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Sample records for hydrocarbon receptor-dependent estrogen

  1. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent activation of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription by 3-methycholanthrene

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, Jonathan M.; Waxman, David J. . E-mail: djw@bu.edu

    2006-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates transcription directed by xenobiotic response elements upstream of target genes. Recently, AhR ligands were reported to induce formation of an AhR-estrogen receptor (ER) complex, which can bind to estrogen response elements (EREs) and stimulate transcription of ER target genes. Presently, we investigate the effect of the AhR ligands 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (BZ126) on ERE-regulated luciferase reporter activity and endogenous ER target gene expression. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, 3MC induced transcription of ER reporter genes containing native promoter sequences of the ER-responsive genes complement 3 and pS2 and heterologous promoters regulated by isolated EREs. Dose-response studies revealed that the concentration of 3MC required to half-maximally activate transcription (EC{sub 5}) was >100-fold higher for an ER reporter (27-57 {mu}M) than for an AhR reporter (86-250 nM) in both MCF-7 cells and in human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells. 3MC also stimulated expression of the endogenous ER target genes amphiregulin, cathepsin D and progesterone receptor, albeit to a much lower extent than was achieved following stimulation with 17{beta}-estradiol. In Ishikawa cells, 3MC, but not BZ126 or TCDD, stimulated ER{alpha}-dependent reporter activity but did not induce expression of endogenous ER target genes. Finally, studies carried out in the AhR-positive rat hepatoma cell line 5L and the AhR-deficient variant BP8 demonstrated that ER reporter activity could be induced by 3MC in a manner that was independent of AhR and thus distinct from the AhR-ER 'hijacking' mechanism described recently. 3MC may thus elicit estrogenic activity by multiple mechanisms.

  2. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Pathways in Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gargaro, M; Pirro, M; Romani, R; Zelante, T; Fallarino, F

    2016-08-01

    The idea of possible involvement of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in transplant tolerance can be traced back >30 years, when very low doses of dioxin-the most potent AhR ligand-were found to markedly reduce the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in response to alloantigen challenge in vivo. AhR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is activated by dioxins and other environmental pollutants. We now know that AhR can bind a broad variety of activating ligands that are disparate in nature, including endogenous molecules and those formed in the gut from food and bacterial products. Consequently, in addition to its classical role as a toxicological signal mediator, AhR is emerging as a transcription factor involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in various immune cell types, including lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Allograft rejection is mostly a T cell-mediated alloimmune response initiated by the recognition of alloantigens presented by donor and recipient APCs to recipient CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Based on those findings, AhR may function as a critical sensor of outside and inside environments, leading to changes in the immune system that may have relevance in transplantation. PMID:26751261

  3. Treatment of BG-1 Ovarian Cancer Cells Expressing Estrogen Receptors with Lambda-cyhalothrin and Cypermethrin Caused a Partial Estrogenicity Via an Estrogen Receptor-dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cho-Won; Go, Ryeo-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) are the most common pesticides which are recently used for indoor pest control. The widespread use of SPs has resulted in the increased exposure to wild animals and humans. Recently, some SPs are suspected as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and have been assessed for their potential estrogenicity by adopting various analyzing assays. In this study, we examined the estrogenic effects of lambda-cyhalothrin (LC) and cypermethrin (CP), the most commonly used pesticides in Korea, using BG-1 ovarian cancer cells expressing estrogen receptors (ERs). To evaluate the estrogenic activities of two SPs, LC and CP, we employed MTT assay and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in LC or CP treated BG-1 ovarian cancer cells. In MTT assay, LC (10−6 M) and CP (10−5 M) significantly induced the growth of BG-1 cancer cells. LC or CP-induced cell growth was antagonized by addition of ICI 182,720 (10−8 M), an ER antagonist, suggesting that this effect appears to be mediated by an ER-dependent manner. Moreover, RT-PCR results showed that transcriptional level of cyclin D1, a cell cycle-regulating gene, was significantly up-regulated by LC and CP, while these effects were reversed by co-treatment of ICI 182,780. However, p21, a cyclin D-ckd-4 inhibitor gene, was not altered by LC or CP. Moreover, ERα expression was not significantly changed by LC and CP, while downregulated by E2. Finally, in xenografted mouse model transplanted with human BG-1 ovarian cancer cells, E2 significantly increased the tumor volume compare to a negative control, but LC did not. Taken together, these results suggest that LC and CP may possess estrogenic potentials by stimulating the growth of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells via partially ER signaling pathway associated with cell cycle as did E2, but this estrogenic effect was not found in in vivo mouse model. PMID:26877835

  4. Cigarette smoke condensate induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent changes in gene expression in spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Esakky, Prabagaran; Hansen, Deborah A; Drury, Andrea M; Moley, Kelle H

    2012-12-01

    Cigarette smoke contains numerous compounds that cause oxidative stress and alter gene expression in many tissues, and cigarette smoking is correlated with male infertility. To identify mechanisms by which this occurs, we evaluated expression of antioxidant genes in mouse spermatocytes in response to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC exposure led to oxidative stress and dose-dependent up-regulation of Hsp90aa1, Ahr, Arnt, Sod1, Sod2, and Cyp1a1 expression in a mouse spermatocyte cell line. An antagonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) abrogated several CSC-mediated changes in mRNA and protein levels. Consistent with these results, spermatocytes isolated by laser-capture microdissection from CSC-treated mice showed increased expression of several antioxidant genes. In vivo exposure to CSC was genotoxic to spermatocytes, resulting in apoptosis and disruptions to the seminiferous tubules. Our in vivo and in vitro data indicate that CSC-mediated damage to murine spermatocytes is AHR-dependent and is mediated by oxidative stress. PMID:23069111

  5. DEHP exposure impairs mouse oocyte cyst breakdown and primordial follicle assembly through estrogen receptor-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xinyi; Liao, Xinggui; Chen, Xuemei; Li, Yanli; Wang, Meirong; Shen, Cha; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Yingxiong; Liu, Xueqing; He, Junlin

    2015-11-15

    Estrogen plays an essential role in the development of mammalian oocytes, and recent studies suggest that it also regulates primordial follicle assembly in the neonatal ovaries. During the last decade, potential exposure of humans and animals to estrogen-like endocrine disrupting chemicals has become a growing concern. In the present study, we focused on the effect of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), a widespread plasticizer with estrogen-like activity, on germ-cell cyst breakdown and primordial follicle assembly in the early ovarian development of mouse. Neonatal mice injected with DEHP displayed impaired cyst breakdown. Using ovary organ cultures, we revealed that impairment was mediated through estrogen receptors (ERs), as ICI 182,780, an efficient antagonist of ER, reversed this DEHP-mediated effect. DEHP exposure reduced the expression of ERβ, progesterone receptor (PR), and Notch2 signaling components. Finally, DEHP reduced proliferation of pregranulosa precursor cells during the process of primordial folliculogenesis. Together, our results indicate that DEHP influences oocyte cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation through several mechanisms. Therefore, exposure to estrogen-like chemicals during fetal or neonatal development may adversely influence early ovarian development. PMID:26073378

  6. Human Colon Microbiota Transform Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to Estrogenic Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Boeckaert, Charlotte; Peru, Kerry; Headley, John; Verstraete, Willy; Siciliano, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Ingestion is an important exposure route for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to enter the human body. Although the formation of hazardous PAH metabolites by human biotransformation enzymes is well documented, nothing is known about the PAH transformation potency of human intestinal microbiota. Using a gastrointestinal simulator, we show that human intestinal microbiota can also bioactivate PAHs, more in particular to estrogenic metabolites. PAH compounds are not estrogenic, and indeed, stomach and small intestine digestions of 62.5 nmol naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene showed no estrogenic effects in the human estrogen receptor bioassay. In contrast, colon digests of these PAH compounds displayed estrogenicity, equivalent to 0.31, 2.14, 2.70, and 1.48 nmol 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), respectively. Inactivating the colon microbiota eliminated these estrogenic effects. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the microbial PAH transformation by the detection of PAH metabolites 1-hydroxypyrene and 7-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene in colon digests of pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene. Furthermore, we show that colon digests of a PAH-contaminated soil (simulated ingestion dose of 5 g/day) displayed estrogenic activity equivalent to 0.58 nmol EE2, whereas stomach or small intestine digests did not. Although the matrix in which PAHs are ingested may result in lower exposure concentrations in the gut, our results imply that the PAH bioactivation potency of colon microbiota is not eliminated by the presence of soil. Moreover, because PAH toxicity is also linked to estrogenicity of the compounds, the PAH bioactivation potency of colon microbiota suggests that current risk assessment may underestimate the risk from ingested PAHs. PMID:15626640

  7. Notoginsenoside R1-mediated neuroprotection involves estrogen receptor-dependent crosstalk between Akt and ERK1/2 pathways: a novel mechanism of Nrf2/ARE signaling activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, X; Sun, G; Ye, J; Xu, H; Wang, H; Sun, X

    2014-04-01

    Notoginsenoside R1 (NGR1), a novel phytoestrogen isolated from Panax notoginseng, has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in neurodegenerative diseases. To mimic oxidative stress in neurons and explore the neuroprotection of NGR1, H₂O₂-induced neurotoxicity in NGF-induced differentiation of PC12 cells was used. In this study, NGR1 preconditioning provided neuroprotective effects via suppressing H₂O₂-induced the intracellular ROS accumulation, the increase in the product of lipid peroxidation (MDA), protein oxidation (protein carbonyl), and DNA fragmentation (8-OHdG), and mitochondrial membrane depolarization as well as caspase-3 activation. Moreover, NGR1 treatment alone potently increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2, augmented ARE enhancer activity, and upregulated the expression and activity of phase II antioxidant enzymes including HO-1, NQO-1, and γ-GCSc. NGR1 could also increase the ERE activity and activate Akt and ERK1/2 pathways. NGR1-mediated activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling and neuroprotection were abolished by genetic silencing of Nrf2 using siRNA or the pharmacological blockade of estrogen receptors using ICI-182780, and partially inhibited by Akt siRNA or ERK siRNA transfection. In addition, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 mediated by NGR1 was markedly inhibited in PC12 cells transfected with Akt siRNA. On the contrary, ERK1/2 siRNA transfection hardly had any effect on the phosphorylation of Akt mediated by NGR1. NGR1-mediated activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways was blocked by ICI-182780. In conclusion, NGR1 provided neuroprotection via inducing an estrogen receptor-dependent crosstalk between Akt and ERK1/2 pathways, subsequently activating Nrf2/ARE signaling and thereby up-regulating phase II antioxidant enzymes. PMID:24437944

  8. Effect of benzophenone-1 and octylphenol on the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition via an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway in estrogen receptor expressing ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sam; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Kim, Cho-Won; Hwang, Kyung-A; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process in embryonic development and cancer progression and metastasis. EMT is influenced by 17β-estradiol (E2), an endogenous estrogen. Benzophenone-1 (2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, BP-1) and 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) are suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) because they can exhibit estrogenic properties. In this study, we examined whether BP-1 and OP can lead to EMT of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells expressing estrogen receptors (ERs). A wound healing assay and western blot assay were conducted to show the effect of BP-1 and OP on the migration of BG-1 cells and protein expression of EMT-related genes. BP-1 (10(-6) M) and OP (10(-6) M) significantly enhanced the migration capability of BG-1 cells by reducing the wounded area in the cell monolayer relative to the control, similar to E2 (10(-9) M). However, when BG-1 cells were co-treated with ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, the uncovered area was maintained at the level of the control. N-cadherin, snail, and slug were increased by BP-1 and OP while E-cadherin was reduced compared to the control. However, this effect was also restored by co-treatment with ICI 182,780. Taken together, these results indicate that BP-1 and OP, the potential EDCs, may have the ability to induce ovarian cancer metastasis via regulation of the expression of EMT markers and migration of ER-expressing BG-1 ovarian cancer cells. PMID:27145024

  9. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Induction of Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase mRNAs in Mouse LiverS

    PubMed Central

    Celius, Trine; Roblin, Steven; Harper, Patricia A.; Matthews, Jason; Boutros, Paul C.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Okey, Allan B.

    2016-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are important in detoxication but generally are considered not to be inducible by xenobiotics. Our recent microarray studies revealed induction of FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in liver of mice with wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) but not in Ahr-null mice. The aim of the present study was to delineate mechanisms of FMO regulation. In adult male mice, basal FMO3 mRNA is low but was induced 6-fold at 4 h and 6000-fold at 24 h. The ED50 was approximately 1 μg/kg for FMO2 and FMO3, similar to that for the classic AHR-regulated gene, Cyp1a1. In adult female mice basal FMO3 mRNA is high and was not induced at 4 h but was elevated 8-fold at 24 h. FMO5 mRNA was significantly down-regulated by TCDD in both male and female adult mice. Juvenile mice show no sex difference in response to TCDD; FMO3 was induced 4 to 6-fold by TCDD in both sexes. Chromatin immuno-precipitation demonstrated recruitment of AHR and aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator proteins to Fmo3 regulatory regions, suggesting that induction by TCDD is a primary AHR-mediated event. Although FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced by TCDD in adult males, overall FMO catalytic activity increased only modestly. In contrast to the striking up-regulation of FMO2 and FMO3 in mouse liver, TCDD has little effect on FMO mRNA in rat liver. However, FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced in transgenic mice that express wild-type rat AHR, indicating that lack of induction in rat is not due to an incompetent AHR in this species. PMID:18765683

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent enrichment of a megakaryocytic precursor with a high potential to produce proplatelets.

    PubMed

    Strassel, Catherine; Brouard, Nathalie; Mallo, Lea; Receveur, Nicolas; Mangin, Pierre; Eckly, Anita; Bieche, Ivan; Tarte, Karin; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms regulating megakaryopoiesis and platelet production (thrombopoiesis) are still incompletely understood. Identification of a progenitor with enhanced thrombopoietic capacity would be useful to decipher these mechanisms and to improve our capacity to produce platelets in vitro. Differentiation of peripheral blood CD34(+) cells in the presence of bone marrow-human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) enhanced the production of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelet-like elements. This was accompanied by enrichment in a MK precursor population exhibiting an intermediate level of CD41 positivity while maintaining its expression of CD34. Following sorting and subculture with MSCs, this CD34(+)CD41(low) population was able to efficiently generate proplatelet-bearing MKs and platelet-like particles. Similarly, StemRegenin 1 (SR1), an antagonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcription factor known to maintain CD34 expression of progenitor cells, led to an enriched CD34(+)CD41(low) fraction and to an increased capacity to generate proplatelet-producing MKs and platelet-like elements ultrastructurally and functionally similar to circulating platelets. The effect of MSCs, like that of SR1, appeared to be mediated by an AhR-dependent mechanism because both culture conditions resulted in repression of its downstream effector CYP1B1. This newly described isolation of a precursor exhibiting strong MK potential could be exploited to study normal and abnormal thrombopoiesis and for in vitro platelet production. PMID:26966088

  11. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent apoptotic cell death induced by the flavonoid chrysin in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean M; Nukaya, Manabu; Díaz-Díaz, Carol J; Megna, Bryant W; Carney, Patrick R; Geiger, Peter G; Kennedy, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The polyphenolic flavone chrysin has been evaluated as a natural chemopreventive agent due to its anti-cancer effects in a variety of cancer cell lines. However, the mechanism of the chemopreventive effect has been not well established, especially in human colorectal cancer cells. We evaluated the chemopreventive effect of chrysin in three different human colorectal cancer cell lines. We found that chrysin treatment consequently reduced cell viability via induction of apoptosis. We identified that the involvement of up-regulation of pro-apoptotic cytokines tumor necrosis factor (Tnf) α and β genes and consequent activation of the TNF-mediated transcriptional pathway in chrysin-induced apoptosis. Using our generated AHR siRNA expressing colorectal cancer cells, we demonstrated that the chrysin-induced up-regulation of Tnfα and β gene expression was dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which is a ligand-receptor for chrysin. Subsequently, we found that the AHR siRNA expressing colorectal cancer cells were resistant to chrysin-induced apoptosis. Therefore, we concluded that AHR is required for the chrysin-induced apoptosis and the up-regulation of Tnfα and β gene expression in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:26515162

  12. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent stanniocalcin 2 induction by cinnabarinic acid provides cytoprotection against endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Aditya D; Carter, Dwayne E; Harper, Tod A; Elferink, Cornelis J

    2015-04-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a cytosolic ligand-activated transcription factor historically known for its role in xenobiotic metabolism. Although AhR activity has previously been shown to play a cytoprotective role against intrinsic apoptotic stimuli, the underlying mechanism by which AhR confers cytoprotection against apoptosis is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that activation of AhR by the tryptophan catabolite cinnabarinic acid (CA) directly upregulates expression of stanniocalcin 2 (Stc2) to elicit cytoprotection against apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that CA treatment induces direct AhR binding to a region of the Stc2 promoter containing multiple xenobiotic response elements. Using isolated primary hepatocytes from AhR wild-type (AhR floxed) and liver-specific AhR conditional knockout mice, we showed that pretreatment with CA conferred cytoprotection against hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-, thapsigargin-, and ethanol-induced apoptosis in an AhR-dependent manner. Furthermore, suppressing Stc2 expression using RNA interference confirmed that the cytoprotective properties of CA against H(2)O(2), thapsigargin, and ethanol injury were absolutely dependent on Stc2. Immunochemistry revealed the presence of Stc2 in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell surface, consistent with Stc2 secretion and autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Finally, in vivo data using a mouse model of acute alcohol hepatotoxicity demonstrated that CA provided cytoprotection against ethanol-induced apoptosis, hepatic microvesicular steatosis, and liver injury. Collectively, our data uncovered a novel mechanism for AhR-mediated cytoprotection in the liver that is dependent on CA-induced Stc2 activity. PMID:25672339

  13. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent regulation of miR-196a expression controls lung fibroblast apoptosis but not proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, Emelia; Zago, Michela; Sarill, Miles; Rico de Souza, Angela; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H.; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2014-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor implicated in the regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Although activation of the AhR by xenobiotics such as dioxin inhibits the cell cycle and control apoptosis, paradoxically, AhR expression also promotes cell proliferation and survival independent of exogenous ligands. The microRNA (miRNA) miR-196a has also emerged as a regulator of proliferation and apoptosis but a relationship between the AhR and miR-196a is not known. Therefore, we hypothesized that AhR-dependent regulation of endogenous miR-196a expression would promote cell survival and proliferation. Utilizing lung fibroblasts from AhR deficient (AhR{sup −/−}) and wild-type (AhR{sup +/+}) mice, we show that there is ligand-independent regulation of miRNA, including low miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} cells. Validation by qRT-PCR revealed a significant decrease in basal expression of miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} compared to AhR{sup +/+} cells. Exposure to AhR agonists benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and FICZ as well as AhR antagonist CH-223191 decreased miR-196a expression in AhR{sup +/+} fibroblasts concomitant with decreased AhR protein levels. There was increased proliferation only in AhR{sup +/+} lung fibroblasts in response to serum, corresponding to a decrease in p27{sup KIP1} protein, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Increasing the cellular levels of miR-196a had no effect on proliferation or expression of p27{sup KIP1} in AhR{sup −/−} fibroblasts but attenuated cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis. This study provides the first evidence that AhR expression is essential for the physiological regulation of cellular miRNA levels- including miR-196a. Future experiments designed to elucidate the functional relationship between the AhR and miR-196a may delineate additional novel ligand-independent roles for the AhR. - Highlights: • The AhR controls proliferation and apoptosis in lung cells. • The AhR regulates the

  14. Notoginsenoside R1 Protects against Neonatal Cerebral Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury through Estrogen Receptor-Dependent Activation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Tu, Liu; Li, Yingbo; Chen, Di; Wang, Shali

    2016-06-01

    Notoginsenoside R1 (NGR1) is a phytoestrogen that is isolated from Panax notoginseng It is used in China to treat many diseases, including hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and it has been shown to target estrogen receptors. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays an important role in the development of cell apoptosis during ischemia, and ER stress is known to be regulated by estrogen; however, the neuroprotective mechanisms of NGR1 in neonatal HIE is unclear. In this study, oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) in primary cortical neurons and unilateral ligation of the common carotid artery (CCL), followed by exposure to a hypoxic environment in 7-day-old postnatal Sprague-Dawley rats were used to mimic HIE episodes. Potential neuroprotective effects of NGR1 against neonatal HIE and its mechanisms were examined. After HIE conditions in vitro and in vivo, we administered NGR1 or the estrogen receptor inhibitor ICI-182780 and measured cell apoptosis, brain injury by MTT assay, TTC stain, and so forth. Expression of estrogen receptors α (ERα) and β (ERβ), ER stress-associated proteins was detected by Western blot upon stimulation with HIE, NGR1, or ICI-182780. Results showed that after HIE, ER chaperone GRP78 was activated, ER stress-associated proapoptotic proteins (CHOP, PERK, ERO1-α, and IRE1α) were increased, caspase-12 was increased, and BCL-2 was decreased. The ER stress response and neuronal apoptosis were attenuated by NGR1 treatment. However, neuroprotective properties of NGR1 against HIE-induced apoptosis and ER stress were attenuated by ICI-182780. These results suggest that NGR1 may be an effective treatment of HIE by reducing ER stress-induced neuronal apoptosis and brain injury via estrogen receptors. PMID:26892460

  15. Estrogenic Activity of Mineral Oil Aromatic Hydrocarbons Used in Printing Inks

    PubMed Central

    Tarnow, Patrick; Hutzler, Christoph; Grabiger, Stefan; Schön, Karsten; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The majority of printing inks are based on mineral oils (MOs) which contain complex mixtures of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons. Consumer exposure to these oils occurs either through direct skin contacts or, more frequently, as a result of MO migration into the contents of food packaging that was made from recycled newspaper. Despite this ubiquitous and frequent exposure little is known about the potential toxicological effects, particularly with regard to the aromatic MO fractions. From a toxicological point of view the huge amount of alkylated and unsubstituted compounds therein is reason for concern as they can harbor genotoxicants as well as potential endocrine disruptors. The aim of this study was to assess both the genotoxic and estrogenic potential of MOs used in printing inks. Mineral oils with various aromatic hydrocarbon contents were tested using a battery of in vitro assays selected to address various endpoints such as estrogen-dependent cell proliferation, activation of estrogen receptor α or transcriptional induction of estrogenic target genes. In addition, the comet assay has been applied to test for genotoxicity. Out of 15 MOs tested, 10 were found to potentially act as xenoestrogens. For most of the oils the effects were clearly triggered by constituents of the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction. From 5 oils tested in the comet assay, 2 showed slight genotoxicity. Altogether it appears that MOs used in printing inks are potential endocrine disruptors and should thus be assessed carefully to what extent they might contribute to the total estrogenic burden in humans. PMID:26771904

  16. Estrogenic status modulates aryl hydrocarbon receptor - mediated hepatic gene expression and carcinogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogenic status is thought to influence the cancer risk in women and has been reported to affect toxicity of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in animals. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of estradiol (E2) on hepatic gene expression changes mediated by 7,...

  17. Mechanism of phytoestrogen puerarin-mediated cytoprotection following oxidative injury: Estrogen receptor-dependent up-regulation of PI3K/Akt and HO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-12-15

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. The phytoestrogen puerarin, the main isoflavone glycoside found in the root of Pueraria lobata, has been used for various medicinal purposes in traditional Chinese medicines for thousands of years. Recent studies have indicated that the estrogen receptor (ER), through interaction with p85, regulates phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, revealing a physiologic, non-nuclear function of ER that may be relevant in cytoprotection. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen puerarin inhibits tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of Hepa1c1c7 and HepG2 cells with puerarin significantly reduced t-BHP-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Also, puerarin up-regulated HO-1 expression and this expression conferred cytoprotection against oxidative injury induced by t-BHP. Moreover, puerarin induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of puerarin-induced HO-1 expression, and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Puerarin-induced up-regulation of HO-1 and cytoprotection against t-BHP were abolished by silencing Nrf2 expression with specific siRNA. Also, puerarin-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that puerarin augments cellular antioxidant defense capacity through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress.

  18. Identification of four novel phosphorylation sites in estrogen receptor α: impact on receptor-dependent gene expression and phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor α (ERα) phosphorylation is important for estrogen-dependent transcription of ER-dependent genes, ligand-independent receptor activation and endocrine therapy response in breast cancer. However ERα phosphorylation at the previously identified sites does not fully account for these receptor functions. To determine if additional ERα phosphorylation sites exist, COS-1 cells expressing human ERα were labeled with [32P]H3PO4 in vivo and ERα tryptic phosphopeptides were isolated to identify phosphorylation sites. Results Previously uncharacterized phosphorylation sites at serines 46/47, 282, 294, and 559 were identified by manual Edman degradation and phosphoamino acid analysis and confirmed by mutagenesis and phospho-specific antibodies. Antibodies detected phosphorylation of endogenous ERα in MCF-7, MCF-7-LCC2, and Ishikawa cancer cell lines by immunoblot. Mutation of Ser-282 and Ser-559 to alanine (S282A, S559A) resulted in ligand independent activation of ERα as determined by both ERE-driven reporter gene assays and endogenous pS2 gene expression in transiently transfected HeLa cells. Mutation of Ser-46/47 or Ser-294 to alanine markedly reduced estradiol dependent reporter activation. Additionally protein kinase CK2 was identified as a kinase that phosphorylated ERα at S282 and S559 using motif analysis, in vitro kinase assays, and incubation of cells with CK2 kinase inhibitor. Conclusion These novel ERα phosphorylation sites represent new means for modulation of ERα activity. S559 represents the first phosphorylation site identified in the extreme C-terminus (F domain) of a steroid receptor. PMID:20043841

  19. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  20. MODELING THE BINDING OF THE METABOLITES OF SOME POLYCYCLIC AROMTIC HYDROCARBONS TO THE LIGAND BINDING DOMAIN OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the binding of the metabolites of some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor
    James Rabinowitz, Stephen Little, Katrina Brown, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC; Un...

  1. Bisphenol A depresses monosynaptic and polysynaptic reflexes in neonatal rat spinal cord in vitro involving estrogen receptor-dependent NO-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A K; Deshpande, S B

    2015-03-19

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a toxic chemical from plastics, is known to produce locomotor abnormalities which may imply the alteration in synaptic activity at Ia-α motoneuron synapse also. However the effect of BPA on this synapse is not known. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the effect of BPA on reflexes originating at Ia-α motoneuron synapse in the spinal cord. The experiments were performed on isolated hemisected spinal cords from 4 to 6d rats. Stimulation of a dorsal root evoked segmental monosynaptic (MSR) and polysynaptic (PSR) reflex potentials in the corresponding ventral root. Nitrite content (indicator of NO activity) of cords was estimated in the presence of BPA with/without antagonists. Superfusion of BPA (3-100μM) depressed the reflexes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The depression was ∼20, ∼50 and ∼70% at 10, 30 and 100μM of BPA, respectively. The 50% depression occurred around 15min at 30μM of BPA. Pretreatment with estrogen receptor (ERα) antagonist, tamoxifen, blocked the BPA-induced depression of reflexes, whereas, 17β-estradiol, ER agonist, did not depress the reflexes even up to 10μM. Further, pretreatment with Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) or hemoglobin (Hb) blocked the BPA-induced depression of spinal reflexes. Nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium-nitroprusside depressed the MSR and PSR in a concentration-dependent manner. The nitrite concentration of the cords exposed to BPA was 733μM/gm of tissue (three times the saline group). Pretreatment with tamoxifen/l-NAME/Hb blocked the BPA-induced increase of nitrite levels. The present observations indicate that BPA depressed spinal synaptic transmission through ERα-dependent NO-mediated mechanisms. The altered synaptic activity may implicate for neurobehavioral locomotor abnormalities after exposure to BPA. PMID:25595991

  2. Estrogen receptor beta activation prevents glucocorticoid receptor-dependent effects of the central nucleus of the amygdala on behavior and neuroendocrine function.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Michael J; Foradori, Chad D; Handa, Robert J

    2010-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression have formidable economic and societal impacts. A dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to elevated endogenous glucocorticoid levels is often associated with such disorders. Chronically high glucocorticoid levels may act upon the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) to alter normally adaptive responses into those that are maladaptive and detrimental. In addition to glucocorticoids, other steroid hormones such as estradiol and androgens can also modify hormonal and behavioral responses to threatening stimuli. In particular, estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) agonists have been shown to be anxiolytic. Consequently, these experiments addressed the hypothesis that the selective stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the CeA would increase anxiety-like behaviors and HPA axis reactivity to stress, and further, that an ERbeta agonist could modulate these effects. Young adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and bilaterally implanted via stereotaxic surgery with a wax pellet containing the selective GR agonist RU28362 or a blank pellet, to a region just dorsal to the CeA. Four days later, animals were administered the ERbeta agonist S-DPN or vehicle (with four daily sc injections). Anxiety-type behaviors were measured using the elevated plus maze (EPM). Central RU28362 implants caused significantly higher anxiety-type behaviors in the EPM and greater plasma CORT levels than controls given a blank central implant. Moreover, S-DPN treated animals, regardless of type of central implant, displayed significantly lower anxiety-type behaviors and post-EPM plasma CORT levels than vehicle treated controls or vehicle treated animals implanted with RU28362. These results indicate that selective activation of GR within the CeA is anxiogenic, and peripheral administration of an ERbeta agonist can overcome this effect. These data suggest that estradiol signaling via ERbeta

  3. Estrogen receptor beta activation prevents glucocorticoid receptor-dependent effects of the central nucleus of the amygdala on behavior and neuroendocrine function

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Michael J.; Foradori, Chad D.; Handa, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression have formidable economic and societal impacts. A dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to elevated endogenous glucocorticoid levels is often associated with such disorders. Chronically high glucocorticoid levels may act upon the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) to alter normally adaptive responses into those that are maladaptive and detrimental. In addition to glucocorticoids, other steroid hormones such as estradiol and androgens can also modify hormonal and behavioral responses to threatening stimuli. In particular, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) agonists have been shown to be anxiolytic. Consequently, these experiments addressed the hypothesis that the selective stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the CeA would increase anxiety-like behaviors and HPA axis reactivity to stress, and further, that an ERβ agonist could modulate these effects. Young adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and bilaterally implanted via stereotaxic surgery with a wax pellet containing the selective GR agonist RU28362 or a blank pellet, to a region just dorsal to the CeA. Four days later, animals were administered the ERβ agonist S-DPN or vehicle (with four daily sc injections). Anxiety-type behaviors were measured using the elevated plus maze (EPM). Central RU28362 implants caused significantly higher anxiety-type behaviors in the EPM and greater plasma CORT levels than controls given a blank central implant. Moreover, S-DPN treated animals, regardless of type of central implant, displayed significantly lower anxiety-type behaviors and post-EPM plasma CORT levels than vehicle treated controls or vehicle treated animals implanted with RU28362. These results indicate that selective activation of GR within the CeA is anxiogenic, and peripheral administration of an ERβ agonist can overcome this effect. These data suggest that estradiol signaling via ERβ prevents

  4. Attenuation of Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced parallel autophagic and apoptotic cell death by gypenoside XVII through the estrogen receptor-dependent activation of Nrf2/ARE pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiangbao; Wang, Min; Sun, Guibo; Ye, Jingxue; Zhou, Yanhui; Dong, Xi; Wang, Tingting; Lu, Shan; Sun, Xiaobo

    2014-08-15

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) has a pivotal function in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To investigate Aβ neurotoxicity, we used an in vitro model that involves Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced cell death in the nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of PC12 cells. Aβ{sub 25–35} (20 μM) treatment for 24 h caused apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by significant cell viability reduction, LDH release, phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation in PC12 cells. Aβ{sub 25–35} treatment led to autophagic cell death, as evidenced by augmented GFP-LC3 puncta, conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and increased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. Aβ{sub 25–35} treatment induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by intracellular ROS accumulation and increased production of mitochondrial superoxide, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and 8-OHdG. Phytoestrogens have been proved to be protective against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and regarded as relatively safe targets for AD drug development. Gypenoside XVII (GP-17) is a novel phytoestrogen isolated from Gynostemma pentaphyllum or Panax notoginseng. Pretreatment with GP-17 (10 μM) for 12 h increased estrogen response element reporter activity, activated PI3K/Akt pathways, inhibited GSK-3β, induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, augmented antioxidant responsive element enhancer activity, upregulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression and activity, and provided protective effects against Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death. In conclusion, GP-17 conferred protection against Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced neurotoxicity through estrogen receptor-dependent activation of PI3K/Akt pathways, inactivation of GSK-3β and activation of Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 pathways. This finding might provide novel insights into understanding the mechanism for neuroprotective effects of phytoestrogens or

  5. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

    Estrogen is used to treat hot flushes ('hot flashes'; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) in ... and cause problems with the skin or nervous system), very high or very low levels of calcium ...

  6. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

    ... estrogen tablets. If you will be taking Estrace® brand tablets, tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to aspirin or tartrazine (a food color additive). Ask your pharmacist or check the manufacturer's ...

  7. Identification of a new mutagenic polychlorinated biphenyl derivative in the Waka River, Wakayama, Japan, showing activation of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Takamura-Enya, Takeji; Watanabe, Tetsushi; Tada, Atsuko; Hirayama, Teruhisa; Nukaya, Haruo; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2002-03-01

    Water samples from the Waka River, which runs through an area housing many chemical industry facilities in Wakayama, Japan, have been found to show significant mutagenicity, especially without a mammalian metabolic activation system (S9 mix) in the Salmonella typhimurium YG1024 strain. Mutagens in the river water were adsorbed to 3 kg of blue cotton, extracted with methanol/ammonia, and separated by several low- and high-pressure liquid chromatography steps with reversed-phase columns. One mutagen (0.6 mg), accounting for 50% of the total mutagenicity of the adsorbed materials, was isolated. On the basis of the mass, high-resolution mass, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra, the chemical was determined to have a polychlorinated biphenyl skeleton with nitro and amino substitution groups. Well-designed chemical synthesis of the putative mutagen revealed it to be 4-amino-3,3'-dichloro-5,4'-dinitrobiphenyl. This novel compound exerted strong mutagenicity without the S9 mix, inducing 66,000 and 140,000 revertants/nmol in S. typhimurium TA98 and YG1024, respectively. Moreover, this polychlorinated biphenyl derivative was proven to activate the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcription in a lac Z reporter gene assay with an efficiency almost the same as that of beta-naphthoflavone, well-known to be a synthetic aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist. It is possible that the mutagen is formed unintentionally via postemission modification of drainage water containing parent chemicals, such as 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine or 3,3'-dichloro-4,4'-dinitrobiphenyl, which are known to be raw materials in the manufacture of polymers and dye intermediates in chemical plants. PMID:11896690

  8. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment alters eicosanoid levels in several organs of the mouse in an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Peter; Solaimani, Parrisa; Wu, Xiaomeng; Hankinson, Oliver

    2012-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) adversely affects many mammalian organs and tissues. These effects are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 are upregulated by the liganded AHR. These (and other) cytochromes P450 can metabolize arachidonic acid into a variety of bioactive eicosanoids. Towards investigating a potential role of eicosanoids in TCDD toxicity, arachidonic acid, two other unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, and up to twenty-five eicosanoids were measured in five organs/tissues of male and female wild-type and Ahr null mice treated or untreated with TCDD. TCDD generally increased the levels of the four dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and (where measured) 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and 18-, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (HETEs) in the serum, liver, spleen and lungs, but not the heart, of both sexes, and increased the levels in the serum, liver and spleen of several metabolites that are usually considered products of lipoxygenase activity, but which may also be generated by cytochromes P450. TCDD also increased the levels of the esterified forms of these eicosanoids in the liver in parallel with the corresponding free forms. The levels of prostanoids were generally not affected by TCDD. The above changes did not occur in Ahr null mice, and are therefore mediated by the AHR. TCDD increased the mRNA levels of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1 and the Pla2g12a form of phospholipase A{sub 2} to varying degrees in the different organs, and these increases correlated with some but not all the changes in eicosanoids levels in the organs, suggesting that other enzymes may also be involved. -- Highlights: ► TCDD treatment increases the levels of many eicosanoids in several mouse organs. ► Products of both the cytochrome P450 and classical lipoxygenase pathways are increased. ► These increases are dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. ► Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 appear to be responsible for much but

  9. Effects of triclocarban on the transcription of estrogen, androgen and aryl hydrocarbon receptor responsive genes in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Hunecke, Danele; Luch, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antimicrobial agent that is used in detergents, soaps and other personal hygiene products. Similarly to triclosan the widespread use of TCC has raised concerns about its endocrine potential. In luciferase-based reporter assays TCC has been shown to enhance estrogenic and androgenic activities following cellular coexposure with estrogen or dihydrotestosterone, respectively. The present study demonstrates that although coexposure with TCC enhances the estrogenic and androgenic readout of luciferase-based reporter cell lines such as HeLa9908 and MDA-kb2, it fails to act as a xenoandrogen on transcriptional level, nor does it induce cell proliferation in the estrogen sensitive E-screen. In addition TCC did not alter the expression of estrogen responsive genes in human mammary carcinoma MCF-7 cells exposed to 17β-estradiol, bisphenol A, butylparaben or genistein. However, TCC was shown to interfere with the regulon of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) as TCC showed a costimulatory effect on transcription of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, effectively lowering the transcriptional threshold for both genes in the presence of estrogens. It thus seems, that while the induction of the respective luciferase reporter assays by TCC is an unspecific false positive signal caused by luciferase stabilisation, TCC has the potential to interfere with the regulatory crosstalk of the estrogen receptor (ER) and the AhR regulon. PMID:23524099

  10. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Retention of Nuclear HuR Suppresses Cigarette Smoke-Induced Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression Independent of DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zago, Michela; Sheridan, Jared A.; Nair, Parameswaran; Rico de Souza, Angela; Gallouzi, Imed-Eddine; Rousseau, Simon; Di Marco, Sergio; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H.; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that responds to man-made environmental toxicants, has emerged as an endogenous regulator of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by a mechanism that is poorly understood. In this study, we first used AhR-deficient (AhR−/−) primary pulmonary cells, together with pharmacological tools to inhibit new RNA synthesis, to show that the AhR is a prominent factor in the destabilization of Cox-2 mRNA. The destabilization of Cox-2 mRNA and subsequent suppression of cigarette smoke-induced COX-2 protein expression by the AhR was independent of its ability to bind the dioxin response element (DRE), thereby differentiating the DRE-driven toxicological AhR pathway from its anti-inflammatory abilities. We further describe that the AhR destabilizes Cox-2 mRNA by sequestering HuR within the nucleus. The role of HuR in AhR stabilization of Cox-2 mRNA was confirmed by knockdown of HuR, which resulted in rapid Cox-2 mRNA degradation. Finally, in the lungs of AhR−/− mice exposed to cigarette smoke, there was little Cox-2 mRNA despite robust COX-2 protein expression, a finding that correlates with almost exclusive cytoplasmic HuR within the lungs of AhR−/− mice. Therefore, we propose that the AhR plays an important role in suppressing the expression of inflammatory proteins, a function that extends beyond the ability of the AhR to respond to man-made toxicants. These findings open the possibility that a DRE-independent AhR pathway may be exploited therapeutically as an anti-inflammatory target. PMID:24086407

  11. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent upregulation of Cyp1b1 by TCDD and diesel exhaust particles in rat brain microvessels

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background AhR activates the transcription of several target genes including CYP1B1. Recently, we showed CYP1B1 as the major cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme expressed in human brain microvessels. Here, we studied the effect of AhR activation by environmental pollutants on the expression of Cyp1b1 in rat brain microvessels. Methods Expression of AhR and Cyp1b1 was detected in isolated rat brain microvessels. AhR was immunovisualised in brain microvessel endothelial cells. The effect of AhR ligands on Cyp1b1 expression was studied using isolated brain microvessels after ex vivo and/or in vivo exposure to TCDD, heavy hydrocarbons containing diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). Results After ex vivo exposure to TCDD (a highly potent AhR ligand) for 3 h, Cyp1b1 expression was significantly increased by 2.3-fold in brain microvessels. A single i.p. dose of TCDD also increased Cyp1b1 transcripts (22-fold) and Cyp1b1 protein (2-fold) in rat brain microvessels at 72 h after TCDD. Likewise, DEP treatment (in vivo and ex vivo) strongly induced Cyp1b1 protein in brain microvessels. DEP-mediated Cyp1b1 induction was inhibited by actinomycin D, cycloheximide, or by an AhR antagonist. In contrast, a sub-chronic in vivo treatment with Δ9-THC once daily for 7 seven days had no effect on Cyp1b1 expression Conclusions Our results show that TCDD and DEP strongly induced Cyp1b1 in rat brain microvessels, likely through AhR activation. PMID:21867498

  12. 2,3,7,8- Te trachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment alters eicosanoid levels in several organs of the mouse in an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Peter; Solaimani, Parrisa; Wu, Xiaomeng; Hankinson, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    2,3,7,8- Te trachlorodibenzo- p-dioxin (TCDD) adversely affects many mammalian organs and tissues. These effects are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 are upregulated by the liganded AHR. These (and other) cytochromes P450 can metabolize arachidonic acid into a variety of bioactive eicosanoids. Towards investigating a potential role of eicosanoids in TCDD toxicity, arachidonic acid, two other unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, and up to twenty-three eicosanoids were measured in five organs/tissues of male and female wild-type and Ahr null mice treated or untreated with TCDD. TCDD generally increased the levels of the four dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and (where measured) 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and 18-, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (HETEs) in the serum, liver, spleen and lungs, but not the heart, of both sexes, and increased the levels in the serum, liver and spleen of several metabolites that are usually considered products of lipoxygenase activity, but which may also be generated by cytochromes P450. TCDD also increased the levels of the esterified forms of these eicosanoids in the liver in parallel with the corresponding free forms. The levels of prostanoids were generally not affected by TCDD. The above changes did not occur in Ahr null mice, and are therefore mediated by the AHR. TCDD increased the mRNA levels of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1 and the Pla2g12a form of phospholipase A2 to varying degrees in the different organs, and these increases correlated with some but not all the changes in eicosanoids levels in the organs, suggesting that other enzymes may also be involved. PMID:22230337

  13. Estrogen receptor- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activities of a coal-tar creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Fielden, M.R.; Wu, Z.F.; Sinal, C.J.; Jury, H.H.; Bend, J.R.; Hammond, G.L.; Zacharewski, T.R.

    2000-05-01

    A coal-tar creosote was examined for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity using a battery of mechanistically based assays. In vitro, creosote was found to bind to the mouse ER, bind to the human sex hormone-binding globulin, and elicit partial agonist activity in reporter gene assays in transiently transfected MCF-7 cells. Based on competitive binding to the mouse ER, creosote contains approximately 165 mg/L of estradiol-equivalents. Creosote effectively transformed the AhR in vitro and induced a Cyplal-regulated luciferase reporter gene in transiently transfected Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Based on dose-response curves, creosote contains approximately 730 mg/L of dioxin-equivalents. Creosote did not exhibit any AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity in vitro. In vivo, creosote significantly induced liver pentoxyresorufin O-depentylation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) in a dose-dependent manner in ovariectomized (OVX) ICR mice, but did not increase uterine weight wet or vaginal cornification, due possibly to AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity. In OVX DBA/2 mice, a strain less responsive to AhR ligands, creosote induced liver EROD to a lesser extent, but still did not show an increase in uterine wet weight or vaginal cornification. These results demonstrate that coal-tar creosote exhibits AhR- and ER-mediated activity in vitro, but its dioxinlike activity may suppress estrogenic responses in vivo.

  14. A COMPUTER DOCKING STUDY OF THE BINDING OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR METABOLITES TO THE LIGARD-BINDING DOMAIN OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of ubiquitous, anthropogenic chemicals found in the environment. In the present study, computational methods are used to evaluate their potential estrogenicity and the contribution chemicals in this class make to environmental e...

  15. Novel daidzein analogs enhance osteogenic activity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and adipose-derived stromal/stem cells through estrogen receptor dependent and independent mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk of fractures. Studies have demonstrated the use of phytoestrogens, or plant-derived estrogens, such as genistein anddaidzein, to effectively increase osteogenic activity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal s...

  16. Ginsenoside Rg3 increases nitric oxide production via increases in phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: Essential roles of estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hien, Tran Thi; Kim, Nak Doo; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Oh, Seok Jeong; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-08-01

    We previously showed that ginsenosides increase nitric oxide (NO) production in vascular endothelium and that ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) is the most active one among ginseng saponins. However, the mechanism for Rg3-mediated nitric oxide production is still uncertain. In this study, we determined whether Rg3 affects phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECV 304 human endothelial cells. Rg3 increased both the phosphorylation and the expression of eNOS in a concentration-dependent manner and a maximal effect was found at 10 {mu}g/ml of Rg3. The enzyme activities of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase were enhanced as were estrogen receptor (ER)- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent reporter gene transcriptions in Rg3-treated endothelial cells. Rg3-induced eNOS phosphorylation required the ER-mediated PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Moreover, Rg3 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through up-regulation of CaM kinase II and Rg3-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation was reversed by AMPK inhibition. The present results provide a mechanism for Rg3-stimulated endothelial NO production.

  17. Cross-Talk in the Female Rat Mammary Gland: Influence of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor on Estrogen Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Helle, Janina; Bader, Manuela I.; Keiler, Annekathrin M.; Zierau, Oliver; Vollmer, Günter; Chittur, Sridar V.; Tenniswood, Martin; Kretzschmar, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cross-talk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) plays a major role in signaling processes in female reproductive organs. Objectives: We investigated the influence of the AHR ligand 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) on ER-mediated signaling in mammary gland tissue of ovariectomized (ovx) rats. Methods: After 14 days of hormonal decline, ovx rats were treated for 3 days with 4 μg/kg 17β-estradiol (E2), 15 mg/kg 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), 15 mg/kg 3-MC, or a combination of these compounds (E2 + 3-MC, 8-PN + 3-MC). Whole-mount preparations of the mammary gland were used to count terminal end buds (TEBs). Protein expression studies (immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence), a cDNA microarray, pathway analyses, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed to evaluate the interaction between AHR- and ER-mediated signaling pathways. Results: E2 treatment increased the number of TEBs and the levels of Ki-67 protein and progesterone receptor (PR); this treatment also changed the expression of 325 genes by more than 1.5-fold. Although 3-MC treatment alone had marginal impact on gene or protein expression, when rats were co-treated with 3-MC and E2, 3-MC strongly inhibited E2-induced TEB development, protein synthesis, and the expression of nearly half of E2-induced genes. This inhibitory effect of 3-MC was partially mirrored when 8-PN was used as an ER ligand. The anti-estrogenicity of ligand-activated AHR was at least partly due to decreased protein levels of ERα in ductal epithelial cells. Conclusion: Our data show transcriptome-wide anti-estrogenic properties of ligand-activated AHR on ER-mediated processes in the mammary gland, thereby contributing an explanation for the chemopreventive and endocrine-disrupting potential of AHR ligands. Citation: Helle J, Bader MI, Keiler AM, Zierau O, Vollmer G, Chittur SV, Tenniswood M, Kretzschmar G. 2016. Cross-talk in the female rat mammary gland: influence

  18. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent up-regulation of the heterodimeric amino acid transporter LAT1 (SLC7A5)/CD98hc (SLC3A2) by diesel exhaust particle extract in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The heterodimeric L-type amino acid transporter (LAT) 1/CD98hc is overexpressed in lung cancers with a poor prognosis factor. Factors that contribute to LAT1/CD98hc overexpression in lung cells remain however to be determined, but the implication of atmospheric pollution can be suspected. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the effects of diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (DEPe) on LAT1/CD98hc expression in bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells. Exposure to DEPe up-regulated LAT1 and CD98hc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent manner, with DEPe EC50 values (around 0.2 μg/mL) relevant to environmental situations. DEPe concomitantly induced LAT1/CD98hc protein expression and LAT1-mediated leucine accumulation in BEAS-2B cells. Inhibition of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway through the use of a chemical AhR antagonist or the siRNA-mediated silencing of AhR expression was next found to prevent DEPe-mediated induction of LAT1/CD98hc, indicating that this regulation depends on AhR, known to be activated by major chemical DEP components like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. DEPe exposure was finally shown to induce mRNA expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in BEAS-2B cells, in a CD98hc/focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) manner, thus suggesting that DEPe-mediated induction of CD98hc triggers activation of the integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway known to be involved in MMP-2 regulation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that exposure to DEPe induces functional overexpression of the amino acid transporter LAT1/CD98hc in lung cells. Such a regulation may participate to pulmonary carcinogenic effects of DEPs, owing to the well-documented contribution of LAT1 and CD98hc to cancer development. PMID:26621329

  19. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation leads to impairment of estrogen-driven chicken vitellogenin promoter activity in LMH cells.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Ursula A; Pérez Sáez, Juan M; Bussmann, Leonardo E; Barañao, J Lino

    2013-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates most of the toxic effects of environmental contaminants. Among the multiple pleiotropic responses elicited by AHR agonists, the antiestrogenic and endocrine-disrupting action of the receptor activation is one of the most studied. It has been demonstrated that some AHR agonists disrupt estradiol-induced vitellogenin synthesis in the fish liver via a mechanism that involves crosstalk between the AHR and the estrogen receptor (ER). Chicken hepatocytes have become a model for the study of AHR action in birds and the induction of the signal and its effect in these cells are well established. However, the impact of AHR activation on estradiol-regulated responses in the chicken liver remains to be demonstrated. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to determine the effect of AHR action on ER-driven transcription in a convenient model of chicken liver cells. For this purpose, we designed a reporter construct bearing the 5' regulatory region of the chicken vitellogenin II gene and used it to transfect chicken hepatoma LMH cells. We found that β-naphthoflavone represses ER-driven vitellogenin promoter activity and that this action is mediated by the AHR. This inhibitory crosstalk between both pathways appears to be unidirectional, since estradiol did not alter the transcript levels of an AHR target gene. Besides, and highly relevant, we show that LMH cell line transfected with a reporter construct bearing the chicken vitellogenin promoter sequence is a useful and convenient model for the study of AHR-ER interaction in chicken liver-derived cells. PMID:23103859

  20. Activation of estrogen receptor signaling by the dioxin-like aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist, 3,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) in salmon in vitro system

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Anne Skjetne; Arukwe, Augustine

    2008-03-01

    Available toxicological evidence indicates that environmental contaminants with strong affinity to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) have anti-estrogenic properties in both mammalian and non-mammalian in vivo and in vitro studies. The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the interactions between the AhR and estrogen receptor (ER) in salmon in vitro system. Two separate experiments were performed and gene expression patterns were analyzed using real-time PCR, while protein analysis was done by immunoblotting. Firstly, salmon primary hepatocytes were exposed to the dioxin-like PCB126 at 1, 10 and 50 pM and ER agonist nonylphenol (NP) at 5 and 10 {mu}M, singly or in combination. Our data showed increased levels of ER-mediated gene expression (vitellogenin: Vtg, zona radiata protein: Zr-protein, ER{alpha}, ER{beta} and vigilin) as well as increased cellular ER{alpha} protein levels after treatment with NP and PCB126, singly or in combination. PCB126 treatment alone produced, as expected, increased transcription of AhR nuclear translocator (Arnt), CYP1A1 and AhR repressor (AhRR) mRNA, and these responses were reduced in the presence of NP concentrations. PCB126 exposure alone did not produce significant effect on AhR2{alpha} mRNA but increased (at 1 and 50 pM) and decreased (at 10 pM) AhR2{beta} mRNA below control level. For AhR2{delta} and AhR2{gamma} isotypes, PCB126 (at 1 pM) produced significant decreases (total inhibition for AhR2{gamma}) of mRNA levels but was indifferent at 10 and 50 pM, compared to control. NP exposure alone produced concentration-dependent significant decrease of AhR2{beta} mRNA. In contrast, while 5 {mu}M NP produced an indifferent effect on AhR2{delta} and AhR2{gamma}, 10 {mu}M NP produced significant decrease (total inhibition for AhR2{gamma}) and the presence of NP produced apparent PCB126 concentration-specific modulation of all AhR isotypes. A second experiment was performed to evaluate the involvement of ER

  1. Estrogen overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002584.htm Estrogen overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Estrogen is a female hormone. Estrogen overdose occurs when ...

  2. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and estrogen receptor alpha differentially modulate nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 transactivation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Raymond; Matthews, Jason

    2013-07-15

    Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2; NFE2L2) plays an important role in mediating cellular protection against reactive oxygen species. NRF2 signaling is positively modulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) but inhibited by estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). In this study we investigated the crosstalk among NRF2, AHR and ERα in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with the NRF2 activator sulforaphane (SFN), a dual AHR and ERα activator, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or 17β-estradiol (E2). SFN-dependent increases in NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase I (HMOX1) mRNA levels were significantly reduced after co-treatment with E2. E2-dependent repression of NQO1 and HMOX1 was associated with increased ERα but reduced p300 recruitment and reduced histone H3 acetylation at both genes. In contrast, DIM + SFN or TCDD + SFN induced NQO1 and HMOX1 mRNA expression to levels higher than SFN alone, which was prevented by RNAi-mediated knockdown of AHR. DIM + SFN but not TCDD + SFN also induced recruitment of ERα to NQO1 and HMOX1. However, the presence of AHR at NQO1 and HMOX1 restored p300 recruitment and histone H3 acetylation, thereby reversing the ERα-dependent repression of NRF2. Taken together, our study provides further evidence of functional interplay among NRF2, AHR and ERα signaling pathways through altered p300 recruitment to NRF2-regulated target genes. - Highlights: • We examined crosstalk among ERα, AHR, and NRF2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. • AHR enhanced the mRNA expression levels of two NRF2 target genes – HMOX1 and NQO1. • ERα repressed HMOX1 and NQO1 expression via decreased histone acetylation. • AHR prevented ERα-dependent repression of HMOX1 and NQO1.

  3. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  4. Novel mammalian cell lines expressing reporter genes for the detection of environmental chemicals activating endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptors (ArhR) or estrogen receptors (ER).

    PubMed

    Minh, Si Do; Below, Sabine; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2008-12-01

    We have constructed two vector systems (pDMS5, pSAB2) containing the promoter regions of the human CYP1A1 gene including xenobiotic response elements or the promoter region of the Xenopus laevis vitellogenin A2 gene including estrogen response elements, respectively, and the genes for green fluorescent protein and firefly luciferase. These vectors were transfected into CHO-K1 cells. Transiently transfected cells consistently responded to 1 nmol/l TCDD (dioxin) or 10 nmol/l 17ss-estradiol, respectively, with a 3-5 fold increase in luciferase activity. Permanent cell lines were selected by culturing transiently transfected cells under continued presence of antibiotics and dilution cloning. Cells which had stably integrated the vector-DNA into the genomic DNA were selected. SiF6 cells responded to treatment with TCDD, PCB126, benzo(a)pyrene or indirubin-3'-monoxime in the concentration range between 0 and 1 micromol/l. SiG12 cells responded to treatment with bisphenol A, 4-MBC and DDT in the concentration range between 0 and 10 micromol/l. Compared with the controls, luciferase mRNA-abundance (semi-quantitative RT-PCR) and luciferase activity (luminescence assay) were elevated up to 3-fold. Resveratrol or tamoxifen, respectively, worked as full antagonists. Luciferase expression was increased upon treatment of cells with extracts of spiked soil samples indicating that our systems are suited for screening of environmental samples. PMID:18835349

  5. Binding of Estrogenic Compounds to Recombinant Estrogen Receptor-α: Application to Environmental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Arnaud; Boussioux, Anne-Marie; Escande, Aurélie; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Gomez, Elena; Fenet, Hélène; Ruff, Marc; Moras, Dino; Vignon, Françoise; Duchesne, Marie-Josèphe; Casellas, Claude; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Balaguer, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Estrogenic activity in environmental samples could be mediated through a wide variety of compounds and by various mechanisms. High-affinity compounds for estrogen receptors (ERs), such as natural or synthetic estrogens, as well as low-affinity compounds such as alkylphenols, phthalates, and polychlorinated biphenyls are present in water and sediment samples. Furthermore, compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which do not bind ERs, modulate estrogen activity by means of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In order to characterize compounds that mediate estrogenic activity in river water and sediment samples, we developed a tool based on the ER-αligand-binding domain, which permitted us to estimate contaminating estrogenic compound affinities. We designed a simple transactivation assay in which compounds of high affinity were captured by limited amounts of recombinant ER-αand whose capture led to a selective inhibition of transactivation. This approach allowed us to bring to light that water samples contain estrogenic compounds that display a high affinity for ERs but are present at low concentrations. In sediment samples, on the contrary, we showed that estrogenic compounds possess a low affinity and are present at high concentration. Finally, we used immobilized recombinant ER-αto separate ligands for ER and AhR that are present in river sediments. Immobilized ER-α, which does not retain dioxin-like compounds, enabled us to isolate and concentrate ER ligands to facilitate their further analysis. PMID:15743715

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent stimulation of amphiregulin expression in androgen-stimulated human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, I; Bailey, J; Hitzemann, K; Pittelkow, M R; Maihle, N J

    1994-01-01

    Amphiregulin is a heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-related peptide that binds to the EGF receptor (EGF-R) with high affinity. In this study, we report a role for amphiregulin in androgen-stimulated regulation of prostate cancer cell growth. Androgen is known to enhance EGF-R expression in the androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cell line, and it has been suggested that androgenic stimuli may regulate proliferation, in part, through autocrine mechanisms involving the EGF-R. In this study, we demonstrate that LNCaP cells express amphiregulin mRNA and peptide and that this expression is elevated by androgenic stimulation. We also show that ligand-dependent EGF-R stimulation induces amphiregulin expression and that androgenic effects on amphiregulin synthesis are mediated through this EGF-R pathway. Parallel studies using the estrogen-responsive breast carcinoma cell line, MCF-7, suggest that regulation of amphiregulin by estrogen may also be mediated via an EGF-R pathway. In addition, heparin treatment of LNCaP cells inhibits androgen-stimulated cell growth further suggesting that amphiregulin can mediate androgen-stimulated LNCaP proliferation. Together, these results implicate an androgen-regulated autocrine loop composed of amphiregulin and its receptor in prostate cancer cell growth and suggest that the mechanism of steroid hormone regulation of amphiregulin synthesis may occur through androgen upregulation of the EGF-R and subsequent receptor-dependent pathways. Images PMID:8049525

  7. Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4′-Trihydroxystilbene) Ameliorates Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis, Primarily via Induction of Apoptosis in T Cells Involving Activation of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra P.; Hegde, Venkatesh L.; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4′-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic compound found in plant products, including red grapes, exhibits anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Using an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), we investigated the use of resveratrol for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. We observed that resveratrol treatment decreased the clinical symptoms and inflammatory responses in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)-induced mice. Furthermore, we observed significant apoptosis in inflammatory cells in spinal cord of EAE-induced mice treated with resveratrol compared with the control mice. Resveratrol administration also led to significant down-regulation of certain cytokines and chemokines in EAE-induced mice including tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-9, IL-12, IL-17, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and Eotaxin. In vitro studies on the mechanism of action revealed that resveratrol triggered high levels of apoptosis in activated T cells and to a lesser extent in unactivated T cells. Moreover, resveratrol-induced apoptosis was mediated through activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and estrogen receptor (ER) and correlated with up-regulation of AhR, Fas, and FasL expression. In addition, resveratrol-induced apoptosis in primary T cells correlated with cleavage of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and release of cytochrome c. Data from the present study demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of resveratrol to trigger apoptosis in activated T cells and its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases including, MS. PMID:17872969

  8. The Immune System Is a Natural Target for Estrogen Action: Opposing Effects of Estrogen in Two Prototypical Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Deena; Ansar Ahmed, S.

