C) can decrease sharply, at very short exposure times; at longer times, however, such changes in the O/C and F/C ratios reverse direction, and these ratios then assume values similar to those of the unexposed PTFE. The greater the extent of hydrocarbon contamination in the PTFE, the larger are the amplitudes of the 'spikes' in the O/C- and F/C-exposure time plots. In contrast, a pristine PTFE experiences a very small, monotonic increase of surface oxidation or O/C ratio with time of exposure to oxygen atoms, while the F/C ratio is virtually unchanged from that of the unexposed polymer (2.0). Unless the presence of adventitious hydrocarbon is taken into account, anomalous surface properties relating to polymer adhesion may be improperly ascribed to PTFE exposed to an oxygen plasma.

  14. In situ determination of the rate of unassisted degradation of saturated-zone hydrocarbon contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Kerfoot, H.B.

    1994-07-01

    A method to measure the in situ degradation rate of dissolved hydrocarbon contamination has been developed and applied at two locations at a field site. The method uses the rates of downward diffusion of oxygen and upward diffusion of carbon dioxide through the unsaturated zone, as calculated from vertical soil-gas concentration gradients, combined with stoichiometry to obtain two degradation rates in hydrocarbon mass per water table surface area per time. Values of 0.385 gram per m{sup 2} per day and 0.52 gram per m{sup 2} per day (based upon oxygen data) and 0.056 gram per m{sup 2} per day and 0.12 gram per m{sup 2} per day (based upon carbon dioxide data) were calculated at a field site with dissolved fuel contamination. This result of lower values from ground-air carbon dioxide concentrations is consistent with a significant fraction of the carbon dioxide produced being lost to the aqueous phase. Based upon a single-stage equilibrium phase-transfer model, gas/water volume ratios of 0.02 and 0.2 for the capillary fringe were calculated. Groundwater carbon dioxide fugacities and soil-gas carbon dioxide concentrations were used at the two locations and a third to determine whether the source of elevated soil carbon dioxide concentrations were unsaturated-zone hydrocarbon degradation or a saturated-zone process. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Rapid evolution of redox processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Lovley, D.R.; O'Neill, K.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Ground water chemistry data collected over a six-year period show that the distribution of contaminants and redox processes in a shallow petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer has changed rapidly over time. Shortly after a gasoline release occurred in 1990, high concentrations of benzene were present near the contaminant source area. In this contaminated zone, dissolved oxygen in ground water was depleted, and by 1994 Fe(III) reduction and sulfate reduction were the predominant terminal electron accepting processes. Significantly, dissolved methane was below measurable levels in 1994, indicating the absence of significant methanogenesis. By 1996, however, depletion of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides in aquifer sediments and depletion of dissolved sulfate in ground water resulted in the onset of methanogenesis. Between 1996 and 2000, water-chemistry data indicated that methanogenic metabolism became increasingly prevalent. Molecular analysis of 16S-rDNA extracted from sediments shows the presence of a more diverse methanogenic community inside as opposed to outside the plume core, and is consistent with water-chemistry data indicating a shift toward methanogenesis over time. This rapid evolution of redox processes reflects several factors including the large amounts of contaminants, relatively rapid ground water flow (???0.3 m/day [???1 foot/day]), and low concentrations of microbially reducible Fe(III) oxyhydroxides (???1 ??mol/g) initially present in aquifer sediments. These results illustrate that, under certain hydrologic conditions, redox conditions in petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers can change rapidly in time and space, and that the availability of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides affects this rate of change.

  16. [Biological treatments for contaminated soils: hydrocarbon contamination. Fungal applications in bioremediation treatment].

    PubMed

    Martn Moreno, Carmen; Gonzlez Becerra, Aldo; Blanco Santos, Mara Jos

    2004-09-01

    Bioremediation is a spontaneous or controlled process in which biological, mainly microbiological, methods are used to degrade or transform contaminants to non or less toxic products, reducing the environmental pollution. The most important parameters to define a contaminated site are: biodegradability, contaminant distribution, lixiviation grade, chemical reactivity of the contaminants, soil type and properties, oxygen availability and occurrence of inhibitory substances. Biological treatments of organic contaminations are based on the degradative abilities of the microorganisms. Therefore the knowledge on the physiology and ecology of the biological species or consortia involved as well as the characteristics of the polluted sites are decisive factors to select an adequate biorremediation protocol. Basidiomycetes which cause white rot decay of wood are able to degrade lignin and a variety of environmentally persistent pollutants. Thus, white rot fungi and their enzymes are thought to be useful not only in some industrial process like biopulping and biobleaching but also in bioremediation. This paper provides a review of different aspects of bioremediation technologies and recent advances on ligninolytic metabolism research. PMID:15709784

  17. Screening of extremotolerant fungi for the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyntner, Caroline; Blasi, Barbara; Prenafeta, Francesc; Sterflinger, Katja

    2015-04-01

    Bioremediation can be used to treat contaminated sites, by taking advantage of microorganisms which have the potential to degrade a wide range of contaminants. While research has been focused mainly on bacteria, the knowledge on other microorganisms, especially fungal communities, is still limited. However, the use of fungi may have advantages compared to bacteria. Extremophile fungi like the black yeasts can withstand high levels of environmental stress (e.g. range of pH, water availability and temperature, presence of toxic chemicals). Therefore they might be applicable in situations, where bacterial communities show limited performance. In order to identify fungi which are good candidates for bioremediation application, a selection of 163 fungal strains, mostly from the group of the black yeasts, was tested for their capability to degrade three different pollutants: hexadecane, toluene, and polychlorinated biphenyl 126, which were used as model compounds for aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. These chemicals are frequently found in sites contaminated by oil, gas and coal. The screening was based on a two-step selection approach. As a first step, a high throughput method was developed to screen the relatively large amount of fungal strains regarding their tolerance to the contaminants. A microtiter plate based method was developed for monitoring fungal growth in the presence of the selected contaminants photometrically with a Tecan reader. Twenty five strains out of 163, being species of the genera Cladophilaophora, Scedosporium and Exophiala, showed the ability to grow on at least 2 hydrocarbons, and are therefore the most promising candidates for further tests. In a second step, degradation of the contaminants was investigated in more detail for a subset of the screened fungi. This was done by closing the carbon balance in sealed liquid cultures in which the selected pollutant was introduce as the sole source of carbon and energy. Substrate depletion and CO2 accumulation in the headspace were monitored chromatographically. In the course of these experiments, two strains showed a good capacity to grow on toluene. In summary, the presented screening method can be used to identify potential candidates for the fungal degradation of contaminants. Further research is necessary to investigate the potential use of the identified fungal strains for remediation purposes.

  18. Quantitative assessment of hydrocarbon contamination in soil using reflectance spectroscopy: a "multipath" approach.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Guy; Ben-Dor, Eyal; Eshel, Gil

    2013-11-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are contaminants of great significance. The commonly used analytic method for assessing total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil samples is based on extraction with 1,1,2-Trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113), a substance prohibited to use by the Environmental Protection Agency. During the past 20 years, a new quantitative methodology that uses the reflected radiation of solids has been widely adopted. By using this approach, the reflectance radiation across the visible, near infrared-shortwave infrared region (400-2500 nm) is modeled against constituents determined using traditional analytic chemistry methods and then used to predict unknown samples. This technology is environmentally friendly and permits rapid and cost-effective measurements of large numbers of samples. Thus, this method dramatically reduces chemical analytical costs and secondary pollution, enabling a new dimension of environmental monitoring. In this study we adapted this approach and developed effective steps in which hydrocarbon contamination in soils can be determined rapidly, accurately, and cost effectively solely from reflectance spectroscopy. Artificial contaminated samples were analyzed chemically and spectrally to form a database of five soils contaminated with three types of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), creating 15 datasets of 48 samples each at contamination levels of 50-5000 wt% ppm (parts per million). A brute force preprocessing approach was used by combining eight different preprocessing techniques with all possible datasets, resulting in 120 different mutations for each dataset. The brute force was done based on an innovative computing system developed for this study. A new parameter for evaluating model performance scoring (MPS) is proposed based on a combination of several common statistical parameters. The effect of dividing the data into training validation and test sets on modeling accuracy is also discussed. The results of this study clearly show that predicting TPH levels at low concentrations in selected soils at high precision levels is viable. Dividing a dataset into training, validation, and test groups affects the modeling process, and different preprocessing methods, alone or in combination, need to be selected based on soil type and PHC type. MPS was found to be a better parameter for selecting the best performing model than ratio of prediction to deviation, yielding models with the same performance but less complicated and more stable. The use of the "all possibilities" system proved to be mandatory for efficient optimal modeling of reflectance spectroscopy data. PMID:24160885

  19. Hydrocarbons in sediments of a chronically contaminated bay: the challenge of source assignment.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Angela de L R; Meniconi, Maria de Ftima G; Hamacher, Claudia; Farias, Cassia O; da Silva, Gilson C; Gabardo, Irene T; Scofield, Arthur de L

    2012-02-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons and 39 PAH (parental and alkylated homologs) determined in ca. 100 sediment samples from the Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, were evaluated for source discrimination using new approaches. Concentrations of total PAH were in the range of 96-135,000 ?g kg(-1) similar to other coastal urbanized embayment. Traditional diagnostic ratios were not as efficient PAH source indicators, e.g. biomass combustion was assigned as the major source of the pyrolytic PAH although the hydrographic basin is highly industrialized and urbanized. It is proved petrogenic imprint cannot be detected if only the 16 USEPA PAH are determined. The high production in the eutrophic system is not apparent in the aliphatic fraction dominated by land derived n-alkanes due to the effectiveness of microbial degradation. The present work demonstrates the complexity of hydrocarbon forensics when applied to chronically contaminated environments. PMID:22178011

  20. Treatment of saline wastewater contaminated with hydrocarbons by the photo-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Jos Ermrio F; Quina, Frank H; Nascimento, Cludio Augusto O; Silva, Douglas N; Chiavone-Filho, Osvaldo

    2004-02-15

    The application of the photo-Fenton process to the treatment of saline wastewater contaminated with hydrocarbons is investigated. Aqueous saline solutions containing raw gasoline were used as a model oil-field-produced water. The dependence on concentrations of the following reagents has been appropriately evaluated: hydrogen peroxide (100-200 mM), iron ions (0.5-1 mM), and sodium chloride (200-2000 ppm). The reactions were monitored by measurement of the absorption spectra and total organic carbon (TOC). Experimental results demonstrate that the photo-Fenton process is feasible for the treatment of wastewaters containing hydrocarbons, even in the presence of high concentrations of salt. The effect of the salt in this process is described through a series of reactions. A simple feedforward neural network model was found to correlate well the observed data for the degradation process. PMID:14998035

  1. Mechanical Alteration And Contamination Issues In Automated Subsurface Sample Acquisition And Handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, B. J.; Cannon, H.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Zacny, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Drilling Automation for Mars Exploration (DAME) project's purpose is to develop and field-test drilling automation and robotics technologies for projected use in missions in the 2011-15 period. DAME includes control of the drilling hardware, and state estimation of both the hardware and the lithography being drilled and the state of the hole. A sister drill was constructed for the Mars Analog Ro Tinto Experiment (MARTE) project and demonstrated automated core handling and string changeout in 2005 drilling tests at Rio Tinto, Spain. DAME focused instead on the problem of drill control while actively drilling while not getting stuck. Together, the DAME and MARTE projects demonstrate a fully automated robotic drilling capability, including hands-off drilling, adjustment to different strata and downhole conditions, recovery from drilling faults (binding, choking, etc.), drill string changeouts, core acquisition and removal, and sample handling and conveyance to in-situ instruments. The 2006 top-level goal of DAME drilling in-situ tests was to verify and demonstrate a capability for hands-off automated drilling, at an Arctic Mars-analog site. There were three sets of 2006 test goals, all of which were exceeded during the July 2006 field season. The first was to demonstrate the recognition, while drilling, of at least three of the six known major fault modes for the DAME planetary-prototype drill, and to employ the correct recovery or safing procedure in response. The second set of 2006 goals was to operate for three or more hours autonomously, hands-off. And the third 2006 goal was to exceed 3m depth into the frozen breccia and permafrost with the DAME drill (it had not gone further than 2.2m previously). Five of six faults were detected and corrected, there were 43 hours of hands-off drilling (including a 4 hour sequence with no human presence nearby), and 3.2m was the total depth. And ground truth drilling used small commercial drilling equipment in parallel in order to obtain cores and ice profiles at the drilling site. In the course of DAME drilling automation testing, the drilling-induced temperature gradients and their effects on encountered subsurface permafrost and ice layers were observed while drilling in frozen impact breccia at Haughton Crater. In repeated tests of robotic core removal processing and handling in the MARTE project, including field tests, cross-contamination issues arose between successive cores and samples, and procedures and metrics were developed for minimizing the cross-contamination. The MARTE core processing cross-contamination aspects were tested by analyzing a set of pristine samples (those stratigraphically known) vs. cuttings (loose clays) or artifacts from the robotic drilling (indurated clay layers). MARTE ground truth drilling, in parallel with the automated tests, provided control information on the discontinuity/continuity of the stratigraphic record (i.e., texture, color and structure of loose and consolidated materials).

  2. MONITORING THE SUCCESS OF SEDIMENT REMEDIATION AT A SITE CONTAMINATED WITH CHLORINATED PESTICIDES, POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring the Success of Sediment Remediation at a Site Contaminated with Chlorinated Pesticides, Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Arsenic (Baird & McGuire Superfund Site, Holbrook, MA) Contaminated sediment in the Cochato River adjacent to the Baird & McGuire Superfund Sit...

  3. Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-06

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic contaminants. The results from a study with TCE contaminated-clay indicate that electrochemically inducing reductive dechlorination of TCE in a saturated matrix may offer an effective and viable alternative to remediation TCE and other contaminants with potential of being reduced. Another study focused on steel wool oxidation to electrochemically increase population of hydrocarbon-degrading denitrifying bacteria. Significantly larger denitrifying activity was observed in the cathode chamber of a treatment unit setup like an MFC with steel wool as the anode. This enhanced nitrate reduction could be due to direct electron utilization by denitrifying bacteria on the cathode, thereby stimulating microbial denitrification or a combination of electron transfer directly to NO{sub 3}{sup -} and electron transfer to nitrate reducing bacteria, which may serve as a type of bio-catalyst on the cathode for nitrate reduction. Overall, the studies conducted under Task 72 demonstrated different innovative methods to enhance petroleum hydrocarbon degradation and associated contaminants.

  4. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Franck O. P.; Bell, Terrence H.; Marchand, Charlotte; de la Providencia, Ivan E.; El Yassimi, Abdel; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA) with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media) techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:26053848

  5. Biomarker sensitivity for polynuclear and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in fish species from Galveston Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, K.; McDonald, S.; Steinberg, M.; Beatty, K.; Safe, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Galveston Bay estuary exhibits a contamination gradient for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, which is useful for comparing biomarker response sensitivity in fish taken from different bay locations. Two fish species, hardhead catfish (Arius felis) and Atlantic croaker (Micropogon undulatus), were collected from four stations where sediment total PAHs ranged from 68 to > 1,000 ng/g. Hardhead catfish showed no consistent CYP1A mediated responses (hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD), CYP1A mRNA levels, or CYP1A immunoreactive protein) in the field collected fish or in fish dosed with up to 15 mg/kg benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Significant differences were seen in field collected hardhead catfish in biliary concentrations of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and BaP metabolites. Conversely, in croakers taken from the same four Galveston Bay locations, there were significant elevations IN EROD and glutathione-S-transferase activities, CYP1A immunoreactive protein, and biliary PAH metabolites at the contaminated stations. These studies suggest that croaker is a good monitoring species especially with respect to induction of CYP1A mediated responses by PAHs. Biliary PAH metabolites and PAH-DNA adducts were sensitive to PAH contamination in both species.

  6. Migration of selected hydrocarbon contaminants into dry pasta packaged in direct contact with recycled paperboard.

    PubMed

    Barp, Laura; Suman, Michele; Lambertini, Francesca; Moret, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the migration of selected hydrocarbon contaminants, namely mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOH), diisopropyl naphthalenes (DIPN) and polyalphaolefins (PAO) from adhesives into dry semolina and egg pasta packaged in direct contact with recycled paperboard. Migration was monitored during its shelf life (for up to two years) simulating storage in a supermarket (packs on shelves) and conditions preventing exchange with the surrounding environment (packs wrapped in aluminium foil). Migration from the secondary packaging (transport boxes of corrugated board) was also studied for semolina pasta. After 24 months of exposure, semolina pasta stored on shelves reached 3.2 and 0.6 mg kg(-1) of MOSH and MOAH, respectively, Migration from the adhesives used to close the boxes and from the transport boxes contributed about 30% and 25% of the total contamination, respectively. The highest contamination levels (14.5 and 2.0 mg kg(-1) of MOSH and MOAH, respectively, after 24 months) were found in egg pasta stored on shelves (no adhesives), and seemed due to the highest contribution from the external environment. PMID:25571955

  7. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Franck O P; Bell, Terrence H; Marchand, Charlotte; de la Providencia, Ivan E; El Yassimi, Abdel; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA) with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media) techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:26053848

  8. RESEARCH PROJECT -- IN SITU CO-OXIDATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS DURING BIOVENTING OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS (SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a large number of sites containing both petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. Fire training pits at military bases are the most common example. These were often used to dispose of waste oils and solvents. Incomplete burning resulted in releases of contamin...

  9. Effects of Temperature Changes on Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Soils from an Arctic Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Klemm, S.; Whyte, L.; Ghoshal, S.

    2009-05-01

    Bioremediation is being considered as a cost-effective and a minimally disruptive remedial option at remote sites in the Arctic and sub-Arctic impacted by petroleum NAPL contamination. The implementation of on-site bioremediation in cold environments has been generally limited in the short, non-freezing summer months since ground remains frozen for 8-9 months of the year. This study evaluates the effect of different temperature regimes on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation rates and extent, as well as on the microbial activity. A series of pilot-scale landfarming bioremediation experiments (1 m0.6 m0.35 m soil tank dimension) was performed using aged, petroleum fuel-contaminated soils shipped from Resolution Island, Nunavut, Canada. These experiments were conducted under the following temperature conditions: (1) variable daily average field temperatures (1 to 10C) representative of summers at the site; (2) constant mean temperature-mode with 6C, representing typical stable laboratory incubation; and (3) under seasonal freeze-thaw conditions (-8C to 10C). Data to be presented include changes with time of petroleum hydrocarbons concentration fractionated by C-lengths, soil moisture (unfrozen water) contents, O2 and CO2 concentrations in soil pore gas, microbial population size and community composition in nutrient- amended and untreated landfarms. Hydrocarbon biodegradation and heterotrophic respiration activity was more rapid under the variable temperature cycle (1 to 10C) than at a constant average temperature of 6C, and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations were reduced by 55% due to biodegradation over a 60 day test period under the variable temperature regime, compared to only 21% in soil tanks which were subjected to a constant temperature of 6C. Shifts in microbial community were clearly observed in the both temperature modes using PCR-DGGE analyses and the emergence of a hydrocarbon-degrading population, Alkanindiges, was identified through 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Under the seasonal freeze-thaw conditions, microbial activity and hydrocarbon degradation was detected even when soils were frozen. The microbial activity was significantly correlated to residual unfrozen water contents.

  10. Effects of humic acid on phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil simultaneously contaminated with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyoung; Kim, Ki Seob; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Kang, Daeseok; Sung, Kijune

    2011-01-01

    The use of humic acid (HA) to enhance the efficiency of phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel was evaluated in this study. A sample of soil was artificially contaminated with commercially available diesel fuel to an initial total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) concentration of 2300 mg/kg and four heavy metals with concentrations of 400 mg/kg for Pb, 200 mg/kg for Cu, 12 mg/kg for Cd, and 160 mg/kg for Ni. Three plant species, Brassica campestris, Festuca arundinacea, and Helianthus annuus, were selected for the phytodegradation experiment. Percentage degradation of TPH in the soil in a control pot supplemented with HA increased to 45% from 30% without HA. The addition of HA resulted in an increases in the removal of TPH from the soil in pots planted with B. campestris, E arundinacea, and H. annuus, enhancing percentage degradation to 86%, 64%, and 85% from 45%, 54%, and 66%, respectively. The effect of HA was also observed in the degradation of n-alkanes within 30 days. The rates of removal of n-alkanes in soil planted with B. campestris and H. annuus were high for n-alkanes in the range of C11-C28. A dynamic increase in dehydrogenase activity was observed during the last 15 days of a 30-day experimental period in all the pots amended with HA. The enhanced biodegradation performance for TPHs observed might be due to an increase in microbial activities and bioavailable TPH in soils caused by combined effects of plants and HA. The results suggested that HA could act as an enhancing agent for phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel and heavy metals. PMID:22432335

  11. Temporal evolution of the geoelectrical response on a hydrocarbon contaminated site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondel, Amlie; Schmutz, Myriam; Franceschi, Michel; Tichan, Frdric; Carles, Margaux

    2014-04-01

    A geoelectrical campaign was initiated in 2009 to delineate a massive hydrocarbon spill, which occurred because of a petroleum pipe breakdown in 2009. These measurements have been compared with both field resistivity measurements made in 2009 and with laboratory measurements. From a physicochemical point of view, a hydrocarbon contamination has to be understood as a spatially and temporally varying object, responsible for a change in geoelectrical response. To evaluate the signal measured on site, geoelectrical laboratory measurements were performed on the petroleum oil extracted from the site during two stages of degradation. On the laboratory scale, the non-degraded oil shows an increase in resistivity, normalized chargeability and quadrature conductivity with oil content, whereas the degraded oil indicates a slight decrease in resistivity, but no modification of the phase-lag and chargeability parameters. In the field, resistivity measurements performed in 2009, just after the pipe breakdown, show weak changes in resistivity measured over the contaminated area. However, between 2009 and 2012, biodegradation of the oil has led to a clear decrease in the resistivity within the impacted zone. No variations in normalized chargeability or quadrature conductivity were measured in 2012 between the contaminated and the non-contaminated areas, despite the presence of biofilms. In the field, the studied hydrocarbon contamination under degradation appears not to modify the capacitive part of conduction, but rather it concerns the ohmic part of conduction. The field and laboratory measurements led us to the conclusion that to choose the most discriminatory and efficient geophysical parameters, it is necessary to have a priori information about the oil (i.e. non-degraded or partially degraded). In the present case study, there is no need to acquire chargeability and phase-lag parameters to locate the contamination in the field, as they do not undergo any change. On the other hand, the resistivity parameter is a good indicator of the presence of partially degraded oil. We also note that normalized chargeability values have been very useful in characterizing the geometry of the clayey-silt roof.

  12. Evaluation of electrochemical processes for the removal of several target aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Alsalka, Yamen; Karabet, Franois; Hashem, Shahir

    2011-03-01

    Ground and surface water contamination resulting from the leakage of crude oil and refined petroleum products is a serious and growing environmental problem throughout the world. Consequently, a study of the use of electrochemical treatment in the clean-up was undertaken with the aim of reducing the water contamination by aromatic pollutants to more acceptable levels. In the experiments described, water contamination by refined petroleum products was simulated under laboratory conditions. Electrochemical treatment, using aluminium electrodes, has been optimised by full factorial design and surface response analysis in term of BTEX and PAHs removal and energy consumption. The optimal conditions of pH, current density, electrolysis time, electrolyte type, and electrolyte concentration have then been applied in the treatment of real water samples which were monitored as petroleum contaminated samples. Treatment results have shown that electrochemical methods could achieve the concentration of these pollutants to undetectable levels in particular groundwater and surface water, hence, they can be highly effective in the remediation of water contaminated by aromatic hydrocarbons, and the use of these processes is therefore recommended. PMID:21243149

  13. Bioremediation of poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil by composting

    SciTech Connect

    Loick, N.; Hobbs, P.J.; Hale, M.D.C.; Jones, D.L.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive and critical review of research on different co-composting approaches to bioremediate hydrocarbon contaminated soil, organisms that have been found to degrade PAHs, and PAH breakdown products. Advantages and limitations of using certain groups of organisms and recommended areas of further research effort are identified. Studies investigating the use of composting techniques to treat contaminated soil are broad ranging and differ in many respects, which makes comparison of the different approaches very difficult. Many studies have investigated the use of specific bio-additives in the form of bacteria or fungi with the aim of accelerating contaminant removal; however, few have employed microbial consortia containing organisms from both kingdoms despite knowledge suggesting synergistic relationships exist between them in contaminant removal. Recommendations suggest that further studies should attempt to systemize the investigations of composting approaches to bio-remediate PAH-contaminated soil, to focus on harnessing the biodegradative capacity of both bacteria and fungi to create a cooperative environment for PAH degradation, and to further investigate the array of PAHs that can be lost during the composting process by either leaching or volatilization.

  14. Contamination of urban, industrial and continental waters by chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides along the Mediterranean coast of Morocco.

    PubMed

    Kessabi, M; Elhraiki, A; Nader, B

    1988-05-01

    Residual waters (urban, industrial and continental) of the Moroccan Mediterranean coast situated between Tangier and Al Hoceima were found to be contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides. Hexachlorobenzene, lindane, aldrin and heptachlor were frequently encountered. The contamination was relatively low for endrin and dieldrin and irregular for DDT and its derivatives. The levels detected differed from traces to 0.5 ppm. The areas of high urban density showed the highest contamination, with some seasonal variation. PMID:2454504

  15. Assessment of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination in the surficial sediments and ground water at three former underground storage tank locations, Fort Jackson, South Carolina, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water and sediment contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons resulting from leaks and overfills was detected during tank removal activities at three former underground storage tank locations at Fort Jackson, near Columbia, South Carolina. Investigations were initiated to assess the effect of contamination to the surficial aquifer at Sites 1062, 2438, and 2444. These investigations involved the installation of permanent monitoring wells and the collection and analysis of sediment and ground-water samples at the three sites. Water-level data were collected at all sites to determine hydraulic gradients and the direction of ground-water flow. In addition, aquifer tests were made at Site 1062 to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the surficial aquifer at that site. Sediment borings were made at the three sites to collect subsurface-sediment samples for lithologic description and laboratory analyses, and for the installation of ground-water monitoring wells. Laboratory analyses of sediment samples collected from boreholes at Site 1062 indicated elevated concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons at three locations. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons - Diesel Range Organics were detected at one borehole at a concentration of 388,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene concentrations in sediment from the site ranged from less than 350 to over 100,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total lead was detected at concentrations ranging from 2,900 to 5,900 micrograms per kilogram. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected at Site 2438 in one borehole at a trace concentration of 112 micrograms per kilogram of para- and meta-xylenes. No concentrations exceeding the detection limits were reported for petroleum hydrocarbons in sediment samples collected from Site 2444; however, total lead was detected in sediment samples from two boreholes, each at concentrations of 600 micrograms per kilogram. Ground-water samples were collected from each site for laboratory analysis and field-property determinations. Petroleum hydrocarbons and lead were detected at concentrations exceeding regulatory limits for drinking water in ground water from Site 1062 only. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in ground water from three wells at Site 1062, with the highest concentrations occurring in the area of the former underground storage tanks. Benzene was detected at concentrations as much as 28 micrograms per liter; toluene as much as 558 micrograms per liter; para- and meta-xylenes as much as 993 micrograms per liter; and naphthalene as much as 236 micrograms per liter. Ethylbenzene and ortho-xylene were detected in one well at concentrations of 70 and 6 micrograms per liter, respectively. Dissolved lead was detected in ground water from four wells at concentrations from 5 to 152 micrograms per liter. Analysis of ground-water samples collected from Sites 2438 and 2444 showed little evidence of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination. Petroleum hydrocarbons were not detected in any of the ground-water samples collected from Site 2438. With the exception of a low concentration of naphthalene (11 micrograms per liter) detected in ground water from one well, petroleum hydrocarbons and lead were not detected in ground water collected from Site 2444.

  16. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  17. [Improving Agricultural Safety of Soils Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by In Situ Bioremediation].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hai-huan; Pan, Jian-gang; Xu, Shena-jun; Bai, Zhi-hui; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhan-bin

    2015-08-01

    In order to reduce the risk of enrichment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in crops, reduce the potential hazards of food-sourced PAHs to human and increase the agricultural safety of PAHs contaminated soils, the bio-augmented removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated through in situ remediation by introducing Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RS) into the agricultural soil contaminated by PAHs. The 50-times diluted RS was sprayed on leaf surface (in area B) or irrigated to roots (in area D). The treatment of spraying water of the equal amount was taken as the control (A) and the wheat field without any treatment as the blank (CK). Treatments were conducted since wheat seeding. Soil and wheat samples were collected in the mature period to analyze the changes of community structure of the soil microorganisms and the concentration of PAHs in soils and investigate the strengthening and restoration effects of RS on PAHs contaminated soils. Compared to the CK Area, the areas B and D revealed that the variation ratio of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) that were the biomarker of soil microorganisms was 29.6%, and the ratio of total PAHs removed was increased 1.59 times and 1.68 times, respectively. The dry weight of wheat grain of 50 spikes was increased by 8.95% and 12.5%, respectively, and the enrichment factor of total PAHs was decreased by 58.9% and 62.2% respectively in the wheat grains. All the results suggested that RS reduced enrichment of PAHs in wheat grains and increased wheat yield, which had great exploitation and utilization potentiality in repairing and improving the agricultural safety of the soils contaminated with PHAs. PMID:26592038

  18. Changes in Magnetic Mineralogy Through a Depth Sequence of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameen, N. N.; Klglein, N.; Appel, E.; Petrovsky, E.; Kappler, A.

    2013-12-01

    Sediments, soils and groundwater can act as a natural storage for many types of pollution. This study aims to investigate ferro(i)magnetic phase formation and transformation in the presence of organic contaminants (hydrocarbons) and its relation to bacterial activity, in particular in the zone of fluctuating water levels. The work extends previous studies conducted at the same site. The study area is a former military air base at Hrad?any, Czech Republic (5037'22.71"N, 1445'2.24"E). Due to leaks in petroleum storage tanks and jet fuelling stations over years of active use the site was heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, until the base was closed in 1991. This site is one of the most important sources of high quality groundwater in the Czech Republic. During remediation processes the groundwater level in the sediments fluctuated, driving the hydrocarbon contaminants to lower depth levels along with the groundwater and leading to magnetite formation (Rijal et al., Environ.Pollut., 158, 1756-1762, 2010). In our study we drilled triplicate cores at three locations which were studied earlier. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) profiles combined with other magnetic properties were analyzed to obtain the ferro(i)magnetic concentration distributions along the depth sections. Additionally the sediment properties, hydrocarbon content and bacterial activity were studied. The triplicate cores were used to statistically discriminate outliers and to recognize significant magnetic signatures with depth. The results show that the highest concentration of ferrimagnetic phases (interpreted as newly formed magnetite) exists at the probable top of the groundwater fluctuation (GWF) zone. For example at one of the sites this zone is found between 1.4-1.9 m depth (groundwater table at ~2.3 m depth). High S-ratio and the correlation of ARM with MS values confirm the contribution of magnetite for the ferro(i)magnetic enhancement in the GWF zone. In the previous studies the MS signals revealed small-scale isolated features, but with the use of triplicate cores significant trends of MS could be identified, showing an increase from the lowermost position of the groundwater table upward. Bacterial activity is likely responsible for magnetite formation in this depth range as indicated by most probable number (MPN) results of iron-reducing bacteria.

  19. Mutagenic hazards of complex polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures in contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, C.L.; Lambert, A.B.; Lundstedt, S.; Tysklind, M.; White, P.A.

    2008-04-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate hazard/risk assessment methods for complex environmental mixtures that involve a targeted, priority chemical approach based on the cumulative hazard/risk of known mixture components or analyses of sufficiently similar mixtures. Ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils were separated into nonpolar and semipolar fractions, and both fractions elicited positive responses on the Salmonella reverse mutation assay. Targeted and nontargeted methods of hazard prediction routinely overestimated mutagenic activities for the nonpolar soil fractions, suggesting nonadditive interactions of PAHs in complex mixtures. This suggests that current risk assessment methods for complex mixtures may provide conservative estimates regarding soils contaminated with priority PAHs alone. Significant underestimations of total risk, however, will be obtained if the soils also contain unidentified PAHs as well as polycyclic aromatic compounds and related compounds that contribute to the total mutagenic activity. Furthermore, estimates of excess lifetime cancer risk associated with the nondietary ingestion of the PAH-contaminated soils studied here indicate that a traditional risk assessment model based on identified priority PAHs and an assumption of additivity generally underestimates the risk associated with the nonpolar soil fractions (in comparison to bioassay-derived risk estimates). Additional cancer risk may be associated with the more polar compounds that also are found at these contaminated sites and that rarely are included in the standard risk assessment methodology.

  20. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater in northern climates

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, C.M.; Braely, W.A.; Travis, M.D.; Perry, L.B.; Iskandar, I.K.

    1998-03-01

    A field demonstration and research project was conducted in Fairbanks, Alaska, to demonstrate, evaluate, and document the construction and operation of three selected bioremediation technologies-landfarming, recirculating leachbeds, and infiltration galleries. Landfarming involves adding water and nutrients to contaminated soil to stimulate microbial activity and contaminant degradation. Infiltration galleries are dynamic in-situ treatment systems designed to stimulate microbial activity and subsequent hydrocarbon degradation by circulating nutrient and oxygen-amended water through petroleum-contaminated soil. Recirculating leachbeds, in a way similar to slurry reactors, aerate and mix nutrients with contaminated soil, and can be built as on-site bioreactors. Estimated biotreatment costs in the landfarm were between $20 to $30 per cubic yard ($15 to $23 per cubic meter). Nutrient placement has been demonstrated to be a critical factor, even though the site is tilled and mixed frequently. Success of the infiltration gallery was more difficult to document. Benzene was detected at less than 2 ppb and BTEX levels were less than 5 ppb for water extracted from the pumping well during 1992, which is significantly lower than the 1991 levels. Problems were encountered during the brief operation of the recirculating leach bed, but a similar system has performed well. Relatively simple, low-cost techniques provided significant potential for improving degradation rates.

  1. Heavy metal-immobilizing organoclay facilitates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in mixed-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Mandal, Asit; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-11-15

    Soils contaminated with a mixture of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pose toxic metal stress to native PAH-degrading microorganisms. Adsorbents such as clay and modified clay minerals can bind the metal and reduce its toxicity to microorganisms. However, in a mixed-contaminated soil, an adsorption process more specific to the metals without affecting the bioavailability of PAHs is desired for effective degradation. Furthermore, the adsorbent should enhance the viability of PAH-degrading microorganisms. A metal-immobilizing organoclay (Arquad(®) 2HT-75-bentonite treated with palmitic acid) (MIOC) able to reduce metal (cadmium (Cd)) toxicity and enhance PAH (phenanthrene) biodegradation was developed and characterized in this study. The MIOC differed considerably from the parent clay in terms of its ability to reduce metal toxicity (MIOC>unmodified bentonite>Arquad-bentonite). The MIOC variably increased the microbial count (10-43%) as well as activities (respiration 3-44%; enzymatic activities up to 68%), and simultaneously maintained phenanthrene in bioavailable form in a Cd-phenanthrene mixed-contaminated soil over a 21-day incubation period. This study may lead to a new MIOC-assisted bioremediation technique for PAHs in mixed-contaminated soils. PMID:26022853

  2. Comparison of indigenous and exogenous microbial populations during slurry phase biodegradation of long-term hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Adetutu, Eric M; Aleer, Sam; Weber, John; Patil, Sayali S; Sheppard, Petra J; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2012-11-01

    In this study, a number of slurry-phase strategies were trialled over a 42 day period in order to determine the efficacy of bioremediation for long-term hydrocarbon-contaminated soil (145 g kg(-1) C(10)-C(40)). The addition of activated sludge and nutrients to slurries (bioaugmentation) resulted in enhanced hydrocarbon removal (51.6 8.5 %) compared to treatments receiving only nutrients (enhanced natural attenuation [ENA]; 41.3 6.4 %) or no amendments (natural attenuation; no significant hydrocarbon removal, P < 0.01). This data suggests that the microbial community in the activated sludge inoculum contributed to the enhanced removal of hydrocarbons in ENA slurries. Microbial diversity in slurries was monitored using DGGE with dominant bands excised and sequenced for identification. Applying the different bioremediation strategies resulted in the formation of four distinct community clusters associated with the activated sludge (inoculum), bioaugmentation strategy at day 0, bioaugmentation strategy at weeks 2-6 and slurries with autoclaved sludge and nutrient additions (bioaugmentation negative control). While hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria genera (e.g. Aquabacterium and Haliscomenobacter) were associated with the hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, bioaugmentation of soil slurries with activated sludge resulted in the introduction of bacteria associated with hydrocarbon degradation (Burkholderiales order and Klebsiella genera) which presumably contributed to the enhanced efficacy for this slurry strategy. PMID:22684213

  3. Modelling of spatial contaminant probabilities of occurrence of chlorinated hydrocarbons in an urban aquifer.

    PubMed

    Greis, Tillman; Helmholz, Kathrin; Schniger, Hans Matthias; Haarstrick, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    In this study, a 3D urban groundwater model is presented which serves for calculation of multispecies contaminant transport in the subsurface on the regional scale. The total model consists of two submodels, the groundwater flow and reactive transport model, and is validated against field data. The model equations are solved applying finite element method. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to perform parameter identification of flow, transport and reaction processes. Coming from the latter, stochastic variation of flow, transport, and reaction input parameters and Monte Carlo simulation are used in calculating probabilities of pollutant occurrence in the domain. These probabilities could be part of determining future spots of contamination and their measure of damages. Application and validation is exemplarily shown for a contaminated site in Braunschweig (Germany), where a vast plume of chlorinated ethenes pollutes the groundwater. With respect to field application, the methods used for modelling reveal feasible and helpful tools to assess natural attenuation (MNA) and the risk that might be reduced by remediation actions. PMID:21858434

  4. Microbial Diversity and Bioremediation of a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico)

    PubMed Central

    Rodrguez-Martnez, Enid M.; Prez, Ernie X.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Zhou, Jizhong; Massol-Dey, Arturo A.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources has become a major environmental and human health concern in many parts of the world. Our objectives were to employ both culture and culture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbial community structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate a diesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normal operating conditions, 97 to 99% of total hydrocarbons were removed with only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultures were isolated from the treatment unit (96% which utilized diesel constituents as sole carbon source). Approximately 20% of the isolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with most belonging to the ?, ? and ? subdivision of the Proteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the genetic constitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple time points with a Functional Gene Array (FGA) containing over 12,000 probes for genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemical cycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using an isothermal ?29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, and hybridized to the arrays in 50% formimide overnight at 50C. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course of treatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbial community. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation (including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane, biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene); and 333 genes involved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases [nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB], potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase [pmoA]) were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE, nitroaromatics and chlorinated compounds were also present, indicating a broad catabolic potential of the treatment unit. FGAs demonstrated the early establishment of a diverse community with concurrent aerobic and anaerobic processes contributing to the bioremediation process. PMID:16968977

  5. Microbial Diversity and Bioremediation of aHydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Martinez, E.M.; Perez, Ernie X.; Schadt, ChristopherW.; Zhou, Jizhong; Massol-Deya, Arturo A.

    2006-09-30

    Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources hasbecome a major environmental and human health concern in many parts ofthe world. Our objectives were to employ both culture andculture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbialcommunity structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate adiesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normaloperating conditions, 97 to 99 percent of total hydrocarbons were removedwith only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultureswere isolated from the treatment unit (96 percent which utilized dieselconstituents as sole carbon source). Approximately 20 percent of theisolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas.Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with mostbelonging to the infinity, beta and gamma subdivision of theProteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the geneticconstitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple timepoints with a Functional Gene Array (FGA) containing over 12,000 probesfor genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemicalcycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using anisothermal phi29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, andhybridized to the arrays in 50 percent formimide overnight at 50 degreesC. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course oftreatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbialcommunity. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation(including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane,biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene); and 333 genesinvolved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases[nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB],potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase[pmoA]) were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE,nitroaromatics and chlorinated compounds werealso present, indicating abroad catabolic potential of the treatment unit. FGA's demonstrated theearly establishment of a diverse community with concurrent aerobic andanaerobic processes contributing to the bioremediationprocess.

  6. Microbial Diversity and Bioremediation of a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Martinex, Enid M.; Perez, Ernie; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Zhou, Jizhong; Massol-Deya, Arturo A.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources has become a major environmental and human health concern in many parts of the world. Our objectives were to employ both culture and culture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbial community structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate a diesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normal operating conditions, 97 to 99% of total hydrocarbons were removed with only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultures were isolated from the treatment unit (96% which utilized diesel constituents as sole carbon source). Approximately 20% of the isolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with most belonging to the {infinity}, {beta} and {gamma} subdivision of the Proteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the genetic constitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple time points with a Functional Gene Array (FGA) containing over 12,000 probes for genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemical cycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using an isothermal {phi}29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, and hybridized to the arrays in 50% formimide overnight at 50 C. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course of treatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbial community. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation (including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane, biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene); and 333 genes involved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases [nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB], potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase [pmoA]) were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE, nitroaromatics and chlorinated compounds were also present, indicating a broad catabolic potential of the treatment unit. FGA's demonstrated the early establishment of a diverse community with concurrent aerobic and anaerobic processes contributing to the bioremediation process.

  7. COMPARISON OF METHODS TO DETERMINE OXYGEN DEMAND FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF A FUEL CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four analytical methods were compared for estimating concentrations of fuel contaminants in subsurface core samples. The methods were total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, oil and grease, and a solvent extraction of fuel hydrocarbons combined with a gas chromatographic te...

  8. COMPARISON OF METHODS TO DETERMINE OXYGEN DEMAND FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF A FUEL CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four analytical methods were compared for estimating concentrations of fuel contaminants in subsurface core samples. he methods were total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, oil and grease, and a solvent extraction of fuel hydrocarbons combined with a gas chromatographic tec...

  9. Response of the microbial community to seasonal groundwater level fluctuations in petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ai-xia; Zhang, Yu-ling; Dong, Tian-zi; Lin, Xue-yu; Su, Xiao-si

    2015-07-01

    The effects of seasonal groundwater level fluctuations on the contamination characteristics of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soils, groundwater, and the microbial community were investigated at a typical petrochemical site in northern China. The measurements of groundwater and soil at different depths showed that significant TPH residue was present in the soil in this study area, especially in the vicinity of the pollution source, where TPH concentrations were up to 2600 mg kg(-1). The TPH concentration in the groundwater fluctuated seasonally, and the maximum variation was 0.8 mg L(-1). The highest TPH concentrations were detected in the silty clay layer and lied in the groundwater level fluctuation zones. The groundwater could reach previously contaminated areas in the soil, leading to higher groundwater TPH concentrations as TPH leaches into the groundwater. The coincident variation of the electron acceptors and TPH concentration with groundwater-table fluctuations affected the microbial communities in groundwater. The microbial community structure was significantly different between the wet and dry seasons. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) results showed that in the wet season, TPH, NO3(-), Fe(2+), TMn, S(2-), and HCO3(-) were the major factors correlating the microbial community. A significant increase in abundance of operational taxonomic unit J1 (97% similar to Dechloromonas aromatica sp.) was also observed in wet season conditions, indicating an intense denitrifying activity in the wet season environment. In the dry season, due to weak groundwater level fluctuations and low temperature of groundwater, the microbial activity was weak. But iron and sulfate-reducing were also detected in dry season at this site. As a whole, groundwater-table fluctuations would affect the distribution, transport, and biodegradation of the contaminants. These results may be valuable for the control and remediation of soil and groundwater pollution at this site and in other petrochemical-contaminated areas. Furthermore, they are probably helpful for reducing health risks to the general public from contaminated groundwater. PMID:25687607

  10. Chemical Fate of Contaminants in the Environment: Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in the Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, Donald G.; Cramer, Christopher; Gao, Jiali; Garrett, Bruce C.; Dupuis, Michel; Straatsma, TP; Morokuma, Keiji; Dunning, Thomas H.; Borisov, Yurii A.; Arcia, Edgar E.; Thompson, Jacob S.

    2006-09-21

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) are the most common contaminant found at hazardous waste sites and are the most prevalent contaminants on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons production sites. Many of the CHCs are either known or suspected carcinogens and thus pose health risks to the public and/or site workers. Unlike simple hydrocarbons, CHCs are resistant to biodegradation, but can degrade by abiotic processes such as hydrolysis, nucleophilic substitution, and dehydrochlorination. Unfortunately, few studies of the reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons have been reported in literature, and disagreement still exists about the mechanisms and rates of many of the key reactions. In this work, we modeled the reactions involved in the degradation of CHCs in the groundwater. The goals of the research proposed are: • development of a computational approach that will allow reaction pathways and rate constants to be accurately calculated • development of more approximate approaches, evaluated against the more accurate approach, which will lay the groundwork for exploratory studies of more complex CHCs • application of these approaches to study the degradation pathways of CHCs in aqueous liquids • application of the more approximate approaches to study the mechanism of forming complex CHC polychlorinated benzene compounds and dioxins. We examined elementary reactions involved in the aqueous-phase chemistry of chlorinated methanes and ethylenes in an attempt to obtain a detailed understanding of the abiotic processes involved in the degradation of this important class of contaminants. We began by studying the reactions of CHnCl(4-n) and C2HnCl(4-n) with OH¯, as these are thought to be the dominant processes involved in the degradation of these chlorinated species. We used state-of-the-art theoretical techniques to model the elementary reactions of CHCs important in the groundwater. We employed high-accuracy electronic structure methods (e.g., perturbation theory and coupled cluster methods with correlation-consistent basis sets) to determine the energies of the various stable species, intermediates, and transition states involved in the elementary reactions of CHCs. Effects of solvation on the reaction energetics were studied by including small numbers of solvent molecules (microsolvation). Our own N-layered molecular orbital + molecular mechanics (ONIOM) method was used because it allows the number of solvent molecules to be increased, and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods and continuum solvation models were used to estimate the effects of bulk solvation. Rate constants for the gas-phase, microsolvated, and bulk-phase reactions were computed using variational transition state theory (VTST).

  11. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil by Rhodobacter sphaeroides biofertilizer and plants.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Haihua; Luo, Jinxue; Zhang, Yiming; Xu, Shengjun; Bai, Zhihui; Huang, Zhanbin

    2015-09-01

    Bio-augmentation is a promising technique for remediation of polluted soils. This study aimed to evaluate the bio-augmentation effect of Rhodobacter sphaeroides biofertilizer (RBF) on the bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) contaminated soil. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted over a period of 120 days, three methods for enhancing bio-augmentation were tested on TPH contaminated soils, including single addition RBF, planting, and combining of RBF and three crop species, such as wheat (W), cabbage (C) and spinach (S), respectively. The results demonstrated that the best removal of TPH from contaminated soil in the RBF bio-augmentation rhizosphere soils was found to be 46.2%, 65.4%, 67.5% for W+RBF, C+RBF, S+RBF rhizosphere soils respectively. RBF supply impacted on the microbial community diversity (phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA) and the activity of soil enzymes, such as dehydrogenase (DH), alkaline phosphatase (AP) and urease (UR). There were significant difference among the soil only containing crude oil (CK), W, C and S rhizosphere soils and RBF bio-augmentation soils. Moreover, the changes were significantly distinct depended on crops species. It was concluded that the RBF is a valuable material for improving effect of remediation of TPH polluted soils. PMID:26525019

  12. Phototoxic response of Lumbriculus variegatus to sediments contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, P.D.; Ankley, G.T.; Kosian, P.A.

    1995-05-01

    The toxicity of certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to aquatic organisms can be greatly increased upon exposure of the organisms to ultraviolet (UV) radiation present in sunlight. The phenomenon of photoactivation of PAHs had received some attention in the laboratory; however, evaluation of the photoinduced toxicity of PAHs in field settings has been limited. In these studies, in situ chambers made from Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tubes were used to evaluate the phototoxic response of laboratory-cultured oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) in sediments contaminated with PAHs. These experiments were conducted using both sunlight-exposed and shaded test chambers. In addition to the PAH-contaminated site, a reference site lacking PAHs was tested as a control. Survival of L. variegatus at the PAH-contaminated site was significantly less in chambers exposed to sunlight than in chambers held in the dark, or chambers from the reference site. Concurrent laboratory studies with sediment collected from the two sites and an artificial source of UV light corroborated observations made in the field. Although a number of PAHs were present at elevated concentrations in the test sample, further work is required to determine exactly which were responsible for the observed phototoxicity.

  13. Influence of ultraviolet light in the toxicity of sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Monson, P.D.; Kosian, P.A.; Collyard, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Standard 10-d toxicity tests were conducted with freshwater benthic invertebrates using sediments containing a range of concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The assays were performed both under normal laboratory fluorescent light and ultraviolet (UV) light which mimicked wavelengths present in sunlight at about 10% of ambient solar intensity. Additionally, field experiments used an in situ apparatus to evaluate the phototoxic response of the aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus to sediments contaminated with PAHs. Those experiments were conducted using both sunlight exposed and shaded test chambers. In addition to a PAH contaminated site, a reference site lacking in PAHs also was tested as a control. Laboratory tests conducted with PAH contaminated sediments exposed to UV light resulted in significantly greater mortality of Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus than tests performed under otherwise comparable conditions with fluorescent light. Results from field experiments corroborated this trend. The results suggest that failure to consider photoactivation of PAHs by sunlight could result in sediment toxicity test methods or criteria which are underprotective of benthic organisms.

  14. Assessing the hydrocarbon degrading potential of indigenous bacteria isolated from crude oil tank bottom sludge and hydrocarbon-contaminated soil of Azzawiya oil refinery, Libya.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Abdulatif A; Adetutu, Eric M; Kadali, Krishna K; Morrison, Paul D; Nurulita, Yuana; Ball, Andrew S

    2014-09-01

    The disposal of hazardous crude oil tank bottom sludge (COTBS) represents a significant waste management burden for South Mediterranean countries. Currently, the application of biological systems (bioremediation) for the treatment of COTBS is not widely practiced in these countries. Therefore, this study aims to develop the potential for bioremediation in this region through assessment of the abilities of indigenous hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms from Libyan Hamada COTBS for the biotreatment of Libyan COTBS-contaminated environments. Bacteria were isolated from COTBS, COTBS-contaminated soil, treated COTBS-contaminated soil, and uncontaminated soil using Bushnell Hass medium amended with Hamada crude oil (1 %) as the main carbon source. Overall, 49 bacterial phenotypes were detected, and their individual abilities to degrade Hamada crude and selected COBTS fractions (naphthalene, phenanthrene, eicosane, octadecane and hexane) were evaluated using MT2 Biolog plates. Analyses using average well colour development showed that ~90 % of bacterial isolates were capable of utilizing representative aromatic fractions compared to 51 % utilization of representative aliphatics. Interestingly, more hydrocarbonoclastic isolates were obtained from treated contaminated soils (42.9 %) than from COTBS (26.5 %) or COTBS-contaminated (30.6 %) and control (0 %) soils. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) separated the isolates into two clusters with microorganisms in cluster 2 being 1.7- to 5-fold better at hydrocarbon degradation than those in cluster 1. Cluster 2 isolates belonged to the putative hydrocarbon-degrading genera; Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Arthrobacter and Brevundimonas with 57 % of these isolates being obtained from treated COTBS-contaminated soil. Overall, this study demonstrates that the potential for PAH degradation exists for the bioremediation of Hamada COTBS-contaminated environments in Libya. This represents the first report on the isolation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria from Libyan COTBS and COTBS-contaminated soil. PMID:24888608

  15. Management of ground water contaminated by aromatic hydrocarbons in the aquifer supplying Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Yazicigil, H.; Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1981-11-01

    A digital model and field monitoring data were used to evaluate alternatives for handling a coal tar residues dump and the resulting pollution of the unconsolidated buried channel aquifer supplying Ames, Iowa. Wastes from a coal gasification plant were deposited in a pit from 1910 to the late 1920s. Several city wells were abandoned and some are currently threatened because of tastes and odours from the chemicals. A variety of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds, mostly aromatic, have been identified in contaminated well water. A number of management practices were considered, but none of the alternatives, used alone offered a practical solution to the problem. It was recommended that the 2 localised coal tar residue sources be excavated and a pumping trough barrier with protective pumping well be constructed.

  16. Hydrocarbon degrading microbial communities in bench scale aerobic biobarriers for gasoline contaminated groundwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Daghio, Matteo; Tatangelo, Valeria; Franzetti, Andrea; Gandolfi, Isabella; Papacchini, Maddalena; Careghini, Alessandro; Sezenna, Elena; Saponaro, Sabrina; Bestetti, Giuseppina

    2015-07-01

    BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) are some of the main constituents of gasoline and can be accidentally released in the environment. In this work the effect of bioaugmentation on the microbial communities in a bench scale aerobic biobarrier for gasoline contaminated water treatment was studied by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Catabolic genes (tmoA and xylM) were quantified by qPCR, in order to estimate the biodegradation potential, and the abundance of total bacteria was estimated by the quantification of the number of copies of the 16S rRNA gene. Hydrocarbon concentration was monitored over time and no difference in the removal efficiency for the tested conditions was observed, either with or without the microbial inoculum. In the column without the inoculum the most abundant genera were Acidovorax, Bdellovibrio, Hydrogenophaga, Pseudoxanthomonas and Serpens at the beginning of the column, while at the end of the column Thauera became dominant. In the inoculated test the microbial inoculum, composed by Rhodococcus sp. CE461, Rhodococcus sp. CT451 and Methylibium petroleiphilum LMG 22953, was outcompeted. Quantitative PCR results showed an increasing in xylM copy number, indicating that hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were selected during the treatment, although only a low increase of the total biomass was observed. However, the bioaugmentation did not lead to an increase in the degradative potential of the microbial communities. PMID:25747304

  17. A new risk and stochastic analysis of monitoring and remediation in subsurface contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papapetridis, K.; Paleologos, E.

    2012-04-01

    Sanitary landfills constitute the most widely used management approach for the disposal of solid wastes because of their simplicity and cost effectiveness. However, historical records indicate that landfills exhibit a high failure rate of groundwater contamination. Successful detection of aquifer contamination via monitoring wells is a complicated problem with many factors, such as the heterogeneity of the geologic environment, the dispersion of contamination into the geologic medium, the quantity and nature of the contaminants, the number and location of the monitoring wells, and the frequency of sampling, all contributing to the uncertainty of early detection. Detection of contaminants, of course, is of value if remedial actions follow as soon as possible, so that the volume of contaminated groundwater to be treated is minimized. Practically, there is always a time lag between contaminant detection and remedial action response. Administrative decisions and arrangements with local contractors initiate remedial procedures introduces a time lag between detection and remediation time. During this time lag a plume continues to move into an aquifer contaminating larger groundwater volumes. In the present study these issues are addressed by investigating the case of instantaneous leakage from a landfill facility into a heterogeneous aquifer. The stochastic Monte Carlo framework was used to address, in two dimensions, the problem of evaluating the effectiveness of contaminant detection in heterogeneous aquifers by linear networks of monitoring wells. Numerical experiments based on the random-walk tracking-particle method were conducted to determine the detection probabilities and to calculate contaminated areas at different time steps. Several cases were studied assuming different levels of geologic heterogeneity, contamination dispersion, detectable contamination limits and monitoring wells' sampling frequencies. A new perspective is introduced for the correction of risk analyses; contemporary risk analyses consider the cost of alternative remediation procedures by assuming that the contamination area to be remediated coincides with the area calculated at the time of detection. However, there is always a considerable lag between the time that a plume is detected and the time when remediation commences. This time lag constitutes a random variable that depends on available resources and technologies, as well as efficiency of administration decision-making. An expression is proposed that accounts for the delay between detection and remedial action in order to provide a correction to decision analyses that evaluate the economic worth of well monitoring. This expression illustrates that delays over 3 years are equivalent to reducing the monitoring performance of 12 wells to that of a much lower number of wells, or equally, having to consider higher failure costs than those assumed in current risk analyses.