    2016-01-01

    Analogous to other physiological systems, the immune system also demonstrates remarkable sex differences. Although the reasons for sex differences in immune responses are not precisely understood, it potentially involves differences in sex hormones (estrogens, androgens, and differential sex hormone receptor-mediated events), X-chromosomes, microbiome, epigenetics among others. Overall, females tend to have more responsive and robust immune system compared to their male counterparts. It is therefore not surprising that females respond more aggressively to self-antigens and are more susceptible to autoimmune diseases. Female hormone (estrogen or 17β-estradiol) can potentially act on all cellular subsets of the immune system through estrogen receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms. This minireview highlights differential expression of estrogen receptors on immune cells, major estrogen-mediated signaling pathways, and their effect on immune cells. Since estrogen has varied effects in female-predominant autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus, we will mechanistically postulate the potential differential role of estrogen in these chronic debilitating diseases. PMID:26779182

  9. Estrogen Decrease in Tight Junctional Resistance Involves Matrix-Metalloproteinase-7-Mediated Remodeling of Occludin

    PubMed Central

    Gorodeski, George I.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen modulates tight junctional resistance through estrogen receptor-α-mediated remodeling of occludin. The objective of the study was to understand the mechanisms involved. Experiments using human normal vaginal-cervical epithelial cells showed that human normal vaginal-cervical epithelial cells secrete constitutively matrix-metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) into the luminal solution and that MMP-7 is necessary and sufficient to produce estrogen decrease of tight junctional resistance and remodeling of occludin. Treatment with estrogen stimulated activation of the pro-MMP-7 intracellularly and augmented secretion of the activated MMP-7 form. Steady-state levels of MMP-7 mRNA and protein were not affected by estrogen. Estrogen modulated phosphorylation of the MMP-7, but the changes were most likely secondary to changes in cellular MMP-7 mass. Estrogen increased coimmunoreactivity of MMP-7 with the Golgi protein GPP130. Tunicamycin and brefeldin-A had no effect on cellular MMP-7 but monensin (inhibitor of Golgi traffic) blocked estrogen effects, suggesting estrogen site of action is at the Golgi system. Estrogen increased generalized secretory activity, including of luminal exocytosis of polycarbohydrates. However, estrogen increased coimmunoreactivity of MMP-7 with synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa in apical membranes, suggesting soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion factor attachment protein receptor-facilitated exocytosis of MMP-7. Treatment with the vesicular-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 inhibited activation of MMP-7. These data suggest that estrogen up-regulates activation of the MMP-7 intracellularly, at the level of Golgi, and augments secretion of activated MMP-7 through soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion factor attachment protein receptor-dependent exocytosis. On the other hand, estrogen acidification of the luminal solution would tend to alkalinize exocytotic vesicles and may lead to decreased activation of the MMP-7. These mechanisms

  10. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  11. Estrogen and Bazedoxifene

    MedlinePlus

    Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are used to treat hot flashes (sudden feelings of warmth, especially in the ... women may experience other symptoms and body changes). Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are also used to prevent ...

  12. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  13. Estrogen and cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Shang, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen exhibits a broad spectrum of physiological functions ranging from regulation of the menstrual cycle and reproduction to modulation of bone density, brain function, and cholesterol mobilization. Despite the beneficial actions of endogenous estrogen, sustained exposure to exogenous estrogen is a well-established risk factor for various cancers. We summarize our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of estrogen signaling in normal and cancer cells and discuss the major challenges to existing antiestrogen therapies. PMID:23043248

  14. [Estrogens and pharmacological modulation of estrogen receptors].

    PubMed

    Sanidize, T V; Ratiani, L R; Gabuniia, L Iu; Tortladze, M L; Kuridze, N N

    2009-02-01

    Estrogens belong to more or less frequently prescribed preparations. Main fields of application of these preparations (as in monotherapy as well as in combination) are contraception and hormone replacement therapy during menopause. More uncommon indications of estrogens are growth inhibition and hypogonadism (in this case they are prescribed along with gonadotropic hormones). Synthesis and metabolism of estrogens, as well as their intracellular receptors are well studied these days, which allow us to understand physiology and pharmacology of these hormones. In pharmacology the main stage is detection of estrogen receptors inside of cells of targets. There are two types of estrogen receptors alpha- and beta- coded by different genes. A number of steroid and non-steroid compounds have characteristics of estrogens. Likely in the future their popularity will increase, as by the aging of population number of those women, who receive replacement therapy, will increase. Investigations to find an ideal elective modulator of estrogen receptors, that will possess anti-estrogenic activity in connection with mammal gland and develop indifference in connection with endometrium and at the same time will display ability to reduce hot flushes, bone resorption, atrophy of mucous membranes of vagina and urinary bladder, as well as it will favorably effect on metabolism of lipoproteins are carried out. PMID:19276483

  15. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    PubMed

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation - both peripherally and in the brain - and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures. PMID:26774208

  16. Synergism of aromatic amines and benzo[a]pyrene in induction of Ah receptor-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Borza, Alexandra; Plöttner, Sabine; Wolf, Alexander; Behm, Claudia; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G; Roos, Peter H; Bolt, Hermann M; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Föllmann, Wolfram

    2008-12-01

    Aromatic amines have been shown to cause bladder cancer. However, epithelial cells of the urinary bladder, cells of origin of bladder cancer, may be exposed to numerous substances besides aromatic amines. In the present study, we analysed possible interactions between the aromatic amines 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) as well as 2-naphthylamine (2-NA) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). For this purpose we incubated primary porcine urinary bladder epithelial cells (PUBEC) with concentrations of 1 to 50 microM 4-ABP with and without co-exposure to B[a]P. As expected B[a]P increased mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), whereas 4-ABP had no effect. However, when co-exposed 4-ABP enhanced the induction of CYP1A1 by B[a]P. This result was confirmed by Western blot analysis of CYP1A1 protein expression. A similar effect as for CYP1A1 was also observed for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1). Next, we studied co-exposures of 2-NA and B[a]P. Similar as for 4-ABP also 2-NA enhanced B[a]P-mediated induction of CYP1A1. Our results demonstrate that some aromatic amines may enhance the influence of B[a]P on Ah receptor-dependent genes. PMID:18989657

  17. Estrogens, cartilage, and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Richette, Pascal; Corvol, Maïté; Bardin, Thomas

    2003-08-01

    A role for estrogens in osteoarthritis is consistent with the larger increases in women than in men in the incidence and prevalence of hip, knee, and finger osteoarthritis after 50 years of age. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy for the menopause seems to be associated with a decrease in the prevalence of symptoms and radiological alterations related to hip and knee osteoarthritis. The two estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERalpha and Erbeta) have been identified in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage, indicating that cartilage can respond to estrogens. Finally, in vivo experiments in animals and in vitro studies have shed light on the mechanisms by which estrogens may influence chondrocyte metabolism. PMID:12951307

  18. ESTROGENIC STATUS MODULATES DMBA-MEDIATED HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION: MICROARRAY-BASED ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogenic status in women influences the metabolism and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The objective of this study was to examine the influence of estradiol (E2) on 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), a ligand for aryl hydrocarbon receptor, mediated changes on gene expressio...

  19. The Measurement of Estrogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Geoff; Makin, Hugh L. J.; Bradlow, H. Leon

    Biologists use the word ‘estrogen' when referring to molecules which have the ability to induce uterine growth or vaginal cornification in the immature or ovariectomized rodent. The word estrogen was derived from two Greek words - oistros meaning frenzy and gennein - to beget. Chemists and biochemists, however, often restrict their use of this term to molecules that contain a characteristic 18-carbon steroid nucleus with an aromatic (phenolic) A-ring, both those that are biologically active estrogens and those without biologic activity but which are of intrinsic interest, such as the estrogen conjugates. This chapter is concerned only with these steroid compounds. The structure and inter-relationship of some common estrogens are given in Fig. 8.1. In addition to the biological estrogens, there are a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds which have estrogenic activity when measured by one or another parameter. While many of the assay procedures described in this review are applicable to these compounds, their application to non C18-steroids will not be discussed here. Methodology for these non-steroidal compounds can be found in reviews by Wang et al. (2002), Wu et al. (2004), Muir (2006), and Delmonte and Rader (2006). While not wishing to downgrade the importance of previous work in the estrogen field, the authors have taken a deliberate decision to exclude most publications prior to 1975, not because these do not have value but simply because space is not unlimited and readers of the present chapter might be expected to be seeking information about methodology which is less than 30 years old. Readers seeking pre-1975 information in this area can find it in Oakey and Holder (1995).

  20. Removal of estrogens and estrogenicity through drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Kathleen; Rosenblum, Laura; Wiese, Thomas E; Wymer, Larry; Dugan, Nicholas; Williams, Daniel; Mash, Heath; Merriman, Betty; Speth, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drinking waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conventional drinking water treatment using a natural water. Bench-scale studies utilizing chlorine, alum coagulation, ferric chloride coagulation, and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were conducted using Ohio River water spiked with three estrogens, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethynylestradiol, and estriol. Treatment of the estrogens with chlorine, either alone or with coagulant, resulted in approximately 98% reductions in the concentrations of the parent estrogens, accompanied by formation of by-products. The MVLN reporter gene and MCF-7 cell proliferation assays were used to characterize the estrogenic activity of the water before and after treatment. The observed estrogenic activities of the chlorinated samples showed that estrogenicity of the water was reduced commensurate with removal of the parent estrogen. Therefore, the estrogen chlorination by-products did not contribute appreciably to the estrogenic activity of the water. Coagulation alone did not result in significant removals of the estrogens. However, addition of PAC, at a typical drinking water plant dose, resulted in removals ranging from approximately 20 to 80%. PMID:22361701

  1. Cooperative demethylation by JMJD2C and LSD1 promotes androgen receptor-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wissmann, Melanie; Yin, Na; Müller, Judith M; Greschik, Holger; Fodor, Barna D; Jenuwein, Thomas; Vogler, Christine; Schneider, Robert; Günther, Thomas; Buettner, Reinhard; Metzger, Eric; Schüle, Roland

    2007-03-01

    Posttranslational modifications of histones, such as methylation, regulate chromatin structure and gene expression. Recently, lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), the first histone demethylase, was identified. LSD1 interacts with the androgen receptor and promotes androgen-dependent transcription of target genes by ligand-induced demethylation of mono- and dimethylated histone H3 at Lys 9 (H3K9) only. Here, we identify the Jumonji C (JMJC) domain-containing protein JMJD2C as the first histone tridemethylase regulating androgen receptor function. JMJD2C interacts with androgen receptor in vitro and in vivo. Assembly of ligand-bound androgen receptor and JMJD2C on androgen receptor-target genes results in demethylation of trimethyl H3K9 and in stimulation of androgen receptor-dependent transcription. Conversely, knockdown of JMJD2C inhibits androgen-induced removal of trimethyl H3K9, transcriptional activation and tumour cell proliferation. Importantly, JMJD2C colocalizes with androgen receptor and LSD1 in normal prostate and in prostate carcinomas. JMJD2C and LSD1 interact and both demethylases cooperatively stimulate androgen receptor-dependent gene transcription. In addition, androgen receptor, JMJD2C and LSD1 assemble on chromatin to remove methyl groups from mono, di and trimethylated H3K9. Thus, our data suggest that specific gene regulation requires the assembly and coordinate action of demethylases with distinct substrate specificities. PMID:17277772

  2. Removal of Estrogens and Estrogenicity through Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drining waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conven...

  3. Estrogens suppress RANK ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation via a stromal cell independent mechanism involving c-Jun repression

    PubMed Central

    Shevde, Nirupama K.; Bendixen, Amy C.; Dienger, Krista M.; Pike, J. Wesley

    2000-01-01

    Loss of ovarian function following menopause results in a substantial increase in bone turnover and a critical imbalance between bone formation and resorption. This imbalance leads to a progressive loss of trabecular bone mass and eventually osteoporosis, in part the result of increased osteoclastogenesis. Enhanced formation of functional osteoclasts appears to be the result of increased elaboration by support cells of osteoclastogenic cytokines such as IL-1, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-6, all of which are negatively regulated by estrogens. We show here that estrogen can suppress receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced differentiation of myelomonocytic precursors into multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts through an estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism that does not require mediation by stromal cells. This suppression is dose-dependent, isomer-specific, and reversed by ICI 182780. Furthermore, the bone-sparing analogues tamoxifen and raloxifene mimic estrogen's effects. Estrogen blocks RANKL/M-CSF-induced activator protein-1-dependent transcription, likely through direct regulation of c-Jun activity. This effect is the result of a classical nuclear activity by estrogen receptor to regulate both c-Jun expression and its phosphorylation by c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Our results suggest that estrogen modulates osteoclast formation both by down-regulating the expression of osteoclastogenic cytokines from supportive cells and by directly suppressing RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PMID:10869427

  4. Nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling is required for normal liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wendong; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Jun; Qatanani, Mohammed; Cuvillier, James; Liu, Jun; Dong, Bingning; Huang, Xiongfei; Moore, David D

    2006-04-14

    Liver mass depends on one or more unidentified humoral signals that drive regeneration when liver functional capacity is diminished. Bile acids are important liver products, and their levels are tightly regulated. Here, we identify a role for nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling in normal liver regeneration. Elevated bile acid levels accelerate regeneration, and decreased levels inhibit liver regrowth, as does the absence of the primary nuclear bile acid receptor FXR. We propose that FXR activation by increased bile acid flux is a signal of decreased functional capacity of the liver. FXR, and possibly other nuclear receptors, may promote homeostasis not only by regulating expression of appropriate metabolic target genes but also by driving homeotrophic liver growth. PMID:16614213

  5. Estrogen receptors and endothelium.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-François; Fontaine, Coralie; Billon-Galés, Audrey; Favre, Julie; Laurell, Henrik; Lenfant, Françoise; Gourdy, Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Estrogens, and in particular 17beta-estradiol (E2), play a pivotal role in sexual development and reproduction and are also implicated in a large number of physiological processes, including the cardiovascular system. Both acetylcholine-induced and flow-dependent vasodilation are preserved or potentiated by estrogen treatment in both animal models and humans. Indeed, E2 increases the endothelial production of nitric oxide and prostacyclin and prevents early atheroma through endothelial-mediated mechanisms. Furthermore, whereas it prevents endothelial activation, E2 potentiates the ability of several subpopulations of the circulating or resident immune cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The balance between these 2 actions could determine the final effect in a given pathophysiological process. E2 also promotes endothelial healing, as well as angiogenesis. Estrogen actions are essentially mediated by 2 molecular targets: estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and ERbeta. The analysis of mouse models targeted for ERalpha or ERbeta demonstrated a prominent role of ERalpha in vascular biology. ERalpha directly modulates transcription of target genes through 2 activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2. Interestingly, an AF-1-deficient ERalpha isoform can be physiologically expressed in the endothelium and appears sufficient to mediate most of the vasculoprotective actions of E2. In contrast, AF-1 is necessary for the E2 actions in reproductive targets. Thus, it appears conceivable to uncouple the vasculoprotective and sexual actions with appropriate selective ER modulators. PMID:20631350

  6. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  7. Estrogens and endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gray, L A; Christopherson, W M; Hoover, R N

    1977-04-01

    A group of 205 women with endometrial carcinoma was matched for age, parity, and year of operation with a group of 205 women who had had hysterectomies for benign disease. In the former group, 32 patients had used conjugated estrogens, while in the latter group 12 had used this hormone, yielding a relative risk of 3.1 (P = 0.0008). Users of other forms of systemic estrogens showed similar elevations in relative risk. Relative risk was related to duration of use, progressing from no evidence of risk among those using the hormone for less than 5 years to an 11.5-fold greater risk for those using it for 10 years or more. Risk was also related to the strength of the medication. The relative risk for users of the 1.25-mg tablets was 12.7 as compared to a two- to fourfold greater risk among users of lesser strength tablets. PMID:193072

  8. IL12-mediated sensitizing of T-cell receptor-dependent and -independent tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Braun, Matthias; Ress, Marie L; Yoo, Young-Eun; Scholz, Claus J; Eyrich, Matthias; Schlegel, Paul G; Wölfl, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL12) is a key inflammatory cytokine critically influencing Th1/Tc1-T-cell responses at the time of initial antigen encounter. Therefore, it may be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we investigated how IL12, and other inflammatory cytokines, shape effector functions of human T-cells. Using a defined culture system, we followed the gradual differentiation and function of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells from their initial activation as naïve T cells through their expansion phase as early memory cells to full differentiation as clonally expanded effector T cells. The addition of IL12 8 days after the initial priming event initiated two mechanistically separate events: First, IL12 sensitized the T-cell receptor (TCR) for antigen-specific activation, leading to an approximately 10-fold increase in peptide sensitivity and, in consequence, enhanced tumor cell killing. Secondly, IL12 enabled TCR/HLA-independent activation and cytotoxicity: this "non-specific" effect was mediated by the NK cell receptor DNAM1 (CD226) and dependent on ligand expression of the target cells. This IL12 regulated, DNAM1-mediated killing is dependent on src-kinases as well as on PTPRC (CD45) activity. Thus, besides enhancing TCR-mediated activation, we here identified for the first time a second IL12 mediated mechanism leading to activation of a receptor-dependent killing pathway via DNAM1. PMID:27622043

  9. β-caryophyllene ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in a cannabinoid 2 receptor-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kechrid, Malek; Patel, Vivek; Tanashian, Galin; Wink, David A.; Gertsch, Jürg; Pacher, Pál

    2012-01-01

    (E)-β-caryophyllene (BCP) is a natural sequiterpene found in many essential oils of spice (best known for contributing to the spiciness of black pepper) and food plants with recognized anti-inflammatory properties. Recently it was shown that BCP is a natural agonist of endogenous cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors, which are expressed in immune cells and mediate anti-inflammatory effects. In this study we aimed to test the effects of BCP in a clinically relevant murine model of nephropathy (induced by the widely used antineoplastic drug cisplatin) in which the tubular injury is largely dependent on inflammation and oxidative/nitrative stress. β-caryophyllene dose-dependently ameliorated cisplatin-induced kidney dysfunction, morphological damage, and renal inflammatory response (chemokines MCP-1 and MIP-2, cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration). It also markedly mitigated oxidative/nitrative stress (NOX-2, NOX-4 expression, 4-HNE and 3-NT content) and cell death. The protective effects of BCP against biochemical and histological markers of nephropathy were absent in CB2 knockout mice. Thus, BCP may be an excellent therapeutic agent to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through a CB2 receptor dependent pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of BCP in humans it has tremendous therapeutic potential in multitude of diseases associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:22326488

  10. Estrogen Metabolism and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samavat, Hamed; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    There is currently accumulating evidence that endogenous estrogens play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Estrogens and their metabolites have been studied in both pre- and postmenopausal women with more consistent results shown in the latter population, in part because of large hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and far fewer studies having been performed in premenopausal women. In this review we describe in detail estrogen metabolism and associated genetic variations, and provide a critical review of the current literature regarding the role of estrogens and their metabolites in breast cancer risk. PMID:24784887

  11. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  12. Interdicting Gq Activation in Airway Disease by Receptor-Dependent and Receptor-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Lam, Hong; An, Steven S; Tall, Gregory G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Gαqβγ heterotrimer (Gq), an important mediator in the pathology of airway disease, plays a central role in bronchoconstriction and airway remodeling, including airway smooth muscle growth and inflammation. Current therapeutic strategies to treat airway disease include the use of muscarinic and leukotriene receptor antagonists; however, these pharmaceuticals demonstrate a limited clinical efficacy as multiple Gq-coupled receptor subtypes contribute to these pathologies. Thus, broadly inhibiting the activation of Gq may be an advantageous therapeutic approach. Here, we investigated the effects of broadly inhibiting Gq activation in vitro and ex vivo using receptor-dependent and receptor-independent strategies. P4pal-10 is a protease activated receptor 4-derived pepducin that exhibits efficacy toward multiple Gq-coupled receptors. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that P4pal-10 selectively inhibits all G protein coupling to several Gq-coupled receptors, including protease activated receptor 1, muscarinic acetylcholine M3, and histamine H1 receptors, while demonstrating no direct effect on Gq. We also evaluated the ability of FR900359, also known as UBO-QIC, to directly inhibit Gq activation. FR900359 inhibited spontaneous Gαq nucleotide exchange, while having little effect on Gαsβγ, Gαiβγ, or Gα12/13βγ heterotrimer activity. Both P4pal-10 and FR900359 inhibited Gq-mediated intracellular signaling and primary human airway smooth muscle growth, whereas only FR900359 effectively interdicted agonist-promoted airway contraction in human precision cut lung slices. These studies serve as a proof of concept that the broad-based inhibition of Gq activation may be a useful therapeutic approach to treat multiple common pathologies of airway disease. PMID:26464325

  13. The flavonoid baicalein promotes NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation and enhances memory

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Fang; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Long, Li-Hong; Fu, Hui; Xie, Na; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE There is growing interest in the physiological functions of flavonoids, especially in their effects on cognitive function and on neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the role of the flavonoid baicalein in long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 region and cognitive behavioural performance. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Effects of baicalein on LTP in rat hippocampal slices were investigated by electrophysiological methods. Phosphorylation of Akt (at Ser473), the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (at Ser133) were analysed by Western blot. Fear conditioning was used to determine whether baicalein could improve learning and memory in rats. KEY RESULTS Baicalein enhanced the N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor-dependent LTP in a bell-shaped concentration-dependent manner. Addition of the lipoxygenase metabolites 12(S)-HETE and 12(S)-HPETE did not reverse these effects of baicalein. Baicalein treatment enhanced phosphorylation of Akt during induction of LTP with the same bell-shaped dose–response curve. LTP potentiation induced by baicalein was blocked by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase. CREB phosphorylation was also increased in the CA1 region of baicalein-treated slices. Baicalein-treated rats performed significantly better than controls in a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear conditioning task. Furthermore, baicalein treatment selectively increased the phosphorylation of Akt and CREB in the CA1 region of hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex, after fear conditioning training. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrate that the flavonoid baicalein can facilitate memory, and therefore it might be useful in the treatment of patients with memory disorders. PMID:21133890

  14. Blueberry-enriched diet ameliorates age-related declines in NMDA receptor-dependent LTP

    PubMed Central

    Bickford, Paula C.; Browning, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus is widely accepted as a cellular substrate for memory formation. Age-related declines in the expression of both NMDAR-dependent LTP and NMDAR subunit proteins in the CA1 region of the hippocampus have been well characterized and likely underlie age-related memory impairment. In the current study, we examined NMDAR-dependent LTP in young Fischer 344 rats (4 months old) and aged rats (24 months old) given either a control diet or a diet supplemented with blueberry extract for 6–8 weeks. NMDAR-dependent LTP was evoked by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in the presence of nifedipine, to eliminate voltage-gated calcium channel LTP. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were increased by 57% 1 h after HFS in young animals, but this potentiation was reduced to 31% in aged animals. Supplementation of the diet with blueberry extract elevated LTP (63%) in aged animals to levels seen in young. The normalization of LTP may be due to the blueberry diet preventing a decline in synaptic strength, as measured by the slope of the fEPSP for a given fiber potential. The blueberry diet did not prevent age-related declines in NMDAR protein expression. However, phosphorylation of a key tyrosine residue on the NR2B subunit, important for increasing NMDAR function, was enhanced by the diet, suggesting that an increase in NMDAR function might overcome the loss in protein. This report provides evidence that dietary alterations later in life may prevent or postpone the cognitive declines associated with aging. PMID:19424850

  15. CoRILISA: a local similarity based receptor dependent QSAR method.

    PubMed

    Khedkar, Vijay M; Coutinho, Evans C

    2015-01-26

    Molecular similarity methods have played a crucial role in the success of structure-based and computer-assisted drug design. However, with the exception of CoMSIA, the current approaches for estimating molecular similarity yield a global picture thereby providing limited information about the local spatial molecular features responsible for the variation of activity with the 3D structure. Application of molecular similarity measures, each related to the functional "pieces" of a ligand-receptor complex, is advantageous over a composite molecular similarity alone and will provide more insights to rationally interpret the activity based on the receptor and ligand structural features. Building on the ideas of our previously published methodologies-CoRIA and LISA, we present here a local molecular similarity based receptor dependent QSAR method termed CoRILISA which is a hybrid of the two approaches. The method improves on previous techniques by inclusion of receptor attributes for the calculation and comparison of similarity between molecules. For validation studies, the CoRILISA methodology was applied on three large and diverse data sets-glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb), human immunodeficiency virus-1 protease (HIV PR), and cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitors. The statistics of the CoRILISA models were benchmarked against the standard CoRIA approach and with other published approaches. The CoRILISA models were found to be significantly better, especially in terms of the predictivity for the test set. CoRILISA is able to identify the thermodynamic properties associated with residues that define the active site and modulate the variation in the activity of the molecules. It is a useful tool in the fragment-based drug discovery approach for ligand activity prediction. PMID:25535645

  16. Estrogen receptor scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Scheidhauer, K; Scharl, A; Schicha, H

    1998-03-01

    Radio-labeled estrogen receptor ligands are tracers that can be used for functional receptor diagnosis. Their specificity towards receptors, together with the fact that only 50-70% of mammary carcinomas are receptor positive, renders them unsuitable for detection of primary tumors or metastases, and this means that estrogen receptor scintigraphy can be used neither for tumor screening nor for staging. However, both 18F-labeled and 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives are suitable for in vivo imaging of estrogen receptors. Their high specificity, established in animal experiments and in vitro studies has been reproduced in in vivo applications in humans. Tracers with positron radiation emitters are, however, hardly suitable for broad application owing to the short half-life of 18F, which would mean that users would need to be situated close to a cyclotron and a correspondingly equipped radiochemical laboratory. The number of available PET scanners, on the other hand, has increased over the last few years, especially in Germany, so that this, at least, does not present a limiting factor. All the same, 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives will find more widespread application, since the number of gamma-cameras incorporating modern multi-head systems is several times greater. The results of studies with 123I-E2-scintigraphy published to date are very promising, even given the initial technical problems mentioned above. As a method of examination, it could be optimised by using improved tracers with a higher tumor contrast and less disturbance from overlapping in diagnostically relevant locations, for instance, by selecting tracers with higher activities whose excretion is more renal than hepatobiliary. The use of modern multi-head camera systems can also be expected to improve the photon yield. PMID:9646642

  17. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  18. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  19. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  20. Estrogen receptor signaling during vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Bondesson, Maria; Hao, Ruixin; Lin, Chin-Yo; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are expressed and their cognate ligands produced in all vertebrates, indicative of important and conserved functions. Through evolution estrogen has been involved in controlling reproduction, affecting both the development of reproductive organs and reproductive behavior. This review broadly describes the synthesis of estrogens and the expression patterns of aromatase and the estrogen receptors, in relation to estrogen functions in the developing fetus and child. We focus on the role of estrogens for development of reproductive tissues, as well as non-reproductive effects on the developing brain. We collate data from human, rodent, bird and fish studies and highlight common and species-specific effects of estrogen signaling on fetal development. Morphological malformations originating from perturbed estrogen signaling in estrogen receptor and aromatase knockout mice are discussed, as well as the clinical manifestations of rare estrogen receptor alpha and aromatase gene mutations in humans. PMID:24954179

  1. Direct in vitro effects of androgens and estrogens on ob gene expression and leptin secretion in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Machinal-Quélin, Florence; Dieudonné, Marie-Noëlle; Pecquery, René; Leneveu, Marie-Christine; Giudicelli, Yves

    2002-07-01

    In the present study, we have explored, in vitro, the possibility that short exposure to androgens and estrogens for 24 h may directly influence leptin expression (ARNm and secretion) in sc adipose tissue from men and women. In men, only dihydrotestosterone at high concentration (100 nM) induced a reduction in leptin secretion and ob mRNA level. In women, 17beta-estradiol (10-100 nM) increased ob mRNA expression (+180 to +500%) and leptin release (+75%). Moreover, in adipose tissue of women, the estrogen precursors testosterone (100 nM) and dehydroepiandrosterone (1 microM) also induced an increase in leptin secretion (+84 and +96%, respectively), an effect that was prevented by the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. Finally, the stimulatory effect of 17beta-estradiol observed in women was antagonized by the antiestrogen ICI182780. Altogether, these results suggest that the sexual dimorphism of leptinemia in humans is mainly owing to the estrogen receptor-dependent stimulation of leptin expression in adipose tissue by estrogens and estrogen precursors in women. PMID:12374466

  2. Catabolism of low density lipoproteins by perfused rabbit livers: cholestyramine promotes receptor-dependent hepatic catabolism of low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chao, Y S; Yamin, T T; Alberts, A W

    1982-07-01

    Rabbits fed a wheat starch/casein diet develop a marked hypercholesterolemia accompanied by a decrease in the number of EDTA-sensitive binding sites on plasma membrane fractions of the liver for low density lipoproteins (LDL) and beta-migrating very low density lipoproteins [Chao, Y.-S., Yamin, T.-T. & Alberts, A. W. (1982) J. Biol. Chem., in press]. Inclusion of 1% cholestyramine resin in this diet prevents the increase in plasma cholesterol, increases the removal of LDL from plasma, and increases the number of hepatic plasma membrane LDL-binding sites. To determine the functional role of hepatic LDL-binding sites in the catabolism of LDL, we studied the catabolism of (125)I-labeled LDL ((125)I-LDL) by in situ perfused rabbit livers in a recirculating system. The rate of catabolism was measured from the increment of nonprotein-bound radioiodine in the perfusate. The receptor-dependent catabolism of LDL by the liver was calculated from the difference of hepatic catabolism of (125)I-LDL and catabolism of (125)I-labeled cyclohexanedione-modified LDL, which does not bind to LDL receptors. The data show that about 74% of LDL catabolized by perfused livers from chow-fed rabbits is through the receptor-dependent pathway and 26% is through the receptor-independent pathway. In rabbits fed a cholesterol diet, the hepatic catabolism of (125)I-LDL is reduced, and the receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL is abolished. In rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet, the receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL is reduced by 40% when compared with hepatic catabolism in chow-fed rabbits. Perfused livers from rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet supplemented with 1% cholestyramine show a 5,4-fold increase of receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL when compared with that of livers from rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet alone. Thus, these studies demonstrate that the change in the number of rabbit hepatic membrane LDL receptors induced by dietary manipulation

  3. Influence of estrogenic pesticides on membrane integrity and membrane transfer of monosaccharide into the human red cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermann, R.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Some natural and synthetic estrogens inhibit carrier-mediated transport of glucose into human red blood cells and membrane vesicles from the placenta. The inhibitory action of these estrogens on transport appears to be a direct effect at the membrane and does not involve receptor binding and protein synthesis. It is not clear, however, whether such inhibition is a common feature among estrogenic agents. Several chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides have been shown to possess estrogenic activity. These pesticides could have inhibitory effects on the human sodium-independent glucose transporter. Owing to the apparent importance of this membrane transporter in human tissues, direct interaction of hormones and xenobiotics with the glucose transporter is of fundamental significance. Some pesticides have been shown to alter membrane structure directly and alter the passive permeability of membranes. Whether the estrogenic pesticides influence passive diffusion of sugars across membranes has not been established. Finally, preliminary observations have suggested that some estrogens and pesticides have lytic effects on intact cells. Consequently, this study focuses on the ability of several estrogens and estrogenic pesticides to disrupt the cell membrane, influence the monosaccharide transporter, and alter the rate of monosaccharide permeation through the membrane by simple diffusion.

  4. Estrogen Signaling in Metabolic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Rosário; Teixeira, Diana; Calhau, Conceição

    2014-01-01

    There is extensive evidence supporting the interference of inflammatory activation with metabolism. Obesity, mainly visceral obesity, is associated with a low-grade inflammatory state, triggered by metabolic surplus where specialized metabolic cells such as adipocytes activate cellular stress initiating and sustaining the inflammatory program. The increasing prevalence of obesity, resulting in increased cardiometabolic risk and precipitating illness such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, fatty liver, cirrhosis, and certain types of cancer, constitutes a good example of this association. The metabolic actions of estrogens have been studied extensively and there is also accumulating evidence that estrogens influence immune processes. However, the connection between these two fields of estrogen actions has been underacknowledged since little attention has been drawn towards the possible action of estrogens on the modulation of metabolism through their anti-inflammatory properties. In the present paper, we summarize knowledge on the modification inflammatory processes by estrogens with impact on metabolism and highlight major research questions on the field. Understanding the regulation of metabolic inflammation by estrogens may provide the basis for the development of therapeutic strategies to the management of metabolic dysfunctions. PMID:25400333

  5. Estrogens, breast cancer, and intestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, S L

    1984-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence has linked diet to breast cancer, with the highest cancer rates observed in women who eat a high fat-low fiber diet. There is also substantial information, both clinical and experimental, that implicates estrogens in the etiology of breast cancer. A recent study from our laboratory has shown that diet influences levels of estrogens, and the main mechanism is metabolism of estrogens in the intestine. The intestinal microflora plays a key role in the enterohepatic circulation of estrogens by deconjugating bound estrogens that appear in the bile, thereby permitting the free hormones to be reabsorbed. By suppressing the microflora with antibiotic therapy, fecal estrogens increase and urinary estrogens decrease, changes indicating diminished intestinal reabsorption. A low fat-high fiber diet is associated with similar findings-high fecal estrogens and low urinary estrogens. It appears that the microflora plays a key role in the metabolism of female sex hormones. PMID:6326245

  6. Relationship between estrogen receptor-binding and estrogenic activities of environmental estrogens and suppression by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Han, Dal-Ho; Denison, Michael S; Tachibana, Hirofumi; Yamada, Koji

    2002-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the estrogenic activity of environmental estrogens by a competition binding assay using a human recombinant estrogens receptor (hERbeta) and by a proliferation assay using MCF-7 cells and a sulforhodamine-B assay. In the binding assay, pharmaceuticals had a stronger binding activity to hERbeta than that of some phytoestrogens (coumestrol, daidzein, genistein, luteolin, chrysin, flavone, and naringenin) or industrial chemicals, but phytoestrogens such as coumestrol had a binding activity as strong as pharmaceuticals such as 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE), tamoxifen (Tam), and mestranol. In the proliferation assay, pharmaceuticals such as diethylstilbestrol, EE, Tam, and clomiphene, and industrial chemicals such as 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and 4-dihydroxybiphenyl had a proliferation-stimulating activity as strong as 17beta-estradiol (ES). In addition, we found that phytoestrogens such as coumestrol, daidzein, luteolin, and quercetin exerted a proliferation stimulating activity as strong as ES. Furthermore, we examined the suppression of proliferation-stimulating activity, induced by environmental estrogen, by flavonoids, such as daidzein, genistein, quercetin, and luteolin, and found that these flavonoids suppressed the induction of the proliferation-stimulating activity of environmental estrogens. The suppressive effect of flavonoids suggests that these compounds have anti-estrogenic and anti-cancer activities. PMID:12224631

  7. Estrogenic profile on a water-soluble estrogen, estrazinol hydrobromide.

    PubMed

    Rassaert, C L; DiPasquale, G; Giannina, T; Manning, J P; Meli, A

    1973-01-01

    The estrogenic properties of estrazinol hydrobromide (EZ), a water-soluble estrogen, were compared with those of Premarin (PR), another water-soluble estrogen preparation consisting of conjugated equine estrogens. Estradiol-17beta, estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17beta-diol (E), and ethinyl estradiol, 17alpha-ethinyl-1,3,5 (10)-estratriene-3,17beta-diol (EE) were used as reference standards. Subcutaneous progesterone (400 mcg) given to rabbits primed with comparable subcutaneous doses of either E or EE produced full secretory changes of the endometrium, while such a transformation could not be elicited in orally primed animals regardless of the estrogen used. The biological profile or orally administered EZ was very similar to that of oral EE and different from oral PR. Howerver, the oral EZ-induced morphological changes of the rabbit endometrium appeared somewhat different from those produced by oral EE. The findings indicated that following oral administration, EZ-induced endometrial transformation is more "normal" and/or adequate than the changes produced by either EE or PR. PMID:4368700

  8. VASCULAR ACTIONS OF ESTROGENS: FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M.; Duckles, Sue P.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of estrogen exposure in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease is controversial. But it is clear that estrogen has important effects on vascular physiology and pathophysiology, with potential therapeutic implications. Therefore, it is the goal of this review to summarize, using an integrated approach, current knowledge of the vascular effects of estrogen, both in humans and in experimental animals. Aspects of estrogen synthesis and receptors, as well as general mechanisms of estrogenic action are reviewed with an emphasis on issues particularly relevant to the vascular system. Recent understanding of the impact of estrogen on mitochondrial function suggests that the longer lifespan of women compared to men may depend in part on the ability of estrogen to decrease production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. Mechanisms by which estrogen increases endothelial vasodilator function, promotes angiogenesis and modulates autonomic function are summarized. Key aspects of the relevant pathophysiology of inflammation, atherosclerosis, stroke, migraine and thrombosis are reviewed concerning current knowledge of estrogenic effects. A number of emerging concepts are addressed throughout. These include the importance of estrogenic formulation and route of administration and the impact of genetic polymorphisms, either in estrogen receptors or in enzymes responsible for estrogen metabolism, on responsiveness to hormone treatment. The importance of local metabolism of estrogenic precursors and the impact of timing for initiation of treatment and its duration are also considered. While consensus opinions are emphasized, controversial views are presented in order to stimulate future research. PMID:18579753

  9. Effects of pinostrobin on estrogen metabolism and estrogen receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Le Bail, J C; Aubourg, L; Habrioux, G

    2000-08-01

    The interaction between the estrogen receptor and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (pinostrobin) was studied in the presence or absence of estradiol or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), respectively, using a stably transfected human breast cancer cell line (MVLN). We also evaluated its action on the proliferation in estrogen-dependent (MCF-7) human breast cancer cells in the same conditions than the estrogen receptor assay. On the other hand pinostrobin was evaluated for their effects on the human placental aromatase, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Delta(4)/Delta(5) isomerase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities. Pinostrobin did not possess antiestrogenic activity but presented anti-aromatase activity and decreased the growth of MCF-7 cells induced by DHEAS and E(2). This study provides particularly evidence of the potential biological interest of pinostrobin among the flavonoids. PMID:10840157

  10. ERGDB: Estrogen Responsive Genes Database.

    PubMed

    Tang, Suisheng; Han, Hao; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2004-01-01

    ERGDB is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to genes responsive to estrogen. Genes included in ERGDB are those whose expression levels are experimentally proven to be either up-regulated or down-regulated by estrogen. Genes included are identified based on publications from the PubMed database and each record has been manually examined, evaluated and selected for inclusion by biologists. ERGDB aims to be a unified gateway to store, search, retrieve and update information about estrogen responsive genes. Each record contains links to relevant databases, such as GenBank, LocusLink, Refseq, PubMed and ATCC. The unique feature of ERGDB is that it contains information on the dependence of gene reactions on experimental conditions. In addition to basic information about the genes, information for each record includes gene functional description, experimental methods used, tissue or cell type, gene reaction, estrogen exposure time and the summary of putative estrogen response elements if the gene's promoter sequence was available. Through a web interface at http://sdmc.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/ergdb/ cgi-bin/explore.pl users can either browse or query ERGDB. Access is free for academic and non-profit users. PMID:14681475

  11. INTERACTION OF PAH-RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ALPHA AND BETA ISOFORMS OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. (R826192)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of several 4- and 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic PAHs, and their monohydroxy derivatives to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta isoforms was examined. Only compounds possessing a hydroxyl group were able to compete wit...

  12. Mixture interactions of xenoestrogens with endogenous estrogens.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. These environmental estrogens originate from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), m...

  13. Estrogen Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Stefan M; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2009-01-01

    Currently available treatments for multiple sclerosis reduce inflammatory lesions on MRI and decrease clinical relapses but have limited effects on disability. Novel treatment options that target both the inflammatory as well as the neurodegenerative component of the disease are therefore needed. A growing body of evidence from basic science and clinical studies supports the therapeutic potential of estrogens in MS. Mechanisms of action include both immunomodulatory and directly neuroprotective pathways. A first pilot trial of oral estriol treatment showed encouraging results. There are now several phase II trials underway to further determine the efficacy of estrogen treatment in MS. PMID:19539954

  14. Retrieval-induced NMDA receptor-dependent Arc expression in two models of cocaine-cue memory.

    PubMed

    Alaghband, Yasaman; O'Dell, Steven J; Azarnia, Siavash; Khalaj, Anna J; Guzowski, John F; Marshall, John F

    2014-12-01

    The association of environmental cues with drugs of abuse results in persistent drug-cue memories. These memories contribute significantly to relapse among addicts. While conditioned place preference (CPP) is a well-established paradigm frequently used to examine the modulation of drug-cue memories, very few studies have used the non-preference-based model conditioned activity (CA) for this purpose. Here, we used both experimental approaches to investigate the neural substrates of cocaine-cue memories. First, we directly compared, in a consistent setting, the involvement of cortical and subcortical brain regions in cocaine-cue memory retrieval by quantifying activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated (Arc) protein expression in both the CPP and CA models. Second, because NMDA receptor activation is required for Arc expression, we investigated the NMDA receptor dependency of memory persistence using the CA model. In both the CPP and CA models, drug-paired animals showed significant increases in Arc immunoreactivity in regions of the frontal cortex and amygdala compared to unpaired controls. Additionally, administration of a NMDA receptor antagonist (MK-801 or memantine) immediately after cocaine-CA memory reactivation impaired the subsequent conditioned locomotion associated with the cocaine-paired environment. The enhanced Arc expression evident in a subset of corticolimbic regions after retrieval of a cocaine-context memory, observed in both the CPP and CA paradigms, likely signifies that these regions: (i) are activated during retrieval of these memories irrespective of preference-based decisions, and (ii) undergo neuroplasticity in order to update information about cues previously associated with cocaine. This study also establishes the involvement of NMDA receptors in maintaining memories established using the CA model, a characteristic previously demonstrated using CPP. Overall, these results demonstrate the utility of the CA model for studies of cocaine

  15. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  16. Estrogen mediation of hormone responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Robert R; Francois, Michelle; Castracane, V Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The roles of estrogens extend from the regulation of reproduction to other functions involved in control of metabolism, fluid balance, as well as gastrointestinal, lung, and brain function, with a strong effect on other hormones that subsequently alter the physiology of multiple tissues. As such, alteration of endogenous estrogens across the menstrual cycle, or from oral contraception and estrogen replacement therapy, can affect these tissues. Due to the important effects that estrogens have on different tissues, there are many investigations concerning the effects of a human estrogenic environment on endocrine responses to exercise. The following review will describe the consequences of varying estrogen levels on pituitary, adrenal, gonadal, and endocrine function, followed by discussion of the outcomes of different estrogen levels on endocrine tissues in response to exercise, problems encountered for interpretation of findings, and recommended direction for future research. PMID:22512823

  17. Targeted Radiotherapy of Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan Rajagopalan

    2006-08-31

    The overall objectives of the proposal were to develop estrogen receptor (ER) binding small molecule radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radiotherapy of ER positive (ER+) tumors. In particular, this proposal focused on embedding a {sup 186,188}Re or a {sup 32}P radionuclide into an estrogen steroidal framework by isosteric substitution such that the resulting structure is topologically similar to the estrogen (estrogen mimic). The estrogen mimic molecules expected to bind to the ER and exhibit biodistribution akin to that of native estrogen due to structural mimicry. It is anticipated that the {sup 186,188}Re- or a {sup 32}P-containing estrogen mimics will be useful for targeted molecular radiotherapy of ER+ tumors. It is well established that the in vivo target tissue uptake of estrogen like steroidal molecules is related to the binding of the steroids to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is important in the uptake of estrogens and testosterone in target tissues by SHBG receptors on the cell surface. However, hitherto the design of estrogen like small molecule radiopharmaceuticals was focused on optimizing ER binding characteristics without emphasis on SHBG binding properties. Consequently, even the molecules with good ER affinity in vitro, performed poorly in biodistribution studies. Based on molecular modeling studies the proposal focused on developing estrogen mimics 1-3 which were topologically similar to native estrogens, and form hydrogen bonds in ER and SHBG in the same manner as those of native estrogens. To this end the technical objectives of the proposal focused on synthesizing the rhenium-estrone and estradiol mimics 1 and 2 respectively, and phosphorous estradiol mimic 3 and to assess their stability and in vitro binding characteristics to ER and SHBG.

  18. [Carcinogenesis theory based on estrogen deficiency].

    PubMed

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2009-06-21

    Earlier, estrogens were considered simply the most important hormones involved in female physiology and reproduction. Nowadays it has become familiar that they have pivotal roles in gene regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. There are many contradictions concerning the associations of female sexual steroids and cancer. Cancers of the highly estrogen dependent organs are in the forefront of tumors as they are regarded as hormone associated ones. However, re-evaluation of earlier results supporting the carcinogenic capacity of estrogen exhibited many shortcomings and controversies. Recently, the clinical studies on hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women justified beneficial anticancer effects in several organs even in the female breast. The newly revealed association between estrogen deficiency and oral cancer risk also means a contradiction of the traditional concept of estrogen-induced cancer. Distinction between cancers of moderately and highly estrogen dependent tumors can be based on their different epidemiological features. The vast majority of the so-called smoking associated malignancies of the moderately estrogen dependent organs occur typically in the late postmenopausal life of women when the ovarian estrogen production is fairly decreased. However cancers of the highly estrogen dependent organs such as breast, endometrium and ovary exhibit both premenopausal and postmenopausal occurrence. In spite of the different epidemiological data of these two groups of cancers the mechanism of gene regulation disorder in the background of tumor initiation cannot act through quite opposite pathways. This suggests that in moderately estrogen sensitive organs a serious, in the highly estrogen dependent sites even a mild estrogen deficiency is enough to provoke gene regulation disorders. The new findings both on smoking associated and hormone related cancers might lead to the same conversion; not estrogen but rather its deficiency may provoke

  19. The Estrogen Hypothesis of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, James P.; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The explanation of obesity as a simple result of positive energy balance fails to account for the scope of variable responses to diets and lifestyles. It is postulated that individual physiological and anatomical variation may be responsible for developing obesity. Girls in poor families develop greater adiposity than their male siblings, a trend not present in richer environments. This indicates strong influence of estrogen on fat accumulation irrespective of poor socioeconomic conditions. Obesity rates in males and females of developed nations are similar, while in poorer nations obesity is much more prevalent in females. Female to male ratio of obesity correlates inversely with gross domestic product. Therefore, the parity of male and female obesity in developed countries may result from male exposure to environmental estrogen-like substances associated with affluence. These hormonally driven mechanisms may be equally active within both sexes in more developed areas, thereby increasing overall obesity. PMID:24915457

  20. [Transdermal estrogenic therapy in menopause].

    PubMed

    Nencioni, T; Polvani, F; Penotti, M; Porcaro, E; Barbieri Carones, M

    1989-01-01

    The availability of percutaneous estrogenic preparations capable of directly entering the bloodstream, avoiding the liver, has opened new prospects in the treatment of the climacteric syndrome. The purpose of our work has been to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of a percutaneous 17-beta-estradiol-oral progestin association with an all oral association of conjugated estrogens and progestins and to evaluate the ability to control menopausal symptoms and biohumoral characteristics. 42 (1 to 7 years postmenopausal) heavily symptomatic patients were selected at the "Centro per lo studio e la terapia del climaterio" in Milan and divided in two equally sized groups. One group was treated using the percutaneous therapy, the other with the all-oral one. The results show that percutaneous administration leads to a quicker control of vasomotor symptomatology and metabolic effects similar to oral administration. PMID:2543896

  1. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Estrogen receptor knockout mice: what their phenotypes reveal about mechanisms of estrogen action.

    PubMed

    Curtis Hewitt, S; Couse, J F; Korach, K S

    2000-01-01

    Natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens have numerous effects on the development and physiology of mammals. Estrogen is primarily known for its role in the development and functioning of the female reproductive system. However, roles for estrogen in male fertility, bone, the circulatory system and immune system have been established by clinical observations regarding sex differences in pathologies, as well as observations following menopause or castration. The primary mechanism of estrogen action is via binding and modulation of activity of the estrogen receptors (ERs), which are ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factors. ERs are found in highest levels in female tissues critical to reproduction, including the ovaries, uterus, cervix, mammary glands and pituitary gland. Since other affected tissues have extremely low levels of ER, indirect effects of estrogen, for example induction of pituitary hormones that affect the bone, have been proposed. The development of transgenic mouse models that lack either estrogen or ER have proven to be valuable tools in defining the mechanisms by which estrogen exerts its effects in various systems. The aim of this article is to review the mouse models with disrupted estrogen signaling and describe the associated phenotypes. PMID:11250727

  2. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids)which ar...

  3. The pesticides endosulfan, toxaphene, and dieldrin have estrogenic effects on human estrogen-sensitive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soto, A M; Chung, K L; Sonnenschein, C

    1994-01-01

    Estrogenic pesticides such as DDT and chlordecone generate deleterious reproductive effects. An "in culture" bioassay was used to assess the estrogenicity of several pesticides. The E-screen test uses human breast estrogen-sensitive MCF7 cells and compares the cell yield achieved after 6 days of culture in medium supplemented with 5% charcoal-dextran stripped human serum in the presence (positive control) or absence (negative control) of estradiol and with diverse concentrations of xenobiotics suspected of being estrogenic. Among the organochlorine pesticides tested, toxaphene, dieldrin, and endosulfan had estrogenic properties comparable to those of DDT and chlordecone; the latter are known to be estrogenic in rodent models. The E-screen test also revealed that estrogenic chemicals may act cumulatively; when mixed together they induce estrogenic responses at concentrations lower than those required when each compound is administered alone. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7925178

  4. Nongenomic Signaling Pathways of Estrogen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Cheryl S.; Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Kochukov, Mikhail Y.

    2010-01-01

    Xenoestrogens can affect the healthy functioning of a variety of tissues by acting as potent estrogens via nongenomic signaling pathways or by interfering with those actions of multiple physiological estrogens. Collectively, our and other studies have compared a wide range of estrogenic compounds, including some closely structurally related subgroups. The estrogens that have been studied include environmental contaminants of different subclasses, dietary estrogens, and several prominent physiological metabolites. By comparing the nongenomic signaling and functional responses to these compounds, we have begun to address the structural requirements for their actions through membrane estrogen receptors in the pituitary, in comparison to other tissues, and to gain insights into their typical non-monotonic dose-response behavior. Their multiple inputs into cellular signaling begin processes that eventually integrate at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinase activities to coordinately regulate broad cellular destinies, such as proliferation, apoptosis, or differentiation. PMID:19955490

  5. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  6. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  7. Unbalanced estrogen metabolism in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Muhammad; Beseler, Cheryl L; Hall, James B; LeVan, Tricia; Cavalieri, Ercole L; Rogan, Eleanor G

    2014-05-15

    Greater exposure to estrogens is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in ovarian cancer, a spot urine sample and a saliva sample were obtained from 33 women with ovarian cancer and 34 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed in the urine samples using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (p < 0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. DNA was purified from the saliva samples and analyzed for genetic polymorphisms in the genes for two estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Women with two low-activity alleles of catechol-O-methyltransferase plus one or two high-activity alleles of cytochrome P450 1B1 had higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts and were more likely to have ovarian cancer. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in ovarian cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts plays a critical role in the initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:24170413

  8. Estrogens and Cognition: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Korol, Donna L.; Pisani, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are becoming well known for their robust enhancement on cognition particularly for learning and memory that relies upon functioning of the hippocampus and related neural systems. What is also emerging is that estrogen modulation of cognition is not uniform, at times enhancing yet at other times impairing learning. This review explores the bidirectional effects of estrogens on learning from a multiple memory systems view, focusing on the hippocampus and striatum, whereby modulation by estrogens sorts according to task attributes and neural systems engaged during cognition. We highlight our findings that show the ability to solve hippocampus-sensitive tasks typically improves under relatively high estrogen status while the ability to solve striatum-sensitive tasks degrades with estrogen exposures. Though constrained by dose and timing of exposure, these opposing enhancements and impairments of cognition can be observed following treatments with different estrogenic compounds including the hormone estradiol, the isoflavone genistein found in soybeans, and agonists that are selective for specific estrogen receptors, suggesting that activation of a single receptor type is sufficient to produce the observed shifts in learning strategies. Using this multi-dimensional framework will allow us to extend our thinking of the relationship between estrogens and cognition to other brain regions and cognitive functions. PMID:26149525

  9. Bidirectional regulation of angiogenesis by phytoestrogens through estrogen receptor-mediated signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Xin; Wang, Yu; Lu, Qing; Yang, Ming-Zhu; Fan, Guan-Wei; Karas, Richard H; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Zhu, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Sex hormone estrogen is one of the most active intrinsic angiogenesis regulators; its therapeutic use has been limited due to its carcinogenic potential. Plant-derived phytoestrogens are attractive alternatives, but reports on their angiogenic activities often lack in-depth analysis and sometimes are controversial. Herein, we report a data-mining study with the existing literature, using IPA system to classify and characterize phytoestrogens based on their angiogenic properties and pharmacological consequences. We found that pro-angiogenic phytoestrogens functioned predominantly as cardiovascular protectors whereas anti-angiogenic phytoestrogens played a role in cancer prevention and therapy. This bidirectional regulation were shown to be target-selective and, for the most part, estrogen-receptor-dependent. The transactivation properties of ERα and ERβ by phytoestrogens were examined in the context of angiogenesis-related gene transcription. ERα and ERβ were shown to signal in opposite ways when complexed with the phytoestrogen for bidirectional regulation of angiogenesis. With ERα, phytoestrogen activated or inhibited transcription of some angiogenesis-related genes, resulting in the promotion of angiogenesis, whereas, with ERβ, phytoestrogen regulated transcription of angiogenesis-related genes, resulting in inhibition of angiogenesis. Therefore, the selectivity of phytoestrogen to ERα and ERβ may be critical in the balance of pro- or anti-angiogenesis process. PMID:27114311

  10. Analysis of lagoon samples from different concentrated animal feeding operations for estrogens and estrogen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Stephen R; White, Mark V; Hudson, Felisa M; Fine, Dennis D

    2007-02-01

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids) which are used for land application. Lagoons associated with swine, poultry, and cattle operations were sampled at three locations each for direct analysis for estrogens by GC/ MS/MS and estrogen conjugates by LC/MS/MS. Estrogen conjugates were also analyzed indirectly by first subjecting the same samples to enzyme hydrolysis. Solids from centrifuged samples were extracted for free estrogens to estimate total estrogen load. Total free estrogen levels (estrone, 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estriol) were generally higher in swine primary (1000-21000 ng/L), followed by poultry primary (1800-4000 ng/L), dairy secondary (370-550 ng/L), and beef secondary (22-24 ng/L) whole lagoon samples. Swine and poultry lagoons contained levels of 17(alpha-estradiol comparable to those of 17beta-estradiol. Confirmed estrogen conjugates included estrone-3-sulfate (2-91 ng/L), 17beta-estradiol-3-sulfate (8-44 ng/L), 17alpha-estradiol-3-sulfate (141-182 ng/L), and 17beta-estradiol-17-sulfate (72-84 ng/L) in some lagoons. Enzymatic hydrolysis indicated the presence of additional unidentified estrogen conjugates not detected bythe LC/MS/MS method. In most cases estrogen conjugates accounted for at least a third of the total estrogen equivalents. Collectively, these methods can be used to better determine estrogen loads from CAFO operations, and this research shows that estrogen conjugates contribute significantly to the overall estrogen load, even in different types of CAFO lagoons. PMID:17328177

  11. Role of estrogen in avian osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Beck, M M; Hansen, K K

    2004-02-01

    One of the difficulties associated with commercial layer production is the development of osteoporosis in hens late in the production cycle. In light of this fact and because of hens' unique requirements for Ca, many studies have focused on the regulation of Ca and the role of estrogen in this process. The time course of estrogen synthesis over the productive life of hens has been well documented; increased circulating estrogen accompanies the onset of sexual maturity while decreases signal a decline in egg production prior to a molt. Numbers of estrogen receptors decrease with age in numerous tissues. The parallel changes in calcium-regulating proteins, primarily Calbindin D28K, and in the ability of duodenal cells to transport Ca, are thought to occur as a result of the changes in estrogen, and are also reversible by the molt process. In addition to the traditional model of estrogen action, evidence now exists for a possible nongenomic action of estrogen via membrane-bound receptors, demonstrated by extremely rapid surges of ionized Ca in chicken granulosa cells in response to 17beta-estradiol. Estrogen receptors have also been discovered in duodenal tissue, and tamoxifen, which binds to the estrogen receptor, has been shown to cause a rapid increase in Ca transport in the duodenum. In addition, recent evidence also suggests that mineralization of bone per se may not explain entirely the etiology of osteoporosis in the hen but that changes in the collagen matrix may contribute through decreases in bone elasticity. Taken together, these studies suggest that changes in estrogen synthesis and estrogen receptor populations may underlie the age-related changes in avian bone. As with postmenopausal women, dietary Ca and vitamin D are of limited benefit as remedies for osteoporosis in the hen. PMID:14979570

  12. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  13. Opioid Receptor-Dependent Sex Differences in Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway of the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Harte-Hargrove, Lauren C.; Varga-Wesson, Ada; Duffy, Aine M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    The mossy fiber (MF) pathway is critical to hippocampal function and influenced by gonadal hormones. Physiological data are limited, so we asked whether basal transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) differed in slices of adult male and female rats. The results showed small sex differences in basal transmission but striking sex differences in opioid receptor sensitivity and LTP. When slices were made from females on proestrous morning, when serum levels of 17β-estradiol peak, the nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 μm) enhanced MF transmission but there was no effect in males, suggesting preferential opioid receptor-dependent inhibition in females when 17β-estradiol levels are elevated. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist Cys2,Tyr3,Orn5,Pen7-amide (CTOP; 300 nm) had a similar effect but the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist naltrindole (NTI; 1 μm) did not, implicating MORs in female MF transmission. The GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen (200 μm) occluded effects of CTOP but the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 μm) did not. For LTP, a low-frequency (LF) protocol was used because higher frequencies elicited hyperexcitability in females. Proestrous females exhibited LF-LTP but males did not, suggesting a lower threshold for synaptic plasticity when 17β-estradiol is elevated. NTI blocked LF-LTP in proestrous females, but CTOP did not. Electron microscopy revealed more DOR-labeled spines of pyramidal cells in proestrous females than males. Therefore, we suggest that increased postsynaptic DORs mediate LF-LTP in proestrous females. The results show strong MOR regulation of MF transmission only in females and identify a novel DOR-dependent form of MF LTP specific to proestrus. PMID:25632146

  14. Estrogen Promotes Luteolysis by Redistributing Prostaglandin F2α Receptors Within Primate Luteal Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Ok; Markosyan, Nune; Pepe, Gerald J.; Duffy, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) has been proposed as a functional luteolysin in primates. However, administration of PGF2α or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors in vivo both initiate luteolysis. These contradictory findings may reflect changes in PGF2α receptors (PTGFR) or responsiveness to PGF2α at a critical point during the life span of the corpus luteum. The current study addressed this question using ovarian cells and tissues from female cynomolgus monkeys and luteinizing granulosa cells from healthy women undergoing follicle aspiration. PTGFRs were present in the cytoplasm of monkey granulosa cells, while PTGFRs were localized to the perinuclear region of large, granulosa-derived monkey luteal cells by mid-late luteal phase. A PTGFR agonist decreased progesterone production by luteal cells obtained at mid-late and late luteal phases but did not decrease progesterone production by granulosa or luteal cells from younger corpora lutea. These findings are consistent with a role for perinuclear PTGFRs in functional luteolysis. This concept was explored using human luteinizing granulosa cells maintained in vitro as a model for luteal cell differentiation. In these cells, PTGFRs relocated from the cytoplasm to the perinuclear area in an estrogen- and estrogen receptor-dependent manner. Similar to our findings with monkey luteal cells, human luteinizing granulosa cells with perinuclear PTGFRs responded to a PTGFR agonist with decreased progesterone production. These data support the concept that PTGFR stimulation promotes functional luteolysis only when PTGFRs are located in the perinuclear region. Estrogen receptor-mediated relocation of PTGFRs within luteal cells may be a necessary step in the initiation of luteolysis in primates. PMID:25687410

  15. Endocrine disrupting chemicals targeting estrogen receptor signaling: Identification and mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Many endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) adversely impact estrogen signaling by interacting with two estrogen receptors (ERs): ERα and ERβ. Though the receptors have similar ligand binding and DNA binding domains, ERα and ERβ have some unique properties in terms of ligand selectivity and target gene regulation. EDCs that target ER signaling can modify genomic and non-genomic ER activity through direct interactions with ERs, indirectly through transcription factors like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), or through modulation of metabolic enzymes that are critical for normal estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Many EDCs act through multiple mechanisms as exemplified by chemicals that bind both AhR and ER, such as 3-methylcholanthrene. Other EDCs that target ER signaling include phytoestrogens, bisphenolics, and organochlorine pesticides and many alter normal ER signaling through multiple mechanisms. EDCs can also display tissue-selective ER agonist and antagonist activities similar to selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) designed for pharmaceutical use. Thus, biological effects of EDCs need to be carefully interpreted because EDCs can act through complex tissue-selective modulation of ERs and other signaling pathways in vivo. Current requirements by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency require some in vitro and cell-based assays to identify EDCs that target ER signaling through direct and metabolic mechanisms. Additional assays may be useful screens for identifying EDCs that act through alternative mechanisms prior to further in vivo study. PMID:21053929

  16. Waste crankcase oil: an environmental contaminant with potential to modulate estrogenic responses.

    PubMed

    Ssempebwa, John; Carpenter, David; Yilmaz, Bayram; DeCaprio, Anthony; O'Hehir, David; Arcaro, Kathleen

    2004-07-23

    Used engine, or crankcase, oil is frequently discarded into the environment resulting in significant pollution of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The chemical composition of crankcase oils changes with use, and in general, used, or waste, crankcase oil is considered more toxic than the original oil. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major constituents of crankcase oil and may exhibit both estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity. In the present study, the estrogenic activity and antiestrogenic activity of both new (unused) and waste crankcase oils were examined in a human breast cancer cell culture assay. Concentrations of 5, 10, 15, 20, or 25 ppm of new oil or waste oil did not alter either the preconfluent or postconfluent cell growth when tested in control medium. In contrast, waste crankcase oil significantly reduced the postconfluent growth of cells grown in medium containing 0.1 nM 17 beta-estradiol. Results from mechanistic assays using [3H]-17 beta-estradiol demonstrated that waste crankcase oil both increased the metabolism of 17 beta-estradiol, and displaced 17 beta-estradiol from the estrogen receptor in MCF-7 cells. The observed antiestrogenic activity of the waste crankcase oil suggests that this pollutant has the potential to alter estrogenic responses, and therefore its presence in the environment may be of concern for reproductive health. PMID:15205025

  17. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women (Post-MW) than premenopausal women (Pre-MW). Despite recent advances in preventive measures, the incidence of CVD in women has shown a rise that matched the increase in the Post-MW population. The increased incidence of CVD in Post-MW has been related to the decline in estrogen levels, and hence suggested vascular benefits of endogenous estrogen. Experimental studies have identified estrogen receptor ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30 (GPER) in blood vessels of humans and experimental animals. The interaction of estrogen with vascular ERs mediates both genomic and non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by increasing nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor. Estrogen also inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the vascular cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, lipid profile and the vascular inflammatory response have been reported. In addition to the experimental evidence in animal models and vascular cells, initial observational studies in women using menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) have suggested that estrogen may protect against CVD. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which examined the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in older women with established CVD (HERS) or without overt CVD (WHI), failed to demonstrate protective vascular effects of estrogen treatment. Despite the initial set-back from the results of MHT RCTs, growing evidence now supports the ‘timing hypothesis’, which suggests that MHT could increase the risk of CVD if started late after menopause, but may produce beneficial cardiovascular effects in younger women during the perimenopausal period. The choice of

  18. High-Dose Estradiol-Replacement Therapy Enhances the Renal Vascular Response to Angiotensin II via an AT2-Receptor Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Tahereh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Evans, Roger G.; Denton, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological levels of estrogen appear to enhance angiotensin type 2 receptor- (AT2R-) mediated vasodilatation. However, the effects of supraphysiological levels of estrogen, analogous to those achieved with high-dose estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women, remain unknown. Therefore, we pretreated ovariectomized rats with a relatively high dose of estrogen (0.5 mg/kg/week) for two weeks. Subsequently, renal hemodynamic responses to intravenous angiotensin II (Ang II, 30–300 ng/kg/min) were tested under anesthesia, while renal perfusion pressure was held constant. The role of AT2R was examined by pretreating groups of rats with PD123319 or its vehicle. Renal blood flow (RBF) decreased in a dose-related manner in response to Ang II. Responses to Ang II were enhanced by pretreatment with estradiol. For example, at 300 ng kg−1 min−1, Ang II reduced RBF by 45.7 ± 1.9% in estradiol-treated rats but only by 27.3 ± 5.1% in vehicle-treated rats. Pretreatment with PD123319 blunted the response of RBF to Ang II in estradiol-treated rats, so that reductions in RBF were similar to those in rats not treated with estradiol. We conclude that supraphysiological levels of estrogen promote AT2R-mediated renal vasoconstriction. This mechanism could potentially contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with hormone replacement therapy using high-dose estrogen. PMID:26681937

  19. Combustion of viscous hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, M.E.; Hrebenar, K.R.; Murphy, P.L.; Futch, L.E. Jr.; Deal, J.F. III; Bolden, P.L. Jr.

    1987-08-04

    A method is described for utilizing viscous hydrocarbons as combustible pre-atomized fuels, comprising: (A) forming a hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion using an effective amount of a surfactant package comprising at least one water-soluble surfactant, the hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion (1) comprising a hydrocarbon characterized by API gravity of about 20/sup 0/ API or less, viscosity of about 1000 centipoise or greater at 212/sup 0/F., a paraffin content of about 50% by weight or less and, an aromatic content of about 15% by weight or greater, and (2) having a hydrocarbon water ratio from about 60:40 to about 90:10 by volume; and (B) burning the resultant hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion.

  20. Differential estrogen receptor binding of estrogenic substances: a species comparison.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J; Celius, T; Halgren, R; Zacharewski, T

    2000-11-15

    The study investigated the ability of 34 natural and synthetic chemicals to compete with [3H]17beta-estradiol (E2) for binding to bacterially expressed glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-estrogen receptors (ER) fusion proteins from five different species. Fusion proteins consisted of the ER D, E and F domains of human alpha (GST-hERalphadef), mouse alpha (GST-mERalphadef), chicken (GST-cERdef), green anole (GST-aERdef) and rainbow trout ERs (GST-rtERdef). All five fusion proteins displayed high affinity for E2 with dissociation constants (K(d)) ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 nM. Although, the fusion proteins exhibited similar binding preferences and binding affinities for many of the chemicals, several differences were observed. For example, alpha-zearalenol bound with greater affinity to GST-rtERdef than E2, which was in contrast to other GST-ERdef fusion proteins examined. Coumestrol, genistein and naringenin bound with higher affinity to the GST-aERdef, than to the other GST-ERdef fusion proteins. Many of the industrial chemicals examined preferentially bound to GST-rtERdef. Bisphenol A, 4-t-octylphenol and o,p' DDT bound with approximately a ten-fold greater affinity to GST-rtERdef than to other GST-ERdefs. Methoxychlor, p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDE, alpha-endosulfan and dieldrin weakly bound to the ERs from the human, mouse, chicken and green anole. In contrast, these compounds completely displaced [3H]E2 from GST-rtERdef. These results demonstrate that ERs from different species exhibit differential ligand preferences and relative binding affinities for estrogenic compounds and that these differences may be due to the variability in the amino acid sequence within their respective ER ligand binding domains. PMID:11162928

  1. Estrogens from sewage in coastal marine environments.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Shannon; Atkinson, Marlin J; Tarrant, Ann M

    2003-04-01

    Estrogens are ancient molecules that act as hormones in vertebrates and are biologically active in diverse animal phyla. Sewage contains natural and synthetic estrogens that are detectable in streams, rivers, and lakes. There are no studies reporting the distribution of steroidal estrogens in marine environments. We measured estrogens in sewage, injection-well water, and coastal tropical and offshore tropical water in the Pacific Ocean, western Atlantic Ocean, and Caribbean Sea. Concentrations of unconjugated estrone ranged from undetectable (< 40 pg/L) in the open ocean to nearly 2,000 pg/L in Key West, Florida, and Rehoboth Bay, Delaware (USA); estrone concentrations were highest near sources of sewage. Enzymatic hydrolysis of steroid conjugates in seawater samples indicated that polar conjugates comprise one-half to two-thirds of "total estrone" (unconjugated plus conjugated) in Hawaiian coastal samples. Adsorption to basalt gravel and carbonate sand was less than 20% per week and indicates that estrogens can easily leach into the marine environment from septic fields and high-estrogen groundwater. Of 20 sites (n = 129 samples), the mean values from 12 sites were above the threshold concentration for uptake into coral, indicating that there is a net uptake of anthropogenic steroidal estrogen into these environments, with unknown impacts. PMID:12676611

  2. Estrogens from sewage in coastal marine environments.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Shannon; Atkinson, Marlin J; Tarrant, Ann M

    2003-01-01

    Estrogens are ancient molecules that act as hormones in vertebrates and are biologically active in diverse animal phyla. Sewage contains natural and synthetic estrogens that are detectable in streams, rivers, and lakes. There are no studies reporting the distribution of steroidal estrogens in marine environments. We measured estrogens in sewage, injection-well water, and coastal tropical and offshore tropical water in the Pacific Ocean, western Atlantic Ocean, and Caribbean Sea. Concentrations of unconjugated estrone ranged from undetectable (< 40 pg/L) in the open ocean to nearly 2,000 pg/L in Key West, Florida, and Rehoboth Bay, Delaware (USA); estrone concentrations were highest near sources of sewage. Enzymatic hydrolysis of steroid conjugates in seawater samples indicated that polar conjugates comprise one-half to two-thirds of "total estrone" (unconjugated plus conjugated) in Hawaiian coastal samples. Adsorption to basalt gravel and carbonate sand was less than 20% per week and indicates that estrogens can easily leach into the marine environment from septic fields and high-estrogen groundwater. Of 20 sites (n = 129 samples), the mean values from 12 sites were above the threshold concentration for uptake into coral, indicating that there is a net uptake of anthropogenic steroidal estrogen into these environments, with unknown impacts. PMID:12676611

  3. Role of estrogen in diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Hao; Jessup, Jewell A; Lindsey, Sarah H; Chappell, Mark C; Groban, Leanne

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) sharply increases in women after menopause and may lead to heart failure. While evidence suggests that estrogens protect the premenopausal heart from hypertension and ventricular remodeling, the specific mechanisms involved remain elusive. Moreover, whether there is a protective role of estrogens against cardiovascular disease, and specifically LVDD, continues to be controversial. Clinical and basic science have implicated activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), linked to the loss of ovarian estrogens, in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal diastolic dysfunction. As a consequence of increased tissue ANG II and low estrogen, a maladaptive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system produces ROS that contribute to female sex-specific hypertensive heart disease. Recent insights from rodent models that mimic the cardiac phenotype of an estrogen-insufficient or -deficient woman (e.g., premature ovarian failure or postmenopausal), including the ovariectomized congenic mRen2.Lewis female rat, provide evidence showing that estrogen modulates the tissue RAAS and NOS system and related intracellular signaling pathways, in part via the membrane G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30; also called G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1). Complementing the cardiovascular research in this field, the echocardiographic correlates of LVDD as well as inherent limitations to its use in preclinical rodent studies will be briefly presented. Understanding the roles of estrogen and GPR30, their interactions with the local RAAS and NOS system, and the relationship of each of these to LVDD is necessary to identify new therapeutic targets and alternative treatments for diastolic heart failure that achieve the cardiovascular benefits of estrogen replacement without its side effects and contraindications. PMID:24414072

  4. Aging, Estrogens, and Episodic Memory in Women

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Victor W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review the relation in midlife and beyond between estrogen exposures and episodic memory in women. Background Episodic memory performance declines with usual aging, and impairments in episodic memory often portend the development of Alzheimer's disease. In the laboratory, estradiol influences hippocampal function and animal learning. However, it is controversial whether estrogens affect memory after a woman's reproductive years. Method Focused literature review, including a summary of a systematic search of clinical trials of estrogens in which outcomes included an objective measure of episodic memory. Results The natural menopause transition is not associated with objective changes in episodic memory. Strong clinical trial evidence indicates that initiating estrogen-containing hormone therapy after about age 60 years does not benefit episodic memory. Clinical trial findings in middle-age women before age 60 are limited by smaller sample sizes and shorter treatment durations, but these also do not indicate substantial memory effects. Limited short-term evidence, however, suggests that estrogens may improve verbal memory after surgical menopause. Although hormone therapy initiation in old age increases dementia risk, observational studies raise the question of an early critical window during which midlife estrogen therapy reduces late-life Alzheimer's disease. However, almost no data address whether midlife estrogen therapy affects episodic memory in old age. Conclusions Episodic memory is not substantially impacted by the natural menopause transition or improved by use of estrogen-containing hormone therapy after age 60. Further research is needed to determine whether outcomes differ after surgical menopause or whether episodic memory later in life is modified by midlife estrogenic exposures. PMID:19996872

  5. Role of estrogen in diastolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Hao; Jessup, Jewell A.; Lindsey, Sarah H.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) sharply increases in women after menopause and may lead to heart failure. While evidence suggests that estrogens protect the premenopausal heart from hypertension and ventricular remodeling, the specific mechanisms involved remain elusive. Moreover, whether there is a protective role of estrogens against cardiovascular disease, and specifically LVDD, continues to be controversial. Clinical and basic science have implicated activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), linked to the loss of ovarian estrogens, in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal diastolic dysfunction. As a consequence of increased tissue ANG II and low estrogen, a maladaptive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system produces ROS that contribute to female sex-specific hypertensive heart disease. Recent insights from rodent models that mimic the cardiac phenotype of an estrogen-insufficient or -deficient woman (e.g., premature ovarian failure or postmenopausal), including the ovariectomized congenic mRen2.Lewis female rat, provide evidence showing that estrogen modulates the tissue RAAS and NOS system and related intracellular signaling pathways, in part via the membrane G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30; also called G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1). Complementing the cardiovascular research in this field, the echocardiographic correlates of LVDD as well as inherent limitations to its use in preclinical rodent studies will be briefly presented. Understanding the roles of estrogen and GPR30, their interactions with the local RAAS and NOS system, and the relationship of each of these to LVDD is necessary to identify new therapeutic targets and alternative treatments for diastolic heart failure that achieve the cardiovascular benefits of estrogen replacement without its side effects and contraindications. PMID:24414072

  6. Vaginal Estrogen for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, David D.; Carberry, Cassandra; Sanses, Tatiana V.; Mamik, Mamta M.; Ward, Renée M.; Meriwether, Kate V.; Olivera, Cedric K.; Abed, Husam; Balk, Ethan M.; Murphy, Miles

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To comprehensively review and critically assess the literature on vaginal estrogen and its alternatives for women with genitourinary syndrome of menopause and to provide clinical practice guidelines. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched from inception to April 2013. We included randomized controlled trials and prospective comparative studies. Interventions and comparators included all commercially available vaginal estrogen products. Placebo, no treatment, systemic estrogen (all routes), and nonhormonal moisturizers and lubricants were included as comparators. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION We double-screened 1,805 abstracts, identifying 44 eligible studies. Discrepancies were adjudicated by a third reviewer. Studies were individually and collectively assessed for methodologic quality and strength of evidence. TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS Studies were extracted for participant, intervention, comparator, and outcomes data, including patient-reported atrophy symptoms (eg, vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, dysuria, urgency, frequency, recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and urinary incontinence), objective signs of atrophy, urodynamic measures, endometrial effects, serum estradiol changes, and adverse events. Compared with placebo, vaginal estrogens improved dryness, dyspareunia, urinary urgency, frequency, and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). Urinary tract infection rates decreased. The various estrogen preparations had similar efficacy and safety; serum estradiol levels remained within postmenopausal norms for all except high-dose conjugated equine estrogen cream. Endometrial hyperplasia and adenocarcinoma were extremely rare among those receiving vaginal estrogen. Comparing vaginal estrogen with nonhormonal moisturizers, patients with two or more symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy were substantially more improved using vaginal estrogens, but those with one or minor complaints had similar

  7. Fennel and anise as estrogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Albert-Puleo, M

    1980-12-01

    Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare, and anise, Pimpinella anisum, are plants which have been used as estrogenic agents for millennia. Specifically, they have been reputed to increase milk secretion, promote menstruation, facilitate birth, alleviate the symptoms of the male climacteric, and increase libido. In the 1930s, some interest was shown in these plants in the development of synthetic estrogens. The main constituent of the essential oils of fennel and anise, anethole, has been considered to be the active estrogenic agent. However, further research suggests that the actual pharmacologically active agents are polymers of anethole, such as dianethole and photoanethole. PMID:6999244

  8. Purified estrogen receptor enhances in vitro transcription.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V; Molinari, A M; Armetta, I; de Falco, A; Abbondanza, C; Medici, N; Puca, G A

    1992-07-31

    An in vitro transcription system was developed to investigate the mechanisms of gene regulation by the estrogen receptor (ER). ER purified from calf uterus was highly active in enhancing RNA transcription from a template DNA containing estrogen response elements (EREs) upstream from a minimal promoter. Under the conditions employed, no addition of tissue specific factors was required and both estrogen or antiestrogens were ineffective. The stimulation of transcription correlated with the copy number of EREs in the template. The addition of competitor ERE oligonucleotides specifically inhibited the ER-induced transcription. We suggest that the ER may be involved in the formation of the stable initiation complex. PMID:1497666

  9. Recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing vapors

    DOEpatents

    Mirza, Zia I.; Knell, Everett W.; Winter, Bruce L.

    1980-09-30

    Values are recovered from a hydrocarbon-containing vapor by contacting the vapor with quench liquid consisting essentially of hydrocarbons to form a condensate and a vapor residue, the condensate and quench fluid forming a combined liquid stream. The combined liquid stream is mixed with a viscosity-lowering liquid to form a mixed liquid having a viscosity lower than the viscosity of the combined liquid stream to permit easy handling of the combined liquid stream. The quench liquid is a cooled portion of the mixed liquid. Viscosity-lowering liquid is separated from a portion of the mixed liquid and cycled to form additional mixed liquid.

  10. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  11. Bioinformatics Analysis of Estrogen-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Handel, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone that plays critical roles in a myriad of intracellular pathways. The expression of many genes is regulated through the steroid hormone receptors ESR1 and ESR2. These bind to DNA and modulate the expression of target genes. Identification of estrogen target genes is greatly facilitated by the use of transcriptomic methods, such as RNA-seq and expression microarrays, and chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). Combining transcriptomic and ChIP-seq data enables a distinction to be drawn between direct and indirect estrogen target genes. This chapter discusses some methods of identifying estrogen target genes that do not require any expertise in programming languages or complex bioinformatics. PMID:26585125

  12. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  13. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  14. Pyrolysis of wastewater biosolids significantly reduces estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, T C; Zitomer, D H; McNamara, P J

    2016-11-01

    Most wastewater treatment processes are not specifically designed to remove micropollutants. Many micropollutants are hydrophobic so they remain in the biosolids and are discharged to the environment through land-application of biosolids. Micropollutants encompass a broad range of organic chemicals, including estrogenic compounds (natural and synthetic) that reside in the environment, a.k.a. environmental estrogens. Public concern over land application of biosolids stemming from the occurrence of micropollutants hampers the value of biosolids which are important to wastewater treatment plants as a valuable by-product. This research evaluated pyrolysis, the partial decomposition of organic material in an oxygen-deprived system under high temperatures, as a biosolids treatment process that could remove estrogenic compounds from solids while producing a less hormonally active biochar for soil amendment. The estrogenicity, measured in estradiol equivalents (EEQ) by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, of pyrolyzed biosolids was compared to primary and anaerobically digested biosolids. The estrogenic responses from primary solids and anaerobically digested solids were not statistically significantly different, but pyrolysis of anaerobically digested solids resulted in a significant reduction in EEQ; increasing pyrolysis temperature from 100°C to 500°C increased the removal of EEQ with greater than 95% removal occurring at or above 400°C. This research demonstrates that biosolids treatment with pyrolysis would substantially decrease (removal>95%) the estrogens associated with this biosolids product. Thus, pyrolysis of biosolids can be used to produce a valuable soil amendment product, biochar, that minimizes discharge of estrogens to the environment. PMID:27344259

  15. Urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites and subsequent risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Eliassen, A Heather; Spiegelman, Donna; Xu, Xia; Keefer, Larry K; Veenstra, Timothy D; Barbieri, Robert L; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E; Ziegler, Regina G

    2012-02-01

    Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolism are hypothesized to be associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk but evidence is limited. We examined 15 urinary estrogens/estrogen metabolites and breast cancer risk among premenopausal women in a case-control study nested within the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII). From 1996 to 1999, urine was collected from 18,521 women during the mid-luteal menstrual phase. Breast cancer cases (N = 247) diagnosed between collection and June 2005 were matched to two controls each (N = 485). Urinary estrogen metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and adjusted for creatinine level. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by multivariate conditional logistic regression. Higher urinary estrone and estradiol levels were strongly significantly associated with lower risk (top vs. bottom quartile RR: estrone = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.30-0.88; estradiol = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.30-0.86). Generally inverse, although nonsignificant, patterns also were observed with 2- and 4-hydroxylation pathway estrogen metabolites. Inverse associations generally were not observed with 16-pathway estrogen metabolites and a significant positive association was observed with 17-epiestriol (top vs. bottom quartile RR = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.08-2.81; P(trend) = 0.01). In addition, there was a significant increased risk with higher 16-pathway/parent estrogen metabolite ratio (comparable RR = 1.61; 95% CI, 0.99-2.62; P(trend) = 0.04). Other pathway ratios were not significantly associated with risk except parent estrogen metabolites/non-parent estrogen metabolites (comparable RR = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.96; P(trend) = 0.03). These data suggest that most mid-luteal urinary estrogen metabolite concentrations are not positively associated with breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. The inverse associations with parent estrogen metabolites and the parent estrogen metabolite/non-parent estrogen metabolite ratio

  16. Estrogen effects in allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Rana S.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Asthma prevalence and severity are greater in women than in men, and mounting evidence suggests this is in part related to female steroid sex hormones. Of these, estrogen has been the subject of much study. This review highlights recent research exploring the effects of estrogen in allergic disease. Recent findings Estrogen receptors are found on numerous immunoregulatory cells and estrogen’s actions skew immune responses toward allergy. It may act directly to create deleterious effects in asthma, or indirectly via modulation of various pathways including secretory leukoprotease inhibitor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel and nitric oxide production to exert effects on lung mechanics and inflammation. Not only do endogenous estrogens appear to play a role, but environmental estrogens have also been implicated. Environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens) including bisphenol A and phthalates enhance allergic sensitization in animal models and may enhance development of atopic disorders like asthma in humans. Summary Estrogen’s role in allergic disease remains complex. As allergic diseases continue to increase in prevalence and affect women disproportionately, gaining a fuller understanding of its effects in these disorders will be essential. Of particular importance may be effects of xenoestrogens on allergic disease. PMID:23090385

  17. Estrogen Regulation of MicroRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Carolyn M

    2009-01-01

    Women outlive men, but life expectancy is not influenced by hormone replacement (estrogen + progestin) therapy. Estrogens appear to protect brain, cardiovascular tissues, and bone from aging. Estrogens regulate genes directly through binding to estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα and ERβ) that are ligand-activated transcription factors and indirectly by activating plasma membrane-associated ER which, in turns, activates intracellular signaling cascades leading to altered gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (19-25 nucleotides), naturally-occurring, non-coding RNA molecules that base-pair with the 3’ untranslated region of target mRNAs. This interaction either blocks translation of the mRNA or targets the mRNA transcript to be degraded. The human genome contains ~ 700-1,200 miRNAs. Aberrant patterns of miRNA expression are implicated in human diseases including breast cancer. Recent studies have identified miRNAs regulated by estrogens in human breast cancer cells, human endometrial stromal and myometrial smooth muscle cells, rat mammary gland, and mouse uterus. The decline of estradiol levels in postmenopausal women has been implicated in various age-associated disorders. The role of estrogen-regulated miRNA expression, the target genes of these miRNAs, and the role of miRNAs in aging has yet to be explored. PMID:19881910

  18. Estrogen Protects against Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Valluri, Shailaja; Lopez, Jennifer; Greer, Falon; DesRosiers, Colleen; Caperell-Grant, Andrea; Mendonca, Marc S.; Bigsby, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Cataractogenesis is a complication of radiotherapy when the eye is included in the treatment field. Low doses of densely ionizing space radiation may also result in an increased risk of cataracts in astronauts. We previously reported that estrogen (17-β-estradiol), when administered to ovariectomized rats commencing 1 week before γ irradiation of the eye and continuously thereafter, results in a significant increase in the rate and incidence of cataract formation and a decreased latent period compared to an ovariectomized control group. We therefore concluded that estrogen accelerates progression of radiation-induced opacification. We now show that estrogen, if administered continuously, but commencing after irradiation, protects against radiation cataractogenesis. Both the rate of progression and incidence of cataracts were greatly reduced in ovariectomized rats that received estrogen treatment after irradiation compared to ovariectomized rats. As in our previous study, estradiol administered 1 week prior to irradiation at the time of ovariectomy and throughout the period of observation produced an enhanced rate of cataract progression. Estrogen administered for only 1 week prior to irradiation had no effect on the rate of progression but resulted in a slight reduction in the incidence. We conclude that estrogen may enhance or protect against radiation cataractogenesis, depending on when it is administered relative to the time of irradiation, and may differentially modulate the initiation and progression phases of cataractogenesis. These data have important implications for astronauts and radiotherapy patients. PMID:19138041

  19. Evidence of a correlation of estrogen receptor level and avian osteoclast estrogen responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Pederson, L; Kremer, M; Foged, N T; Winding, B; Ritchie, C; Fitzpatrick, L A; Oursler, M J

    1997-05-01

    Isolated osteoclasts from 5-week-old chickens respond to estradiol treatment in vitro with decreased resorption activity, increased nuclear proto-oncogene expression, and decreased lysosomal enzyme secretion. This study examines osteoclasts from embryonic chickens and egg-laying hens for evidence of estrogen responsiveness. Although osteoclasts from both of these sources express estrogen receptor mRNA and protein, estradiol treatment had no effect on resorption activity. In contrast to the lack of effect on resorption, estradiol treatment for 30 minutes resulted in steady-state mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun increasing in osteoclasts from embryonic chickens and decreasing in osteoclasts from egg-laying hens. These data suggest that a nuclear proto-oncogene response may not be involved in estradiol-mediated decreased osteoclast resorption activity. To examine the influence of circulating estrogen on osteoclast estrogen responsiveness, 5-week-old chickens were injected with estrogen for 4 days prior to sacrifice. Estradiol treatment of osteoclasts from these chickens did not decrease resorption activity in vitro. Transfection of an estrogen receptor expression vector into osteoclasts from the estradiol-injected chickens and egg-laying hens restored estrogen responsiveness. Osteoclasts from 5-week-old chickens and estradiol treated 5-week-old chickens transfected with the estrogen receptor expression vector contained significantly higher levels of estrogen receptor protein and responded to estradiol treatment by decreasing secretion of cathepsins B and L and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. In contrast, osteoclasts from embryonic chickens, egg-laying hens, and estradiol-treated 5-week-old chickens either untransfected or transfected with an empty expression vector did not respond similarly. These data suggest that modulation of osteoclast estrogen responsiveness may be controlled by changes in the osteoclast estrogen receptor levels. PMID:9144340

  20. Estrogenic activity of natural and synthetic estrogens in human breast cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Zava, D T; Blen, M; Duwe, G

    1997-04-01

    We investigated the estrogenic activity of various environmental pollutants (xenobiotics), in particular the xenoestrogen o,p-DDT, and compared their effects with those of endogenous estrogens, phytoestrogens, and mycoestrogens on estrogen receptor binding capacity, induction of estrogen end products, and activation of cell proliferation in estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer cells in monolayer culture. We also quantified the levels of phytoestrogens in extracts of some common foods, herbs, and spices and in human saliva following consumption of a high phytoestrogen food source (soy milk) to compare phytoestrogen abundance and bioavailability relative to the reported xenoestrogen burden in humans. Results show that natural endogenous estrogens, phytoestrogens, mycoestrogens, and xenoestrogens bind estrogen receptor (ER) in intact cells, but demonstrate marked differences in their ability to induce end products of estrogen action and to regulate cell proliferation. All of the different classes of estrogens stimulated cell proliferation at concentrations that half-saturated ER, but only some classes were able to induce estrogen-regulated end products. Genistein, a common phytoestrogen found in soy foods, differed from the xenoestrogen DDT in its effects on cell proliferation and ability to induce estrogen-regulated end products. Moreover, we found that many of the foods, herbs, and spices commonly consumed by humans contain significant amounts of phytoestrogens, and consumption of soy milk, a phytoestrogen-rich food, markedly increases the levels of phytoestrogens in saliva. In conclusion, our in vitro results predict that a diet high in phytoestrogens would significantly reduce the binding of weak xenoestrogens to ER in target tissues in vivo. PMID:9168008

  1. Estrogenic activity assessment of environmental chemicals using in vitro assays: identification of two new estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Lascombe, I; Beffa, D; Rüegg, U; Tarradellas, J; Wahli, W

    2000-01-01

    Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activities have been suggested to be associated with deleterious effects in animals and humans. To characterize estrogenic chemicals and their mechanisms of action, we established in vitro and cell culture assays that detect human estrogen receptor [alpha] (hER[alpha])-mediated estrogenicity. First, we assayed chemicals to determine their ability to modulate direct interaction between the hER[alpha] and the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and in a competition binding assay to displace 17ss-estradiol (E(2)). Second, we tested the chemicals for estrogen-associated transcriptional activity in the yeast estrogen screen and in the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The chemicals investigated in this study were o,p'-DDT (racemic mixture and enantiomers), nonylphenol mixture (NPm), and two poorly analyzed compounds in the environment, namely, tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methane (Tris-H) and tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methanol (Tris-OH). In both yeast and MCF-7 cells, we determined estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor (ER) for o,p'-DDT, NPm, and for the very first time, Tris-H and Tris-OH. However, unlike estrogens, none of these xenobiotics seemed to be able to induce ER/SRC-1 interactions, most likely because the conformation of the activated receptor would not allow direct contacts with this coactivator. However, these compounds were able to inhibit [(3)H]-E(2) binding to hER, which reveals a direct interaction with the receptor. In conclusion, the test compounds are estrogen mimics, but their molecular mechanism of action appears to be different from that of the natural hormone as revealed by the receptor/coactivator interaction analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:10903615

  2. Effects of Estrogens and Estrogenic Disrupting Compounds on Fish Mineralized Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patricia I. S.; Estêvão, Maria D.; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play well-recognized roles in reproduction across vertebrates, but also intervene in a wide range of other physiological processes, including mineral homeostasis. Classical actions are triggered when estrogens bind and activate intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), regulating the transcription of responsive genes, but rapid non-genomic actions initiated by binding to plasma membrane receptors were recently described. A wide range of structurally diverse compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources have been shown to interact with and disrupt the normal functions of the estrogen system, and fish are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these compounds are frequently discharged or run-off into waterways. The effect of estrogen disruptors in fish has mainly been assessed in relation to reproductive endpoints, and relatively little attention has been given to other disruptive actions. This review will overview the actions of estrogens in fish, including ER isoforms, their expression, structure and mechanisms of action. The estrogen functions will be considered in relation to mineral homeostasis and actions on mineralized tissues. The impact of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues will be reviewed, and the potential adverse outcomes of exposure to such compounds will be discussed. Current lacunae in knowledge are highlighted along with future research priorities. PMID:25196834

  3. Estrogen-related receptor γ modulates cell proliferation and estrogen signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Shigekawa, Takashi; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Osaki, Akihiko; Saeki, Toshiaki; Inoue, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is primarily a hormone-dependent tumor that can be regulated by status of steroid hormones including estrogen and progesterone. Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are orphan nuclear receptors most closely related to estrogen receptor (ER) and much attention has been recently paid to the functions of ERRs in breast cancer in terms of the interactions with ER. In the present study, we investigated the expression of ERRγ in human invasive breast cancers by immunohistochemical analysis (n=110) obtained by radical mastectomy. Nuclear immunoreactivity of ERRγ was detected in 87 cases (79%) and tended to correlate with the lymph node status. No significant associations were observed with other clinicopathological characteristics, including the expression levels of both estrogen and progesterone receptors. In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we demonstrated that ERRγ mRNA was up-regulated dose-dependently by estrogen, and that this up-regulation of ERRγ mRNA by estrogen was abolished by ICI 182,780 treatment. We also demonstrated that exogenously transfected ERRγ increased MCF-7 cell proliferation. Furthermore, ERRγ enhanced estrogen response element (ERE)-driven transcription in MCF-7 cells. In 293T cells, ERRγ could also stimulate ERE-mediated transcription with or without ERα. These results suggest that ERRγ plays an important role as a modulator of estrogen signaling in breast cancer cells. PMID:20883782

  4. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  5. Aromatase inhibiting and combined estrogenic effects of parabens and estrogenic effects of other additives in cosmetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van Son, O. van; Piersma, A.H.; Jong, P.C. de; Berg, M. van den

    2008-08-01

    There is concern widely on the increase in human exposure to exogenous (anti)estrogenic compounds. Typical are certain ingredients in cosmetic consumer products such as musks, phthalates and parabens. Monitoring a variety of human samples revealed that these ingredients, including the ones that generally are considered to undergo rapid metabolism, are present at low levels. In this in vitro research individual compounds and combinations of parabens and endogenous estradiol (E{sub 2}) were investigated in the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. The experimental design applied a concentration addition model (CA). Data were analyzed with the estrogen equivalency (EEQ) and method of isoboles approach. In addition, the catalytic inhibitory properties of parabens on an enzyme involved in a rate limiting step in steroid genesis (aromatase) were studied in human placental microsomes. Our results point to an additive estrogenic effect in a CA model for parabens. In addition, it was found that parabens inhibit aromatase. Noticeably, the effective levels in both our in vitro systems were far higher than the levels detected in human samples. However, estrogenic compounds may contribute in a cumulative way to the circulating estrogen burden. Our calculation for the extra estrogen burden due to exposure to parabens, phthalates and polycyclic musks indicates an insignificant estrogenic load relative to the endogenous or therapeutic estrogen burden.

  6. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in primary cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ellis, D L; Wheeland, R G; Solomon, H

    1985-01-01

    Using a variety of techniques, estrogen and progesterone receptors have previously been identified in variable percentages of malignant melanomas. We examined 10 primary superficial spreading melanomas (SSM) with a fluorescent hormone-binding technique for estrogen and progesterone cytoplasmic receptors. Of these 6 SSM were markedly positive for estrogen and progesterone binding. Patients with dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS) or a family history of DNS were markedly positive for estrogen and progesterone binding. A single patient with lentigo maligna and another patient with lentigo maligna melanoma were negative for estrogen and progesterone binding. None of the 21 control intradermal nevi examined for estrogen and progesterone binding exhibited marked positivity. PMID:3965520

  7. Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

    2007-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

  8. Hydrocarbon treating process

    SciTech Connect

    Verachtert, T. A.

    1984-11-06

    A process is disclosed for treating hydrocarbon streams such as naphtha by the oxidation of mercaptans into disulfide compounds which remain in the hydrocarbon stream. The conversion is effected during passage of the hydrocarbon and an aqueous stream downward through a cylindrical mass of liquid-liquid contact material. The liquids then flow through a cylindrical screen into an annular separation zone which surrounds a lower part of the contact material. After decantation in the separation zone, the aqueous material, which preferably contains the oxidation catalyst, is recycled.

  9. Effects of treadmill exercise training on cerebellar estrogen and estrogen receptors, serum estrogen, and motor coordination performance of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Saidah; Soejono, Sri Kadarsih; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The present study aims at examining the motor coordination performance, serum and cerebellar estrogen, as well as ERβ levels, of ovariectomized rats (as menopausal model) following regular exercise. Materials and Methods: Ten female Sprague Dawley rats aged 12 weeks old were randomly divided into two groups; all of which underwent ovariectomy. The first group was treated with regular exercise of moderate intensity, in which the rats were trained to run on a treadmill for 60 min per day for 12 weeks. The second group served as control. Rotarod test was carried out before and after exercise treatment. All rats were euthanized thereafter, and blood and cerebellums of the rats were collected. The serum and cerebellar estrogen as well as cerebellar ERβ levels were measured using ELISA assays. Results: The number of falls in the rotarod task of the exercise group was significantly lower than that of control group. The cerebellar estrogen level of the exercise group was significantly higher than that of control group. Accordingly, there was a significantly negative correlation between the number of falls and cerebellar estrogen level in the exercise group. Conclusion: The present study shows that a lengthy period of regular exercise improves the cerebellar estrogen level and motor coordination performance in ovariectomized rats. PMID:26221482

  10. Estrogenic Compounds, Estrogen Receptors and Vascular Cell Signaling in the Aging Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Dia A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) remain controversial. The earlier clinical observations that cardiovascular disease (CVD) was less common in MHT users compared to non-users suggested cardiovascular benefits of MHT. Also, experimental studies have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30, which mediate genomic or non-genomic effects in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), most notably the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, have challenged the cardiovascular benefits and highlighted adverse cardiovascular events with MHT. The discrepancies have been attributed to the design of RCTs, the subjects' advanced age and preexisting CVD, and the form of estrogen used. The discrepancies may also stem from age-related changes in vascular ER amount, distribution, integrity, and post-receptor signaling pathways as well as structural changes in the vasculature. Age-related changes in other sex hormones such as testosterone may also alter the hormonal environment and influence the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Investigating the chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and pharmacology of natural and synthetic estrogens should improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT. Further characterization of phytoestrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and specific ER agonists may provide substitutes to conventional MHT. Conditions with excess or low estrogen levels such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Turner syndrome may provide insight into the development and regulation of ER and the mechanisms of aberrant estrogen-ER interactions. The lessons learned from previous RCTs have led to more directed studies such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Careful design of experimental models and RCTs, coupled with the development of specific ER modulators, hold the promise of improving the actions of

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of baicalein in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages via estrogen receptor and NF-κB-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guan-Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Jiang, Xiaorui; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Bingyao; Su, Lina; Cao, Wenjie; Zhang, Han; Gao, Xiumei

    2013-12-01

    Baicalein has been used for many years as a popular antiviral and antibacterial in China. Recent investigations revealed that baicalein also has anti-inflammatory activities. Our results indicated that baicalein increases ERE-luciferase activity in an estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent manner when either ERα or ERβ were coexpressed in Hela cells. This study examined whether baicalein exerts an anti-inflammatory effect in RAW264.7 cells through an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway and through regulation of NF-ĸB activation. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW264.7 cells, baicalein exerts anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α mRNA expression; NO production; as well as inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, PGE2, and TNF-α) production through an ER-dependent pathway. These effects are accompanied with the inhibition of the transcription factor NF-ĸB activation and IκBα phosphorylation. We therefore conclude that baicalein inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine production via regulation of the NF-ĸB pathway and estrogen-like activity, suggesting that it may be useful for preventing inflammation-related diseases. PMID:23892998

  12. Hydrocarbon recovery from diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Scinta, J.

    1984-05-15

    Supercritical extraction of diatomaceous earth results in a much more significant improvement in hydrocarbon recovery over Fischer retorting than achievable with tar sands. Process and apparatus for supercritical extraction of diatomaceous earth are disclosed.

  13. Noncontraceptive estrogen use and epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, D W; Kelly, J P; Welch, W R; Rosenberg, L; Stolley, P D; Warshauer, M E; Lewis, J; Woodruff, J; Shapiro, S

    1989-12-01

    The relation of noncontraceptive estrogen use to epithelial ovarian cancer was evaluated in a case-control study conducted in hospitals mainly in the northeastern United States. There were 377 cases diagnosed within the year before hospital admission and 2,030 hospital controls; data were collected by interview in the hospital. Compared with women who never took noncontraceptive estrogens, the overall relative risk estimate for women whose estrogen use lasted at least one year and was not combined with progestogens or testosterone was 1.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-1.9), after taking into account risk factors for ovarian cancer. There were 55 cases of the endometrioid, clear cell, or malignant mixed mesodermal cell type; the corresponding relative risk estimate was 0.9 (95% CI 0.3-3.0). There were 26 cases of undifferentiated cell type, with a relative risk estimate of 3.6 (95% CI 1.2-11). Relative risk estimates were similar in a subset of the cases (57%) for which pathology slides were reviewed. For estrogen use of long duration, use of high-dose preparations, or use in the distant past, the relative risk estimates were not significantly different from 1.0. The estimates were elevated for some categories of use, but not consistently--for example, for an interval of 5-9 years since estrogen use began (relative risk (RR) = 2.7), but not after shorter or longer intervals, and for use of conjugated estrogens with a dose of 0.3 mg (RR = 3.2) or 1.25 mg (RR = 2.4), but not for doses of 0.625 mg or 2.5 mg. The relative risk estimate was also elevated for use by nulliparous women (RR = 2.4). The results suggest that, overall, noncontraceptive estrogen use is not associated with the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. Furthermore, our data do not support the hypothesis that estrogens increase the risk of endometrioid ovarian cancer. The elevated estimates could be due to multiple stratification of the data, but they should be explored in further studies, given the

  14. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    PubMed

    Dewundara, Samantha S; Wiggs, Janey L; Sullivan, David A; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    This article's objective is to provide an overview of the association between estrogen and glaucoma. A literature synthesis was conducted of articles published in peer-reviewed journals screened through May 5, 2015, using the PubMed database. Keywords used were "estrogen and glaucoma," "reproductive factors and glaucoma," and "estrogen, nitric oxide and eye." Forty-three journal articles were included. Results indicated that markers for lifetime estrogen exposure have been measured by several studies and show that the age of menarche onset, oral contraceptive (OC) use, bilateral oophorectomy, age of menopause onset and duration between menarche to menopause are associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) risk. The Blue Mountain Eye Study found a significantly increased POAG risk with later (>13 years) compared with earlier (≤12 years) age of menarche. Nurses' Health Study (NHS) investigators found that OC use of greater than 5 years was associated with a 25% increased risk of POAG. The Mayo Clinic Cohort Study of Oophorectomy and Aging found that women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before age 43 years had an increased risk of glaucoma. The Rotterdam Study found that women who went through menopause before reaching the age of 45 years had a higher risk of open-angle glaucoma (2.6-fold increased risk), while the NHS showed a reduced risk of POAG among women older than 65 who entered menopause after age ≥ 54 years. Increased estrogen states may confer a reduced risk of glaucoma or glaucoma-related traits such as reduced intraocular pressure (IOP). Pregnancy, a hyperestrogenemic state, is associated with decreased IOP during the third trimester. Though the role of postmenopausal hormone (PMH) use in the reduction of IOP is not fully conclusive, PMH use may reduce the risk of POAG. From a genetic epidemiologic perspective, estrogen metabolic pathway single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with POAG in women and polymorphisms in

  15. Estrogenic and AhR activities in dissolved phase and suspended solids from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, Sonia; Gomez, Elena; Picot, Bernadette; Cavaillès, Vincent; Casellas, Claude; Balaguer, Patrick; Fenet, Hélène

    2010-05-15

    The distribution of estrogen receptor (ERalpha) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) activities between the dissolved phase and suspended solids were investigated during wastewater treatment. Three wastewater treatment plants with different treatment technologies (waste stabilization ponds (WSPs), trickling filters (TFs) and activated sludge supplemented with a biofilter system (ASB)) were sampled. Estrogenic and AhR activities were detected in both phases in influents and effluents. Estrogenic and AhR activities in wastewater influents ranged from 41.8 to 79 ng/L E(2) Eq. and from 37.9 to 115.5 ng/L TCDD Eq. in the dissolved phase and from 5.5 to 88.6 ng/g E(2) Eq. and from 15 to 700 ng/g TCDD Eq. in the suspended solids. For both activities, WSP showed greater or similar removal efficiency than ASB and both were much more efficient than TF which had the lowest removal efficiency. Moreover, our data indicate that the efficiency of removal of ER and AhR activities from the suspended solid phase was mainly due to removal of suspended solids. Indeed, ER and AhR activities were detected in the effluent suspended solid phase indicating that suspended solids, which are usually not considered in these types of studies, contribute to environmental contamination by endocrine disrupting compounds and should therefore be routinely assessed for a better estimation of the ER and AhR activities released in the environment. PMID:20303573

  16. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Funk, Edward W.; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Chang, Y. Alice

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture over a polymeric membrane which comprises a polymer capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds at temperature ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psi. The membranes which possess pore sizes ranging from about 10 to about 500 Angstroms are cast from a solvent solution and recovered.

  17. Hydrocarbon geoscience research strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This document outlines a strategy for oil and gas related research focused on optimizing the economic producibility of the Nation's resources. The Hydrocarbon Geoscience Strategy was developed by the Hydrocarbon Geoscience Research Coordinating Committee of the Department of Energy (DOE). This strategy forms the basis for the development of DOE Fossil Energy's Oil Research Program Implementation Plan and Natural Gas Program Implementation Plan. 24 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Using a customized DNA microarray for expression profiling of the estrogen-responsive genes to evaluate estrogen activity among natural estrogens and industrial chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, Shunichi; Aita, Yukie; Inoue, Akio; Hayashi, Shinichi; Nishigaki, Michiko; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Hiroki; Wada-Kiyama, Yuko; Sakuma, Yasuo; Akaba, Shuichi; Tanaka, Junko; Sone, Hideko; Yonemoto, Junzo; Tanji, Masao; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2004-01-01

    We developed a DNA microarray to evaluate the estrogen activity of natural estrogens and industrial chemicals. Using MCF-7 cells, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of estrogen-responsive genes among approximately 20,000 human genes. On the basis of reproducible and reliable responses of the genes to estrogen, we selected 172 genes to be used for developing a customized DNA microarray. Using this DNA microarray, we examined estrogen activity among natural estrogens (17beta-estradiol, estriol, estrone, genistein), industrial chemicals (diethylstilbestrol, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, methoxychlor), and dioxin. We obtained results identical to those for other bioassays that are used for detecting estrogen activity. On the basis of statistical correlations analysis, these bioassays have shown more sensitivity for dioxin and methoxychlor. PMID:15159206

  19. Estrogen sulfotransferase ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiaojuan; Guo, Yan; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Deng, Meihong; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Xu, Meishu; Lu, Peipei; Yan, Jiong; Fu, Haiyan; Liu, Youhua; Yu, Lushan; Huang, Min; Zeng, Su; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the host's deleterious systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections. Here we report an essential role for the estrogen sulfotransferase (EST or SULT1E1), a conjugating enzyme that sulfonates and deactivates estrogens, in sepsis response. Both the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and lipopolysacharide (LPS) models of sepsis induce the expression of EST and compromise the activity of estrogen, an anti-inflammatory hormone. Surprisingly, EST ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis-induced death. Mechanistically, EST ablation attenuates sepsis-induced inflammatory responses due to compromised estrogen deactivation, leading to increased sepsis lethality. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of EST promotes estrogen deactivation and sensitizes mice to CLP-induced inflammatory response. The induction of EST by sepsis is NF-κB dependent and EST is a NF-κB target gene. The reciprocal regulation of inflammation and EST may represent a yet to be explored mechanism of endocrine regulation of inflammation, which has an impact on the clinical outcome of sepsis. PMID:26259151

  20. Estrogen receptors and human disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    A myriad of physiological processes in mammals are influenced by estrogens and the estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ. As we reviewed previously, given the widespread role for estrogen in normal human physiology, it is not surprising that estrogen is implicated in the development or progression of a number of diseases. In this review, we are giving a 5-year update of the literature regarding the influence of estrogens on a number of human cancers (breast, ovarian, colorectal, prostate, and endometrial), endometriosis, fibroids, and cardiovascular disease. A large number of sophisticated experimental studies have provided insights into human disease, but for this review, the literature citations were limited to articles published after our previous review (Deroo and Korach in J Clin Invest 116(3):561–570, 2006) and will focus in most cases on human data and clinical trials. We will describe the influence in which estrogen’s action, through one of or both of the ERs, mediates the aforementioned human disease states. PMID:22648069

  1. Estrogenicity of Glabridin in Ishikawa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su Wei Poh, Melissa; Viseswaran, Navaratnam

    2015-01-01

    Glabridin is an isoflavan from licorice root, which is a common component of herbal remedies used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. Past studies have shown that glabridin resulted in favorable outcome similar to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), suggesting a possible role as an estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). This study aims to evaluate the estrogenic effect of glabridin in an in-vitro endometrial cell line -Ishikawa cells via alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator assay. Its effect on cell proliferation was also evaluated using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that glabridin activated the ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator complex and displayed a dose-dependent increase in estrogenic activity supporting its use as an ERT. However, glabridin also induced an increase in cell proliferation. When glabridin was treated together with 17β-E2, synergistic estrogenic effect was observed with a slight decrease in cell proliferation as compared to treatment by 17β-E2 alone. This suggest that the combination might be better suited for providing high estrogenic effects with lower incidences of endometrial cancer that is associated with 17β-E2. PMID:25816349

  2. Modulation of thymosin beta 4 by estrogen.

    PubMed

    Suh, B Y; Naylor, P H; Goldstein, A L; Rebar, R W

    1985-02-15

    The endocrine thymus produces several hormone-like peptides (generically termed thymosins) which control development of the thymic-dependent lymphoid system and participate in the process of immune regulation. In addition, recent literature supports the hypothesis that gonadal steroids in general and estrogens in particular affect the immune system. To determine whether steroid hormones modulate secretion of thymic peptides, basal concentrations of thymosins alpha 1 and beta 4 were determined by radioimmunoassay in morning blood samples from 87 women in various clinical states. Basal concentrations of thymosin alpha 1 were similar in all women sampled. Basal levels of thymosin beta 4 were similar in normal women during the early follicular phase, women with premature ovarian failure, postmenopausal women not receiving estrogen, and individuals with gonadal dysgenesis. However, the marked variability of basal levels in premature ovarian failure and in postmenopausal women suggests that these groups are quite heterogeneous. Thymosin beta 4 concentrations were reduced in castrated women not receiving estrogen and were decreased more in both postmenopausal women and castrated women who were on chronic estrogen therapy. These data suggest that estrogens can modulate the circulating levels of thymosin beta 4 but not of thymosin alpha 1. We do not yet know whether sex steroids modulate secretion of other thymic peptides. PMID:2983555

  3. Estrogenicity of glabridin in Ishikawa cells.

    PubMed

    Su Wei Poh, Melissa; Voon Chen Yong, Phelim; Viseswaran, Navaratnam; Chia, Yoke Yin

    2015-01-01

    Glabridin is an isoflavan from licorice root, which is a common component of herbal remedies used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. Past studies have shown that glabridin resulted in favorable outcome similar to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), suggesting a possible role as an estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). This study aims to evaluate the estrogenic effect of glabridin in an in-vitro endometrial cell line -Ishikawa cells via alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator assay. Its effect on cell proliferation was also evaluated using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that glabridin activated the ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator complex and displayed a dose-dependent increase in estrogenic activity supporting its use as an ERT. However, glabridin also induced an increase in cell proliferation. When glabridin was treated together with 17β-E2, synergistic estrogenic effect was observed with a slight decrease in cell proliferation as compared to treatment by 17β-E2 alone. This suggest that the combination might be better suited for providing high estrogenic effects with lower incidences of endometrial cancer that is associated with 17β-E2. PMID:25816349

  4. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  5. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  6. Novel Promising Estrogenic Receptor Modulators: Cytotoxic and Estrogenic Activity of Benzanilides and Dithiobenzanilides

    PubMed Central

    Kucinska, Malgorzata; Giron, Maria-Dolores; Piotrowska, Hanna; Lisiak, Natalia; Granig, Walter H.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco-Javier; Salto, Rafael; Murias, Marek; Erker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 27 benzanilides and dithiobenzanilides built on a stilbene scaffold and possessing various functional groups in aromatic rings previously described for their spasmolytic properties was assayed on three human cancer cell lines (A549 –lung adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 estrogen dependent breast adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-231 estrogen independent breast adenocarcinoma) and 2 non-tumorigenic cell lines (CCD39Lu–lung fibroblasts, MCF-12A - breast epithelial). Three compounds (6, 15 and 18) showed selective antiproliferative activity against estrogen dependent MCF-7 cancer cells and their estrogenic activity was further confirmed in MCF-7 transfected with an estrogen receptor reporter plasmid and in HEK239 cells over-expressing the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Compound 18 is especially interesting as a potential candidate for therapy since it is highly toxic and selective towards estrogen dependent MCF7 cell lines (IC50 = 5.07 μM versus more than 100 μM for MDA-MB-231) and almost innocuous for normal breast cells (IC50 = 91.46 μM for MCF-12A). Docking studies have shown that compound 18 interacts with the receptor in the same cavity as estradiol although the extra aromatic ring is involved in additional binding interactions with residue W383. The role of W383 and the extended binding mode were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:26730945

  7. Estrophilin immunoreactivity versus estrogen receptor binding activity in meningiomas: evidence for multiple estrogen binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, K.P.; Schott, W.; Gross, S.