  18. Identification of anthraquinone-degrading bacteria in soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A; Zhang, Zhenfa; Adrion, Alden C; Gold, Avram; Aitken, Michael D

    2015-06-01

    Quinones and other oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) are toxic and/or genotoxic compounds observed to be cocontaminants at PAH-contaminated sites, but their formation and fate in contaminated environmental systems have not been well studied. Anthracene-9,10-dione (anthraquinone) has been found in most PAH-contaminated soils and sediments that have been analyzed for oxy-PAHs. However, little is known about the biodegradation of oxy-PAHs, and no bacterial isolates have been described that are capable of growing on or degrading anthraquinone. PAH-degrading Mycobacterium spp. are the only organisms that have been investigated to date for metabolism of a PAH quinone, 4,5-pyrenequinone. We utilized DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) with [U-(13)C]anthraquinone to identify bacteria associated with anthraquinone degradation in PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site both before and after treatment in a laboratory-scale bioreactor. SIP with [U-(13)C]anthracene was also performed to assess whether bacteria capable of growing on anthracene are the same as those identified to grow on anthraquinone. Organisms closely related to Sphingomonas were the most predominant among the organisms associated with anthraquinone degradation in bioreactor-treated soil, while organisms in the genus Phenylobacterium comprised the majority of anthraquinone degraders in the untreated soil. Bacteria associated with anthracene degradation differed from those responsible for anthraquinone degradation. These results suggest that Sphingomonas and Phenylobacterium species are associated with anthraquinone degradation and that anthracene-degrading organisms may not possess mechanisms to grow on anthraquinone. PMID:25819957

  19. Magnetic Parameter Changes in Soil and Sediments in the Presence of Hydrocarbon Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, E.; Porsch, K.; Rijal, M. L.; Ameen, N. N.; Kappler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic proxies were successfully used for fast and non-destructive detection of fly ash related heavy metal pollution. Correlations of magnetic signals with organic contaminants in soils and sediments were also reported; however, their significance is unclear because of co-existing heavy metal pollution. At a hydrocarbon (HC) contaminated former military airbase (Hradcany, Czech Rep.), where heavy metal contents are insignificant, we detected clearly higher magnetic concentrations at the top of the groundwater fluctuation (GWF) zone. Frequent GWF by up to ca. one meter was caused through remediation by air sparging. In this study and all previous ones magnetite was identified as the dominant phase for higher magnetic concentrations. To determine the importance of microbial activity and soil parameters on changes in magnetic susceptibility (MS) laboratory batch experiments with different microbially active and sterile soils without carbon addition and with gasoline amendment were setup. MS of these microcosms was followed weekly. Depending on the soil MS either increased or decreased by up to ~7% and remained constant afterwards. The main findings were that MS changes were mainly microbially driven and influenced by the bioavailable Fe content, the initial MS and the organic carbon content of the soils. Moreover, we tested magnetic changes in laboratory columns, filled with sand from the field site Hradcany, by simulating water level changes. The observed changes were small and hardly statistically significant. Our laboratory studies revealed that different factors influence changes in magnetic properties of soil/sediments after HC contamination, with much smaller effects than expected from anomalies observed at field sites. With the present results, the ambitious goal of using magnetic monitoring for detecting HC contaminations by oil spills seem far from practical application.

  20. Using trees to remediate groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, S.E.; Gordon, M.P.

    1998-06-01

    'Industrial practices in the past have resulted in contamination of groundwater with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) at many DOE sites, such as Hanford and Savannah River. Such contamination is a major problem because existing groundwater remediation technologies are expensive and difficult. An inexpensive method for groundwater remediation is greatly needed. Trees could be used to remediate CHC polluted groundwater at minimal cost (phytoremediation). Before phytoremediation can be extensively applied, the authors must determine the range of compounds that are attacked, the effects of metabolic products on the plants and the environment, and the effect of transpiration and concentration of CHC on uptake and metabolism. They will test the ability of hybrid poplar to take up and transform the chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethylenes. The rate of uptake and transformation by poplar of TCE as a function of concentration in the soil, transpiration rate and illumination level will be determined. Methods will be developed to permit rapid testing of plants from contaminated sites for species able to oxidize and sequester chlorinated compounds. They will identify the nature of the bound residues of TCE metabolism in poplar. They will identify the mechanisms involved in CHC oxidation in poplar and use genetic manipulations to enhance that activity. They will introduce the genes for mammalian cytochrome P-450-IIE1, known to oxidize light CHCs such as TCE to attempt to increase the CHC metabolism capacity of poplar. The results of this research will place phytoremediation of CHCs on a firm scientific footing, allowing a rational assessment of its application to groundwater contamination. This report summarizes the results of the first 1.5 years of work on a three-year project.'

  1. Identification of Anthraquinone-Degrading Bacteria in Soil Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Adrion, Alden C.; Gold, Avram

    2015-01-01

    Quinones and other oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) are toxic and/or genotoxic compounds observed to be cocontaminants at PAH-contaminated sites, but their formation and fate in contaminated environmental systems have not been well studied. Anthracene-9,10-dione (anthraquinone) has been found in most PAH-contaminated soils and sediments that have been analyzed for oxy-PAHs. However, little is known about the biodegradation of oxy-PAHs, and no bacterial isolates have been described that are capable of growing on or degrading anthraquinone. PAH-degrading Mycobacterium spp. are the only organisms that have been investigated to date for metabolism of a PAH quinone, 4,5-pyrenequinone. We utilized DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) with [U-13C]anthraquinone to identify bacteria associated with anthraquinone degradation in PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site both before and after treatment in a laboratory-scale bioreactor. SIP with [U-13C]anthracene was also performed to assess whether bacteria capable of growing on anthracene are the same as those identified to grow on anthraquinone. Organisms closely related to Sphingomonas were the most predominant among the organisms associated with anthraquinone degradation in bioreactor-treated soil, while organisms in the genus Phenylobacterium comprised the majority of anthraquinone degraders in the untreated soil. Bacteria associated with anthracene degradation differed from those responsible for anthraquinone degradation. These results suggest that Sphingomonas and Phenylobacterium species are associated with anthraquinone degradation and that anthracene-degrading organisms may not possess mechanisms to grow on anthraquinone. PMID:25819957

  2. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in boreal forest soils: a mycorrhizal ecosystems perspective.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Susan J; McGill, William B; Massicotte, Hugues B; Rutherford, P Michael

    2007-05-01

    The importance of developing multi-disciplinary approaches to solving problems relating to anthropogenic pollution is now clearly appreciated by the scientific community, and this is especially evident in boreal ecosystems exposed to escalating threats of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contamination through expanded natural resource extraction activities. This review aims to synthesize information regarding the fate and behaviour of PHCs in boreal forest soils in both ecological and sustainable management contexts. From this, we hope to evaluate potential management strategies, identify gaps in knowledge and guide future research. Our central premise is that mycorrhizal systems, the ubiquitous root symbiotic fungi and associated food-web communities, occupy the structural and functional interface between decomposition and primary production in northern forest ecosystems (i.e. underpin survival and productivity of the ecosystem as a whole), and, as such, are an appropriate focal point for such a synthesis. We provide pertinent basic information about mycorrhizas, followed by insights into the ecology of ecto- and ericoid mycorrhizal systems. Next, we review the fate and behaviour of PHCs in forest soils, with an emphasis on interactions with mycorrhizal fungi and associated bacteria. Finally, we summarize implications for ecosystem management. Although we have gained tremendous insights into understanding linkages between ecosystem functions and the various aspects of mycorrhizal diversity, very little is known regarding rhizosphere communities in PHC-contaminated soils. This makes it difficult to translate ecological knowledge into environmental management strategies. Further research is required to determine which fungal symbionts are likely to survive and compete in various ecosystems, whether certain fungal - plant associations gain in ecological importance following contamination events, and how PHC contamination may interfere with processes of nutrient acquisition and exchange and metabolic processes. Research is also needed to assess whether the metabolic capacity for intrinsic decomposition exists in these ecosystems, taking into account ecological variables such as presence of other organisms (and their involvement in syntrophic biodegradation), bioavailability and toxicity of mixtures of PHCs, and physical changes to the soil environment. PMID:17437558

  3. Bioavailability of (Geno)toxic Contaminants in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil Before and After Biological Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Adrion, Alden C; Nakamura, Jun; Shea, Damian; Aitken, Michael D

    2014-04-01

    Contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site was treated in a laboratory-scale bioreactor. Desorbability and biodegradability of 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 4 oxygenated PAHs (oxy-PAHs) were investigated throughout a treatment cycle. Desorbability was determined using a mixed-function sorbent (Oasis() HLB) or a hydrophobic sorbent (Tenax()) in dialysis tubing suspended in the soil slurry. Toxicity and genotoxicity of the whole soil and the desorbable fractions were determined by DNA damage response analysis with the chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic cell line and its DNA repair-deficient mutant Rad54 (-/-). Biological treatment significantly removed both PAHs and oxy-PAHs, and their desorbability decreased throughout the bioreactor treatment cycle. Collectively, oxy-PAHs were more desorbable and biodegradable than the corresponding PAHs; for example, the oxy-PAH present at the highest concentration, 9,10-anthraquinone, was more desorbable and biodegradable than anthracene. For both PAHs and oxy-PAHs, the percentage removed in the bioreactor significantly exceeded the percentage desorbed from untreated soil, indicating that desorption did not control the extent of biodegradation. Consistent with previous results on the same soil, genotoxicity of the whole soil slightly increased after biological treatment. However, both toxicity and genotoxicity of the desorbable constituents in the soil decreased after treatment, suggesting that any genotoxic constituents that may have formed during treatment were primarily associated with less accessible domains in the soil. PMID:24803838

  4. PILOT-SCALE SUBCRITICAL WATER REMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON- AND PESTICIDE-CONTAMINATED SOIL. (R825394)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subcritical water (hot water under enough pressure to maintain the liquid
    state) was used to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides
    from highly contaminated soils. Laboratory-scale (8 g of soil) experiments were
    used to determine conditions f...

  5. Electron flow in acidic subsurface sediments co-contaminated with nitrate and uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Lainie; Ksel, Kirsten; Drake, Harold; Kostka, Joel E.

    2007-02-01

    The combination of low pH and high concentrations of nitrate and radionuclides in the subsurface is representative of many sites within the U.S. nuclear weapons complex managed by the Department of Energy (DOE), including the DOE's Environmental Remediation Sciences Program Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In order to provide a further understanding of the coupled microbiological and geochemical processes limiting radionuclide bioremediation, we determined the rates and pathways of terminal-electron accepting processes (TEAPs) in microcosm experiments using close to in situ conditions with ORFRC subsurface materials. At the in situ pH range of 4-5, carbon substrate utilization and TEAP rates were diminished, such that nitrate was not depleted and metal reduction was prevented. Upon biostimulation by pH neutralization and carbon substrate addition, TEAPs were stimulated to rates that rival those measured in organic-rich surficial sediments of aquatic environments, and extremely high nitrate concentrations (0.4-0.5 M) were not found to be toxic to microbial metabolism. Metal reduction under neutral pH conditions started once nitrate was depleted to low levels in response to biostimulation. Acidity controlled not only the rates but also the pathways of microbial activity. Denitrification predominated in sediments originating from neutral pH zones, while dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium occurred in neutralized acidic microcosms amended with glucose. Electron donors were determined to stimulate microbial metabolism leading to metal reduction in the following order: glucose > ethanol > lactate > hydrogen. In microcosms of neutralized acidic sediments, 80-90% of C equivalents were recovered as fermentation products, mainly as acetate. Due to the stress imposed by low pH on microbial metabolism, our results indicate that the TEAPs of acidic subsurface sediment are inherently different from those of neutral pH environments and neutralization will be necessary to achieve sufficient metabolic rates for radionuclide remediation.

  6. Trajectories of Microbial Community Function in Response to Accelerated Remediation of Subsurface Metal Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Mary

    2015-01-14

    Objectives of proposed research were to; Determine if the trajectories of microbial community composition and function following organic carbon amendment can be related to, and predicted by, key environmental determinants; Assess the relative importance of the characteristics of the indigenous microbial community, sediment, groundwater, and concentration of organic carbon amendment as the major determinants of microbial community functional response and bioremediation capacity; and Provide a fundamental understanding of the microbial community ecology underlying subsurface metal remediation requisite to successful application of accelerated remediation and long-term stewardship of DOE-IFC sites.

  7. Use of tree rings to investigate the onset of contamination of a shallow aquifer by chlorinated hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanosky, T.M.; Hansen, B.P.; Schening, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Oaks (Quercus velutina Lam.) growing over a shallow aquifer contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons were studied to determine if it was possible to estimate the approximate year that contamination began. The annual rings of some trees downgradient from the contaminant release site contained elevated concentrations of chloride possibly derived from dechlorination of contaminants. Additionally, a radial-growth decline began in these trees at approximately the same time that chloride became elevated. Growth did not decline in trees that contained smaller concentrations of chloride. The source of elevated chloride and the corresponding reductions in tree growth could not be explained by factors other than contamination. On the basis of tree-ring evidence alone, the release occurred in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Contaminant release at a second location apparently occurred in the mid- to late 1970s, suggesting that the area was used for disposal for at least 5 years and possibly longer. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Effects of rapeseed oil on the rhizodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Gartler, Jorg; Wimmer, Bernhard; Soja, Gerhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Plants have the ability to promote degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil by supporting PAH degrading microorganisms in the rhizosphere (rhizodegradation). The aim of this study was to evaluate if rapeseed oil increases rhizodegradation because various studies have shown that vegetable oils are able to act as extractants for PAHs in contaminated soils and therefore might increase bioavailability of PAHs for microbial degradation. In this study different leguminous and grass species were tested. The results suggested a significant impact of vegetable oil (1 and 3% w/w) on plant growth (decrease of plant height and biomass). The results of the pot experiment showed a decrease in the PAH content of the soil without amendment of rapeseed oil after six months. In soil amended with 1% and 3% of oil, there was no decrease in PAH content within this period. Although no enhancement of PAH degradation by plants could be measured in the bulk soil of the pot experiments, a rhizobox experiment showed a significant reduction of PAH content in the rhizosphere of alfalfa (Medicago sativa cv. Europe). Our investigations also showed significant differences in the degradation behaviour of the 16 individually analysed PAHs. PMID:24933877

  9. Surfactant-Enhanced Desorption and Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongbo; Aitken, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated two nonionic surfactants, one hydrophobic (Brij 30) and one hydrophilic (C12E8), for their ability to enhance the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil after it had been treated in an aerobic bioreactor. The effects of each surfactant were evaluated at doses corresponding to equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations well above the surfactants critical micelle concentration (CMC), slightly above the CMC, and below the CMC. The concentrations of all 3- and 4-ring PAHs were significantly lower in the soil amended with Brij 30 at the two lower doses compared to controls, whereas removal of only the 3-ring PAHs was significantly enhanced at the highest Brij 30 dose. In contrast, C12E8 did not enhance PAH removal at any dose. In the absence of surfactant, <5% of any PAH desorbed from the soil over an 18-d period. Brij 30 addition at the lowest dose significantly increased the desorption of most PAHs, whereas the addition of C12E8 at the lowest dose actually decreased the desorption of all PAHs. These findings suggest that the effects of the two surfactants on PAH biodegradation could be explained by their effects on PAH bioavailability. Overall, this study demonstrates that the properties of the surfactant and its dose relative to the corresponding aqueous-phase concentration are important factors in designing systems for surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils in which PAH bioavailability is limited. PMID:20586488

  10. Field-based supercritical fluid extraction of hydrocarbons at industrially contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Rigou, Peggy; Setford, Steven John; Saini, Selwayan

    2002-04-19

    Examination of organic pollutants in groundwaters should also consider the source of the pollution, which is often a solid matrix such as soil, landfill waste, or sediment. This premise should be viewed alongside the growing trend towards field-based characterisation of contaminated sites for reasons of speed and cost. Field-based methods for the extraction of organic compounds from solid samples are generally cumbersome, time consuming, or inefficient. This paper describes the development of a field-based supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) system for the recovery of organic contaminants (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons) from soils. A simple, compact, and robust SFE system has been constructed and was found to offer the same extraction efficiency as a well-established laboratory SFE system. Extraction optimisation was statistically evaluated using a factorial analysis procedure. Under optimised conditions, the device yielded recovery efficiencies of >70% with RSD values of 4% against the standard EPA Soxhlet method, compared with a mean recovery efficiency of 48% for a commercially available field-extraction kit. The device will next be evaluated with real samples prior to field deployment. PMID:12805963

  11. Bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a historically contaminated sediment core

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A.; Van Hoof, P.L.; Landrum, P.F.

    1995-09-01

    To determine changes in bioavailability of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with sediment aging, Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed for 4 weeks to sediment core sections taken from a contaminated lake. Core depths included surficial (0 to 4 cm), 4- to 8-, 12- to 16-, 28- to 32-, and 44- to 48-cm sections deposited for approximately 1899 to 1993, and were known to be historically contaminated with PAHs. Bioaccumulation was maximal at the 12- to 16-cm depth (circa 1967) where sediment PAH concentrations were greatest. Accumulation was generally below detection limits in the 0- to 4-cm depths, even though sediment concentrations of some compounds were comparable to those at the 12- to 16-cm depth where accumulation was great enough to generate accurate kinetics curves. Accumulation peaked at about 96 h, then declined over the remainder of the study for the lower-molecular-weight PAHs. For most higher-molecular-weight PAHs, accumulation peaked at about 2 weeks, then declined only slightly after 4 weeks. The differential bioavailability observed between surficial and at-depth core sections raises questions concerning the adequacy of results generated from toxicity and bioaccumulation tests routinely conducted surficial sediments.

  12. Contamination of stream fishes with chlorinated hydrocarbons from eggs of Great Lakes salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Merna, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. have been stocked in the Great Lakes where they accumulate body burdens of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The transport of these contaminants to resident communities in spawning streams was studied in two tributaries of Lake Michigan accessible to anadromous spawners and one control tributary blocked to them. No polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT, or dieldrin were detected in the sediments or biota of the control stream, or in sediments of the test streams. However, trout Salmo spp. and, to a lesser extent, sculpins Cottus spp. accumulated PCBs and DDT as a result of eating contaminated salmon eggs. Eggs constituted as much as 87% (by weight) of the total stomach contents of trout collected during the salmon spawning season early October to early January. Salmon eggs contained 0.46-9.50 mg PCBs/kg,. and 0.14-1.80 mg DDT/kg. Consumption of eggs varied greatly among individual trout, and there was a strong correlation between numbers of eggs in the stomachs and PCB and DDT concentrations in the fillets.

  13. Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Jasrotia, Puja; Green, Stefan; Canion, Andy; Overholt, Will; Prakash, Om; Wafula, Dennis; Hubbard, Daniela; Watson, David B; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Kostka,

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

  14. Leaching of human pathogens in repacked soil lysimeters and contamination of potato tubers under subsurface drip irrigation in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Anita; Plauborg, Finn; Andersen, Mathias Neumann; Markussen, Bo; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-10-01

    The risk for contamination of potatoes and groundwater through subsurface drip irrigation with low quality water was explored in 30 large-scale lysimeters containing repacked coarse sand and sandy loam soils. The human pathogens, Salmonella Senftenberg, Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli O157:H7, and the virus indicator Salmonella Typhimurium bacteriophage 28B, were added weekly through irrigation tubes for one month with low irrigation rates (8mm per week). In the following six months lysimeters were irrigated with groundwater free of pathogens. Two weeks after irrigation was started, phage 28B was detected in low concentrations (2pfuml(-1)) in leachate from both sandy loam soil and coarse sand lysimeters. After 27 days, phage 28B continued to be present in similar concentrations in leachate from lysimeters containing coarse sand, while no phage were found in lysimeters with sandy loam soil. The added bacterial pathogens were not found in any leachate samples during the entire study period of 212 days. Under the study conditions with repacked soil, limited macropores and low water velocity, bacterial pathogens seemed to be retained in the soil matrix and died-off before leaching to groundwater. However, viruses may leach to groundwater and represent a health risk as for some viruses only few virus particles are needed to cause human disease. The bacterial pathogens and the phage 28B were found on the potato samples harvested just after the application of microbial tracers was terminated. The findings of bacterial pathogens and phage 28 on all potato samples suggest that the main risk associated with subsurface drip irrigation with low quality water is faecal contamination of root crops, in particular those consumed raw. PMID:21762945

  15. Chromium transport in an acidic waste contaminated subsurface medium: The role of reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Dresel, P. Evan; Ilton, Eugene S.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.

    2010-11-22

    A series of wet chemical extractions and column experiments, combined with electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, were conducted to estimate the extent of contaminant Cr(VI) desorption and determine the mechanism(s) of Cr(VI) attenuation in contaminated and naturally aged (decades) Hanford sediments which were exposed to dichromate and acidic waste solutions. Results from wet extractions demonstrated that contaminated sediments contained a large fraction of tightly-bound Cr. Results from column experiments showed that effluent Cr(VI) concentrations were low and only a small percentage of the total Cr inventory was released from the contaminated sediments, demonstrating again low Cr mobility. EMPA inspections showed that Cr contamination was spread throughout sediment matrix and high-concentrated Cr spots were not apparently present. XPS analyses showed that most surface Cr was Cr(III). Reduced Cr(III) was spatially associated with Fe, which occurred mostly as Fe(III). Neoprecipitates were most likely Cr(III) oxyhydroxides or [Cr(III) Fe(III)] solid solutions. Extensive reduction to Cr(III) limited dramatically mass flux from this source. The following multiple-step mechanism was most likely operational in the contaminated sediments: acid promoted dissolution of Fe(II)-bearing soil minerals and/or their surface coatings, release of Fe(II) in the aqueous phase, abiotic homogeneous and/or heterogeneous Cr(VI) reduction by aqueous, sorbed and/or structural Fe(II), formation of insoluble Cr(III) phases or [Cr(III) Fe(III)] solid solutions.

  16. Cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols in contaminated soil slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Ian J. Allan; Kirk T. Semple; Rina Hare; Brian J. Reid

    2007-08-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the relative contribution of soil catabolic activity, contaminant bioaccessibility, and nutrient levels on the biodegradation of field-aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds in three municipal gas plant site soils. Extents of biodegradation achieved, in 6 week-long soil slurry assays, under the following conditions were compared: (i) with inoculation of catabolically active PAH and phenol-degrading microorganisms, (ii) with and without hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin supplementation (HPCD; 100 g L{sup -1}), and finally (iii) with the provision of additional inorganic nutrients in combination with HPCD. Results indicated no significant (p {lt} 0.05) differences between biodegradation endpoints attained in treatments inoculated with catabolically active microorganisms as compared with the uninoculated control. Amendments with HPCD significantly (p {lt} 0.05) lowered biodegradation endpoints for most PAHs and phenolic compounds. Only in one soil did the combination of HPCD and nutrients consistently achieve better bioremediation endpoints with respect to the HPCD-only treatments. Thus, for most compounds, biodegradation was not limited by the catabolic activity of the indigenous microorganisms but rather by processes resulting in limited availability of contaminants to degraders. It is therefore suggested that the bioremediation of PAH and phenol impacted soils could be enhanced through HPCD amendments. In addition, the biodegradability of in situ and spiked (deuterated analogues) PAHs following 120 days aging of the soils suggested that this contact time was not sufficient to obtain similar partitions to that observed for field-aged contaminants; with the spiked compounds being significantly (p {lt} 0.05) more available for biodegradation. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols in contaminated soil slurries.

    PubMed

    Allan, Ian J; Semple, Kirk T; Hare, Rina; Reid, Brian J

    2007-08-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the relative contribution of soil catabolic activity, contaminant bioaccessibility, and nutrient levels on the biodegradation of field-aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds in three municipal gas plant site soils. Extents of biodegradation achieved, in 6 week-long soil slurry assays, under the following conditions were compared: (i) with inoculation of catabolically active PAH and phenol-degrading microorganisms, (ii) with and without hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin supplementation (HPCD; 100 g L(-1)), and finally (iii) with the provision of additional inorganic nutrients in combination with HPCD. Results indicated no significant (p < 0.05) differences between biodegradation endpoints attained in treatments inoculated with catabolically active microorganisms as compared with the uninoculated control. Amendments with HPCD significantly (p < 0.05) lowered biodegradation endpoints for most PAHs and phenolic compounds. Only in one soil did the combination of HPCD and nutrients consistently achieve better bioremediation endpoints with respect to the HPCD-only treatments. Thus, for most compounds, biodegradation was not limited by the catabolic activity of the indigenous microorganisms but rather by processes resulting in limited availability of contaminants to degraders. It is therefore suggested that the bioremediation of PAH and phenol impacted soils could be enhanced through HPCD amendments. In addition, the biodegradability of in situ and spiked (deuterated analogues) PAHs following 120 days aging of the soils suggested that this contact time was not sufficient to obtain similar partitions to that observed for field-aged contaminants; with the spiked compounds being significantly (p < 0.05) more available for biodegradation. PMID:17822123

  18. Effects of climatic modalities on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) availability and attenuation in historically contaminated Technosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagois, Robin; Schwartz, Christophe; Faure, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Since the decline of industrial activities in France, large areas of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs)-contaminated soils have remained derelict. Thus, the fate of PAHs in such soils through natural attenuation process needs to be assessed. On the long-term scale (10-100 years), climate will greatly contribute to the evolution of soil physico-chemical properties and by consequences PAHs availability. In our study, we examined the effect of three contrasted climatic conditions (freeze-thawing, wetting-drying and high temperature) on soil aging processes of 11 historically contaminated soils and consequences on the availability of polycyclic aromatic compounds (including the 16 priority pollutants PAHs). Batch experiments were set-up for each modality; freeze-dried soil underwent variation of humidity and/or temperature. In a first step, PACs availability was roughly evaluated, with a water-extraction method using a H2O2 + CaCl2 solution. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content was measured in these extracts before and after applying the climatic modalities. Difference in DOC indicated an effect of the climatic modality on PACs availability. If an effect was noticed, available PACs was then accurately measured using (i) an hydrogen-peroxide oxidation on the soils followed (ii) a dichloromethane (DCM) extraction and a Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) quantification of the remaining PACs (i.e. unavailable). Variation of PACs availability will greatly help to understand the mechanisms associated between PACs desorption/sequestration and the abiotic influence of climate. Results of this work will further help understanding and predict the rate of natural attenuation of PACs in contaminated soils for the incoming decades.

  19. Bioremediation of heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons in diesel contaminated soil with the earthworm: Eudrilus eugeniae.

    PubMed

    Ekperusi, Ogheneruemu Abraham; Aigbodion, Iruobe Felix

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory study on the bioremediation of diesel contaminated soil with the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae (Kingberg) was conducted. 5 ml of diesel was contaminated into soils in replicates and inoculated with E. eugeniae for 90 days. Physicochemical parameters, heavy metals and total petroleum hydrocarbons were analyzed using AAS. BTEX in contaminated soil and tissues of earthworms were determined with GC-FID. The activities of earthworms resulted in a decrease in pH (3.0 %), electrical conductivity (60.66 %), total nitrogen (47.37 %), chloride (60.66 %), total organic carbon (49.22 %), sulphate (60.59 %), nitrate (60.65 %), phosphate (60.80 %), sodium (60.65 %), potassium (60.67 %), calcium (60.67 %), magnesium (60.68 %), zinc (60.59 %), manganese (60.72 %), copper (60.68 %), nickel (60.58 %), cadmium (60.44 %), vanadium (61.19 %), chromium (53.60 %), lead (60.38 %), mercury (61.11 %), arsenic (80.85 %), TPH (84.99 %). Among the BTEX constituents, only benzene (8.35 %) was detected in soil at the end of the study. Earthworm tissue analysis showed varying levels of TPH (57.35 %), benzene (38.91 %), toluene (27.76 %), ethylbenzene (42.16 %) and xylene (09.62 %) in E. eugeniae at the end of the study. The study has shown that E. eugeniae could be applied as a possible bioremediator in diesel polluted soil. PMID:26413446

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic responses of a riverine microbial community to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Langworthy, D.E.; Findlay, R.H.; Stapleton, R.D.; Sayler, G.S.

    1998-09-01

    The phenotypic and genotypic adaptation of a freshwater sedimentary microbial community to elevated levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined by using an integrated biomolecular approach. Central to the approach was the use of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles to characterize the microbial community structure and nucleic acid analysis to quantify the frequency of degradative genes. The study site was the Little Scioto River, a highly impacted, channelized riverine system located in central Ohio. This study site is a unique lotic system, with all sampling stations having similar flow and sediment characteristics both upstream and downstream from the source of contamination. These characteristics allowed for the specific analysis of PAH impact on the microbial community. PAH concentrations in impacted sediments ranged from 22 to 217 {micro}g g(dry weight) of sediment{sup {minus}1}, while PAH concentrations in ambient sediments ranged from below detection levels to 1.5 {micro}g g (dry weight) of sediment{sup {minus}1}. Total microbial biomass measured by phospholipid phosphate (PLP) analysis ranged from 95 to 345 nmol of PLP g(dry weight) of sediment{sup {minus}1}. Nucleic acid analysis showed the presence of PAH-degradative genes at all sites, although observed frequencies were typically higher at contaminated sites. Principal component analysis of PLFA profiles indicated that moderate to high PAH concentrations altered microbial community structure and that seasonal changes were comparable in magnitude to the effects of PAH pollution. These data indicate that this community responded to PAH contamination at both the phenotypic and the genotypic level.

  1. The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    David Watson

    2005-04-18

    Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies.

  2. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn; Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth

    2012-07-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites. (authors)

  3. Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond cryogenic barrier technology demonstration: Pre-barrier subsurface hydrology and contaminant transport investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Moline, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    The Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond is the site of a former impoundment for radioactive wastes that has since been drained, filled with soil, and covered with an asphalt cap. The site is bordered to the east and south by a tributary that empties into Melton Branch Creek and that contains significant concentrations of radioactive contaminants, primarily {sup 90}Sr. Because of the proximity of the tributary to the HRE disposal site and the probable flow of groundwater from the site to the tributary, it is hypothesized that the HRE Pond is a source of contamination to he creek. As a means for temporary containment of contaminants within the impoundment, a cryogenic barrier technology demonstration was initiated in FY96 with a background hydrologic investigation that continued through FY97. Cryogenic equipment installation was completed in FY97, and freezing was initiated in September of 1997. This report documents the results of a hydrologic and geologic investigation of the HRE Pond/cryogenic barrier site. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the hydrologic conditions within and around the impoundment in order to meet the following objectives: (1) to provide a pre-barrier subsurface hydrologic baseline for post-barrier performance assessment; (2) to confirm that the impoundment is hydraulically connected to the surrounding sediments; and (3) to determine the likely contaminant exit pathways from the impoundment. The methods of investigation included water level and temperature monitoring in a network of wells and standpipes in and surrounding the impoundment, a helium tracer test conducted under ambient flow conditions, and geologic logging during the drilling of boreholes for installation of cryogenic probes and temperature monitoring wells.

  4. Improved management of winter operations to limit subsurface contamination with degradable deicing chemicals in cold regions.

    PubMed

    French, Helen K; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of management considerations required for better control of deicing chemicals in the unsaturated zone at sites with winter maintenance operations in cold regions. Degradable organic deicing chemicals are the main focus. The importance of the heterogeneity of both the infiltration process, due to frozen ground and snow melt including the contact between the melting snow cover and the soil, and unsaturated flow is emphasised. In this paper, the applicability of geophysical methods for characterising soil heterogeneity is considered, aimed at modelling and monitoring changes in contamination. To deal with heterogeneity, a stochastic modelling framework may be appropriate, emphasizing the more robust spatial and temporal moments. Examples of a combination of different field techniques for measuring subsoil properties and monitoring contaminants and integration through transport modelling are provided by the SoilCAM project and previous work. Commonly, the results of flow and contaminant fate modelling are quite detailed and complex and require post-processing before communication and advising stakeholders. The managers' perspectives with respect to monitoring strategies and challenges still unresolved have been analysed with basis in experience with research collaboration with one of the case study sites, Oslo airport, Gardermoen, Norway. Both scientific challenges of monitoring subsoil contaminants in cold regions and the effective interaction between investigators and management are illustrated. PMID:24281673

  5. MICROBIAL PROCESSES AFFECTING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the alternatives considered for the remediation of soil and ground water at hazardous wastes sites are the use of natural processes to reduce or remove the contaminants of concern. Under favorable conditions, the use of natural attenuation can result in significant cost sa...

  6. Bacterial communities of surface and deep hydrocarbon-contaminated waters of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Nigro, L. M.; McKay, L.; Ziervogel, K.; Gutierrez, T.; Teske, A.

    2010-12-01

    We performed a 16S rRNA gene sequencing survey of bacterial communities within oil-contaminated surface water, deep hydrocarbon plume water, and deep water samples above and below the plume to determine spatial and temporal patterns of oil-degrading bacteria growing in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. In addition, we are reporting 16S rRNA sequencing results from time series incubation, enrichment and cultivation experiments. Surface oil slick samples were collected 3 nautical miles from ground zero, (5/6/10, RV Pelican) and were added to uncontaminated surface water (collected within a 30 nautical mile radius of ground zero, 5/6/10 - 5/9/10, RV Pelican). This mixture was incubated for 20 days in a rolling bottle at 25C. 16S rRNA clone libraries from marine snow-like microbial flocs that had formed during the incubation yielded a highly diverse bacterial community, predominately composed of the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, and a smaller number of Planktomycetes and other bacterial lineages. The most frequently recovered proteobacterial sequences were closely related to cultured species of the genus Cycloclasticus, specialists in aerobic oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. These time series incubation results will be compared to the microbial community structure of contaminated surface water, sampled on the same cruise with RV Pelican (5/6/10-5/9/10) and frozen immediately. Stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments with C13-labelled alkanes and polycyclic aromatic substrates and gulf water samples have yielded different enrichments. With naphthalene, predominantly Alteromonas-related clones and a smaller share of Cycloclasticus clones were recovered; phenanthrene yielded predominantly clones related to Cycloclasticus, and diverse other Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria. Analyses of SIP experiments with hexadecane are in progress. The microbial community composition of the deep hydrocarbon plume was characterized using water column profile samples taken with RV Walton Smith on May 30, at station WS 46 near the leak (28N659.35; 88W.43498). Water was collected and filtered from above the plume (800 m), within the plume (1170 m and 1210 m) and below the plume (1320 m) as indicated by Color Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) measurements. Clone libraries of both plume samples were dominated by a cluster of closely related 16S rRNA clones within the Oceanospirillales. The closest relatives were aerobic alkane oxidizers of the genera Oleispira and Thalassolituus. In contrast, the water samples above and below the plume showed distinct, diverse bacterial communities that lacked the characteristic clones of the hydrocarbon plume. Analysis of additional water samples from different locations and time points will further resolve spatial and temporal dynamics of oil degrading microbes in the water column. Thus far, our results indicate a stratified bacterial community in the oil-polluted water column with distinct types of oil-degrading bacteria in surface oil slicks and finely dispersed deepwater plumes.

  7. An integrated bioremediation process for petroleum hydrocarbons removal and odor mitigation from contaminated marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Lo, Irene M C; Yan, Dickson Y S

    2015-10-15

    This study developed a novel integrated bioremediation process for the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and the mitigation of odor induced by reduced sulfur from contaminated marine sediment. The bioremediation process consisted of two phases. In Phase I, acetate was dosed into the sediment as co-substrate to facilitate the sulfate reduction process. Meanwhile, akaganeite (β-FeOOH) was dosed in the surface layer of the sediment to prevent S(2-) release into the overlying seawater. In Phase II, NO3(-) was injected into the sediment as an electron acceptor to facilitate the denitrification process. After 20 weeks of treatment, the sequential integration of the sulfate reduction and denitrification processes led to effective biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), in which about 72% of TPH was removed. In Phase I, the release of S(2-) was effectively controlled by the addition of akaganeite. The oxidation of S(2-) by Fe(3+) and the precipitation of S(2-) by Fe(2+) were the main mechanisms for S(2-) removal. In Phase II, the injection of NO3(-) completely inhibited the sulfate reduction process. Most of residual AVS and S(0) were removed within 4 weeks after NO3(-) injection. The 16S rRNA clone library-based analysis revealed a distinct shift of bacterial community structure in the sediment over different treatment phases. The clones affiliated with Desulfobacterales and Desulfuromonadales were the most abundant in Phase I, while the clones related to Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus, Thiohalomonas nitratireducens and Sulfurimonas denitrificans predominated in Phase II. PMID:26117370

  8. Microbial diversity and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation potential in an oil-contaminated mangrove sediment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mangrove forests are coastal wetlands that provide vital ecosystem services and serve as barriers against natural disasters like tsunamis, hurricanes and tropical storms. Mangroves harbour a large diversity of organisms, including microorganisms with important roles in nutrient cycling and availability. Due to tidal influence, mangroves are sites where crude oil from spills farther away can accumulate. The relationship between mangrove bacterial diversity and oil degradation in mangrove sediments remains poorly understood. Results Mangrove sediment was sampled from 0–5, 15–20 and 35–40 cm depth intervals from the Suruí River mangrove (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), which has a history of oil contamination. DGGE fingerprinting for bamA, dsr and 16S rRNA encoding fragment genes, and qPCR analysis using dsr and 16S rRNA gene fragment revealed differences with sediment depth. Conclusions Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity revealed changes with depth. DGGE for bamA and dsr genes shows that the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community profile also changed between 5 and 15 cm depth, and is similar in the two deeper sediments, indicating that below 15 cm the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community appears to be well established and homogeneous in this mangrove sediment. qPCR analysis revealed differences with sediment depth, with general bacterial abundance in the top layer (0–5 cm) being greater than in both deeper sediment layers (15–20 and 35–40 cm), which were similar to each other. PMID:22935169

  9. Microbial diversity in a hydrocarbon- and chlorinated-solvent- contaminated aquifer undergoing intrinsic bioremediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dojka, M.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Haack, S.K.; Pace, N.R.

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic approach was used to survey constituents of microbial communities associated with an aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons (mainly jet fuel) and chlorinated solvents undergoing intrinsic bioremediation. Samples were obtained from three redox zones: methanogenic, methanogenic-sulfate reducing, and iron or sulfate reducing. Small-subunit rRNA genes were amplified directly from aquifer material DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria- or Archaea-specific primers and were cloned. A total of 812 clones were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), approximately 50% of which were unique. All RFLP types that occurred more than once in the libraries, as well as many of the unique types, were sequenced. A total of 104 (94 bacterial and 10 archaeal) sequence types were determined. Of the 94 bacterial sequence types, 10 have no phylogenetic association with known taxonomic divisions and are phylogenetically grouped in six novel division level groups (candidate divisions WS1 to WS6); 21 belong to four recently described candidate divisions with no cultivated representatives (OPS, OP8, OP10, and OP11); and 63 are phylogenetically associated with 10 well-recognized divisions. The physiology of two particularly abundant sequence types obtained from the methanogenic zone could be inferred from their phylogenetic association with groups of microorganisms with a consistent phenotype. One of these sequence types is associated with the genus Syntrophus; Syntrophus spp. produce energy from the anaerobic oxidation of organic acids, with the production of acetate and hydrogen. The organism represented by the other sequence type is closely related to Methanosaeta spp., which are known to be capable of energy generation only through aceticlastic methanogenesis. We hypothesize, therefore, that the terminal step of hydrocarbon degradation in the methanogenic zone of the aquifer is aceticlastic methanogenesis and that the microorganisms represented by these two sequence types occur in syntrophic association.

  10. PROGRESS REPORT. FIXATION MECHANISMS AND DESORPTION RATES OF SORBED CS IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS: IMPLICATIONS TO FUTURE BEHAVIOR AND IN-GROUND STABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project is focused on defining the in-ground geochemistry of sorbed 137Cs released from high-level waste tanks, so that better future projections can be made of Cs mobility in the vadose zone. The project will study Cs-contaminated subsurface sediments from various Hanford t...

  11. Rigorous Modeling of Contaminant Removal from the Subsurface by Soil Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzek, Tadeus W.

    1996-03-01

    Fully compositional and nonisothermal numerical simulators have found their way into Environmental Engineering. The research codes in use, e.g., Berkeley's Multicomponent Multiphase Nonisothermal Organics Transport Simulator, M2NOTS, are still user-hostile and, therefore, difficult to use by the uninitiated. Nevertheless, such codes are quite general and robust, and make it possible to model rigorously transport of several contaminants which can flow as solutes, a separate organic phase, or a gas. They may also adsorb on the rock surface, evaporate or condense, float on the water table or sink. The contaminants may be spilled at the surface or injected. M2NOTS allows us to incorporate complex 3D system geologies, e.g. clay lenses or fractures. Its modular structure lets us change easily the Equation-of-State Package and add new features. For example, we are now able to model the simultaneous injection of steam and electrical current to heat up wet contaminated soil. In this presentation, I will briefly describe the physics and thermodynamics of the multicomponent and nonisothermal contaminant transport models, an integrated finite-difference implementation, and will give several examples of contaminant removal in the air and water zone with or without active aquifer. The contaminants will be multicomponent, with different boiling temperatures, and they will be removed by the injection of steam, hot air, both dry and wet, and electrical current. Finally, I will introduce the next generation of simulators under development at Berkeley. We use time split methods (with a sequential approach) for multidimensional nonisothermal flow equations in porous media. I will show splitting of the advection diffusion equation (flow equation) and a parabolic pressure equation. The advection-diffusion is modeled by a predictor (High Order Godunov Scheme) and a corrector (Crank Nicholson with full multigrid). Then the pressure equation is solved by another multigrid routine. The method represents accurately the physics of the problem by calculating the advection and the diffusion terms at different sequential steps. It can be shown that the number of operations per time step is Nlog(N) where N is the number of grid points in the computational domain. This approach will allow us to solve much bigger problems much faster, compared with the classical simulators.

  12. An electrokinetic/Fe0 permeable reactive barrier system for the treatment of nitrate-contaminated subsurface soils.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tasuma; Oyama, Yukinori; Moribe, Mai; Niinae, Masakazu

    2012-03-01

    Effective nitrate removal by Fe(0) permeable reactive barriers (Fe(0) PRB) has been recognized as a challenging task because the iron corrosion product foamed on Fe(0) hinders effective electron transfer from Fe(0) to surface-bound nitrate. The objectives of this study were (i) to demonstrate the effectiveness of an electrokinetic/Fe(0) PRB system for remediating nitrate-contaminated low permeability soils using a bench-scale system and (ii) to deepen the understanding of the behavior and fate of nitrate in the system. Bench-scale laboratory experiments were designed to investigate the influence of the Fe(0) content in the permeable reactive barrier, the pH in the anode well, and the applied voltage on remediation efficiency. The experimental results showed that the major reaction product of nitrate reduction by Fe(0) was ammonium and that nitrate reduction efficiency was significantly influenced by the variables investigated in this study. Nitrate reduction efficiency was enhanced by either increasing the Fe(0) content in the Fe(0) reactive barrier or decreasing the initial anode pH. However, nitrate reduction efficiency was reduced by increasing the applied voltage from 10V to 40V due to the insufficient reaction time during nitrate migration through the Fe(0) PRB. For all experimental conditions, nearly all nitrate nitrogen was recovered in either anode or cathode wells as nitrate or ammonium within 100h, demonstrating the effectiveness of the system for remediating nitrate-contaminated subsurface soils. PMID:22153957

  13. Phytoremediation of hydrocarbon contaminants in subantarctic soils: an effective management option.

    PubMed

    Bramley-Alves, Jessica; Wasley, Jane; King, Catherine K; Powell, Shane; Robinson, Sharon A

    2014-09-01

    Accidental fuel spills on world heritage subantarctic Macquarie Island have caused considerable contamination. Due to the island's high latitude position, its climate, and its fragile ecosystem, traditional methods of remediation are unsuitable for on-site clean up. We investigated the tolerance of a subantarctic native tussock grass, Poa foliosa (Hook. f.), to Special Antarctic Blend (SAB) diesel fuel and its potential to reduce SAB fuel contamination via phytoremediation. Toxicity of SAB fuel to P. foliosa was assessed in an 8 month laboratory growth trial under growth conditions which simulated the island's environment. Single seedlings were planted into 1 L pots of soil spiked with SAB fuel at concentrations of 1000, 5 000, 10,000, 2000 and 40,000 mg/kg (plus control). Plants were harvested at 0, 2, 4 and 8 months and a range of plant productivity endpoints were measured (biomass production, plant morphology and photosynthetic efficiency). Poa foliosa was highly tolerant across all SAB fuel concentrations tested with respect to biomass, although higher concentrations of 20,000 and 40,000 mg SAB/kg soil caused slight reductions in leaf length, width and area. To assess the phytoremediation potential of P. foliosa (to 10 000 mg/kg), soil from the planted pots was compared with that from paired unplanted pots at each SAB fuel concentration. The effect of the plant on SAB fuel concentrations and the associated microbial communities found within the soil (total heterotrophs and hydrocarbon degraders) were compared between planted and unplanted treatments at the 0, 2, 4 and 8 month harvest periods. The presence of plants resulted in significantly less SAB fuel in soils at 2 months and a return to background concentration by 8 months. Microbes did not appear to be the sole driving force behind the observed hydrocarbon loss. This study provides evidence that phytoremediation using P. foliosa is a valuable remediation option for use at Macquarie Island, and may be applicable to the management of fuel spills in other cold climate regions. PMID:24836716

  14. Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation in Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects On Contaminant Fate and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Redden, George D.; Yoshiko Fujita; Scheibe, Tim; Smith, Robert; Reddy, Michael; Kelly, Shelly

    2006-06-01

    Reactive mixing fronts can occur at large scales, e.g. when chemical amendments are injected in wells, or at small scales (pore-scales) when reactive intermediates are being generated in situ at grain boundaries, cell surfaces and adjacent to biofilms. The product of the reactions such as mineral precipitates, biofilms or filtered colloids modifies permeability leading to the complex coupling between flow and reactions and precipitation. The objectives are to determine how precipitates are distributed within large and small scale mixing fronts, how permeability and flow is modified by precipitation, how the mobility of a representative contaminant, strontium, is affected by the precipitation of carbonates, and how subsequent dissolution of the carbonates result in mobilization of Sr and increased flow. The desired outcomes of the project are to help develop methods leading to sequestration of metal contaminants, and to determine how macroscopic field-scale modeling can be applied to predict the outcome of remediation activities.

  15. Temporal and spatial changes of terminal electron-accepting processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer and the significance for contaminant biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    1994-05-01

    Measurements of dissolved hydrogen and other biologically active solutes in groundwater from a shallow petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer indicate that the distribution of microbial terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs), such as methanogenesis, sulfate reduction, and ferric iron (Fe (III)) reduction, is highly dynamic in both time and space. Delivery of sulfate to methanogenic zones by infiltrating recharge or lateral transport can result in a TEAP shift from methanogenesis to sulfate reduction. Conversely, lack of recharge and consumption of available sulfate can result in a shift from sulfate reduction to methanogenesis. Temporal shifts between sulfate and Fe (III) reduction were also observed. Time lags associated with TEAP shifts ranged from less than 10 days to about months. The relation between TEAP and biodegradation rates of a variety of organic compounds indicate that biodegradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons probably vary temporally and spatially in a contaminated aquifer.

  16. Slurry-phase ozonation for remediation of sediments contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu; Hong, P K Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of toxic, persistent, bioaccumulating organic compounds containing two or more fused aromatic rings. They are listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as priority pollutants because of their carcinogenicity and toxicity. Employing ozonation as a remediation technique, this work investigated the treatability of a sediment sample from a freshwater boat slip subjected to coal tar contamination over a long period. The contaminated sediment sample contained high levels of PAHs in the forms of naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene, among other byproducts present in the humic and solid phases of the sediment. The objectives of this work were to examine (1) the degradation of PAHs in the contaminated sediment as treated by ozonation in the slurry form, (2) the effects of ozonation upon the soil matrix and the biodegradability of the resultant PAH intermediates, and (3) the feasibility of a combined technique using O3 as a pretreatment followed by biological degradation. The sediment was made into 3% w/w soil slurries and ozonated in a 1.7-L semi-batch, well-stirred reactor equipped with pH control and a cold trap for the gaseous effluent. Samples were collected after different ozonation durations and tested for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), UV absorbance, and toxicity, along with quantitative and qualitative determinations of the parent and daughter intermediates using gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID), GC/mass spectrometry (MS), and ion chromatography (IC) techniques. The GC/MS technique identified 16 compounds associated with the humic and solid phases of the sediment. Intermediates identified at different ozonation times suggested that the degradation of PAHs was initiated by an O3 attack resulting in ring cleavage, followed by the intermediates' oxidation reactions with O3 and the concomitant OH radical toward their mineralization. Results suggested that ozonation for 2 hr removed 50-100% of various PAHs in the solid and liquid phases (as well as the aqueous and gaseous media resulting from the treatment process) of the sediment sample and that organic and inorganic constituents of the sediment were also altered by ozonation. Measurements and comparisons of BOD, COD, UV absorbance, and toxicity of the samples further suggested that ozonation improved the bioavailability and biodegradability of the contaminants, despite the increased toxicity of the treatment effluent. An integrated chemical-biological system appeared to be feasible for treating recalcitrant compounds. PMID:15152665

  17. A combined approach of physicochemical and biological methods for the characterization of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Masakorala, Kanaji; Yao, Jun; Chandankere, Radhika; Liu, Haijun; Liu, Wenjuan; Cai, Minmin; Choi, Martin M F

    2014-01-01

    Main physicochemical and microbiological parameters of collected petroleum-contaminated soils with different degrees of contamination from DaGang oil field (southeast of Tianjin, northeast China) were comparatively analyzed in order to assess the influence of petroleum contaminants on the physicochemical and microbiological properties of soil. An integration of microcalorimetric technique with urease enzyme analysis was used with the aim to assess a general status of soil metabolism and the potential availability of nitrogen nutrient in soils stressed by petroleum-derived contaminants. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of contaminated soils varied from 752.3 to 29,114 mg kg(?1). Although the studied physicochemical and biological parameters showed variations dependent on TPH content, the correlation matrix showed also highly significant correlation coefficients among parameters, suggesting their utility in describing a complex matrix such as soil even in the presence of a high level of contaminants. The microcalorimetric measures gave evidence of microbial adaptation under highest TPH concentration; this would help in assessing the potential of a polluted soil to promote self-degradation of oil-derived hydrocarbon under natural or assisted remediation. The results highlighted the importance of the application of combined approach in the study of those parameters driving the soil amelioration and bioremediation. PMID:23797708

  18. (The role of colloidal particles on the subsurface transport of contaminants)

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1990-02-22

    The primary purpose of this foreign travel was to attend the 10th meeting of the European Community's CoCo (colloids and complexation) Club to learn about research on groundwater colloids in Europe and inform the CoCo participants about the colloid subprogram of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Science Program. The goal of CoCo Club research, and of the umbrella MIRAGE (MIgration of RAdionuclides in the GEosphere) Project, is to develop data and understanding necessary to complete safety assessments for licensing nuclear repositories in Europe. The emphasis of CoCo Club research is sorption of radionuclides to organic and inorganic colloidal particles. The traveler also visited the British Geological Survey (BGS) headquarters and a BGS field site. Discussions focused on development of innovative drilling equipment for minimizing aquifer disturbance, development and application of computerized resistivity tomography for aquifer characterization, and laboratory research on the role of organic matter on metal transport. The trip was successful in that the traveler obtained a comprehensive overview of European research on groundwater colloids which will help improve and focus DOE's colloid subprogram, and the traveler learned about advances in specific areas that will contribute to his own DOE-funded project.

  19. Intrinsic bioremediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater at a petroleum-hydrocarbon spill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. F.; Kao, C. M.; Chen, T. Y.; Weng, C. H.; Tsai, C. T.

    2006-06-01

    An oil-refining plant site located in southern Taiwan has been identified as a petroleum-hydrocarbon [mainly methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)] spill site. In this study, groundwater samples collected from the site were analyzed to assess the occurrence of intrinsic MTBE biodegradation. Microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of biodegrading MTBE by indigenous microorganisms under aerobic, cometabolic, iron reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results from the field investigation and microbial enumeration indicate that the intrinsic biodegradation of MTBE and BTEX is occurring and causing the decrease in MTBE and BTEX concentrations. Microcosm results show that the indigenous microorganisms were able to biodegrade MTBE under aerobic conditions using MTBE as the sole primary substrate. The detected biodegradation byproduct, tri-butyl alcohol (TBA), can also be biodegraded by the indigenous microorganisms. In addition, microcosms with site groundwater as the medium solution show higher MTBE biodegradation rate. This indicates that the site groundwater might contain some trace minerals or organics, which could enhance the MTBE biodegradation. Results show that the addition of BTEX at low levels could also enhance the MTBE removal. No MTBE removal was detected in iron reducing and methanogenic microcosms. This might be due to the effects of low dissolved oxygen (approximately 0.3 mg/L) within the plume. The low iron reducers and methanogens (<1.8×103 cell/g of soil) observed in the aquifer also indicate that the iron reduction and methanogenesis are not the dominant biodegradation patterns in the contaminant plume. Results from the microcosm study reveal that preliminary laboratory study is required to determine the appropriate substrates and oxidation-reduction conditions to enhance the biodegradation of MTBE. Results suggest that in situ or on-site aerobic bioremediation using indigenous microorganisms would be a feasible technology to clean up this MTBE-contaminated site.

  20. Plant responses to a phytomanaged urban technosol contaminated by trace elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lilian; Sabaris, Celestino-Quintela; Desjardins, Dominic; Oustrière, Nadège; Pesme, Eric; Butin, Damien; Wicart, Gaetan; Mench, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Medicago sativa was cultivated at a former harbor facility near Bordeaux (France) to phytomanage a soil contaminated by trace elements (TE) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In parallel, a biotest with Phaseolus vulgaris was carried out on potted soils from 18 sub-sites to assess their phytotoxicity. Total soil TE and PAH concentrations, TE concentrations in the soil pore water, the foliar ionome of M. sativa (at the end of the first growth season) and of Populus nigra growing in situ, the root and shoot biomass and the foliar ionome of P. vulgaris were determined. Despite high total soil TE, soluble TE concentrations were generally low, mainly due to alkaline soil pH (7.8-8.6). Shoot dry weight (DW) yield and foliar ionome of P. vulgaris did not reflect the soil contamination, but its root DW yield decreased at highest soil TE and/or PAH concentrations. Foliar ionomes of M. sativa and P. nigra growing in situ were generally similar to the ones at uncontaminated sites. M. sativa contributed to bioavailable TE stripping by shoot removal (in g ha(-1) harvest(-1)): As 0.9, Cd 0.3, Cr 0.4, Cu 16.1, Ni 2.6, Pb 4, and Zn 134. After 1 year, 72 plant species were identified in the plant community across three subsets: (I) plant community developed on bare soil sowed with M. sativa; (II) plant community developed in unharvested plots dominated by grasses; and (III) plant community developed on unsowed bare soil. The shoot DW yield (in mg ha(-1) harvest(-1)) varied from 1.1 (subset I) to 6.9 (subset II). For subset III, the specific richness was the lowest in plots with the highest phytotoxicity for P. vulgaris. PMID:26174982

  1. SMART 3D SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT CHARACTERIZATION AT THE BGRR DEC OMMISSIONING PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect

    HEISER,J.; KALB,P.; SULLIVAN,T.; MILIAN,L.

    2002-08-04

    The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor is currently on an accelerated decommissioning schedule with a completion date projected for 2005. The accelerated schedule combines characterization with removal actions for the various systems and structures. A major project issue involves characterization of the soils beneath contaminated Below Grade Ducts (BGD), the main air ducts connecting the exhaust plenums with the Fan House. The air plenums experienced water intrusion during BGRR operations and after shutdown. The water intrusions were attributed to rainwater leaks into degraded parts of the system, and to internal cooling water system leaks. If the characterization could provide enough information to show that soil contamination surrounding the BGD is either below cleanup guidelines or is very localized and can be ''surgically removed'' at a reasonable cost, the ducts may be decontaminated and left in place. This will provide significant savings compared to breaking up the 170-ft. long concrete duct, shipping the projected 9,000 m{sup 3} of waste off-site and disposing of it in an approved site. The focus of this Department of Energy Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (DOE ASTD) project was to determine the extent (location, type, and level) of soil contamination surrounding the BGD. A suite of innovative characterization tools was used to complete the characterization of the soil surrounding the BGD in a cost-effective and timely fashion and in a manner acceptable to the stakeholders. A state-of-the-art perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology was used to screen the BGD for existing leak pathways and thus focus the characterization on potential contamination ''hot spots.'' Once pathways were identified, the sampling and analysis plan was designed to emphasize the leaking areas of the duct and perform only confirmatory checks in areas shown to be leak-free. A small-footprint Geoprobe{reg_sign} was used obtain core samples and allowed sampling in areas surrounding the BGD that were difficult to access. Two novel, field-deployed, radiological analysis systems (ISOCS and BetaScint{trademark}) were used to analyze the core samples and a three-dimensional (3-D) visualization system facilitated data analysis/interpretation for the stakeholders. All of the technologies performed as well or better than expected and the characterization could not have been completed in the same time or at the same cost without using this approach. A total of 904 BGD soil samples were taken, evaluated, and modeled. Results indicated that contamination was primarily located in discrete areas near several expansion joints and underground structures (bustles), but that much of the soil beneath and surrounding the BGD was clean of any radiological contamination. One-year project cost savings are calculated to be $1,254K. Life cycle cost savings, resulting from reduction in the number of samples and the cost of sample analysis, are estimated to be $2,162K. When added to potential cost savings associated with decontaminating and leaving the BGD in place ($7.1 to 8.1M), far greater overall savings may be realized.