    1987-09-01

    The existence of estrogen receptors in human meningiomas has long been a controversial issue. This may be explained, in part, by apparent heterogeneity of estrogen binding sites in meningioma tissue. In this study, estrogen receptors were determined in 58 meningiomas with an enzyme immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies against human estrogen receptor protein (estrophilin) and with a sensitive radioligand binding assay using /sup 125/I-labeled estradiol (/sup 125/I-estradiol) as radioligand. Low levels of estrophilin immunoreactivity were found in tumors from 62% of patients, whereas radioligand binding activity was demonstrated in about 46% of the meningiomas examined. In eight (14%) tissue samples multiple binding sites for estradiol were observed. The immunoreactive binding sites correspond to the classical, high affinity estrogen receptors: the Kd for /sup 125/I-estradiol binding to the receptor was approximately 0.2 nM and the binding was specific for estrogens. The second, low affinity class of binding sites considerably influenced measurement of the classical receptor even at low ligand concentrations. The epidemiological and clinical data from patients with meningiomas, and the existence of specific estrogen receptors confirmed by immunochemical detection, may be important factors in a theory of oncogenesis.

  8. Multicolor Imaging of Bifacial Activities of Estrogens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces multicolor imaging of bifacial activities of an estrogen. For the multicolor imaging, the authors fabricated two single-chain probes emitting green or red bioluminescence (named Simer-G and -R, respectively) from click beetle luciferase (CBLuc) green and red: Simer-R consists of the ligand binding domain of estrogen receptor (ER LBD) and the Src homology-2 (SH2) domain of Src, which are sandwiched between split-CBLuc red (CBLuc-R). On the other hand, Simer-G emitting red light consists of the ER LBD and a common consensus sequence of coactivators (LXXLL motif), which are inserted between split-CBLuc green (CBLuc-G). This probe set creates fingerprinting spectra from the characteristic green and red bioluminescence in response to agonistic and antagonistic activities of a ligand of interest. The present protocol further provides a unique methodology to calculate characteristic estrogenicity scores of various ligands from the spectra. PMID:27424902

  9. Toxic and chemopreventive ligands preferentially activate distinct aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathways: implications for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Okino, Steven T; Pookot, Deepa; Basak, Shashwati; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2009-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated regulatory protein that controls estrogen action through two distinct pathways. In one pathway, AhR acts as a transcription factor that induces the expression of the CYP1 family of estrogen-metabolizing genes; in the other pathway, AhR initiates the degradation of the estrogen receptor and suppresses estrogen signaling. The AhR ligand 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) is a beneficial dietary constituent that prevents breast tumors in rodents and is associated with decreased breast cancer risk in humans. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a toxic AhR ligand that is implicated in birth defects, infertility, and cancer. We analyzed MCF-7 cells to gain insight into how two AhR ligands can exert such fundamentally different health effects. We find that DIM and TCDD have differing abilities to activate the distinct AhR-controlled pathways. TCDD strongly induces AhR-dependent CYP1 gene expression, whereas DIM is a relatively weak CYP1 inducer. DIM strongly inhibits estrogen receptor-alpha expression and estrogen signaling, whereas TCDD has a notably weaker effect on these processes. Small interfering RNA knockdown of AhR confirms that the effects of DIM and TCDD are indeed AhR dependent. Our findings reveal that DIM and TCDD each elicit a unique pattern of change in pathways that control estrogen action; such patterns may determine if an AhR ligand has beneficial or adverse health effects. PMID:19223575

  10. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFOS) FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids) which ...

  11. Exploration of Dimensions of Estrogen Potency

    PubMed Central

    Jeyakumar, M.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Gunther, Jillian R.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  12. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  13. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  14. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  15. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  16. Cumulative Estrogen Exposure and Prospective Memory in Older Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesson, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at cumulative lifetime estrogen exposure, as estimated with a mathematical index (Index of Cumulative Estrogen Exposure (ICEE)) that included variables (length of time on estrogen therapy, age at menarche and menopause, postmenopausal body mass index, time since menopause, nulliparity and duration of breastfeeding) known to…

  17. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  18. Estrogen Abolishes Latent Inhibition in Ovariectomized Female Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nofrey, Barbara S.; Ben-Shahar, Osnat M.; Brake, Wayne G.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen is frequently prescribed as a method of birth control and as hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal women with varied effects on cognition. Here the effects of estrogen on attention were examined using the latent inhibition (LI) behavioral paradigm. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were given either estrogen benzoate (EB, 10 or…

  19. Thermal cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.

    1988-09-01

    Knowledge of thermal cracking of hydrocarbons is important in understanding and modeling petroleum maturation. We have reviewed the literature on the thermal cracking of pure hydrocarbons and mixtures of hydrocarbons, with particular attention given to dependence of the kinetics on temperature, pressure, and phase. Major uncertainties remain with regard to pressure dependence. Based on this review, we developed a simple, four-component, three-reaction model for oil-cracking. We also developed a simple, kerogen-maturation, kinetic model that incorporates hydrogen and carbon balance and includes the most important oil- and gas-forming reactions: kerogen pyrolysis, three oil-cracking reactions, and three coke-pyrolysis reactions. Tentative stoichiometry parameters are given for lacustrine and marine kerogens. 35 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  1. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  2. Histopathologic Effects of Estrogens on Marine Fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as estrogens estradiol (E2) and ethinylestradiol (EE2) have been reported to affect fish reproduction. This study histologically compared and evaluated effects of EDCs in two species of treated fish. Juvenile male summer flounder (Paral...

  3. HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS.

    Robert J. Kavlock, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.

    Over the past several decades a hypothesis has been put forth that a numb...

  4. Women's Skills Linked to Estrogen Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, R.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes the result of research which considers the effect of women's hormone level on specific skills. Reports that low estrogen levels allow women to excel at spatial skills, but perform poorly at complex motor tasks and speech articulation. Discusses some implications and further research ideas. (YP)

  5. Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Tiano, Joseph P; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate that has superior sex-independent efficacy over either of the individual hormones alone to correct obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in mice. The therapeutic benefits are driven by pleiotropic dual hormone action to improve energy, glucose and lipid metabolism, as shown by loss-of-function models and genetic action profiling. Notably, the peptide-based targeting strategy also prevents hallmark side effects of estrogen in male and female mice, such as reproductive endocrine toxicity and oncogenicity. Collectively, selective activation of estrogen receptors in GLP-1–targeted tissues produces unprecedented efficacy to enhance the metabolic benefits of GLP-1 agonism. This example of targeting the metabolic syndrome represents the discovery of a new class of therapeutics that enables synergistic co-agonism through peptide-based selective delivery of small molecules. Although our observations with the GLP-1–estrogen conjugate justify translational studies for diabetes and obesity, the multitude of other possible combinations of peptides and small molecules may offer equal promise for other diseases. PMID:23142820

  6. Melatonin and estrogen in breast cyst fluids.

    PubMed

    Burch, James B; Walling, Margie; Rush, Adam; Hennesey, Maxine; Craven, Winfield; Finlayson, Christina; Anderson, Benjamin O; Cosma, Greg; Wells, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    Increased breast cancer risks have been reported among women with gross cystic breast disease (GCBD), although the mechanism for this increase remains unexplained. Relationships between GCBD characteristics, breast cancer risk factors, and the biochemical composition and growth properties of 142 breast cyst fluid (BCF) samples were studied among 93 women with GCBD. Concentrations of melatonin, estrogen (17-beta-estradiol), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-B1 and TGF-B2), sodium (Na), and potassium (K) were quantified in BCF samples, and human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were treated with BCF in vitro. Patients were grouped according to BCF Na:K ratios previously linked with increased breast cancer risks (Na:K 3, Type 2) and mixed cyst groups. Women with larger and more frequently occurring cysts had higher BCF estrogen and DHEA-S, and lower TGF-B1 levels. Women with Type 1 cysts had elevated BCF melatonin, estrogen, DHEA-S, and EGF, and lower concentrations of TGF-B2 compared to women with Type 2 cysts. BCF generally inhibited cell growth relative to serum-treated controls, consistent with previous studies. Melatonin and estrogen in BCF independently predicted growth inhibition and stimulation, respectively. Biological monitoring of BCF may help identify women with GCBD at greatest risk for breast cancer development. PMID:17061046

  7. Estrogen receptor expert system overview and examples

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogen receptor expert system (ERES) is a rule-based system developed to prioritize chemicals based upon their potential for binding to the ER. The ERES was initially developed to predict ER affinity of chemicals from two specific EPA chemical inventories, antimicrobial pe...

  8. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. A review].

    PubMed

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cumulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena. PMID:2101377

  9. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. Review article].

    PubMed

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cummulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena. PMID:2292429

  10. In vitro estrogenicity of polybrominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Nakari, Tarja; Pessala, Piia

    2005-09-10

    Estrogenicity of five brominated flame retardants (BFRs), namely BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-205, PBB-153 and technical Firemaster BP-6, were assessed by in vitro assays developed to detect chemicals with estrogenic properties. Recombinant yeast cells containing a human estrogen receptor gene failed to give any response to the chemicals tested. However, the positive control compound, estradiol-17beta, showed that the yeast cell assays had worked properly. The freshly separated fish hepatocyte assay based on the synthesis and secretion of vitellogenin from the isolated liver cells produced a clear dose-response curve in the presence of all tested flame retardants except Firemaster BP-6. The toxicity of the BFRs was detected by determining the cell ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD). The BFRs tested induced hepatic EROD activity at low test concentrations, but started to inhibit activity at higher concentrations. The decreased detoxification capacity of the hepatocytes resulted in a decrease in the vitellogenin production of the cells. The capability of in vitro assays to detect estrogenic properties of chemicals seems to vary. Thus, further work is needed to understand the mechanisms responsible for these reactions. PMID:16024102

  11. Breast cancer survivors who use estrogenic botanical supplements have lower serum estrogen levels than non users

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Sharon J; Neuhouser, Marian L; Koprowski, Carol; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiggins, Charles; Gilliland, Frank; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Baumgartner, Richard N; McTiernan, Anne; Bernstein, Leslie; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the association between use of estrogenic botanical supplements and serum sex hormones in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Methods 502 postmenopausal women were queried 2-3 years after breast cancer diagnosis about their use of botanical supplements, and supplements were categorized according to their estrogenic properties. Concurrently, a fasting blood sample was obtained for assay of estrone, estradiol, free estradiol, testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and sex hormone-binding globulin. Adjusted means of the serum hormones were calculated by use of estrogenic supplements. Results Women reporting use of any estrogenic botanical supplement had significantly lower levels of estrone (20.8 v 23.6 pg/mL), estradiol (12.8 v 14.7 pg/mL), free estradiol (0.29 v 0.35 pg/mL), and DHEAS (47.7 v 56.2 ug/dL) compared to women reporting no use. Conclusion Data from this cross-sectional study suggest the use of estrogenic botanical supplements may be associated with sex hormone concentrations in breast cancer survivors. Considering the high use of these supplements among breast cancer patients, further research is needed to clarify the relative estrogenicity/antiestrogenicity of these compounds and their relation with prognosis. PMID:18931907

  12. The other estrogen receptor in the plasma membrane: implications for the actions of environmental estrogens.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C S; Pappas, T C; Gametchu, B

    1995-01-01

    Environmental or nutritional estrogenic toxicants are thought to mediate developmental and carcinogenic pathologies. Estrogen receptor (ER) measurements are currently used to predict hormonal responsiveness; therefore all ER subpopulations should be considered. We have been involved in the immunoidentification and characterization of membrane steroid receptors in several systems and have recently shown that binding of estradiol (E2) to a subpopulation of ERs (mER) residing in the plasma membrane of GH3 pituitary tumor cells mediates the rapid release of prolactin (PRL). Here we review these findings and present other important characterizations of these receptors such as trypsin and serum susceptibility, movement in the membrane, confocal localization to the membrane, binding to and function of impeded ligands, and immunoseparation of cells bearing mER. We plan to use this system as a model for both the physiological and pathological nongenomic effects of estrogens and estrogenic xenobiotics. Specifically, it should be useful as an in vitro assay system for the ability of estrogenic xenobiotics to cause rapid PRL release as an example of nongenomic estrogen effects. Images Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 4. D Figure 4. E Figure 4. F Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C Figure 7. D PMID:8593873

  13. Identification of an estrogenic hormone receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Mimoto, Ai; Fujii, Madoka; Usami, Makoto; Shimamura, Maki; Hirabayashi, Naoko; Kaneko, Takako; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-12-28

    Changes in both behavior and gene expression occur in Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, and to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compound. However, only one steroid hormone receptor has been identified. Of the 284 known nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in C. elegans, we selected nhr-14, nhr-69, and nhr-121 for analysis as potential estrogenic hormone receptors, because they share sequence similarity with the human estrogen receptor. First, the genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the affinity of each protein for estrogen was determined using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. All three NHRs bound estrogen in a dose-dependent fashion. To evaluate the specificity of the binding, we performed a solution competition assay using an SPR biosensor. According to our results, only NHR-14 was able to interact with estrogen. Therefore, we next examined whether nhr-14 regulates estrogen signaling in vivo. To investigate whether these interactions actually control the response of C. elegans to hormones, we investigated the expression of vitellogenin, an estrogen responsive gene, in an nhr-14 mutant. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that vitellogenin expression was significantly reduced in the mutant. This suggests that NHR-14 is a C. elegans estrogenic hormone receptor and that it controls gene expression in response to estrogen.

  14. Hydrocarbon fuel detergent

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.R.; Lyons, W.R.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a hydrocarbon fuel composition comprising: a hydrocarbon fuel; and a detergent amount of a detergent comprising an alkenylsuccinimide prepared by reacting an alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride with a mixture of amines, wherein at least 90 weight percent of the alkenyl substituent is derived from an olefin having a carbon chain of from 10 to 30 carbons or mixtures thereof, and wherein the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride is reacted with the mixture of amines at a mole ratio of 0.8 to 1.5 moles of the amines per mole of the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride.

  15. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  16. Concentrations of estrogens in patients with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Zeisler, Harald; Jirecek, Stefan; Hohlagschwandtner, Maria; Knöfler, Martin; Tempfer, Clemens; Livingston, Jeffrey C

    2002-06-28

    The role of estrogens in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia remains to be determined. The aim of our study was to compare serum concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol and estriol in women with preeclampsia to normotensive pregnant controls. Serum concentrations of estrogens were measured in women with mild (n = 24) and severe (n = 24) preeclampsia as well as is normotensive pregnant controls (n = 24). Patients were matched for gestational age. Pregnancies complicated by early onset severe preeclampsia are associated with increased rates of maternal and fetal morbidity. Subsequently, we created further subgroups before and after 34 weeks of gestation (34 + 0). Serum estrogen concentrations were determined by standard ELISA technique. Compared to normotensive controls, the differences between the overall median serum concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol in women with mild (3811 v. 3730 pg/ml, P = 0.9) and severe (3811 v. 3630 pg/ml, P = 0.1) preeclampsia were statistically not significant. The differences between the overall median serum concentrations of estroil in controls and in patients with mild (121 v. 76 ng/ml, P = 0.6) and severe (121 v. 79 ng/ml, P = 0.4) preeclampsia were similar. The differences between the median concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol in patient with early onset severe preeclampsia compared to patients with mild preeclampsia (3061 v. 3715 pg/ml, P = 0.004) and controls (3061 v. 3807 pg/ml, P = 0.006) were statistically significant. In addition, the differences between the median concentrations of estriol in women with early onset severe preeclampsia compared to controls were statistically significant (20 v. 92 ng/ml, P = 0.02). The differences between the median concentrations of estrogens in those with late onset severe preeclampsia compared to women with mild preeclampsia were not significant. We found significantly lower concentrations of estrogens in women with early onset severe preeclampsia. PMID:12422581

  17. CD14 as a Mediator of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor-Dependent Anti-apolipoprotein A-1 IgG Chronotropic Effect on Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mannic, Tiphaine; Satta, Nathalie; Pagano, Sabrina; Python, Magaly; Virzi, Julien; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Frias, Miguel A; James, Richard W; Maturana, Andres D; Rossier, Michel F; Vuilleumier, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    In vitro and animal studies point to autoantibodies against apolipoprotein A-1 (anti-apoA-1 IgG) as possible mediators of cardiovascular (CV) disease involving several mechanisms such as basal heart rate interference mediated by a mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent L-type calcium channel activation, and a direct pro-inflammatory effect through the engagement of the toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/CD14 complex. Nevertheless, the possible implication of these receptors in the pro-arrhythmogenic effect of anti-apoA-1 antibodies remains elusive. We aimed at determining whether CD14 and TLRs could mediate the anti-apoA-1 IgG chronotropic response in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVC). Blocking CD14 suppressed anti-apoA-1 IgG binding to NRVC and the related positive chronotropic response. Anti-apoA-1 IgG alone induced the formation of a TLR2/TLR4/CD14 complex, followed by the phosphorylation of Src, whereas aldosterone alone promoted the phosphorylation of Akt by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), without affecting the chronotropic response. In the presence of both aldosterone and anti-apoA-1 IgG, the localization of TLR2/TLR4/CD14 was increased in membrane lipid rafts, followed by PI3K and Src activation, leading to an L-type calcium channel-dependent positive chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition of the Src pathway led to the decrease of L-type calcium channel activity and abrogated the NRVC chronotropic response. Activation of CD14 seems to be a key regulator of the mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent anti-apoA-1 IgG positive chronotropic effect on NRVCs, involving relocation of the CD14/TLR2/TLR4 complex into lipid rafts followed by PI3K and Src-dependent L-type calcium channel activation. PMID:26393305

  18. Calmodulin enhances the stability of the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Joyal, J L; Sacks, D B

    2001-05-18

    The estrogen receptor mediates breast cell proliferation and is the principal target for chemotherapy of breast carcinoma. Previous studies have demonstrated that the estrogen receptor binds to calmodulin-Sepharose in vitro. However, the association of endogenous calmodulin with endogenous estrogen receptors in intact cells has not been reported, and the function of the interaction is obscure. Here we demonstrate by co-immunoprecipitation from MCF-7 human breast epithelial cells that endogenous estrogen receptors bind to endogenous calmodulin. Estradiol treatment of the cells had no significant effect on the interaction. However, incubation of the cells with tamoxifen enhanced by 5-10-fold the association of calmodulin with the estrogen receptor and increased the total cellular content of estrogen receptors by 1.5-2-fold. In contrast, the structurally distinct calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine and CGS9343B attenuated the interaction between calmodulin and the estrogen receptor and dramatically reduced the number of estrogen receptors in the cell. Neither of these agents altered the amount of estrogen receptor mRNA, suggesting that calmodulin stabilizes the protein. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that, in the presence of Ca2+, calmodulin protected estrogen receptors from in vitro proteolysis by trypsin. Furthermore, overexpression of wild type calmodulin, but not a mutant calmodulin incapable of binding Ca2+, increased the concentration of estrogen receptors in MCF-7 cells, whereas transient expression of a calmodulin inhibitor peptide reduced the estrogen receptor concentration. These data demonstrate that calmodulin binds to the estrogen receptor in intact cells in a Ca2+-dependent, but estradiol-independent, manner, thereby modulating the stability and the steady state level of estrogen receptors. PMID:11278648

  19. HYDROCARBON POLLUTANTS FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of hydrocarbon pollutants from stationary sources. Early in the study, readily available information was assembled on stationary sources of hydrocarbon emissions and effluents. Information was also obtained on process descriptions, operating pa...

  20. Assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of chemicals and complex mixtures using in vitro recombinant receptor-reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, P; Joyeux, A; Denison, M S; Vincent, R; Gillesby, B E; Zacharewski, T

    1996-02-01

    In vitro recombinant receptor-reporter gene assays have been used to assess and rank the potency of chemicals and complex mixtures suspected of possessing estrogen and (or) aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated activity. The environmental estrogen (E2) bioassay consists of a Gal4-human estrogen receptor chimeric construct (Gal4-HEGO) and a Gal4-regulated luciferase reporter gene (17m5-G-Luc) that have been stably integrated into HeLa cells. The assay exhibits 10-fold induction in luciferase reporter gene activity following treatment with 1 nM 17 beta-estradiol and has a detection limit of approximately 5 pg of 17 beta-estradiol/mL. The AhR bioassay uses Hepa 1c1c7 wild-type cells transiently transfected with a dioxin response element regulated luciferase reporter gene. These assays were used to assess the estrogen and dioxin-like activities of naringenin, atrazine, and simazine and complex mixtures such as pulp and paper mill black liquor and urban air particulates. The activities of these chemicals and complex mixtures are confirmed using the pure antiestrogen ICI 164,384 and in in vitro gel retardation assays. Results of this study demonstrate the utility of in vitro recombinant receptor-reporter gene assays in identifying and assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of chemicals and complex mixtures. PMID:8723035

  1. Bridging the Gap From Screening Assays to Estrogenic Effects in Fish: Potential Roles of Multiple Estrogen Receptor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to delineate the ligand interactions that drive biomarker induction in fish exposed to estrogenic pollutants and provide a case study on the capacity of human (h) estrogen receptor (ER)-based in vitro screening assays to predict estrogenic effects in aquatic species. Adult male Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to solutions of singular steroidal estrogens or to the estrogenic extract of an anaerobic swine waste lagoon. All exposure concentrations were calibrated to be equipotent based on the yeast estrogen screen (YES), which reports activation of hERα. These exposures elicited significantly different magnitudes of hepatic vitellogenin and choriogenin gene induction in the male medaka. Effects of the same YES-calibrated solutions in the T47D-KBluc assay, which reports activation of hERα and hERβ, generally recapitulated observations in medaka. Using competitive ligand binding assays, it was found that the magnitude of vitellogenin/choriogenin induction by different estrogenic ligands correlated positively with preferential binding affinity for medaka ERβ subtypes, which are highly expressed in male medaka liver prior to estrogen exposure. Results support emerging evidence that ERβ subtypes are critically involved in the teleost estrogenic response, with the ERα:ERβ ratio being of particular importance. Accordingly, incorporation of multiple ER subtypes into estrogen screening protocols may increase predictive value for the risk assessment of aquatic systems, including complex estrogenic mixtures. PMID:24422420

  2. Selecting hydrocarbon rocket propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Past studies have shown that the dry weight of future earth-to-orbit vehicles can be reduced by the combined use of hydrogen and hydrocarbon propulsion compared to all-hydrogen propulsion. This paper shows that the use of certain hydrocarbon engines with hydrogen engines produces the lowest vehicle dry mass. These hydrocarbon engines use propane or RP-1 fuel, hydrogen cooling, and hydrogen-rich gas generators. Integration of the hydrogen and hydrocarbon nozzles is also beneficial.

  3. Analysis of estrogenic activity in environmental waters in Rio de Janeiro state (Brazil) using the yeast estrogen screen.

    PubMed

    Dias, Amanda Cristina Vieira; Gomes, Frederico Wegenast; Bila, Daniele Maia; Sant'Anna, Geraldo Lippel; Dezotti, Marcia

    2015-10-01

    The estrogenicity of waters collected from an important hydrological system in Brazil (Paraiba do Sul and Guandu Rivers) was assessed using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. Sampling was performed in rivers and at the outlets of conventional water treatment plants (WTP). The removal of estrogenic activity by ozonation and chlorination after conventional water treatment (clarification and sand filtration) was investigated employing samples of the Guandu River spiked with estrogens and bisphenol A (BPA). The results revealed a preoccupying incidence of estrogenic activity at levels higher than 1ngL(-1) along some points of the rivers. Another matter of concern was the number of samples from WTPs presenting estrogenicity surpassing 1ngL(-1). The oxidation techniques (ozonation and chlorination) were effective for the removal of estrogenic activity and the combination of both techniques led to good results using less amounts of oxidants. PMID:26024813

  4. Hydrocarbon options emerge

    SciTech Connect

    Fairley, P.

    1995-11-01

    Europe stole the scene at last week`s International Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and Halon Alternatives Conference in Washington as attendees learned more about an accelerating shift to low-cost hydrocarbon refrigerants by European equipment manufacturers. Udo Wenning, representing German refrigerator market leader Bosch-Siemens, told the conference that hydrocarbons-isobutane as refrigerant and cyclopentane to blow the insulating foam-are now used in 90% of German production. Wenning says that in all performance parameters, hydrocarbons match the hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) replacements favored in the U.S. and Japan and that, unlike HCFCs and HFCs they have low global warming potential. Their Achille`s heel is flammability, Wenning says. American equipment manufacturers aiming to sell a new generation of equipment designed for the new HFC refrigerants sought to amplify concern over flammability at the conference. {open_quotes}In a society as litigious as ours, we do not see a future for flammable refrigerants,{close_quotes} says a representative of air conditioner manufacturer Carrier. Hydrocarbon supporters such as Greenpeace say the risks are mananageable.

  5. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1987-05-19

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 6 figs.

  6. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1988-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  7. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1988-09-13

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 5 figs.

  8. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  9. Zeroing in on hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Roest, I.P.B. van der; Brasser, D.J.S.; Wagebaert, A.P.J.; Stam, P.H.

    1997-05-01

    The increasing costs of remediating contaminated sites has stimulated research for cost-reducing techniques in soil investigation and cleanup techniques. MAP Environmental Research has developed a technology using ground penetrating radar in combination with in house developed software to locate and define the extent of hydrocarbon contamination. This article discusses the new technology. 2 figs.

  10. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  11. Mantle hydrocarbons: Abiotic or biotic?

    SciTech Connect

    Sugisaki, Ryuichi; Mimura, Koichi

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) and peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro and granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from field contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here {open_quotes}mantle hydrocarbons.{close_quotes} The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) {delta}{sup 13}C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about {minus}27{per_thousand}). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were inorganically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH{sub 4} at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C{sub 4}H{sub 10}. 76 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10. PMID:11541663

  13. Mantle hydrocarbons: Abiotic or biotic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugisaki, Ryuichi; Mimura, Koichi

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) and peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons ( n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro and granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from field contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas Chromatographic—mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present (c) δ13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%.). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were inorganically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH 4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C 4H 10.

  14. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Fernando; Guzmán, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones strongly influence body fat distribution and adipocyte differentiation. Estrogens and testosterone differentially affect adipocyte physiology, but the importance of estrogens in the development of metabolic diseases during menopause is disputed. Estrogens and estrogen receptors regulate various aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism. Disturbances of this metabolic signal lead to the development of metabolic syndrome and a higher cardiovascular risk in women. The absence of estrogens is a clue factor in the onset of cardiovascular disease during the menopausal period, which is characterized by lipid profile variations and predominant abdominal fat accumulation. However, influence of the absence of these hormones and its relationship to higher obesity in women during menopause are not clear. This systematic review discusses of the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in adipocyte differentiation, and its control by the central nervous systemn and the possible role of estrogen-like compounds and endocrine disruptors chemicals are discussed. Finally, the interaction between the decrease in estrogen secretion and the prevalence of obesity in menopausal women is examined. We will consider if the absence of estrogens have a significant effect of obesity in menopausal women. PMID:24734243

  15. Bacterial sources for phenylalkane hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, L.; Winans, R.E.; Langworthy, T.

    1996-10-01

    The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in geochemical samples has been the source of much controversy. Although an anthropogenic input from detergent sources always appears likely, the distribution of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in some cases far exceeding that attributed to detergent input has led to a reappraisal of this view. Indeed, recent work involving analysis of the lipid hydrocarbon extracts from extant Thermoplasma bacteria has revealed the presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons. The presence of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in sedimentary organic matter may therefore represent potential biological markers for thermophilic bacteria.

  16. Estrogen and estrogen receptor alpha promotes malignancy and osteoblastic tumorigenesis in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sweta; Tai, Qin; Gu, Xiang; Schmitz, James; Poullard, Ashley; Fajardo, Roberto J.; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xueqiong; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    The role of estrogen signaling in regulating prostate tumorigenesis is relatively underexplored. Although, an increasing body of evidence has linked estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) to prostate cancer, the function of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in prostate cancer is not very well studied. We have discovered a novel role of ERα in the pathogenesis of prostate tumors. Here, we show that prostate cancer cells express ERα and estrogen induces oncogenic properties in prostate cancer cells through ERα. Importantly, ERα knockdown in the human prostate cancer PacMetUT1 cells as well as pharmacological inhibition of ERα with ICI 182,780 inhibited osteoblastic lesion formation and lung metastasis in vivo. Co-culture of pre-osteoblasts with cancer cells showed a significant induction of osteogenic markers in the pre-osteoblasts, which was attenuated by knockdown of ERα in cancer cells suggesting that estrogen/ERα signaling promotes crosstalk between cancer and osteoblastic progenitors to stimulate osteoblastic tumorigenesis. These results suggest that ERα expression in prostate cancer cells is essential for osteoblastic lesion formation and lung metastasis. Thus, inhibition of ERα signaling in prostate cancer cells may be a novel therapeutic strategy to inhibit the osteoblastic lesion development as well as lung metastasis in patients with advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26575018

  17. Delay in post-ovariectomy estrogen replacement negates estrogen-induced augmentation of post-exercise muscle satellite cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mangan, Gary; Iqbal, Sobia; Hubbard, Andrew; Hamilton, Victoria; Bombardier, Eric; Tiidus, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the effects of a delay in post-ovariectomy replacement of 17β-estradiol (estrogen) on the post-exercise proliferation of muscle satellite cells. Nine-week-old, ovariectomized, female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 64) were distributed among 8 groups based on estrogen status (0.25 mg estrogen pellet or sham), exercise status (90 min run at 17 m·min(-1) and a grade of -13.5° or unexercised), and estrogen replacement ("proximal", estrogen replacement within 2 weeks; or "delayed", estrogen replacement at 11 weeks following ovariectomy). Significant increases in satellite cells were found in the soleus and white gastrocnemius muscle (immunofluorescent colocalization of nuclei with Pax7) 72 h following eccentric exercise (p < 0.05) in all exercised groups. Proximal E2 replacement resulted in a further augmentation of muscle satellite cells in exercised rats (p < 0.05) relative to the delayed estrogen replacement group. Expression of PI3K was unaltered and phosphorylation of Akt relative to total Akt increased following estrogen supplementation and exercise. Exercise alone did not alter the expression levels of Akt. An 11 week delay in post-ovariectomy estrogen replacement negated the augmenting influence seen with proximal (2 week delay) post-ovariectomy estrogen replacement on post-exercise muscle satellite cell proliferation. This effect appears to be independent of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. PMID:26406298

  18. Sinonasal Leiomyoma With Estrogen Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Seung; Shin, Jin Yong; Kwon, Sam Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Leiomyoma is an extremely rare tumor in sinonasal area. The reason for this is due to minimal amount of the smooth muscle in the area. The origin of this tumor is not clear and its etiology has not been proven in the literature. A 58-year-old woman who experienced nasal obstruction and epiphora visited our clinic. A huge mass was noted in right nasal cavity originating from the lacrimal bone area. The authors conducted endoscopic sinus surgery and obtained the specimen. Immunochemistry showed leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which expressed estrogen receptor. There was no progesterone receptor expressed. The authors describe a sinonasal leiomyoma with estrogen receptors, not ever reported in previous article. PMID:26355987

  19. The E-SCREEN assay as a tool to identify estrogens: an update on estrogenic environmental pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Soto, A M; Sonnenschein, C; Chung, K L; Fernandez, M F; Olea, N; Serrano, F O

    1995-01-01

    Estrogens are defined by their ability to induce the proliferation of cells of the female genital tract. The wide chemical diversity of estrogenic compounds precludes an accurate prediction of estrogenic activity on the basis of chemical structure. Rodent bioassays are not suited for the large-scale screening of chemicals before their release into the environment because of their cost, complexity, and ethical concerns. The E-SCREEN assay was developed to assess the estrogenicity of environmental chemicals using the proliferative effect of estrogens on their target cells as an end point. This quantitative assay compares the cell number achieved by similar inocula of MCF-7 cells in the absence of estrogens (negative control) and in the presence of 17 beta-estradiol (positive control) and a range of concentrations of chemicals suspected to be estrogenic. Among the compounds tested, several "new" estrogens were found; alkylphenols, phthalates, some PCB congeners and hydroxylated PCBs, and the insecticides dieldrin, endosulfan, and toxaphene were estrogenic by the E-SCREEN assay. In addition, these compounds competed with estradiol for binding to the estrogen receptor and increased the levels of progesterone receptor and pS2 in MCF-7 cells, as expected from estrogen mimics. Recombinant human growth factors (bFGF, EGF, IGF-1) and insulin did not increase in cell yields. The aims of the work summarized in this paper were a) to validate the E-SCREEN assay; b) to screen a variety of chemicals present in the environment to identify those that may be causing reproductive effects in wildlife and humans; c) to assess whether environmental estrogens may act cumulatively; and finally d) to discuss the reliability of this and other assays to screen chemicals for their estrogenicity before they are released into the environment. PMID:8593856

  20. Comparison of immunocytochemical estrogen receptor assay, estrogen receptor enzyme immunoassay, and radioligand-labeled estrogen receptor assay in human breast cancer and uterine tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Heubner, A.; Beck, T.; Grill, H.J.; Pollow, K.

    1986-08-01

    Determination of estrogen receptor content in 82 breast cancer specimens with immunocytochemical estrogen receptor assay (ER-EIA) (Abbott) was compared with our routinely used binding assay using /sup 125/I-estradiol as radioligand with Scatchard plot analysis of the binding data. Although the estrogen receptor content measured with the ER-EIA was approximately 2-fold higher compared with the binding assay, the immunochemical method proved to be a useful alternative for estrogen receptor determination. Furthermore, it is possible to detect estrogen receptors in FPLC Superose 12 (size exclusion column) eluates or in the fractions obtained after sucrose density centrifugation using the ER-EIA. Forty breast cancer samples were analyzed utilizing the immunocytochemical technique (ER-ICA) for visualization of the estrogen receptor content in frozen tumor tissues in relationship to the quantitative results obtained with the ER-EIA assay. Specific staining for estrogen receptor was confined only to the cell nucleus, was distributed irregularly among the tumor cells, and was variable in intensity. The staining intensity and the percentage of positively stained cells increased with increasing level of cytosolic estrogen receptor. In 27 of 40 cases the immunocytochemical results correlated well with the ER-EIA assay. Nine cases were ER-ICA negative with positive ER-EIA, and four were ER-ICA positive with negative ER-EIA.

  1. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  2. Sulfur removal from hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, R.L.; Wolcott, R.A.

    1989-02-28

    A method is described for treating liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon streams containing H/sub 2/S, CO/sub 2/ and COS to remove a substantial portion of the H/sub 2/S and COS, and slip a substantial portion of the CO/sub 2/ which comprises: contacting the hydrocarbon stream containing H/sub 2/S, CO/sub 2/ and COS with a solution of methyldiethanolamine, which is a selective absorbent for H/sub 2/S with respect to CO/sub 2/, and which solution also contains diisopropanolamine, an organic liquid COS absorbent which absorbent converts by hydrolysis the COS to H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/.

  3. Exogenous pubertal induction by oral versus transdermal estrogen therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Lisa; Balachandar, Sadana; Prasad, Kris; Shah, Bina

    2013-04-01

    Hypogonadal adolescent girls need estrogen therapy for the induction of puberty. For years, oral conjugated estrogens have been used for this purpose, starting at a very low dose, with gradual increments over time, to allow for the maturation of the reproductive organs, in order to mimic physiologic conditions. Several concerns, mainly due to first pass through the liver, are manifest with oral estrogen therapy. With the advent of transdermal estrogens and its improved efficacy profile as well as reduced side effects, it seems reasonable to consider it for pubertal induction. The primary objective of this study was to compare and contrast oral versus transdermal estrogen with regard to metabolism and physiology and to review current available data on transdermal estrogens with respect to exogenous pubertal induction. PMID:22112543

  4. Estrogenic modulation of auditory processing: a vertebrate comparison

    PubMed Central

    Caras, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    Sex-steroid hormones are well-known regulators of vocal motor behavior in several organisms. A large body of evidence now indicates that these same hormones modulate processing at multiple levels of the ascending auditory pathway. The goal of this review is to provide a comparative analysis of the role of estrogens in vertebrate auditory function. Four major conclusions can be drawn from the literature: First, estrogens may influence the development of the mammalian auditory system. Second, estrogenic signaling protects the mammalian auditory system from noise- and age-related damage. Third, estrogens optimize auditory processing during periods of reproductive readiness in multiple vertebrate lineages. Finally, brain-derived estrogens can act locally to enhance auditory response properties in at least one avian species. This comparative examination may lead to a better appreciation of the role of estrogens in the processing of natural vocalizations and may provide useful insights toward alleviating auditory dysfunctions emanating from hormonal imbalances. PMID:23911849

  5. Estrogen treatment affects brain functioning after menopause.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2011-12-01

    Sex hormones have powerful neuromodulatory effects on functional brain organization and cognitive functioning. This paper reviews findings from studies investigating the influence of sex hormones in postmenopausal women with and without hormone therapy (HT). Functional brain organization was investigated using different behavioural tasks in postmenopausal women using either estrogen therapy or combined estrogen plus gestagen therapy and age- and IQ-matched postmenopausal women not taking HT. The results revealed HT-related modulations in specific aspects of functional brain organization including functional cerebral asymmetries and interhemispheric interaction. In contrast to younger women during the menstrual cycle, however, it seems that HT, and especially estrogen therapy, after menopause affects intrahemispheric processing rather than interhemispheric interaction. This might be explained by a faster and more pronounced age-related decline in intrahemispheric relative to interhemispheric functioning, which might be associated with higher sensitivity to HT. Taken together, the findings suggest that the female brain retains its plasticity even after reproductive age and remains susceptible to the effects of sex hormones throughout the lifetime, which might help to discover new clinical approaches in the hormonal treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:22120942

  6. The role of estrogen in intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Chervonsky, Liza; Felmingham, Kim L; Bryant, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    Intrusive memories are highly vivid, emotional and involuntary recollections which cause significant distress across psychological disorders including posttraumatic disorder (PTSD). Recent evidence has potentially extended our understanding of the development of intrusive memories by identifying biological factors which significantly impact on memories for emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigated the role of stress on the development of intrusions for negative and neutral images, and indexed the potential contributions of sex (estrogen and progesterone) and stress (noradrenaline and cortisol) hormones. Whilst viewing the images, half the participants underwent a cold pressor stress (CPS) procedure to induce stress while the control participants immersed their hands in warm water. Saliva samples were collected to index estrogen, progesterone and noradrenergic and cortisol response. Participants (55 university students, 26 men, 29 women) viewed a series of negatively arousing and neutral images. Participants completed recall and intrusions measures 2 days later. Negative images resulted in greater recall and more intrusions than neutral images. In the cold water condition females recalled fewer neutral memories than males. Cortisol increase predicted decreased recall of negative memories in males, and estrogen predicted increased intrusions of negative images in women. These findings are consistent with evidence that circulating levels of ovarian hormones influence memory for emotionally arousing events, and provides the first evidence of the influence of sex hormones on intrusive memories. These results provide one possible explanation for the higher incidence of anxiety disorders in women. PMID:23891994

  7. Removal of estrogens by electrochemical oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Cong, Vo Huu; Iwaya, Sota; Sakakibara, Yutaka

    2014-06-01

    Treatments of estrogens such as Estrone (E1), Estradiol (E2) and Ethinylestradiol (EE2) were conducted using an electrolytic reactor equipped with multi-packed granular glassy carbon electrodes. Experimental results showed that E1, E2 and EE2 were oxidized in the range of 0.45-0.85 V and were removed through electro-polymerization. Observed data from continuous experiments were in good agreement with calculated results by a mathematical model constructed based on mass transfer limitation. In continuous treatment of trace estrogens (1 μg/L), 98% of E1, E2 and EE2 were stably removed. At high loading rate (100 μg/L), removal efficiency of E1 was kept around 74%-88% for 21 days, but removal efficiency reduced due to passivation of electrodes. However, removal efficiency was recovered after electrochemical regeneration of electrodes in presence of ozone. Electric energy consumption was observed in the range of 1-2 Wh/m(3). From these results, we concluded that the present electrochemical process would be an alternative removal of estrogens. PMID:25079848

  8. Estrogen sulfotransferases in breast and endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge Raul

    2009-02-01

    Estrogen sulfotransferase is significantly more active in the normal breast cell (e.g., Human 7) than in the cancer cell (e.g., MCF-7). The data suggest that in breast cancer sulfoconjugated activity is carried out by another enzyme, the SULT1A, which acts at high concentration of the substrates. In breast cancer cells sulfotransferase (SULT) activity can be stimulated by various progestins: medrogestone, promegestone, and nomegestrol acetate, as well as by tibolone and its metabolites. SULT activities can also be controlled by other substances including phytoestrogens, celecoxib, flavonoids (e.g., quercetin, resveratrol), and isoflavones. SULT expression was localized in breast cancer cells, which can be stimulated by promegestone and correlated with the increase of the enzyme activity. The estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1), which acts at nanomolar concentration of estradiol, can inactivate most of this hormone present in the normal breast; however, in the breast cancer cells, the sulfotransferase denoted as SULT1A1 is mainly present, and this acts at micromolar concentrations of E(2). A correlation was postulated among breast cancer cell proliferation, the effect of various progestins, and sulfotransferase stimulation. In conclusion, it is suggested that factors involved in the stimulation of the estrogen sulfotransferases could provide new possibilities for the treatment of patients with hormone-dependent breast and endometrial cancers. PMID:19250196

  9. Estrogen and Xenoestrogens in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, S.V.; Russo, J.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing concern that estrogenic environmental compounds that act as endocrine disrupting chemicals might potentially have adverse effects on hormone-sensitive organs such as the breast. This concern is further fueled by evidence indicating that natural estrogens, specifically 17 β-estradiol (E2), are important factors in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. We have developed an in vitro- in vivo model in which we have demonstrated the carcinogenicity of E2 in the human breast epithelial cells MCF-10F. Hypermethylation of NRG1, STXBP6, BMP6, CSS3, SPRY1 and SNIP were found at different progression stages in this model. The utilization of this powerful and unique model has provided a tool for exploring whether bisphenol A (BPA) and butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) have relevance in the initiation of breast cancer. These studies provide first hand evidence that the natural estrogen 17 β-estradiol and xenoestrogenic substances like BPA are able to induce neoplastic transformation in human breast epithelial cells. PMID:19933552

  10. FROZEN HYDROCARBONS IN COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Simonia, Irakli

    2011-02-15

    Recent investigations of the luminescence of frozen hydrocarbon particles of icy cometary halos have been carried out. The process of luminescence of organic icy particles in a short-wavelength solar radiation field is considered. A comparative analysis of observed and laboratory data leads to 72 luminescent emission lines in the spectrum of the comet 153P/Ikeya-Zhang. The concept of cometary relict matter is presented, and the creation of a database of unidentified cometary emission lines is proposed.

  11. Biogeochemistry of Halogenated Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriaens, P.; Gruden, C.; McCormick, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    Halogenated hydrocarbons originate from both natural and industrial sources. Whereas direct anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere and biosphere are often easy to assess, particularly when they are tied to major industrial activities, the attribution of emissions to other human activities (e.g., biomass burning), diffuse sources (e.g., atmospheric discharge, run off), and natural production (e.g., soils, fungi, algae, microorganisms) are difficult to quantify. The widespread occurrence of both alkyl and aryl halides in groundwater, surface water, soils, and various trophic food chains, even those not affected by known point sources, suggests a substantial biogeochemical cycling of these compounds (Wania and Mackay, 1996; Adriaens et al., 1999; Gruden et al., 2003). The transport and reactive fate mechanisms controlling their reactivity are compounded by the differences in sources of alkyl-, aryl-, and complex organic halides, and the largely unknown impact of biogenic processes, such as enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter, fungal production of halogenated hydrocarbons, and microbial or abiotic transformation reactions (e.g., Asplund and Grimvall, 1991; Gribble, 1996; Watling and Harper, 1998; Oberg, 2002). The largest source may be the natural halogenation processes in the terrestrial environment, as the quantities detected often exceed the amount that can be explained by human activities in the surrounding areas ( Oberg, 1998). Since biogeochemical processes result in the distribution of a wide range of halogenated hydrocarbon profiles, altered chemical structures, and isomer distributions in natural systems, source apportionment (or environmental forensics) can often only be resolved using multivariate statistical methods (e.g., Goovaerts, 1998; Barabas et al., 2003; Murphy and Morrison, 2002).This chapter will describe the widespread occurrence of halogenated hydrocarbons, interpret their distribution and biogeochemical cycling in light of

  12. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  13. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  14. Insights into Rapid Modulation of Neuroplasticity by Brain Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Penzes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Converging evidence from cellular, electrophysiological, anatomic, and behavioral studies suggests that the remodeling of synapse structure and function is a critical component of cognition. This modulation of neuroplasticity can be achieved through the actions of numerous extracellular signals. Moreover, it is thought that it is the integration of different extracellular signals regulation of neuroplasticity that greatly influences cognitive function. One group of signals that exerts powerful effects on multiple neurologic processes is estrogens. Classically, estrogens have been described to exert their effects over a period of hours to days. However, there is now increasing evidence that estrogens can rapidly influence multiple behaviors, including those that require forebrain neural circuitry. Moreover, these effects are found in both sexes. Critically, it is now emerging that the modulation of cognition by rapid estrogenic signaling is achieved by activation of specific signaling cascades and regulation of synapse structure and function, cumulating in the rewiring of neural circuits. The importance of understanding the rapid effects of estrogens on forebrain function and circuitry is further emphasized as investigations continue to consider the potential of estrogenic-based therapies for neuropathologies. This review focuses on how estrogens can rapidly influence cognition and the emerging mechanisms that underlie these effects. We discuss the potential sources and the biosynthesis of estrogens within the brain and the consequences of rapid estrogenic-signaling on the remodeling of neural circuits. Furthermore, we argue that estrogens act via distinct signaling pathways to modulate synapse structure and function in a manner that may vary with cell type, developmental stage, and sex. Finally, we present a model in which the coordination of rapid estrogenic-signaling and activity-dependent stimuli can result in long-lasting changes in neural circuits

  15. Estrogens and Prostate Cancer: Etiology, Mediators, Prevention, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Shuk-Mei; Lee, Ming-tsung; Lam, Hung-Ming; Leung, Yuet-Kin

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between hormones and the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa) has been studied extensively. All the mainstay targets for hormonal PCa therapies are based on negating androgen action. Recent epidemiologic and experimental data have clearly pinpointed the key roles of estrogens in PCa development and progression. Racial and geographical differences, as well as age-associated changes, in estrogen synthesis and metabolism contribute significantly to the etiology by increasing the ratio of circulating estrogen to androgen, sex hormone binding globulin synthesis, and aromatase activity and reducing androgen glucuronidation and tissue bioactivation. Promotion of aberrant cell growth, evasion of apoptosis, increased oxidative stress and inflammation, and gains in adiposity and bioactivation to genotoxic carcinogens during adulthood are probable mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenicity, while “estrogen imprinting” via epigenetics in early-life also determines PCa risk. Although the effects of estrogens are known to be mediated by genomic actions of the two estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes (ERα and ERβ), other non-canonical mediators, including the different ERβ isoforms, membrane and mitochondrial ERs, and G protein-coupled receptor 30, may have major actions diverging from classical ER actions. These new discoveries have led to renewed interest among the public and the medicinal field in estrogens and antiestrogens as singular and adjuvant PCa treatment and prevention regimens. This review summarizes current knowledge on how different estrogens/antiestrogens/estrogen mimics contribute to prostate carcinogenesis, the roles of the different mediators of estrogen in the process, and the potentials of new estrogenic/antiestrogenic compounds as targeted therapies for prevention and treatment of PCa. PMID:21889723

  16. Zinc finger protein 131 inhibits estrogen signaling by suppressing estrogen receptor {alpha} homo-dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yohan; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding affinity of ZNF131 to ER{alpha} increases upon E2 stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-dimerization and E2-induced breast cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor. -- Abstract: Steroid hormone estrogen elicits various physiological functions, many of which are mediated through two structurally and functionally distinct estrogen receptors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}. The functional role of zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131) is poorly understood, but it is assumed to possess transcriptional regulation activity due to the presence of a DNA binding motif. A few recent reports, including ours, revealed that ZNF131 acts as a negative regulator of ER{alpha} and that SUMO modification potentiates the negative effect of ZNF131 on estrogen signaling. However, its molecular mechanism for ER{alpha} inhibition has not been elucidated in detail. Here, we demonstrate that ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}, which consequently inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Moreover, we show that the C-terminal region of ZNF131 containing the SUMOylation site is necessary for its inhibition of estrogen signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor.

  17. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  18. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  19. Removal of surfactants from hydrocarbons with alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, R.P.; Poling, D.E.; Stefanidakis, G.

    1984-02-07

    A method is disclosed for removing hydrocarbon-soluble anionic surfactants from gasoline or kerosene boiling range hydrocarbons. The method comprises (a) contacting a hydrocarbon mixture containing surfactants with a lower alcohol which is miscible with the hydrocarbon mixture to extract the surfactants; (b) contacting the mixture with water or caustic solution to extract the lower alcohol and surfactants from the hydrocarbon mixture; (c) separating the water or caustic solution from the hydrocarbons; and (d) removing the hydrocarbons.

  20. Visualization of Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Marnie E.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens regulate a diverse range of physiological processes and affect multiple tissues. Estrogen receptors (ERs) regulate transcription by binding to DNA at conserved estrogen response elements, and such elements have been used to report ER activity in cultured cells and in transgenic mice. We generated stable, transgenic zebrafish containing five consecutive elements upstream of a c-fos minimal promoter and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to visualize and quantify transcriptional activation in live larvae. Transgenic larvae show robust, dose-dependent estrogen-dependent fluorescent labeling in the liver, consistent with er gene expression, whereas ER antagonists inhibit GFP expression. The nonestrogenic steroids dexamethasone and progesterone fail to activate GFP, confirming ER selectivity. Natural and synthetic estrogens activated the transgene with varying potency, and two chemicals, genistein and bisphenol A, preferentially induce GFP expression in the heart. In adult fish, fluorescence was observed in estrogenic tissues such as the liver, ovary, pituitary gland, and brain. Individual estrogen-responsive neurons and their projections were visualized in the adult brain, and GFP-positive neurons increased in number after 17β-estradiol exposure. The transgenic estrogen-responsive zebrafish allow ER signaling to be monitored visually and serve as in vivo sentinels for detection of estrogenic compounds. PMID:21540282

  1. Insights from the Study of Animals Lacking Functional Estrogen Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korach, Kenneth S.

    1994-12-01

    Estrogen hormones produce physiological actions within a variety of target sites in the body and during development by activating a specific receptor protein. Hormone responsiveness for the estrogen receptor protein was investigated at different stages of development with the use of gene knockout techniques because no natural genetic mutants have been described. A mutant mouse line without a functional estrogen receptor was created and is being used to assess estrogen responsiveness. Both sexes of these mutant animals are infertile and show a variety of phenotypic changes, some of which are associated with the gonads, mammary glands, reproductive tracts, and skeletal tissues.

  2. Selectivity of natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens for zebrafish estrogen receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Caroline; Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Pakdel, Farzad; Brion, François; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Cavaillès, Vincent; Bourguet, William; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; and others

    2014-10-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental estrogens. As most of these estrogens have only been tested on human estrogen receptors (ERs), it is necessary to measure their effects on zebrafish ERs. In humans there are two distinct nuclear ERs (hERα and hERβ), whereas the zebrafish genome encodes three ERs, zfERα and two zfERβs (zfERβ1 and zfERβ2). In this study, we established HeLa-based reporter cell lines stably expressing each of the three zfERs. We first reported that estrogens more efficiently activate the zfERs at 28 °C as compared to 37 °C, thus reflecting the physiological temperature of zebrafish in wildlife. We then showed significant differences in the ability of agonist and antagonist estrogens to modulate activation of the three zfER isotypes in comparison to hERs. Environmental compounds (bisphenol A, alkylphenols, mycoestrogens) which are hER panagonists and hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zfERα as compared to zfERβs. Among hERα selective synthetic agonists, PPT did not activate zfERα while 16α-LE2 was the most zfERα selective compound. Altogether, these results confirm that all hER ligands control in a similar manner the transcriptional activity of zfERs although significant differences in selectivity were observed among subtypes. The zfER subtype selective ligands that we identified thus represent new valuable tools to dissect the physiological roles of the different zfERs. Finally, our work also points out that care has to be taken in transposing the results obtained using the zebrafish as a model for human physiopathology. - Highlights: • Zebrafish is increasingly used to study the effects of estrogens. • We assessed the activity of pharmaceutical and environmental estrogens on zfERs. • Environmental estrogens displayed greater potency for zfERα compared to zfERβs. • hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zf

  3. Rapid Signaling Actions of Environmental Estrogens in Developing Granule Cell Neurons Are Mediated by Estrogen Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoa H.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) constitute a diverse group of man-made chemicals and natural compounds derived from plants and microbial metabolism. Estrogen-like actions are mediated via the nuclear hormone receptor activity of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ and rapid regulation of intracellular signaling cascades. Previous study defined cerebellar granule cell neurons as estrogen responsive and that granule cell precursor viability was developmentally sensitive to estrogens. In this study experiments using Western blot analysis and pharmacological approaches have characterized the receptor and signaling modes of action of selective and nonselective estrogen ligands in developing cerebellar granule cells. Estrogen treatments were found to briefly increase ERK1/2-phosphorylation and then cause prolonged depression of ERK1/2 activity. The sensitivity of granule cell precursors to estrogen-induced cell death was found to require the integrated activation of membrane and intracellular ER signaling pathways. The sensitivity of granule cells to selective and nonselective ER agonists and a variety of estrogenic and nonestrogenic EDCs was also examined. The ERβ selective agonist DPN, but not the ERα selective agonist 4,4′,4′-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol or other ERα-specific ligands, stimulated cell death. Only EDCs with selective or nonselective ERβ activities like daidzein, equol, diethylstilbestrol, and bisphenol A were observed to induce E2-like neurotoxicity supporting the conclusion that estrogen sensitivity in granule cells is mediated via ERβ. The presented results also demonstrate the utility of estrogen sensitive developing granule cells as an in vitro assay for elucidating rapid estrogen-signaling mechanisms and to detect EDCs that act at ERβ to rapidly regulate intracellular signaling. PMID:20926581

  4. Steroidal aromatic 'naphthenic acids' in oil sands process-affected water: structural comparisons with environmental estrogens.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Steven J; West, Charles E; Jones, David; Scarlett, Alan G; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark

    2011-11-15

    The large volumes, acute toxicity, estrogenicity, and antiandrogenicity of process-affected waters accruing in tailings ponds from the operations of the Alberta oil sands industries pose a significant task for environmental reclamation. Synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) suggest that oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) may contain aromatic carboxylic acids, which are among the potentially environmentally important toxicants, but no such acids have yet been identified, limiting interpretations of the results of estrogenicity and other assays. Here we show that multidimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) of methyl esters of acids in an OSPW sample produces mass spectra consistent with their assignment as C(19) and C(20) C-ring monoaromatic hydroxy steroid acids, D-ring opened hydroxy and nonhydroxy polyhydrophenanthroic acids with one aromatic and two alicyclic rings and A-ring opened steroidal keto acids. High resolution MS data support the assignment of several of the so-called 'O3' species. When fractions of distilled, esterified, OSPW acid-extractable organics were examined, the putative aromatics were mainly present in a high boiling fraction; when examined by argentation thin layer chromatography, some were present in a fraction with a retardation factor between that of the methyl esters of synthetic monoalicyclic and monoaromatic acids. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of these fractions indicated the presence of benzenoid moieties. SFS of model octahydro- and tetrahydrophenanthroic acids produced emissions at the characteristic excitation wavelengths observed in some OSPW extracts, consistent with the postulations from ultraviolet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry data. We suggest the acids originate from extensive biodegradation of C-ring monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons and offer a means of differentiating residues at different biodegradation stages in tailings ponds. Structural similarities with estrone and

  5. Identification of estrogenic compounds emitted from the combustion of computer printed circuit boards in electronic waste.

    PubMed

    Owens, Clyde V; Lambright, Christy; Bobseine, Kathy; Ryan, Bryce; Gray, L Earl; Gullett, Brian K; Wilson, Vickie S

    2007-12-15

    Rapid changes in technology have brought about a surge in demand for electronic equipment. Many of these products contain brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) as additives to decrease the rate of combustion, raising concerns about their toxicological risk. In our study, emissions from the combustion of computer-printed circuit boards were evaluated in the T47D-KBluc estrogen-responsive cell line at a series of concentrations. There was significant activity from the emission extract when compared to the positive control, 0.1 nM estradiol. After HPLC fractionation, GC/MS identified ten chemicals which included bisphenol A; the brominated derivates mono-, di-, and tribisphenol, triphenyl phosphate, triphenyl phosphine oxide, 4'-bromo-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-ol,3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybiphenyl,3,5-dibromo-2-hydroxybiphenyl, and the oxygenated polyaromatic hydrocarbon benzanthrone. Commercially available samples of these ten compounds were tested. The compound 4'-bromo-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-ol resulted in dose-dependent significant increases for luciferase activity at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 microM in the T47D-KBluc assay. The chemical also demonstrated an affinity for binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) with an IC50 of 2 x 10(-7) M. To determine the uterotrophic activity, three doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day) of 4'-bromo-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-ol were administered to adult ovariectomized Long-Evans rats for 3 days. Treatment of the animals with 200 mg/ kg/day showed an increase in uterine weight Hence one new chemical, released by burning of electrical wastes, was identified which displays estrogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. However, it was about 1000-fold less potent than ethynyl estradiol. PMID:18200886

  6. A systematic investigation of the protein kinases involved in NMDA receptor-dependent LTD: evidence for a role of GSK-3 but not other serine/threonine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Peineau, Stéphane; Nicolas, Céline S; Bortolotto, Zuner A; Bhat, Ratan V; Ryves, W Jonathan; Harwood, Adrian J; Dournaud, Pascal; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Collingridge, Graham L

    2009-01-01

    Background The signalling mechanisms involved in the induction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus are poorly understood. Numerous studies have presented evidence both for and against a variety of second messengers systems being involved in LTD induction. Here we provide the first systematic investigation of the involvement of serine/threonine (ser/thr) protein kinases in NMDAR-LTD, using whole-cell recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons. Results Using a panel of 23 inhibitors individually loaded into the recorded neurons, we can discount the involvement of at least 57 kinases, including PKA, PKC, CaMKII, p38 MAPK and DYRK1A. However, we have been able to confirm a role for the ser/thr protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). Conclusion The present study is the first to investigate the role of 58 ser/thr protein kinases in LTD in the same study. Of these 58 protein kinases, we have found evidence for the involvement of only one, GSK-3, in LTD. PMID:19583853

  7. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models with receptor-dependent descriptors for predicting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activities of thiazolidinedione and oxazolidinedione derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lather, Viney; Kairys, Visvaldas; Fernandes, Miguel X

    2009-04-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship study has been carried out, in which the relationship between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonistic activities of thiazolidinedione and oxazolidinedione derivatives and quantitative descriptors, V(site) calculated in a receptor-dependent manner is modeled. These descriptors quantify the volume occupied by the optimized ligands in regions that are either common or specific to the superimposed binding sites of the targets under consideration. The quantitative structure-activity relationship models were built by forward stepwise linear regression modeling for a training set of 27 compounds and validated for a test set of seven compounds, resulting in a squared correlation coefficient value of 0.90 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and of 0.89 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. The leave-one-out cross-validation and test set predictability squared correlation coefficient values for these models were 0.85 and 0.62 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and 0.89 and 0.50 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma respectively. A dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor model has also been developed, and it indicates the structural features required for the design of ligands with dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activity. These quantitative structure-activity relationship models show the importance of the descriptors here introduced in the prediction and interpretation of the compounds affinity and selectivity. PMID:19243388

  8. Urokinase receptor-dependent and -independent p56/59(hck) activation state is a molecular switch between myelomonocytic cell motility and adherence.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaradonna, F; Fontana, L; Iavarone, C; Carriero, M V; Scholz, G; Barone, M V; Stoppelli, M P

    1999-01-01

    Anchorage-independent myelomonocytic cells acquire adherence within minutes of differentiation stimuli, such as the proteolytically inactive N-terminal fragment of urokinase binding to its cognate glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored receptor. Here, we report that urokinase-treated differentiating U937 monocyte-like cells exhibit a rapid and transient inhibition of p56/59(hck) and p55(fgr) whereas no changes in the activity of other Src family kinases, such as p53/56(lyn) and p59(fyn) were observed. U937 transfectants expressing a kinase-defective (Lys267 to Met) p56/59(hck) variant exhibit enhanced adhesiveness and a marked F-actin redistribution in thin protruding structures. Conversely, urokinase as well as expression of wild-type or constitutively active (Tyr499 to Phe) p56/59(hck) stimulates the directional migration of uninduced U937 cells. Accordingly, expression of constitutively active or kinase inactive p56/59(hck) selectively prevents urokinase receptor-dependent induction of either adhesion or motility, indicating that a specific activation state of p56/59(hck) is required for each cell response. In conclusion, modulation of the intracellular p56/59(hck) tyrosine kinase activity switches cell motility towards adherence, providing a mutually exclusive mechanism to regulate these properties during monocyte/macrophage differentiation in vivo. PMID:10357814

  9. Comparative analysis of the interaction of various estrogens with the estrogen-receptor system of the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Fanchenko, N.D.; Alekseeva, M.L.; Minina, L.S.; Novikov, E.A.; Khel'mun, D.K.

    1986-05-20

    The binding of various labeled estrogens under conditions of equilibrium in the cytosol of the uterus of sexually immature Wistar rats was studied. An analysis of the data obtained, as well as the kinetics of the dissociation of the complexes of the ligands used with specific high-affinity estrogen-binding sites of the cytosol, suggested that the population of estrogen receptors in the rat uterus is homogeneous. The possibility of intracellular regulation of the action of estrogens in the target cell in the presence of a homogeneous population of receptors, both at the receptor and at the post-receptor stages, is suggested.

  10. Environmental estrogens in an urban aquatic ecosystem: I. Spatial and temporal occurrence of estrogenic activity in effluent-dominated systems.

    PubMed

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Minarik, Thomas A; Curran, Erin M; Marchuk, Jascha S; Pazderka, Matt J; Smith, Eric A; Goldenstein, Rachel L; Miresse, Christine L; Matlon, Thomas J; Schultz, Melissa M; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2013-11-01

    The present study investigated occurrence of environmental estrogens (EEs) in waterways managed by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago ('District') - one of the largest and most complex water districts in the United States. The objectives of the study were: (i) to document spatial and temporal occurrence of EEs in the Chicago Area Waterways (CAWs); (ii) to determine whether water reclamation plant (WRP) effluents contribute to estrogenic pollution of the receiving streams; (iii) to determine whether the mandated water quality monitoring data could be used to predict estrogenic pollution in the receiving streams; and (iv) to determine whether snow melt, storm runoff and combined sewer overflows may also be contributors of estrogenic activity to these systems. The estrogenic potency of the waterways was assessed using a cell-based reporter gene assay. The water quality data was readily available as part of the District's regular monitoring program. Our findings indicate that EEs are commonly found in the CAWs, and that WRP effluents are one of, but not the only important contributor to estrogenic activity. Mean estrogenic activities in CAWs (11ng estradiol equivalents (EEQs/L)) are well within the values reported for other urban areas and WRP effluents. The estrogenic activity exhibited significant seasonal variation with highest values noted during the spring and summer months. When comparing the mean estrogenic activity of general use waters, secondary contact waters and WRP effluents, we found that general use waters had significantly lower estrogenic activity (ca 5ng EEQ/L) than the other two matrices (ca 15 and 17ng EEQ/L respectively). Our analyses indicate that estrogenic activity of the waterways was not reliably associated with mandated water quality parameters, and that such measurements may not be useful for predicting estrogenic activity, especially so in the complex urban systems. One of the prominent findings of this study is

  11. Manure-borne estrogens as potential environmental contaminants: a review.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Travis A; Graetz, Donald A; Wilkie, Ann C

    2003-12-15

    Livestock wastes are potential sources of endocrine disrupting compounds to the environment. Steroidal estrogen hormones such as estradiol, estrone, and estriol are a particular concern because there is evidence that low nanogram per liter concentrations of estrogens in water can adversely affect the reproductive biology of fish and other aquatic vertebrate species. We performed a literature review to assess the current state of science regarding estrogen physicochemical properties, livestock excretion, and the fate of manure-borne estrogens in the environment. Unconjugated steroidal estrogens have low solubility in water (0.8-13.3 mg L(-1)) and are moderately hydrophobic (log Kow 2.6-4.0). Cattle excrete mostly 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and respective sulfated and glucuronidated counterparts, whereas swine and poultry excrete mostly 17beta-estradiol, estrone, estriol, and respective sulfated and glucuronidated counterparts. The environmental fate of estrogens is not clearly known. Laboratory-based studies have found that the biological activity of these compounds is greatly reduced or eliminated within several hours to days due to degradation and sorption. On the other hand, field studies have demonstrated that estrogens are sufficiently mobile and persistent to impact surface and groundwater quality. Future research should use standardized methods for the analysis of manure, soil, and water. More information is needed about the types and amounts of estrogens that exist in livestock wastes and the fate of manure-borne estrogens applied to agricultural lands. Field and laboratory studies should work toward revealing the mechanisms of estrogen degradation, sorption, and transport so that the risk of estrogen contamination of waterways can be minimized. PMID:14717153

  12. Postmenopausal Estrogen Therapy and Depressive Symptoms in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Whooley, Mary A; Grady, Deborah; Cauley, Jane A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND Evidence regarding the effect of postmenopausal estrogen therapy on mood is limited. METHODS To determine whether postmenopausal estrogen therapy is associated with fewer depressive symptoms in elderly women, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 6,602 white women ages 71 years or older who were recruited from population-based listings in Baltimore, Md; Minneapolis, Minn; Portland, Ore; and the Monongahela Valley, Pa. Use of estrogen and progestin was determined by interview. Participants completed the Geriatric Depression Scale short form (GDS) and were considered depressed if they reported 6 or more of 15 possible symptoms of depression. RESULTS A total of 6.3% (72/1,150) of current estrogen users, 7.2% (142/1,964) of past estrogen users, and 9.0% (313/3,488) of never users reported 6 or more symptoms of depression (P = .004). Current estrogen users had a decreased risk of reporting 6 or more depressive symptoms, compared with not current (past or never) users of estrogen (odds ratio [OR], 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9; P = .01], adjusted for living alone, bilateral oophorectomy, current smoking, physical activity, social network, self-perceived health, cognitive function, functional status, and antidepressant use. However, excluding women who use estrogen or progestin alone, we were unable to find an association between current use of combined estrogen plus progestin therapy and depressive symptoms (adjusted OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.4; P = .5). CONCLUSIONS This cross-sectional study found that current use of unopposed estrogen was associated with a decreased risk of depressive symptoms in older women. Additional studies are needed to understand the effect of combined estrogen and progestin therapy on the prevalence of depressive symptoms in older women. PMID:10940144

  13. Remote detection of hydrocarbon seeps

    SciTech Connect

    Barringer, A. R.

    1985-05-14

    A method of detecting hydrocarbon seeps in a sea or in earth is disclosed. The method involves interrogating aerosols formed above the sea or earth surface with an intense beam of primary light radiation generated aboard an aircraft or other vehicle. The spectral composition of the beam is selected to induce secondary light radiation in certain hydrocarbon materials contained in aerosols generated by hydrocarbon seeps rising to the sea or earth surface. The secondary light radiation is detected aboard the aircraft and subjected to spectral analysis to determine whether the composition of the aerosols is characteristic of aerosols generated by hydrocarbon seeps. Apparatus for implementing the method is also disclosed.

  14. Is there a role for estrogen activity assays? Recombinant cell bioassay for estrogen: Development and applications.

    PubMed

    Klein, Karen Oerter

    2015-07-01

    There are many questions which cannot be answered without a very sensitive estradiol assay. A recombinant cell bioassay (RCBA) for estradiol was developed in 1994. The sensitivity of the bioassay is 0.02-0.2 pg/ml (0.07-0.7 pmol/L), more than 20 times more sensitive than commercial RIAs and 10 times more sensitive than newer mass spectrometry assays. The RCBA for estradiol opened the door to study low levels of estradiol equivalents (EE) across the physiological spectrum of life from prepubertal children through menopause and across the spectrum from normal physiology, in boys as well as girls, to pathology, including: premature thelarche; estradiol suppression in children treated with GnRH analogues for precocious puberty; aromatase inhibition in boys with growth hormone deficiency; the differences between oral and transdermal routes of estrogen administration in girls with Turner's syndrome; women with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors; and women with urogenital atrophy treated with low dose vaginal estrogen. A bioassay also allows study of endocrine disruptors, like phytoestrogens and other environmental compounds, which are relevant to public health and alternative medicine options. This paper reviews the assay and the last 20 years of applications. A bioassay for estrogen has a role because measuring biological effect is theoretically useful, increasing the understanding of physiology in addition to biochemical levels, giving different information than other assays, and opening the door to measure very low levels of estrogen activity in both humans and the environment. PMID:25159103

  15. The in vivo estrogenic and in vitro anti-estrogenic activity of permethrin and bifenthrin

    PubMed Central

    Brander, Susanne M.; He, Guochun; Smalling, Kelly L.; Denison, Michael S.; Cherr, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrethroids are highly toxic to fish at parts per billion or parts per trillion concentrations. Their intended mechanism is prolonged sodium channel opening, but recent studies reveal that pyrethroids such as permethrin and bifenthrin also have endocrine activity. Additionally, metabolites may have greater endocrine activity than parent compounds. We evaluated the in vivo concentration-dependent ability of bifenthrin and permethrin to induce choriogenin (an estrogen-responsive protein) in Menidia beryllina, a fish species known to reside in pyrethroid contaminated aquatic habitats. We then compared the in vivo response to an in vitro assay: CALUX (Chemical Activated Luciferase Gene Expression). Juvenile Menidia beryllina exposed to bifenthrin (1, 10, 100 ng/L), permethrin (0.1, 1, 10 µg/L), and ethinylestradiol (1, 10, 50 ng/L) had significantly higher ng/mL choriogenin (Chg) measured in whole body homogenate than controls. While Chg expression in fish exposed to ethinylestradiol (EE2) exhibited a traditional sigmoidal concentration-response, curves fit to Chg expressed in fish exposed to pyrethroids suggest a unimodal response, decreasing slightly as concentration increases. While the in vivo response indicated that bifenthrin and permethrin or their metabolites act as estrogen agonists, the CALUX assay demonstrated estrogen antagonism by the pyrethroids. Our results, supported by evidence from previous studies, suggest that bifenthrin and permethrin, and/or their metabolites, appear to act as estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in vivo, and that the unmetabolized pyrethroids, particularly bifenthrin, act as an ER antagonists in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:23007834

  16. Nonsteroidal Bivalent Estrogen Ligands - An Application of the Bivalent Concept to the Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Min; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Bujotzek, Alexander; Wellner, Anja; Gust, Ronald; Weber, Marcus; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Haag, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a hormone-regulated transcription factor that binds, as a dimer, to estrogens and to specific DNA sequences. To explore at a fundamental level the geometric and topological features of bivalent-ligand binding to the ER dimer, dimeric ER crystal structures were used to rationally design nonsteroidal bivalent estrogen ligands. Guided by this structure-based ligand design, we prepared two series of bivalent ligands (agonists and antagonists) tethered by flexible spacers of varying lengths (7–47Å) and evaluated their ER-binding affinities for the two ER subtypes and their biological activities in cell lines. Bivalent ligands based on the agonist diethylstilbestrol (DES) proved to be poor candidates, but bivalent ligands based on the antagonist hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) were well suited for intensive study. Binding affinities of the OHT-based bivalent ligands were related to spacer length in a distinctive fashion, reaching two maximum values at 14 and 29Å in both ER subtypes. These results demonstrate that the bivalent concept can operate in determining ER-ligand binding affinity and suggest that two distinct modes operate for the binding of bivalent estrogen ligands to the ER dimers, an intermolecular as well as an intramolecular mode. Our insights, particularly the possibility of intramolecular bivalent binding on a single ER monomer, may provide an alternative strategy to prepare more selective and active ER antagonists for endocrine therapy of breast cancer. PMID:23312071

  17. Estrogen receptors alpha mediates postischemic inflammation in chronically estrogen-deprived mice.

    PubMed

    Cordeau, Pierre; Lalancette-Hébert, Mélanie; Weng, Yuan Cheng; Kriz, Jasna

    2016-04-01

    Estrogens are known to exert neuroprotective and immuneomodulatory effects after stroke. However, at present, little is known about the role of estrogens and its receptors in postischemic inflammation after menopause. Here, we provide important in vivo evidence of a distinct shift in microglial phenotypes in the model of postmenopause brain. Using a model-system for live imaging of microglial activation in the context of chronic estrogen- and ERα-deficiency associated with aging, we observed a marked deregulation of the TLR2 signals and/or microglial activation in ovariectomized and/or ERα knockout mice. Further analysis revealed a 5.7-fold increase in IL-6, a 4.7-fold increase in phospho-Stat3 levels suggesting an overactivation of JAK/STAT3 pathway and significantly larger infarction in ERα knockouts chronically deprived of estrogen. Taken together, our results suggest that in the experimental model of menopause and/or aging, ERα mediates innate immune responses and/or microglial activation, and ischemia-induced production of IL-6. Based on our results, we propose that the loss of functional ERα may lead to deregulation of postischemic inflammatory responses and increased vulnerability to ischemic injury in aging female brains. PMID:26973103

  18. Is Soy Estrogenic? Hepatic Gene Expression in the Presence or Absence of Endogenous Estrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to address the question of soy's estrogenicity by studying the hepatic gene expression (HGE) signature of diets made with soy protein isolate (SPI) fed in the presence or absence of estradiol (E2). Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized (OVX) at PND50, infused with E...

  19. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Petra Y; Fent, Karl

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hERalpha agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 beta estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hERalpha agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hERalpha agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products. PMID:17027055

  20. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Petra Y. . E-mail: petra.kunz@fhnw.ch; Fent, Karl . E-mail: karl.fent@bluewin.ch

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hER{alpha} agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER{alpha}). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 {beta} estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (Canada) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hER{alpha} agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hER{alpha} agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products.

  1. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones. PMID:23161396

  2. Effectiveness of estrogen replacement in restoration of cognitive function after long-term estrogen withdrawal in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Alicja L; Savonenko, Alena V

    2002-12-15

    Recent studies suggest that some aspects of learning and memory may be altered by a midlife loss of estrogen, indicating a potential causal relationship between the deficiency of ovarian hormones and cognitive aging. In this study, the effects of estrogen withdrawal and replacement were tested in middle-aged Fischer-344 rats using different memory tasks. Estrogen withdrawal accelerated the rate of cognitive aging. A deficit first occurred 4 months after ovariectomy in working memory, which was tested in a delayed-nonmatching-to-position task, and progressed from long-delay to short-delay trials. Reference memory, which was tested in a place discrimination task and a split-stem T-maze, was not affected by aging or ovariectomy. The efficacy of estrogen in ameliorating the cognitive deficit in old rats depended on the type of treatment (acute vs chronic) and whether the aging-related decline in a particular cognitive process was aggravated by estrogen withdrawal. Chronic estrogen treatment (implants) was effective in improving working memory only when primed with repeated injections of estrogen, indicating that simulating the estrogen fluctuations of the estrous cycle may be more effective than the widely used mode of chronic pharmacological treatment. A challenge with scopolamine revealed that ovariectomy-induced cognitive deterioration coincided with a compromised cholinergic system. Importantly, the estrogen treatment that had restored effectively the cognitive abilities of old ovariectomized rats did not reduce their sensitivity to scopolamine. Taking into consideration that estrogen was highly effective against the amnestic action of scopolamine when tested in young-adult rats, these data emphasize that mechanisms of the protective effect of estrogen differ in young and old rats. PMID:12486194

  3. Process for separating an ethylenically unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon mixture

    SciTech Connect

    vanEijl, A.T.

    1986-06-24

    A process is described for separating an ethylenically unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon mixture characterized by: (a) distilling a hydrocarbon mixture containing the unsaturated hydrocarbon with an N-(aminoalkyl) piperazine; and (b) separating the amine/hydrocarbon mixture into at least two factions, one of which contains the amine and the unsaturated hydrocarbon.

  4. Comparing predicted estrogen concentrations with measurements in US waters.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The range of exposure rates to the steroidal estrogens estrone (E1), beta-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), and ethinyl estradiol (EE2) in the aquatic environment was investigated by modeling estrogen introduction via municipal wastewater from sewage plants across the US. Model predi...

  5. Modulation of estrogenic effects by environmental temperature and food availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), in combination with environmental influences, interfere with endocrine function in humans and wildlife. Estrogens are a type of EDC that may alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. The impact of estrogens on P...

  6. Estrogen receptor mutations in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Karnik, P S; Kulkarni, S; Liu, X P; Budd, G T; Bukowski, R M

    1994-01-15

    Clinical resistance to antiestrogens like tamoxifen is a major problem in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancers. Since the estrogen receptor plays a central role in mediating the effects of estrogens and antiestrogens, we hypothesized that mutations in the estrogen receptor could be one mechanism by which breast tumors evolve from a hormone-dependent to a hormone-independent phenotype. The eight exons of the estrogen receptor complementary DNA from 20 tamoxifen-resistant and 20 tamoxifen-sensitive tumors were screened by Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP), and the variant conformers were sequenced to identify the nucleotide changes. A 42-base pair replacement was found in exon 6 of a tamoxifen-resistant tumor. A single base pair deletion in exon 6 of a tamoxifen-resistant metastatic tumor but not in the primary tumor was detected in another case. If translated, both these mutations could generate truncated receptors with an intact DNA-binding domain and a defective hormone-binding domain that could constitutively activate transcription of previously estrogen-responsive genes. The remaining 18 of 20 tamoxifen-resistant tumors did not contain mutations in any of the 8 exons of the estrogen receptor complementary DNA. These results suggest that mutations in the estrogen receptor occur at a low frequency and do not account for most estrogen-independent, tamoxifen-resistant breast tumors. PMID:8275466

  7. Estrogen Actions on Mitochondria-Physiological and Pathological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Simpkins, James W.; Yang, ShaoHua; Sarkar, Saumyendra N.; Pearce, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    Estrogens are potent neuroprotective hormones and mitochondria are the site of cellular life-death decisions. As such, it is not surprising that we and other have shown that estrogens have remarkable effects on mitochondrial function. Herein we provide evidence for a primary effect of estrogens on mitochondrial function, achieved in part by the import of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) into the mitochondria where it mediates a number of estrogen actions on this vital organelle. ERβ is imported into the mitochondria, through tethering to cytosolic chaperone protein and/or through direct interaction with mitochondrial import proteins. In the mitochondria, ERβ can affect transcription of critical mitochondrial genes through the interaction with estrogen response elements (ERE) or through protein-protein interactions with mitochondrially imported transcription factors. The potent effects of estrogens on mitochondrial function, particularly during mitochondrial stress, argues for a role of estrogens in the treatment of mitochondrial defects in chronic neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) and more acute conditions of mitochondrial compromise, like cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury. PMID:18571833

  8. The Endocrine Role of Estrogens on Human Male Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Rochira, Vincenzo; Kara, Elda; Carani, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Before the characterization of human and animal models of estrogen deficiency, estrogen action was confined in the context of the female bone. These interesting models uncovered a wide spectrum of unexpected estrogen actions on bone in males, allowing the formulation of an estrogen-centric theory useful to explain how sex steroids act on bone in men. Most of the principal physiological events that take place in the developing and mature male bone are now considered to be under the control of estrogen. Estrogen determines the acceleration of bone elongation at puberty, epiphyseal closure, harmonic skeletal proportions, the achievement of peak bone mass, and the maintenance of bone mass. Furthermore, it seems to crosstalk with androgen even in the determination of bone size, a more androgen-dependent phenomenon. At puberty, epiphyseal closure and growth arrest occur when a critical number of estrogens is reached. The same mechanism based on a critical threshold of serum estradiol seems to operate in men during adulthood for bone mass maintenance via the modulation of bone formation and resorption in men. This threshold should be better identified in-between the ranges of 15 and 25 pg/mL. Future basic and clinical research will optimize strategies for the management of bone diseases related to estrogen deficiency in men. PMID:25873947

  9. Estrogens maintain skeletal muscle and satellite cell functions.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Ono, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    Estrogens have crucial roles in an extensive range of physiological functions regulating cellular proliferation and differentiation, development, homeostasis, and metabolism. Therefore, prolonged estrogen insufficiency influences various types of tissues expressing estrogen receptors (ERs). Although ERs are expressed in skeletal muscle and its stem cells, called satellite cells, how prolonged estrogen insufficiency affects their function remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of estrogen reduction on muscle in young ovariectomized (OVX) female mice. We found that reduced estrogens resulted in muscle atrophy in a time-dependent manner. Muscle force generation was reduced in OVX mice. Interestingly, prolonged estrogen insufficiency shifted fiber types toward faster myosin heavy chain isoforms. The number of satellite cells per isolated myofiber was unchanged, while satellite cell expansion, differentiation, and self-renewal were all markedly impaired in OVX mice. Indeed, muscle regeneration was significantly compromised in OVX mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that estrogens are essential for comprehensively maintaining muscle function with its insufficiency affecting muscle strength and regeneration in young female mice. PMID:27048232

  10. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit devices and methods for detecting estrogen

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Sayler, Gary S.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Ripp, Steven A.

    2006-08-15

    Bioelectronic devices for the detection of estrogen include a collection of eukaryotic cells which harbor a recombinant lux gene from a high temperature microorganism wherein the gene is operably linked with a heterologous promoter gene. A detectable light-emitting lux gene product is expressed in the presence of the estrogen and detected by the device.

  11. Bioassay- versus analytically-derived estrogen equivalents: Ramifications for monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern for possible endocrine-related effects on aquatic vertebrates, environmental estrogens (EEs) are a growing focus of surface water contaminant monitoring programs. Some efforts utilize measurement of a targeted set of chemicals known to act as estrogen receptor (ER)...

  12. Breast-related effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators and tissue-selective estrogen complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A number of available treatments provide relief of menopausal symptoms and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, as breast safety is a major concern, new options are needed, particularly agents with an improved mammary safety profile. Results from several large randomized and observational studies have shown an association between hormone therapy, particularly combined estrogen-progestin therapy, and a small increased risk of breast cancer and breast pain or tenderness. In addition, progestin-containing hormone therapy has been shown to increase mammographic breast density, which is an important risk factor for breast cancer. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) provide bone protection, are generally well tolerated, and have demonstrated reductions in breast cancer risk, but do not relieve menopausal symptoms (that is, vasomotor symptoms). Tissue-selective estrogen complexes (TSECs) pair a SERM with one or more estrogens and aim to blend the positive effects of the components to provide relief of menopausal symptoms and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis without stimulating the breast or endometrium. One TSEC combination pairing conjugated estrogens (CEs) with the SERM bazedoxifene (BZA) has completed clinical development and is now available as an alternative option for menopausal therapy. Preclinical evidence suggests that CE/BZA induces inhibitory effects on breast tissue, and phase 3 clinical studies suggest breast neutrality, with no increases seen in breast tenderness, breast density, or cancer. In non-hysterectomized postmenopausal women, CE/BZA was associated with increased bone mineral density and relief of menopausal symptoms, along with endometrial safety. Taken together, these results support the potential of CE/BZA for the relief of menopausal symptoms and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis combined with breast and endometrial safety. PMID:25928299

  13. Assaying estrogenicity by quantitating the expression levels of endogenous estrogen-regulated genes.

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, M; Vendelbo, B; Skakkebaek, N E; Leffers, H

    2000-01-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that humans and wildlife species may experience adverse health consequences from exposure to environmental chemicals that interact with the endocrine system. Reliable short-term assays are needed to identify hormone-disrupting chemicals. In this study we demonstrate that the estrogenic activity of a chemical can be evaluated by assaying induction or repression of endogenous estrogen-regulated "marker genes" in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. We included four marker genes in the assay--pS2, transforming growth factor beta3 (TGFbeta3), monoamine oxidase A, and [alpha]1-antichymotrypsin--and we evaluated estrogenic activity for 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), diethylstilbestrol, [alpha]-zearalanol, nonylphenol, genistein, methoxychlor, endosulphan, o,p-DDE, bisphenol A, dibutylphthalate, 4-hydroxy tamoxifen, and ICI 182.780. All four marker genes responded strongly to the three high-potency estrogens (E(2), diethylstilbestrol, and [alpha]-zearalanol), whereas the potency of the other chemicals was 10(3)- to 10(6)-fold lower than that of E(2). There were some marker gene-dependent differences in the relative potencies of the tested chemicals. TGFbeta3 was equally sensitive to the three high-potency estrogens, whereas the sensitivity to [alpha]-zearalanol was approximately 10-fold lower than the sensitivity to E(2) and diethylstilbestrol when assayed with the other three marker genes. The potency of nonylphenol was equal to that of genistein when assayed with pS2 and TGFbeta3, but 10- to 100-fold higher/lower with monoamine oxidase A and [alpha]1-antichymotrypsin, respectively. The results are in agreement with results obtained by other methods and suggest that an assay based on endogenous gene expression may offer an attractive alternative to other E-SCREEN methods. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10811566

  14. Caffeine, coffee and tea intake and urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Julia S.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Gu, Fangyi; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Rosner, Bernard; Xu, Xia; Ziegler, Regina; Eliassen, A. Heather

    2015-01-01

    Background Prior studies have found weak inverse associations between breast cancer and caffeine and coffee intake, possibly mediated through their effects on sex hormones. Methods High-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify levels of 15 individual estrogens and estrogen metabolites (EM) among 587 premenopausal women in the Nurses’ Health Study II with mid-luteal phase urine samples and caffeine, coffee and/or tea intakes from self-reported food frequency questionnaires. Multivariate linear mixed models were used to estimate geometric means of individual EM, pathways and ratios by intake categories, and P-values for tests of linear trend. Results Compared to women in the lowest quartile of caffeine consumption, those in the top quartile had higher urinary concentrations of 16α-hydroxyestrone (28% difference; P-trend=0.01) and 16-epiestriol (13% difference; P-trend=0.04), and a decreased parent estrogens/2-, 4-, 16-pathway ratio (P-trend=0.03). Coffee intake was associated with higher 2-catechols, including 2-hydroxyestradiol (57% difference, ≥4 cups/day vs. ≤6 cups/week; P-trend=0.001) and 2-hydroxyestrone (52% difference; P-trend=0.001), and several ratio measures. Decaffeinated coffee was not associated with 2-pathway metabolism, but women in the highest (vs. lowest) category of intake (≥2 cups/day vs. ≤1–3 cups/month) had significantly lower levels of two 16-pathway metabolites, estriol (25% difference; P-trend=0.01) and 17-epiestriol (48% difference; Ptrend=0.0004). Tea intake was positively associated with 17-epiestriol (52% difference; Ptrend=0.01). Conclusion Caffeine and coffee intake were both associated with profiles of estrogen metabolism in premenopausal women. Impact Consumption of caffeine and coffee may alter patterns of premenopausal estrogen metabolism. PMID:26063478

  15. Evolution of estrogen receptors in ray-finned fish and their comparative responses to estrogenic substances.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Saki; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Lange, Anke; Ogino, Yukiko; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ihara, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Kobayashi, Tohru; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2016-04-01

    In vertebrates, estrogens play fundamental roles in regulating reproductive activities through estrogen receptors (ESRs), and disruption of estrogen signaling is now of global concern for both wildlife and human health. To date, ESRs of only a limited number of species have been characterized. We investigated the functional diversity and molecular basis or ligand sensitivity of ESRs among ray-finned fish species (Actinopterygii), the most variable group within vertebrates. We cloned and characterized ESRs from several key species in the evolution of ray-finned fish including bichir (Polypteriformes, ESR1 and ESR2) at the basal lineage of ray-finned fish, and arowana (Osteoglossiformes, ESR1 and ESR2b) and eel (Anguilliformes, ESR1, ESR2a and ESR2b) both belonging to ancient early-branching lineages of teleosts, and suggest that ESR2a and ESR2b emerged through teleost-specific whole genome duplication, but an ESR1 paralogue has been lost in the early lineage of euteleost fish species. All cloned ESR isoforms showed similar responses to endogenous and synthetic steroidal estrogens, but they responded differently to non-steroidal estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) (e.g., ESR2a exhibits a weaker reporter activity compared with ESR2b). We show that variation in ligand sensitivity of ESRs can be attributed to phylogeny among species of different taxonomic groups in ray-finned fish. The molecular information provided contributes both to understanding of the comparative role of ESRs in the reproductive biology of fish and their comparative responses to EDCs. PMID:26707410

  16. Alcohol Consumption and Urinary Estrogens and Estrogen Metabolites in Premenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Terryl J; Sisti, Julia S; Hankinson, Susan E; Xu, Xia; Eliassen, A Heather; Ziegler, Regina

    2016-02-01

    In a cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the associations of usual total alcohol and wine intake with a comprehensive profile of mid-luteal phase urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites (referred to jointly as EM) in a sample of 603 premenopausal women participating in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII). A total of 15 individual EM (pmol/mg creatinine) were measured by a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method with high accuracy and reproducibility. We used linear mixed models to calculate the adjusted geometric means of individual EM, EM grouped by metabolic pathways, and pathway ratios by category of alcohol intake with non-drinkers of alcohol as the referent. Total alcohol intake was not associated with total EM but was positively associated with estradiol (26% higher among women consuming >15 g/day vs. non-drinkers; P trend = 0.03). Wine consumption was positively associated with a number of EM measures including estradiol (22% higher among women consuming ≥ 5 drinks/week vs. non-drinkers, P trend < 0.0001). In conclusion, the total alcohol intake was positively and significantly associated with urinary estradiol levels. Some differences in urinary estrogen metabolites were observed with wine drinking, when compared with non-drinkers. This study strengthens the evidence that alcohol consumption might play a role in breast cancer and other estrogen-related conditions. Additional studies of premenopausal women are needed to further explore the association of alcohol, particularly the specific types of alcohol, on patterns of estrogen metabolism in blood, urine, and tissue. PMID:26728472

  17. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Caterina; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies, by cloning hybridoma derived from the fusion of myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes, has allowed to obtain great advances in many fields of biological knowledge. The use of specific antibodies to the estrogen receptor, in fact, has been an invaluable method to bring out its mechanisms of action and its effects, both genomic and extra-genomic. Here we describe, step by step, the production of monoclonal antibodies, starting from protocol for antigen preparation to the selection of antibody-secreting hybridoma. PMID:25182770

  18. Process for extracting hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon bearing ores

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.H.; Eakin, B.E.

    1986-02-18

    This patent describes a process for recovering hydrocarbons from a diatomite ore consisting of: reducing the size of the ore to less than about 5 mesh to form a reduced ore; combining the reduced ore with liquid to form ore pellets; treating the ore pellets to form extractable ore pellets; contacting a bed of the extractable pellets with extracting solvent in an extraction zone such that the relative velocity of the solvent to the extractable pellets is at least about one-half gallon per square foot per minute or more to thereby extract hydrocarbons from the extractable pellets and form spent pellets and a hydrocarbon rich solvent stream comprising extracting solvent and extracted hydrocarbons. The extracted hydrocarbons have an ash content of about less than 3 weight percent; and recovering extracting solvent from the spent pellets while retaining the spent pellets in pellet form without release of a significant amount of fines.

  19. Role of xenoestrogens and endogenous sources of estrogens on the occurrence of premenopausal breast cancer in Iran.

    PubMed

    Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi; Eftekhari, Tara; Sadeghipour, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer affects Iranian women one decade younger than their counterparts in other countries and the underlying risk factors have remained controversial. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates endocrine disruptive activities of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins, which may compromise ovarian functions of women in polluted environments. This study focused on tissue expression levels of AhR and associations with exposure to chemicals with estrogen-like activities (xenoestrogens) and other reproductive factors in premenopausal breast cancer patients. Fifty cases who underwent surgery from June 2009 to June 2010 were matched with 100 controls by age and hospital records. AhR overexpression was detected in 87% of epithelial cells of young breast cancer patients. Living near factories generating PAHs and dioxins was considered as a major risk factor in premenopausal breast cancer (p=0.001, OR=4.8). History of idiopathic infertility was identified as a second significant risk factor (p=0.002, OR=3.50), which could be affected by endogenous estrogen levels. Long term (>5 yrs) consumption of oral contraceptive pills was identified as the third most important risk factor (p=0.006, OR=2.27). Adiposity and abnormal weight gain after 18 years were considered as two major background factors, which may contribute to the levels of endogenous estrogens. Direct and indirect exposure to cigarette smoke (p=0.005, OR=1.43) was considered as a weak risk factor without association with AhR levels. It seems that AhR overexpression is affected by exposure to xenoestrogens and by adiposity. Early occurrence of breast cancer in Iran may be a result of interactions between hormonal and environmental factors. PMID:22296395

  20. Multiple sclerosis at menopause: Potential neuroprotective effects of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Mindy S; Mensah, Virginia A; Shen, Wen

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating and neurodegenerative condition of the central nervous system that preferentially afflicts women more than men. Low estrogen states such as menopause and the postpartum period favor exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in women with the disease. Existing and emerging evidence suggests a role for estrogen in the alleviation of symptoms and reversal of pathology associated with MS. While clinical evidence is sparse regarding the benefit of estrogen therapy for women at risk for MS exacerbations, scientific data demonstrates that estrogen potentiates numerous neuroprotective effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Estrogens play a wide range of roles involved in MS disease pathophysiology, including increasing antiinflammatory cytokines, decreasing demyelination, and enhancing oxidative and energy producing processes in CNS cells. PMID:25544310

  1. Estrogen therapy for severe persistent depressions in women.

    PubMed

    Klaiber, E L; Broverman, D M; Vogel, W; Kobayashi, Y

    1979-05-01

    Positive results are reported from a double-blind study of estrogen therapy administered to severely depressed, inpatient women who had failed to respond to various conventional treatments of depression. Large doses of oral conjugated estrogen were administered for a three-month period to 23 premenopausal and postmenopausal inpatient women. Placebos were administered for a comparable period to 17 similar patients. The posttreatment Hamilton ratings of depression were significantly reduced in the estrogen-treated group, but not in the placebo group. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed. The risk-benefit ratio for estrogen therapy of depression in these patients was judged to be favorable. However, periodic endometrial biopsies are required to monitor the endometrial response of women receiving high doses of estrogens. PMID:219802

  2. Science Signaling podcast for 24 May 2016: Designer estrogens.

    PubMed

    Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Zeynep Madak-Erdogan, Benita Katzenellenbogen, and John Katzenellenbogen, authors of a Research Article that appears in the 24 May 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about designer estrogens that have the therapeutic benefits of natural estrogens, but less cancer risk. In addition to controlling female reproduction and secondary sex characteristics, estrogen is also an important regulator of metabolism, the vasculature, and bone. Estrogen production decreases as women enter menopause, leading to changes in metabolism, a reduced ability to repair blood vessels, and decreased bone density. Although hormone replacement therapy can alleviate these symptoms, it can also promote the growth of uterine and breast cancers. Madak-Erdogan et al engineered synthetic forms of estrogen that activate the cytosolic signaling pathways that are associated with the beneficial effects of this hormone without also activating the nuclear signaling events associated with cancer growth.Listen to Podcast. PMID:27221709

  3. The Antidepressant-like Effects of Estrogen-mediated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xingyi; Ren, Bingzhong; Li, Bingjin

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, one of the brain-gut peptides, stimulates food-intake. Recently, ghrelin has also shown to play an important role in depression treatment. However, the mechanism of ghrelin’s antidepressant-like actions is unknown. On the other hand, sex differences in depression, and the fluctuation of estrogens secretion have been proved to play a key role in depression. It has been reported that women have higher level of ghrelin expression, and ghrelin can stimulate estrogen secretion while estrogen acts as a positive feedback mechanism to up-regulate ghrelin level. Ghrelin may be a potential regulator of reproductive function, and estrogen may have additional effect in ghrelin’s antidepressantlike actions. In this review, we summarize antidepressant-like effects of ghrelin and estrogen in basic and clinical studies, and provide new insight on ghrelin’s effect in depression. PMID:26412072

  4. Characterization of the liver X receptor-dependent regulatory mechanism of goat stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 gene by linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yao, D W; Luo, J; He, Q Y; Li, J; Wang, H; Shi, H B; Xu, H F; Wang, M; Loor, J J

    2016-05-01

    Stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD1) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of palmitoleic and oleic acid. Although the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of SCD1 via polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has been extensively explored in nonruminants, the existence of such mechanism in ruminant mammary gland remains unknown. In this study, we used goat genomic DNA to clone and sequence a 1,713-bp fragment of the SCD1 5' flanking region. Deletion assays revealed a core region of the promoter located between -415 and -109 bp upstream of the transcription start site, and contained the highly conserved PUFA response region. An intact PUFA response region was required for the basal transcriptional activity of SCD1. Linoleic acid reduced endogenous expression of SCD1 and sterol regulatory element binding factor-1 (SREBF1) in goat mammary epithelial cells. Further analysis indicated that both the sterol response element (SRE) and the nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) binding site in the SCD1 promoter were responsible for the inhibition effect by linoleic acid, whereas the effect was abrogated once NF-Y was deleted. In addition, SRE and NF-Y were partly responsible for the transcriptional activation induced via the liver X receptor agonist T 4506585 (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO). When goat mammary epithelial cells were cultured with linoleic acid, addition of T 4506585 markedly increased SCD1 transcription in controls, but had no effect on cells with a deleted SRE promoter. These results demonstrated that linoleic acid can regulate SCD1 expression at the transcriptional level through SRE and NF-Y in a liver X receptor-dependent fashion in the goat mammary gland. PMID:26947306

  5. Osmotic Edema Rapidly Increases Neuronal Excitability Through Activation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Slow Inward Currents in Juvenile and Adult Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lauderdale, Kelli; Murphy, Thomas; Tung, Tina; Davila, David; Binder, Devin K; Fiacco, Todd A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular edema (cell swelling) is a principal component of numerous brain disorders including ischemia, cortical spreading depression, hyponatremia, and epilepsy. Cellular edema increases seizure-like activity in vitro and in vivo, largely through nonsynaptic mechanisms attributable to reduction of the extracellular space. However, the types of excitability changes occurring in individual neurons during the acute phase of cell volume increase remain unclear. Using whole-cell patch clamp techniques, we report that one of the first effects of osmotic edema on excitability of CA1 pyramidal cells is the generation of slow inward currents (SICs), which initiate after approximately 1 min. Frequency of SICs increased as osmolarity decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Imaging of real-time volume changes in astrocytes revealed that neuronal SICs occurred while astrocytes were still in the process of swelling. SICs evoked by cell swelling were mainly nonsynaptic in origin and NMDA receptor-dependent. To better understand the relationship between SICs and changes in neuronal excitability, recordings were performed in increasingly physiological conditions. In the absence of any added pharmacological reagents or imposed voltage clamp, osmotic edema induced excitatory postsynaptic potentials and burst firing over the same timecourse as SICs. Like SICs, action potentials were blocked by NMDAR antagonists. Effects were more pronounced in adult (8-20 weeks old) compared with juvenile (P15-P21) mice. Together, our results indicate that cell swelling triggered by reduced osmolarity rapidly increases neuronal excitability through activation of NMDA receptors. Our findings have important implications for understanding nonsynaptic mechanisms of epilepsy in relation to cell swelling and reduction of the extracellular space. PMID:26489684

  6. β-Arrestin 2 is required for B1 receptor-dependent post-translational activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kuhr, Frank K.; Zhang, Yongkang; Brovkovych, Viktor; Skidgel, Randal A.

    2010-01-01

    A major source of “high-output” NO in inflammation is inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). iNOS is primarily transcriptionally regulated and is thought to function as an uncontrolled generator of high NO. We found that iNOS in cytokine-stimulated human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs) is highly regulated post-translationally via activation of the B1 kinin G protein-coupled receptor (B1R). We report here that B1R-mediated iNOS activation was significantly inhibited by knockdown of β-arrestin 2 with siRNA in cytokine-treated HLMVECs or HEK293 cells transfected with iNOS and B1R. In contrast, β-arrestin 1 siRNA had no effect. The prolonged phase of B1R-dependent ERK activation was also inhibited by β-arrestin 2 knockdown. Furthermore, robust ERK activation by the epidermal growth factor receptor (a β-arrestin 2 independent pathway) had no effect on iNOS-derived NO production. β-arrestin 2 and iNOS coimmunoprecipitated, and there was significant fluorescence resonance energy transfer between CFP-iNOS and β-arrestin 2-YFP (but not β-arrestin 1-YFP) that increased 3-fold after B1R stimulation. These data show that β-arrestin 2 mediates B1R-dependent high-output NO by scaffolding iNOS and ERK to allow post-translational activation of iNOS. This could play a critical role in mediating endothelial function in inflammation.—Kuhr, F. K., Zhang, Y., Brovkovych, V., Skidgel, R. A. β-Arrestin 2 is required for B1 receptor-dependent post-translational activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase. PMID:20228252

  7. Technetium-99m labelled LDL as a tracer for quantitative LDL scintigraphy. II. In vivo validation, LDL receptor-dependent and unspecific hepatic uptake and scintigraphic results.

    PubMed

    Leitha, T; Staudenherz, A; Gmeiner, B; Hermann, M; Hüttinger, M; Dudczak, R

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the hepatic uptake of dialysed technetium-99m labelled low-density lipoprotein (99mTc-LDL) reflects the hepatic LDL receptor activity and to what extent the non-LDL receptor-dependent 99mTc-LDL uptake by non-parenchymal cells relates to the diagnostic utility of quantitative 99mTc-LDL scintigraphy of the liver. New Zealand White rabbits and Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidaemic rabbits, which were sacrificed 24 h after simultaneous injection of 99mTc-LDL and iodine-125 labelled LDL, were clearly discriminated by their hepatic 99mTc-LDL uptake according to their genetically different hepatic LDL receptor activity. Yet the hepatic 99mTc-LDL uptake exceeded the 125I-LDL uptake in all animals. The different hepatic uptake of the tracers was elucidated in the isolated perfused rat liver and was due to rapid intracellular degradation and the release of low molecular catabolites of 125I-LDL. In contrast, 99mTc activity was trapped in the liver. Analysis of biliary 99mTc activity provided evidence for the excretion of 99mTc-labelled apolipoprotein B. The amount of biliary excreted protein-bound 99mTc was linked to total hepatic 99mTc-LDL uptake and presumably reflected LDL receptor-mediated apolipoprotein excretion. Collagenase liver perfusion in Sprague-Dawley rats 90 min following simultaneous injection of 99mTc- and 125I-LDL and subsequent cell separation by gradient centrifugation revealed that 99mTc-LDL and 125I-LDL had a comparably low uptake into non-parenchymal cells; thus its contribution can be neglected for scintigraphic purposes. Planar scintigraphy was performed in New Zealand White and Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidaemic rabbits.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8404953

  8. Osmotic Edema Rapidly Increases Neuronal Excitability Through Activation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Slow Inward Currents in Juvenile and Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lauderdale, Kelli; Murphy, Thomas; Tung, Tina; Davila, David; Binder, Devin K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular edema (cell swelling) is a principal component of numerous brain disorders including ischemia, cortical spreading depression, hyponatremia, and epilepsy. Cellular edema increases seizure-like activity in vitro and in vivo, largely through nonsynaptic mechanisms attributable to reduction of the extracellular space. However, the types of excitability changes occurring in individual neurons during the acute phase of cell volume increase remain unclear. Using whole-cell patch clamp techniques, we report that one of the first effects of osmotic edema on excitability of CA1 pyramidal cells is the generation of slow inward currents (SICs), which initiate after approximately 1 min. Frequency of SICs increased as osmolarity decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Imaging of real-time volume changes in astrocytes revealed that neuronal SICs occurred while astrocytes were still in the process of swelling. SICs evoked by cell swelling were mainly nonsynaptic in origin and NMDA receptor-dependent. To better understand the relationship between SICs and changes in neuronal excitability, recordings were performed in increasingly physiological conditions. In the absence of any added pharmacological reagents or imposed voltage clamp, osmotic edema induced excitatory postsynaptic potentials and burst firing over the same timecourse as SICs. Like SICs, action potentials were blocked by NMDAR antagonists. Effects were more pronounced in adult (8–20 weeks old) compared with juvenile (P15–P21) mice. Together, our results indicate that cell swelling triggered by reduced osmolarity rapidly increases neuronal excitability through activation of NMDA receptors. Our findings have important implications for understanding nonsynaptic mechanisms of epilepsy in relation to cell swelling and reduction of the extracellular space. PMID:26489684

  9. Changes in mGlu5 receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and coupling to homer proteins in the hippocampus of Ube3A hemizygous mice modeling angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Marco; Piccinin, Sonia; Molinaro, Gemma; Di Menna, Luisa; Riozzi, Barbara; Cannella, Milena; Motolese, Marta; Vetere, Gisella; Catania, Maria Vincenza; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Nisticò, Robert; Bruno, Valeria

    2014-03-26

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is caused by the loss of Ube3A, an ubiquitin ligase that commits specific proteins to proteasomal degradation. How this defect causes autism and other pathological phenotypes associated with AS is unknown. Long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory synaptic transmission mediated by type 5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu5) receptors was enhanced in hippocampal slices of Ube3A(m-/p+) mice, which model AS. No changes were found in NMDA-dependent LTD induced by low-frequency stimulation. mGlu5 receptor-dependent LTD in AS mice was sensitive to the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, and relied on the same signaling pathways as in wild-type mice, e.g., the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycine pathway, and protein tyrosine phosphatase. Neither the stimulation of MAPK and PI3K nor the increase in Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) levels in response to mGlu5 receptor activation were abnormal in hippocampal slices from AS mice compared with wild-type mice. mGlu5 receptor expression and mGlu1/5 receptor-mediated polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis were also unchanged in the hippocampus of AS mice. In contrast, AS mice showed a reduced expression of the short Homer protein isoform Homer 1a, and an increased coupling of mGlu5 receptors to Homer 1b/c proteins in the hippocampus. These findings support the link between Homer proteins and monogenic autism, and lay the groundwork for the use of mGlu5 receptor antagonists in AS. PMID:24672001

  10. Ethanol withdrawal is required to produce persisting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent hippocampal cytotoxicity during chronic intermittent ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Anna R.; Berry, B. Jennifer N.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent ethanol consumption is associated with neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits in preclinical laboratory animals and in the clinical population. While previous work suggests a role for neuroadaptations in the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the development of ethanol dependence and manifestation of withdrawal, the relative roles of ethanol exposure and ethanol withdrawal in producing these effects have not been fully characterized. To examine underlying cytotoxic mechanisms associated with CIE exposure, organotypic hippocampal slices were exposed to 1–3 cycles of ethanol (50 mM) in cell culture medium for 5 days, followed by 24-hours of ethanol withdrawal in which a portion of slices were exposed to competitive NMDA receptor antagonist (2R)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 40 µM). Cytotoxicity was assessed using immunohistochemical labeling of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN; Fox-3), a marker of mature neurons, and thionine (2%) staining of Nissl bodies. Multiple cycles of CIE produced neurotoxicity, as reflected in persisting losses of neuron NeuN immunoreactivity and thionine staining in each of the primary cell layers of the hippocampal formation. Hippocampi aged in vitro were significantly more sensitive to the toxic effects of multiple CIEs than were non-aged hippocampi. This effect was not demonstrated in slices exposed to continuous ethanol, in the absence of withdrawal, or to a single exposure/withdrawal regimen. Exposure to APV significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity observed in the primary cell layers of the hippocampus. The present findings suggest that ethanol withdrawal is required to produce NMDA receptor-dependent hippocampal cytotoxicity, particularly in the aging hippocampus in vitro. PMID:25746220

  11. Control of βAR- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor-Dependent cAMP Dynamics in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chay, Andrew; Zamparo, Ilaria; Koschinski, Andreas; Zaccolo, Manuela; Blackwell, Kim T.

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine, a neuromodulator that activates β-adrenergic receptors (βARs), facilitates learning and memory as well as the induction of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Several forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) at the Schaffer collateral CA1 synapse require stimulation of both βARs and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). To understand the mechanisms mediating the interactions between βAR and NMDAR signaling pathways, we combined FRET imaging of cAMP in hippocampal neuron cultures with spatial mechanistic modeling of signaling pathways in the CA1 pyramidal neuron. Previous work implied that cAMP is synergistically produced in the presence of the βAR agonist isoproterenol and intracellular calcium. In contrast, we show that when application of isoproterenol precedes application of NMDA by several minutes, as is typical of βAR-facilitated LTP experiments, the average amplitude of the cAMP response to NMDA is attenuated compared with the response to NMDA alone. Models simulations suggest that, although the negative feedback loop formed by cAMP, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and type 4 phosphodiesterase may be involved in attenuating the cAMP response to NMDA, it is insufficient to explain the range of experimental observations. Instead, attenuation of the cAMP response requires mechanisms upstream of adenylyl cyclase. Our model demonstrates that Gs-to-Gi switching due to PKA phosphorylation of βARs as well as Gi inhibition of type 1 adenylyl cyclase may underlie the experimental observations. This suggests that signaling by β-adrenergic receptors depends on temporal pattern of stimulation, and that switching may represent a novel mechanism for recruiting kinases involved in synaptic plasticity and memory. PMID:26901880

  12. E2F1 in neurons is cleaved by calpain in an NMDA receptor-dependent manner in a model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zyskind, Jacob W.; Wang, Ying; Cho, Giyong; Ting, Jenhao H.; Kolson, Dennis L.; Lynch, David R.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor E2F1 activates gene targets required for G1-S phase progression and for apoptosis, and exhibits increased expression levels in neurons in several CNS diseases including HIV encephalitis, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson Disease. While E2F1 is known to regulate cell viability through activation of caspases, here we present evidence supporting the involvement of E2F1 in NMDA receptor-dependent, HIV-induced neuronal death mediated by calpains. Using an in vitro model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity that is dependent on NMDA receptor and calpain activation, we have shown that cortical neurons lacking functional E2F1 are less susceptible to neuronal death. Additionally, we report that neuronal E2F1 is cleaved by calpain to a stable 55-kiloDalton fragment following NR2B-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation. This cleavage of E2F1 is protein conformation-dependent and involves at least two cleavage events, one at each terminus of the protein. Intriguingly, the stabilized E2F1 cleavage product is produced in postmitotic neurons of all ages, but fails to be stabilized in cycling cells. Finally, we show that a matching E2F1 cleavage product is produced in human fetal neurons, suggesting that calpain cleavage of E2F1 may be produced in human cortical tissue. These results suggest neuronal E2F1 is processed in a novel manner in response to NMDA receptor-mediated toxicity, a mechanism implicated in HAND pathogenesis as well as several other diseases of the CNS. PMID:25279448

  13. Control of βAR- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor-Dependent cAMP Dynamics in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Chay, Andrew; Zamparo, Ilaria; Koschinski, Andreas; Zaccolo, Manuela; Blackwell, Kim T

    2016-02-01

    Norepinephrine, a neuromodulator that activates β-adrenergic receptors (βARs), facilitates learning and memory as well as the induction of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Several forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) at the Schaffer collateral CA1 synapse require stimulation of both βARs and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). To understand the mechanisms mediating the interactions between βAR and NMDAR signaling pathways, we combined FRET imaging of cAMP in hippocampal neuron cultures with spatial mechanistic modeling of signaling pathways in the CA1 pyramidal neuron. Previous work implied that cAMP is synergistically produced in the presence of the βAR agonist isoproterenol and intracellular calcium. In contrast, we show that when application of isoproterenol precedes application of NMDA by several minutes, as is typical of βAR-facilitated LTP experiments, the average amplitude of the cAMP response to NMDA is attenuated compared with the response to NMDA alone. Models simulations suggest that, although the negative feedback loop formed by cAMP, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and type 4 phosphodiesterase may be involved in attenuating the cAMP response to NMDA, it is insufficient to explain the range of experimental observations. Instead, attenuation of the cAMP response requires mechanisms upstream of adenylyl cyclase. Our model demonstrates that Gs-to-Gi switching due to PKA phosphorylation of βARs as well as Gi inhibition of type 1 adenylyl cyclase may underlie the experimental observations. This suggests that signaling by β-adrenergic receptors depends on temporal pattern of stimulation, and that switching may represent a novel mechanism for recruiting kinases involved in synaptic plasticity and memory. PMID:26901880

  14. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  15. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  16. Role of exogenous and endogenous sources of estrogen on the incidence of breast fibroadenoma: case-control study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi; Eftekhari, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Breast fibroadenoma (FAD) is the most common benign mammary condition among women but the environmental risk factors have not identified yet. As the role of long term estrogen exposure in the incidence of FAD has been remained controversial; we have decided to investigate the possible role of endogenous and exogenous sources of estrogens in present study. Women less than 45 years old who underwent surgery from June 2009 to June 2010 were matched with controls by age and hospital. From reproductive factors, lack of breast feeding (p< 0.001, 8.76 CI95% 3.79-20.24), Nulliparity (p=0.001, OR=8.09, CI95% 3.505-18.67), Lack of parity (p=0.001, OR=6.64, CI 95% 2.56-16.31) and Hormonal dysfunction (p=0.016, OR=4.66, CI 95% 1.26- 17.28) were considered as the most important ones. Adiposity and abnormal weight gain after 18 years were considered as major background factor which induce FAD and may be contributed to the level of endogenous estrogen. Out of evaluated exogenous sources of estrogen, lower age at first OCP consumption (20.76_+3.87 vs. 22.85_+3.88, p=0.046) and living near Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) producing factories (p< 0.001, OR=3.7, CI95%1.61-7.94), were considered as the main sources of exposure to xenestrogens in FAD patients but FAD showed inverse association with cigarette smoking because of antiestrogenic activities of cigarette smoking . This study concludes that the incidence and development of FAD could be associated with the reproductive history of women, activity of ovarian hormones as well as environmental factors. PMID:21875284

  17. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  18. Diterpenoid tetracyclic hydrocarbons of petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob'eva, N.S.; Zemskova, Z.K.; Pekh, T.I.; Petrov, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    Diterpenoid hydrocarbons are fairly widespread in various caustobioliths. However, if petroleums contain mainly acyclic diterpenoids (phytane, pristane and norpristane), cyclic diterpaenes such as fichtelite, pimarane, iosene (kaurane) and hibbane are often found in hydrocarbons isolated from coal and shale. Recent advances in the chemistry of diterpenoids isolated from caustobioliths, are described in a separate paper. Much less is known about petroleum polycyclic diterpenoid hydrocarbons, particularly those with four saturated rings. A series of tetracyclic hydrocarbons C/sub 19/H/sub 32/ (molar mass 260), found in a number of light petroleums and gas condensates from the Jura deposits of Central Kara-Kum (Turkmen S.S.R.), are examined here. These hydrocarbons are present in petroleums and condensates from the Davaly, Erden, Ortakak, Southern Beuideshik deposits, they are always identical and occur in the same ratios. The composition of the tretracyclanes isolated from the Ortakak gas condensates (well 17) will be examined in detail.

  19. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Michaël; Antonio, Leen; Sinnesael, Mieke; Dubois, Vanessa; Gielen, Evelien; Classens, Frank; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T) to estradiol (E2) by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution) peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refi ned our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen defi ciency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the fi eld of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis. PMID:24385015

  20. Contemporary Alternatives to Plant Estrogens for Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Stacie E.; Studee, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Every year, millions of women begin the peri-menopause and may experience a number of symptoms related to this transition. Many women are reluctant to use exogenous hormone therapy for treatment of menopausal symptoms and are turning to botanical and dietary supplements (BDS) for relief. This paper reviews the literature on alternatives to plant estrogens for relief of menopausal symptoms. Methods The MEDLINE database was searched for clinical trials of non-estrogenic plant extracts for menopausal symptoms. To be included, studies had to include peri- or postmenopausal women as subjects. All clinical trials (randomized-controlled trials, open trials, and comparison group studies) were included for this review. Results Black Cohosh appears to be one of the most effective botanicals for relief of vasomotor symptoms, while St. John’s wort can improve mood disorders related to the menopausal transition. Many other botanicals have limited evidence to demonstrate safety and efficacy for relief of symptoms related to menopause. Conclusions A growing body of evidence suggests that some botanicals and dietary supplements could result in improved clinical outcomes. Health care providers should discuss these issues with their patients so they can assist them in managing these alternative therapies through an evidence-based approach. PMID:16884867

  1. Licorice root components in dietary supplements are selective estrogen receptor modulators with a spectrum of estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Boonmuen, Nittaya; Gong, Ping; Ali, Zulfiqar; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Khan, Ikhlas; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G; Carlson, Kathryn E; Martin, Teresa; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2016-01-01

    Licorice root extracts are often consumed as botanical dietary supplements by menopausal women as a natural alternative to pharmaceutical hormone replacement therapy. In addition to their components liquiritigenin (Liq) and isoliquiritigenin (Iso-Liq), known to have estrogenic activity, licorice root extracts also contain a number of other flavonoids, isoflavonoids, and chalcones. We have investigated the estrogenic activity of 7 of these components, obtained from an extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra powder, namely Glabridin (L1), Calycosin (L2), Methoxychalcone (L3), Vestitol (L4), Glyasperin C (L5), Glycycoumarin (L6), and Glicoricone (L7), and compared them with Liq, Iso-Liq, and estradiol (E2). All components, including Liq and Iso-Liq, have low binding affinity for estrogen receptors (ERs). Their potency and efficacy in stimulating the expression of estrogen-regulated genes reveal that Liq and Iso-Liq and L2, L3, L4, and L6 are estrogen agonists. Interestingly, L3 and L4 have an efficacy nearly equivalent to E2 but with a potency ca. 10,000-fold less. The other components, L1, L5 and L7, acted as partial estrogen antagonists. All agonist activities were reversed by the antiestrogen, ICI 182,780, or by knockdown of ERα with siRNA, indicating that they are ER dependent. In HepG2 hepatoma cells stably expressing ERα, only Liq, Iso-Liq, and L3 stimulated estrogen-regulated gene expression, and in all cases gene stimulation did not occur in HepG2 cells lacking ERα. Collectively, these findings classify the components of licorice root extracts as low potency, mixed ER agonists and antagonists, having a character akin to that of selective estrogen receptor modulators or SERMs. PMID:26631549

  2. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-{alpha} with BCAR1 and Traf6

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Lisa J.; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L.; Blair, Harry C.

    2009-04-15

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at {approx} 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-{beta}-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ER{alpha}. However, ER{alpha} was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ER{alpha} in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid ({approx} 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ER{alpha}-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-{kappa}B activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ER{alpha}.

  3. Process for recovering hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon-bearing formation

    SciTech Connect

    Alston, R.B.; Braden, W.B.; Flournoy, K.H.

    1980-03-11

    A method is described for transporting heavy crude oil through a pipeline which involves introducing into a pipeline or well-bore with the viscous hydrocarbons an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) coupling agent whereby there is spontaneously formed a low viscosity, salt tolerant, oil-in-water emulsion. Also disclosed is a method of recovery of hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon bearing formation employing an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) a coupling agent.

  4. 21 CFR 862.1270 - Estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.1270 Estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system. (a) Identification. As estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system is a device intended to measure total estrogens in plasma, serum,...

  5. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck . E-mail: khchung@skku.edu

    2006-08-01

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect.

  6. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  7. Synthesis and Functional Analysis of Novel Bivalent Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Wendlandt, Alison E.; Yelton, Sharon M.; Lou, Dingyuan; Watt, David S.; Noonan, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    The steroid hormone estrogen plays a critical role in female development and homeostasis. Estrogen mediates its effects through binding and activation of specific estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ), members of the steroid/nuclear receptor family of ligand-induced transcription factors. Due to their intimate roles in genomic and nongenomic signaling pathways, these hormones and their receptors have been also implicated in the pathologies of a variety of cancers and metabolic disorders, and have been the target of large therapeutic development efforts. The binding of estrogen to its respective receptors initiates a cascade of events that include receptor dimerization, nuclear localization, DNA binding and recruitment of co-regulatory protein complexes. In this manuscript, we investigate the potential for manipulating steroid receptor gene expression activity through the development of bivalent steroid hormones that are predicted to facilitate hormone receptor dimerization events. Data are presented for the development and testing of novel estrogen dimers, linked through their C-17 moiety, that can activate estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-mediated transcription events with efficacy and potency equal to or greater than that of ERα’s cognate ligand, 17β-estradiol. These bivalent estrogen structures open the door to the development of a variety of steroid therapeutics that could dramatically impact future drug development in this area. PMID:20685325

  8. A human fetal prostate xenograft model of developmental estrogenization.

    PubMed

    Saffarini, Camelia M; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V; Amin, Ali; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common disease in older men. Rodent models have demonstrated that an early and later-life exposure to estrogen can lead to cancerous lesions and implicated hormonal dysregulation as an avenue for developing future prostate neoplasia. This study utilizes a human fetal prostate xenograft model to study the role of estrogen in the progression of human disease. Histopathological lesions were assessed in 7-, 30-, 90-, 200-, and 400-day human prostate xenografts. Gene expression for cell cycle, tumor suppressors, and apoptosis-related genes (ie, CDKN1A, CASP9, ESR2, PTEN, and TP53) was performed for 200-day estrogen-treated xenografts. Glandular hyperplasia was observed in xenografts given both an initial and secondary exposure to estradiol in both 200- and 400-day xenografts. Persistent estrogenic effects were verified using immunohistochemical markers for cytokeratin 10, p63, and estrogen receptor α. This model provides data on the histopathological state of the human prostate following estrogenic treatment, which can be utilized in understanding the complicated pathology associated with prostatic disease and early and later-life estrogenic exposures. PMID:25633637

  9. Sexual maturation protects against development of lung inflammation through estrogen.

    PubMed

    Draijer, Christina; Hylkema, Machteld N; Boorsma, Carian E; Klok, Pieter A; Robbe, Patricia; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S; Greene, Catherine M; Melgert, Barbro N

    2016-01-15

    Increasing levels of estrogen and progesterone are suggested to play a role in the gender switch in asthma prevalence during puberty. We investigated whether the process of sexual maturation in mice affects the development of lung inflammation in adulthood and the contributing roles of estrogen and progesterone during this process. By inducing ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation in sexually mature and immature (ovariectomized before sexual maturation) adult mice, we showed that sexually immature adult mice developed more eosinophilic lung inflammation. This protective effect of "puberty" appears to be dependent on estrogen, as estrogen supplementation at the time of ovariectomy protected against development of lung inflammation in adulthood whereas progesterone supplementation did not. Investigating the underlying mechanism of estrogen-mediated protection, we found that estrogen-treated mice had higher expression of the anti-inflammatory mediator secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI) and lower expression of the proasthmatic cytokine IL-33 in parenchymal lung tissue and that their expressions colocalized with type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII). Treating AECII directly with SLPI significantly inhibited IL-33 production upon stimulation with ATP. Our data suggest that estrogen during puberty has a protective effect on asthma development, which is accompanied by induction of anti-inflammatory SLPI production and inhibition of proinflammatory IL-33 production by AECII. PMID:26608529

  10. Estrogen Stimulates Homing of Endothelial Progenitor Cells to Endometriotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Rudzitis-Auth, Jeannette; Nenicu, Anca; Nickels, Ruth M; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2016-08-01

    The incorporation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into microvessels contributes to the vascularization of endometriotic lesions. Herein, we analyzed whether this vasculogenic process is regulated by estrogen. Estrogen- and vehicle-treated human EPCs were analyzed for migration and tube formation. Endometriotic lesions were induced in irradiated FVB/N mice, which were reconstituted with bone marrow from FVB/N-TgN (Tie2/green fluorescent protein) 287 Sato mice. The animals were treated with 100 μg/kg β-estradiol 17-valerate or vehicle (control) over 7 and 28 days. Lesion growth, cyst formation, homing of green fluorescent protein(+)/Tie2(+) EPCs, vascularization, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed by high-resolution ultrasonography, caliper measurements, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Numbers of blood circulating EPCs were assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro, estrogen-treated EPCs exhibited a higher migratory and tube-forming capacity when compared with controls. In vivo, numbers of circulating EPCs were not affected by estrogen. However, estrogen significantly increased the number of EPCs incorporated into the lesions' microvasculature, resulting in an improved early vascularization. Estrogen further stimulated the growth of lesions, which exhibited massively dilated glands with a flattened layer of stroma. This was mainly because of an increased glandular secretory activity, whereas cell proliferation and apoptosis were not markedly affected. These findings indicate that vasculogenesis in endometriotic lesions is dependent on estrogen, which adds a novel hormonally regulated mechanism to the complex pathophysiology of endometriosis. PMID:27315780

  11. Hydrocarbons in Washington coastal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Fredrick G.; Carpenter, Roy

    1984-06-01

    The sources and distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and aliphatic hydrocarbons are characterized in seventeen sediments from a highly river-influenced sedimentary environment off the southwestern coast of Washington. The major hydrocarbons are land-derived, introduced as preformed compounds and display long-term stability in sediment cores. A series of PAH of anthropogenic origin and two naturally derived compounds, retene and perylene, dominate the PAH composition in these sediments. Plantwax n-alkanes are the major aliphatic hydrocarbon constituents. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of marine origin, pristane and a series of four acyclic, multibranched C 25 polyolefins, are also observed in many sediments. The concentrations of these marine-derived hydrocarbons decrease to negligible levels rapidly with sediment depth from the sea-sediment interface, suggesting degradation. In general, the major land-derived hydrocarbons are concentrated in the midshelf silt deposit which extends northwestward along the continental shelf from the Columbia River mouth. A quantitatively more minor, natural series of phenanthrene homologs, also of terrestrial origin, is preferentially advected further offshore and deposited in continental slope sediments. These distributions are consistent with recognized particle associations for these compounds and sediment dispersal processes in this coastal environment. Sediment core records suggest the present pattern of dispersal has persisted for at least the past century and possibly since the Late Pleistocene.

  12. Selective binding of the estrogen receptor to one strand of the estrogen responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, R

    1993-01-01

    The human estrogen receptor (hER) activates gene transcription by binding to cognate palindromic sequences called estrogen responsive elements (ERE). I used gel retardation assays and oligonucleotides containing the ERE from the Xenopus vitellogenin gene to study the interaction of the hER with the ERE. I observed that the hER bound to double-stranded ERE and to the single strand of the ERE that had T in the center with nearly equal affinity, but not to the strand which had A in the center. Interchanging the two central nucleotides changed the strand specificity. Binding of the hER to a single strand is extremely sensitive to temperature. Initial recognition of one of the two strands of the ERE may be involved in the binding of the hER to the ERE. Images PMID:8332462

  13. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Tropsha, Alexander; Varnek, Alexandre; Zakharov, Alexey; Worth, Andrew; Richard, Ann M.; Grulke, Christopher M.; Trisciuzzi, Daniela; Fourches, Denis; Horvath, Dragos; Benfenati, Emilio; Muratov, Eugene; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Grisoni, Francesca; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Incisivo, Giuseppina M.; Hong, Huixiao; Ng, Hui W.; Tetko, Igor V.; Balabin, Ilya; Kancherla, Jayaram; Shen, Jie; Burton, Julien; Nicklaus, Marc; Cassotti, Matteo; Nikolov, Nikolai G.; Nicolotti, Orazio; Andersson, Patrik L.; Zang, Qingda; Politi, Regina; Beger, Richard D.; Todeschini, Roberto; Huang, Ruili; Farag, Sherif; Rosenberg, Sine A.; Slavov, Svetoslav; Hu, Xin; Judson, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these chemicals have never been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Objectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) and demonstrate the efficacy of using predictive computational models trained on high-throughput screening data to evaluate thousands of chemicals for ER-related activity and prioritize them for further testing. Methods: CERAPP combined multiple models developed in collaboration with 17 groups in the United States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure–activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1,677 chemical structures provided by the U.S. EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical and 8 continuous models for binding, agonist, and antagonist ER activity. All predictions were evaluated on a set of 7,522 chemicals curated from the literature. To overcome the limitations of single models, a consensus was built by weighting models on scores based on their evaluated accuracies. Results: Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing high prediction reliabilities. Out of the 32,464 chemicals, the consensus model predicted 4,001 chemicals (12.3%) as high priority actives and 6,742 potential actives (20.8%) to be considered for further testing. Conclusion: This project demonstrated the possibility to screen large libraries of chemicals using a consensus of different in silico approaches. This concept will be applied in future projects related to other

  14. Mixture Effects of Estrogenic Pesticides at the Human Estrogen Receptor α and β.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Bettina; Klawonn, Frank; Nguema Bekale, Boris; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Consumers of fruits and vegetables are frequently exposed to small amounts of hormonally active pesticides, some of them sharing a common mode of action such as the activation of the human estrogen receptor α (hERα) or β (hERβ). Therefore, it is of particular importance to evaluate risks emanating from chemical mixtures, in which the individual pesticides are present at human-relevant concentrations, below their corresponding maximum residue levels. Binary and ternary iso-effective mixtures of estrogenic pesticides at effect concentrations eliciting a 1 or 10% effect in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol were tested experimentally at the hERα in the yeast-based estrogen screen (YES) assay as well as in the human U2-OS cell-based ERα chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ERα CALUX) assay and at the hERβ in the ERβ CALUX assay. The outcome was then compared to predictions calculated by means of concentration addition. In most cases, additive effects were observed with the tested combinations in all three test systems, an observation that supports the need to expand the risk assessment of pesticides and consider cumulative risk assessment. An additional testing of mixture effects at the hERβ showed that most test substances being active at the hERα could also elicit additive effects at the hERβ, but the hERβ was less sensitive. In conclusion, effects of the same ligands at the hERα and the hERβ could influence the estrogenic outcome under physiological conditions. PMID:26812056

  15. Dynamic Estrogen Receptor Interactomes Control Estrogen-Responsive Trefoil Factor (TFF) Locus Cell-Specific Activities

    PubMed Central

    Quintin, Justine; Le Péron, Christine; Palierne, Gaëlle; Bizot, Maud; Cunha, Stéphanie; Sérandour, Aurélien A.; Avner, Stéphane; Henry, Catherine; Percevault, Frédéric; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Huet, Sébastien; Watrin, Erwan; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Legagneux, Vincent; Salbert, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol signaling is ideally suited for analyzing the molecular and functional linkages between the different layers of information directing transcriptional regulations: the DNA sequence, chromatin modifications, and the spatial organization of the genome. Hence, the estrogen receptor (ER) can bind at a distance from its target genes and engages timely and spatially coordinated processes to regulate their expression. In the context of the coordinated regulation of colinear genes, identifying which ER binding sites (ERBSs) regulate a given gene still remains a challenge. Here, we investigated the coordination of such regulatory events at a 2-Mb genomic locus containing the estrogen-sensitive trefoil factor (TFF) cluster of genes in breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that this locus exhibits a hormone- and cohesin-dependent reduction in the plasticity of its three-dimensional organization that allows multiple ERBSs to be dynamically brought to the vicinity of estrogen-sensitive genes. Additionally, by using triplex-forming oligonucleotides, we could precisely document the functional links between ER engagement at given ERBSs and the regulation of particular genes. Hence, our data provide evidence of a formerly suggested cooperation of enhancers toward gene regulation and also show that redundancy between ERBSs can occur. PMID:24752895

  16. Impaired estrogen sensitivity in bone by inhibiting both estrogen receptor alpha and beta pathways.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, S; Fujita, M; Ishii, Y; Tsurukami, H; Hirabayashi, M; Ikeda, K; Orimo, A; Hosoi, T; Ueda, M; Nakamura, T; Ouchi, Y; Muramatsu, M; Inoue, S

    2000-07-14

    Although it is well established that estrogen deficiency causes osteoporosis among the postmenopausal women, the involvement of estrogen receptor (ER) in its pathogenesis still remains uncertain. In the present study, we have generated rats harboring a dominant negative ERalpha, which inhibits the actions of not only ERalpha but also recently identified ERbeta. Contrary to our expectation, the bone mineral density (BMD) of the resulting transgenic female rats was maintained at the same level with that of the wild-type littermates when sham-operated. In addition, ovariectomy-induced bone loss was observed almost equally in both groups. Strikingly, however, the BMD of the transgenic female rats, after ovariectomized, remained decreased even if 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) was administrated, whereas, in contrast, the decrease of littermate BMD was completely prevented by E(2). Moreover, bone histomorphometrical analysis of ovariectomized transgenic rats revealed that the higher rates of bone turnover still remained after treatment with E(2). These results demonstrate that the prevention from the ovariectomy-induced bone loss by estrogen is mediated by ER pathways and that the maintenance of BMD before ovariectomy might be compensated by other mechanisms distinct from ERalpha and ERbeta pathways. PMID:10806217

  17. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activity of off-the-shelf hair and skin care products.

    PubMed

    Myers, Sharon L; Yang, Chun Z; Bittner, George D; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R; Baird, Donna D

    2015-05-01

    Use of personal care products is widespread in the United States but tends to be greater among African Americans than whites. Of special concern is the possible hazard of absorption of chemicals with estrogenic activity (EA) or anti-EA (AEA) in these products. Such exposure may have adverse health effects, especially when it occurs during developmental windows (e.g., prepubertally) when estrogen levels are low. We assessed the ethanol extracts of eight commonly used hair and skin products popular among African Americans for EA and AEA using a cell proliferation assay with the estrogen sensitive MCF-7:WS8 cell line derived from a human breast cancer. Four of the eight personal care products tested (Oil Hair Lotion, Extra-dry Skin Lotion, Intensive Skin Lotion, Petroleum Jelly) demonstrated detectable EA, whereas three (Placenta Hair Conditioner, Tea-Tree Hair Conditioner, Cocoa Butter Skin Cream) exhibited AEA. Our data indicate that hair and skin care products can have EA or AEA, and suggest that laboratory studies are warranted to investigate the in vivo activity of such products under chronic exposure conditions as well as epidemiologic studies to investigate potential adverse health effects that might be associated with use of such products. PMID:24849798

  18. Estrogen Signalling and the Metabolic Syndrome: Targeting the Hepatic Estrogen Receptor Alpha Action

    PubMed Central

    Matic, Marko; Bryzgalova, Galyna; Gao, Hui; Antonson, Per; Humire, Patricia; Omoto, Yoko; Portwood, Neil; Pramfalk, Camilla; Efendic, Suad; Berggren, Per-Olof; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2013-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence now links estrogenic signalling with the metabolic syndrome (MS). Despite the beneficial estrogenic effects in reversing some of the MS symptoms, the underlying mechanisms remain largely undiscovered. We have previously shown that total estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) knockout (KO) mice exhibit hepatic insulin resistance. To determine whether liver-selective ablation of ERα recapitulates metabolic phenotypes of ERKO mice we generated a liver-selective ERαKO mouse model, LERKO. We demonstrate that LERKO mice have efficient reduction of ERα selectively within the liver. However, LERKO and wild type control mice do not differ in body weight, and have a comparable hormone profile as well as insulin and glucose response, even when challenged with a high fat diet. Furthermore, LERKO mice display very minor changes in their hepatic transcript profile. Collectively, our findings indicate that hepatic ERα action may not be the responsible factor for the previously identified hepatic insulin resistance in ERαKO mice. PMID:23451233

  19. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activity of off-the-shelf hair and skin care products

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Sharon L.; Yang, Chun Z.; Bittner, George D.; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.; Baird, Donna D.

    2014-01-01

    Use of personal care products is widespread in the United States but tends to be greater among African Americans than whites. Of special concern is the possible hazard of absorption of chemicals with estrogenic activity (EA) or anti-EA (AEA) in these products. Such exposure may have adverse health effects, especially when it occurs during developmental windows (e.g., prepubertally) when estrogen levels are low. We assessed the ethanol extracts of eight commonly used hair and skin products popular among African Americans for EA and AEA using a cell proliferation assay with the estrogen sensitive MCF-7:WS8 cell line derived from a human breast cancer. Four of the eight personal care products tested (Oil Hair Lotion, Extra-dry Skin Lotion, Intensive Skin Lotion, Petroleum Jelly) demonstrated detectable EA, whereas three (Placenta Hair Conditioner, Tea-Tree Hair Conditioner, Cocoa Butter Skin Cream) exhibited AEA. Our data indicate that hair and skin care products can have EA or AEA, and suggest that laboratory studies are warranted to investigate the in vivo activity of such products under chronic exposure conditions as well as epidemiologic studies to investigate potential adverse health effects that might be associated with use of such products. PMID:24849798

  20. Biomarker Genes for Detecting Estrogenic Activity of Endocrine Disruptors via Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eui-Man; An, Beum-Soo; Yang, Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are compounds used in various industrial products, drugs, and cosmetics. They can be found in the environment and disturb the endocrine and reproductive systems, resulting in adverse effects to humans and wildlife such as birth defects and developmental disorders. Since several EDs have a structure similar to that of endogenous steroid hormones such as estrogens, they intend to have an affinity for steroid hormone receptors and alter hormone-mediated metabolism by binding to these receptors. EDs are therefore a global concern and assays should be developed to efficiently determine whether these compounds are detrimental to biological systems. Diverse experimental methods may help determine the endocrine disrupting potential of EDs and evaluate the adverse effects of a single and/or combination of these reagents. Currently, biomarkers have been employed to objectively measure EDs potency and understand the underlying mechanisms. Further studies are required to develop ideal screening methods and biomarkers to determine EDs potency at environmentally relevant concentrations. In this review, we describe the biomarkers for estrogenicity of EDs identified both in vitro and in vivo, and introduce a biomarker, cabindin-D9k (CaBP-9k), that may be used to assess estrogenic activity of EDs. PMID:22690157

  1. The cerebellum as a target for estrogen action

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, Valerie L.; Ebner, Timothy J.; Meisel, Robert L.; Mermelstein, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the effects of estrogens upon the cerebellum, a brain region long ignored as a site of estrogen action. Highlighted are the diverse effects of estradiol within the cerebellum, emphasizing the importance of estradiol signaling in cerebellar development, modulation of synaptic neurotransmission in the adult, and the potential influence of estrogens on various health and disease states. We also provide new data, consistent with previous studies, in which locally synthesized estradiol modulates cerebellar glutamatergic neurotransmission, providing one underlying mechanism by which the actions of estradiol can affect this brain region. PMID:22975197

  2. [Local estrogen therapy--clinical implications--2012 update].

    PubMed

    Kokot-Kierepa, Marta; Bartuzi, Aleksandra; Kulik-Rechberger, Beata; Rechberger, Tomasz

    2012-10-01

    With increasing longevity in Poland, women can now expect to live around 40% of their lives after menopause, and there is a growing desire for older women to preserve their vitality sexual function and quality of life. The most common urogenital symptoms associated with menopause are dryness, followed by irritation or itching, and discharge, with a substantial number of post-menopausal women also being affected by dysuria. These symptoms are the result of vaginal atrophy which is in turn caused by reduced transudation through the vaginal epithelium and reduced cervical gland secretions resulting from post-menopausal estrogen depletion. Vaginal atrophy generally occurs 4-5 years after the last menstrual period and progressively increases in prevalence in the subsequent years. Importantly vaginal atrophy is strongly associated with sexual dysfunction, and lower urinary tract symptoms, such as frequency urgency nocturia and dysuria, as well as incontinence and recurrent infection are reported more frequently in the presence of vaginal atrophy Those symptoms, apart from being bothersome for the patients also negatively impact their quality of life. Consequently before irreversible changes occur, early detection and treatment of vaginal atrophy should be implemented. Estrogen therapy is the most commonly prescribed treatment. Estrogens restore the cytology pH and vascularity of the vagina, resulting in symptom resolution for the majority of treated women. Because vaginal atrophy symptoms tend to occur later than vasomotor symptoms, many women do not necessarily require or wish to take systemic estrogen treatment if their symptoms are restricted to the urogenital tract. Vaginal estrogen products deliver estrogen locally to vaginal tissues with little or no systemic absorption and provide an effective alternative to systemic estrogen therapy for these women. Various vaginal estrogen preparations such as conjugated equine estrogens, estradiol and estriol vaginal creams, a

  3. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Stafford, James L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W.; Blazer, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  4. The removal of estrogenic activity with UV/chlorine technology and identification of novel estrogenic disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Xu, Bi; Liungai, Zhiqi; Hu, Hong-Ying; Chen, Chao; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-04-15

    As a recently developed disinfection technology, ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine treatment has received much attention. Many studies have evaluated its effects on pathogen inactivation, contaminant removal, and formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), but its potential for environmental estrogen removal and estrogenic DBP generation, which can also be a risk to both ecosystem and human health, have not been evaluated. In this study, UV/chlorine treatment resulted in a greater removal of estrogenic activity in synthetic effluent samples containing 17β-estradiol (E2) than did UV or chlorine treatment alone regardless of the water quality. For both the UV/chlorine and chlorine treatments, there was significant interference from NH3-N, although the UV/chlorine treatment was less affected. Estrogen receptor based affinity chromatography was used to isolate the specific estrogenic DBPs, and a novel product, with high estrogenic activity compared to E2, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, was identified. It was generated by all three treatments, and might be previously mistakenly recognized as estrone (E1). This study demonstrated that UV/chlorine is a better treatment for the removal of 17β-estradiol than chlorine and UV alone. The new identified estrogenic DBP, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, which can be isolated by affinity chromatography, could be an emerging concern in the future. PMID:26780699

  5. Molecular characterization of an estrogen receptor and estrogen-related receptor and their autoregulatory capabilities in two Mytilus species.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kazue; Treen, Nicholas; Kondo, Reki; Otoki, Yurika; Itoh, Naoki; Rotchell, Jeanette M; Osada, Makoto

    2015-06-15

    Vertebrate-like sex steroid hormones have been widely detected in mollusks, and numerous experiments have shown the importance of steroids in gonad development. Nevertheless, their signaling pathways in invertebrates have not been uncovered yet. Steroid receptors are an ancient class of transcription factors with multiple roles in not only vertebrates but also invertebrates. Estrogen signaling is thought to have major roles in mollusk physiology, but the full repertoire of estrogen receptors is unknown. We presented the successful cloning of two novel forms of estrogen receptor-like genes. These receptors are present in two closely related species of Mytilus: Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis, commonly known and widely distributed sentinel species. Our phylogenetic analysis revealed that one of these receptors is an estrogen receptor (ER) and the other one is an estrogen-related receptor (ERR). Studies of expression analysis showed that both receptor mRNAs were localized in the oocytes and follicle cells in contact with developing oocytes in the ovary and Sertoli cells in the testis, and in the ciliated cells of the gill. In addition, we have evidence that one (ER) of these may have a capacity to autoregulate its own expression in the gonadal cells by estrogen (E2) and that this gene is responsive to estrogenic compounds. PMID:25862924

  6. Estrogen receptor beta agonists in neurobehavioral investigations.

    PubMed

    Choleris, Elena; Clipperton, Amy E; Phan, Anna; Kavaliers, Martin

    2008-07-01

    Neurobehavioral investigations into the functions of estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and ERbeta have utilized 'knockout' mice, phytoestrogens and, more recently, ER-specific agonists. Feeding, sexual, aggressive and social behavior, anxiety, depression, drug abuse, pain perception, and learning (and associated synaptic plasticity) are affected by ERalpha and ERbeta in a manner that is dependent upon the specific behavior studied, gender and developmental stage. Overall, ERalpha and ERbeta appear to function together to foster sociosexual behavior while inhibiting behaviors that, if occurring at the time of behavioral estrous, may compete with reproduction (eg, feeding). Recently developed pharmacological tools have limited selectivity and availability to the research community at large, as they are not commercially available. The development of highly selective, commercially available ERbeta-specific antagonists would greatly benefit preclinical and applied research. PMID:18600582

  7. [Estrogen receptor alpha in obesity and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Cahua-Pablo, José Ángel; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Cruz, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) is an important hormone in reproductive physiology, cardiovascular, skeletal and in the central nervous system (CNS). In human and rodents, E2 and its receptors are involved in the control of energy and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NR), which are transcription factors that regulate gene expression. Three ER, ER-alpha, ER-beta and the G protein-coupled ER (GPER; also called GPR30) in tissues are involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Also, it may have important implications for risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MS), insulin resistance (IR), obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). PMID:27197110

  8. Immunoresponsiveness in endometriosis: implications of estrogenic toxicants.

    PubMed Central

    Rier, S E; Martin, D C; Bowman, R E; Becker, J L

    1995-01-01

    Endometriosis is a reproductive disease characterized by the growth of endometrial cells at sites outside the uterus. This disease is a serious disorder associated with chronic pain and infertility, which may be present in 6 million women in this country. Traditional medical therapy has consisted of hormonal regimens that limit the action of endogenous estrogen. The etiology of endometriosis is unknown, but studies suggest that soluble factors known as cytokines play a role in disease pathogenesis. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or dioxin) is an environmental toxicant that alters the action of estrogen in reproductive organs and adversely affects immunocompetence. The incidence of endometriosis was determined in rhesus monkeys that were chronically exposed to dioxin for a period of approximately 4 years. Ten years after termination of dioxin treatment, the presence and severity of endometriosis was assessed by surgical laparoscopy. The incidence of endometriosis correlated with dioxin exposure and disease severity was dependent upon the dose administered. Moderate to severe endometriosis was not found in control animals but was documented in three of seven animals exposed to 5 ppt dioxin (43%) and in five of seven animals exposed to 25 ppt dioxin (71%). The frequency of spontaneous disease in the control group was 33%, similar to an overall prevalence of 30% in 304 rhesus monkeys with no history of dioxin exposure. This study indicates that endometriosis may be associated with dioxin exposure in the rhesus. In view of overwhelming evidence that cytokines participate in the mediation of reproductive-endocrine phenomena and regulation of endometrial growth, future assessment of the effects of environmental toxicants on reproductive health may depend upon our understanding of the bidirectional cytokine network between the immune and endocrine systems. PMID:8593863

  9. Bioassay of estrogenicity and chemical analyses of estrogens in streams across the United States associated with livestock operations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, D A; Shappell, N W; Billey, L O; Bermudez, D S; Wilson, V S; Kolpin, D W; Perkins, S D; Evans, N; Foreman, W T; Gray, J L; Shipitalo, M J; Meyer, M T

    2013-06-15

    Animal manures, used as a nitrogen source for crop production, are often associated with negative impacts on nutrient levels in surface water. The concentrations of estrogens in streams from these manures also are of concern due to potential endocrine disruption in aquatic species. Streams associated with livestock operations were sampled by discrete samples (n = 38) or by time-integrated polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS, n = 19). Samples were analyzed for estrogens by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS(2)) and estrogenic activity was assessed by three bioassays: Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES), T47D-KBluc Assay, MCF-7 Estrogenicity Screen (E-Screen). Samples were collected from 19 streams within small (≈ 1-30 km(2)) watersheds in 12 U.S. states representing a range of hydrogeologic conditions, dominated by: dairy (3), grazing beef (3), feedlot cattle (1); swine (5); poultry (3); and 4 areas where no livestock were raised or manure was applied. Water samples were consistently below the United Kingdom proposed Lowest Observable Effect Concentration for 17β-estradiol in fish (10 ng/L) in all watersheds, regardless of land use. Estrogenic activity was often higher in samples during runoff conditions following a period of manure application. Estrone was the most commonly detected estrogen (13 of 38 water samples, mean 1.9, maximum 8.3 ng/L). Because of the T47D-KBluc assay's sensitivity towards estrone (1.4 times 17β-estradiol) it was the most sensitive method for detecting estrogens, followed by the E-Screen, GC-MS(2), and YES. POCIS resulted in more frequent detections of estrogens than discrete water samples across all sites, even when applying the less-sensitive YES bioassay to the POCIS extracts. PMID:23623470

  10. Bioassay of estrogenicity and chemical analyses of estrogens in streams across the United States associated with livestock operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, David A.; Shappell, Nancy W.; Billey, L.O.; Bermudez, Dietrich S.; Wilson, Vickie S.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Perkins, Stephanie D.; Evans, Nicola; Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; Shipitalo, J.M.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Animal manures, used as a nitrogen source for crop production, are often associated with negative impacts on nutrient levels in surface water. The concentrations of estrogens in streams from these manures also are of concern due to potential endocrine disruption in aquatic species. Streams associated with livestock operations were sampled by discrete samples (n = 38) or by time-integrated polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS,n = 19). Samples were analyzed for estrogens by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MSM2) and estrogenic activity was assessed by three bioassays: Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES), T47D-KBluc Assay, MCF-7 Estrogenicity Screen (E-Screen). Samples were collected from 19 streams within small (∼1-30 km2) watersheds in 12 U.S. states representing a range of hydrogeologic conditions, dominated by: dairy (3), grazing beef (3), feedlot cattle (1); swine (5); poultry (3); and 4 areas where no livestock were raised or manure was applied. Water samples were consistently below the United Kingdom proposed Lowest Observable Effect Concentration for 17b-estradiol in fish (10 ng/L) in all watersheds, regardless of land use. Estrogenic activity was often higher in samples during runoff conditions following a period of manure application. Estrone was the most commonly detected estrogen (13 of 38 water samples, mean 1.9, maximum 8.3 ng/L). Because of the T47D-KBluc assay’s sensitivity towards estrone (1.4 times 17β-estradiol) it was the most sensitive method for detecting estrogens, followed by the E-Screen, GC-MS2, and YES. POCIS resulted in more frequent detections of estrogens than discrete water samples across all sites, even when applying the less-sensitive YES bioassay to the POCIS extracts.

  11. BIOCHEMICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ESTROGENICALLY ACTIVE WASTEWATER: COMPARISON OF FIELD EXTRAPOLATIONS TO THE MEASURED CONCENTRATION OF ESTROGENS IN SEWAGE EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenically active wastewater was observed at two municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) utilizing caged male channel catfish in a previous study. The focus of this investigation was to identify and characterize the compound(s) responsible for this estrogenic response. ...

  12. Modeling mixtures of environmental estrogens found in U.S. surface waters with an in vitro estrogen mediated transcriptionai activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental estrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipa...

  13. Uncertainties in hydrocarbon charge prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, W.; Bell, A.

    Computer simulations allow the prediction of hydrocarbon volumes, composition and charge timing in undrilled petroleum prospects. Whereas different models may give different hydrocarbon charge predictions, it has now become evident that a dominant cause of erroneous predictions is the poor quality of input data. The main culprit for prediction errors is the uncertainty in the initial hydrogen index (H/C) of the source rock. A 10% uncertainty in the H/C may lead to 50% error in the predicted hydrocarbon volumes, and associated gas-oil ratio. Similarly, uncertainties in the maximum burial temperature and the kinetics of hydrocarbon generation may lead to 20-50% error. Despite this, charge modelling can have great value for the ranking of prospects in the same area with comparable geological histories.

  14. Estrogen regulation of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene is mediated by ERE half sites without direct binding of estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Urvashi; Ganjam, Goutham K; Vasudevan, Nandini; Kondaiah, Paturu

    2005-02-28

    Estrogen is an important steroid hormone that mediates most of its effects on regulation of gene expression by binding to intracellular receptors. The consensus estrogen response element (ERE) is a 13bp palindromic inverted repeat with a three nucleotide spacer. However, several reports suggest that many estrogen target genes are regulated by diverse elements, such as imperfect EREs and ERE half sites (ERE 1/2), which are either the proximal or the distal half of the palindrome. To gain more insight into ERE half site-mediated gene regulation, we used a region from the estrogen-regulated chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) gene promoter that contains ERE half sites. Using moxestrol, an analogue of estrogen and transient transfection of deletion and mutation containing RCP promoter/reporter constructs in chicken hepatoma (LMH2A) cells, we identified an estrogen response unit (ERU) composed of two consensus ERE 1/2 sites and one non-consensus ERE 1/2 site. Mutation of any of these sites within this ERU abolishes moxestrol response. Further, the ERU is able to confer moxestrol responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. Interestingly, RCP promoter is regulated by moxestrol in estrogen responsive human MCF-7 cells, but not in other cell lines such as NIH3T3 and HepG2 despite estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) co transfection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) with promoter regions encompassing the half sites and nuclear extracts from LMH2A cells show the presence of a moxestrol-induced complex that is abolished by a polyclonal anti-ERalpha antibody. Surprisingly, estrogen receptor cannot bind to these promoter elements in isolation. Thus, there appears to be a definite requirement for some other factor(s) in addition to estrogen receptor, for the generation of a suitable response of this promoter to estrogen. Our studies therefore suggest a novel mechanism of gene regulation by estrogen, involving ERE half sites without direct binding of ER to the

  15. Long-term estrogen exposure promotes carcinogen bioactivation, induces persistent changes in gene expression, and enhances the tumorigenicity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Spink, Barbara C.; Bennett, James A.; Pentecost, Brian T.; Lostritto, Nicole; Englert, Neal A.; Benn, Geoffrey K.; Goodenough, Angela K.; Turesky, Robert J.; Spink, David C.

    2009-11-01

    The cumulative exposure to estrogens is an important determinant in the risk of breast cancer, yet the full range of mechanisms involving estrogens in the genesis and progression of breast cancer remains a subject of debate. Interactions of estrogens and environmental toxicants have received attention as putative factors contributing to carcinogenesis. Mechanistic studies have demonstrated interactions between estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), with consequences on the genes that they regulate. Many studies of ERalpha and AhR-mediated effects and crosstalk between them have focused on the initial molecular events. In this study, we investigated ERalpha- and AhR-mediated effects in long-term estrogen exposed (LTEE) MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, which were obtained by continuous culturing for at least 12 weeks in medium supplemented with 1 nM of 17beta-estradiol (E{sub 2}). With these LTEE cells and with parallel control cells cultured without E{sub 2} supplementation, we performed an extensive study of cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, carcinogen bioactivation, global gene expression, and tumorigenicity in immunocompromised mice. We found that LTEE cells, in comparison with control cells, had higher levels of AhR mRNA and protein, greater responsiveness for AhR-regulated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 induction, a 6-fold higher initial level of benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adducts as determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, marked differences in the expression of numerous genes, and a higher rate of E{sub 2}-dependent tumor growth as xenografts. These studies indicate that LTEE causes adaptive responses in MCF-7 cells, which may reflect processes that contribute to the overall carcinogenic effect of E{sub 2}.

  16. Hydrocarbon potential of Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Achnin, H.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1988-08-01

    Morocco lies at the junction of the African and Eurasian plates and carries a record of their movements since the end of the Precambrian. Four structural regions with basins and troughs can be identified: Saharan (Tarfaya-Ayoun and Tindouf basins); Anti-Atlas (Souss and Ouarzazate troughs and Boudnib basin); the Essaouria, Doukkala, Tadla, Missour, High Plateau, and Guercif basins; and Meseta and Rif (Rharb and Pre-Rif basins). The targets in the Tindouf basin are Paleozoic, Cambrian, Ordovician (clastics), Devonian (limestones), and Carboniferous reservoirs sourced primarily by Silurian shales. In the remaining basins, excluding the Rharb, the reservoirs are Triassic detritals, limestones at the base of the Lias and Dogger, Malm detritals, and sandy horizons in the Cretaceous. In addition to the Silurian, potential source rocks include the Carboniferous and Permo-Carboniferous shales and clays; Jurassic shales, marls, and carbonates; and Cretaceous clays. In the Rharb basin, the objectives are sand lenses within the Miocene marls. The maturation level of the organic matter generally corresponds to oil and gas. The traps are stratigraphic (lenses and reefs) and structural (horsts and folds). The seals in the pre-Jurassic rocks are shales and evaporites; in the younger rocks, shales and marl. Hydrocarbon accumulations have been found in Paleozoic, Triassic, Liassic, Malm, and Miocene rocks.

  17. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  18. Illite and hydrocarbon exploration

    PubMed Central

    Pevear, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Illite is a general term for the dioctahedral mica-like clay mineral common in sedimentary rocks, especially shales. Illite is of interest to the petroleum industry because it can provide a K-Ar isotope date that constrains the timing of basin heating events. It is critical to establish that hydrocarbon formation and migration occurred after the formation of the trap (anticline, etc.) that is to hold the oil. Illite also may precipitate in the pores of sandstone reservoirs, impeding fluid flow. Illite in shales is a mixture of detrital mica and its weathering products with diagenetic illite formed by reaction with pore fluids during burial. K-Ar ages are apparent ages of mixtures of detrital and diagenetic end members, and what we need are the ages of the end members themselves. This paper describes a methodology, based on mineralogy and crystallography, for interpreting the K-Ar ages from illites in sedimentary rocks and for estimating the ages of the end members. PMID:10097055

  19. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  20. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  1. A Role for Estrogen in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Preclinical Findings.

    PubMed

    Gogos, Andrea; Sbisa, Alyssa M; Sun, Jeehae; Gibbons, Andrew; Udawela, Madhara; Dean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in schizophrenia have been extensively researched and it is being increasingly accepted that gonadal steroids are strongly attributed to this phenomenon. Of the various hormones implicated, the estrogen hypothesis has been the most widely researched one and it postulates that estrogen exerts a protective effect by buffering females against the development and severity of the illness. In this review, we comprehensively analyse studies that have investigated the effects of estrogen, in particular 17β-estradiol, in clinical, animal, and molecular research with relevance to schizophrenia. Specifically, we discuss the current evidence on estrogen dysfunction in schizophrenia patients and review the clinical findings on the use of estradiol as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia patients. Preclinical research that has used animal models and molecular probes to investigate estradiol's underlying protective mechanisms is also substantially discussed, with particular focus on estradiol's impact on the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia, namely, the dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate systems. PMID:26491441

  2. Comparison of estrogen mixtures in vitro vs. in vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous sources contribute to widespread contamination of drinking water sources with both natural and synthetic estrogens, which isa concern for potential ecological and human health effects. In vitro screening assays are valuable tools for identifying mechanisms of toxicity bu...

  3. ROLE OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-α ON FOOD DEMAND ELASTICITY

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Vanessa; Rowland, Neil E.; Robertson, Kimberly L.; Foster, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have an inhibitory effect on food intake under free-feeding conditions, yet the effects of estrogens on food-maintained operant responding have been studied to a much lesser extent and, thus, are not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of the present experiment was to use a behavioral economics paradigm to assess differences in demand elasticity between mice with knockout of the estrogen receptor subtype α, knockout of subtype β, and their wild type controls. The mice responded in a closed economy, and the price of food was increased by increasing the fixed-ratio response requirement every four sessions. Overall, we found that mice with the knockout of receptor subtype α had the most elastic demand functions. Therefore, under these conditions, estrogens increased food seeking via activation of the receptor subtype α. The results were inconsistent with those reported by previous studies that employed free-feeding conditions. PMID:25869426

  4. The Role and Use of Estrogens Following Trauma.

    PubMed

    Weniger, Maximilian; Angele, Martin K; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2016-09-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that female sex is a protective factor in trauma and hemorrhage. In both clinical and experimental studies, proestrus females have been shown to have better chances of survival and reduced rates of posttraumatic sepsis. Estrogen receptors are expressed in a variety of tissues and exert genomic, as well as nongenomic effects. By improving cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, and immune function, estrogens have been shown to prolong survival in animal models of hemorrhagic shock. Despite encouraging results from experimental studies, retrospective clinical studies have not clearly pointed to advantages of estrogens following trauma-hemorrhage, which may be due to insufficient study design. Therefore, this review aims to give an overview on the current evidence and emphasizes on the importance of further clinical investigation on estrogens following trauma. PMID:27380534

  5. Modeling environmental loading rates of municipal wastewater contaminants: steroidal estrogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds in municipal wastewater are of substantial interest because of suspicion that they may cause reproductive disruption in aquatic invertebrates, and because of their potential to contaminate human drinking water sources. Previous work suggests the primary contr...

  6. Estrogen-induced myelotoxicity in dogs: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sontas, Hasan B.; Dokuzeylu, Banu; Turna, Ozge; Ekici, Hayri

    2009-01-01

    Exogenous estrogens used for therapeutic purposes or endogenous estrogen sources such as functional Sertoli cell or ovarian granulosa cell tumors may cause bone marrow toxicity in dogs. The condition is characterized by hematologic abnormalities including thrombocytopenia, anemia, and leukocytosis or leukopenia. Despite intensive therapy with blood or platelet-rich transfusions, broad-spectrum antibiotics, steroids, and bone marrow stimulants, prognosis is unfavorable. Due to the the risk of stimulating the development of uterine diseases and the potential for inducing aplastic anemia, estrogen use in dogs is best avoided where possible. This paper describes the causes of estrogen-induced myelotoxicity, the clinical presentation of the patients, the diagnosis, and the treatment options in the dog. PMID:20046604

  7. SPONTANEOUS AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-A DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Airway hyperresponsiveness is a critical feature of asthma. Substantial epidemiologic evidence supports a role for female sex hormones in modulating lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in humans. Objectives: To examine the role of estrogen receptors in modulat...

  8. ESTROGEN RECEPTORS AND THE REGULATION OF NEURAL STRESS RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Robert J.; Mani, Shaila K.; Uht, Rosalie M.

    2012-01-01

    It is now well established that estrogens can influence a panoply of physiological and behavioral functions. In many instances, the effects of estrogens are mediated by the ‘classical’ actions of two different estrogen receptors (ER), alpha or beta. Estrogen receptor alpha and beta appear to have opposing actions in the control of stress responses and modulate different neurotransmitter or neuropeptide systems. Studies elucidating the molecular mechanisms for such regulatory processes are currently in progress. Furthermore, the use of ERalpha and ERbeta knockout mouse lines has allowed the exploration of the importance of these receptors in behavioral responses such as anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviors. This review examines some of the recent advances in our knowledge of hormonal control of neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to stress and underscore the importance of these receptors as future therapeutic targets for control of stress-related signaling pathways. PMID:22538291

  9. A Role for Estrogen in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Preclinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Gogos, Andrea; Sbisa, Alyssa M.; Sun, Jeehae; Gibbons, Andrew; Udawela, Madhara; Dean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in schizophrenia have been extensively researched and it is being increasingly accepted that gonadal steroids are strongly attributed to this phenomenon. Of the various hormones implicated, the estrogen hypothesis has been the most widely researched one and it postulates that estrogen exerts a protective effect by buffering females against the development and severity of the illness. In this review, we comprehensively analyse studies that have investigated the effects of estrogen, in particular 17β-estradiol, in clinical, animal, and molecular research with relevance to schizophrenia. Specifically, we discuss the current evidence on estrogen dysfunction in schizophrenia patients and review the clinical findings on the use of estradiol as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia patients. Preclinical research that has used animal models and molecular probes to investigate estradiol's underlying protective mechanisms is also substantially discussed, with particular focus on estradiol's impact on the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia, namely, the dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate systems. PMID:26491441

  10. Role of estrogen receptor-α on food demand elasticity.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Vanessa; Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly L; Foster, Thomas C

    2015-05-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have an inhibitory effect on food intake under free-feeding conditions, yet the effects of estrogens on food-maintained operant responding have been studied to a much lesser extent and, thus, are not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of the present experiment was to use a behavioral economics paradigm to assess differences in demand elasticity between mice with knockout of the estrogen receptor subtype α, knockout of subtype β, and their wild type controls. The mice responded in a closed economy, and the price of food was increased by increasing the fixed-ratio response requirement every four sessions. Overall, we found that mice with the knockout of receptor subtype α had the most elastic demand functions. Therefore, under these conditions, estrogens increased food seeking via activation of the receptor subtype α. The results were inconsistent with those reported by previous studies that employed free-feeding conditions. PMID:25869426

  11. Molecular mechanism of inhibition of estrogen-induced cathepsin D gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, V.; Porter, W.; Santostefano, M.; Wang, Xiahong

    1995-12-01

    This report describes how 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) induces cathepsin D gene expression, but is inhibited by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor by disruption of the estrogen receptor/pBC12/S1/pac plasmid complex by interaction with an overlapping xenobiotic responsive element. It was also determined that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorobenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) alone does not affect cathepsin D gene expression but can together with E2 to affect the rate of transcription and levels of immunoreactive protein. 85 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The estrogenic activity of phthalate esters in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C A; Henttu, P; Parker, M G; Sumpter, J P

    1997-01-01

    A large number of phthalate esters were screened for estrogenic activity using a recombinant yeast screen. a selection of these was also tested for mitogenic effect on estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cells. A small number of the commercially available phthalates tested showed extremely weak estrogenic activity. The relative potencies of these descended in the order butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) > dibutyl phthalate (DBP) > diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP) > diethyl phthalate (DEP) > diisiononyl phthalate (DINP). Potencies ranged from approximately 1 x 10(6) to 5 x 10(7) times less than 17beta-estradiol. The phthalates that were estrogenic in the yeast screen were also mitogenic on the human breast cancer cells. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) showed no estrogenic activity in these in vitro assays. A number of metabolites were tested, including mono-butyl phthalate, mono-benzyl phthalate, mono-ethylhexyl phthalate, mon-n-octyl phthalate; all were wound to be inactive. One of the phthalates, ditridecyl phthalate (DTDP), produced inconsistent results; one sample was weakly estrogenic, whereas another, obtained from a different source, was inactive. analysis by gel chromatography-mass spectometry showed that the preparation exhibiting estrogenic activity contained 0.5% of the ortho-isomer of bisphenol A. It is likely that the presence of this antioxidant in the phthalate standard was responsible for the generation of a dose-response curve--which was not observed with an alternative sample that had not been supplemented with o,p'-bisphenol A--in the yeast screen; hence, DTDP is probably not weakly estrogenic. The activities of simple mixtures of BBP, DBP, and 17beta-estradiol were assessed in the yeast screen. No synergism was observed, although the activities of the mixtures were approximately additive. In summary, a small number of phthalates are weakly estrogenic in vitro. No data has yet been published on whether these are also estrogenic in vitro. No data has

  13. Sex-Dependent Influence of Endogenous Estrogen in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Kirsty M.; Wright, Audrey F.; Duggan, Nicholas; Rowlands, David J.; Hussey, Martin J.; Roberts, Sonia; Fullerton, Josephine; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Thomas, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The incidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension is greater in women, suggesting estrogens may play a role in the disease pathogenesis. Experimentally, in males, exogenously administered estrogen can protect against pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, in models that display female susceptibility, estrogens may play a causative role. Objectives: To clarify the influence of endogenous estrogen and sex in PH and assess the therapeutic potential of a clinically available aromatase inhibitor. Methods: We interrogated the effect of reduced endogenous estrogen in males and females using the aromatase inhibitor, anastrozole, in two models of PH: the hypoxic mouse and Sugen 5416/hypoxic rat. We also determined the effects of sex on pulmonary expression of aromatase in these models and in lungs from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Measurements and Main Results: Anastrozole attenuated PH in both models studied, but only in females. To verify this effect was caused by reduced estrogenic activity we confirmed that in hypoxic mice inhibition of estrogen receptor α also has a therapeutic effect specifically in females. Female rodent lung displays increased aromatase and decreased bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 and Id1 expression compared with male. Anastrozole treatment reversed the impaired bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 pathway in females. Increased aromatase expression was also detected in female human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells compared with male. Conclusions: The unique phenotype of female pulmonary arteries facilitates the therapeutic effects of anastrozole in experimental PH confirming a role for endogenous estrogen in the disease pathogenesis in females and suggests aromatase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. PMID:24956156

  14. Estrogen Effects on Cognitive and Synaptic Health Over the Lifecourse

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yuko; Waters, Elizabeth M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen facilitates higher cognitive functions by exerting effects on brain regions such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Estrogen induces spinogenesis and synaptogenesis in these two brain regions and also initiates a complex set of signal transduction pathways via estrogen receptors (ERs). Along with the classical genomic effects mediated by activation of ER α and ER β, there are membrane-bound ER α, ER β, and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) that can mediate rapid nongenomic effects. All key ERs present throughout the body are also present in synapses of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. This review summarizes estrogen actions in the brain from the standpoint of their effects on synapse structure and function, noting also the synergistic role of progesterone. We first begin with a review of ER subtypes in the brain and how their abundance and distributions are altered with aging and estrogen loss (e.g., ovariectomy or menopause) in the rodent, monkey, and human brain. As there is much evidence that estrogen loss induced by menopause can exacerbate the effects of aging on cognitive functions, we then review the clinical trials of hormone replacement therapies and their effectiveness on cognitive symptoms experienced by women. Finally, we summarize studies carried out in nonhuman primate models of age- and menopause-related cognitive decline that are highly relevant for developing effective interventions for menopausal women. Together, we highlight a new understanding of how estrogen affects higher cognitive functions and synaptic health that go well beyond its effects on reproduction. PMID:26109339

  15. Exercise (and Estrogen) Make Fat Cells “Fit”

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Zidon, Terese M.; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation links obesity and metabolic disease. Both exercise and estrogen improve metabolic health, enhance mitochondrial function, and have anti-inflammatory effects. We hypothesize that there is an inverse relationship between mitochondrial function and inflammation in adipose tissue and that exercise acts as an estrogen “mimetic”. Explicitly, exercise may improve adipose tissue “immunometabolism” by improving mitochondrial function and reducing inflammation. Summary Exercise improves adipose tissue metabolic health by reducing inflammation and improving mitochondrial function. PMID:25906425

  16. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  17. Estrogen replacement during hypoalbuminemia may enhance atherosclerotic risk.

    PubMed

    Joles, J A; Bijleveld, C; van Tol, A; Geelen, M J; Koomans, H A

    1997-12-01

    Estrogen replacement therapy is considered antiatherosclerotic because it reduces LDL cholesterol and fibrinogen and increases HDL cholesterol concentrations. However, exogenous estrogen is also known to increase hepatic triglyceride production. Hyperlipidemia in the nephrotic syndrome is probably due to increased lipoprotein secretion into plasma and decreased clearance of lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. Previously, lipid-lowering effects of ovariectomy in analbuminemic rats were observed, suggesting that in the presence of hypoalbuminemia, estrogen replacement may have adverse effects on the lipid profile. To test this hypothesis, ovariectomized control rats and rats with Adriamycin-induced nephrotic syndrome were treated with estradiol. In ovariectomized controls, estradiol reduced plasma LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and fibrinogen and increased apolipoprotein A-I and triglycerides. Nephrotic rats were characterized by a marked decrease in plasma colloid osmotic pressure, hyperfibrinogenemia, hyperlipidemia, and stimulated hepatic fatty acid synthesis. The beneficial effects of estradiol on LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and fibrinogen found in ovariectomized controls were not present in estradiol-treated nephrotic rats. This suggests that in hypoalbuminemia, downregulation of the LDL receptor overrides putative estradiol-induced increases in LDL receptor activity. Moreover, estrogen replacement in the nephrotic syndrome doubled fatty acid synthesis and triglyceride secretion, and markedly exacerbated hypertriglyceridemia, suggesting saturation of triglyceride clearance. Thus, severe hypoalbuminemia in rats induces an atherosclerotic metabolic response that is aggravated by estrogen replacement. These findings suggest that estrogen replacement in hypoalbuminemic subjects could be contra-indicated. PMID:9402089

  18. Estrogen Biology: New Insights into GPER Function and Clinical Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Prossnitz, Eric R.; Barton, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play an important role in the regulation of normal physiology, aging and many disease states. Although the nuclear estrogen receptors have classically been described to function as ligand-activated transcription factors mediating genomic effects in hormonally regulated tissues, more recent studies reveal that estrogens also mediate rapid signaling events traditionally associated with G protein-coupled receptors. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER (formerly GPR30) has now become recognized as a major mediator of estrogen’s rapid cellular effects throughout the body. With the discovery of selective synthetic ligands for GPER, both agonists and antagonists, as well as the use of GPER knockout mice, significant advances have been made in our understanding of GPER function at the cellular, tissue and organismal levels. In many instances, the protective/beneficial effects of estrogen are mimicked by selective GPER agonism and are absent or reduced in GPER knockout mice, suggesting an essential or at least parallel role for GPER in the actions of estrogen. In this review, we will discuss recent advances and our current understanding of the role of GPER and certain drugs such as SERMs and SERDs in physiology and disease. We will also highlight novel opportunities for clinical development towards GPER-targeted therapeutics, for molecular imaging, as well as for theranostic approaches and personalized medicine. PMID:24530924

  19. The in vitro estrogenic activities of triclosan and triclocarban.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongyu; Du, Guizhen; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jialei; Wu, Di; Song, Ling; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2014-09-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC), as broad spectrum antibacterial agents, are distributed widely in the environment and humans. Most studies have focused on their distribution and biodegradation, but the endocrine-disrupting effects of these chemicals, especially their estrogenic effects, are still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the estrogenic effects of TCS and TCC using a series of in vitro assays, including the ER reporter gene assay in the CV-1 cells, E-screen assay and evaluation of estrogen-responsive genes in the MCF-7 cells. The tested concentrations of TCS and TCC were both from 1 × 10(-9) to 1 × 10(-6)  M. Results showed that TCS and TCC exerted estrogenic activities by inducing luciferase activities in an ER reporter gene assay, promoting the proliferation of the MCF-7 cells, up-regulating the expression of pS2 and down-regulating ERα expression at both the mRNA and protein levels in the MCF-7 cells. We further found that TCS and TCC could alter the expression of multiple microRNAs (mir-22, mir-206 and mir-193b) in the MCF-7 cells, which would help understand the mechanisms of their estrogenic effects on regulating the expression of ERα. In brief, our results demonstrated the potential estrogenic effects and profiled in vitro data for further risk assessment of TCS and TCC. PMID:24740835

  20. Estrogenic Impact on Cardiac Ischemic/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Sivasinprasasn, Sivaporn; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-02-01

    The increase in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome incidence following the onset of menopause has highlighted the role of estrogen as a cardiometabolic protective agent. Specifically regarding the heart, estrogen induced an improvement in cardiac function, preserved calcium homeostasis, and inhibited the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The beneficial effects of estrogen in relation to cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, such as reduced infarction and ameliorated post-ischemic recovery, have also been shown. Nevertheless, controversial findings exist and estrogen therapy is reported to be related to a higher rate of thromboembolic events and atrial fibrillation in post-menopausal women. Therefore, greater clarification is needed to evaluate the exact potential of estrogen use in cases of cardiac I/R injury. This article reviews the effects of estrogen, in both acute and chronic treatment, and collates the studies with regard to their in vivo, in vitro, or clinical trial settings in cases of cardiac I/R injury and myocardial infarction. PMID:26786980

  1. Evaluation of the estrogenic effects of legume extracts containing phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Boué, Stephen M; Wiese, Thomas E; Nehls, Suzanne; Burow, Matthew E; Elliott, Steven; Carter-Wientjes, Carol H; Shih, Betty Y; McLachlan, John A; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2003-04-01

    Seven legume extracts containing phytoestrogens were analyzed for estrogenic activity. Methanol extracts were prepared from soybean (Glycine max L.), green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), alfalfa sprout (Medicago sativa L.), mung bean sprout (Vigna radiata L.), kudzu root (Pueraria lobata L.), and red clover blossom and red clover sprout (Trifolium pratense L.). Extracts of kudzu root and red clover blossom showed significant competitive binding to estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Estrogenic activity was determined using an estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation assay. Kudzu root, red clover blossom and sprout, mung bean sprout, and alfalfa sprout extracts displayed increased cell proliferation above levels observed with estradiol. The pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suppressed cell proliferation induced by the extracts, suggesting an ER-related signaling pathway was involved. The ER subtype-selective activities of legume extracts were examined using transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. All seven of the extracts exhibited preferential agonist activity toward ERbeta. Using HPLC to collect fractions and MCF-7 cell proliferation, the active components in kudzu root extract were determined to be the isoflavones puerarin, daidzin, genistin, daidzein, and genistein. These results show that several legumes are a source of phytoestrogens with high levels of estrogenic activity. PMID:12670155

  2. Combined effects of estrogenic chemicals with the same mode of action using an estrogen receptor binding bioassay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Li, Na; Ma, Mei; Wang, Zijian

    2014-11-01

    The increasing amounts of various estrogenic chemicals coexisting in the aquatic environment may pose environmental risks. While the concept of estradiol equivalent (EEQ) has been frequently applied in studying estrogenic mixtures, few experiments have been done to prove its reliability. In this study, the reliability of EEQ and the related model concentration addition (CA) was verified based on the two-hybrid recombinant yeast bioassay when all mixture components had the same mode of action and target of action. Our results showed that the measured estrogenic effects could be well predicted by CA and EEQ for all laboratory-made mixtures using two designs, despite the varying estrogenic activity, concentration levels and ratios of the test chemicals. This suggests that when an appropriate endpoint and its relevant bioassay are chosen, CA should be valid and the application of EEQ in predicting the effect of non-equi-effect mixtures is feasible. PMID:25461542

  3. Assessment of in vivo estrogenic response and identification of environmental estrogens in influent and effluent from a sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenting; Wang, Zhijun; Lian, Chuanjie

    2013-09-01

    The in vivo estrogenic response and estrogenic contents of the influent and effluent collected from a sewage treatment plant located in Jiaozuo were assessed. The bioassay showed significant serum vitellogenin (VTG) induction in all the treated male goldfish (Carassius auratus) and significant gonad atrophies were only observed in the fish induced the most VTG expressions. Six target estrogens (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethynylestradiol, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol and bisphenol A) were detected in different polar fractions, with the exception of the 25 % and 50 % methanol fractions extracted from the influent and the 25 %, 50 %, 95 % and 100 % methanol fractions extracted from the effluent. For both the influent and effluent, natural and synthetic steroidal estrogens were detected in those extracted fractions induced the most abundant VTG expressions. PMID:23877625

  4. Estrogen action and cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Part I: membrane-associated signaling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Segars, James H.; Driggers, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable progress in recent years has suggested that estrogen action in vivo is complex and often involves activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades in addition to genomic actions mediated directly through estrogen receptors α and β. Rather than a linear response mediated solely through estrogen-responsive DNA elements, in vivo estrogen might simultaneously activate distinct signaling cascades that function as networks to coordinate tissue responses to estrogen. This complex signaling system provides for exquisite control and plasticity of response to estrogen at the tissue level, and undoubtedly contributes to the remarkable tissue-specific responses to estrogens. In part I of this series, we summarize cytoplasmic signaling modules involving estrogen or estrogen receptors, with particular focus on recently described membrane-associated signaling complexes. PMID:12217492

  5. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  6. Acquisition of Estrogen Independence Induces TOB1-Related Mechanisms Supporting Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Wei; Nasto, Rochelle E.; Varghese, Rency; Jablonski, Sandra A.; Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Surana, Rishi; Calvert, Valerie S.; Bebu, Ionut; Murray, Joseph; Jin, Lu; Johnson, Michael; Riggins, Rebecca; Ressom, Habtom; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Clarke, Robert; Golemis, Erica A.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to therapies targeting the estrogen pathway remains a challenge in the treatment of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. To address this challenge, a systems biology approach was used. A library of siRNAs targeting an estrogen receptor- and aromatase-centered network identified 46 genes that are dispensable in estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells, but are selectively required for the survival of estrogen-independent MCF7-derived cells, and multiple additional estrogen-independent breast cancer cell lines. Integration of this information identified a tumor suppressor gene TOB1 as a critical determinant of estrogen-independent estrogen receptor-positive breast cell survival. Depletion of TOB1 selectively promoted G1 phase arrest and sensitivity to AKT and mTOR inhibitors in estrogen-independent cells but not estrogen-dependent cells. Phosphoproteomic profiles from reverse phase protein array analysis supported by mRNA profiling identified a significant signaling network reprogramming by TOB1 that differed in estrogen-sensitive and estrogen-resistant cell lines. These data support a novel function for TOB1 in mediating survival of estrogen-independent breast cancers. These studies also provide evidence for combining TOB1 inhibition and AKT/mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic strategy, with potential translational significance for the management of patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. PMID:26165839

  7. Neoplastic transformation of cultured mammalian cells by estrogens and estrogenlike chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, T; Barrett, J C

    1997-01-01

    Estrogens are clearly carcinogenic in humans and rodents but the mechanisms by which these hormones induce cancer are only partially understood. Stimulation of cell proliferation and gene expression by binding to the estrogen receptor is one important mechanism in hormonal carcinogenesis; however, estrogenicity is not sufficient to explain the carcinogenic activity of all estrogens because some estrogens are not carcinogenic. Estrogens are nonmutagenic in many assays but exhibit specific types of genotoxic activity under certain conditions. We have studied extensively the mechanisms by which estrogens induce neoplastic transformation in a model in vitro system and our findings are summarized in this review. 17beta-Estradiol (E2) and diethylstilbestrol (DES) and their metabolites induce morphological and neoplastic transformation of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells that express no measurable levels of estrogen receptor. Treatment of the cells with E2 or DES fails to induce DNA damage, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations in SHE cells but results in numerical chromosome aberrations (aneuploidy) that could arise from microtubule disruption or disfunction of mitotic apparatus. Estrogen-induced genotoxicity is detected in cells following treatment with estrogen metabolites or following exogenous metabolic activation of estrogens. The estrogens induce DNA adduct formation that is detected by 32P-postlabeling. Both aneuploidy induction and DNA damage caused by DNA adduct formation correlate with the estrogen-induced cell transformation and may be important in hormonal carcinogenesis. We propose that multiple effects of estrogens acting together cause genetic alterations leading to cell transformation. PMID:9168005

  8. Occurrence of selected estrogenic compounds and estrogenic activity in surface water and sediment of Langat River (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Lui, Tang Seok; Hamin, Nur'Aqilah; Razak, Siti Quistina Noorain Abdul; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and estrogenic activities of steroid estrogens, such as the natural estrone (E1), 17β estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3), as well as the synthetic 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), were investigated in eight sampling points along the Langat River (Malaysia). Surface water samples were collected at 0.5 m and surface sediment 0-5 cm from the river surface. Instrument analysis of steroid estrogens was determined by UPLC-ESI-MS with an ultra-performance liquid chromatograph (Perkin Elmer FX15) coupled to a Q Trap function mass spectrophotometer (model 3200: AB Sciex). Steroid estrogen concentrations were higher in the Langat River sediments than those in its surface water. In surface water, E1 was not detected in any sampling point, E2 was only detected in two midstream sampling points (range 0-0.004 ng/L), E3 in three sampling points (range 0-0.002 ng/L), and EE2 in four sampling points (range 0-0.02 ng/L). E1 and E2 were detected in sediments from all sampling points, E3 in five sampling points, while EE2 only in one midstream sample (3.29E-4 ng/g). Sewage treatment plants, farming waste, and agricultural activities particularly present midstream and downstream were identified as potential sources of estrogens. Estrogenic activity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQs) was below 1 ng/L in all samples for both surface water and sediment, indicating therefore a low potential estrogenic risk to the aquatic environment. Although the health risks are still uncertain for drinking water consumers exposed to low levels of steroid estrogen concentrations, Langat River water is unacceptable for direct drinking purposes without treatment. Further studies of endocrine disruptors in Malaysian waters are highly recommended. PMID:27353134

  9. Optimization of a yeast estrogen screen and its applicability to study the release of estrogenic isoflavones from a soygerm powder.

    PubMed Central

    De Boever, P; Demaré, W; Vanderperren, E; Cooreman, K; Bossier, P; Verstraete, W

    2001-01-01

    Here we describe a redesigned protocol of the yeast estrogen screen developed by Routledge and Sumpter. The redesigned test comprises two steps. First, a large amount of yeast with estrogenic compounds is incubated for 24 hr. Subsequently, a mixture of cycloheximide and the chromogenic substrate chlorophenol red-beta-d-galactopyranoside (CPRG) is added. The cycloheximide stops protein synthesis and allows for an end-point measurement of beta-galactosidase activity generated during the first 24 hr. CPRG is converted to chlorophenol red and reflects beta-galactosidase activity, which is indicative of the estrogenic activity. The modifications shorten the duration of the assay at least 1 day and avoid interference of the estrogenic CPRG or chlorophenol red. The redesigned and the original protocol were used to study the estrogenic activity of bisphenol A, methoxychlor, p,p'-DDT, and isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, and glycitein). Bisphenol A, methoxychlor, and genistein triggered higher levels of beta-galactosidase activity in the redesigned protocol. Estrogenic activity of p,p'-DDT could only be demonstrated with the redesigned protocol. Glycitein and daidzein failed to give a response with both protocols. We also studied deconjugation of beta-glycosidic isoflavones present in soygerm powder. Treatment of the soygerm powder with beta-glycosidase released isoflavones. The estrogenic response of the samples was confirmed with the redesigned protocol and correlated with the amount of genistein present. The release of isoflavones under conditions prevailing in the intestines was studied. Bacterial beta-glycosidase present in the large intestine released isoflavones, and moderate estrogenic activity could be demonstrated. PMID:11485867

  10. Estrogen withdrawal from osteoblasts and osteocytes causes increased mineralization and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M Á; Haugh, M G; O'Brien, F J; McNamara, L M

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated increased bone mineral heterogeneity following estrogen withdrawal in vivo. Such changes likely contribute to fracture risk during post-menopausal osteoporosis since tissue mineralization is correlated with bone strength and stiffness. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for increased mineral variability have not yet been distinguished. The objective of this study is to elucidate how alterations in mineral distribution are initiated during estrogen depletion. Specifically, we tested two separate hypotheses; (1) estrogen deficiency directly alters osteoblast mineralization and (2) estrogen deficiency increases bone cell apoptosis. Osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) and osteocyte-like cells (MLO-Y4) were pretreated with or without estrogen (17β-estradiol) for 14 days. Estrogen deficiency was subsequently induced by either withdrawing estrogen from cells or blocking estrogen receptors using an estrogen antagonist, fulvestrant (ICI 182,780). Cell number (Hoechst DNA), alkaline phosphatase activity (p-NPP), mineralization (alizarin red) and apoptosis (Caspase 3/7) were evaluated. Whether estrogen withdrawal altered apoptosis rates in the presence of an apoptosis promoting agent (etoposide) was also determined. Interestingly, estrogen withdrawal from cells accustomed to estrogen exposure caused significantly increased osteoblast mineralization and osteocyte apoptosis compared with continued estrogen treatment. In contrast, blocking estrogen receptors with fulvestrant abrogated the mineralization induced by estrogen treatment. When apoptosis was induced using etoposide, cells undergoing estrogen withdrawal increased apoptosis compared to cells with continued estrogen treatment. Recognizing the underlying mechanisms regulating bone cell mineralization and apoptosis during estrogen deficiency and their consequences is necessary to further our knowledge of osteoporosis. PMID:24446157

  11. Estrogen, SNP-Dependent Chemokine Expression and Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Bongartz, Tim; Liu, Mohan; Kalari, Krishna R; Goss, Paul E; Shepherd, Lois E; Goetz, Matthew P; Kubo, Michiaki; Ingle, James N; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported, on the basis of a genome-wide association study for aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms, that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near the T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1A (TCL1A) gene were associated with aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal pain and with estradiol (E2)-induced TCL1A expression. Furthermore, variation in TCL1A expression influenced the downstream expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors. Specifically, the top hit genome-wide association study SNP, rs11849538, created a functional estrogen response element (ERE) that displayed estrogen receptor (ER) binding and increased E2 induction of TCL1A expression only for the variant SNP genotype. In the present study, we pursued mechanisms underlying the E2-SNP-dependent regulation of TCL1A expression and, in parallel, our subsequent observations that SNPs at a distance from EREs can regulate ERα binding and that ER antagonists can reverse phenotypes associated with those SNPs. Specifically, we performed a series of functional genomic studies using a large panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines with dense genomic data that demonstrated that TCL1A SNPs at a distance from EREs can modulate ERα binding and expression of TCL1A as well as the expression of downstream immune mediators. Furthermore, 4-hydroxytamoxifen or fulvestrant could reverse these SNP-genotype effects. Similar results were found for SNPs in the IL17A cytokine and CCR6 chemokine receptor genes. These observations greatly expand our previous results and support the existence of a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the complex interplay between estrogens and immune systems. They also raise the possibility of the pharmacological manipulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a SNP genotype-dependent fashion. PMID:26866883

  12. Gene Alterations of Ovarian Cancer Cells Expressing Estrogen Receptors by Estrogen and Bisphenol A Using Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Se-Hyung; Yi, Bo-Rim

    2011-01-01

    Since endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may interfere with the endocrine system(s) of our body and have an estrogenicity, we evaluated the effect(s) of bisphenol A (BPA) on the transcriptional levels of altered genes in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BG-1 ovarian cancer cells by microarray and real-time polymerase-chain reaction. In this study, treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) or BPA increased mRNA levels of E2-responsive genes related to apoptosis, cancer and cell cycle, signal transduction and nucleic acid binding etc. In parallel with their microarray data, the mRNA levels of some altered genes including RAB31_MEMBER RAS ONCOGENE FAMILY (U59877), CYCLIN D1 (X59798), CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 (U37022), IGF-BINDING PROTEIN 4 (U20982), and ANTI-MULLERIAN HORMONE (NM_000479) were significantly induced by E2 or BPA in this cell model. These results indicate that BPA in parallel with E2 induced the transcriptional levels of E2-responsive genes in an estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BG-1 cells. In conclusion, these microarray and real-time polymerase-chain reaction results indicate that BPA, a potential weak estrogen, may have estrogenic effect by regulating E2-responsive genes in ER-positive BG-1 cells and BG-1 cells would be the best in vitro model to detect these estrogenic EDCs. PMID:21826169

  13. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štísová, Viktorie; Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie; Davídková, Marie

    2010-08-01

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERα, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with γ rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  14. Corncob bedding alters the effects of estrogens on aggressive behavior and reduces estrogen receptor-α expression in the brain.

    PubMed

    Villalon Landeros, Rosalina; Morisseau, Christophe; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Fu, Samuel H; Hammock, Bruce D; Trainor, Brian C

    2012-02-01

    There is growing appreciation that estrogen signaling pathways can be modulated by naturally occurring environmental compounds such as phytoestrogens and the more recently discovered xenoestrogens. Many researchers studying the effects of estrogens on brain function or behavior in animal models choose to use phytoestrogen-free food for this reason. Corncob bedding is commonly used in animal facilities across the United States and has been shown to inhibit estrogen-dependent reproductive behavior in rats. The mechanism for this effect was unclear, because the components of corncob bedding mediating this effect did not bind estrogen receptors. Here, we show in the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) that estrogens decrease aggression when cardboard-based bedding is used but that this effect is absent when corncob bedding is used. California mice housed on corncob bedding also had fewer estrogen receptor-α-positive cells in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and ventromedial hypothalamus compared with mice housed on cardboard-based bedding. In addition, corncob bedding suppressed the expression of phosphorylated ERK in these brain regions as well as in the medial amygdala and medial preoptic area. Previous reports of the effects of corncob bedding on reproductive behavior are not widely appreciated. Our observations on the effects of corncob bedding on behavior and brain function should draw attention to the importance that cage bedding can exert on neuroendocrine research. PMID:22186416

  15. Committee Opinion No. 659: The Use of Vaginal Estrogen in Women With a History of Estrogen-Dependent Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Cancer treatment should address female-specific survivorship issues, including the hypoestrogenic- related adverse effects of cancer therapies or of natural menopause in survivors. Systemic and vaginal estrogen are widely used for symptomatic relief of vasomotor symptoms, sexual dysfunction, and lower urinary tract infections in the general population. However, given that some types of cancer are hormone sensitive, there are safety concerns about the use of local hormone therapy in women who currently have breast cancer or have a history of breast cancer. Nonhormonal approaches are the first-line choices for managing urogenital symptoms or atrophy-related urinary symptoms experienced by women during or after treatment for breast cancer. Among women with a history of estrogen-dependent breast cancer who are experiencing urogenital symptoms, vaginal estrogen should be reserved for those patients who are unresponsive to nonhormonal remedies. The decision to use vaginal estrogen may be made in coordination with a woman's oncologist. Additionally, it should be preceded by an informed decision-making and consent process in which the woman has the information and resources to consider the benefits and potential risks of low-dose vaginal estrogen. Data do not show an increased risk of cancer recurrence among women currently undergoing treatment for breast cancer or those with a personal history of breast cancer who use vaginal estrogen to relieve urogenital symptoms. PMID:26901334

  16. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic influences in cultured brown trout hepatocytes: Focus on the expression of some estrogen and peroxisomal related genes and linked phenotypic anchors.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Tânia Vieira; Malhão, Fernanda; Pinheiro, Ivone; Lopes, Célia; Ferreira, Nádia; Urbatzka, Ralph; Castro, L Filipe C; Rocha, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Estrogens, estrogenic mimics and anti-estrogenic compounds are known to target estrogen receptors (ER) that can modulate other nuclear receptor signaling pathways, such as those controlled by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and alter organelle (inc. peroxisome) morphodynamics. By using primary isolated brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario) hepatocytes after 72 and 96h of exposure we evaluated some effects in selected molecular targets and in peroxisomal morphological features caused by: (1) an ER agonist (ethinylestradiol-EE2) at 1, 10 and 50μM; (2) an ER antagonist (ICI 182,780) at 10 and 50μM; and (3) mixtures of both (Mix I-10μM EE2 and 50μM ICI; Mix II-1μM EE2 and 10μM ICI and Mix III-1μM EE2 and 50μM ICI). The mRNA levels of the estrogenic targets (ERα, ERβ-1 and vitellogenin A-VtgA) and the peroxisome structure/function related genes (catalase, urate oxidase-Uox, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 4-17β-HSD4, peroxin 11α-Pex11α and PPARα) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Stereology combined with catalase immunofluorescence revealed a significant reduction in peroxisome volume densities at 50μM of EE2 exposure. Concomitantly, at the same concentration, electron microscopy showed smaller peroxisome profiles, exacerbated proliferation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, and a generalized cytoplasmic vacuolization of hepatocytes. Catalase and Uox mRNA levels decreased in all estrogenic stimuli conditions. VtgA and ERα mRNA increased after all EE2 treatments, while ERβ-1 had an inverse pattern. The EE2 action was reversed by ICI 182,780 in a concentration-dependent manner, for VtgA, ERα and Uox. Overall, our data show the great value of primary brown trout hepatocytes to study the effects of estrogenic/anti-estrogenic inputs in peroxisome kinetics and in ER and PPARα signaling, backing the still open hypothesis of crosstalk interactions between these pathways and calling for more mechanistic

  17. No substantial changes in estrogen receptor and estrogen-related receptor orthologue gene transcription in Marisa cornuarietis exposed to estrogenic chemicals☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Richard; Beresford, Nicola; Granger, David W.; Pounds, Nadine A.; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; White, Roger; Jobling, Susan; Routledge, Edwin J.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor orthologues in molluscs may be targets for endocrine disruptors, although mechanistic evidence is lacking. Molluscs are reported to be highly susceptible to effects caused by very low concentrations of environmental estrogens which, if substantiated, would have a major impact on the risk assessment of many chemicals. The present paper describes the most thorough evaluation to-date of the susceptibility of Marisa cornuarietis ER and ERR gene transcription to modulation by vertebrate estrogens in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the effects of estradiol-17β and 4-tert-Octylphenol exposure on in vivo estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogen-related receptor (ERR) gene transcription in the reproductive and neural tissues of the gastropod snail M. cornuarietis over a 12-week period. There was no significant effect (p > 0.05) of treatment on gene transcription levels between exposed and non-exposed snails. Absence of a direct interaction of estradiol-17β and 4-tert-Octylphenol with mollusc ER and ERR protein was also supported by in vitro studies in transfected HEK-293 cells. Additional in vitro studies with a selection of other potential ligands (including methyl-testosterone, 17α-ethinylestradiol, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, diethylstilbestrol, cyproterone acetate and ICI182780) showed no interaction when tested using this assay. In repeated in vitro tests, however, genistein (with mcER-like) and bisphenol-A (with mcERR) increased reporter gene expression at high concentrations only (>10−6 M for Gen and >10−5 M for BPA, respectively). Like vertebrate estrogen receptors, the mollusc ER protein bound to the consensus vertebrate estrogen-response element (ERE). Together, these data provide no substantial evidence that mcER-like and mcERR activation and transcript levels in tissues are modulated by the vertebrate estrogen estradiol-17β or 4-tert-Octylphenol in vivo, or that other ligands of vertebrate ERs and ERRs (with the possible exception of

  18. Cystic fibrosis and estrogens: a perfect storm

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    Irreversible destruction and widening of the airways due to acquired infections or genetic mutations as well as those of unknown cause are more severe in females. Differences between male and female anatomy, behavior, and hormonal state have been proposed to explain the increased incidence and severity in females with airway disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF); however, a mechanism to explain a sex-related difference has remained elusive. In this issue of the JCI, Coakley et al. report that elevations in the major estrogen hormone in humans — 17β-estradiol — reduce Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion by airway epithelial cells in culture, thereby disrupting ion and water balance (see the related article beginning on page 4025). They measure a similar diminution of nasal epithelial Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion in women with CF during the menstrual cycle phase at which 17β-estradiol level is at its highest. These data suggest that for about one week of a four-week menstrual cycle, women with CF will have a reduced ability to efficiently clear airway secretions, the buildup of which is a hallmark of CF. The authors suggest that these data warrant the testing of antiestrogen therapy in females with CF and propose an alternative avenue for CF therapeutic development. PMID:19033654

  19. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, S; Asare, B K; Biswas, P K; Rajnarayanan, R V

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide "I-box" derived from ER residues 503-518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479-485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497-506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511-520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497-506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. PMID:27462021

  20. Quantitative comparisons of in vitro assays for estrogenic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, H; Tong, W; Perkins, R; Soto, A M; Prechtl, N V; Sheehan, D M

    2000-01-01

    Substances that may act as estrogens show a broad chemical structural diversity. To thoroughly address the question of possible adverse estrogenic effects, reliable methods are needed to detect and identify the chemicals of these diverse structural classes. We compared three assays--in vitro estrogen receptor competitive binding assays (ER binding assays), yeast-based reporter gene assays (yeast assays), and the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay (E-SCREEN assay)--to determine their quantitative agreement in identifying structurally diverse estrogens. We examined assay performance for relative sensitivity, detection of active/inactive chemicals, and estrogen/antiestrogen activities. In this examination, we combined individual data sets in a specific, quantitative data mining exercise. Data sets for at least 29 chemicals from five laboratories were analyzed pair-wise by X-Y plots. The ER binding assay was a good predictor for the other two assay results when the antiestrogens were excluded (r(2) is 0.78 for the yeast assays and 0.85 for the E-SCREEN assays). Additionally, the examination strongly suggests that biologic information that is not apparent from any of the individual assays can be discovered by quantitative pair-wise comparisons among assays. Antiestrogens are identified as outliers in the ER binding/yeast assay, while complete antagonists are identified in the ER binding and E-SCREEN assays. Furthermore, the presence of outliers may be explained by different mechanisms that induce an endocrine response, different impurities in different batches of chemicals, different species sensitivity, or limitations of the assay techniques. Although these assays involve different levels of biologic complexity, the major conclusion is that they generally provided consistent information in quantitatively determining estrogenic activity for the five data sets examined. The results should provide guidance for expanded data mining examinations and the selection of appropriate

  1. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Yang; Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2010-08-10

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  2. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2011-11-29

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  3. Effects of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate on uterine estrogen receptor. II. Inhibition of estrogen . receptor transformation.

    PubMed

    Traish, A; Müller, R E; Wotiz, H H

    1980-05-10

    Previous observations suggested that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was capable of inhibiting estrogen . receptor (R . E2) activation, or translocation to the nucleus, or both. The present study attempts to define more specifically the locus of this action. To this end we have examined the physicochemical alteration produced by interaction of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with estrogen . receptor complex, using sucrose density gradient analysis and dissociation kinetics. Receptor transformation was inhibited when activation was performed in the presence of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. This effect was protein- and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentration-dependent. When pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was introduced postactivation it did not have any effect on the activated receptor, but when similar treatment was followed by NABH4 reduction, the complex reverted to the monomeric entity. The dissociation behavior obtained with cytosol R . E2, warmed in the presence of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, showed a biphasic curve suggesting that a significant portion of receptors remained nonactivated as demonstrated by the fast dissociating component. Due to the fact that Tris buffers cannot be used for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate experiments, we have used a borate buffer which resulted in a displacement of the sedimentation values from a 4S to 4.6 S for the unactivated receptor and 5S to 6 S for the activated form. The observations reported suggest that at least the initial effect of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate results in the inhibition of cytosolic receptor transformation from the nonactivated to the activated form. PMID:7372667

  4. Hydrocarbon components in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Y. V.

    2003-05-01

    Currently, the presence of free n-alkanes and isoprenoid alkanes in carbonaceous meteorites is usually explained either by microbial contamination during the period between the meteorite fall and collection or by contamination from the environment of analytical laboratories and museums. The goal of this research was to repeat analysis of hydrocarbon components in meteorites and to investigate possible meteorite contamination routes discussed in the literature. Experimental analysis of free organic constituents in five carbonaceous meteorites by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and gas chromatographic (GC) methods confirmed the presence of extractable aliphatic components, n-alkanes in the C 15H 32-C 27H 56 range and isoprenoid alkanes (phytane, pristane, and norpristane), in some of these meteorites. The contents of these compounds vary depending on the source. Insoluble organic components of two meteorites (meteorite kerogens) were isolated, and their composition was analyzed by IR and cracking/GC methods. Comparison with the data on several terrestrial contamination sources proposed in the literature shows that the presence of free saturated hydrocarbons in meteorites and the composition of the meteorite kerogen could not be explained either by microbial contamination or by contamination from the laboratory environment. The types of the hydrocarbons in meteorites resemble those typical of ancient terrestrial deposits of organic-rich sediments, except for the absence of lighter hydrocarbons, which apparently slowly evaporated in space, and multi-ring naphthenic compounds of the biologic origin, steranes, terpanes, etc. The prevailing current explanation for the presence of free linear saturated hydrocarbons in carbonaceous meteorites, apart from contamination, is the abiotic route from hydrogen and carbon monoxide. However, the data on the structure of meteorite kerogens require a search for different routes that initially produce complex polymeric structures containing

  5. Estrogen anti-inflammatory activity on human monocytes is mediated through cross-talk between estrogen receptor ERα36 and GPR30/GPER1.

    PubMed

    Pelekanou, Vasiliki; Kampa, Marilena; Kiagiadaki, Foteini; Deli, Alexandra; Theodoropoulos, Panayiotis; Agrogiannis, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Tsapis, Andreas; Castanas, Elias; Notas, George

    2016-02-01

    Estrogens are known modulators of monocyte/macrophage functions; however, the underlying mechanism has not been clearly defined. Recently, a number of estrogen receptor molecules and splice variants were identified that exert different and sometimes opposing actions. We assessed the expression of estrogen receptors and explored their role in mediating estrogenic anti-inflammatory effects on human primary monocytes. We report that the only estrogen receptors expressed are estrogen receptor-α 36-kDa splice variant and G-protein coupled receptor 30/G-protein estrogen receptor 1, in a sex-independent manner. 17-β-Estradiol inhibits the LPS-induced IL-6 inflammatory response, resulting in inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity. This is achieved via a direct physical interaction of ligand-activated estrogen receptor-α 36-kDa splice variant with the p65 component of NF-κB in the nucleus. G-protein coupled receptor 30/G-protein estrogen receptor 1, which also physically interacts with estrogen receptor-α 36-kDa splice variant, acts a coregulator in this process, because its inhibition blocks the effect of estrogens on IL-6 expression. However, its activation does not mimic the effect of estrogens, on neither IL-6 nor NF-κB activity. Finally, we show that the estrogen receptor profile observed in monocytes is not modified during their differentiation to macrophages or dendritic cells in vitro and is shared in vivo by macrophages present in atherosclerotic plaques. These results position estrogen receptor-α 36-kDa splice variant and G-protein coupled receptor 30 as important players and potential therapeutic targets in monocyte/macrophage-dependent inflammatory processes. PMID:26394816

  6. Method for producing viscous hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Poston, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A method for recovering viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels from a subterranean formation by drilling a well bore through the formation and completing the well by cementing a casing means in the upper part of the pay zone. The well is completed as an open hole completion and a superheated thermal vapor stream comprised of steam and combustion gases is injected into the lower part of the pay zone. The combustion gases migrate to the top of the pay zone and form a gas cap which provides formation pressure to produce the viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels.

  7. Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Brigmon, Robin L.; Berry, Christopher J.

    2009-01-06

    A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

  8. Process for purification of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, C.C.; Rastelli, H.

    1991-05-28

    This patent describes a process for separating a minor proportion of ammonia form a hydrocarbon having a kinetic diameter of not more than about 5 {Angstrom}. It comprises: contacting a feedstream comprising ammonia and the hydrocarbon with clinoptilolite that has been subjected to ion-exchange with at least one metal cation of the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, barium and strontium, zinc, copper, cobalt, iron and manganese cations to an extent sufficient to cause the ammonia to be selectively absorbed into the clinoptilolite and withdrawing a product stream at least partially depleted in ammonia relative to the feedstream.

  9. Dehydroepiandrosterone Activation of G-protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor Rapidly Stimulates MicroRNA-21 Transcription in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yun; Radde, Brandie N; Litchfield, Lacey M; Ivanova, Margarita M; Prough, Russell A; Clark, Barbara J; Doll, Mark A; Hein, David W; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2015-06-19

    Little is known about the regulation of the oncomiR miR-21 in liver. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) regulates gene expression as a ligand for a G-protein-coupled receptor and as a precursor for steroids that activate nuclear receptor signaling. We report that 10 nm DHEA increases primary miR-21 (pri-miR-21) transcription and mature miR-21 expression in HepG2 cells in a biphasic manner with an initial peak at 1 h followed by a second, sustained response from 3-12 h. DHEA also increased miR-21 in primary human hepatocytes and Hep3B cells. siRNA, antibody, and inhibitor studies suggest that the rapid DHEA-mediated increase in miR-21 involves a G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30), estrogen receptor α-36 (ERα36), epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent, pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway requiring activation of c-Src, ERK1/2, and PI3K. GPER antagonist G-15 attenuated DHEA- and BSA-conjugated DHEA-stimulated pri-miR-21 transcription. Like DHEA, GPER agonists G-1 and fulvestrant increased pri-miR-21 in a GPER- and ERα36-dependent manner. DHEA, like G-1, increased GPER and ERα36 mRNA and protein levels. DHEA increased ERK1/2 and c-Src phosphorylation in a GPER-responsive manner. DHEA increased c-Jun, but not c-Fos, protein expression after 2 h. DHEA increased androgen receptor, c-Fos, and c-Jun recruitment to the miR-21 promoter. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of DHEA activate a GPER intracellular signaling cascade that increases pri-miR-21 transcription mediated at least in part by AP-1 and androgen receptor miR-21 promoter interaction. PMID:25969534

  10. Nitric Oxide Plays a Key Role in Ovariectomy-Induced Apoptosis in Anterior Pituitary: Interplay between Nitric Oxide Pathway and Estrogen.

    PubMed

    Ronchetti, Sonia A; Machiavelli, Leticia I; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Duvilanski, Beatriz H; Cabilla, Jimena P

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the estrogenic status produce deep changes in pituitary physiology, mainly because estrogens (E2) are one of the main regulators of pituitary cell population. Also, E2 negatively regulate pituitary neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity and expression and may thereby modulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), an important regulator of cell death and survival. Little is known about how ovary ablation affects anterior pituitary cell remodelling and molecular mechanisms that regulate this process have not yet been elucidated. In this work we used freshly dispersed anterior pituitaries as well as cell cultures from ovariectomized female rats in order to study whether E2 deficiency induces apoptosis in the anterior pituitary cells, the role of NO in this process and effects of E2 on the NO pathway. Our results showed that cell activity gradually decreases after ovariectomy (OVX) as a consequence of cell death, which is completely prevented by a pan-caspase inhibitor. Furthermore, there is an increase of fragmented nuclei and DNA cleavage thereby presenting the first direct evidence of the existence of apoptosis in the anterior pituitary gland after OVX. NO production and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) expression in anterior pituitary cells increased concomitantly to the apoptosis. Inhibition of both, NO synthase (NOS) and sGC activities prevented the drop of cell viability after OVX, showing for the first time that increased NO levels and sGC activity observed post-OVX play a key role in the induction of apoptosis. Conversely, E2 and prolactin treatments decreased nNOS expression and activity in pituitary cells from OVX rats in a time- and E2 receptor-dependent manner, thus suggesting interplay between NO and E2 pathways in anterior pituitary. PMID:27611913

  11. Hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon-soluble magnesium dialkoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kamienski, C.W.

    1988-05-31

    This patent describes a process for the preparation of hydrocarbon or chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent solutions of magnesium dialkoxides, which comprises reacting a suspension of magnesium metal or magnesium amide, or a solution of a dialkyimagnesium compound, in a volatile hydrocarbon or chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent with an alcohol selected from the group of (a) aliphatic, cycloaliphatic and acyclic C/sub 5/-C/sub 18/ beta- and gamma-alkyl-substituted secondary and tertiary monohydric alcohols; or (b) mixtures of the (a) alcohols with C/sub 3/-C/sub 18/ aliphatic or cycloaliphatic beta- and gamma-alkyl-unsubstituted secondary or tertiary alcohols; or (c) mixtures of the (a) alcohols with C/sub 1/-C/sub 18/ aliphatic primary unsubstituted and 2-alkyl-substituted alcohols; the mole ratios of the (a) to the (b), and the (a) to the (c), alcohols being 1 of the (a) alcohols to 0.1 to 2 of the (b) and/or the (c) alcohols.

  12. Temperature dependence of estrogen binding: importance of a subzone in the ligand binding domain of a novel piscine estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Tan, N S; Frecer, V; Lam, T J; Ding, J L

    1999-11-11

    The full length estrogen receptor from Oreochromis aureus (OaER) was cloned and expressed in vitro and in vivo as a functional transcription factor. Amino acid residues involved in the thermal stability of the receptor are located at/near subzones beta1 and beta3, which are highly conserved in other non-piscine species but not in OaER. Hormone binding studies, however, indicate that OaER is thermally stable but exhibited a approximately 3-fold reduced affinity for estrogen at elevated temperatures. Transfection of OaER into various cell lines cultured at different temperatures displayed a significant estrogen dose-response shift compared with that of chicken ER (cER). At 37 degrees C, OaER requires approximately 80-fold more estrogen to achieve half-maximal stimulation of CAT. Lowering of the incubation temperature from 37 degrees C to 25 degrees C or 20 degrees C resulted in a 4-fold increase in its affinity for estrogen. The thermally deficient transactivation of OaER at temperatures above 25 degrees C was fully prevented by high levels of estrogen. Thus, compared to cER, the OaER exhibits reduced affinity for estrogen at elevated temperature as reflected in its deficient transactivation capability. Amino acid replacements of OaER beta3 subzones with corresponding amino acids from cER could partially rescue this temperature sensitivity. The three-dimensional structure of the OaER ligand binding domain (LBD) was modelled based on conformational similarity and sequence homology with human RXRalpha apo, RARgamma holo and ERalpha LBDs. Unliganded and 17beta-estradiol-liganded OaER LBD retained the overall folding pattern of the nuclear receptor LBDs. The residues at/near the subzone beta3 of the LBD constitute the central core of OaER structure. Thus, amino acid alteration at this region potentially alters the structure and consequently its temperature-dependent ligand binding properties. PMID:10559464

  13. The estrogenic and androgenic potential of pyrethroids in vitro. Review.

    PubMed

    Saillenfait, Anne-Marie; Ndiaye, Dieynaba; Sabaté, Jean-Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids are used worldwide as insecticides. Their metabolites are regularly detected in the urine of adults and children from the general population. There is increasing concern that they may induce sex-hormone disrupting effects. The present work reviews available published information on the (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic activity of pyrethroids in in vitro screening tests. In recent years, a large number of pyrethroids have been evaluated using various common testing methods. In tests using recombinant yeast or mammalian cells, the pyrethroids were found to be essentially negative or weakly estrogenic. More inconsistent results were found regarding their estrogenic action in proliferation tests. Conflicting findings were also reported across studies and/or assays which evaluated their anti-estrogenic or anti-androgenic potential. Some studies have suggested that certain pyrethroids may have potential antagonist activity. However, no strong interaction with the estrogenic or androgenic pathway was reported. The present review confirms the interest in performing a screening battery and in adopting an integrative approach for identifying the potential of different compounds from a chemical family to interfere with the endocrine system. PMID:26921664

  14. Structural and Functional Diversity of Estrogen Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptors, comprised of ERα and ERβ isoforms in mammals, act as ligand-modulated transcription factors and orchestrate a plethora of cellular functions from sexual development and reproduction to metabolic homeostasis. Herein, I revisit the structural basis of the binding of ERα to DNA and estradiol in light of the recent discoveries and emerging trends in the field of nuclear receptors. A particular emphasis of this review is on the chemical and structural diversity of an ever-increasing repertoire of physiological, environmental and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors that ultimately modulate their interactions with cognate DNA located within the promoters of estrogen-responsive genes. In particular, modulation of estrogen receptors by small molecule ligands represents an important therapeutic goal toward the treatment of a wide variety of human pathologies including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and obesity. Collectively, this article provides an overview of a wide array of small organic and inorganic molecules that can fine-tune the physiological function of estrogen receptors, thereby bearing a direct impact on human health and disease. PMID:25866274

  15. Inhibition of estrogen biosynthesis enhances lymphoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Talaber, Gergely; Yakimchuk, Konstantin; Guan, Jiyu; Inzunza, Jose; Okret, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Most lymphomas show higher incidence and poorer prognosis in males compared to females. However, the endocrine contribution to this gender difference is not entirely known. Here we show that castration accelerates lymphoma growth in C57BL6 male mice grafted with murine EG7 T cell lymphoma cells. However, the androgen receptor antagonist Bicalutamide did not affect lymphoma growth, suggesting no impact of androgen receptor signaling on lymphoma progression. In contrast, inhibition of androgen-to-estrogen conversion by the aromatase inhibitor (AI) Letrozole induced faster lymphoma growth in mice, suggesting that androgens impact lymphoma growth through its conversion to estrogens. This was supported by the inability of dihydrotestosterone, which is not converted to estrogens by aromatase, to influence lymphoma growth in castrated male mice. Lymphoma growth was also stimulated in immunocompromised mice grafted with human B cell lymphoma (Granta-519) and treated with either reversible or irreversible AIs, showing that the blockage of estrogen synthesis caused enhanced growth of both murine T and human B cell lymphomas and with different AIs. Additionally, AI-treated EG7 lymphomas showed accelerated growth not only in male but also in intact female mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that aromatase inhibition accelerates lymphoma growth but not androgens per se, highlighting a protective role of estrogens in lymphoma pathogenesis. These results also raise concern that the use of AIs in women with breast cancer might enhance lymphoma progression. PMID:26943574

  16. Estrogen-Dependent Gene Expression in the Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Seng H.; Sarraj, Mai A.; Drummond, Ann E.; Findlay, Jock K.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen (E) plays a pivotal role in regulating the female reproductive system, particularly the ovary. However, the number and type of ovarian genes influenced by estrogen remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have utilized wild-type (WT) and aromatase knockout (ArKO; estrogen free) mouse ovaries as an in vivo model to profile estrogen dependent genes. RNA from each individual ovary (n = 3) was analyzed by a microarray-based screen using Illumina Sentrix Mouse WG-6 BeadChip (45,281 transcripts). Comparative analysis (GeneSpring) showed differential expression profiles of 450 genes influenced by E, with 291 genes up-regulated and 159 down-regulated by 2-fold or greater in the ArKO ovary compared to WT. Genes previously reported to be E regulated in ArKO ovaries were confirmed, in addition to novel genes not previously reported to be expressed or regulated by E in the ovary. Of genes involved in 5 diverse functional processes (hormonal processes, reproduction, sex differentiation and determination, apoptosis and cellular processes) 78 had estrogen-responsive elements (ERE). These analyses define the transcriptome regulated by E in the mouse ovary. Further analysis and investigation will increase our knowledge pertaining to how E influences follicular development and other ovarian functions. PMID:21347412

  17. Genetic Bases of Estrogen-Induced Pituitary Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Strecker, Tracy E.; Spady, Thomas J.; Schaffer, Beverly S.; Gould, Karen A.; Kaufman, Amy E.; Shen, Fangchen; McLaughlin, Mac T.; Pennington, Karen L.; Meza, Jane L.; Shull, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Estrogens stimulate proliferation and enhance survival of the prolactin (PRL)-producing lactotroph of the anterior pituitary gland and induce development of PRL-producing pituitary tumors in certain inbred rat strains but not others. The goal of this study was to elucidate the genetic bases of estrogen-induced pituitary tumorigenesis in reciprocal intercrosses between the genetically related ACI and Copenhagen (COP) rat strains. Following 12 weeks of treatment with the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES), pituitary mass, an accurate surrogate marker of absolute lactotroph number, was increased 10.6-fold in ACI rats and 4.5-fold in COP rats. Composite interval mapping analyses of the phenotypically defined F2 progeny from the reciprocal crosses identified six quantitative trait loci (QTL) that determine the pituitary growth response to DES. These loci reside on chromosome 6 [Estrogen-induced pituitary tumor (Ept)1], chromosome 3 (Ept2 and Ept6), chromosome 10 (Ept9), and chromosome 1 (Ept10 and Ept13). Together, these six Ept loci and one additional suggestive locus on chromosome 4 account for an estimated 40% of the phenotypic variance exhibited by the combined F2 population, while 34% of the phenotypic variance was estimated to result from environmental factors. These data indicate that DES-induced pituitary mass behaves as a quantitative trait and provide information that will facilitate identification of genes that determine the tumorigenic response of the pituitary gland to estrogens. PMID:15687265

  18. FUNGI AND HYDROCARBONS IN THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrocarbons from various sources--anthropogenic pollution, marine seeps, marine algae, atmospheric fallout and terrestrial runoff--enter the ocean daily. These complex hydrocarbon mixtures are dispersed and degraded by abiotic and biogenic processes. Most commonly, bacteria are ...

  19. THE PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to be interested in developing methods for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in the environment. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are common contaminants in our environment. Being major product...

  20. Function of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1 in Reproductive System Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hongyan; Xuan, Jingxiu; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER-1), also known as GPR30, is a novel estrogen receptor mediating estrogen receptor signaling in multiple cell types. The progress of estrogen-related cancer is promoted by GPER-1 activation through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. However, this promoting effect of GPER-1 is nonclassic estrogen receptor (ER) dependent manner. In addition, clinical evidences revealed that GPER-1 is associated with estrogen resistance in estrogen-related cancer patients. These give a hint that GPER-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the estrogen-related cancers. However, preclinical studies also found that GPER-1 activation of its special agonist G-1 inhibits cancer cell proliferation. This review aims to summarize the characteristics and complex functions of GPER-1 in cancers. PMID:27314054

  1. COMPARISON OF FATHEAD MINNOW AND HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens have the potential to disrupt endocrine function in a myriad of species. However, in vitro assays designed to detect and characterize endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) typically utilize mammalian estrogen receptors. Our overall objective is to charac...

  2. Adaptive Significance of ERα Splice Variants in Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) Resident in an Estrogenic Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility that chronic, multigenerational exposure to environmental estrogens selects for adaptive hormone response phenotypes is a critical unanswered question. Embryos/larvae of killifish from an estrogenic polluted environment (New Bedford Harbor, NBH), as compared to th...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGEN SCREEN USING TRANSIENTLY TRANSFECTED RAINBOW TROUT CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow troutp hepatoma (RTH-149) and gonad cells (RTG-2) were used to develop a screening protocol for estrogen disrupting chemicals. Transfection of an estrogen-responsive luciferase reporter plasmid into...

  4. COLLAPSE OF A FISH POPULATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO A SYNTHETIC ESTROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Municipal wastewaters are a complex mixture containing estrogens and estrogen mimics that are known to affect the reproductive health of wild fishes. Male fishes downstream of some wastewater outfalls produce vitellogenin (VTG) (a protein normally synthesized by females during oo...

  5. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  6. ESTROGEN INDUCED VITELLOGENIN MRNA AND PROTEIN IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally persistent xenobiotic chemicals appear to disrupt normal endocrine function by acting as ligands for endogenous steroid receptors, including the estrogen receptor. Xenobiotics that bind to the estrogen receptor may elicit several effects, one of which is acti...

  7. Tissue-Specific Effects of Loss of Estrogen during Menopause and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wend, Korinna; Wend, Peter; Krum, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    The roles of estrogens have been best studied in the breast, breast cancers, and in the female reproductive tract. However, estrogens have important functions in almost every tissue in the body. Recent clinical trials such as the Women’s Health Initiative have highlighted both the importance of estrogens and how little we know about the molecular mechanism of estrogens in these other tissues. In this review, we illustrate the diverse functions of estrogens in the bone, adipose tissue, skin, hair, brain, skeletal muscle and cardiovascular system, and how the loss of estrogens during aging affects these tissues. Early transcriptional targets of estrogen are reviewed in each tissue. We also describe the tissue-specific effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) used for the treatment of breast cancers and postmenopausal symptoms. PMID:22654856

  8. Tissue-selective estrogen complexes with bazedoxifene prevent metabolic dysfunction in female mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ho; Meyers, Matthew S.; Khuder, Saja S.; Abdallah, Simon L.; Muturi, Harrison T.; Russo, Lucia; Tate, Chandra R.; Hevener, Andrea L.; Najjar, Sonia M.; Leloup, Corinne; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Pairing the selective estrogen receptor modulator bazedoxifene (BZA) with estrogen as a tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC) is a novel menopausal therapy. We investigated estrogen, BZA and TSEC effects in preventing diabetisity in ovariectomized mice during high-fat feeding. Estrogen, BZA or TSEC prevented fat accumulation in adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle, and improved insulin resistance and glucose intolerance without stimulating uterine growth. Estrogen, BZA and TSEC improved energy homeostasis by increasing lipid oxidation and energy expenditure, and promoted insulin action by enhancing insulin-stimulated glucose disposal and suppressing hepatic glucose production. While estrogen improved metabolic homeostasis, at least partially, by increasing hepatic production of FGF21, BZA increased hepatic expression of Sirtuin1, PPARα and AMPK activity. The metabolic benefits of BZA were lost in estrogen receptor-α deficient mice. Thus, BZA alone or in TSEC produces metabolic signals of fasting and caloric restriction and improves energy and glucose homeostasis in female mice. PMID:24634829

  9. Loading-related regulation of gene expression in bone in the contexts of estrogen deficiency, lack of estrogen receptor α and disuse

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Gul; Saxon, Leanne K.; Sunters, Andrew; Hilton, Helen; Underhill, Peter; Williams, Debbie; Price, Joanna S.; Lanyon, Lance E.

    2010-01-01

    Loading-related changes in gene expression in resident cells in the tibia of female mice in the contexts of normality (WT), estrogen deficiency (WT-OVX), absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα−/−) and disuse due to sciatic neurectomy (WT-SN) were established by microarray. Total RNA was extracted from loaded and contra-lateral non-loaded tibiae at selected time points after a single, short period of dynamic loading sufficient to engender an osteogenic response. There were marked changes in the expression of many genes according to context as well as in response to loading within those contexts. In WT mice at 3, 8, 12 and 24 h after loading the expression of 642, 341, 171 and 24 genes, respectively, were differentially regulated compared with contra-lateral bones which were not loaded. Only a few of the genes differentially regulated by loading in the tibiae of WT mice have recognized roles in bone metabolism or have been linked previously to osteogenesis (Opn, Sost, Esr1, Tgfb1, Lrp1, Ostn, Timp, Mmp, Ctgf, Postn and Irs1, BMP and DLX5). The canonical pathways showing the greatest loading-related regulation were those involving pyruvate metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, calcium-induced apoptosis, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, aryl hydrocarbon receptor and oxidative phosphorylation. In the tibiae from WT-OVX, ERα−/− and WT-SN mice, 440, 439 and 987 genes respectively were differentially regulated by context alone compared to WT. The early response to loading in tibiae of WT-OVX mice involved differential regulation compared to their contra-lateral non-loaded pair of fewer genes than in WT, more down-regulation than up-regulation and a later response. This was shared by WT-SN. In tibiae of ERα−/− mice, the number of genes differentially regulated by loading was markedly reduced at all time points. These data indicate that in resident bone cells, both basal and loading-related gene expression is substantially modified by context. Many of the genes

  10. Depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts, generators of cancer initiation: their minimization leads to cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Ercole L; Rogan, Eleanor G

    2016-03-01

    Estrogens can initiate cancer by reacting with DNA. Specific metabolites of endogenous estrogens, the catechol estrogen-3,4-quinones, react with DNA to form depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts. Loss of these adducts leaves apurinic sites in the DNA, generating mutations that can lead to the initiation of cancer. A variety of endogenous and exogenous factors can disrupt estrogen homeostasis, which is the normal balance between estrogen activating and protective enzymes. In fact, if estrogen metabolism becomes unbalanced and generates excessive catechol estrogen 3,4-quinones, formation of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts increases and the risk of initiating cancer is greater. The levels of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts are high in women diagnosed with breast cancer and those at high risk for the disease. High levels of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts before the presence of breast cancer indicates that adduct formation is a critical factor in breast cancer initiation. Women with thyroid or ovarian cancer also have high levels of estrogen-DNA adducts, as do men with prostate cancer or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts are initiators of many prevalent types of human cancer. These findings and other discoveries led to the recognition that reducing the levels of estrogen-DNA adducts could prevent the initiation of human cancer. The dietary supplements N-acetylcysteine and resveratrol inhibit formation of estrogen-DNA adducts in cultured human breast cells and in women. These results suggest that the two supplements offer an approach to reducing the risk of developing various prevalent types of human cancer. Graphical abstract Major metabolic pathway in cancer initiation by estrogens. PMID:26979321

  11. HYDROCARBON SPILL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrocarbon spills impact drinking water supplies at down gradient locations. onventional finite difference and finite element models of multiphase, multicomponent flow have extreme requirements for both computer time and site data. ite data and the intent of the modeling often d...

  12. Steam Hydrocarbon Cracking and Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golombok, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The interactive methods of steam hydrocarbon reforming and cracking of the oil and chemical industries are scrutinized, with special focus on their resemblance and variations. The two methods are illustrations of equilibrium-controlled and kinetically-controlled processes, the analysis of which involves theories, which overlap and balance each…

  13. PASSENGER CAR HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emission factors for over 60 individual hydrocarbon compounds were determined for four passenger cars. The cars included a 1963 Chevrolet, a 1977 Mustang, and 1978 Monarch, and 1979 LTD II. The speciation data is reported for both tailpipe and evaporative emissions. The tailpipe ...

  14. Hydrocarbons from plants and trees

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, M.

    1982-07-01

    The way energy was used in the US in 1980 was examined. A diagram shows the development of energy from its source to its end use. The following are described: the carbon dioxide problem - the greenhouse effect, sugar cane as an energy source, hydrocarbon-producing plants and trees, and isoprenoids from plants and trees. (MHR)

  15. Body Size in Relation to Urinary Estrogens and Estrogen Metabolites (EM) among Premenopausal Women during the Luteal Phase

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Eliassen, A. Heather; Xu, Xia; Matthews, Charles E.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen metabolism profiles may play an important role in the relationship between body size and breast carcinogenesis. Previously, we observed inverse associations between current body mass index (BMI) and plasma levels of parent estrogens (estrone and estradiol) among premenopausal women during both follicular and luteal phases. Using data from the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS II), we assessed whether height, current BMI, and BMI at age 18 were associated with the urinary concentrations of 15 estrogens and estrogen metabolites (jointly referred to as EM) measured during the luteal phase among 603 premenopausal women. We observed inverse associations with total EM for height (Ptrend=0.01) and current BMI (Ptrend=0.01), but not BMI at age 18 (Ptrend=0.26). Six EMs were 18–27% lower in women with a height 68+ inches versus ≤62 inches, primarily in the methylated catechol pathway (Ptrend=0.04). Eight EMs were 18–50% lower in women with a BMI of 30+ versus <20, primarily in the 2-catechol and methylated catechol pathways (Ptrend<0.001 for both). Our results suggest that height and current BMI are associated with estrogen metabolism profiles in premenopausal women. Further studies with timed urine and blood collections are required to confirm and extend our findings. PMID:23011724

  16. Measurement of Hydrocarbon Transport in Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrocarbon uptake by bacteria has not been extensively studied, and strong evidence for active transport of hydrocarbons is lacking. The volatile nature of hydrocarbons, their hydrophobicity, and their relatively low aqueous solubilities can complicate transport assays. Here we present a detailed...

  17. Estrogen receptor profiling and activity in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Pugach, Emily K; Blenck, Christa L; Dragavon, Joseph M; Langer, Stephen J; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2016-08-15

    Estrogen signaling appears critical in the heart. However a mechanistic understanding of the role of estrogen in the cardiac myocyte is lacking. Moreover, there are multiple cell types in the heart and multiple estrogen receptor (ER) isoforms. Therefore, we studied expression, localization, transcriptional and signaling activity of ERs in isolated cardiac myocytes. We found only ERα RNA (but no ERβ RNA) in cardiac myocytes using two independent methods. The vast majority of full-length ERα protein (ERα66) localizes to cardiac myocyte nuclei where it is competent to activate transcription. Alternate isoforms of ERα encoded by the same genomic locus (ERα46 and ERα36) have differential transcriptional activity in cardiac myocytes but also primarily localize to nuclei. In contrast to other reports, no ERα isoform is competent to activate MAPK or PI3K signaling in cardiac myocytes. Together these data support a role for ERα at the level of transcription in cardiac myocytes. PMID:27164442

  18. Bisphenol A in dental sealants and its estrogen like effect

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Manu; Malik, Poonam; Singh, Jyotirmay

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A or BPA-based epoxy resins are widely used in the manufacture of commercial products, including dental resins, polycarbonate plastics, and the inner coating of food cans. BPA is a precursor to the resin monomer Bis-GMA. During the manufacturing process of Bis-GMA dental sealants, Bisphenol A (BPA) might be present as an impurity or as a degradation product of Bis-DMA through esterases present in saliva. Leaching of these monomers from resins can occur during the initial setting period and in conjunction with fluid sorption and desorption over time and this chemical leach from dental sealants may be bioactive. Researchers found an estrogenic effect with BPA, Bis-DMA, and Bis-GMA because BPA lacks structural specificity as a natural ligand to the estrogen receptor. It generated considerable concern regarding the safety of dental resin materials. This review focuses on the BPA in dental sealants and its estrogen-like effect. PMID:22629496

  19. Synthesis of catechol estrogens by human uterus and leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, V.V.; Hanjani, P.; Rajan, R.

    1981-02-01

    Homogenates of human endometrial, myometrial and leiomyoma tissues were incubated with (2,4,6,7-/sub 3/H)-estradiol and tritiated catechol estrogens were isolated and identified. Though 2- and 4-hydroxylations were about the same in endometrium, 4-hydroxylation was two to four fold higher than 2-hydroxylation in myometrium and leiomyoma. However, endometrium showed greater capacity to form both 2- and 4-hydroxyestrogens than the other two tissues. Both 2- and 4-hydroxylations were significantly less than in myometrium. In view of the reports indicating that inhibitors of catechol 0-methyl transferase (COMT) might act as antineoplastic agents due to their interference with t-RNA methylases and since catechol estrogens inhibit COMT, the present results suggest that endogenous synthesis of catechol estrogens may play an important role in the pathophysiology of uterine leiomyoma.

  20. Estrogen and neuroprotection: from clinical observations to molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dubal, Dena B.; Wise, Phyllis M.

    2002-01-01

    We now appreciate that estrogen is a pleiotropic gonadal steroid that exerts profound effects on the plasticity and cell survival of the adult brain. Over the past century, the life span of women has increased, but the age of the menopause remains constant. This means that women may now live over one third of their lives in a hypoestrogenic, postmenopausal state. The impact of prolonged hypoestrogenicity on the brain is now a critical health concern as we realize that these women may suffer an increased risk of cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration due to a variety of diseases. Accumulating evidence from both clinical and basic science studies indicates that estrogen exerts critical protective actions against neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Here, we review the discoveries that comprise our current understanding of estrogen action against neurodegeneration. These findings carry far-reaching possibilities for improving the quality of life in our aging population. PMID:22034440

  1. Estrogen formulations and beauty care practices in Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Takashi; Wong, Tze Fang; Kitamura, Mari; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, oral estrogens have been used for hormone replacement therapy. However, in Japan, additional estrogen formulations have been used, including transdermal patches and transdermal gels. The latter have a unique commonality with cosmetics because both of them are applied to the skin. Beauty care is one of the most important lifestyle factors for women, and it has been reported that the amount of attention paid to beauty care has an effect in determining whether or not women will choose to undergo HRT during menopause. Therefore, our study focused on estrogen formulations and beauty care practices. Patients and methods Fifty women who use hormone replacement therapy were recruited from the outpatient clinic of Tohoku University Hospital. They were treated with oral conjugated estrogen (n = 11), transdermal 17β-estradiol patch (n = 11), and transdermal 17β-estradiol gel (n = 28). They completed a questionnaire to assess their lifestyle (beauty care practices and exercise habits) and their compliance. The transdermal gel users were further interviewed about their subjective impressions regarding “smell”, “sticky feeling”, “spreadability”, and “irritation” on the skin using a five-grade scale. Results There were no differences in the usability of medicines and patient compliance among the estrogen formulations. We observed a positive tendency between the level of beauty care and transdermal gel use (P = 0.0645, ordinary logistic regression analysis). The gel users placed top priority on a lack of “sticky feeling” but the subjective impression regarding “sticky feeling” was worst among the four factors (P < 0.01, Steel–Dwass test). Correspondence analysis showed that the subjective impressions of transdermal gel corresponding to usability in the range of “moderate” to “very good” and “sticky feeling” greatly affected the usability of the formulation. Conclusion These results suggest that the level of attention

  2. Neuro-estrogens rapidly regulate sexual motivation but not performance

    PubMed Central

    Seredynski, Aurore L.; Balthazart, Jacques; Christophe, Virginie J.; Ball, Gregory F.; Cornil, Charlotte A.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogens exert pleiotropic effects on reproductive traits, which include differentiation and activation of reproductive behaviors and the control of the secretion of gonadotropins. Estrogens also profoundly affect non-reproductive traits such as cognition and neuroprotection. These effects are usually attributed to nuclear receptor binding and subsequent regulation of target gene transcription. Estrogens also affect neuronal activity and cell-signaling pathways via faster, membrane-initiated events. How these two types of actions that operate in distinct time scales interact in the control of complex behavioral responses is poorly understood. Here, we show that the central administration of estradiol rapidly increases the expression of sexual motivation, as assessed by several measures of sexual motivation produced in response to the visual presentation of a female but not sexual performance in male Japanese quail. This effect is mimicked by membrane-impermeable analogs of estradiol, indicating that it is initiated at the cell membrane. Conversely, blocking the action of estrogens or their synthesis by a single intracereboventricular injection of estrogen receptor antagonists or aromatase inhibitors respectively decreases sexual motivation within minutes without affecting performance. The same steroid has thus evolved complementary mechanisms to regulate different behavioral components (motivation vs. performance) in distinct temporal domains (long- vs. short-term) so that diverse reproductive activities can be properly coordinated to improve reproductive fitness. Given the pleiotropic effects exerted by estrogens, other responses controlled by these steroids might also depend on a slow genomic regulation of neuronal plasticity underlying behavioral activation and an acute control of motivation to engage in behavior. PMID:23283331

  3. Deoxybenzoins are novel potent selective estrogen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Papoutsi, Zoi; Kassi, Eva; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Mitakou, Sofia; Lambrinidis, George; Mikros, Emmanuel; Moutsatsou, Paraskevi

    2007-09-01

    Deoxybenzoins are plant compounds with similar structure to isoflavones. In this study, we evaluated the ability of two synthesized deoxybenzoins (compound 1 and compound 2) (a) to influence the activity of the estrogen receptor subtypes ERalpha and ERbeta in HeLa cells co-transfected with an estrogen response element-driven luciferase reporter gene and ERalpha- or ERbeta-expression vectors, (b) to modulate the IGFBP-3 and pS2 protein in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, (c) to induce mineralization of KS483 osteoblasts and (d) to affect the cell viability of endometrial (Ishikawa) and breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) cancer cells. Docking and binding energy calculations were performed using the mixed Monte Carlo/Low Mode search method (Macromodel 6.5). Compound 1 displayed significant estrogenic activity via ERbeta but no activity via ERalpha. Compound 2 was an estrogen-agonist via ERalpha and antagonist via ERbeta. Both compounds increased, like the pure antiestrogen ICI182780, the IGFBP-3 levels. Compound 2 induced, like 17beta-estradiol, significant mineralization in osteoblasts. The cell viability of Ishikawa cells was unchanged in the presence of either compound. Compound 1 increased MCF-7 cell viability consistently with an increase in pS2 levels, whereas compound 2 inhibited the cell viability. Molecular modeling confirmed the agonistic or antagonistic behaviour of compound 2 via ER subtypes. Compound 2, being an agonist in osteoblasts, an antagonist in breast cancer cells, with no estrogenic effects in endometrial cancer cells, makes it a potential selective estrogen receptor modulator and a choice for hormone replacement therapy. PMID:17659312

  4. Rapid Actions of Xenoestrogens Disrupt Normal Estrogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Cheryl S.; Hu, Guangzhen; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A.

    2014-01-01

    Some chemicals used in consumer products or manufacturing (eg. plastics, surfactants, pesticides, resins) have estrogenic activities; these xenoestrogens (XEs) chemically resemble physiological estrogens and are one of the major categories of synthesized compounds that disrupt endocrine actions. Potent rapid actions of XEs via nongenomic mechanisms contribute significantly to their disruptive effects on functional endpoints (eg. cell proliferation/death, transport, peptide release). Membrane-initiated hormonal signaling in our pituitary cell model is predominantly driven by mERα with mERβ and GPR30 participation. We visualized ERα on plasma membranes using many techniques in the past (impeded ligands, antibodies to ERα ) and now add observations of epitope proximity with other membrane signaling proteins. We have demonstrated a range of rapid signals/protein activations by XEs including: calcium channels, cAMP/PKA, MAPKs, G proteins, caspases, and transcription factors. XEs can cause disruptions of the oscillating temporal patterns of nongenomic signaling elicited by endogenous estrogens. Concentration effects of XEs are nonmonotonic (a trait shared with natural hormones), making it difficult to design efficient (single concentration) toxicology tests to monitor their harmful effects. A plastics monomer, Bisphenol A, modified by waste treatment (chlorination) and other processes causes dephosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases, in contrast to having no effects as it does in genomic signaling. Mixtures of XEs, commonly found in contaminated environments, disrupt the signaling actions of physiological estrogens even more severely than do single XEs. Understanding the features of XEs that drive these disruptive mechanisms will allow us to redesign useful chemicals that exclude estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities. PMID:24269739

  5. Estrogen-Cholinergic Interactions: Implications for Cognitive Aging

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Paul; Dumas, Julie

    2015-01-01

    While many studies in humans have investigated the effects of estrogen and hormone therapy on cognition, potential neurobiological correlates of these effects have been less well studied. An important site of action for estrogen in the brain is the cholinergic system. Several decades of research support the critical role of CNS cholinergic systems in cognition in humans, particularly in learning and memory formation and attention. In humans, the cholinergic system has been implicated in many aspects of cognition including the partitioning of attentional resources, working memory, inhibition of irrelevant information, and improved performance on effort-demanding tasks. Studies support the hypothesis that estradiol helps to maintain aspects of attention and verbal and visual memory. Such cognitive domains are exactly those modulated by cholinergic systems and extensive basic and preclinical work over the past several decades has clearly shown that basal forebrain cholinergic systems are dependent on estradiol support for adequate functioning. This paper will review recent human studies from our laboratories and others that have extended preclinical research examining estrogen-cholinergic interactions to humans. Studies examined include estradiol and cholinergic antagonist reversal studies in normal older women, examinations of the neural representations of estrogen-cholinergic interactions using functional brain imaging, and studies of the ability of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen to interact with cholinergic-mediated cognitive performance. We also discuss the implications of these studies for the underlying hypotheses of cholinergic-estrogen interactions and cognitive aging, and indications for prophylactic and therapeutic potential that may exploit these effects. PMID:26187712

  6. Estrogen-cholinergic interactions: Implications for cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Paul; Dumas, Julie

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and Cognition". While many studies in humans have investigated the effects of estrogen and hormone therapy on cognition, potential neurobiological correlates of these effects have been less well studied. An important site of action for estrogen in the brain is the cholinergic system. Several decades of research support the critical role of CNS cholinergic systems in cognition in humans, particularly in learning and memory formation and attention. In humans, the cholinergic system has been implicated in many aspects of cognition including the partitioning of attentional resources, working memory, inhibition of irrelevant information, and improved performance on effort-demanding tasks. Studies support the hypothesis that estradiol helps to maintain aspects of attention and verbal and visual memory. Such cognitive domains are exactly those modulated by cholinergic systems and extensive basic and preclinical work over the past several decades has clearly shown that basal forebrain cholinergic systems are dependent on estradiol support for adequate functioning. This paper will review recent human studies from our laboratories and others that have extended preclinical research examining estrogen-cholinergic interactions to humans. Studies examined include estradiol and cholinergic antagonist reversal studies in normal older women, examinations of the neural representations of estrogen-cholinergic interactions using functional brain imaging, and studies of the ability of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen to interact with cholinergic-mediated cognitive performance. We also discuss the implications of these studies for the underlying hypotheses of cholinergic-estrogen interactions and cognitive aging, and indications for prophylactic and therapeutic potential that may exploit these effects. PMID:26187712

  7. Progress in the molecular understanding of central regulation of body weight by estrogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens can act in the brain to prevent body weight gain. Tremendous research efforts have been focused on estrogen physiology in the brain in the context of body weight control; estrogen receptors and the related signals have been attractive targets for development of new obesity therapies. The o...

  8. Fate and transformation of an estrogen conjugate and its metabolites in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens are naturally produced steroid hormones that are constantly being eliminated by many life forms, including production animals. An important form of release of estrogens is as water-soluble conjugates, which are not toxic, but may readily be hydrolyzed back to parent estrogens, which are kn...

  9. [Focusing on tissue biomarkers. Estrogens as key players in the immune response and autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Vásárhelyi, Barna; Mészáros, Katalin; Karvaly, Gellért; Patócs, Attila

    2015-12-20

    Estrogens modulate the immune response as well as the risk and progression of autoimmune disorders. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors (i.e. estrogen receptor alpha and beta), membrane receptors, and are influenced by their interactions with other hormones. Locally produced hormones and cytokines are the main factors in maintaining tissue homeostasis. The response of immune cells to estrogens is related to their developmental stage. The diverse effects of estrogens on various autoimmune disorders are the result of the versatility of their pathomechanism. In general, progression of B-cell mediated disorders is aggravated by estrogens. Their effects on T-cell mediated disorders, on the other hand, are driven by Th1 or Th2 dominance. As estrogens promote the escalation of the Th2 immune response, Th2-dominant disorders are aggravated, while Th1-dominant disorders are ameliorated upon high estrogen levels. Inflammation on its own also modulates the impact of estrogens. Inflammatory cytokines alter the expression of the alpha and beta estrogen receptors as well as the activity of estrogen metabolizing enzymes. Monitoring the local, tissue-wide interaction between hormones and immune cells would provide a better tool for identification and characterization of molecules involved in this system. To date, routinely used laboratory methods have a limited role in monitoring the local effects of estrogens. In this current paper the authors summarize the role of estrogens in immune system and overview those novel methods which are useful in the investigation of local endocrine milieu. PMID:26654543

  10. Evaluation of surface waters associated with animal feeding operations for estrogenic chemicals and activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens and estrogenic activity (EA) were evaluated in surface waters associated with animal feeding operations. Water was sampled at 19 sites in 12 states using discrete (n=41) and POCIS (n=19) sampling methods. Estrogenic chemicals measured in unfiltered water by GC/MS2 included: estrone (E1),17...

  11. Bone marrow oxytocin mediates the anabolic action of estrogen on the skeleton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen withdrawal in women due to natural or artificial menopause is followed by rapid bone loss, osteoporosis, and a high fracture risk. Replacement with estrogen prevents this bone loss and reduces the risk of fracture. Estrogen uses two mechanisms to exert this effect: it inhibits bone resorpti...

  12. DNA Repair, Redox Regulation and Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Mediated Transcription

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis-Ducey, Carol Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) with 17[beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) facilitates binding of the receptor to estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, which in turn leads to recruitment of coregulatory proteins. To better understand how estrogen-responsive genes are regulated, our laboratory identified a number of…

  13. Acquisition of estrogen independence induces TOB1-related mechanisms supporting breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-W; Nasto, R E; Varghese, R; Jablonski, S A; Serebriiskii, I G; Surana, R; Calvert, V S; Bebu, I; Murray, J; Jin, L; Johnson, M; Riggins, R; Ressom, H; Petricoin, E; Clarke, R; Golemis, E A; Weiner, L M

    2016-03-31

    Resistance to therapies targeting the estrogen pathway remains a challenge in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. To address this challenge, a systems biology approach was used. A library of small interfering RNAs targeting an estrogen receptor (ER)- and aromatase-centered network identified 46 genes that are dispensable in estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells, but are selectively required for the survival of estrogen-independent MCF7-derived cells and multiple additional estrogen-independent breast cancer cell lines. Integration of this information identified a tumor suppressor gene TOB1 as a critical determinant of estrogen-independent ER-positive breast cell survival. Depletion of TOB1 selectively promoted G1 phase arrest and sensitivity to AKT and mammalian target of rapmycin (mTOR) inhibitors in estrogen-independent cells but not in estrogen-dependent cells. Phosphoproteomic profiles from reverse-phase protein array analysis supported by mRNA profiling identified a significant signaling network reprogramming by TOB1 that differed in estrogen-sensitive and estrogen-resistant cell lines. These data support a novel function for TOB1 in mediating survival of estrogen-independent breast cancers. These studies also provide evidence for combining TOB1 inhibition and AKT/mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic strategy, with potential translational significance for the management of patients with ER-positive breast cancers. PMID:26165839

  14. Estrogen-induced neurochemical and electrophysiological changes in the parabrachial nucleus of the male rat.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Tarek M; Connell, Barry J; McQuaid, Tim; Cribb, Alastair E

    2003-11-14

    Estrogen has previously been shown to significantly change sympathetic and parasympathetic system output via an action within the central nuclei responsible for regulating autonomic tone. These estrogen-induced changes were observed within 30 min of systemic administration and could be blocked by the direct microinjection of the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182780, into the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) of the pons. In the present investigation, we sought to determine the possible mechanism(s) by which estrogen produced these rapid changes in autonomic tone by determining if estrogen modulates neuronal excitability within the PBN. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with Inactin (sodium thiobutabarbitol, 100 mg/kg) and instrumented for the intravenous injection of estrogen and placed in a stereotaxic frame for the insertion of a microdialysis probe or glass recording electrode into the PBN. In the first experiment, we sought to determine the local concentration of estrogen in the cerebrospinal fluid in the PBN following systemic injection of estrogen. In the second experiment, we sought to determine the functional significance of systemic estrogen injection on neuronal activity and amino acid neurotransmitter levels in the PBN. Systemic estrogen injection resulted in a significant increase in local estrogen concentration in the PBN which corresponded to a decrease in neuronal excitability and extracellular glutamate levels while increasing GABA levels in the PBN. These results suggest that estrogen decreases neuronal excitability in the PBN by modulating synaptic transmission via an increased release of GABA and a decreased release of glutamate. PMID:14568330

  15. Measuring free, conjugated, and halogenated estrogens in secondary treated wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Griffith, David R; Kido Soule, Melissa C; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Eglinton, Timothy I; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B; Gschwend, Philip M

    2014-01-01

    Steroidal estrogens are potent endocrine-disrupting chemicals that enter natural waters through the discharge of treated and raw sewage. Because estrogens are detrimental to aquatic organisms at sub-nanogram per liter concentrations, many studies have measured so-called "free" estrogen concentrations in wastewater effluents, rivers, and lakes. Other forms of estrogens are also of potential concern because conjugated estrogens can be easily converted to potent free estrogens by bacteria in wastewater treatment plants and receiving waters and halogenated estrogens are likely produced during wastewater disinfection. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have concurrently characterized free, conjugated, and halogenated estrogens. We have developed a method that is capable of simultaneously quantifying free, conjugated, and halogenated estrogens in treated wastewater effluent, in which detection limits were 0.13-1.3 ng L(-1) (free), 0.11-1.0 ng L(-1) (conjugated), and 0.18-18 ng L(-1) (halogenated). An aqueous phase additive, ammonium fluoride, was used to increase the electrospray (negative mode) ionization efficiency of free and halogenated estrogens by factors of 20 and 2.6, respectively. The method was validated using treated effluent from the greater Boston metropolitan area, where conjugated and halogenated estrogens made up 60-70% of the steroidal estrogen load on a molar basis. PMID:24476066

  16. Steroid receptor coactivator-1 mediates estrogenic actions to prevent body weight gain in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) expressed by hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and steroidogenic factor-1 neurons largely mediates the antiobesity effects of estrogens in females. However, the critical molecular events that are coupled to ERalpha and mediate estrogenic effects on energy balance rem...

  17. Binding and transactivation of the largemouth bass estrogen receptors by model compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens (EEs) are chemicals in the environment that can elicit adverse effects on estrogen (E2) signaling by binding with the estrogen receptors (ERs). In largemouth bass (LMB), the physiological actions of E2 are primarily mediated via three receptors (ERα, ERßb ...

  18. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  19. Reversal of fortune: estrogen receptor-β in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Simmen, Rosalia C M; Kelley, Angela S

    2016-08-01

    Enhanced inflammation and reduced apoptosis sustain the growth of endometriotic lesions. Alterations in the expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor-beta (ERβ) accompany the conversion of resident endometrial cells within the normal uterine environment to ectopic lesions located in extrauterine sites. Recent studies highlighted in this focused review linked ERβ to dysregulation of apoptotic and inflammatory networks involving novel interacting partners in endometriosis. The elucidation of these nongenomic actions of ERβ using human cells and mouse models is an important step in understanding key regulatory pathways that are disrupted leading to disease establishment and progression. PMID:27272520

  20. Keto-enol tautomerism in estrogen hormone. A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameh-Bozorghi, Saeed; Shirani, Hossein; Ghaempanah, Aram; Ghapanvari, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    The HF/6-311+G** calculation was used to investigate Keto-Enol tautomerism of Estrogen Hormone. Molecular geometries of keto, enol and transition state of this reaction were optimized and NBO calculations were performed. These calculation results showed that activation energy (Ea) of Keto-Enol tautomerization of Estrogen is 118.65 Kcal mol-1. Energetic study at B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory revealed that keto tautomer is more stable structure. NBO analysis results have a good agreements with optimized geometries and experimental data.

  1. Estrogen and Estrogen Receptor-α-Mediated Transrepression of Bile Salt Export Pump.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Vasilenko, Alex; Song, Xiulong; Valanejad, Leila; Verma, Ruchi; You, Sangmin; Yan, Bingfang; Shiffka, Stephanie; Hargreaves, Leeza; Nadolny, Christina; Deng, Ruitang

    2015-04-01

    Among diseases unique to pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is the most prevalent disorder with elevated serum bile acid levels. We have previously shown that estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) transrepresses bile salt export pump (BSEP) through an interaction between estrogen receptor (ER)-α and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transrepression of BSEP by E2/ERα is an etiological contributing factor to intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Currently the mechanistic insights into such transrepression are not fully understood. In this study, the dynamics of coregulator recruitment to BSEP promoter after FXR activation and E2 treatment were established with quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 was predominantly recruited to the BSEP promoter upon FXR activation, and its recruitment was decreased by E2 treatment. Meanwhile, recruitment of nuclear receptor corepressor was markedly increased upon E2 treatment. Functional evaluation of ERα and ERβ chimeras revealed that domains AC of ERα are the determinants for ERα-specific transrepression on BSEP. Further studies with various truncated ERα proteins identified the domains in ERα responsible for ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transrepression. Truncated ERα-AD exhibited potent ligand-independent transrepressive activity, whereas ERα-CF was fully capable of transrepressing BSEP ligand dependently in vitro in Huh 7 cells and in vivo in mice. Both ERα-AD and ERα-CF proteins were associated with FXR in the coimmunoprecipitation assays. In conclusion, E2 repressed BSEP expression through diminishing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 recruitment with a concurrent increase in nuclear receptor corepressor recruitment to the BSEP promoter. Domains AD and CF in ERα mediated ligand-independent and ligand-dependent transrepression on BSEP, respectively, through interacting with FXR. PMID:25675114

  2. Dioxin exerts anti-estrogenic actions in a novel dioxin-responsive telomerase-immortalized epithelial cell line of the porcine oviduct (TERT-OPEC).

    PubMed

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Pocar, Paola; Kauffold, Johannes; Klonisch, Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Oviduct epithelial cells are important for the nourishment and survival of ovulated oocytes and early embryos, and they respond to the steroid hormones estrogen and progesterone. Endocrine-disrupting polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAH) are environmental toxins that act in part through the ligand-activated transcription factor arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR; dioxin receptor), and exposure to PHAH has been shown to decrease fertility. To investigate effects of PHAHs on the oviduct epithelium as a potential target tissue of dioxin-type endocrine disruptors, we have established a novel telomerase-immortalized oviduct porcine epithelial cell line (TERT-OPEC). TERT-OPEC exhibited active telomerase and the immunoreactive epithelial marker cytokeratin but lacked the stromal marker vimentin. TERT-OPEC contained functional estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and AhR, as determined by the detection of ER-alpha- and AhR-specific target molecules. Treatment of TERT-OPEC with the AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) resulted in a significant increase in the production of the cytochrome P-450 microsomal enzyme CYP1A1. Activated AhR caused a downregulation of ER nuclear protein fraction and significantly decreased ER-signaling in TERT-OPEC as determined by ERE-luciferase transient transfection assays. In summary, the TCDD-induced and AhR-mediated anti-estrogenic responses by TERT-OPEC suggest that PHAH affect the predominantly estrogen-dependent differentiation of the oviduct epithelium within the fallopian tube. This action then alters the local endocrine milieu, potentially resulting in a largely unexplored cause of impaired embryonic development and female infertility. PMID:16431846

  3. ERRF is essential for Estrogen-Estrogen Receptor alpha signaling pathway in ER positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ang; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-05-27

    Estrogen-Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) belongs to one of the most important signaling pathways controlling breast tissue development and progression of breast cancer. ERRF was recently identified as a candidate breast cancer associated protein and showed positive association with ERα status in clinical samples and cell lines. To further explore the relationship between ERRF and ERα, we studied whether ERRF plays any roles in estrogen-ERα pathway. Knockdown of ERRF in ER positive breast cancer cells T-47D and BT-474 reduced the level of p-AKT, p-MAPK, and phosphorylation of ERα at Ser 118 and Ser 167, and the transcriptional activity of ERα was inhibited as well. Further mechanism study proved ERRF to be an interacting partner of ERα. In total, these data revealed that ERRF is essential for the activity of E2-ERα pathway. PMID:27125460

  4. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-07-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  5. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  6. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  7. Dexamethasone suppresses the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer via inducing estrogen sulfotransferase and inactivating estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-jie; Li, Jian; Hao, Fang-ran; Yuan, Yin; Li, Jing-yun; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Dexamethasone (DEX) is a widely used synthetic glucocorticoid, which has shown anti-cancer efficacy and anti-estrogenic activity. In this study we explored the possibility that DEX might be used as an endocrine therapeutic agent to treat human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The viability and proliferation of human NSCLC cell lines A549 and H1299 were assessed in vitro. Anti-tumor action was also evaluated in A549 xenograft nude mice treated with DEX (2 or 4 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or the positive control tamoxifen (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 32 d. The expression of estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) in tumor cells and tissues was examined. The intratumoral estrogen levels and uterine estrogen responses were measured. Results: DEX displayed mild cytotoxicity to the NSCLC cells (IC50 >500 μmol/L) compared to tamoxifen (IC50 <50 μmol/L), but it was able to inhibit the cell proliferation at low micromolar ranges. Furthermore, DEX (0.1–10 μmol/L) dose-dependently up-regulated EST expression in the cells, and inhibited the cell migration in vitro. Triclosan, a sulfation inhibitor, was able to diminish DEX-caused inhibition on the cell viability. In A549 xenograft nude mice, DEX or tamoxifen administration remarkably suppressed the tumor growth. Moreover, DEX administration dose-dependently increased EST expression in tumor tissues, and reduced intratumoral estrogen levels as well as the volumes and weights of uterine. Conclusion: DEX suppresses the growth of A549 xenograft tumors via inducing EST and decreasing estradiol levels in tumor tissues, suggesting that DEX may be used as anti-estrogenic agent for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27133297

  8. Estrogen increases the permeability of the cultured human cervical epithelium by modulating cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Gorodeski, G I

    1998-09-01

    Estrogens increase secretion of cervical mucus in females. The objective of this research was to study the mechanisms of estrogen action. The experimental models were human CaSki (endocervical) and hECE (ectocervical) epithelial cells cultured on filters. Incubation in steroid-free medium increased transepithelial electrical resistance (RTE) and decreased epithelial permeability to the cell-impermeant acid pyranine. Estrogen treatment reversed the effects, indicating estrogen decreases epithelial paracellular resistance. The estrogen effect was time and dose related (EC50 approximately 1 nM) and specific (estradiol = diethylstilbestrol > estrone, estriol; no effect by progesterone, testosterone, or cortisol) and was blocked by progesterone, tamoxifen, and ICI-182780 (an estrogen receptor antagonist). Estrogen treatment did not modulate dilution potential or changes in RTE in response to diC8 or to low extracellular Ca2+ (modulators of tight junctional resistance). In contrast, estrogen augmented decreases in RTE in response to hydrostatic and hypertonic gradients [modulators of resistance of lateral intercellular space (RLIS)], suggesting estrogen decreases RLIS. Estrogen decreased cervical cell size, shortened response time relative to changes in cell size after hypertonic challenge, and augmented the decrease in cell size in response to hypertonic and hydrostatic gradients. Lowering luminal NaCl had no significant effect on RTE, and the Cl- channel blocker diphenylamine-2-carboxylate attenuated the hypertonicity-induced decrease in cell size to the same degree in control and estrogen-treated cells, suggesting estrogen effects on permeability and cell size are not mediated by modulating Na+ or Cl- transport. In contrast, estrogen increased cellular G-actin levels, suggesting estrogens shift actin steady-state toward G-actin and the cervical cell cytoskeleton toward a more flexible structure. We suggest that the mechanism by which estrogens decrease RLIS and

  9. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Structure-function relationship in DNA- and ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Marc; Gangloff, Monique; Marie Wurtz, Jean; Moras, Dino

    2000-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are members of the nuclear receptor steroid family that exhibit specific structural features, ligand-binding domain sequence identity and dimeric interactions, that single them out. The crystal structures of their DNA-binding domains give some insight into how nuclear receptors discriminate between DNA response elements. The various ligand-binding domain crystal structures of the two known estrogen receptor isotypes (α and β) allow one to interpret ligand specificity and reveal the interactions responsible for stabilizing the activation helix H12 in the agonist and antagonist positions. PMID:11250728

  10. Relationship between the expression of estrogen-regulated genes and estrogen-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Aitken, S C; Lippman, M E; Kasid, A; Schoenberg, D R

    1985-06-01

    The growth of MCF-7 cells was arrested by 24 h of isoleucine deprivation. Following replenishment of the medium, the incorporation of uridine and thymidine into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable material began to increase slowly and gradually rose to the level of cycling cells. The addition of 5 X 10(-9) M estradiol to growth-arrested cells dramatically shortened the time of onset of macromolecular synthesis and increased the overall amount of precursor incorporation 2- to 4-fold over the level obtained by arrested control cells. The increase in uridine incorporation preceded the increase in thymidine incorporation by 6 h. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide blocked the recovery of macromolecular synthesis in both control and estrogen-treated cells. Actinomycin D was ineffective in blocking the estrogen-stimulated recovery of macromolecular synthesis at concentrations known to inhibit pre-rRNA synthesis (10(-8) M). At higher concentrations, uridine and thymidine incorporation were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity with alpha-amanitin similarly blocked both the recovery of the cells from isoleucine starvation and the potentiation of this by estradiol. Dihydrofolate reductase and thymidine kinase activities are both stimulated by estradiol in MCF-7 cells. In cycling cells, estrogen stimulates a 2-fold increase in their messenger RNAs (mRNAs) within 24 h. The level of dihydrofolate reductase mRNA is unaffected by isoleucine starvation, and estrogen caused no change in dihydrofolate reductase mRNA levels over a 24-h period following reversal of growth arrest. Similar results were observed for the 600-nucleotide pS2 mRNA that has been identified as an estrogen-induced RNA in MCF-7 cells. In contrast, thymidine kinase mRNA was found to be increased by estrogen at 24 h, but not at 12 h, following reversal of growth arrest. This increase correlates with increases in thymidine, but not uridine incorporation. These

  11. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact

  12. Dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Yatish T.; Gardner, Todd H.

    2014-09-25

    Developments in catalyst technology for the dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks are reviewed for methane, higher hydrocarbons and alcohols. Thermodynamics, mechanisms and the kinetics of dry reforming are also reviewed. The literature on Ni catalysts, bi-metallic Ni catalysts and the role of promoters on Ni catalysts is critically evaluated. The use of noble and transitional metal catalysts for dry reforming is discussed. The application of solid oxide and metal carbide catalysts to dry reforming is also evaluated. Finally, various mechanisms for catalyst deactivation are assessed. This review also examines the various process related issues associated with dry reforming such as its application and heat optimization. Novel approaches such as supercritical dry reforming and microwave assisted dry reforming are briefly expanded upon.

  13. Kinetic models of hydrocarbon generation

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A.K.; Sweeney, J.J.

    1990-10-25

    We are carrying out an integrated program of laboratory experiments, kinetics modeling, and basin thermal history modeling in order to better understand the natural breakdown of organic matter into oil and gas. Our kinetic models of organic maturation are being used to better understand the coupling of generation, cracking, expulsion, and overpressuring in both the laboratory and geologic setting. Currently we are carrying out chemical experiments and developing more efficient chemical kinetic modeling schemes to obtain a better understanding of expulsion and cracking from lean source rocks and from hydrogen-poor (terrestrial) organic source material. We verify the chemical kinetic models by integrating them with thermal history models of hydrocarbon-producing sediments and comparing predicted and observed characteristics of the hydrocarbon occurrence in a variety of settings. We intend to apply this approach to evaluate the potential for deep gas resources in the Pacific Northwest and in the Louisiana Gulf Coast. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Farm-scale reconnaissance of estrogens in subsurface waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol is a natural estrogenic hormone found in animal manure and urine. In its parent form it has the ability to affect the reproductive systems of aquatic organisms at very low concentrations (10-100 ngL-1). While it has been reported to dissipate rapidly in soil laboratory studies it is...

  15. METHOXYCHLOR REGULATES RAT UTERINE ESTROGEN-INDUCED PROTEIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methoxychlor (MXC), a pesticide, affects fertility and the uterus. o address the question of whether MXC acts like estradiol (E2) at the molecular level, we used immature rat uteri to compare the effects of MXC and E2 on the estrogen-induced protein (IP), also known as creatine k...

  16. Ontogeny of the estrogen receptor in the chick oviduct.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, T K; Tuohimaa, P J

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of estrogen receptor (ER) in the chick oviduct was studied immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibody H222, known to recognize chick ER [1]. The ontogeny of ER appeared to be very dependent on cellular differentiation. In the undifferentiated oviduct ER was located in the epithelial, mesothelial, stromal and smooth muscle cells. During differentiation ER disappeared from the surface epithelium, mesothelium, stromal and smooth muscle cells. At the onset of differentiation the protodifferentiated gland cells invaginated into the underlying stroma; these cells expressed ER. In the fully differentiated chick oviduct ER was located only in the tubular gland cells, which correlates with the known transcriptional activity of estrogen-induced ovalbumin-gene. However, we have reported estrogen dependency of PR also in ER-negative stromal cells, the mechanism being so far unknown. It is possible that there are mechanisms other than ER regulating the expression of PR. Estrogen-induced differentiation did not differ from normal maturation in regard to the distribution of ER. Since stromal, epithelial, mesothelial and smooth muscle cells were ER-negative in the mature oviduct, the concentration of ER, i.e. ER binding sites/cell is underestimated when whole tissue homogenates are used. PMID:2626020

  17. Synthesis of 3-alkyl naphthalenes as novel estrogen receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jing; Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Britton, Jonathan E.; Katamreddy, Subba R.; Navas III, Frank; Miller, Aaron B.; Williams, Shawn P.; Gray, David W.; Orband-Miller, Lisa A.; Shearin, Jean; Heyer, Dennis

    2009-06-24

    A series of estrogen receptor ligands based on a 3-alkyl naphthalene scaffold was synthesized using an intramolecular enolate-alkyne cycloaromatization as the key step. Several of these compounds bearing a C6-OH group were shown to be high affinity ligands. All compounds had similar ER{alpha} and ER{beta} binding affinity ranging from micromolar to low nanomolar.

  18. DEVELOPMENTAL EVALUATION OF A POTENTIAL NON-STEROIDAL ESTROGEN: TRICLOSAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan is an antibacterial agent commonly used in industry and often detected in wastewater effluent. The potential of triclosan to act as an endocrine disruptor was examined because its chemical structure closely resembles known non-steroidal estrogens (e.g. DES, bis-phenol A...

  19. Potential estrogenic effects of phosphorus-containing flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Lu, Meiya; Dong, Xiaowu; Wang, Cui; Zhang, Chunlong; Liu, Weiping; Zhao, Meirong

    2014-06-17

    As the substitute of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), further assessments about the potential ecological safety and health risks of phosphorus-containing flame retardants (PFRs) are required because the worldwide demand for PFRs has been increasing every year. In this study, we examined the agonistic/antagonistic activity of a group of PFRs by three in vitro models (luciferase reporter gene assay, yeast two-hybrid assay, and E-screen assay). Molecule docking was used to further explain the interactions between ERα and PFRs. Data from luciferase reporter gene analysis showed three members of the nine tested PFRs significantly induced estrogenic effects, with the order of TPP > TCP > TDCPP, while TCEP and TEHP have remarkable antiestrogenic properties with calculated REC20 and RIC20 values of 10(-6) M or lower. Results from the luciferase reporter gene method are generally consistent with results obtained from the yeast two-hybrid assay and E-screen, except for the positive estrogenic activity of TBP in E-screen testing. Docking results showed that binding between ligands and ERα was stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. As a proposed alternative for brominated flame retardant, PFRs may have anti/estrogenic activity via ERα at the low dose typical of residue in environmental matrix or animals. PFRs with a short chain, halogen, and benzene ring in the substituent group tend to be estrogenic. Our research suggests that comprehensive evaluations, including health and ecological assessments, are required in determining whether PFRs are preferable as an emerging industrial substitute. PMID:24844797

  20. ASSAYS FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: BEYOND ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent popular and scientific articles have reported the presence of estrogenic and other hormone mimicking chemicals in the environment and their potential for causing reproductive dysfunction in humans and wildlife. The purpose of this session was to present the best available,...

  1. Sorption and degradation of estrogen conjugates in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural estrogenic hormone, 17'-estradiol (E2), can disrupt the endocrine system of some aquatic species at ng/L concentrations. Laboratory studies have shown low potentials for E2 persistence and mobility in the environment due to high degradation and soil retention. However, field studies have...

  2. Biochar as potential adsorptive media for estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are an emerging problem in water pollution due to their toxic effects on humans and wildlife. Estrogenic compounds are a subset of endocrine disrupting chemicals that are particularly dangerous since they are very potent and can affect fish at concentrations as low as ...

  3. EFFECTS OF EXTROGENOUS ESTROGEN ON MATE SELECTION OF HOUSE FINCHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of exogenous estrogen on mate selection of house finches. Clark, J., Fairbrother, A*. Parametrix, Inc., Corvallis, OR; Brewer, L., EBA, Inc., Sisters, OR; Bennett, R.S., USEPA, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN.

    Concern about the potential for endocrine...

  4. EFFECTS OF EXOGENOUS ESTROGEN ON MATE SELECTION OF HOUSE FINCHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern about the potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife has prompted this study of effects of exogenous estrogen on mate selection in songbirds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as a model as it is ...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  9. Examining triclosan-induced potentiation of the estrogen uterotrophic effect

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan (TCS), a widely used antibacterial, has been shown to be an endocrine disruptor. We reported previously that TCS potentiated the estrogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol (EE) on uterine growth in rats orally administered 3 μg/kg EE and TCS (2 to 18 mg/kg) in the utero...

  10. Prenatal Estrogens and the Development of Homosexual Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the hypothesis that prenatal estrogens contribute to the development of human sexual orientation. Several groups of women with a history of prenatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) were compared with several samples of control women. Findings showed that more DES-exposed women than controls were rated as bisexual or homosexual,…

  11. Novel Metal Ion Based Estrogen Mimics for Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2006-01-30

    The overall objective of the SBIR Phase I proposal is to prepare and evaluate a new class of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 94m}Tc containing estrogen-like small molecules ('estrogen mimics') for SPECT or PET molecular imaging of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. In this approach, the metal ion is integrated into the estrone skeleton by isosteric substitution of a carbon atom in the steroidal structure to give new class of mimics that are topologically similar to the native estrogen (Fig. 1). Although both N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S mimics 1 and 2 were considered as target structures, molecular modeling study revealed that the presence of the acetyl group at position-15 in the N{sub 3}S mimic 2 causes steric hinderance toward binding of 2 to SHBG. Therefore, initial efforts were directed at the synthesis and evaluation of the N{sub 2}S{sub 2} mimic 1.

  12. EADB: An Estrogenic Activity Database for Assessing Potential Endocrine Activity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body’s endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many ...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1275 - Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estrogens (total, nonpregnancy) test system. 862.1275 Section 862.1275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  14. Molecular cloning of estrogen receptor alpha of the Nile crocodile.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Myburgh, Jan; Kohno, Satomi; Swan, Gerry E; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2006-03-01

    Estrogens are essential for normal reproductive activity in female and male vertebrates. In female reptiles, they are essential for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage. To understand the molecular mechanisms of estrogen action in the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus), we have isolated cDNA encoding the estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) from the ovary. Degenerate PCR primers specific to ER were designed and used to amplify Nile crocodile cDNA from the ovary. The full-length Nile crocodile ERalpha cDNA was obtained using 5' and 3' rapid amplification cDNA ends (RACE). The deduced amino acid sequence of the Nile crocodile ERalpha showed high identity to the American alligator ERalpha (98%), caiman ER (98%), lizard ER (82%) and chicken ERalpha (92%), although phylogenetic analysis suggested profound differences in the rate of sequence evolution for vertebrate ER sequences. Expression of ERalpha was observed in the ovary and testis of juvenile Nile crocodiles. These data provide a novel tool allowing future studies examining the regulation and ontogenic expression of ERalpha in crocodiles and expands our knowledge of estrogen receptor evolution. PMID:16455277

  15. Synchronous Multiple Lung Adenocarcinomas: Estrogen Concentration in Peripheral Lung

    PubMed Central

    Shinchi, Yusuke; Sanada, Mune; Motooka, Yamato; Fujino, Kosuke; Mori, Takeshi; Suzuki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Background The detection rate of synchronous multiple lung adenocarcinomas (SMLA), which display multiple ground glass opacity nodules in the peripheral lung, is increasing due to advances in high resolution computed tomography. The backgrounds of multicentric development of adenocarcinoma are unknown. In this study, we quantitated estrogen concentration in the peripheral lungs of postmenopausal female patients with SMLA. Methods The tissue concentration of estrogens (estrone [E1] and estdadiol [E2]) in the noncancerous peripheral lung were measured with liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry in postmenopausal female patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The expression levels of CYP19A1 in the normal lung were also quantitated with real-time PCR. Thirty patients with SMLA and 79 cases of control patients with single lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed. Results The concentrations of E1 and E2 in the noncancerous tissue were significantly higher in SMLA cases than control cases (P = 0.004 and P = 0.02, respectively). The minor allele (A) of single nucleotide polymorphism rs3764221 were significantly associated with higher concentration of E1 and E2 (P = 0.002 and P = 0.01, respectively) and higher CYP19A1 mRNA expression (P = 0.03). Conclusion The tissue estrogen concentration of peripheral lung was significantly higher in SMLA than control cases. The high concentration of estrogen may be one of the causes of multicentric development of peripheral lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:27526096

  16. Removal and Transformation of Estrogens During the Coagulation Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over the possible presence of endocrine disrupting compounds in finished drinking waters. Bench-scale studies (jar tests) simulating coagulation were conducted to evaluate the ability of tw...

  17. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  18. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  19. Exercise and Estrogen in Women's Health: Getting a Clearer Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnings, Frances

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys recent research on how and when exercise or estrogen therapy should be used to treat or prevent athletic amenorrhea, osteoporosis, cancer, and heart disease. The suspected causes of each disease are discussed and the benefits and dangers of each form of treatment/prevention are weighed. (JL)

  20. Modulation by estrogen of synthesis of specific uterine proteins.

    PubMed

    Skipper, J K; Eakle, S D; Hamilton, T H

    1980-11-01

    The contemporary procedure for high resolution two dimensional gel electrophoresis was extended to include an initial nondenaturing dimension of electrophoresis. Use of the resulting three dimensional procedure revealed that the previously described single peak of estrogen-induced protein in the uterus of the rat contains at least three distinct proteins whose rates of synthesis are regulated by estrogen. These proteins were localized within partial protein maps, thereby providing definitive operational definitions for the detection and identification of each. It was unambiguously demonstrated that each of the three proteins is continuously synthesized in control uteri. These findings cast doubt on the simplistic hypothesis that estrogen induces a single key protein that triggers a "cascade" of sequential transcriptional events in the uterus. Our finding that the major uterine protein induced by estrogen is also synthesized in liver and muscle cells is significant in that it points to a more general cellular function for the protein, rather than a unique role within uterine cells. Finally, our procedure for three dimensional gel electrophoresis opens new avenues for the detection of minor proteins in heterogeneous protein mixtures, such as those from the tissues of higher animals. PMID:7428041

  1. Lack of activity of cadmium in in vitro estrogenicity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Elisabete . E-mail: elisabete.silva@pharmacy.ac.uk; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria Jose; Molina-Molina, Jose-Manuel; Fernandez, Marieta; Olea, Nicolas; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2006-10-01

    Prompted by reports about strong estrogenic effects of cadmium, attempts were made to reproduce these observations using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) and the E-Screen assays. For the first time, possible activation of the Src/MAPK pathway was also investigated. In the YES, only a slight activation (10% of a maximal effect) of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) was observed at cadmium concentrations between 5 x 10{sup -7} M and 5 x 10{sup -6} M. In the E-Screen assay, carried out by two laboratories, the heavy metal was without observable cell proliferative effects when tested in the range between 6 x 10{sup -11} M and 1 x 10{sup -5} M. However, in both assays, cadmium led to a reduction of the effects of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2). Treatment of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells with 1 x 10{sup -7} M cadmium failed to induce phosphorylation of Src and the MAP kinases Erk1 and Erk2-effects shown to occur with E2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF). In summary, we were unable to confirm the strong estrogenicity of cadmium reported recently by a number of laboratories. This apparent absence of effects in our hands is not due to a lack of uptake of the metal or to effective protection against cadmium by high levels of glutathione or metallothionein, since toxicity and an antagonism of E2 responses were observed both in the YES and the E-Screen.

  2. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF ESTROGENS THROUGH THE COAGULATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters in the U.S. These compounds have the potential to act as potent endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), leading to a growing concern over the possible presence of EDCs in finished drinking waters. Con...

  3. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF ESTROGENS THROUGH THE COAGULATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters in the U.S. These compounds have the potential to act as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), leading to concern over the possible presence of EDCs in finished drinking waters. Consequently, it is ...

  4. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF ESTROGENS THROUGH THE COAGULATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters in the U.S. These compounds have the potential to act as potent endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), leading to a growing concern over the possible presence of EDCs in finished drinking waters. C...

  5. Steroidal estrogen sources in a sewage-impacted coastal ocean.

    PubMed

    Griffith, David R; Kido Soule, Melissa C; Eglinton, Timothy I; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B; Gschwend, Philip M

    2016-08-10

    Estrogens are known to be potent endocrine disrupting chemicals that are commonly found in wastewater effluents at ng L(-1) levels. Yet, we know very little about the distribution and fate of estrogens in coastal oceans that receive wastewater inputs. This study measured a wide range of steroidal estrogens in sewage-impacted seawater using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) together with the method of standard addition. In Massachusetts Bay, we find conjugated, free, and halogenated estrogens at concentrations that are consistent with dilution at sites close to the sewage source. At a site 6 miles down current of the sewage source, we observe estrone (E1) concentrations (520 ± 180 pg L(-1)) that are nearly double the nearfield concentrations (320 ± 60 pg L(-1)) despite 9-fold dilution of carbamazepine, which was used as a conservative sewage tracer. Our results suggest that background E1 concentrations in Massachusetts Bay (∼270 ± 50 pg L(-1)) are derived largely from sources unrelated to wastewater effluent such as marine vertebrates. PMID:27465804

  6. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF ESTROGENS FOLLOWING CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters in the U.S. These compounds have the potential to act as potent endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Although there has not yet been a determination of risks posed by EDCs in finished drinking wat...

  7. RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ALKYLPHENOLS TO RAINBOW TROUT ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ALKYLPHENOLS TO RAINBOW TROUT ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. T R Henry1, J S Denny2 and P K Schmieder2. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, 1Experimental Toxicology Division and 2Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN, USA.
    The USEPA has been mandated to screen industria...

  8. Catalytic method for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Sansone, Michael J.; Slegeir, William A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for synthesizing hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting said gases with a slurry of a catalyst composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants.

  9. Catalytic method for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Sansone, M.J.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    A method for synthesizing hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting said gases with a slurry of a catalyst composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants.

  10. Underground caverns for hydrocarbon storage

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, T.F.

    1998-12-31

    Large, international gas processing projects and growing LPG imports in developing countries are driving the need to store large quantities of hydrocarbon liquids. Even though underground storage is common in the US, many people outside the domestic industry are not familiar with the technology and the benefits underground storage can offer. The latter include lower construction and operating costs than surface storage, added safety, security and greater environmental acceptance.

  11. Synfuels: Hydrocarbons of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Matar, S.

    1982-09-01

    The author reviews Synfuels: Hydrocarbons of the Future by Sami Matar (discusses the important chemical advances made in the synfuels industry and the opportunities available for artificially producing new fuels) and Lighting Energy Management for Colleges and Universities from the National Lighting Bureau and the Energy Task Force (gives information on conducting a lighting energy audit, calculating lighting expenses and savings, and a glossary of terms).

  12. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Song, Chunshan; Ma, Xiaoliang; Sprague, Michael J.; Subramani, Velu

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  13. Evaluation of the in vitro estrogenicity of emerging bisphenol analogs and their respective estrogenic contributions in municipal sewage sludge in China.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ting; Liang, Dong; Song, Shanjun; Song, Maoyong; Wang, Hailin; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-04-01

    There is a potential risk to the environment from persistent estrogenic compounds in sewage sludge. In this study, eight bisphenols (BPs) were identified in sewage sludge collected from wastewater treatment plants in 15 cities in China. The estrogenic potencies of the eight BPs and the estrogenic activities of sludge samples were evaluated using a bioluminescence yeast estrogen screen (BLYES) assay. All sludge samples elicited considerable estrogenic activity at a range of 2.8-4.7 ng E2 g(-1) dry weight (dw). All BPs exhibited estrogenic activity in the BLYES assay, but there were significant differences between the potency of individual chemicals. Bisphenol AF had the highest activity, followed by tetrachlorobisphenol A, bisphenol F, bisphenol A, bisphenol E, bisphenol S and 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone. Tetrabromobisphenol A showed weak estrogenic activity at 1×10(4)nM, but significant cytotoxicity above this concentration. The total estradiol equivalency quantities (EEQs) of BPs were in the range of 2.16-49.13 pg E2 g(-1) dw, accounting for 0.05-1.47% of the total EEQs in sewage sludge samples. The results indicate that BPs made a minor contribution to the estrogenic activity of the investigated sewage sludge. Nevertheless, our results suggest that considerable attention should be directed to the estrogenic potentials of emerging organic pollutants because of their widespread use and their potential to persist in the environment. PMID:25548037

  14. Biosensor Zebrafish Provide New Insights into Potential Health Effects of Environmental Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Okhyun; Takesono, Aya; Tada, Masazumi; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: Environmental estrogens alter hormone signaling in the body that can induce reproductive abnormalities in both humans and wildlife. Available testing systems for estrogens are focused on specific systems such as reproduction. Crucially, however, the potential for significant health impacts of environmental estrogen exposures on a variety of body systems may have been overlooked. Objective: Our aim was to develop and apply a sensitive transgenic zebrafish model to assess real-time effects of environmental estrogens on signaling mechanisms in a whole body system for use in integrated health assessments. Methods: We created a novel transgenic biosensor zebrafish containing an estrogen-inducible promoter derived with multiple tandem estrogen responsive elements (EREs) and a Gal4ff-UAS system for enhanced response sensitivity. Results: Using our novel estrogen-responsive transgenic (TG) zebrafish, we identified target tissues for environmental estrogens; these tissues have very high sensitivity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Exposure of the TG fish to estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) induced specific expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a wide variety of tissues including the liver, heart, skeletal muscle, otic vesicle, forebrain, lateral line, and ganglions, most of which have not been established previously as targets for estrogens in fish. Furthermore, we found that different EDCs induced GFP expression with different tissue response patterns and time trajectories, suggesting different potential health effects. Conclusion: We have developed a powerful new model for understanding toxicological effects, mechanisms, and health impacts of environmental estrogens in vertebrates. PMID:22510978

  15. Electrochemical estrogen screen method based on the electrochemical behavior of MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlian; Song, Jia; Bi, Sheng; Zhou, Shi; Cui, Jiwen; Liu, Jiguang; Wu, Dongmei

    2016-08-01

    It was an urgent task to develop quick, cheap and accurate estrogen screen method for evaluating the estrogen effect of the booming chemicals. In this study, the voltammetric behavior between the estrogen-free and normal fragmented MCF-7 cell suspensions were compared, and the electrochemical signal (about 0.68V attributed by xanthine and guanine) of the estrogen-free fragmented MCF-7 cell suspension was obviously lower than that of the normal one. The electrochemistry detection of ex-secretion purines showed that the ability of ex-secretion purines of cells sharp decreased due to the removing of endogenous estrogen. The results indicated that the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells was related to the level of intracellular estrogen. When the level of intracellular estrogen was down-regulated, the concentrations of the xanthine and hypoxanthine decreased, which led to the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells fall. Based on the electrochemical signal, the electrochemical estrogen screen method was established. The estrogen effect of estradiol, nonylphenol and bisphenol A was evaluated with the electrochemical method, and the result was accordant with that of MTT assay. The electrochemical estrogen screen method was simple, quickly, cheap, objective, and it exploits a new way for the evaluation of estrogenic effects of chemicals. PMID:27108272

  16. Detection of xenoestrogens in serum after immunoprecipitation of endogenous steroidal estrogens.

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Kala; Overstreet, James W; Rogers, Jane M; Denison, Michael S; Chen, Jiangang; Lohstroh, Peter N; McConnell, Daniel S; Lasley, Bill L

    2002-01-01

    In this article we report a simple and efficient method for detecting nonsteroidal estrogens in a biologic sample. This method uses polyclonal antibodies to estradiol (E2) to immunoprecipitate these major biologically active steroidal estrogens, leaving behind the nonsteroidal estrogens, which are then detected in a cell-based transcriptional activation bioassay for estrogen receptor agonist. The immunoprecipitation method efficiently removed 99% of radiolabeled E2 and estrone (E1) from human serum. In experiments in which supraphysiologic concentrations of E2 and E1 to human serum, all of the immunoreactive estrogens were still removed by the immunoprecipitation protocol. We carried out an in vivo validation study of this method in which we treated female macaques with the xenoestrogen nonylphenol (NP), during the late follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. We used blood samples collected before and after treatment to evaluate and characterize endogenous and exogenous serum estrogens. An immunoassay for E2 did not detect the NP in treated monkeys. The cell-based bioassay also did not detect the estrogenic activity of NP because of its saturation by the endogenous serum steroidal estrogens. However, when steroidal estrogens were removed by immunoprecipitation, we detected the estrogenic activity of NP in the bioassay. Thus, this approach is appropriate for detecting exogenous, nonsteroidal estrogens in serum samples. PMID:12153760

  17. Estrogen and cancers of the colorectum, breast, and lung in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Honma, Naoko; Hosoi, Takayuki; Arai, Tomio; Takubo, Kaiyo

    2015-09-01

    As estrogens play an important role in maintaining physiological function in various organs, the estrogen decrease after menopause is thought to cause various diseases frequently observed in postmenopausal or elderly women. With the aging of society and a decrease in infectious or vascular diseases, neoplasms have now become the most frequent cause of death in Japan. Cancers of the colorectum, breast, and lung have been rapidly increasing both in incidence and death, especially among postmenopausal women. Interestingly, all three of these cancers are associated with estrogens. In premenopausal women, ovarian estrogens plays major roles in the female reproductive organs through the classic estrogen receptor, ER-α. In postmenopausal women, however, estrogens produced/activated by peripherally localized estrogen-metabolizing enzymes such as aromatase, which converts androgen into estrogens, are thought to play physiologically and pathobiologically important roles in various organs through second ER, namely ER-β, distributing systemically. In this article, the association of estrogens with these cancers in postmenopausal or elderly women are reviewed, especially focusing on the role of ER-β and peripheral estrogen metabolism. The possibility of prevention or treatment of these diseases through estrogenic control is also discussed. PMID:26126901

  18. Identification of Estrogen Response Element in Aquaporin-3 Gene that Mediates Estrogen-induced Cell Migration and Invasion in Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Zhou, Jun; Shi, Shuai; Xu, Hai-Yan; Qu, Fan; Zhang, Dan; Chen, Yi-Ding; Yang, Jing; Huang, He-Feng; Sheng, Jian-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that aquaporins (AQPs) may facilitate tumor development. The molecular pathways connecting the pathological functions of AQPs are unclear and need to be better defined. This study aimed to investigate whether AQP3, one of the AQPs expressed highly in breast cancer, had any clinical implication in estrogen-receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, and explore the regulatory mechanisms of AQP3 in estrogen-related breast cancer progression. Here we show that AQP3 is an important enforcer of migration and invasion in breast cancer. We, for the first time, reported that ER-positive breast cancer tissues obtained from premenopausal patients had higher AQP3 expression when compared to those obtained from postmenopausal patients. Estrogen directly upregulates AQP3 by activating ERE in the promoter of the AQP3 gene. The upregulation of AQP3 can influence the expression of molecules related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the reorganization of actin-cytoskeleton, resulting in enhancement of cell migration and invasion in ER-positive breast cancer cells. PMID:26219409

  19. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  20. The Role of Estrogens in Control of Energy Balance and Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, Deborah J.; Hevener, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogens play a fundamental role in the physiology of the reproductive, cardiovascular, skeletal, and central nervous systems. In this report, we review the literature in both rodents and humans on the role of estrogens and their receptors in the control of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. Estrogen actions in hypothalamic nuclei differentially control food intake, energy expenditure, and white adipose tissue distribution. Estrogen actions in skeletal muscle, liver, adipose tissue, and immune cells are involved in insulin sensitivity as well as prevention of lipid accumulation and inflammation. Estrogen actions in pancreatic islet β-cells also regulate insulin secretion, nutrient homeostasis, and survival. Estrogen deficiency promotes metabolic dysfunction predisposing to obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. We also discuss the effect of selective estrogen receptor modulators on metabolic disorders. PMID:23460719