  2. Geophysical monitoring of subsurface contamination in two-phase porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jincai; Spetzler, Hartmut

    2016-02-01

    We have explored a new technology based on using low-frequency strain attenuation data to monitor the infiltration of contaminants into two-fluid phase porous materials. The attenuation mechanism is related to the loss of energy due to the hysteresis of resistance to meniscus movement (changes in surface tension and wettability) when a pore containing two fluids is stressed at very low frequencies. This phenomenon was verified in our laboratory experiments and applied to a field study near Maricopa, Arizona. In the field study we conducted controlled experiments with the aim of detecting and monitoring the infiltration of a contaminant - a biosurfactant - into groundwater. Three sets of geophysical instruments, each consisting of a 3-component seismometer and a tiltmeter, were installed near an irrigation site. The experiment lasted about 3 years with controlled irrigations of initially water only and then water with contaminant into the vadose zone. We used naturally occurring signals of microseisms for our seismic sources and solid Earth tides as sources for the tilt signals. To process the tilt data we extracted the tidal signal from the raw data, and then compared the measured tidal signals with site-specific theoretical data. Changes in tidal signals indicate a strong anomaly associated with the irrigation when a 150 ppm concentration of a biosurfactant was present. No such anomaly was detected when only water was used. Further data processing with an automated procedure shows that the anomalies still persisted. Furthermore, the microseismic results from the seismic data suggest that there may also be a detectable anomaly.

  3. Borehole Calibration Facilities to Support Gamma Logging for Hanford Subsurface Investigation and Contaminant Monitoring - 13516

    SciTech Connect

    McCain, R.G.; Henwood, P.D.; Pope, A.D.; Pearson, A.W.

    2013-07-01

    Repeated gamma logging in cased holes represents a cost-effective means to monitor gamma-emitting contamination in the deep vadose zone over time. Careful calibration and standardization of gamma log results are required to track changes and to compare results over time from different detectors and logging systems. This paper provides a summary description of Hanford facilities currently available for calibration of logging equipment. Ideally, all logging organizations conducting borehole gamma measurements at the Hanford Site will take advantage of these facilities to produce standardized and comparable results. (authors)

  4. Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy

    2003-06-01

    This project seeks to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is hereby investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes.

  5. Treatability assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated marine sediments using permanganate, persulfate and Fenton oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-05-01

    Various chemical oxidation techniques, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8), Fenton (H2O2/Fe(2+)), and the modified persulfate and Fenton reagents (activated by ferrous complexes), were carried out to treat marine sediments that were contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dredged from Kaohsiung Harbor in Taiwan. Experimental results revealed that KMnO4 was the most effective of the tested oxidants in PAH degradation. Owing to the high organic matter content in the sediment that reduced the efficiencies of Na2S2O8 and regular Fenton reactions, a large excess of oxidant was required. Nevertheless, KH2PO4, Na4P2O7 and four chelating agents (EDTA, sodium citrate, oxalic acid, and sodium oxalate) were utilized to stabilize Fe(II) in activating the Na2S2O8 and Fenton oxidations, while Fe(II)-citrate remarkably promoted the PAH degradation. Increasing the molecular weight and number of rings of PAH did not affect the overall removal efficiencies. The correlation between the effectiveness of the oxidation processes and the physicochemical properties of individual PAH was statistically analyzed. The data implied that the reactivity of PAH (electron affinity and ionization potential) affected its treatability more than did its hydrophobicity (Kow, Koc and Sw), particularly using experimental conditions under which PAHs could be effectively oxidized. PMID:26915591

  6. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which achieved total PAH removal of 76%. Molecular analyses, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, revealed significant shifts in the soil bacterial communities after introduction to the bioreactors and differences in the abundance and types of bacteria in each of the bioreactors. The weekly-fed bioreactor displayed a more stable bacterial community with gradual changes over time, whereas the monthly-fed bioreactor community was less consistent and may have been more strongly influenced by the influx of untreated soil during feeding. Phylogenetic groups containing known PAH-degrading bacteria previously identified through stable-isotope probing of the untreated soil were differentially affected by bioreactor conditions. Sequences from members of the Acidovorax and Sphingomonas genera, as well as the uncultivated Pyrene Group 2 were abundant in the bioreactors. However, the relative abundances of sequences from the Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, and Pseudoxanthomonas genera, as well as from a group of unclassified anthracene degraders, were much lower in the bioreactors compared to the untreated soil. PMID:21369833

  7. Cooling/heating-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Pirdadeh-Beiranvand, Masoumeh

    2015-11-01

    A simple, low-cost, and effective cooling/heating-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (CHA-HS-SPME) device, capable of direct cooling the fiber to low temperatures and simultaneous heating the sample matrix to high temperatures, was fabricated and evaluated. It was able to cool down the commercial and handmade fibers for the effective tapping of volatile and semi-volatile species in the headspace of complex solid matrices, with minimal manipulation compared with conventional SPME. The CHA-HS-SPME system can create large temperature gaps (up to 200C) between the fiber and the sample matrix, because the cooling process is directly applied onto the fiber. Different effective experimental parameters for the fabrication of the CHA-HS-SPME device as well as for the extraction and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from solid samples were evaluated and optimized. The proposed device coupled to GC-FID was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of PAHs in contaminated soils without any sample pretreatment step. Good agreement was observed between the results obtained by the proposed CHA-HS-SPME-GC-FID method and those achieved by validated method. PMID:26572839

  8. Identification of persulfate oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during remediation of contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoyong; Zhao, Dan; Yan, Xiulan; Huling, Scott G

    2014-07-15

    The extent of PAH transformation, the formation and transformation of reaction byproducts during persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking plant soil was investigated. Pre-oxidation analyses indicated that oxygen-containing PAHs (oxy-PAHs) existed in the soil. Oxy-PAHs including 1H-phenalen-1-one, 9H-fluoren-9-one, and 1,8-naphthalic anhydride were also produced during persulfate oxidation of PAHs. Concentration of 1,8-naphthalic anhydride at 4h in thermally activated (50C) persulfate oxidation (TAPO) treatment increased 12.7 times relative to the oxidant-free control. Additionally, the oxy-PAHs originally present and those generated during oxidation can be oxidized by unactivated or thermally activated persulfate oxidation. For example, 9H-fluoren-9-one concentration decreased 99% at 4h in TAPO treatment relative to the control. Thermally activated persulfate resulted in greater oxy-PAHs removal than unactivated persulfate. Overall, both unactivated and thermally activated persulfate oxidation of PAH-contaminated soil reduced PAH mass, and oxidized most of the reaction byproducts. Consequently, this treatment process could limit environmental risk related to the parent compound and associated reaction byproducts. PMID:24862467

  9. Screening of biosurfactant producers from petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sources in cold marine environments.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qinhong; Zhang, Baiyu; Chen, Bing; Zhu, Zhiwen; Lin, Weiyun; Cao, Tong

    2014-09-15

    An overview of literature about isolating biosurfactant producers from marine sources indicated no such producers have been reported form North Atlantic Canada. Water and sediment samples were taken from petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated coastal and offshore areas in this region. Either n-hexadecane or diesel was used as the sole carbon source for the screening. A modified colony-based oil drop collapsing test was used to cover sessile biosurfactant producers. Fifty-five biosurfactant producers belong to genera of Alcanivorax, Exiguobacterium, Halomonas, Rhodococcus, Bacillus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Streptomyces were isolated. The first three genera were established after 1980s with interesting characteristics and limited relevant publications. Some of the 55 isolated strains were found with properties such as greatly reducing surface tension, stabilizing emulsion and producing flocculant. Isolates P6-4P and P1-5P were selected to demonstrate the performance of biosurfactant production, and were found to reduce the surface tension of water to as low as 28 dynes/cm. PMID:25034191

  10. Ecotoxicological assessment of bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Renoux, A.Y.; Tyagi, R.D.; Roy, Y.; Samson, R.

    1995-12-31

    A battery of bioassays [barley seed germination, barley plant growth, lettuce seed germination, worm mortality, Microtox{reg_sign}, lettuce root elongation, algae Selenastrum capricornutum growth, Daphnia magna mortality, and SOS Chromotest ({+-}S9)] was used to assess an above-ground heap pile treatment of a soil contaminated with aliphatic petroleum hydrocarbons (12 to 24 carbons). Despite an initial oil and grease concentration of 2,000 mg/kg, no significant (geno)toxicity was apparent in the soil sample before treatment. During the treatment, which decreased oil and grease concentrations to 800 mg/kg, slight toxicity was revealed by three bioassays (barley seed germination, worm mortality, Daphnia magna mortality), and a significant increase in genotoxicity was measured with the SOS Chromotest ({+-} S9). It appears that ecotoxicological evaluation revealed harmful condition(s) that were not detected by chemical assessment. This suggests that the remediation had ceased before complete detoxification occurred. This phenomenon must be further investigated, however, to furnish solid conclusions on the toxicological effectiveness of the biotreatment.

  11. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Zedelius, Johannes; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5 × 0.8 μm. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkane n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes. PMID:25806023

  12. Evaluation of landfarm remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at the Inveresk Railyard, Launceston, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Line, M.A.; Garland, C.D.; Crowley, M.

    1996-12-31

    The cost of landfarm bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at a disused railyard site in Tasmania, Australia is reported. The landfarm area was enclosed in an impermeable clay embankment and where necessary the base was also rolled with clay. Microbial inoculation was not deemed to be necessary since suitable degrading biota were found to be present in site samples prior to commencement of the landfarming. Fertilizer amendment comprised primarily ammonium sulphate and superphosphate to give a C:N ratio (TPH:fertilizer) of 28:1 and a C:P ratio of 200:1. The soil was turned regularly and watered as required for the 12-month duration of the operation. Over this period levels of TPH showed a linear decline from a mean of 4,644 mg/kg to near 100 mg/kg or less, with greatest losses being in the chain lengths C10-C28. The cost was determined to be $A13.40c per m{sup 3}, which is at the lower end of the spectrum of reported landfarming costs. The cost of such operations is important since the reported economics will influence others` choice of bioremediation techniques.

  13. Cancer risk assessments of Hong Kong soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Man, Yu Bon; Kang, Yuan; Wang, Hong Sheng; Lau, Winifred; Li, Hui; Sun, Xiao Lin; Giesy, John P; Chow, Ka Lai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate soils from 12 different land use types on human cancer risks, with the main focus being on human cancer risks related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fifty-five locations were selected to represent 12 different types of land use (electronic waste dismantling workshop (EW (DW)); open burning site (OBS); car dismantling workshop (CDW) etc.). The total concentrations of 16 PAHs in terms of total burden and their bioaccessibility were analysed using GC/MS. The PAHs concentrations were subsequently used to establish cancer risks in humans via three exposure pathways, namely, accident ingestion of soil, dermal contact soil and inhalation of soil particles. When the 95th centile values of total PAH concentrations were used to derive ingestion and dermal cancer risk probabilities on humans, the CDW land use type indicated a moderate potential for cancerous development (244 × 10(-6) and 209 × 10(-6), respectively). Bioaccessible PAHs content in soil samples from CDW (3.60 × 10(-6)) were also classified as low cancer risk. CDW soil possessed a higher carcinogenic risk based on PAH concentrations. Bioremediation is recommended to treat the contaminated soil. PMID:23465409

  14. Biostimulation Reveals Functional Redundancy of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Dunlevy, Sage R.; Singleton, David R.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Stable-isotope probing was previously used to identify bacterial anthracene-degraders in untreated soil from a former manufactured gas plant site. However, subsequent pyrosequence analyses of total bacterial communities and quantification of 16S rRNA genes indicated that relative abundances of the predominant anthracene-degrading bacteria (designated Anthracene Group 1) diminished as a result of biological treatment conditions in lab-scale, aerobic bioreactors. This study identified Alphaproteobacterial anthracene-degrading bacteria in bioreactor-treated soil which were dissimilar to those previously identified. The largest group of sequences was from the Alterythrobacter genus while other groups of sequences were associated with bacteria within the order Rhizobiales and the genus Bradyrhizobium. Conditions in the bioreactor enriched for organisms capable of degrading anthracene which were not the same as those identified as dominant degraders in the untreated soil. Further, these data suggest that identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in contaminated but untreated soil may be a poor indicator of the most active degraders during biological treatment. PMID:24302851

  15. Influence of ultraviolet light on the toxicity of sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Collyard, S.A. ); Monson, P.D. ); Kosian, P.A. )

    1994-11-01

    Standard 10-d toxicity tests were conducted with freshwater benthic invertebrates using sediments containing a range of concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The assays were performed both under normal laboratory fluorescent light and ultraviolet (UV) light, which mimicked wavelengths present in sunlight, at about 10% of ambient solar intensity. In sediments with elevated PAH concentrations, tests conducted with UV light resulted in significantly greater mortality of Hyalella azteca (amphipods) and Lumbriculus variegatus (oligochaetes) than tests performed under otherwise comparable conditions with fluorescent light. There also was increased mortality of these two species, relative to controls, when surviving organisms from the 10-d exposures to the PAH-contaminated sediments were placed in clean water under UV light for 2 h. These results suggest that the organisms accumulated PAHs from the test sediments, which were subsequently photoactivated by UV light to excited states more toxic than the ground-state molecules. The phenomenon of photoactivation has been examined for pelagic species exposed to PAHs, but not for benthic organisms exposed to sediment-associated PAHs. The results suggest that failure to consider photoactivation of PAHs by sunlight could result in sediment toxicity test methods or criteria that are underprotective of benthic organisms.

  16. Using discriminant analysis to assess polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination in Yongding New River.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Zou, Zhihong; Zou, Hui

    2013-10-01

    Yongding New River has been polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which are carcinogenic and mutagenic. In three periods (the abundant water period, mean water period, dry water period), ten sites (totally 30 samples) in Yongding New River were clustered into four categories by hierarchical cluster analysis (hierarchical CA). In the same cluster, the samples had the same approximate contamination situation. In order to eliminate the dimensional differences, the data in each sample, containing 16 kinds of PAHs, were standardized with normal standardization and maximum difference standardization. According to the results of the cubic clustering criterion, pseudo F, and pseudo t (2) (PST2), the proper number of clustering for the 30 samples is 4. Before conducting hierarchical CA and K-means cluster analysis on the samples, we used principal component analysis to obtain another group data set. This data set was composed of the principal component scores which are uncorrelated variables. Hierarchical CA and K-means cluster analysis were used to classify the two data sets into four categories. With the classification results of hierarchical CA and K-means cluster analysis, discriminant analysis is applied to determine which method was better for normalization of the original data and which one was proper to cluster the samples and establish discriminant functions so that a new sample can be grouped into the right categories. PMID:23657734

  17. Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons at a petroleum‐contaminated site

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Victoria A.; Brubaker, Gaylen R.; Zenker, Matthew J.; Prince, Roger C.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Da Silva, Marcio L.B.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Field metabolomics and laboratory assays were used to assess the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underlying a former refinery. Benzene, ethylbenzene, 2‐methylnaphthalene, 1,2,4‐ and 1,3,5‐trimethylbenzene were targeted as contaminants of greatest regulatory concern (COC) whose intrinsic remediation has been previously reported. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization of alkylbenzenes, including the trimethylbenzene COC, PAHs and several n‐alkanes in the contaminated portions of the aquifer. Anaerobic biodegradation experiments designed to mimic in situ conditions showed no loss of exogenously amended COC; however, a substantive rate of endogenous electron acceptor reduction was measured (55 ± 8 µM SO4 day−1). An assessment of hydrocarbon loss in laboratory experiments relative to a conserved internal marker revealed that non‐COC hydrocarbons were being metabolized. Purge and trap analysis of laboratory assays showed a substantial loss of toluene, m‐ and o‐xylene, as well as several alkanes (C6–C12). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that benzene is persistent under the prevailing site anaerobic conditions. We could find no in situ benzene intermediates (phenol or benzoate), the parent molecule proved recalcitrant in laboratory assays and low copy numbers of Desulfobacterium were found, a genus previously implicated in anaerobic benzene biodegradation. This study also showed that there was a reasonable correlation between field and laboratory findings, although with notable exception. Thus, while the intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation was clearly evident at the site, non‐COC hydrocarbons were preferentially metabolized, even though there was ample literature precedence for the biodegradation of the target molecules. PMID:21261914

  18. Biodegradation of organic contaminants in subsurface systems: Kinetic and metabolic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Groundwater contaminated by organic chemicals from industrial spills, leaking underground gasoline storage tanks and landfills has caused concern about the future of a major source of drinking water. A potential alternative to expensive groundwater reclamation projects is the use of natural soil bacteria to degrade organic contaminants. This study was designed to measure the kinetic response of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA), determine the biological degradation rates of methanol, ethanol, propanol, l-butanol, TBA, pentanol, phenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol; describe site specific conditions which enhance or inhibit degradation and compare biodegradation rates with thermodynamic predictions. Each of the test compounds except TBA was readily degraded in the Blacksburg soil. Inhibition of sulfate reduction by the addition of molybdate stimulated degradation of all compounds including TBA, whereas, inhibition of methanogenesis with BESA slowed the degradation rates. The addition of nitrate did not affect the biodegradation in Blacksburg soil. In the Newport News soil, all of the test compounds were biodegraded at substantially higher rates than was observed in the Blacksburg soil. The presence of the metabolic inhibitors did not affect degradation, however, the addition of nitrate increased the degradation rates of the alcohols but not the phenols. The degradation rates in each of the soils did not correlate with the bacterial population size or free energies of the reactions.

  19. The effect of subsurface military detonations on vadose zone hydraulic conductivity, contaminant transport and aquifer recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Burman, Jan; Edlund, Christina; Simonsson, Louise; Berglind, Rune; Leffler, Per; Qvarfort, Ulf; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Meuken, Denise; Duvalois, Willem; Martel, Richard; Sjstrm, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Live fire military training involves the detonation of explosive warheads on training ranges. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the hydrogeological changes to the vadose zone caused by military training with high explosive ammunition. In particular, this study investigates artillery ammunition which penetrates underground prior to exploding, either by design or by defective fuze mechanisms. A 105 mm artillery round was detonated 2.6 m underground, and hydraulic conductivity measurements were taken before and after the explosion. A total of 114 hydraulic conductivity measurements were obtained within a radius of 3 m from the detonation point, at four different depths and at three different time periods separated by 18 months. This data was used to produce a three dimensional numerical model of the soil affected by the exploding artillery round. This model was then used to investigate potential changes to aquifer recharge and contaminant transport caused by the detonating round. The results indicate that an exploding artillery round can strongly affect the hydraulic conductivity in the vadose zone, increasing it locally by over an order of magnitude. These variations, however, appear to cause relatively small changes to both local groundwater recharge and contaminant transport.

  20. Coupled Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 and Contaminants from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs on Groundwater Quality.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongbo; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Lawter, Amanda R; Bowden, Mark E; Brown, Christopher F

    2015-07-01

    The leakage of CO2 and the concomitant brine from deep storage reservoirs to overlying groundwater aquifers is considered one of the major potential risks associated with geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS). In this work both batch and column experiments were conducted to determine the fate of trace metals in groundwater in the scenarios of CO2 and metal-contaminated brine leakage. The sediments for this study were from an unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifer in Kansas, containing 0-4 wt % carbonates. Cd (114 ?g/L) and As (40 ?g/L) were spiked into the reaction system to represent potential contaminants from the reservoir brine. Through this research we demonstrated that Cd and As were adsorbed on the sediments, in spite of the lowered pH due to CO2 dissolution in the groundwater. Cd concentrations in the effluent were below the Cd MCL, even for sediments without detectable carbonate to buffer the pH. Arsenic concentrations in the effluent were also significantly lower than the influent concentration, suggesting that the sediments tested have the capacity to mitigate the coupled adverse effects of CO2 leakage and brine intrusion. The mitigation capacity of sediment is a function of its geochemical properties (e.g., the presence of carbonate minerals, adsorbed As, and phosphate). PMID:26039150

  1. Assessing clustering strategies for Gaussian mixture filtering a subsurface contaminant model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Gharamti, M. E.; Hoteit, I.

    2016-04-01

    An ensemble-based Gaussian mixture (GM) filtering framework is studied in this paper in term of its dependence on the choice of the clustering method to construct the GM. In this approach, a number of particles sampled from the posterior distribution are first integrated forward with the dynamical model for forecasting. A GM representation of the forecast distribution is then constructed from the forecast particles. Once an observation becomes available, the forecast GM is updated according to Bayes' rule. This leads to (i) a Kalman filter-like update of the particles, and (ii) a Particle filter-like update of their weights, generalizing the ensemble Kalman filter update to non-Gaussian distributions. We focus on investigating the impact of the clustering strategy on the behavior of the filter. Three different clustering methods for constructing the prior GM are considered: (i) a standard kernel density estimation, (ii) clustering with a specified mixture component size, and (iii) adaptive clustering (with a variable GM size). Numerical experiments are performed using a two-dimensional reactive contaminant transport model in which the contaminant concentration and the heterogenous hydraulic conductivity fields are estimated within a confined aquifer using solute concentration data. The experimental results suggest that the performance of the GM filter is sensitive to the choice of the GM model. In particular, increasing the size of the GM does not necessarily result in improved performances. In this respect, the best results are obtained with the proposed adaptive clustering scheme.

  2. Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namocatcat, J. A.; Fang, J.; Barcelona, M. J.; Quibuyen, A. T. O.; Abrajano, T. A.

    2003-12-01

    Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer.

  3. Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Namocatcat, J A; Fang, J; Barcelona, M J; Quibuyen, A T O; Abrajano, T A

    2003-12-01

    Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer. PMID:14607476

  4. Biodegradation of an alicyclic hydrocarbon by a sulfate-reducing enrichment from a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Rios-Hernandez, Luis A; Gieg, Lisa M; Suflita, Joseph M

    2003-01-01

    We used ethylcyclopentane (ECP) as a model alicyclic hydrocarbon and investigated its metabolism by a sulfate-reducing bacterial enrichment obtained from a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer. The enrichment coupled the consumption of ECP with the stoichiometrically expected amount of sulfate reduced. During ECP biodegradation, we observed the transient accumulation of metabolite peaks by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, three of which had identical mass spectrometry profiles. Mass-spectral similarities to analogous authentic standards allowed us to identify these metabolites as ethylcyclopentylsuccinic acids, ethylcyclopentylpropionic acid, ethylcyclopentylcarboxylic acid, and ethylsuccinic acid. Based on these findings, we propose a pathway for the degradation of this alicyclic hydrocarbon. Furthermore, a putative metabolite similar to ethylcyclopentylsuccinic acid was also found in samples of contaminated groundwater from the aquifer. However, no such finding was evident for samples collected from wells located upgradient of the gas condensate spill. Microbial community analysis of the ECP-degrading enrichment by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of at least three different organisms using universal eubacterial primers targeting 550 bp of the 16S rRNA gene. Based on sequence analysis, these organisms are phylogenetically related to the genera Syntrophobacter and Desulfotomaculum as well as a member of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group. The evidence suggests that alicyclic hydrocarbons such as ECP can be anaerobically activated by the addition to the double bond of fumarate to form alkylsuccinate derivatives under sulfate-reducing conditions and that the reaction occurs in the laboratory and in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. PMID:12514025

  5. Combination of surfactant enhanced soil washing and electro-Fenton process for the treatment of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Huguenot, David; Mousset, Emmanuel; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2015-04-15

    In order to improve the efficiency of soil washing treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated soils, an innovative combination of this soil treatment technique with an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (i.e. electro-Fenton (EF)) has been proposed. An ex situ soil column washing experiment was performed on a genuinely diesel-contaminated soil. The washing solution was enriched with surfactant Tween 80 at different concentrations, higher than the critical micellar concentration (CMC). The impact of soil washing was evaluated on the hydrocarbons concentration in the leachates collected at the bottom of the soil columns. These eluates were then studied for their degradation potential by EF treatment. Results showed that a concentration of 5% of Tween 80 was required to enhance hydrocarbons extraction from the soil. Even with this Tween 80 concentration, the efficiency of the treatment remained very low (only 1% after 24 h of washing). Electrochemical treatments performed thereafter with EF on the collected eluates revealed that the quasi-complete mineralization (>99.5%) of the hydrocarbons was achieved within 32 h according to a linear kinetic trend. Toxicity was higher than in the initial solution and reached 95% of inhibition of Vibrio fischeri bacteria measured by Microtox method, demonstrating the presence of remaining toxic compounds even after the complete degradation. Finally, the biodegradability (BOD?/COD ratio) reached a maximum of 20% after 20 h of EF treatment, which is not enough to implement a combined treatment with a biological treatment process. PMID:25646675

  6. Effect of reduced iron on the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated soil and ground water: A review of publications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

    2014-02-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons are among the most hazardous organic pollutants. The traditional remediation technologies, i.e., pumping of contaminated soil- and groundwater and its purification appear to be costly and not very efficient as applied to these pollutants. In the last years, a cheaper method of destroying chlorine-replaced hydrocarbons has been used based on the construction of an artificial permeable barrier, where the process develops with the participation of in situ bacteria activated by zerovalent iron. The forced significant decrease in the redox potential (Eh) down to -750 mV provides the concentration of electrons necessary for the reduction of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A rise in the pH drastically accelerates the dechlorination process. In addition to chlorine-organic compounds, ground water is often contaminated with heavy metals. The influence of the latter on the effect of zerovalent iron may be different: both accelerating its degradation (Cu) and inhibiting it (Cr). Most of the products of zerovalent iron corrosion, i.e., green rust, magnetite, ferrihydrite, hematite, and goethite, weaken the efficiency of the Fe0 barrier by mitigating the dechlorination and complicating the water filtration. However, pyrrhotite FeS, on the contrary, accelerates the dechlorination of chlorine hydrocarbons.

  7. Anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments under sulfate-reducing and artificially imposed iron-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The potential use of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in-situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments was investigated. Previous studies have indicated that Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) can oxidize some electron donors more effectively than sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB). In contrast to previous results in freshwater sediments, the addition of Fe(III) to marine sediments from San Diego Bay, CA did not switch the terminal electron-accepting process (TEAP) from sulfate reduction to Fe-(III) reduction. Addition of Fe(III) also did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III)] followed by anaerobic incubation of the sediments, resulted in Fe-(III) reduction as the TEAP, but contaminant degradation was not stimulated and in some instances was inhibited. The difference in the ability of FeRB to compete with the SRB in the different sediment treatments was related to relative population sizes. Although the addition of Fe(III) did not stimulate hydrocarbon degradation, the results presented here as well as other recent studies demonstrate that there may be significant anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments.

  8. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-06-01

    This annual report summarizes the progress of three years of a three-year grant awarded to the Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) at Tulane and Xavier Universities. The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. The three major areas of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects; and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular focus in this study are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The focus of the literature research was to provide an analysis of the contaminants located on or around various Department of Energy (DOE) sites that are or have the potential to function as endocrine disruptors and to correlate the need for studying endocrine disruptors to DOE's programmatic needs. Previous research within the Center for Bioenvironmental Research at Tulane and Xavier Universities has focused on understanding the effects of environmental agents on the human and wildlife health and disease. In particular this research has focused on how exogenous agents can function to mimic or disrupt normal endocrine signaling, i.e. estrogen, thyroid within various systems from whole animal studies with fish, amphibians and insects to human cancer cell lines. Significant work has focused on the estrogenic and anti-estrogenic action of both synthetic organochlorine chemicals and naturally produced phytochemicals. Recent projects have extended these research objectives to examination of these environmental agents on the symbiotic relationship between nitrogen fixing rhizobial bacteria and leguminous plants. This research will form the foundation for future experiments into the genetic manipulation of plants to potentially promote greater or more specific symbiotic relationships between plant and Rhizobium allowing this biological phenomenon to be used in a greater number of crop types. Future technology developments could include the genetic engineering of crops suitable for in situ vadose zone 2 bioremediation (via microbes) and phytoremediation (through the crop, itself) in contaminated DOE sites.

  9. Soil pollution in the railway junction Niš (Serbia) and possibility of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Larisa; Aleksic, Gorica; Radosavljevic, Milan; Onjia, Antonije

    2015-04-01

    Mineral oil leaking from vehicles or released during accidents is an important source of soil and ground water pollution. In the railway junction Niš (Serbia) total 90 soil samples polluted with mineral oil derivatives were investigated. Field work at the railway Niš sites included the opening of soil profiles and soil sampling. The aim of this work is the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons concentration in the soil samples and the investigation of the bioremediation technique for treatment heavily contaminated soil. For determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil samples method of gas-chromatography was carried out. On the basis of measured concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil it can be concluded that: Obtained concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in 60% of soil samples exceed the permissible values (5000 mg/kg). The heavily contaminated soils, according the Regulation on the program of systematic monitoring of soil quality indicators for assessing the risk of soil degradation and methodology for development of remediation programs, Annex 3 (Official Gazette of RS, No.88 / 2010), must be treated using some of remediation technologies. Between many types of phytoremediation of soil contaminated with mineral oils and their derivatives, the most suitable are phytovolatalisation and phytostimulation. During phytovolatalisation plants (poplar, willow, aspen, sorgum, and rye) absorb organic pollutants through the root, and then transported them to the leaves where the reduced pollutants are released into the atmosphere. In the case of phytostimulation plants (mulberry, apple, rye, Bermuda) secrete from the roots enzymes that stimulates the growth of bacteria in the soil. The increase in microbial activity in soil promotes the degradation of pollutants. Bioremediation is performed by composting the contaminated soil with addition of composting materials (straw, manure, sawdust, and shavings), moisture components, oligotrophs and heterotrophs bacteria.

  10. Subsurface Microbial Communities and Geochemistry Within a Vertical Transect of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gihring, T. M.; McKinley, J. P.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Long, P. E.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial communities and geochemistry were analyzed within floodplain alluvia of the San Juan River, New Mexico, down-gradient of a uranium mill tailings disposal cell. A multi-level sampling device was used to investigate vertical variations in geochemistry and microbial community structure within the uranium contaminant plume within this shallow aquifer. Chemical analyses indicate that the interaction of uncontaminated artesian water and contaminant fluids has resulted in three geochemically-distinct regions. Similarity comparisons of bacterial community 16S rDNA fingerprints, based on T-RFLP analyses, show a grouping of microbial populations into three assemblages. These groupings correspond to the three geochemically-defined regions of the aquifer profile, indicating a relationship between community structure and geochemistry. Combined Bacterial 16S rDNA clone library and T-RFLP analyses show a predominance of organisms related to Nitrospira and Nitrosolobus, chemolithotrophic nitrite and ammonia oxidizers respectively, in the uncontaminated region of the aquifer profile. Within the plume-impacted area, organisms related to known nitrifying bacteria were not detected. Bacteria phylogenetically related to Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Gallionella, Psuedomonas, and Thiomicrospira were identified in both the uncontaminated and plume regions. Within the contaminated region, sequences from organisms related to the metal oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix and Sphaerotilus were also found. 16S rDNA sequences with high similarity to Duganella zoogloeoides, a chemolithotrophic Mn-oxidizing bacterium known for uranyl complexation and sorption, were abundant in the clone library from the plume-impacted region. A diversity of organisms related to sulfate- and sulfur-reducing bacteria including Desulfobulbus, Desulfofrigus, Desulfosarcina, Desulfosporosinus, Desulfotomaculum, and Geobacter were present in the uncontaminated zone while less SRB diversity (Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus, and Desulfonema) was observed in the plume region. T-RFLP results substantiate this trend, suggesting sulfate reducer populations shift from high diversity and low relative abundance to less diversity and a larger abundance over the transition from uncontaminated water into the plume region. These findings indicate that there is considerable biological potential for uranium immobilization at this site through reductive precipitation by sulfate or other metal reducing organisms or microbial uptake and sequestration. Given the diversity of microorganisms related to chemolithotrophic bacteria, growth by this mode of metabolism, and the biological oxidation of reduced metals, is also potentially an important process that may influence metal biogeochemistry at this site.

  11. Methods for characterizing subsurface volatile contaminants using in-situ sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2006-02-21

    An inverse analysis method for characterizing diffusion of vapor from an underground source of volatile contaminant using data taken by an in-situ sensor. The method uses one-dimensional solutions to the diffusion equation in Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates for isotropic and homogenous media. If the effective vapor diffusion coefficient is known, then the distance from the source to the in-situ sensor can be estimated by comparing the shape of the predicted time-dependent vapor concentration response curve to the measured response curve. Alternatively, if the source distance is known, then the effective vapor diffusion coefficient can be estimated using the same inverse analysis method. A triangulation technique can be used with multiple sensors to locate the source in two or three dimensions. The in-situ sensor can contain one or more chemiresistor elements housed in a waterproof enclosure with a gas permeable membrane.

  12. Coupled Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 and Contaminants from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs on Groundwater Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Hongbo; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-07-07

    The leakage of CO2 and the concomitant saline solutions from deep storage reservoirs to overlying groundwater aquifers is considered one of the major potential risks associated with geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS). Batch and column experiments were conducted to determine the fate of trace metals in groundwater in the scenarios of CO2 and metal contaminated brine leakage. The sediments used in this work were collected from an unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifer in Kansas, and contained 0-4 wt% carbonates. Cd and As were spiked into the reaction system to represent potential contaminants from the reservoir brine that could intrude into groundwater aquifers with leaking CO2 at initial concentrations of 114 and 40 ppb, respectively. Through this research we demonstrated that Cd and As were adsorbed on the sediments, in spite of the lowered pH due to CO2 dissolution in the groundwater. Cd concentrations were well below its MCL in both batch and column studies, even for sediment samples without detectable carbonate to buffer the pH. Arsenic concentrations in the effluent were also significantly lower than influent concentration, suggesting that the sediments tested have the capacity to mitigate the coupled adverse effects of CO2 leakage and brine intrusion. However, the mitigation capacity of sediment is a function of its geochemical properties [e.g., the calcite content; the presence of adsorbed As(III); and the presence of P in the natural sediment]. The competitive adsorption between phosphate and arsenate may result in higher concentrations of As in the aqueous phase.

  13. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  14. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  15. Treatment Of Groundwater Contaminated With PAHs, Gasoline Hydrocarbons, And Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether In A Laboratory Biomass-Retaining Bioreactor

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated the treatability of co-mingled groundwater contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), gasoline hydrocarbons, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) using an ex-situ aerobic biotreatment system. The PAHs of interest were nap...

  16. Effective sensing approach for assessment and monitoring of in-situ biodegradation in a subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong X.

    1999-02-01

    Rapid assessment and monitoring of biological conditions in a subsurface environment is becoming more and more important as bioremediation approaches become widely used in environmental cleanup. Remediation monitoring is also more challenging for in-situ remedial approaches, such as bioventing, biosparging, or passive bioremediation, where conventional 'inlet' and 'outlet' monitoring can no longer be applied. A sensing approach using subsurface chemical sensors offers a cost- effective alternative for remediation monitoring. Additional benefits of deploying subsurface sensors include continuous and unattended measurement with minimum disturbance to the subsurface condition. In a series of field studies, an electrochemical oxygen sensor, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide sensor, and two hydrocarbons sensors were employed for monitoring in-situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. Biodegradation rates were effectively measured through an in-situ respiration measurement using subsurface oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors. The high sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor to small change in the concentration enables rapid respiration measurements. Subsurface hydrocarbon sensors offer a means to monitor the progress of remediation and the migration of contaminant vapors during the remediation. The chemical sensors tested are clearly cost effective for remediation monitoring. The strengths of oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors are complimentary to each other. Strengths and limitations of different hydrocarbon sensors were also noted. Balancing cost and performance of sensors is crucial for environmental remediation application.

  17. Modeling the (Sub)surface Deformation Field Evolution Due to Production from a Hydrocarbon Reservoir Overlain by Rocksalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketos, G.; Govers, R. M. A.; Spiers, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Rocksalt is an important caprock for sealing or trapping hydrocarbons. Given its relatively low viscosity, it may flow during and after production and result in time-dependent surface deformation. To predict the consequences of alternative production strategies, we seek to understand the primary controls on stress-driven flow and surface deformation of hydrocarbon extraction from a reservoir topped by rocksalt. The mechanical properties of rock salt are a key influence, but complicated. Depending on grain size, temperature, and stress, salt can deform mainly elastically, by power law viscous creep, and/or by linear viscous diffusion creep. In this study, we evaluate the evolution of production induced deformation using generic geo-mechanical models. Our strategy is to start with simplified geometries, rheologies, and forcing, and to increase model complexity slowly. Our results show that there are two distinctly different time scales that dominate the evolution of the models: short term subsidence and longer term partial rebound. The shortest time scale corresponds to stress-driven flow in the vicinity of the reservoir. The longest time scale is controlled by resistance to viscous flow and stress relaxation within a wider region of the rocksalt layer. We discuss the sensitivity to the thickness of the rocksalt seal, the geometry of the reservoir, and the distance between the source and the seal.

  18. Apparent contradiction: psychrotolerant bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated arctic tundra soils that degrade diterpenoids synthesized by trees.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z; Stewart, G R; Mohn, W W

    2000-12-01

    Resin acids are tricyclic terpenoids occurring naturally in trees. We investigated the occurrence of resin acid-degrading bacteria on the Arctic tundra near the northern coast of Ellesmere Island (82 degrees N, 62 degrees W). According to most-probable-number assays, resin acid degraders were abundant (10(3) to 10(4) propagules/g of soil) in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, but they were undetectable (<3 propagules/g of soil) in pristine soils from the nearby tundra. Plate counts indicated that the contaminated and the pristine soils had similar populations of heterotrophs (10(6) to 10(7) propagules/g of soil). Eleven resin acid-degrading bacteria belonging to four phylogenetically distinct groups were enriched and isolated from the contaminated soils, and representative isolates of each group were further characterized. Strains DhA-91, IpA-92, and IpA-93 are members of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain DhA-95 is a member of the genus Sphingomonas. All four strains are psychrotolerant, with growth temperature ranges of 4 degrees C to 30 degrees C (DhA-91 and DhA-95) or 4 degrees C to 22 degrees C (IpA-92 and IpA-93) and with optimum temperatures of 15 to 22 degrees C. Strains DhA-91 and DhA-95 grew on the abietanes, dehydroabietic and abietic acids, but not on the pimaranes, isopimaric and pimaric acids. Strains IpA-92 and IpA-93 grew on the pimaranes but not the abietanes. All four strains grew on either aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons, which is unusual for described resin acid degraders. Eleven mesophilic resin acid degraders did not use hydrocarbons, with the exception of two Mycobacterium sp. strains that used aliphatic hydrocarbons. We conclude that hydrocarbon contamination in Arctic tundra soil indirectly selected for resin acid degraders, selecting for hydrocarbon degraders that coincidentally use resin acids. Psychrotolerant resin acid degraders are likely important in the global carbon cycle and may have applications in biotreatment of pulp and paper mill effluents. PMID:11097882

  19. Apparent Contradiction: Psychrotolerant Bacteria from Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Arctic Tundra Soils That Degrade Diterpenoids Synthesized by Trees

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongtang; Stewart, Gordon R.; Mohn, William W.

    2000-01-01

    Resin acids are tricyclic terpenoids occurring naturally in trees. We investigated the occurrence of resin acid-degrading bacteria on the Arctic tundra near the northern coast of Ellesmere Island (82N, 62W). According to most-probable-number assays, resin acid degraders were abundant (103 to 104 propagules/g of soil) in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, but they were undetectable (<3 propagules/g of soil) in pristine soils from the nearby tundra. Plate counts indicated that the contaminated and the pristine soils had similar populations of heterotrophs (106 to 107 propagules/g of soil). Eleven resin acid-degrading bacteria belonging to four phylogenetically distinct groups were enriched and isolated from the contaminated soils, and representative isolates of each group were further characterized. Strains DhA-91, IpA-92, and IpA-93 are members of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain DhA-95 is a member of the genus Sphingomonas. All four strains are psychrotolerant, with growth temperature ranges of 4C to 30C (DhA-91 and DhA-95) or 4C to 22C (IpA-92 and IpA-93) and with optimum temperatures of 15 to 22C. Strains DhA-91 and DhA-95 grew on the abietanes, dehydroabietic and abietic acids, but not on the pimaranes, isopimaric and pimaric acids. Strains IpA-92 and IpA-93 grew on the pimaranes but not the abietanes. All four strains grew on either aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons, which is unusual for described resin acid degraders. Eleven mesophilic resin acid degraders did not use hydrocarbons, with the exception of two Mycobacterium sp. strains that used aliphatic hydrocarbons. We conclude that hydrocarbon contamination in Arctic tundra soil indirectly selected for resin acid degraders, selecting for hydrocarbon degraders that coincidentally use resin acids. Psychrotolerant resin acid degraders are likely important in the global carbon cycle and may have applications in biotreatment of pulp and paper mill effluents. PMID:11097882

  20. Two- and Three-Dimensional Depiction of Subsurface Geology Using Commercial Software for Support of Groundwater Contaminant Fate and Transport Analysis - 13345

    SciTech Connect

    Ivarson, Kristine A.; Miller, Charles W.; Arola, Craig C.

    2013-07-01

    Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other nuclear reactor operation-related contaminants has resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas (the Hanford Site 100 Area). The large geographic extent of the resultant contaminant plumes requires an extensive level of understanding of the aquifer structure, characteristics, and configuration to support assessment and design of remedial alternatives within the former 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K reactor areas. The authors have prepared two- and three-dimensional depictions of the key subsurface geologic structures at two Hanford Site reactor operable units (100-K and 100-D/H). These depictions, prepared using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) visualization software, provide a basis for expanding the understanding of groundwater contaminant migration pathways, including identification of geologically-defined preferential groundwater flow pathways. These identified preferential flow pathways support the conceptual site model and help explain both historical and current contaminant distribution and transport. (authors)

  1. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M.L.; Bentley, A.J.; Dunkin, K.A.; Hodgson, A.T.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Sextro, R.G.; Daisey, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    We report a field study of soil gas transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into a slab-on-grade building found at a site contaminated with gasoline. Although the high VOC concentrations (30-60 g m{sup -3}) measured in the soil gas at depths of 0.7 m below the building suggest a potential for high levels of indoor VOC, the measured indoor air concentrations were lower than those in the soil gas by approximately six orders of magnitude ({approx} 0.03 mg m{sup -3}). This large ratio is explained by (1) the expected dilution of soil gas entering the building via ambient building ventilation (a factor of {approx}1000), and (2) an unexpectedly sharp gradient in soil gas VOC concentration between the depths of 0.1 and 0.7 m (a factor of {approx}1000). Measurements of the soil physical and biological characteristics indicate that a partial physical barrier to vertical transport in combination with microbial degradation provides a likely explanation for this gradient. These factors are likely to be important to varying degrees at other sites.

  2. Relating subsurface temperature changes to microbial activity at a crude oil-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ean; Bekins, Barbara A

    2015-11-01

    Crude oil at a spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota has been undergoing aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation for over 30 years, creating a 150-200 m plume of primary and secondary contaminants. Microbial degradation generates heat that should be measurable under the right conditions. To measure this heat, thermistors were installed in wells in the saturated zone and in water-filled monitoring tubes in the unsaturated zone. In the saturated zone, a thermal groundwater plume originates near the residual oil body with temperatures ranging from 2.9°C above background near the oil to 1.2°C down gradient. Temperatures in the unsaturated zone above the oil body were up to 2.7°C more than background temperatures. Previous work at this site has shown that methane produced from biodegradation of the oil migrates upward and is oxidized in a methanotrophic zone midway between the water table and the surface. Enthalpy calculations and observations demonstrate that the temperature increases primarily result from aerobic methane oxidation in the unsaturated zone above the oil. Methane oxidation rates at the site independently estimated from surface CO2 efflux data are comparable to rates estimated from the observed temperature increases. The results indicate that temperature may be useful as a low-cost measure of activity but care is required to account for the correct heat-generating reactions, other heat sources and the effects of focused recharge. PMID:26409188

  3. Relating subsurface temperature changes to microbial activity at a crude oil-contaminated site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, Ean; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil at a spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota has been undergoing aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation for over 30years, creating a 150200m plume of primary and secondary contaminants. Microbial degradation generates heat that should be measurable under the right conditions. To measure this heat, thermistors were installed in wells in the saturated zone and in water-filled monitoring tubes in the unsaturated zone. In the saturated zone, a thermal groundwater plume originates near the residual oil body with temperatures ranging from 2.9C above background near the oil to 1.2C down gradient. Temperatures in the unsaturated zone above the oil body were up to 2.7C more than background temperatures. Previous work at this site has shown that methane produced from biodegradation of the oil migrates upward and is oxidized in a methanotrophic zone midway between the water table and the surface. Enthalpy calculations and observations demonstrate that the temperature increases primarily result from aerobic methane oxidation in the unsaturated zone above the oil. Methane oxidation rates at the site independently estimated from surface CO2efflux data are comparable to rates estimated from the observed temperature increases. The results indicate that temperature may be useful as a low-cost measure of activity but care is required to account for the correct heat-generating reactions, other heat sources and the effects of focused recharge.

  4. Relating subsurface temperature changes to microbial activity at a crude oil-contaminated site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Ean; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2015-11-01

    Crude oil at a spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota has been undergoing aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation for over 30 years, creating a 150-200 m plume of primary and secondary contaminants. Microbial degradation generates heat that should be measurable under the right conditions. To measure this heat, thermistors were installed in wells in the saturated zone and in water-filled monitoring tubes in the unsaturated zone. In the saturated zone, a thermal groundwater plume originates near the residual oil body with temperatures ranging from 2.9 °C above background near the oil to 1.2 °C down gradient. Temperatures in the unsaturated zone above the oil body were up to 2.7 °C more than background temperatures. Previous work at this site has shown that methane produced from biodegradation of the oil migrates upward and is oxidized in a methanotrophic zone midway between the water table and the surface. Enthalpy calculations and observations demonstrate that the temperature increases primarily result from aerobic methane oxidation in the unsaturated zone above the oil. Methane oxidation rates at the site independently estimated from surface CO2 efflux data are comparable to rates estimated from the observed temperature increases. The results indicate that temperature may be useful as a low-cost measure of activity but care is required to account for the correct heat-generating reactions, other heat sources and the effects of focused recharge.

  5. Microbial responses to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in temporary river sediments: Experimental insights.

    PubMed

    Zoppini, Annamaria; Ademollo, Nicoletta; Amalfitano, Stefano; Capri, Silvio; Casella, Patrizia; Fazi, Stefano; Marxsen, Juergen; Patrolecco, Luisa

    2016-01-15

    Temporary rivers are characterized by dry-wet phases and represent an important water resource in semi-arid regions worldwide. The fate and effect of contaminants have not been firmly established in temporary rivers such as in other aquatic environments. In this study, we assessed the effects of sediment amendment with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) on benthic microbial communities. Experimental microcosms containing natural (Control) and amended sediments (2 and 20 mg PAHs kg(-1) were incubated for 28 days. The PAH concentrations in sediments were monitored weekly together with microbial community structural (biomass and phylogenetic composition by TGGE and CARD-FISH) and functional parameters (ATP concentration, community respiration rate, bacterial carbon production rate, extracellular enzyme activities). The concentration of the PAH isomers did not change significantly with the exception of phenanthrene. No changes were observed in the TGGE profiles, whereas the occurrence of Alpha- and Beta-Proteobacteria was significantly affected by the treatments. In the amended sediments, the rates of carbon production were stimulated together with aminopeptidase enzyme activity. The community respiration rates showed values significantly lower than the Control after 1 day from the amendment then recovering the Control values during the incubation. A negative trend between the respiration rates and ATP concentration was observed only in the amended sediments. This result indicates a potential toxic effect on the oxidative phosphorylation processes. The impoverishment of the energetic resources that follows the PAH impact may act as a domino on the flux of energy from prokaryotes to the upper level of the trophic chain, with the potential to alter the temporary river functioning. PMID:26479910

  6. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, J.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

  7. Source identification of hydrocarbon contaminants and their transportation over the Zonguldak shelf, Turkish Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unlu, S.; Alpar, B.

    2009-04-01

    Under great anthropogenic pressure due to the substantial freshwater input from the surrounding industrial and agricultural areas, especially central and middle-Eastern Europe, the Black Sea basin is ranked among the most ecologically threatened water bodies of the world. Oil levels are unacceptable in many coastal areas perilously close to polluted harbors and many river mouths; the places presenting the highest levels of bio-diversity and having a high socio-economic importance due to human use of coastal resources. There are about sixty sources of pollution which resulted in "hot spots" having disastrous impacts on sensitive marine and coastal areas and needing immediate priorities for action. Beyond such land-based sources, trans-boundary pollution sources from Black Sea riparian countries, heavy maritime traffic, particularly involving petroleum transports and fishing boats, and the improper disposal of ballast and bilge waters and solid waste are also important marine sources of pollution. Found in fossil fuels such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons are generated by incomplete combustion of organic matter. In order to estimate their distribution in sediment and their sources, they were monitored from the bottom samples offshore the Zonguldak industry region, one of the most polluted spots in the Turkish Black Sea. There the budget of pollutants via rivers is not precisely known due to an evident lack of data on chemical and granulometric composition of the river runoff and their fluxes. Therefore the marine sediments, essential components of marine ecosystems, are very important in our estimating the degree of the damage given to the ecosystem by such inputs. Realization of the sources and transport of these contaminants will be a critical tool for future management of the Zonguldak industry region and its watershed. The sea bottom in study area is composed of mainly sand and silt mixtures with small amount of clay. Geochemical analyses have shown that oil contamination was dominated in near-shore sediments. Their spatial distributions over the shelf area make an estimation of possible pollution sources and their transportation routes possible. Sea port activities, industrial inputs and partly maritime petroleum transport are the main sources of pollutants. They are under the control of the longshore currents supplied with river alluvium and coastal abrasion material.

  8. Partial Characterization of Biosurfactant from Lactobacillus pentosus and Comparison with Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate for the Bioremediation of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Moldes, A. B.; Paradelo, R.; Vecino, X.; Cruz, J. M.; Gudiña, E.; Rodrigues, L.; Teixeira, J. A.; Domínguez, J. M.; Barral, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    The capability of a cell bound biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus pentosus, to accelerate the bioremediation of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, was compared with a synthetic anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate SDS-). The biosurfactant produced by the bacteria was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) that clearly indicates the presence of OH and NH groups, C=O stretching of carbonyl groups and NH nebding (peptide linkage), as well as CH2–CH3 and C–O stretching, with similar FTIR spectra than other biosurfactants obtained from lactic acid bacteria. After the characterization of biosurfactant by FTIR, soil contaminated with 7,000 mg Kg−1 of octane was treated with biosurfactant from L. pentosus or SDS. Treatment of soil for 15 days with the biosurfactant produced by L. pentosus led to a 65.1% reduction in the hydrocarbon concentration, whereas SDS reduced the octane concentration to 37.2% compared with a 2.2% reduction in the soil contaminated with octane in absence of biosurfactant used as control. Besides, after 30 days of incubation soil with SDS or biosurfactant gave percentages of bioremediation around 90% in both cases. Thus, it can be concluded that biosurfactant produced by L. pentosus accelerates the bioremediation of octane-contaminated soil by improving the solubilisation of octane in the water phase of soil, achieving even better results than those reached with SDS after 15-day treatment. PMID:23691515

  9. Biomarker sensitivity for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in two marine fish species collected in Galveston Bay, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, K.L.; Steinberg, M.A.; Safe, S.H.; McDonald, S.J.; Beatty, K.B.; Kennicutt, M.C.

    1997-07-01

    The Galveston Bay estuary exhibited a contamination gradient for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, and the comparative sensitivity of various biomarkers in fish from different bay locations were determined. Two fish species, hardhead catfish (Arius felis) and Atlantic croaker (Micropogon undulatus), were collected from four stations where sediment total PAHs ranged from 68 > 1,000 ng/g. The induction of cytochrome P4501A-(CYP1A)-dependent hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, CYPIA mRNA levels, or CYPIA immunoreactive protein in hardhead catfish was highly variable in the field-collected fish and in fish dosed with up to 15 mg/kg benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). In contrast, significant differences were seen in biliary concentrations of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and BaP metabolites in hardhead catfish from polluted versus less polluted areas. In croakers taken from the same four Galveston Bay locations, EROD and glutathione S-transferase activities, immunoreactive CYP1A protein, biliary PAH metabolites, and PAH-DNA adducts were higher at the contaminated stations compared with less polluted locations. These studies suggest that the croaker is a good species for monitoring contaminants that induce CYP1A-mediated responses. Biliary PAH metabolites and PAH-DNA adducts were also sensitive indicators of exposure to PAH contamination in both species of fish.

  10. Enhancement and inhibition of microbial activity in hydrocarbon- contaminated arctic soils: Implications for nutrient-amended bioremediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braddock, J.F.; Ruth, M.L.; Catterall, P.H.; Walworth, J.L.; McCarthy, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    Bioremediation is being used or proposed as a treatment option at many hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. One such site is a former bulk-fuel storage facility near Barrow, AK, where contamination persists after approximately 380 m3 of JP-5 was spilled in 1970. The soil at the site is primarily coarse sand with low organic carbon (<1%) end low moisture (1-3%) contents. We examined the effects of nutrient additions on microorganisms in contaminated soil from this site in laboratory microcosms and in mesocosms incubated for 6 weeks in the field. Nitrogen was the major limiting nutrient in this system, but microbial populations and activity were maximally enhanced by additions of both nitrogen and phosphorus. When nutrients were added to soil in the field at three levels of N:P (100:45, 200:90, and 300:135 mg/kg soil), the greatest stimulation in microbial activity occurred at the lowest, rather than the highest, level of nutrient addition. The total soil-water potentials ranged from -2 to -15 bar with increasing levels of fertilizer. Semivolatile hydrocarbon concentrations declined significantly only in the soils treated at the low fertilizer level. These results indicate that an understanding of nutrient effects at a specific site is essential for successful bioremediation.Bioremediation is being used or proposed as a treatment option at many hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. One such site is a former bulk-fuel storage facility near Barrow, AK, where contamination persists after approximately 380 m3 of JP-5 was spilled in 1970. The soil at the site is primarily coarse sand with low organic carbon (<1%) and low moisture (1-3%) contents. We examined the effects of nutrient additions on microorganisms in contaminated soil from this site in laboratory microcosms and in mesocosms incubated for 6 weeks in the field. Nitrogen was the major limiting nutrient in this system, but microbial populations and activity were maximally enhanced by additions of both nitrogen and phosphorus. When nutrients were added to soil in the field at three levels of N:P (100:45, 200:90, and 300:135 mg/kg soil), the greatest stimulation in microbial activity occurred at the lowest, rather than the highest, level of nutrient addition. The total soil-water potentials ranged from -2 to -15 bar with increasing levels of fertilizer. Semi-volatile hydrocarbon concentrations declined significantly only in the soils treated at the low fertilizer level. These results indicate that an understanding of nutrient effects at a specific site is essential for successful bioremediation.

  11. BENZENE AND NAPHTHALENE SORPTION ON SOIL CONTAMINATED WITH HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT RESIDUAL HYDROCARBONS FROM UNLEADED GASOLINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    For complex nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), the composition of the NAPL retained in the pore space of geologic material weathers until the residual NAPL no longer acts a liquid and exists as discrete regions of hydrocarbon (termed residual hydrocarbons) in association with the ...

  12. Separation of motor oils, oily wastes and hydrocarbons from contaminated water by sorption on chrome shavings.

    PubMed

    Gammoun, A; Tahiri, S; Albizane, A; Azzi, M; Moros, J; Garrigues, S; de la Guardia, M

    2007-06-25

    In this paper, the ability of chrome shavings to remove motor oils, oily wastes and hydrocarbons from water has been studied. To determine amount of hydrocarbons sorbed on tanned wastes, a FT-NIR methodology was used and a multivariate calibration based on partial least squares (PLS) was employed for data treatment. The light density, porous tanned waste granules float on the surface of water and remove hydrocarbons and oil films. Wastes fibers from tannery industry have high sorption capacity. These tanned solid wastes are capable of absorbing many times their weight in oil or hydrocarbons (6.5-7.6g of oil and 6.3g of hydrocarbons per gram of chrome shavings). The removal efficiency of the pollutants from water is complete. The sorption of pollutants is a quasi-instantaneous process. PMID:17157981

  13. Patterns of benthic bacterial diversity in coastal areas contaminated by heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

    PubMed

    Quero, Grazia Marina; Cassin, Daniele; Botter, Margherita; Perini, Laura; Luna, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotes in coastal sediments are fundamental players in the ecosystem functioning and regulate processes relevant in the global biogeochemical cycles. Nevertheless, knowledge on benthic microbial diversity patterns across spatial scales, or as function to anthropogenic influence, is still limited. We investigated the microbial diversity in two of the most chemically polluted sites along the coast of Italy. One site is the Po River Prodelta (Northern Adriatic Sea), which receives contaminant discharge from one of the largest rivers in Europe. The other site, the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea), is a chronically polluted area due to steel production plants, oil refineries, and intense maritime traffic. We collected sediments from 30 stations along gradients of contamination, and studied prokaryotic diversity using Illumina sequencing of amplicons of a 16S rDNA gene fragment. The main sediment variables and the concentration of eleven metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured. Chemical analyses confirmed the high contamination in both sites, with concentrations of PCBs particularly high and often exceeding the sediment guidelines. The analysis of more than 3 millions 16S rDNA sequences showed that richness decreased with higher contamination levels. Multivariate analyses showed that contaminants significantly shaped community composition. Assemblages differed significantly between the two sites, but showed wide within-site variations related with spatial gradients in the chemical contamination, and the presence of a core set of OTUs shared by the two geographically distant sites. A larger importance of PCB-degrading taxa was observed in the Mar Piccolo, suggesting their potential selection in this historically polluted site. Our results indicate that sediment contamination by multiple contaminants significantly alter benthic prokaryotic diversity in coastal areas, and suggests considering the potential contribution of the resident microbes to contaminant bioremediation actions. PMID:26528247

  14. Patterns of benthic bacterial diversity in coastal areas contaminated by heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    PubMed Central

    Quero, Grazia Marina; Cassin, Daniele; Botter, Margherita; Perini, Laura; Luna, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotes in coastal sediments are fundamental players in the ecosystem functioning and regulate processes relevant in the global biogeochemical cycles. Nevertheless, knowledge on benthic microbial diversity patterns across spatial scales, or as function to anthropogenic influence, is still limited. We investigated the microbial diversity in two of the most chemically polluted sites along the coast of Italy. One site is the Po River Prodelta (Northern Adriatic Sea), which receives contaminant discharge from one of the largest rivers in Europe. The other site, the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea), is a chronically polluted area due to steel production plants, oil refineries, and intense maritime traffic. We collected sediments from 30 stations along gradients of contamination, and studied prokaryotic diversity using Illumina sequencing of amplicons of a 16S rDNA gene fragment. The main sediment variables and the concentration of eleven metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured. Chemical analyses confirmed the high contamination in both sites, with concentrations of PCBs particularly high and often exceeding the sediment guidelines. The analysis of more than 3 millions 16S rDNA sequences showed that richness decreased with higher contamination levels. Multivariate analyses showed that contaminants significantly shaped community composition. Assemblages differed significantly between the two sites, but showed wide within-site variations related with spatial gradients in the chemical contamination, and the presence of a core set of OTUs shared by the two geographically distant sites. A larger importance of PCB-degrading taxa was observed in the Mar Piccolo, suggesting their potential selection in this historically polluted site. Our results indicate that sediment contamination by multiple contaminants significantly alter benthic prokaryotic diversity in coastal areas, and suggests considering the potential contribution of the resident microbes to contaminant bioremediation actions. PMID:26528247

  15. Hydrocarbon biodegradation in oxygen-limited sequential batch reactors by consortium from weathered, oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Medina-Moreno, S A; Huerta-Ochoa, S; Gutirrez-Rojas, M

    2005-03-01

    We studied the use of sequential batch reactors under oxygen limitation to improve and maintain consortium ability to biodegrade hydrocarbons. Air-agitated tubular reactors (2.5 L) were operated for 20 sequential 21-day cycles. Maya crude oil-paraffin mixture (13,000 mg/L) was used as the sole carbon source. The reactors were inoculated with a consortium from the rhizosphere of Cyperus laxus, a native plant that grows naturally in weathered, contaminated soil. Oxygen limitation was induced in the tubular reactor by maintaining low oxygen transfer coefficients (k(L)a < 20.6 h(-1)). The extent and biodegradation rates increased significantly up to the fourth cycle, maintaining values of about 66.33% and 460 mg x L(-1) x d(-1), respectively. Thereafter, sequential batch reactor operation exhibited a pattern with a constant general trend of biodegradation. The effect of oxygen limitation on consortium activity led to a low biomass yield and non-soluble metabolite (0.45 g SS/g hydrocarbons consumed). The average number of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms increased from 6.5 x 10(7) (cycles 1-3) to 2.2 x 10(8) (cycles 4-20). Five bacterial strains were identified: Achromobacter (Alcaligenes) xylosoxidans, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Brevibacterium luteum, and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. Asphaltene-free total petroleum hydrocarbons, extracted from a weathered, contaminated soil, were also biodegraded (97.1 mg x L(-1) x d(-1)) and mineralized (210.48 mg CO2 x L(-1) x d(-1)) by the enriched consortium without inhibition. Our results indicate that sequential batch reactors under oxygen limitation can be used to produce consortia with high and constant biodegradation ability for industrial applications of bioremediation. PMID:15920621

  16. CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON DEGRADATION IN PLANTS: MECHANISMS AND ENHANCEMENT OF PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a...

  17. Persistence of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in sediments of the canals in Venice, Italy: 1995 and 1998.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Dana L; Van Vleet, Edward S

    2003-08-01

    Total hydrocarbon and selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels were examined in sediments collected from known problematic areas in the canals of Venice, Italy, in 1995 and 1998. Hydrocarbon concentrations were greatest in the interior canals, moderate in the partially enclosed locations and lowest in the open-water sites. Total hydrocarbon and PAH concentrations declined from 1995 to 1998. Ancillary data suggest that this decline may have been in response to the elimination of many industrial activities in the lagoon and to initiating an aggressive canal dredging program. The distributions of individual components were generally similar both years regardless of the total PAH concentration or the location of sample collected. PAH alkyl homolog distributions suggest that atmospheric deposition of petrochemical combustion products is the main source of PAHs to Venice's sediments. In some cases however, the presence of low levels of the two-ring naphthalene homologous series indicate additional low-level inputs of fresh oil. PMID:12907195

  18. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

    1998-08-25

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

  19. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, Wei; Anderson, Roger N.

    1998-01-01

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

  20. Linkage between bacterial and fungal rhizosphere communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is related to plant phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Terrence H; El-Din Hassan, Saad; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Al-Otaibi, Fahad; Hijri, Mohamed; Yergeau, Etienne; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to excavating and chemically treating contaminated soils. Certain plants can directly bioremediate by sequestering and/or transforming pollutants, but plants may also enhance bioremediation by promoting contaminant-degrading microorganisms in soils. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region to compare the community composition of 66 soil samples from the rhizosphere of planted willows (Salix spp.) and six unplanted control samples at the site of a former petrochemical plant. The Bray–Curtis distance between bacterial communities across willow cultivars was significantly correlated with the distance between fungal communities in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils but not in highly contaminated (HC) soils (>2000 mg kg−1 hydrocarbons). The mean dissimilarity between fungal, but not bacterial, communities from the rhizosphere of different cultivars increased substantially in the HC blocks. This divergence was partly related to high fungal sensitivity to hydrocarbon contaminants, as demonstrated by reduced Shannon diversity, but also to a stronger influence of willows on fungal communities. Abundance of the fungal class Pezizomycetes in HC soils was directly related to willow phylogeny, with Pezizomycetes dominating the rhizosphere of a monophyletic cluster of cultivars, while remaining in low relative abundance in other soils. This has implications for plant selection in phytoremediation, as fungal associations may affect the health of introduced plants and the success of co-inoculated microbial strains. An integrated understanding of the relationships between fungi, bacteria and plants will enable the design of treatments that specifically promote effective bioremediating communities. PMID:23985744

  1. Metagenome-Based Metabolic Reconstruction Reveals the Ecophysiological Function of Epsilonproteobacteria in a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Sulfidic Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andreas H.; Schleinitz, Kathleen M.; Starke, Robert; Bertilsson, Stefan; Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The population genome of an uncultured bacterium assigned to the Campylobacterales (Epsilonproteobacteria) was reconstructed from a metagenome dataset obtained by whole-genome shotgun pyrosequencing. Genomic DNA was extracted from a sulfate-reducing, m-xylene-mineralizing enrichment culture isolated from groundwater of a benzene-contaminated sulfidic aquifer. The identical epsilonproteobacterial phylotype has previously been detected in toluene- or benzene-mineralizing, sulfate-reducing consortia enriched from the same site. Previous stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments with 13C6-labeled benzene suggested that this phylotype assimilates benzene-derived carbon in a syntrophic benzene-mineralizing consortium that uses sulfate as terminal electron acceptor. However, the type of energy metabolism and the ecophysiological function of this epsilonproteobacterium within aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and in the sulfidic aquifer are poorly understood. Annotation of the epsilonproteobacterial population genome suggests that the bacterium plays a key role in sulfur cycling as indicated by the presence of an sqr gene encoding a sulfide quinone oxidoreductase and psr genes encoding a polysulfide reductase. It may gain energy by using sulfide or hydrogen/formate as electron donors. Polysulfide, fumarate, as well as oxygen are potential electron acceptors. Auto- or mixotrophic carbon metabolism seems plausible since a complete reductive citric acid cycle was detected. Thus the bacterium can thrive in pristine groundwater as well as in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers. In hydrocarbon-contaminated sulfidic habitats, the epsilonproteobacterium may generate energy by coupling the oxidation of hydrogen or formate and highly abundant sulfide with the reduction of fumarate and/or polysulfide, accompanied by efficient assimilation of acetate produced during fermentation or incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbons. The highly efficient assimilation of acetate was recently demonstrated by a pulsed 13C2-acetate protein SIP experiment. The capability of nitrogen fixation as indicated by the presence of nif genes may provide a selective advantage in nitrogen-depleted habitats. Based on this metabolic reconstruction, we propose acetate capture and sulfur cycling as key functions of Epsilonproteobacteria within the intermediary ecosystem metabolism of hydrocarbon-rich sulfidic sediments. PMID:26696999

  2. Sample preparation and characterization for a study of environmentally acceptable endpoints for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitinger, J.P.; Finn, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    In the past, the interdisciplinary research effort required to investigate the acceptable cleanup endpoints for hydrocarbon-impacted soils has been limited by the lack of standardized soils for testing. To support the efforts of the various researchers participating in the EAE research initiative, soil samples were collected from ten sites representing hydrocarbon-impacted soils typical of exploration/production, refinery, and bulk storage terminal operations. The hydrocarbons in the standard soils include crude oil, mixed refinery products, diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Physical characterization included analysis of soil texture, water retention, particle density, nanoporosity, pH, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, buffer capacity, organic carbon, sodium adsorption ratio, and clay mineralogy. Chemical characterization included analysis of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and metals, and TCLP for metals and organics. An analysis of the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions was performed on each soil to support the use of various models for assessing soil toxicity. Screening-level toxicity tests were conducted using Microtox{trademark}, plant seed germination and growth, and earthworm mortality and growth. Biodegradability screening tests were performed in slurry shake flasks to estimate the availability of hydrocarbon fractions to soil microorganisms.

  3. EDTA addition enhances bacterial respiration activities and hydrocarbon degradation in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils.

    PubMed

    Al Kharusi, Samiha; Abed, Raeid M M; Dobretsov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    The low number and activity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and the low solubility and availability of hydrocarbons hamper bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils in arid deserts, thus bioremediation treatments that circumvent these limitations are required. We tested the effect of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) addition, at different concentrations (i.e. 0.1, 1 and 10 mM), on bacterial respiration and biodegradation of Arabian light oil in bioaugmented (i.e. with the addition of exogenous alkane-degrading consortium) and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils. Post-treatment shifts in the soils' bacterial community structure were monitored using MiSeq sequencing. Bacterial respiration, indicated by the amount of evolved CO2, was highest at 10 mM EDTA in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented soils, reaching an amount of 2.2 ± 0.08 and 1.6 ± 0.02 mg-CO2 g(-1) after 14 days of incubation, respectively. GC-MS revealed that 91.5% of the C14-C30 alkanes were degraded after 42 days when 10 mM EDTA and the bacterial consortium were added together. MiSeq sequencing showed that 78-91% of retrieved sequences in the original soil belonged to Deinococci, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteia and Bacilli. The same bacterial classes were detected in the 10 mM EDTA-treated soils, however with slight differences in their relative abundances. In the bioaugmented soils, only Alcanivorax sp. MH3 and Parvibaculum sp. MH21 from the exogenous bacterial consortium could survive until the end of the experiment. We conclude that the addition of EDTA at appropriate concentrations could facilitate biodegradation processes by increasing hydrocarbon availability to microbes. The addition of exogenous oil-degrading bacteria along with EDTA could serve as an ideal solution for the decontamination of oil-contaminated desert soils. PMID:26766366

  4. Heavy Metals and Petroleum Hydrocarbons Contamination of Bottom Sediments of Gulf of Oman area, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musallam, A.; El Tokhi, M.; Abed, S. Al; Mahmoud, B.

    2012-04-01

    The concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), total organic carbon (%TOC) and petroleum related heavy metals beside the grain size distribution of 4 stations in Gulf of Oman area (Khor Kalbaa , Debba ,Khor Fakan and Fujairah) , UAE were determined in the bottom sediment. Copper, zinc, nickel, lead, cadmium and vanadium concentration were found within the lowest effect, The contamination levels were found due to petrogenic origin and their sources are either weathered or highly weathered crude oils and or used lubricating oil. Their detection gives an indication of recent and continuous petroleum inputs.

  5. Novel Application of Cyclolipopeptide Amphisin: Feasibility Study as Additive to Remediate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Groboillot, Anne; Portet-Koltalo, Florence; Le Derf, Franck; Feuilloley, Marc J. G.; Orange, Nicole; Poc, Cécile Duclairoir

    2011-01-01

    To decontaminate dredged harbor sediments by bioremediation or electromigration processes, adding biosurfactants could enhance the bioavailability or mobility of contaminants in an aqueous phase. Pure amphisin from Pseudomonas fluorescens DSS73 displays increased effectiveness in releasing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) strongly adsorbed to sediments when compared to a synthetic anionic surfactant. Amphisin production by the bacteria in the natural environment was also considered. DSS73’s growth is weakened by three model PAHs above saturation, but amphisin is still produced. Estuarine water feeding the dredged material disposal site of a Norman harbor (France) allows both P. fluorescens DSS73 growth and amphisin production. PMID:21673923

  6. Assessment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Contamination of Breeding Pools Utilized by the Puerto Rican Crested Toad, Peltophryne lemur

    PubMed Central

    Gjeltema, Jenessa; Stoskopf, Michael; Shea, Damian; De Voe, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Habitat preservation and management may play an important role in the conservation of the Puerto Rican crested toad, Peltophryne lemur, due to this species' small geographic range and declining native wild population. Bioavailable water concentrations of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants within breeding pools at 3 sites were established using Passive Sampling Devices (PSDs) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A more diverse population of PAH analytes were found in higher concentrations at the breeding site that allowed direct vehicular access, but calculated risk quotients indicated low risk to toad reproduction associated with the current PAH analyte levels. PMID:23762634

  7. Contrasting the community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from hydrocarbon-contaminated and uncontaminated soils following willow (Salix spp. L.) planting.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Saad El-Din; Bell, Terrence H; Stefani, Franck O P; Denis, David; Hijri, Mohamed; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a potentially inexpensive alternative to chemical treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, but its success depends heavily on identifying factors that govern the success of root-associated microorganisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation and plant growth stimulation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with many terrestrial plants, and are known to stimulate plant growth, although both species identity and the environment influence this relationship. Although AMF are suspected to play a role in plant adaptation to hydrocarbon contamination, their distribution in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is not well known. In this study, we examined how AMF communities were structured within the rhizosphere of 11 introduced willow cultivars as well as unplanted controls across uncontaminated and hydrocarbon-contaminated soils at the site of a former petrochemical plant. We obtained 69 282 AMF-specific 18S rDNA sequences using 454-pyrosequencing, representing 27 OTUs. Contaminant concentration was the major influence on AMF community structure, with different AMF families dominating at each contaminant level. The most abundant operational taxonomic unit in each sample represented a large proportion of the total community, and this proportion was positively associated with increasing contamination, and seemingly, by planting as well. The most contaminated soils were dominated by three phylotypes closely related to Rhizophagus irregularis, while these OTUs represented only a small proportion of sequences in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils. These results suggest that in situ inoculation of AMF strains could be an important component of phytoremediation treatments, but that strains should be selected from the narrow group that is both adapted to contaminant toxicity and able to compete with indigenous AMF species. PMID:25032685

  8. Contrasting the Community Structure of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi from Hydrocarbon-Contaminated and Uncontaminated Soils following Willow (Salix spp. L.) Planting

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Franck O. P.; Denis, David; Hijri, Mohamed; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a potentially inexpensive alternative to chemical treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, but its success depends heavily on identifying factors that govern the success of root-associated microorganisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation and plant growth stimulation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with many terrestrial plants, and are known to stimulate plant growth, although both species identity and the environment influence this relationship. Although AMF are suspected to play a role in plant adaptation to hydrocarbon contamination, their distribution in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is not well known. In this study, we examined how AMF communities were structured within the rhizosphere of 11 introduced willow cultivars as well as unplanted controls across uncontaminated and hydrocarbon-contaminated soils at the site of a former petrochemical plant. We obtained 69 282 AMF-specific 18S rDNA sequences using 454-pyrosequencing, representing 27 OTUs. Contaminant concentration was the major influence on AMF community structure, with different AMF families dominating at each contaminant level. The most abundant operational taxonomic unit in each sample represented a large proportion of the total community, and this proportion was positively associated with increasing contamination, and seemingly, by planting as well. The most contaminated soils were dominated by three phylotypes closely related to Rhizophagus irregularis, while these OTUs represented only a small proportion of sequences in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils. These results suggest that in situ inoculation of AMF strains could be an important component of phytoremediation treatments, but that strains should be selected from the narrow group that is both adapted to contaminant toxicity and able to compete with indigenous AMF species. PMID:25032685

  9. Microbial activity and diversity in long-term mixed contaminated soils with respect to polyaromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Malik, Seidu; Beer, Michael; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2012-05-30

    The co-occurrence of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with heavy metals and their effect on soil microbial activity have not been systematically investigated. In this study a holistic approach was employed by combining physico-chemical, biological and advanced molecular methods to determine the soil microbial activities of long-term mixed contaminated soils collected from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. Concentrations of PAHs in MGP soils ranged from 335 to 8645 mg/kg. Of the potentially toxic metals, concentrations of lead were found to be highest, ranging from 88 to 671 mg/kg, cadmium 8 to 112 mg/kg, while zinc varied from 64 to 488 mg/kg. The enzyme activities were severely inhibited in soils that were contaminated with both PAHs and heavy metals. The presence of heavy metals in PAH-contaminated soils not only reduced the diversity of microbial population but also showed a few distinctive species by exerting selective pressure. The multivariate analysis revealed that there is an association between PAHs and heavy metals which influenced biological properties in mixed contaminated soils. The findings of this study have major implications for the bioremediation of organic pollutants in metal-organic mixed contaminated sites. PMID:22306081

  10. Assessment of diesel contamination in groundwater using electromagnetic induction geophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, S.; Fallgren, P.; Cooper, J.; Morris, J; . Urynowicz, M.

    2008-07-01

    Determining hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater is typically accomplished through the installation of extensive monitoring wells. Issues of scale and site heterogeneities tend to introduce errors in delineating the extent of contamination and environmental impact. In this study, electromagnetic induction survey was investigated as an alternative technique for mapping petroleum contaminants in the subsurface. The surveys were conducted at a coal mining site near Gillette, Wyoming, using the EM34-XL ground conductivity meter. Data from this survey were validated with known concentrations of diesel compounds detected in groundwater from the study site. Groundwater data correlated well with the electromagnetic survey data, which was used to generate a site model to identify subsurface diesel plumes. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to use electromagnetic survey techniques for mapping hydrocarbon contamination in groundwater. Results from this study indicate that this geophysical technique can be an effective tool for assessing subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon sources and plumes at contaminated sites.

  11. Assessment of diesel contamination in groundwater using electromagnetic induction geophysical techniques.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Fallgren, Paul; Cooper, Jeffrey; Morris, Jeffrey; Urynowicz, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Determining hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater is typically accomplished through the installation of extensive monitoring wells. Issues of scale and site heterogeneities tend to introduce errors in delineating the extent of contamination and environmental impact. In this study, electromagnetic induction survey was investigated as an alternative technique for mapping petroleum contaminants in the subsurface. The surveys were conducted at a coal mining site near Gillette, Wyoming, using the EM34-XL ground conductivity meter. Data from this survey were validated with known concentrations of diesel compounds detected in groundwater from the study site. Groundwater data correlated well with the electromagnetic survey data, which was used to generate a site model to identify subsurface diesel plumes. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to use electromagnetic survey techniques for mapping hydrocarbon contamination in groundwater. Results from this study indicate that this geophysical technique can be an effective tool for assessing subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon sources and plumes at contaminated sites. PMID:18393065

  12. Forensic differentiation of biogenic organic compounds from petroleum hydrocarbons in biogenic and petrogenic compounds cross-contaminated soils and sediments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhendi; Yang, C; Kelly-Hooper, F; Hollebone, B P; Peng, X; Brown, C E; Landriault, M; Sun, J; Yang, Z

    2009-02-13

    "Total petroleum hydrocarbons" (TPHs) or "petroleum hydrocarbons" (PHCs) are one of the most widespread soil pollutants in Canada, North America, and worldwide. Clean-up of PHC-contaminated soils and sediments costs the Canadian economy hundreds of million of dollars annually. Much of this activity is driven by the need to meet regulated levels of PHC in soil. These PHC values are legally required to be assessed using standard methods. The method most commonly used in Canada, specified by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), measures the total hydrocarbon concentrations in a soil by carbon range (Fraction 1: C(6)-C(10); Fraction 2: C(10)-C(16), Fraction 3: C(16)-C(34): and Fraction 4: C(34)+). Using the CCME method, all of the materials extractible by a mixture of 1:1 hexane:acetone are considered to be petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants. Many hydrocarbon compounds and other extractible materials in soil, however, may originate from non-petroleum sources. Biogenic organic compounds (BOCs) is a general term used to describe a mixture of organic compounds, including alkanes, sterols and sterones, fatty acids and fatty alcohols, and waxes and wax esters, biosynthesized by living organisms. BOCs are also produced during the early stages of diagenesis in recent aquatic sediments. BOC sources could include vascular plants, algae, bacteria and animals. Plants and algae produce BOCs as protective wax coating that are released back into the sediment at the end of their life cycle. BOCs are natural components of thriving plant communities. Many solvent-extraction methods for assessing soil hydrocarbons, however, such as the CCME method, do not differentiate PHCs from BOCs. The naturally occurring organics present in soils and wet sediments can be easily misidentified and quantified as regulated PHCs during analysis using such methods. In some cases, biogenic interferences can exceed regulatory levels, resulting in remediation of petroleum impacts that are not actually present. Consequently, reliance on these methods can trigger unnecessary and costly remediation, while also wasting valuable landfill space. Therefore, it is critically important to develop new protocols to characterize and differentiate PHCs and BOCs in contaminated sediments. In this study, a new reliable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method, in combination with a derivatization technique, for characterization of various biogenic compounds (including biogenic alkanes, sterols, fatty acids and fatty alcohols) and PHCs in the same sample has been developed. A multi-criteria approach has been developed to positively identify the presence of biogenic compounds in soil and sediment samples. More than thirty sediment samples were collected from city stormwater management (SWM) ponds and wetlands across Canada. In these wet sediment samples, abundant biogenic n-alkanes, thirteen biogenic sterols, nineteen fatty carboxylic acids, and fourteen fatty alcohols in a wide carbon range have been positively identified. Both PHCs and BOCs in these samples were quantitatively determined. The quantitation data will be used for assessment of the contamination sites and toxicity risks associated with the CCME Fraction 3 hydrocarbons. PMID:19131067

  13. Hepatic coenzyme Q redox balance of fishes as a potential bioindicator of environmental contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Hasbi, Ghitarina; de Nys, Rocky; Burns, Kathryn; Whalan, Steve; Dunlap, Walter C

    2011-02-23

    In this communication, we introduce a novel biomarker of aquatic contamination based on the xenobiotic-induced response of the hepatic coenzyme Q (CoQ) redox balance of fishes to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The method is demonstrated by comparing changes in the liver CoQ redox balance with that measured using the CYP1A-based, 7-ethoxyresofurin-O-deethylase activity assay, on administration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and ?-naphthoflavone (BNF) to Barramundi (Lates calcarifer). Both assays showed comparable dose-dependent effects in fish treated with BaP or BNF. Perturbation in the constitutive hepatic CoQ redox balance of fishes may thus provide a simple biomarker of aquatic PAH contamination. PMID:20739316

  14. Reproductive and morphological condition of wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lutra canadensis) in relation to chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.

    PubMed

    Harding, L E; Harris, M L; Stephen, C R; Elliott, J E

    1999-02-01

    We assessed chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of mink and river otters on the Columbia and Fraser River systems of northwestern North America, in relation to morphological measures of condition. We obtained carcasses of mink and river otters from commercial trappers during the winters 1994-1995 and 1995-1996. Necropsies included evaluation of the following biological parameters: sex, body mass and length, age, thymus, heart, liver, lung, spleen, pancreas, kidney, gonad, omentum, adrenal gland and baculum masses, baculum length, and stomach contents. Livers were analyzed, individually or in pools, for residues of organochlorine (OC) pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans. Contaminant levels were relatively low compared to those documented in other North American populations, although they ranged higher than those detected during an earlier survey (1990-1992) of these regional populations. Body condition varied slightly among collection regions, but showed no relationship with contaminant burden. Mink from the upper Fraser River had less fat stores and also had some of the lowest OC contamination levels observed. Similarly, a few individuals with enlarged livers and kidneys had low contaminant levels. Although a few individual animals with gross abnormalities of reproductive systems did not show high levels of contamination, there was a significant negative correlation between total PCB concentrations (as Aroclor 1260) and baculum length in juvenile mink (r = 0.707; p = 0.033; n = 8). The association of juvenile baculum length with eventual reproductive success is unknown, but further characterization of reproductive organ morphology and relationship to contaminants should be undertaken in a larger subset of these populations. PMID:9924010

  15. Reproductive and morphological condition of wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lutra canadensis) in relation to chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, L E; Harris, M L; Stephen, C R; Elliott, J E

    1999-01-01

    We assessed chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of mink and river otters on the Columbia and Fraser River systems of northwestern North America, in relation to morphological measures of condition. We obtained carcasses of mink and river otters from commercial trappers during the winters 1994-1995 and 1995-1996. Necropsies included evaluation of the following biological parameters: sex, body mass and length, age, thymus, heart, liver, lung, spleen, pancreas, kidney, gonad, omentum, adrenal gland and baculum masses, baculum length, and stomach contents. Livers were analyzed, individually or in pools, for residues of organochlorine (OC) pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans. Contaminant levels were relatively low compared to those documented in other North American populations, although they ranged higher than those detected during an earlier survey (1990-1992) of these regional populations. Body condition varied slightly among collection regions, but showed no relationship with contaminant burden. Mink from the upper Fraser River had less fat stores and also had some of the lowest OC contamination levels observed. Similarly, a few individuals with enlarged livers and kidneys had low contaminant levels. Although a few individual animals with gross abnormalities of reproductive systems did not show high levels of contamination, there was a significant negative correlation between total PCB concentrations (as Aroclor 1260) and baculum length in juvenile mink (r = 0.707; p = 0.033; n = 8). The association of juvenile baculum length with eventual reproductive success is unknown, but further characterization of reproductive organ morphology and relationship to contaminants should be undertaken in a larger subset of these populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9924010

  16. Molecular Analysis of Surfactant-Driven Microbial Population Shifts in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Colores, Gregory M.; Macur, Richard E.; Ward, David M.; Inskeep, William P.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of surfactant addition on hydrocarbon mineralization kinetics and the associated population shifts of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in soil. A mixture of radiolabeled hexadecane and phenanthrene was added to batch soil vessels. Witconol SN70 (a nonionic, alcohol ethoxylate) was added in concentrations that bracketed the critical micelle concentration (CMC) in soil (CMC?) (determined to be 13 mg g?1). Addition of the surfactant at a concentration below the CMC? (2 mg g?1) did not affect the mineralization rates of either hydrocarbon. However, when surfactant was added at a concentration approaching the CMC? (10 mg g?1), hexadecane mineralization was delayed and phenanthrene mineralization was completely inhibited. Addition of surfactant at concentrations above the CMC? (40 mg g?1) completely inhibited mineralization of both phenanthrene and hexadecane. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene segments showed that hydrocarbon amendment stimulated Rhodococcus and Nocardia populations that were displaced by Pseudomonas and Alcaligenes populations at elevated surfactant levels. Parallel cultivation studies revealed that the Rhodococcus population can utilize hexadecane and that the Pseudomonas and Alcaligenes populations can utilize both Witconol SN70 and hexadecane for growth. The results suggest that surfactant applications necessary to achieve the CMC alter the microbial populations responsible for hydrocarbon mineralization. PMID:10877792

  17. Fluorescent aromatic hydrocarbons in bile as a biomarker of exposure of brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) to contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Leadly, T.A.; Haffner, G.D.; Arcand-Hoy, L.D.; Metcalfe, C.D.

    1999-04-01

    Analysis of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) in the bile of fish has been widely used as a biomarker of exposure to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination. However, bile FAC data for feral fish populations are typically highly variable, and in a few cases, elevation of FACs has not been observed in fish from contaminated areas. In this study, the bile FACs and hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) exposed in the laboratory to contaminated sediments from Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, Canada, increased by 173-fold within 72 h of initial exposure and rapidly declined thereafter. In bullheads caged in the contaminated Trenton Channel area of the Detroit River, bile FACs also increased rapidly within 4 d of initial exposure to mean levels >3,000 ng of benzo[a]pyrene equivalents per milliliter of bile. Surprisingly, there was no difference in the mean-levels of bile FACs in fish caged above the sediment versus fish caged in direct contact with the sediment, indicating that water may be the major vector for uptake of PAHs. The lower bile FACs in bullheads caged in other regions of the Detroit River were consistent with the lower concentrations of PAHs in the sediments from these areas. These data indicate that bile FAC levels are a biomarker of recent exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments. However, FAC data were highly variable even in these studies, in which fish were relatively homogenous in size, feeding status, and exposure history. Therefore, Even higher variability in bile FAC data are expected in biomarker studies as a result of differences in reproductive status, size, diet, and mobility of the fish.

  18. Changes in hydrocarbon groups, soil ecotoxicity and microbiology along horizontal and vertical contamination gradients in an old landfarming field for oil refinery waste.

    PubMed

    Mikkonen, Anu; Hakala, Kati P; Lappi, Kaisa; Kondo, Elina; Vaalama, Anu; Suominen, Leena

    2012-03-01

    Horizontal and vertical contaminant gradients in an old landfarming field for oil refinery waste were characterised with the aim to assess parallel changes in hydrocarbon groups and general, microbiological and ecotoxicological soil characteristics. In the surface soil polar compounds were the most prevalent fraction of heptane-extractable hydrocarbons, superseding GC-FID-resolvable and high-molar-mass aliphatics and aromatics, but there was no indication of their relatively higher mobility or toxicity. The size of the polar fraction correlated poorly with soil physical, chemical and microbiological properties, which were better explained by the total heptane-extractable and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Deleterious effects on soil microbiology in situ were observed at surprisingly low TPH concentrations (0.3%). Due to the accumulation of polar and complexed degradation products, TPH seems an insufficient measure to assess the quality and monitor the remediation of soil with weathered hydrocarbon contamination. PMID:22243888

  19. Subsurface geology of the Warfield structures in southwestern West Virginia: Implications for tectonic deformation and hydrocarbon exploration in the Central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, D.; Shumaker, R.C.

    1996-08-01

    Data from over 6000 wells and five multichannel reflection seismic lines were used to constrain the subsurface geometry of the Warfield structures in southwestern West Virginia within the central Appalachian basin. Based on their vertical differences in geometry and structural styles, we divided the Warfield structures into shallow (above the Devonian Onondaga Limestone), intermediate (between the Devonian Onondaga Limestone and the Silurian Tuscarora Sandstone), and deep (below the Ordovician Trenton horizon) structural levels. Shallow structures are related to the Alleghanian deformation above the major detachment horizon of the Devonian shales and consist of the Warfield anticline with a 91.5-m closure and southeast-dipping monoclines, which aided the northwest migration and entrapment of oil and gas. At the intermediate level, the closure of the Warfield anticline is lost because the Alleghanian deformation is obscured below the major detachment of the Devonian shales, which explains the reduced production from the Devonian and Silurian reservoirs. Deep structures are characterized by an asymmetric half graben within a continental rift system known as the Rome trough, in which a thick sequence of sedimentary rocks exists to provide sources for overlying reservoirs. Although stratigraphic traps may be associated with thickness and facies changes, the deep level is structurally unfavorable for trapping hydrocarbons. Based on changes we found in map trend, we divided the Warfield structures into a middle segment and southern and northern bends. The middle segment is parallel to the New York-Alabama lineament (a northeast-trending magnetic gradient); the southern and the northern bends are linked to the 38th parallel lineament (a west-trending fault system) and the Burning Springs-Mann Mountain lineament (a north-trending magnetic gradient), respectively.

  20. Emerging organic contaminant removal depending on primary treatment and operational strategy in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: influence of redox.

    PubMed

    Avila, Cristina; Reyes, Carolina; Bayona, Josep María; García, Joan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the influence of primary treatment (hydrolytic upflow sludge blanket (HUSB) reactor vs. conventional settling) and operational strategy (alternation of saturated/unsaturated phases vs. permanently saturated) on the removal of various emerging organic contaminants (i.e. ibuprofen, diclofenac, acetaminophen, tonalide, oxybenzone, bisphenol A) in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands. For that purpose, a continuous injection experiment was carried out in an experimental treatment plant for 26 days. The plant had 3 treatment lines: a control line (settler-wetland permanently saturated), a batch line (settler-wetland operated with saturate/unsaturated phases) and an anaerobic line (HUSB reactor-wetland permanently saturated). In each line, wetlands had a surface area of 2.95 m(2), a water depth of 25 cm and a granular medium D(60) = 7.3 mm, and were planted with common reed. During the study period the wetlands were operated at a hydraulic and organic load of 25 mm/d and about 4.7 g BOD/m(2)d, respectively. The injection experiment delivered very robust results that show how the occurrence of higher redox potentials within the wetland bed promotes the elimination of conventional quality parameters as well as emerging microcontaminants. Overall, removal efficiencies were always greater for the batch line than for the control and anaerobic lines, and to this respect statistically significantly differences were found for ibuprofen, diclofenac, oxybenzone and bisphenol A. As an example, ibuprofen, whose major removal mechanism has been reported to be biodegradation under aerobic conditions, showed a higher removal in the batch line (85%) than in the control (63%) and anaerobic (52%) lines. Bisphenol A showed also a great dependence on the redox status of the wetlands, finding an 89% removal rate for the batch line, as opposed to the control and anaerobic lines (79 and 65%, respectively). Furthermore, diclofenac showed a greater removal under a higher redox status (70, 48 and 32% in the batch, control and anaerobic lines). Average removal efficiencies of acetaminophen, oxybenzone and tonalide were almost >90% for the 3 treatment lines. The results of this study indicate that the efficiency of horizontal flow constructed wetland systems can be improved by using a batch operation strategy. Furthermore, we tentatively identified 4-hydroxy-diclofenac and carboxy-bisphenol A as intermediate degradation products. The higher abundance of the latter under the batch operation strategy reinforced biodegradation as a relevant bisphenol A removal pathway under higher redox conditions. PMID:23123085

  1. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa DSVP20 isolated from petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and its physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Adgaba, Nuru; Khan, Khalid Ali; Pruthi, Vikas; Al-Waili, Noori

    2015-11-01

    Among 348 microbial strains isolated from petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, five were selected for their ability to produce biosurfactant based on battery of screening assay including hemolytic activity, surface tension reduction, drop collapse assay, emulsification activity, and cell surface hydrophobicity studies. Of these, bacterial isolate DSVP20 was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCBI GenBank accession no. GQ865644) based on biochemical characterization and the 16S rDNA analysis, and it was found to be a potential candidate for biosurfactant production. Maximum biosurfactant production recorded by P. aeruginosa DSVP20 was 6.7g/l after 72h at 150rpm and at a temperature of 30C. Chromatographic analysis and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) revealed that it was a glycolipid in nature which was further confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bioremediation studies using purified biosurfactant showed that P. aeruginosa DSVP20 has the ability to degrade eicosane (97%), pristane (75%), and fluoranthene (47%) when studied at different time intervals for a total of 7days. The results of this study showed that the P. aeruginosa DSVP20 and/or biosurfactant produced by this isolate have the potential role in bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. PMID:26146372

  2. Natural attenuation of fuel hydrocarbon contaminants: Hydraulic conductivity dependency of biodegradation rates in a field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-07-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  3. Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbon Contaminants: Correlation of Biodegradation with Hydraulic Conductivity in a Field Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-10-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, USA. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  4. Identification and quantification of biomarkers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an aged mixed contaminated site: from source to soil.

    PubMed

    Kao, Nien-Hsin; Su, Ming-Chien; Fan, Jheng-Rong; Chung, Ying-Yung

    2015-05-01

    The sources of the spill and the contaminated soils of an aged oil spill contaminated site with unknown mixed pollutants were investigated by using a set of developed forensic chemical procedures which include analysis of oil products, site investigation, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) screening, biomarker identification, and finally, the confirmation of pollutants. Adamantanes (17 compounds), 10 bicyclic sesquiterpanes, 6 newly detected compounds, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 10 alkylated naphthalenes compounds in several gasoline, diesel oil samples, and contaminated soil samples were examined and quantified. GC/MS method, retention indices, relative response factors, and diagnostic ratio were used to identify and quantify pollutant compounds. The study revealed the key factors for distinguishing among gasoline and diesel oil products in the market, created a new set of retention indices for 10 bicyclic sesquiterpane compounds, and discovered 6 quantifiable compounds in analysis of fresh oil products. The suggested diagnostic ratios for BSs and the new compounds in the analysis of the biomarker show the differences among diesel products, link between the source of pollutants with contaminated soil, and the recognition of the signs of an aged spill, and the indications of weathering effects. PMID:25712884

  5. Phytoremediation of abandoned crude oil contaminated drill sites of Assam with the aid of a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial formulation.

    PubMed

    Yenn, R; Borah, M; Boruah, H P Deka; Roy, A Sarma; Baruah, R; Saikia, N; Sahu, O P; Tamuli, A K

    2014-01-01

    Environmental deterioration due to crude oil contamination and abandoned drill sites is an ecological concern in Assam. To revive such contaminated sites, afield study was conducted to phytoremediate four crude oil abandoned drill sites of Assam (Gelakey, Amguri, Lakwa, and Borholla) with the aid of two hydrocarbon-degrading Pseudomonas strains designated N3 and N4. All the drill sites were contaminated with 15.1 to 32.8% crude oil, and the soil was alkaline in nature (pH8.0-8.7) with low moisture content, low soil conductivity and low activities of the soil enzymes phosphatase, dehydrogenase and urease. In addition, N, P, K, and C contents were below threshold limits, and the soil contained high levels of heavy metals. Bio-augmentation was achieved by applying Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains N3 and N4 followed by the introduction of screened plant species Tectona grandis, Gmelina arborea, Azadirachta indica, and Michelia champaca. The findings established the feasibility of the phytoremediation of abandoned crude oil-contaminated drill sites in Assam using microbes and native plants. PMID:24933892

  6. Removal of hydrocarbon contaminant film from spacecraft optical surfaces using a radiofrequency-excited oxygen plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, W. D.; Gillete, R. B.; Cruz, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a study on the feasibility of removing contaminant films from optical surfaces in vacuum, using an oxygen plasma, are discussed. Contaminant films were deposited onto optical surfaces from butadiene and methane gases at a pressure of about 4 torr in the presence of ultraviolet radiation. Optical surfaces evaluated included ultraviolet-reflecting mirrors, gratings, quartz disks, and spacecraft thermal control surfaces. In general, it was found that contaminants could be removed successfully from surfaces using an oxygen plasma. Exceptions were the white-paint thermal control surfaces, which, when contaminated, degraded further during exposure to the oxygen plasma.

  7. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON BIODEGRADATION AS A FUNCTION OF OXYGEN TENSION IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pyrene and nonspiked 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in the soil. The soil used for the evaluation was...

  8. PHOTOACTIVATED TOXICITY IN AMPHIPODS COLLECTED FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk of photo-activated PAH toxicity in contaminated aquatic systems has not been well characterized. To better indicate this potential, amphipods (Gammarus spp.) were collected from two PAH contaminated sites (Hog Island and USX), as well as a reference site (Chipmunk Cove)...

  9. A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the second volume of this comprehensive report of the inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Appendix B contains a complete printout of contaminant inventory and other information from the CIDRA Database and is presented in volumes 2 and 3 of the report.

  10. Evidence of hydrocarbon contamination from the Burgan oil field, Kuwait: interpretations from thermal remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    ud Din, Saif; Al Dousari, Ahmad; Literathy, Peter

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents the application of thermal remote sensing for mapping hydrocarbon polluted sites. This has been achieved by mono-window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) measurements, using multi-date band 6 data of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The emissivity, transmittance and mean atmospheric temperature were used as critical factors to estimate LST. The changes in the surface emissivity due to oil pollution alter the apparent temperature, which was used as a recognition element to map out oil polluted surfaces. The LST contrast was successfully used to map spatial distribution of hydrocarbon pollution in the Burgan Oil field area of Kuwait. The methodology can be positively used to detect waste dumping, oil spills in oceans and ports, besides environmental management of oil pollution at or near the land surface. PMID:17291680

  11. Toxicity to Daphnia pulex and QSAR predictions for polycyclic hydrocarbons representative of Great Lakes contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passino-Reader, D.R.; Hickey, J.P.; Ogilvie, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the toxicity of several types of polycyclic hydrocarbons characteristic of Great Lakes samples to Daphnia pulex, a Great Lakes zooplankter, (2) to investigate the influence of different structural characteristics on toxicity, and (3) to determine the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) parameters and model that describe these compounds. These results will be related to comparative toxicity of other Great Lakes environmental compounds and to their application in site specific risk assessment.

  12. Effects of hydrocarbon contamination on ozone generation with dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose L.; Vezzu, Guido; Freilich, Alfred; Paolini, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    The increasing usage of the feed gases of lower grade liquid oxygen (LOX) containing higher levels of trace hydrocarbon impurities in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) for ozone generation requires a better understanding of the kinetics of the by-product formation resulting from reactions involving these hydrocarbon impurities. As a case study of hydrocarbon impurities, the kinetics of CH4 conversion in DBDs and the subsequent HNO3 formation were investigated by means of gas-phase plasma diagnostics, supported by detailed process modeling, and extensive in-situ and ex-situ by-product analysis. The by-products formation in the plasma with the presence of CH4, were found to differ significantly in oxygen-fed generators as compared to generators fed with oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. The amount of HNO3 formed depends on the concentration of NOx formed in the plasma and the amount of CH4 that is converted, but not on the O3 concentration. In the present work we have investigated CH4 concentrations of up to 1.95 wt% of the feed gas. The rate of deterioration of the overall ozone generator performance was found to be affected by the concentration of nitrogen in the oxygen/nitrogen mixture.

  13. Assessment of sediment hydrocarbon contamination from the 2009 Montara oil blow out in the Timor Sea.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kathryn A; Jones, Ross

    2016-04-01

    In August 2009, a blowout of the Montara H1 well 260 km off the northwest coast of Australia resulted in the uncontrolled release of about 4.7 M L of light crude oil and gaseous hydrocarbons into the Timor Sea. Over the 74 day period of the spill, the oil remained offshore and did not result in shoreline incidents on the Australia mainland. At various times slicks were sighted over a 90,000 km(2) area, forming a layer of oil which was tracked by airplanes and satellites but the slicks typically remained within 35 km of the well head platform and were treated with 183,000 L of dispersants. The shelf area where the spill occurred is shallow (100-200 m) and includes off shore emergent reefs and cays and submerged banks and shoals. This study describes the increased inputs of oil to the system and assesses the environmental impact. Concentrations of hydrocarbon in the sediment at the time of survey were very low (total aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranged from 0.04 to 31 ng g(-1)) and were orders of magnitude lower than concentrations at which biological effects would be expected. PMID:26774768

  14. Analysis of industrial contaminants in indoor air: part 1. Volatile organic compounds, carbonyl compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Barro R; Regueiro J; Llompart M; Garcia-Jares C

    2009-01-16

    This article reviews recent literature on the analysis of industrial contaminants in indoor air in the framework of the REACH project, which is mainly intended to improve protection of human health and the environment from the risks of more than 34 millions of chemical substances. Industrial pollutants that can be found in indoor air may be of very different types and origin, belonging to the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) categories. Several compounds have been classified into the priority organic pollutants (POPs) class such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/PCDFs) and related polychlorinated compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Many of these compounds are partially associated to the air gas phase, but also to the suspended particulate matter. Furthermore, settled dust can act as a concentrator for the less volatile pollutants and has become a matrix of great concern for indoors contamination. Main literature considered in this review are papers from the last 10 years reporting analytical developments and applications regarding VOCs, aldehydes and other carbonyls, PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs, and PAHs in the indoor environment. Sample collection and pretreatment, analyte extraction, clean-up procedures, determination techniques, performance results, as well as compound concentrations in indoor samples, are summarized and discussed. Emergent contaminants and pesticides related to the industrial development that can be found in indoor air are reviewed in a second part in this volume.

  15. Phytomediated Biostimulation of the Autochthonous Bacterial Community for the Acceleration of the Depletion of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gentini, Alessandro; Becarelli, Simone; Azaizeh, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a large group of organic contaminants causing hazards to organisms including humans. The objective of the study was to validate the vegetation of dredged sediments with Phragmites australis as an exploitable biostimulation approach to accelerate the depletion of PAHs in nitrogen spiked sediments. Vegetation with Phragmites australis resulted in being an efficient biostimulation approach for the depletion of an aged PAHs contamination (229.67 15.56??g PAHs/g dry weight of sediment) in dredged sediments. Phragmites australis accelerated the oxidation of the PAHs by rhizodegradation. The phytobased approach resulted in 58.47% of PAHs depletion. The effects of the treatment have been analyzed in terms of both contaminant depletion and changes in relative abundance of the metabolically active Gram positive and Gram negative PAHs degraders. The metabolically active degraders were quantified both in the sediments and in the root endospheric microbial community. Quantitative real-time PCR reactions have been performed on the retrotranscribed transcripts encoding the Gram positive and Gram negative large ? subunit (RHD?) of the aromatic ring hydroxylating dioxygenases. The Gram positive degraders resulted in being selectively favored by vegetation with Phragmites australis and mandatory for the depletion of the six ring condensed indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene and benzo[g,h,i]perylene. PMID:25170516

  16. EVIDENCE FOR MICROBIAL ENHANCED ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical conductivity of sediments during microbial mineralization of diesel was investigated in a mesoscale column experiment consisting of biotic contaminated and uncontaminated columns. Microbial population numbers increased with a clear pattern of depth zonation within the ...

  17. MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN A SHALLOW HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the complex interactions between microbial communities and electrical properties in contaminated aquifers. In order to investigate possible connections between these parameters a study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that the degradation of hydr...

  18. Advanced fuel hydrocarbon remediation national test location - biocell treatment of petroleum contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, J.; Lory, E.

    1997-03-01

    Biocells are engineered systems that use naturally occurring microbes to degrade fuels and oils into simpler, nonhazardous, and nontoxic compounds. Biocells are able to treat soils contaminated with petroleum based fuels and lubricants, including diesel, jet fuel, and lubricating and hydraulic oils. The microbes use the contaminants as a food source and thus destroy them. By carefully monitoring and controlling air and moisture levels, degradation rates can be increased and total treatment time reduced over natural systems.

  19. Food contamination by hydrocarbons from packaging materials determined by coupled LC-GC.

    PubMed

    Grob, K; Biedermann, M; Artho, A; Egli, J

    1991-09-01

    Paraffins from raw extracts of foods and packing materials were isolated by LC and directly transferred to GC, applying concurrent eluent evaporation and a loop-type interface. Paraffins from various packing materials have been characterized: sisal bags, cardboard boxes, plastic films, wax-coated paper and cardboard as well as paraffin coatings. Important food contamination was found for sisal bags, cardboard boxes, and wax-coated paper/cardboard. Contamination by paraffin coatings on cheese was surprisingly small. PMID:1962505

  20. Soil-Water Repellency and Critical Humidity as Cleanup Criteria for Remediation of a Hydrocarbon Contaminated Mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Francisco Javier; Adams, Randy H.

    2010-05-01

    The majority of soil remediation programs focus mainly on reducing the hydrocarbon concentration, based on the assumption that the primary impact is toxicity and/or leachates and that these are directly proportional to concentration. None-the-less, interference with natural soil-water interactions are frequently more damaging, especially for sites contaminated with very viscous, weathered hydrocarbons. Therefore, the kind of hydrocarbons present in the soil and their interactions with soil surfaces may be more important than the overall hydrocarbon concentration in terms of soil restoration. One recently patented technology, the Chemical-Biological Stabilization process, focuses specifically on restoring soil fertility as the main objective for remediation of sites with agricultural use. This method was recently validated at an industrial scale by the treatment of 150 cubic meters of bentonitic drilling muds (70,5% fines) from an old sulphur mine, which were contaminated with very weathered oil (4° API), consisting of 31% asphaltenes. This material was treated by adding 4% (w/w, dry) of calcium hydroxide, followed by 4% (w/w, dry) of sugar cane cachasse (a fine fibered agricultural waste), thoroughly mixing between additions using an excavator. After the soil had dried sufficiently and the pH was <8, a fine-rooted, C-4 tropical grass (Brachiaria humidicola) was planted by seed. Over a two year period this material was monitored for several factors including field moisture (%H), field capacity (FC), and soil water repellency. MED was measured on air dried soil and WDPT values were calculated from the extrapolation of penetration time vs. ethanol molarity functions (Rx=0,99). Additionally, water penetration times were measured at different humidities to determine critical moisture levels for absorption in <5s and <60s. Initially, the FC increased from 24,9%H to 33,8%H (in 4½ months), probably due to the addition of the organic amendment. Over the next 6½ months, the FC dropped to 25,6% H, likely due to organic matter decomposition. However, during the following year+ (13½ months) the FC increased to 33,8%H probably due to an increase of soil humic substances while a vigorous vegetative growth was established. During two years of treatment the MED values were reduced 30% from 5,13 to 3,58M, and WDPT values were reduced over 25 times (from 10 exp5,6 s to 10 exp4,2 s). Critical humidity values varied from ~16,9 - 19,5%H for penetration in <5 s and from ~15,1 - 15,5%H for penetration in <60 s, in both treated and untreated material. During the driest part of the year, in May before the first rains, the soil humidity was 20,3%, and thus values below the critical levels were not experienced. This permitted the development of a complete vegetative cover, vigorous growth, and transformation of a geologic substrate (bentonitic drilling muds) into a soil-like material apt for agricultural use. This focus on soil-water relationships and the use of soil fertility parameters in general is important in establishing cleanup criteria for the real remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites in agricultural areas. As seen in this study, relatively high WDPT and MED values may not necessarily indicate soil moisture problems and these need to be complemented with actual site information on soil humidity during the annual cycle and with determinations of critical humidity. Additionally, the augmentation of field capacity using organic conditioners may effectively mitigate potential critical humidity problems.

  1. Contamination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments and plants of mangrove swamps in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Fenglan; Zeng, Xiaokang; Yang, Junda; Zhou, Kai; Zan, Qijie; Lei, Anping; Tam, Nora F Y

    2014-08-30

    The concentrations of 16 individual and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (?PAHs) in sediments, roots and leaves of three mangrove swamps in Shenzhen, China, namely Futian, Baguang and Waterlands, were determined. The mean concentration of ?PAHs in Futian (4480 ng g(-1)) was significantly higher than that in Baguang (1262 ng g(-1)) and Waterlands (2711 ng g(-1)). Among the 16 PAHs, the concentration of naphthalene was the highest. Based on the ratios of phenanthrene/anthracene and fluoranthene/pyrene, PAHs in Futian and Waterlands came from petrogenic and pyrolytic sources, while Baguang was mainly from pyrolytic. More PAHs were accumulated in leaves, as reflected by its higher mean concentration of ?PAHs (3697 ng g(-1)) and bioconcentration factor of PAHs (BCF) (>1.5) than that in roots. The BCF values in plants collected from Futian were significantly higher than that from Waterlands. These results indicated that more attention should be paid to the PAH contamination in Futian. PMID:24631400

  2. Parameters describing nonequilibrium transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through contaminated soil columns: Estimability analysis, correlation, and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Viet V.; Michel, Julien; Gujisaite, Valérie; Latifi, Abderrazak; Simonnot, Marie-Odile

    2014-03-01

    The soil and groundwater at former industrial sites polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produce a very challenging environmental issue. The description of PAH transport by means of mathematical models is therefore needed for risk assessment and remediation strategies at these sites. Due to the complexity of release kinetics and transport behavior of the PAHs in the aged contaminated soils, their transport is usually evaluated at the laboratory scale. Transport parameters are then estimated from the experimental data via the inverse method. To better assess the uncertainty of optimized parameters, an estimability method was applied to firstly investigate the information content of experimental data and the possible correlations among parameters in the two-site sorption model. These works were based on the concentrations of three PAHs, Acenaphthene (ACE), Fluoranthene (FLA) and Pyrene (PYR), in the leaching solutions of the experiments under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions.

  3. Microbiological characteristics of multi-media PRB reactor in the bioremediation of groundwater contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Zhang, Lanying; Deng, Haijing; Liu, Na; Liu, Cuizhu

    2011-10-01

    A multi-media bio-PRB reactor was designed to treat groundwater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. After a 208-day bioremediation, combined with the total petroleum hydrocarbons content in the groundwater flowed through the reactor, microbiological characteristics of the PRB reactor including microbes immobilized and its dehydrogenase activity were investigated. TPH was significantly reduced by as much as 65% in the back of the second media layer, whereas in the third layer, the TPH content reached lower than 1 mg l?. For microbes immobilized on the media, the variations with depth in different media were significantly the same and the regularity was obvious in the forepart of the media, which increased with depth at first and then reduced gradually, while in the back-end, the microbes almost did not have any variations with depth but decreased with the distance. The dehydrogenase activity varied from 2.98 to 16.16 mg TF L? h? and its distribution illustrated a similar trend with numbers of microbial cell, therefore, the noticeable correlation was found between them. PMID:21152971

  4. Enhanced Bioremediation of Soil Artificially Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons after Amendment with Capra aegagrus hircus (Goat) Manure

    PubMed Central

    Nwogu, T. P.; Azubuike, C. C.; Ogugbue, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the biostimulant potentials of Capra aegagrus hircus manure for bioremediation of crude oil contaminated soil (COCS) under tropical conditions. 1 kg of COCS sample was amended with 0.02 kg of C. a. hircus manure and monitored at 14-day intervals for total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), nutrient content, and changes in microbial counts. At the end of the study period, there was 62.08% decrease in the concentration of TPH in the amended sample compared to 8.15% decrease in the unamended sample, with significant differences (P < 0.05) in TPH concentrations for both samples at different time intervals. Similarly, there was a gradual decrease in the concentrations of total organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in both samples. The culturable hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria (CHUB) increased steadily from 8.5 × 105 cfu/g to 2.70 × 106 cfu/g and from 8.0 × 105 cfu/g to 1.78 × 106 cfu/g for both samples. Acinetobacter, Achromobacter, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Klebsiella, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, and Staphylococcus were isolated from amended sample with Pseudomonas being the predominant isolated bacterial genus. This study demonstrated that C. a. hircus manure is a good biostimulant, which enhanced the activities of indigenous hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria resulting in significant decrease in TPH concentration of COCS. PMID:26770830

  5. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently.

  6. Mineralization of polycyclic and n-heterocyclic aromatic compounds in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Grosser, R.J.; Warshawsky, D.; Vestal, J.R.

    1995-03-01

    The comparative mineralization of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds in five soils collected from an abandoned coal tar refinery in eastern Ohio was determined. The soils showed differences only in total extractable hydrocarbon content of the soil chemical characteristics measured. The compounds studied included five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, and carcinogenic benz[a]anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene) and three N-heterocyclic aromatics (9H-carbazole, and carcinogenic 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole and dibenz[a,j]acridine). Mineralization was measured by serum bottle radiorespirometry. Only phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and carbazole were mineralized in the soils after 64 d. Two of the soils with eight to 15 times the hexane -extractable hydrocarbon content consistently showed more rapid initial rates and higher overall extents of mineralization compared to the other three soils. Overall extents of mineralization ranged from 38 to 55% for phenanthrene, 10 to 60% for anthracene, 25 to 70% for pyrene, background to 40% for benz[a]anthracene, and 25 to 50% for carbazole after 64 d. Extents of mineralization by indigenous soil microbiota appear to be more dependent on the chemical characteristics of the soil and not soil total biomass and activity. Cultures capable of degrading phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene were obtained following enrichment techniques. A Mycobacterium sp. capable of degrading these three compounds was isolated and reintroduced into two of the soils, resulting in mineralization enhanced above that of the indigenous soil microbial population. These data indicate that the future success of bioremediation methods relies on the characterization of environmental parameters affecting microbial degradation as well as the isolation of microbial populations that can reduce toxicity in the environment.

  7. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ángeles, Martínez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p < 0.019) between TPH concentration (mg/kg) and surface tension (mN/m), When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p < 0.009) was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil. PMID:24294259

  8. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    ngeles, Martnez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodrguez-Vzquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = ?0.54; p < 0.019) between TPH concentration (mg/kg) and surface tension (mN/m), When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = ?0.64; p < 0.009) was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosu