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Sample records for hydrofluoric acid etching

  1. Rolled-Up Nanotech: Illumination-Controlled Hydrofluoric Acid Etching of AlAs Sacrificial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costescu, Ruxandra M.; Deneke, Christoph; Thurmer, Dominic J.; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of illumination on the hydrofluoric acid etching of AlAs sacrificial layers with systematically varied thicknesses in order to release and roll up InGaAs/GaAs bilayers was studied. For thicknesses of AlAs below 10 nm, there were two etching regimes for the area under illumination: one at low illumination intensities, in which the etching and releasing proceeds as expected and one at higher intensities in which the etching and any releasing are completely suppressed. The “etch suppression” area is well defined by the illumination spot, a feature that can be used to create heterogeneously etched regions with a high degree of control, shown here on patterned samples. Together with the studied self-limitation effect, the technique offers a way to determine the position of rolled-up micro- and nanotubes independently from the predefined lithographic pattern.

  2. Study on the mechanism of platinum-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching of SiC using density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, P. V.; Isohashi, A.; Kizaki, H.; Sano, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Morikawa, Y.; Inagaki, K.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching of the SiC surface assisted by Pt as a catalyst is investigated using density functional theory. Etching is initiated by the dissociative adsorption of HF on step-edge Si, forming a five-fold coordinated Si moiety as a metastable state. This is followed by breaking of the Si-C back-bond by a H-transfer process. The gross activation barrier strongly correlates with the stability of the metastable state and is reduced by the formation of Pt-O chemical bonds, leading to an enhancement of the etching reaction.

  3. Micro-shear bond strength and surface micromorphology of a feldspathic ceramic treated with different cleaning methods after hydrofluoric acid etching

    PubMed Central

    STEINHAUSER, Henrique Caballero; TURSSI, Cecília Pedroso; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; do AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of feldspathic ceramic surface cleaning on micro-shear bond strength and ceramic surface morphology. Material and Methods Forty discs of feldspathic ceramic were prepared and etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 2 minutes. The discs were randomly distributed into five groups (n=8): C: no treatment, S: water spray + air drying for 1 minute, US: immersion in ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes, F: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, followed by 1-minute rinse, F+US: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, 1-minute rinse and ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes. Composite cylinders were bonded to the discs following application of silane and hydrophobic adhesive for micro-shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until failure. Stereomicroscopy was used to classify failure type. Surface micromorphology of each treatment type was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy at 500 and 2,500 times magnification. Results One-way ANOVA test showed no significant difference between treatments (p=0.3197) and the most common failure types were cohesive resin cohesion followed by adhesive failure. Micro-shear bond strength of the feldspathic ceramic substrate to the adhesive system was not influenced by the different surface cleaning techniques. Absence of or less residue was observed after etching with hydrofluoric acid for the groups US and F+US. Conclusions Combining ceramic cleaning techniques with hydrofluoric acid etching did not affect ceramic bond strength, whereas, when cleaning was associated with ultrasound, less residue was observed. PMID:24676577

  4. [Treatment of hydrofluoric acid burns].

    PubMed

    Thiele, B; Winter, U J; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1986-01-31

    A chemical-plant worker sustained hydrofluoric acid burns during cleaning procedures. Intra-arterial perfusion and intralesional injections of calcium gluconate solution prevented progression of the burns into deeper tissue layers. PMID:3943470

  5. Micro-PIXE and micro-RBS characterization of micropores in porous silicon prepared using microwave-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muthanna; Grime, Geoffrey W

    2013-04-01

    Porous silicon (PS) has been prepared using a microwave-assisted hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching method from a silicon wafer pre-implanted with 5 MeV Cu ions. The use of microbeam proton-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) and microbeam Rutherford backscattering techniques reveals for the first time the capability of these techniques for studying the formation of micropores. The porous structures observed from micro-PIXE imaging results are compared to scanning electron microscope images. It was observed that the implanted copper accumulates in the same location as the pores and that at high implanted dose the pores form large-scale patterns of lines and concentric circles. This is the first work demonstrating the use of microwave-assisted HF etching in the formation of PS. PMID:23388452

  6. Corrosion Behavior of Nickel Alloys in Wet Hydrofluoric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2004-02-06

    Hydrofluoric acid is a water solution of hydrogen fluoride (HF). Hydrofluoric acid is used widely in diverse types of industrial applications; traditionally, it is used in pickling solutions in the metal industry, in the fabrication of chlorofluorocarbon compounds, as an alkylation agent for gasoline and as an etching agent in the industry of glass. In recent years, hydrofluoric acid has extensively been used in the manufacture of semiconductors and microelectronics during the wet chemical cleaning of silicon wafers. Hydrofluoric acid can be considered a reducing acid and although it is chemically classified as weaker than, for example, sulfuric or hydrochloric acids, it is extremely corrosive. This acid is also particularly toxic and poses greater health hazard than most other acids. The corrosion behavior of metals in hydrofluoric acid has not been as systematic studied in the laboratory as for other common inorganic acids. This is largely because tests using hydrofluoric acid cannot be run in standard equipment and because of the toxic nature of this acid. Moreover, short-term weight loss laboratory corrosion tests in hydrofluoric acid can be frustrating since the results are not as highly reproducible as in the case of other acids such as sulfuric or hydrochloric. One of the reasons is because hydrofluoric acid commonly attacks the coupons used for testing in a non-uniform manner. That is, the corrosive power of this acid is not aimed to uniform thinning but mostly to localized penetration below the skin of the metal in the form of thin cracks, voids, pits, trenches and sometimes intergranular attack. Figure 1 shows the cross section of a coupon of Alloy 600 (N06600) exposed for 336 h to the vapor phase of a solution of 20% HF at 93 C. In cases where internal penetration occurs such as in Figure 1, it may not be recommended to use corrosion rates based on weight loss for material selection.

  7. The research on conformal acid etching process of glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kepeng; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments have been done to explore the effect of different conditions on the hydrofluoric acid etching. The hydrofluoric acid was used to etch the glass ceramic called "ZERODUR", which is invented by SCHOTT in Germany. The glass ceramic was processed into cylindrical samples. The hydrofluoric acid etching was done in a plastic beaker. The concentration of hydrofluoric acid and the etching time were changed to measure the changes of geometric tolerance and I observed the surface using a microscope in order to find an appropriate condition of hydrofluoric acid etching.

  8. Geochemistry of Hydrofluoric Acid in Kaolinitic Soils

    SciTech Connect

    DENHAM, MILES

    2004-05-11

    This document explores the geochemical reactions likely to occur when hydrofluoric acid is spilled on Savannah River Site (SRS) soil. In particular, we evaluate the potential of environmental damage from a one-time release of concentrated hydrofluoric acid into a trench. According to interviews with personnel involved, sometime between 1955 and 1960 drums of 50-60 per cent hydrofluoric acid were disposed in a trench in the Central Shops area. The method of disposal suggests that most of the acid would have been released at the time of burial. No evidence of drum disposal or acidic pH values was found. Therefore, the Soil and Groundwater Closure Projects group requested that we evaluate potential risk by examining the major geochemical interactions expected between hydrofluoric acid and soil. The geochemical calculations in this report were done with The Geochemist's Workbench (Registered). This program uses an extended Debye-Huckel method for calculating activity coefficients. The conclusions of this report are accurate, but some of the intermediate steps may have higher uncertainty. Hydrofluoric acid disposed in a trench in the area would have reacted with soil kaolinite to neutralize the pH to a value of about 4.2. Based on conservative assumptions, this would have occurred within the top 500 cm of soil. This analysis considers only the reaction of the acid with kaolinite. Other processes such as dilution, dispersion, and clogging of permeability would contribute to neutralization of the acid within a shorter distance. When the acid solution reached the water table, dilution would have driven the solution to saturation with gibbsite. A resulting layer enriched in aluminum may be the only remnant of the acid disposal identifiable today. However, any such layer would be difficult to identify because of the normally high aluminum concentrations in the soil. Subtle textural evidence of shallow soil dissolution may be present, but 40 years of rainfall infiltration may well have erased such evidence.

  9. Redox buffered hydrofluoric acid etchant for the reduction of galvanic attack during release etching of MEMS devices having noble material films

    DOEpatents

    Hankins, Matthew G.

    2009-10-06

    Etchant solutions comprising a redox buffer can be used during the release etch step to reduce damage to the structural layers of a MEMS device that has noble material films. A preferred redox buffer comprises a soluble thiophosphoric acid, ester, or salt that maintains the electrochemical potential of the etchant solution at a level that prevents oxidation of the structural material. Therefore, the redox buffer preferentially oxidizes in place of the structural material. The sacrificial redox buffer thereby protects the exposed structural layers while permitting the dissolution of sacrificial oxide layers during the release etch.

  10. Burns caused by dilute hydrofluoric acid in the bleach.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kazuhisa; Yasuhara, Naoaki; Kawarada, Harumichi; Kosaka, Sachiko; Kawana, Seiji

    2002-04-01

    Two male cleaning workers aged 62 (patient 1) and 28-(patient 2) presented with red, swollen, aching hands and fingers. At the first interview, the fingers of the right hand of both patients were swollen from the proximal interphalangeal joint to the tip of the finger. The fingers were red and intensely painful. The bleach that both patients used contained 9.5% hydrofluoric acid, and therefore we diagnosed their symptoms as those of burns caused by this agent. We subcutaneously injected 8.5% calcium gluconate into the affected fingers and dressed them with gauze soaked in cooled 0.025% benzethonium chloride. The patients did not use gloves at work, neither of them knew that the cleaning fluid contained dilute hydrofluoric acid, and they were unaware of the danger of this agent. They had not received proper education about the care and handling of poisons and deleterious substances such as hydrofluoric acid. The doctors who had examined the patients in the emergency ward overlooked the possibility of hydrofluoric acid burns, although they suspected chemical burns and confirmed the trade name of the cleaning agent. In addition, although the patients presented with intense pain, no white areas of coagulation and blistering, or surrounding erythemas, which are characteristic symptoms of such burns, were evident. The component of the cleaning agent was described on the container label in very small print. Had the words "poison" and "hydrogen fluoride" been printed in large characters, the examining doctors in the emergency ward would probably not have overlooked the presence of hydrofluoric acid, and the patients would perhaps have been more careful when using it. Hydrofluoric acid can be easily obtained by anyone through the Internet, although general consumers could not obtain industrial quantities. Therefore, the number of burn patients who are not familiar with hydrofluoric acid may increase in the future. PMID:12068331

  11. Hydrofluoric acid burn: latent period was key factor

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.R.; Tobin, J.S.

    1987-07-01

    To clean oxidation from silver soldering on a copper component, a technician used a commercial solution containing 15% hydrofluoric acid. At 9:30 a.m., the technician finished the job. The solution was used for approximately 1 hr. He removed his protective clothing and washed up, but not thoroughly (since there was no indication of anything out of the ordinary). It was not until 5:30 p.m. that he felt a burning sensation in one hand and his fingers started turning white (indicative of an acid burn). Because of the one day lapse of time since the exposure, specific hydrofluoric acid emergency treatment was not given. The next morning he saw the hand surgeon who injected calcium gluconate into the burned area. Later the wounds were debrided. Serious damage to the fingers could have resulted had the hydrofluoric acid reached the bone. Fortunately, the hydrofluoric acid had not penetrated as far as expected and, after debridement of the upper tissue, only a few minor scars remained. Three months after the accident, his hand was still swollen, and the use and dexterity of his fingers had not fully returned. After seven months, dexterity had returned although some swelling remained.

  12. Evaluation of optimal reuse system for hydrofluoric acid wastewater.

    PubMed

    Won, Chan-Hee; Choi, Jeongyun; Chung, Jinwook

    2012-11-15

    The treatment of hydrofluoric acid (HF) wastewater has been an important environmental issue in recent years due to the extensive use of hydrofluoric acid in the chemical and electronics industries, such as semiconductor manufacturers. Coagulation/precipitation and ion exchange technologies have been used to treat HF wastewater, but these conventional methods are ineffective in removing organics, salts, and fluorides, limiting its reuse for water quality and economic feasibility. One promising alternative is reverse osmosis (RO) after lime treatment. Based on pilot-scale experiment using real HF wastewater discharged from semiconductor facility, the spiral wound module equipped with polyamide membranes has shown excellent flux and chemical cleaning cycles. Our results suggest that coagulation/precipitation and spiral wound RO constitute the optimal combination to reuse HF wastewater. PMID:23009792

  13. Hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ostenak, C.A.; Mackay, H.A.

    1985-07-18

    A hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication are disclosed. The composite window comprises a window having first and second sides. The first side is oriented towards an environment containing hydrofluoric acid. An adhesive is applied to the first side. A layer of transparent hydrofluoric acid-resistant material, such as Mylar, is applied to the adhesive and completely covers the first side. The adhesive is then cured.

  14. Hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ostenak, Carl A.; Mackay, Harold A.

    1987-01-01

    A hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication are disclosed. The composite window comprises a window having first and second sides. The first side is oriented towards an environment containing hydrofluoric acid. An adhesive is applied to the first side. A layer of transparent hydrofluoric acid-resistant material, such as Mylar, is applied to the adhesive and completely covers the first side. The adhesive is then cured.

  15. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  5. Treatment of hydrofluoric acid exposure to the eye

    PubMed Central

    Atley, Katherine; Ridyard, Edward

    2015-01-01

    AIM To review the current evidence of the treatment of hydrofluoric acid (HF) exposure to the human cornea. METHODS A comprehensive manual search of the literature was conducted through the Ovid interface to assess the mechanism and efficacy of each irrigator through a variety of clinical cases and experimental studies. RESULTS Ocular exposure to HF is extremely damaging to the eye and swift recognition and decontamination with an appropriate agent forms the basis of treatment. Although there are various decontamination solutions that have efficacy against the corrosive action of HF, irrigation with Hexafluorine proved to be the most safe and effective treatment for the eye. CONCLUSION In conclusion emergency departments could benefit from the availability of Hexafluorine for the treatment of HF ocular burns in patients. PMID:25709926

  6. Light Enhanced Hydrofluoric Acid Passivation: A Sensitive Technique for Detecting Bulk Silicon Defects.

    PubMed

    Grant, Nicholas E

    2016-01-01

    A procedure to measure the bulk lifetime (>100 sec) of silicon wafers by temporarily attaining a very high level of surface passivation when immersing the wafers in hydrofluoric acid (HF) is presented. By this procedure three critical steps are required to attain the bulk lifetime. Firstly, prior to immersing silicon wafers into HF, they are chemically cleaned and subsequently etched in 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide. Secondly, the chemically treated wafers are then placed into a large plastic container filled with a mixture of HF and hydrochloric acid, and then centered over an inductive coil for photoconductance (PC) measurements. Thirdly, to inhibit surface recombination and measure the bulk lifetime, the wafers are illuminated at 0.2 suns for 1 minusing a halogen lamp, the illumination is switched off, and a PC measurement is immediately taken. By this procedure, the characteristics of bulk silicon defects can be accurately determined. Furthermore, it is anticipated that a sensitive RT surface passivation technique will be imperative for examining bulk silicon defects when their concentration is low (<10(12) cm(-3)). PMID:26779939

  7. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Study of High-Alloy Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    A corrosion study involving high-alloy materials and concentrated hydrofluoric acid (HF) was conducted in support of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Conversion Project (CP). The purpose of the test was to obtain a greater understanding of the corrosion rates of materials of construction currently used in the CP vs those of proposed replacement parts. Results of the study will help formulate a change-out schedule for CP parts. The CP will convert slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U from a gas (UF{sub 6}) sorbed on sodium fluoride pellets to a more stable oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). One by-product of the conversion is the formation of concentrated HF. Six moles of highly corrosive HF are produced for each mole of UF{sub 6} converted. This acid is particularly corrosive to most metals, elastomers, and silica-containing materials. A common impurity found in {sup 233}U is {sup 232}U. This impurity isotope has several daughters that make the handling of the {sup 233}U difficult. Traps of {sup 233}U may have radiation fields of up to 400 R at contact, a situation that makes the process of changing valves or working on the CP more challenging. It is also for this reason that a comprehensive part change-out schedule must be established. Laboratory experiments involving the repeated transfer of HF through 1/2-in. metal tubing and valves have proven difficult due to the corrosivity of the HF upon contact with all wetted parts. Each batch of HF is approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt% HF and is transferred most often as a vapor under vacuum and at temperatures of up to 250 C. Materials used in the HF side of the CP include Hastelloy C-276 and Monel 400 tubing, Haynes 230 and alloy C-276 vessels, and alloy 400 valve bodies with Inconel (alloy 600) bellows. The chemical compositions of the metals discussed in this report are displayed in Table 1. Of particular concern are the almost 30 vendor-supplied UG valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. These valves have been proven to have a finite life due to failure, most often at the bellows flange ring. It was discovered that the entire bellows assembly was not all alloy 600 but that alloy 600 bellows had been welded to a stainless steel alloy 316 (SS-316) flange ring. A previous study documents and addresses this problem.1 The fabricators of the valves immediately corrected the problem and began fabricating all wetted parts of the bellows assembly from alloy 600. At the same time, the fabricators began to make alloy C-276 valve bodies and stem tips available for sale. This material is known to be superior to the alloy 400 valve bodies and stem tips of the standard UG valves that had already been installed in the CP. A decision was made to purchase alloy C-276 bodies and stem tips and to change out those alloy 400 components that had already been installed. Due to the enormity of this task (both in terms of time and money), it was desirable to determine the longevity of alloy C-276 vs alloy 400 components in a side-by-side comparison. Also of interest was the question of how long the new (all-alloy 600) bellows would last in comparison with the original alloy 600/SS-316 bellows. A basic HF corrosion test was proposed to compare corrosion rates of several high-alloy materials. Because much of the alloy 400 in the system had been gold plated, some gold-plated alloy 400 coupons were included. Due to time and funding limitations, actual CP variables such as temperature and pressure were not duplicated. Instead, a simple partial-immersion test at ambient temperature was conducted. The purpose of this test was to gain information on the rate of corrosion of different alloys in the CP and to attempt to derive some idea of their expected lifetimes in the operating environment.

  8. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Testing on Unplated and Electroless Gold-Plated Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.; Icenhour, A.S.; Del Cul, G.D.

    2000-08-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) remediation requires that almost 40 kg of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) be converted to uranium oxide (UO). In the process of this conversion, six moles of hydrofluoric acid (HP) are produced for each mole of UF6 converted.

  9. Shear bond strength of metal brackets to feldspathic porcelain treated by Nd:YAG laser and hydrofluoric acid.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Sobouti, Farhad; Etemadi, Ardavan; Chiniforush, Nasim; Shariati, Mahsa

    2015-02-01

    Adult orthodontic treatment requires bonding orthodontic attachment to dental restorations. Ceramics are commonly used as esthetic restorative materials for the crowns and bridges. The present study evaluated the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces following conditioning by different powers of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and hydrofluoric acid as a conventional method. Seventy-two glazed porcelain samples were prepared and randomly attributed to six equal groups of 12. In the conventional hydrofluoric (HF) group, the specimens were etched by 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 4 min. In laser groups, samples were conditioned by 0.75-, 1-, 1.25-, 1.5-, and 2-W Nd:YAG laser for 10 s. Metal brackets were bonded to porcelain samples and after being stored in distilled water for 24 h, they were subjected to thermocycling for 500 cycles. The debonding was carried out by a Zwick testing machine. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tamhane multiple comparisons tests. The mean ± SD of the shear bond strength in the laser group 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 W and HF group was 2.2 ± 0.9, 4.2 ± 1.1, 4.9 ± 2.4, 7 ± 1.7, 9.6 ± 2.7, and 9.4 ± 2.5, respectively. Together with the increased power of laser, the mean shear bond strength was increased continuously and no significant differences were found between the HF group and the laser groups with power of 1.5 or 2 W. Also, there was no significant difference between all test groups in ARI scores. There was no significant difference between bond strength of laser groups with power of 1.5 and 2 W and HF-etched group. So, Nd:YAG laser with appropriate parameters can be used as an alternative method for porcelain etching. PMID:24142046

  10. DFT study of the energetic and noncovalent interactions between imidazolium ionic liquids and hydrofluoric acid.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Marco V; Gallo, Marco; Alonso, P A; Miranda, A D; Dominguez, J M

    2015-04-16

    In this work, we evaluated the energetic interactions between imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) and hydrofluoric acid, as well as the cation-anion interactions in ILs. We used DFT calculations that include dispersion corrections employing the PBE and M06 functionals. We tested 22 ILs, including [C4MIM][PF6], [C4MIM][NTf2], and [C4MIM][CH3COO], obtaining interaction energies in the range of -27 to -13 kcal/mol with the PBE functional. The NCI (noncovalent interaction) index developed by Yang and collaborators ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010 , 132 , 6498 - 6506 ; J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2011 , 7 , 625 - 632 ) also was used for mapping the key noncovalent interactions (hydrogen bonds, van der Waals, and steric repulsions) between the anions and cations of ILs and also for interactions of ILs with hydrofluoric acid (HF). The results obtained show that the anions have a stronger effect with respect to cations in their capacity for interacting with hydrofluoric acid, and the strongest interaction energies occur in systems where the key noncovalent interactions are mainly hydrogen bonds. The [C4MIM][PF6], [C4MIM][NTf2], and [C4MIM][BF4] ionic liquids displayed the weakest cation-anion interactions. PMID:25803741

  11. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (1000, 5-55C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (?=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (p<0.01). EPB (25.6 6.6) and DPB (20.2 4.9) control groups showed significantly higher results than those of other groups (p<0.05). While higher mean bond strengths were obtained in group 1 (EPHF(9.5)) (11.5 2.1) and group 2 (EPHF(5)) (7.3 0.6), lower results were obtained when HF acid gels were applied prior to phosphoric acid (EHF(9.5)P: 5.0 1.1, EHF(5)P: 3.6 0.1) (p<0.05). On dentin, the results were the lowest in group 8 (DHF(5)P: 1.5 1.6), being significantly lower than those of group 5 (DPHF(9.5)) (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images revealed predominantly mixed failures with less than half of the composite left on both enamel and dentin surfaces (64 out of 80) (p<0.05), indicating that in general, adhesion was not ideal. Contamination of the enamel or dentin surfaces with HF acid gel impairs the bond strength of composites. Considering both the bond strength results and failure types, when dental tissues are to be repaired next to ceramic, application of phosphoric acid before HF acid gel application can be recommended. HF acid gel concentration did not influence the results except on enamel. PMID:21859315

  12. Dissolution of plutonium oxide in nitric acid at high hydrofluoric acid concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanjian, A.R.; Stevens, J.R.

    1984-06-15

    The dissolution of plutonium dioxide in nitirc acid (HNO/sub 3/) at high hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentrations has been investigated. Dissolution rate curves were obtained using 12M HNO/sub 3/ and HF at concentrations varying from 0.05 to 1.0 molar. The dissolution rate increased with HF concentration up to 0.2M and then decreased at higher concentrations. There was very little plutonium dissolved at 0.7 and 1.0M HF because of the formation of insoluble PuF/sub 4/. Various oxidizing agents were added to 12M HNO/sub 3/-1M HF dissolvent to oxidize Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) and prevent the formation of PuF/sub 4/. Ceric (Ce(IV)) and silver (Ag(II)) ions were the most effective in dissolving PuO/sub 2/. Although these two oxidants greatly increased the dissolution rate, the rates were not as rapid as those obtained with 12M HNO/sub 3/-0.2M HF.

  13. Bone growth enhancement in vivo on press-fit titanium alloy implants with acid etched microtexture

    PubMed Central

    Daugaard, Henrik; Elmengaard, Brian; Bechtold, Joan E.; Soballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Early bone ongrowth secures long-term fixation of primary implants inserted without cement. Implant surfaces roughened with a texture on the micrometer scale are known to be osseoconductive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone formation at the surface of acid etched implants modified on the micro-scale. We compared implants with a nonparticulate texture made by chemical milling (hydrofluoric acid, nitric acid) (control) with implants that had a dual acid etched (hydrofluoric acid, hydrochloric acid) microtexture surface superimposed on the primary chemically milled texture. We used an experimental joint replacement model with cylindrical titanium implants (Ti-6Al-4V) inserted paired and press-fit in cancellous tibia metaphyseal bone of eight canines for 4 weeks and evaluated by histomorphometric quantification. A significant twofold median increase was seen for bone ongrowth on the acid etched surface [median, 36.1% (interquartile range, 24.3–44.6%)] compared to the control [18.4% (15.6–20.4%)]. The percentage of fibrous tissue at the implant surface and adjacent bone was significantly less for dual acid textured implants compared with control implants. These results show that secondary roughening of titanium alloy implant surface by dual acid etching increases bone formation at the implant bone interface. PMID:18186059

  14. Occupational Hydrofluoric Acid Injury from Car and Truck Washing--Washington State, 2001-2013.

    PubMed

    Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn K; Eckert, Carly M; Anderson, Naomi J; Bonauto, David K

    2015-08-21

    Exposure to hydrofluoric acid (HF) causes corrosive chemical burns and potentially fatal systemic toxicity. Car and truck wash cleaning products, rust removers, and aluminum brighteners often contain HF because it is efficient in breaking down roadway matter. The death of a truck wash worker from ingestion of an HF-based wash product and 48 occupational HF burn cases associated with car and truck washing in Washington State during 2001-2013 are summarized in this report. Among seven hospitalized workers, two required surgery, and all but one worker returned to the job. Among 48 injured workers, job titles were primarily auto detailer, car wash worker, truck wash worker, and truck driver. Because HF exposure can result in potentially severe health outcomes, efforts to identify less hazardous alternatives to HF-based industrial wash products are warranted. PMID:26292206

  15. The Mechanism of Electropolishing of Niobium in Hydrofluoric-Sulfuric Acid Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hui; Corcoran, Sean; Reece, Charles; Kelley, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Niobium surfaces are commonly electropolished in an effort to obtain optimal smoothness for high-field superconducting radio-frequency cavity applications. We report the use of controlled electrochemical analysis techniques to characterize electropolishing of Nb in a sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. Through the use of a reference electrode, we are able to clearly distinguish the anode and cathode polarization potentials as well as the electrolyte voltage drop, which together sum to the applied power supply voltage. We then identify the temperature and HF concentration dependence of each potential. We also report the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on this system. EIS results are consistent with the compact salt film mechanism for niobium electropolishing (EP) in this electrolyte and are not consistent with either the porous salt film or the absorbate-acceptor mechanism. Microscopic understanding of the basic Nb EP mechanism is expected to provide an appro

  16. Study of the chemical behavior of hydrofluoric, nitric and sulfuric acids mixtures applied to niobium polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspart, A.; Antoine, C. Z.

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes the experimental work that has been conducted to develop new chemical polishing baths for surface treatments of niobium RF cavities. The role of the different chemicals is detailed and a wide range of composition is explored. The relationship between the niobium etching rate and the concentration of each mineral acid is put in evidence. Optimization of the bath composition was done in order to get in the same time safe and easy handle conditions, brilliant surface and low grain boundaries etching.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethanes Laminated Glass Treated by Acid Etching Combined with Cold Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xibao; Lu, Jinshan; Luo, Junming; Zhang, Jianjun; Ou, Junfei; Xu, Haitao

    2014-10-01

    To overcome the problem of interlaminar delamination of thermoplastic polyurethane laminated glass, silicate glass was etched with hydrofluoric acid and thermoplastic polyurethane was then treated with cold plasma. Compared with the untreated samples, the interlaminar shear strength of acid etching samples, cold plasma-treated samples and acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples increased by 97%, 84% and 341%, respectively. Acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples exhibited a higher flexural strength and strain as compared with the untreated samples. The impact energy of acid etching samples, cold plasma-treated samples and acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples increased by 8.7%, 8.1% and 11.6%, respectively, in comparison with the untreated samples. FT-IR analysis showed that a large number of -C=O, -CO-N and -CO-O-C- groups appeared on the surface of cold plasma-treated thermoplastic polyurethane, which resulted in the formation of hydrogen bonds. SEM results showed that some pittings formed on the surface of the silicate glass treated by acid etching, which resulted in the formation of a three-dimensional interface structure between the silicate glass and polyurethane. Hydrogen bonds combined with the three-dimensional interface between silicate glass and polyurethanes co-improved the mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethanes laminated glass.

  18. Texturing a pyramid-like structure on a silicon surface via the synergetic effect of copper and Fe(III) in hydrofluoric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ming; Li, Shaoyuan; Deng, Jianxin; Li, Yuping; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang

    2016-05-01

    An innovative approach is proposed to texture a pyramid structure on a silicon surface via Cu-catalyzed chemical etching in the HF/FeCl3 system. The surface and cross-section morphologies of the formed pyramid structure were examined by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results revealed that numerous silicon pyramid-like structures with hemlines of 0.1 ∼ 3 μm and height of 0.1 ∼ 2 μm are close together, and the top angle of the pyramid structure is 90°. Additionally, the systematic study of the effects of the etching time and the concentration of FeCl3 on the pyramid-like structures by the atom configuration model of silicon crystal faces demonstrated that the etching proceeds preferentially along the <1 0 0> directions of silicon. A formation mechanism of the pyramid-like structure is proposed. The results imply that the synergetic effect of Cu nanoparticles and Fe(III) could conveniently generate a pyramid-like architecture on the surface of silicon in hydrofluoric acid solution.

  19. Intra-Arterial Calcium Gluconate Treatment After Hydrofluoric Acid Burn of the Hand

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D. Jaeger, U.; Sagoschen, I.; Lamberti, C.; Wilhelm, K.

    2009-01-15

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) is a colorless corrosive acid used in different industrial branches. Exposure to HF typically results from spills, and most often the hand or fingers are involved. Tissue damage through cutaneous HF exposure occurs through corrosive burns due to the free hydrogen ions and through skin penetration of the fluoride ions, causing a depletion of calcium in the deep tissue layers, ultimately leading to cell death and tissue necrosis. Treatment of HF burns consists of thoroughly flushing the exposed area with water and applying calcium gluconate gel to the skin. If topical treatment does not suffice, subcutaneous injections, as well as intravascular-both intravenous and intra-arterial-calcium gluconate therapy, have been advocated. We report for the first time a case of HF burn of the hand and digits associated with vasospasm. Pain and vasospasm were successfully treated by repeated intra-arterial calcium gluconate injection. We conclude that intra-arterial calcium gluconate injection is a successful and well-tolerated therapy for HF burn associated with Raynaud's syndrome. Intra-arterial injection allows for well-controlled delivery of therapy as well as assessment of the vascular status.

  20. EXAFS study of the speciation of protactinium(V) in aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Stéphanie M; Wilson, Richard E

    2014-12-01

    The speciation of protactinium(V) in hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements were performed on an aqueous solution of 0.05 M protactinium(V) with various HF concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 27 M in order to probe the protactinium coordination sphere with respect to the identity and number of coordinating ligands. The resulting fits to the spectra suggest the presence of an eight-coordinate homoleptic fluoro complex in highly concentrated fluoride solutions (27 M), with equilibrium between seven- and eight-coordinate fluoro complexes at moderate acidities, and in more dilute solutions, results indicate that one water molecule is likely to replace a fluoride in the first coordination sphere, at a distance of 2.54-2.57 Å. Comparisons of this chemistry with group V metals, niobium and tantalum, are presented, and the potential implications for these results on the hydrolytic behavior of protactinium in aqueous systems are discussed. PMID:25389749

  1. Fluorine distribution in soil in the vicinity of an accidental spillage of hydrofluoric acid in Korea.

    PubMed

    An, Jinsung; Lee, Hyun A; Lee, Junseok; Yoon, Hye-On

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the status of fluorine (F) in soil in the vicinity of a spillage of anhydrous hydrofluoric acid in Korea. Gaseous hydrogen fluoride dispersed was suspected to have contaminated the surrounding soil environment. Total and water soluble F concentrations in soil within a 1 km radius of the spillage were determined. Total F concentrations (mean=222±70.1 mg kg(-1)) were lower than the Korean limit value (i.e., 400 mg kg(-1)) and several reported measurements of background F concentrations in soils except for a single outlying case. Soluble F concentrations ranged from 0.111 to 6.40 mg kg(-1) (mean=2.20±1.80 mg kg(-1)). A negative correlation between the soluble F concentration of soil and distance from the spillage was observed. This indicates that the soluble F concentration has a crucial role in fractionating the F concentration arising from a 'non natural input' i.e., the spillage. The F content of rice samples seemed to be significantly influenced by the soluble F concentrations of soils. Rice samples collected from the control and affected areas contained 41 mg kg(-1) and 578 mg kg(-1) of total F, respectively. PMID:25128889

  2. Hydrofluoric acid and anhydrous ammonia spills evaporation/air dispersion modeling and exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    This report provides an assessment of the air dispersion and human exposure to toxic airborne chemical concentrations resulting from potential spill scenarios involving a volatile liquid--hydrofluoric acid (HF) and a liquified gas--anhydrous ammonia (NH3). The HF spill was evaluated both as a ground-level area source and a stack release from within a building. The NH3 spill was only evaluated as a ground-level area source. Critical receptors for exposure assessment were located downwind at 100 m, the nearest public highway, and the nearest site boundary. In addition, worker exposure inside a building after an indoor spill of HF was evaluated. The evaporation computer code SPILLS was used to determine time-variable emission (evaporation) rates for input into the air dispersion model INPUFF. First order kinetic models were used to evaluate the buildup and decay of the indoor HF spill using both steady state and SPILLS time-variable emission rates. Air concentrations were plotted as a function of time to determine the time intervals that receptor concentrations exceeded the TLV, IDLH, and 10,000*TLV levels. 7 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Silica optical fibre behaviour to chemical exposure to hydrofluoric acid vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, Irina; Poulain, Marcel; El Abdi, Rochdi

    2006-04-01

    Reliability of standard single mode silica optical fibre and hermetic coated fibre has been investigated through chemical exposure to hydrofluoric acid (HF) vapours into a hermetic closed disposal for different durations. Dynamic fatigue tests were implemented using a two-point bending testing device. Three series of samples subject to HF attack for variable times were compared. Standard fibres tested immediately after exposure show a broader distribution of fibre strength accompanied by the drastic decrease of the failure stress. Drying treated standard fibres prior to testing has also led to a broader distribution and a slight decrease of failure stress by comparison to as-received fibres. Drying in oven prior to mechanical measurement makes handling difficult and results in brittle fibres that exhibit much lower strength and broader distribution of failure stress. Polymer reacts with hydrogen fluoride, which induces viscosity changes, but it returns to solid state after thermal treatment. This is consistent with SEM observations. Same experiments have been implemented on the hermetic coated fibre. No significant change in the Weibull distribution and the mean fibre strength was observed after 6 days of chemical exposure to HF vapours. By comparison to standard commercial fibre, the hermetic coated fibre appeared extremely durable in harsh chemical conditions.

  4. Dermal absorption and skin damage following hydrofluoric acid exposure in an ex vivo human skin model.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Kilo, Sonja; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Korinth, Gintautas; Drexler, Hans

    2016-04-25

    The wide industrial use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) poses a high risk for accidental dermal exposure. Despite local and systemic hazards associated with HF, information on percutaneous penetration and tissue damage is rare. In the present ex vivo study, the dermal absorption of HF (detected in terms of fluoride ions) was quantified and the skin damaging potential as a function of concentration and exposure duration was assessed. Percutaneous penetration of HF (c=5, 30, and 50%) at 3 exposure durations (3, 5, and 10min) was investigated in a static diffusion cell model using freshly excised human skin. Alterations of skin were histologically evaluated. HF rapidly penetrated through skin under formation of a considerable intradermal reservoir (∼13-67% of total absorbed fluoride). Histologically, epidermal alterations were detected already after exposure to 5% HF for 3min. The degree of skin damage increased with rising concentration and exposure duration leading to coagulation necrosis. For HF concentrations of ≥30%, skin damage progressed into deeper skin layers. Topically applied HF concentration was the principal parameter determining HF induced skin effects. The intradermal HF retention capacity associated with progression and prolongation of HF induced skin effects must be considered in the review of skin decontamination procedures. PMID:26930472

  5. Comparison of skin effects of immediate treatment modalities in experimentally induced hydrofluoric acid skin burns.

    PubMed

    Songur, Meltem K; Akdemir, Ovunc; Lineaweaver, William C; Cavusoglu, Turker; Ozsarac, Murat; Aktug, Huseyin; Songur, Ecmel; Tiftikcioglu, Yigit O

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) burns cause immediate damage and painful long-term sequellae. Traditionally, chelating agents have been used as the initial treatment for such burns. We have introduced epidermal growth factor (EGF) into an HF model to compare EGF with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) treatments; 40 Sprague Dawley rats were divided into five groups. Each rat suffered a 6 × 4 cm(2) burn induced by 40% HF. Group 1 had no treatment, group 2 had saline injected beneath the burn, group 3 received magnesium sulphate injections, group 4 received calcium gluconate and group 5 received EGF. Specimens were evaluated via planimetry and biopsy at intervals of 4, 8, 24 and 72 hours. Fluid losses were significantly less in the Mg(2+) and EGF groups. The EGF group had the smallest burn area, least oedema, least polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) infiltration, most angiogenesis and highest fibroblast proliferation of any group (P < 0·005). EGF limited HF damage morphologically and histologically more effectively than Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). This finding indicates that HF treatment via growth factors may be an improvement over chelation therapy. PMID:24618130

  6. NOVEL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ELECTROPOLISHING OF NIOBIUM WITH SULFURIC AND HYDROFLUORIC ACID MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Tian; Charles Reece; Michael Kelley; Sean Corcoran

    2008-02-12

    Niobium surfaces are commonly electropolished in an effort to obtain optimally smooth surfaces for high-field SRF cavity applications. We report the first use of controlled electrochemical analysis techniques to characterize electropolishing of Nb in a sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. Through the use of a reference electrode we are able to clearly distinguish the anode, cathode polarization potentials as well as the electrolyte voltage drop that sum to the applied power supply voltage. We then separate the temperature and HF concentration dependence of each. We also report the first use of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) on this system. EIS results are consistent with a presence of a compact salt film at the Nb/electrolyte interface that is responsible for the limiting current. Microscopic understanding of the basic Nb EP mechanism is expected to provide an appropriate foundation with which to optimize the preparation of high-field niobium cavity surfaces. The implication of EIS for monitoring Nb surface during electropolishing shows this technology could be potentially used as a source of on-line feedback.

  7. Acute health effects in a community after a release of hydrofluoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, J.S.; Brender, J.D.; Sanderson, L.M.; Perrotta, D.M.; Beauchamp, R.A. )

    1991-05-01

    {approximately} 3,000 persons were evacuated from a Texas community after 24,036 kg (53,000 lb) of caustic hydrofluoric acid (HF) were released from a nearby petrochemical plant. Emergency room and hospital records of 939 persons who were seen at two area hospitals were reviewed. Most persons who presented at the emergency rooms were female (56%) or black (60%), and their mean age was 33.9 y. The most frequently reported symptoms were eye irritation (41.5%), burning throat (21%), headache (20.6%), and shortness of breath (19.4%). Physical examination results were normal for 49% of the cases; however, irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, skin, and lungs were noted on other exams. Decreased pulmonary function was demonstrated by pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in the first second, less than 80% of predicted value, 42.3%); hypoxemia (pO2 less than 80 mm Hg, 17.4%) and hypocalcemia (less than 8.5 mg/dl, 16.3%) were also noted. Ninety-four (10%) of the cases were hospitalized, and more than 83% of all cases were discharged with a primary diagnosis of HF exposure. There are several reports of individuals who are acutely and chronically exposed to HF; however, we are unaware of other published reports that describe exposure of a community to HF. This incident represented a unique opportunity to study the immediate health impact on a community of residents who were exposed to a hazardous materials release. Results of this analysis suggest that (a) initial health problems should be followed up, (b) any long-term health effects of HF exposure must be assessed, and (c) the health impact on the population at risk should be determined.

  8. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Testing on Unplated and Electroless Gold-Plated Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.

    2000-08-03

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) remediation requires that almost 40 kg of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) be converted to uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). In the process of this conversion, six moles of hydrofluoric acid (HF) are produced for each mole of UF{sub 6} converted. The entire conversion process can be summarized by the following reaction: UF{sub 6} + 3H{sub 2}O {yields} UO{sub 3} + 6HF. (The UO{sub 3} is not stable at high temperatures and therefore decomposes to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). HF is well known for its ability to attack most metals and silica-containing compounds. It reacts rapidly to destroy protective films and can be fatal in very small quantities (e.g., 2% exposure of the body or 50 ppm in air). Because most of the conversion system is made of various metals, the sections that come in contact with HF must be able to withstand corrosion, high temperatures, elevated pressures, and radiation. Consequently, most of these sections will be plated with gold for increased protection of the metal. This report summarizes the results from the tests that were performed on the metal samples. Section 2 covers the approach to the tests, gives a general background of the sample preparation, and then reports the data from the tests. The final section presents a discussion of what was learned from the data and recommendations for uses of these metals in the MSRE conversion process.

  9. Cation-exchange behavior of scandium, titanium, and vanadium in various degrees of oxidation in dilute hydrofluoric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Razbash, A.A.; Sevast'yanov, Yu.G.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution coefficients of scandium, titanium, and vanadium in various degrees of oxidation between the sulfonic acid type cation-exchange resin KRS-8p and hydrofluoric acid solutions in the concentration range 0.1-1.0 mole/liter have been determined by static and dynamic methods. On the basis of the research performed, a procedure is suggested for separating the radionuclides vanadium 48 and vanadium 49 from a titanium target irradiated in a cyclotron. The procedure has been tested on a real industrial target and has given good results.

  10. Development of a continuous process for adjusting nitrate, zirconium, and free hydrofluoric acid concentrations in zirconium fuel dissolver product

    SciTech Connect

    Cresap, D.A.; Halverson, D.S.

    1993-04-01

    In the Fluorinel Dissolution Process (FDP) upgrade, excess hydrofluoric acid in the dissolver product must be complexed with aluminum nitrate (ANN) to eliminate corrosion concerns, adjusted with nitrate to facilitate extraction, and diluted with water to ensure solution stability. This is currently accomplished via batch processing in large vessels. However, to accommodate increases in projected throughput and reduce water production in a cost-effective manner, a semi-continuous system (In-line Complexing (ILC)) has been developed. The major conclusions drawn from tests demonstrating the feasibility of this concept are given in this report.

  11. Solution of rocks and refractory minerals by acids at high temperatures and pressures. Determination of silica after decomposition with hydrofluoric acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, I.; Rowe, J.J.

    1965-01-01

    A modified Morey bomb was designed which contains a removable nichromecased 3.5-ml platinium crucible. This bomb is particularly useful for decompositions of refractory samples for micro- and semimicro-analysis. Temperatures of 400-450?? and pressures estimated as great as 6000 p.s.i. were maintained in the bomb for periods as long as 24 h. Complete decompositions of rocks, garnet, beryl, chrysoberyl, phenacite, sapphirine, and kyanite were obtained with hydrofluoric acid or a mixture of hydrofluoric and sulfuric acids; the decomposition of chrome refractory was made with hydrochloric acid. Aluminum-rich samples formed difficultly soluble aluminum fluoride precipitates. Because no volatilization losses occur, silica can be determined on sample solutions by a molybdenum-blue procedure using aluminum(III) to complex interfering fluoride. ?? 1965.

  12. The Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Concentration on the Bond Strength and Morphology of the Surface and Interface of Glass Ceramics to a Resin Cement.

    PubMed

    Sundfeld Neto, D; Naves, L Z; Costa, A R; Correr, A B; Consani, S; Borges, G A; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) on the surface/interface morphology and μ-shear bond strength (μSBS) between IPS Empress Esthetic (EST) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and IPS e.max Press (EMX) (Ivoclar Vivadent) ceramics and resin cement. Ceramic blocks were divided into 12 groups for each kind of ceramic. Six different HF concentrations were evaluated: 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15%. All groups were silanated after etching, and half of the specimens within each group received a thin layer of unfilled resin (UR). Three resin cement cylinders were prepared on each ceramic block for μSBS testing. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The μSBS test was carried out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The data were submitted to three-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were performed using the Tukey post hoc test (p<0.05). The etched surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. μSBS means (MPa) for 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15% HF concentrations were, respectively, 25.2, 27.2, 30.1, 31.4, 33.3, and 31.8. μSBS means with or without UR application measured 32.24 and 27.4, respectively; EST and EMX measured 29.8 and 29.9, respectively. For the HF concentrations, 10% and 15% showed higher μSBS means than did 1% and 2.5% (p<0.05); 7.5% was higher than 1% (p<0.05); and no statistical differences were found among the other concentrations (p>0.05). When evaluating UR, μSBS mean was significantly higher and better infiltration was observed on the etched surfaces. No statistical difference was found between the ceramics. The HF concentration and UR influenced the bond strength and surface/interface morphology. PMID:25764043

  13. Comparative behavior of titanium and zirconium in hydrofluoric-nitric acid pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.M.M.; Hlawka, F.; Cornet, A. )

    1990-07-01

    The different behavior of titanium and zirconium in HF-HNO{sub 3} pickling solutions has been studied using electrochemical methods and Raman spectrometry. In each case, the depleting of the solutions during a pickling experiment could be correlated with the consumption of HF to form metal oxo or oxofluoro complexes. However, the mechanism of metal dissolution is quite different for the two metals. The titanium dissolution process in such solutions can be interpreted using a passivation model in which dissolution and passivation are two competing reactions at the surface of the bare metal. On the other hand, zirconium dissolution occurs through formation of an oxide film with ionic diffusion through the film being a rate-determining step. The particular role of strong acid added to the HF solution for pickling of titanium and zirconium is also discussed.

  14. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... with has an exposure, call your local emergency number (such as 911), or your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States.

  15. HYDROFLUORIC ACID SCRUBBER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    PANESKO JV; MERRITT HD

    2011-05-18

    Each year over a million gallons of water are used to scrub hydrogen fluoride (HP) vapors from waste off-gas streams. Use of other potential scrubber solutions such as potassium hydroxide (KOH), aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN), and monobasic aluminum nitrate (monoban) would result in significant volume reductions. A laboratory study was initiated to (1) demonstrate the effectiveness of these scrubber solutions to sorb HF, (2) determine if unexpected reactions occurred at flowsheet conditions, and (3) determine the consequences of deviation from flowsheet conditions. Caustic or aluminum scrubber solutions remove hydrogen fluoride from off-gas streams. Solids which appear with aluminum could be avoided by heating the scrubber solution.

  16. Effect of Phosphoric Acid Pre-etching on Fatigue Limits of Self-etching Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Tsujimoto, A; Scheidel, D D; Erickson, R L; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue limit (SFL) testing to determine the effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel and dentin prior to application of self-etch adhesives for bonding resin composite to these substrates. Three self-etch adhesives-1) G- ænial Bond (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan); 2) OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp, Orange, CA, USA); and 3) Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA)-were used to bond Z100 Restorative resin composite to enamel and dentin surfaces. A stainless-steel metal ring with an inner diameter of 2.4 mm was used to bond the resin composite to flat-ground (4000 grit) tooth surfaces for determination of both SBS and SFL. Fifteen specimens each were used to determine initial SBS to human enamel/dentin, with and without pre-etching with a 35% phosphoric acid (Ultra-Etch, Ultradent Products Inc, South Jordan, UT, USA) for 15 seconds prior to the application of the adhesives. A staircase method of fatigue testing (25 specimens for each test) was then used to determine the SFL of resin composite bonded to enamel/dentin using a frequency of 10 Hz for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. A two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test were used for analysis of SBS data, and a modified t-test with Bonferroni correction was used for the SFL data. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the area of the bonded restorative/tooth interface. For all three adhesive systems, phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel demonstrated significantly higher (p<0.05) SBS and SFL with pre-etching than it did without pre-etching. The SBS and SFL of dentin bonds decreased with phosphoric acid pre-etching. The SBS and SFL of bonds using phosphoric acid prior to application of self-etching adhesives clearly demonstrated different tendencies between enamel and dentin. The effect of using phosphoric acid, prior to the application of the self-etching adhesives, on SBS and SFL was dependent on the adhesive material and tooth substrate and should be carefully considered in clinical situations. PMID:25706611

  17. Uniform nano-ripples on the sidewall of silicon carbide micro-hole fabricated by femtosecond laser irradiation and acid etching

    SciTech Connect

    Khuat, Vanthanh; Chen, Tao; Gao, Bo; Si, Jinhai Ma, Yuncan; Hou, Xun

    2014-06-16

    Uniform nano-ripples were observed on the sidewall of micro-holes in silicon carbide fabricated by 800-nm femtosecond laser and chemical selective etching. The morphology of the ripple was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy. The formation mechanism of the micro-holes was attributed to the chemical reaction of the laser affected zone with mixed solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid. The formation of nano-ripples on the sidewall of the holes could be attributed to the standing wave generated in z direction due to the interference between the incident wave and the reflected wave.

  18. Crystal growth vs. conventional acid etching: a comparative evaluation of etch patterns, penetration depths, and bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Devanna, Raghu; Keluskar, K M

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect on enamel surface, penetration depth, and bond strength produced by 37% phosphoric acid and 20% sulfated polyacrylic acid as etching agents for direct bonding. Eighty teeth were used to study the efficacy of the etching agents on the enamel surface, penetration depth, and tensile bond strength. It was determined from the present study that a 30 sec application of 20% sulfated polyacrylic acid produced comparable etching topography with that of 37% phosphoric acid applied for 30 sec. The 37% phosphoric acid dissolves enamel to a greater extent than does the 20% sulfated polyacrylic acid. Instron Universal testing machine was used to evaluate the bond strengths of the two etching agents. Twenty percent sulfated polyacrylic acid provided adequate tensile bond strength. It was ascertained that crystal growth can be an alternative to conventional phosphoric acid etching as it dissolves lesser enamel and provides adequate tensile bond strength. PMID:19075433

  19. Sulfuric acid-methanol electrolytes as an alternative to sulfuric-hydrofluoric acid mixtures for electropolishing of niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Corcoran, Sean G.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2011-06-01

    Attainment of the greatest possible interior surface smoothness is critical to meeting the performance demands placed upon niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities by next generation projects. Electropolishing with HF-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolytes yields cavities that meet SRF performance goals, but a less-hazardous, more environmentally-friendly process is desirable. Reported studies of EP on chemically-similar tantalum describe the use of sulfuric acid-methanol electrolytes as an HF-free alternative. Reported here are the results of experiments on niobium samples with this electrolyte. Voltammetry experiments indicate a current plateau whose voltage range expands with increasing acid concentration and decreasing temperature. Impedance spectroscopy indicates that a compact salt film is responsible for the current plateau. Equivalent findings in electropolishing chemically-similar tantalum with this electrolyte were interpreted due to as mass transfer limitation by diffusion of Ta ions away from the anode surface. We infer that a similar mechanism is at work here. Conditions were found that yield leveling and brightening comparable to that obtained with HF-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mixtures.

  20. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  1. In Vitro Evaluation of Microleakage Around Orthodontic Brackets Using Laser Etching and Acid Etching Methods

    PubMed Central

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Yassaei, Sogra; Karandish, Maryam; Farzaneh, Sedigeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: path of microleakage between the enamel and adhesive potentially allows microbial ingress that may consequently cause enamel decalcification. The aim of this study was to compare microleakage of brackets bonded either by laser or acid etching techniques. Materials and Method: The specimens were 33 extracted premolars that were divided into three groups as the acid etching group (group 1), laser etching with Er:YAG at 100 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 2), and laser etching with Er:YAG at 140 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 3). After photo polymerization, the teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 2% methylen blue for 24hs, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. They were scored for marginal microleakage that occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the occlusal and gingival margins. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal- Wallis test. Results: For the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive surfaces, significant differences were not observed between the three groups. Conclusion: According to this study, the Er:YAG laser with 1.5 and 2.1 watt settings may be used as an adjunctive for preparing the surface for orthodontic bracket bonding. PMID:25628661

  2. Influence of previous acid etching on interface morphology and bond strength of self-etching adhesive to cavosurface enamel

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; da Silva, Vinícius Brito; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Baggio Aguiar, Flávio Henrique; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the (1) bond strength of a etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive systems to cavosurface enamel, (2) influence of the previous acid etching with phosphoric acid 35% to the self-etching adhesive application on bond strength values, and (3) analysis of the cavosurface enamel morphology submitted to different types of conditioning, with the use of a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). Methods: Twenty four human third molars were sectioned on mesio-distal direction, resulting in two slices. The specimens were ground flat with 600-grit aluminum oxide papers, and were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 (etch-and-rinse adhesive system (control group)), Group 2 (self-etching adhesive), and Group 3 (self-etching adhesive with previous 35% phosphoric acid-etching for 15 s). Four cylinders (0.75 mm of diameter, 1 mm height) were confectioned prior to the microshear test. Four samples for each group were prepared according the cavosurface enamel treatment and were analyzed in an SEM. Results: Group 3 had the highest values on bond strength to cavosurface enamel compared to the other two groups, which presented statistically similar values. The performance of acid etching before the application of the self-etching adhesive results in an etching pattern that is different than the other groups, favoring the adhesion to the cavosurface enamel. Conclusions: Acid etching increases the bond strength values of the self-etching adhesive to cavosurface enamel, promoting a conditioning pattern that favors the adhesion to this substrate. PMID:22229008

  3. SEM ANALYSIS OF THE ACID-ETCHED ENAMEL PATTERNS PROMOTED BY ACIDIC MONOMERS AND PHOSPHORIC ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Mirela Sanae; de Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; Hipólito, Vinícius Di; Giannin, Marcelo; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Although self-etching bonding systems (SES) are indicated to prepare dental enamel for bonding, concerns have been expressed regarding their effectiveness. The aim of this study was to analyze the etching pattern (EP) of nine SES in comparison with 35% and 34% phosphoric acid etchants (FA) on intact (IN) and ground (GR) enamel surface. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two human third molars were sectioned in mesial-distal and buccal-lingual directions, and four dental fragments were obtained from each tooth. Half of the fragments were ground using 600-grit SiC paper and the other half remained intact. The fragments were randomly assigned into 22 groups, according to the texture of enamel surface (IN and GR) and the technique to etch the enamel (34% FA, 35% FA, AdheSE primer; Brush & Bond; Clearfil Protect Bond primer; iBond; One-up Bond F; OptiBond Solo Plus primer; Tyrian SPE primer; Unifil Bond primer and Xeno III). Conditioners were applied to IN and GR enamel surfaces, according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens etched with phosphoric acids were washed with water, while the surfaces treated with SES were submitted to alternate rinsing with alcohol and acetone. The specimens were dried, sputter-coated and examined under a scanning electron microscope. Results: For both IN and GR enamel surfaces, the EP of 34 and 35% FA was deeper and more homogeneous in comparison to EP of SES, except for Tyrian SPE. The acidic monomer action of self-etching systems was more effective on GR enamel. Conclusion: Most of the SES are less aggressive than phosphoric acid etchants and their etching effects were reduced on intact enamel surfaces. Uniterms: Dental acid etching; Dental enamel; Electron microscopy. PMID:19089243

  4. Improvement in etching rate for epilayer lift-off with surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan-Lei; Horng, Ray-Hua; Lu, Jian-Heng; Chen, Chun-Li; Kao, Yu-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the GaAs epilayer is quickly separated from GaAs substrate by epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process with mixture etchant solution. The HF solution mixes with surfactant as mixture etchant solution to etch AlAs sacrificial layer for the selective wet etching of AlAs sacrificial layer. Addiction surfactants etchant significantly enhance the etching rate in the hydrofluoric acid etching solution. It is because surfactant provides hydrophilicity to change the contact angle with enhances the fluid properties of the mixture etchant between GaAs epilayer and GaAs substrate. Arsine gas was released from the etchant solution because the critical reaction product in semiconductor etching is dissolved arsine gas. Arsine gas forms a bubble, which easily displaces the etchant solution, before the AlAs layer was undercut. The results showed that acetone and hydrofluoric acid ratio of about 1:1 for the fastest etching rate of 13.2 μm / min. The etching rate increases about 4 times compared with pure hydrofluoric acid, moreover can shorten the separation time about 70% of GaAs epilayer with GaAs substrate. The results indicate that etching ratio and stability are improved by mixture etchant solution. It is not only saving the epilayer and the etching solution exposure time, but also reducing the damage to the epilayer structure.

  5. Analysis of fish otoliths by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: aspects of precipitating otolith calcium with hydrofluoric acid for trace element determination.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Zikri

    2005-03-15

    A method is developed for determination of trace elements, including Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Se, Tl and Zn, in fish otoliths by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS). Hydrofluoric acid was used to precipitate calcium resulting from acid dissolution of otolith calcium carbonate. Initial acidity of the sample solution influenced the precipitation efficiency of calcium fluoride. Up to 99.5% of Ca was precipitated in solutions that contained less than 2% (v/v) HNO(3). Recoveries of the elements obtained from spiked artificial otolith solutions were between 90 and 103%. Stabilization of the elements within the ETV cell was achieved with 0.3mug Pd/0.2mug Rh chemical modifier that also afforded optimum sensitivity for multielement determination. The method was validated by the analysis of a fish otolith reference material (CRM) of emperor snapper, and then applied to the determination of the trace elements in otoliths of several fish species captured in Raritan Bay, New Jersey. Results indicated that fish physiology and biological processes could influence the levels of Cu, Mn, Se and Zn in the otoliths of fish inhabiting a similar aqueous environment. Otolith concentrations of Cr and Ni did not show any significant differences among different species. Concentrations for Ag, As, Cd, Co and Tl were also not significantly different, but were very low indicating low affinity of otolith calcium carbonate to these elements. PMID:18969949

  6. Analysis of cationic structure in some room-temperature molten fluorides and dependence of their ionic conductivity and viscosity on hydrofluoric acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Tomohiro; Nakai, Takaaki; Inoue, Hidemi; Nakanishi, Kenta; Kohara, Shinji; Saito, Morihiro; Inaba, Minoru; Tasaka, Akimasa

    2011-08-11

    To understand the ionic and nonionic species in (CH(3))(4)NF·mHF, (CH(3))(3)N·mHF, (C(2)H(5))(4)NF·mHF, and (C(2)H(5))(3)N·mHF melts, the structures of these melts were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, NMR, and high-energy X-ray diffraction. Infrared spectra revealed that three kinds of fluorohydrogenate anions, (FH)(n)F(-) (n = 1, 2, and 3), and molecular hydrofluoric acid (HF) are present in every melt. Ionic conductivity and viscosity of these melts were measured and correlated with their cationic structure. The ionic conductivity of the R(4)N(+)-systems was higher than that of corresponding R(3)NH(+)-systems because a strong N-H···F(HF)(n) interaction prevents the motion of R(3)NH(+) cations in the R(3)N·mHF melts. (CH(3))(4)N(+) and (CH(3))(3)NH(+) cations gave higher ionic conductivity than (C(2)H(5))(4)N(+) and (C(2)H(5))(3)NH(+) cations, respectively, because the ionic radii of former cations were smaller than those of latter. It was concluded that these effects on ionic conductivity can be explained by the cationic structure and the concentration of molecular HF in the melts. PMID:21714521

  7. In-office technique for selectively etching titanium abutments to improve bonding for interim implant prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2016-03-01

    A technique is described for increasing the surface area of a titanium abutment with hydrofluoric acid etching. This provides mechanical retention for acrylic resin and composite resins and can be easily and rapidly accomplished in both the laboratory and clinic. PMID:26553255

  8. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after acid-etched and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-etched

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Birang, Reza; Hajizadeh, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Laser ablation has been suggested as an alternative method to acid etching; however, previous studies have obtained contrasting results. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets that are bonded to enamel etched with acid and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, buccal surfaces of 15 non-carious human premolars were divided into mesial and distal regions. Randomly, one of the regions was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and another region irradiated with Er:YAG laser at 100 mJ energy and 20 Hz frequency for 20 s. Stainless steel brackets were then bonded using Transbond XT, following which all the samples were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to 500 thermal cycles. SBS was tested by a chisel edge, mounted on the crosshead of universal testing machine. After debonding, the teeth were examined under ×10 magnification and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score determined. SBS and ARI scores of the two groups were then compared using t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Significant level was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean SBS of the laser group (16.61 ± 7.7 MPa) was not significantly different from that of the acid-etched group (18.86 ± 6.09 MPa) (P = 0.41). There was no significant difference in the ARI scores between two groups (P = 0.08). However, in the laser group, more adhesive remained on the brackets, which is not suitable for orthodontic purposes. Conclusion: Laser etching at 100 mJ energy produced bond strength similar to acid etching. Therefore, Er:YAG laser may be an alternative method for conventional acid-etching. PMID:25097641

  9. Focused electron beam induced etching of copper in sulfuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, Lindsay; Bresin, Matthew; Botman, Aurélien; Ranney, James; Hastings, J. Todd

    2015-12-01

    We show here that copper can be locally etched by an electron-beam induced reaction in a liquid. Aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) is utilized as the etchant and all experiments are conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope. The extent of etch increases with liquid thickness and dose, and etch resolution improves with H2SO4 concentration. This approach shows the feasibility of liquid phase etching for material selectivity and has the potential for circuit editing.

  10. The Influence of Composition upon Surface Degradation and Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys in Wet Hydrofluoric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, P; Meck, N S; Rebak, R B

    2006-12-04

    At concentrations below 60%, wet hydrofluoric acid (HF) is extremely corrosive to steels, stainless steels and reactive metals, such as titanium, zirconium, and tantalum. In fact, only a few metallic materials will withstand wet HF at temperatures above ambient. Among these are the nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) and nickel-chromium-molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys. Previous work has shown that, even with these materials, there are complicating factors. For example, under certain conditions, internal attack and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are possible with the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, and the Ni-Cu materials can suffer intergranular attack when exposed to wet HF vapors. The purpose of this work was to study further the response of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys to HF, in particular their external corrosion rates, susceptibility to internal attack and susceptibility to HF-induced SCC, as a function of alloy composition. As a side experiment, one of the alloys was tested in two microstructural conditions, i.e. solution annealed (the usual condition for materials of this type) and long-range ordered (this being a means of strengthening the alloy in question). The study of external corrosion rates over wide ranges of concentration and temperature revealed a strong beneficial influence of molybdenum content. However, tungsten, which is used as a partial replacement for molybdenum in some Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, appears to render the alloys more prone to internal attack. With regard to HF-induced SCC of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, this study suggests that only certain alloys (i.e., those containing tungsten) exhibit classical SCC. It was also discovered that high external corrosion rates inhibit HF-induced SCC, presumably due to rapid progression of the external attack front. With regard to the effects of long-range ordering, these were only evident at the highest test temperatures, where the ordered structure exhibited much higher external corrosion rates than the annealed structure.

  11. Characterization of Group V Dubnium Homologs on DGA Extraction Chromatography Resin from Nitric and Hydrofluoric Acid Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Despotopulos, J D; Sudowe, R

    2012-02-21

    Studies of the chemical properties of superheavy elements (SHE) pose interesting challenges due to their short half-lives and low production rates. Chemical systems must have extremely fast kinetics, fast enough kinetics to be able to examine the chemical properties of interest before the SHE decays to another nuclide. To achieve chemistry on such time scales, the chemical system must also be easily automated. Most importantly however, a chemical system must be developed which provides suitable separation and kinetics before an on-line study of a SHE can be performed. Relativistic effects make studying the chemical properties of SHEs interesting due to the impact these effects could have on the SHEs chemical properties. Relativistic effects arise when the velocity of the s orbital electrons approach the speed of light. As this velocity increases, the Bohr radius of the inner electron orbitals decreases and there is an increase in the particles mass. This contraction results in a destabilization of the energy of the outer d and f electron orbitals (5f and 6d in the case of SHE), which can cause these to expand due to their increased shielding from the nuclear charge. Another relativistic effect is the spin-orbit splitting for p, d, and f orbitals into j = 1 {+-} 1/2 states. This can lead most interestingly to a possible increased stability of element 114, which due to large spin-orbit splitting of the 7p orbital and the relativistically stabilized 7p{sub 1/2} and 7s orbital gives rise to a closed shell ground state of 7s{sup 2}7p{sub 1/2}{sup 2}. The homologs of element 105, dubnium (Db), Ta and Nb and the pseudo-homolog Pa, are well known to hydrolyze and form both neutral and non-neutral monoatomic and polyatomic species that may cause issues with extraction from a given chemical system. Early ion-exchange and solvent-extraction studies show mixed results for the behavior of Db. Some studies show Db behaving most similar to Ta, while others show it behaving somewhere between Nb and Pa. Much more recent studies have examined the properties of Db from HNO{sub 3}/HF matrices, and suggest Db forms complexes similar to those of Pa. Very little experimental work into the behavior of element 114 has been performed. Thermochromatography experiments of three atoms of element 114 indicate that the element 114 is at least as volatile as Hg, At, and element 112. Lead was shown to deposit on gold at temperatures about 1000 C higher than the atoms of element 114. Results indicate a substantially increased stability of element 114. No liquid phase studies of element 114 or its homologs (Pb, Sn, Ge) or pseudo-homologs (Hg, Cd) have been performed. Theoretical predictions indicate that element 114 is should have a much more stable +2 oxidation state and neutral state than Pb, which would result in element 114 being less reactive and less metallic than Pb. The relativistic effects on the 7p{sub 1/2} electrons are predicted to cause a diagonal relationship to be introduced into the periodic table. Therefore, 114{sup 2+} is expected to behave as if it were somewhere between Hg{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Pb{sup 2+}. In this work two commercially available extraction chromatography resins are evaluated, one for the separation of Db homologs and pseudo?homologs from each other as well as from potential interfering elements such as Group IV Rf homologs and actinides, and the other for separation of element 114 homologs. One resin, Eichrom's DGA resin, contains a N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide extractant, which separates analytes based on both size and charge characteristics of the solvated metal species, coated on an inert support. The DGA resin was examined for Db chemical systems, and shows a high degree of selectivity for tri-, tetra-, and hexavalent metal ions in multiple acid matrices with fast kinetics. The other resin, Eichrom's Pb resin, contains a di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 extractant with isodecanol solvent, which separates analytes based on steric interactions between the cavity of the crown ether and electrostatic interactions between the oxygen's of the ether and cations in the mobile phase. This particular resin has been shown to have an extremely high uptake affinity for Pb, a direct homolog of element 114, and is thus a good initial extractant to examine for a potential element 114 chemical system. Figure 1.1 shows the respective extractant molecules from the DGA and Pb resins. Batch uptake experiments were conducted to examine the uptake behavior of Ta on the DGA resin. Batch uptake experiments were also conducted to examine the uptake behavior of Ge on the Pb resin. Column experiments were designed based on batch uptake experiments of Ta, Am, Pa, Np, Zr, and Nb to establish a sequential extraction of Group IV/V homologs as well as Am for potential use as a Db chemical system.

  12. Influence of acid-etching and ceramic primers on the repair of a glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, J R C; Souza, Rodrigo O A; Nogueira Junior, L; Ozcan, M; Bottino, M A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of different primers on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between a feldspathic ceramic and two composites. Forty blocks (6.0 x 6.0 x 5.0 mm³) were prepared from Vita Mark II . After polishing, they were randomly divided into 10 groups according to the surface treatment: Group 1, hydrofluoric acid 10% (HF) + silane; Group 2, CoJet + silane; Group 3, HF + Metal/Zirconia Primer; Group 4, HF + Clearfil Primer; Group 5, HF + Alloy Primer; Group 6, HF + V-Primer; Group 7, Metal/Zirconia Primer; Group 8, Clearfil Primer; Group 9, Alloy Primer; Group 10, V-Primer. After each surface treatment, an adhesive was applied and one of two composite resins was incrementally built up. The sticks obtained from each block (bonded area: 1.0 mm² ± 0.2 mm) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 30 days and submitted to thermocycling (7,000 cycles; 5 degrees C/55 degrees C ± 1 degree C). The μTBS test was carried out using a universal testing machine (1.0 mm/min). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and a Tukey test (a = 0.05). The surface treatments significantly affected the results (P < 0.05); no difference was observed between the composites (P > 0.05). The bond strength means (MPa) were as follows: Group 1a = 29.6; Group 1b = 33.7; Group 2a = 28.9; Group 2b = 27.1; Group 3a = 13.8; Group 3b = 14.9; Group 4a = 18.6; Group 4b = 19.4; Group 5a = 15.3; Group 5b = 16.5; Group 6a = 11; Group 6b = 18; Groups 7a to 10b = 0. While the use of primers alone was not sufficient for adequate bond strengths to feldspathic ceramic, HF etching followed by any silane delivered higher bond strength. PMID:22414522

  13. Behavior of acid etching on titanium: topography, hydrophility and hydrogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xi; Zhou, Lei; Li, Shaobing; Lu, Haibin; Ding, Xianglong

    2014-02-01

    Since acid etching is easily controlled and effective, it has become one of the most common methods of surface modification. However, the behavior of etching is seldom discussed. In this study, different surfaces of titanium were prepared by changing the etching temperature and time. Surface topography, roughness, contact angles, surface crystalline structure, hydrogen concentration and mechanical properties were observed. As a result, surface topography and roughness were more proportional to etching temperature; however, diffusion of hydrogen and tensile strength are more time-related to titanium hydride formation on the surface. Titanium becomes more hydrophilic after etching even though the micropits were not formed after etching. More and deeper cracks were found on the specimens with more hydrogen diffusion. Therefore, higher temperature and shorter time are an effective way to get a uniform surface and decrease the diffusion of hydrogen to prevent hydrogen embrittlement. PMID:24343349

  14. A Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of Metal and Ceramic Brackets using Conventional Acid Etching Technique and Er:YAG Laser Etching

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Sogra; Fekrazad, Reza; Shahraki, Neda; Goldani Moghadam, Mahdjoube

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to enamel using acid versus Er:YAG laser etching. Materials and methods. Eighty premolars were divided into 4 groups: AM (acid etching/ metal brackets), AC (acid etching/ ceramic brackets), LM (laser etching/ metal brackets) and LC (laser etching/ ceramic brackets). Enamel condition-ing was done using acid in AC and AM and Er:YAG laser in LC and LM. Brackets were debonded with a Dartec machine and the SBSs were determined. Adhesive remnant index was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Two additional teeth were conditioned with acid and laser for scanning electron microscopy examination. Comparisons of SBS value were done by ANOVA test. Results. statistical analyses showed that SBSs of acid groups were significantly higher than that of laser groups, but dif-ferences between SBS values of AC/ AM and LC/LM were not significant. SEM examination revealed different etching pattern. Conclusion. Low power Er:YAG laser etching offers clinically acceptable SBS which besides its other superiorities to acid etching can be an appropriate alternative for bonding of ceramic brackets. PMID:25024836

  15. Direct observation of silicon surface etching by water with scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, G. J.; Köhler, U.; Henzler, M.

    1992-09-01

    One of the key processes in wet chemical preparation of silicon surfaces for device fabrication is a final rinsing step with water after oxide removal and hydrogen-termination with hydrofluoric acid. On rinsing at elevated temperature (boiling water) the slow statistical oxidation of the surface known from conventional treatment with water at room temperature is replaced by a rapid anisotropic etching attack. On Si(111) scanning tunneling microscopy shows characteristic triangular etch defects and flat (111) terraces separated by monatomic steps along <0 overline11>. The resulting surface is chemically homogeneous without any oxide. Structure and removal mechanism are compared to NH 4F-etched samples.

  16. Nanoparticle-based etching of silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard; Duda, Anna; Ginley, David S.; Yost, Vernon; Meier, Daniel; Ward, James S.

    2011-12-13

    A method (300) of texturing silicon surfaces (116) such to reduce reflectivity of a silicon wafer (110) for use in solar cells. The method (300) includes filling (330, 340) a vessel (122) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface 116) of a wafer or substrate (112). The etching solution (124) is made up of a catalytic nanomaterial (140) and an oxidant-etchant solution (146). The catalytic nanomaterial (140) may include gold or silver nanoparticles or noble metal nanoparticles, each of which may be a colloidal solution. The oxidant-etchant solution (146) includes an etching agent (142), such as hydrofluoric acid, and an oxidizing agent (144), such as hydrogen peroxide. Etching (350) is performed for a period of time including agitating or stirring the etching solution (124). The etch time may be selected such that the etched silicon surface (116) has a reflectivity of less than about 15 percent such as 1 to 10 percent in a 350 to 1000 nanometer wavelength range.

  17. Graphene-Assisted Chemical Etching of Silicon Using Anodic Aluminum Oxides as Patterning Templates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2015-11-01

    We first report graphene-assisted chemical etching (GaCE) of silicon by using patterned graphene as an etching catalyst. Chemical-vapor-deposition-grown graphene transferred on a silicon substrate is patterned to a mesh with nanohole arrays by oxygen plasma etching using an anodic- aluminum-oxide etching mask. The prepared graphene mesh/silicon is immersed in a mixture solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydro peroxide with various molecular fractions at optimized temperatures. The silicon underneath graphene mesh is then selectively etched to form aligned nanopillar arrays. The morphology of the nanostructured silicon can be controlled to be smooth or porous depending on the etching conditions. The experimental results are systematically discussed based on possible mechanisms for GaCE of Si. PMID:26473800

  18. Distribution of Components in Ion Exchange Materials Taken from the K East Basin and Leaching of Ion Exchange Materials by Nitric/Hydrofluoric Acid and Nitric/Oxalic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Hoopes, F.V.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid followed by mixed nitric/oxalic acid leach treatments to decontaminate ion exchange materials that have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East (KE)Basin sludge. The ion exchange materials contain organic ion exchange resins and zeolite inorganic ion exchange material. Based on process records, the ion exchange resins found in the K Basins is a mixed-bed, strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite NRW-037. The zeolite material is Zeolon-900, a granular material composed of the mineral mordenite. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the ion exchange material can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Elutriation and washing steps are designed to remove the organic resins from the K Basin sludge. To help understand the effects of the anticipated separation steps, tests were performed with well-rinsed ion exchange (IX) material from KE Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed IX having small quantities of added KE canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). Tests also were performed to determine the relative quantities of organic and inorganic IX materials present in the H-08 K Basin sludge material. Based on chemical analyses of the separated fractions, the rinsed and dry IX material H-08 BEAD G was found to contain 36 weight percent inorganic material (primarily zeolite). The as-received (unrinsed) and dried H-08 material was estimated to contain 45 weight percent inorganic material.

  19. Acid Solutions for Etching Corrosion-Resistant Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    New study characterized solutions for etching austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base alloys, and titanium alloys (annealed). Solutions recommended for use remove at least 0.4 mil of metal from surface in less than an hour. Solutions do not cause intergranular attack on metals for which they are effective, when used under specified conditions.

  20. Effect of fluoride pretreatment on primary and permanent tooth surfaces by acid-etching.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samjin; Cheong, Youjin; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2010-01-01

    This study observed the effect of fluoride application on a 37% phosphoric acid etching for 20 s of the enamel surfaces of primary and permanent teeth based on a clinical protocol employed in dental hospitals, through atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Enamel samples were prepared from 84 exfoliated and noncarious teeth. Primary (groups 1-4) and permanent (groups 5-8) tooth samples were assigned randomly to one of eight groups based on the timing of acid-etching with 37% phosphoric acid after an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) treatment. Groups 1 and 5 received no fluoride application. Groups 2-4 and 6-8 were pretreated with fluoride and received acid-etching 2 weeks later (groups 2 and 6), 1 week later (groups 3 and 7), and immediately (groups 4 and 8). The acid-etching process led to a significant increase in roughness (p<0.0001), and the APF treatment led to a decrease in primary and permanent tooth surface roughness (p<0.005). An acid-etching procedure 2 weeks after performing an APF pretreatment might be recommended to obtain the maximum enamel adhesion of a resin composite. PMID:21254111

  1. Etching of tungsten and tungsten silicide films by chlorine atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fischi, D.S. ); Rodriques, G.W. ); Hess, D.W. )

    1988-08-01

    Thin films of tungsten and tungsten silicide were etched both within and downstream from a Cl/sub 2/ plasma discharge at 200 mtorr pressure and temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. When samples were positioned downstream from the discharge, etching proceeded solely by chemical reaction of the film with chlorine atoms. Without a discharge, molecular chlorine did not etch tungsten or tungsten silicide. Downstream and in-plasma tungsten etch rates were approximately equal at 110/sup 0/C, but the chlorine atom etch rate dropped more rapidly than the in-plasma etch rate as temperature decreased. The chemical reaction between chlorine atoms and the tungsten film was proportional to the gas phase Cl atom mole fraction. A pretreatment consisting of either a dilute hydrofluoric acid dip or a short plasma etch cycle was necessary for atom etching of tungsten silicide films. The etch rate of tungsten silicde in Cl/sub 2/ plamsas were approximately an order of magnitude higher and less temperature sensitive than those in the downstream (atom) configuration.

  2. Peculiarities of latent track etching in SiO2/Si structures irradiated with Ar, Kr and Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al'zhanova, A.; Dauletbekova, A.; Komarov, F.; Vlasukova, L.; Yuvchenko, V.; Akilbekov, A.; Zdorovets, M.

    2016-05-01

    The process of latent track etching in SiO2/Si structures irradiated with 40Ar (38 MeV), 84Kr (59 MeV) and 132Xe (133 and 200 MeV) ions has been investigated. The experimental results of SiO2 etching in a hydrofluoric acid solution have been compared with the results of computer simulation based on the thermal spike model. It has been confirmed that the formation of a molten region along the swift ion trajectory with minimum radius of 3 nm can serve as a theoretical criterion for the reproducible latent track etching tracks in SiO2.

  3. Evaluating EDTA as a substitute for phosphoric acid-etching of enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Imbery, Terence A; Kennedy, Matthew; Janus, Charles; Moon, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes released when dentin is acid-etched. The enzymes are capable of destroying unprotected collagen fibrils that are not encapsulated by the dentin adhesive. Chlorhexidine applied after etching inhibits the activation of released MMPs, whereas neutral ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) prevents the release of MMPs. The purpose of this study was to determine if conditioning enamel and dentin with EDTA can be a substitute for treating acid-etching enamel and dentin with chlorhexidine. A column of composite resin was bonded to enamel and dentin after conditioning. Shear bond strengths were evaluated after 48 hours and after accelerated aging for three hours in 12% sodium hypochlorite. Shear bond strengths ranged from 15.6 MP a for accelerated aged EDTA enamel specimens to 26.8 MPa for dentin conditioned with EDTA and tested after 48 hours. A three-way ANOVA and a Tukey HSD test found statistically significant differences among the eight groups and the three independent variables (P < 0.05). EDTA was successfully substituted for phosphoric acid-etched enamel and dentin treated with chlorhexidine. Interactions of conditioning agent and aging were significant for dentin but not for enamel. In an effort to reduce the detrimental effects of MMPs, conditioning enamel and dentin with EDTA is an alternative to treating acid-etched dentin and enamel with chlorhexidine. PMID:22414518

  4. Creation of hollow SAPO-34 single crystals via alkaline or acid etching.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuyan; Yang, Miao; Gao, Beibei; Wang, Linying; Tian, Peng; Xu, Shutao; Liu, Zhongmin

    2016-04-14

    Hollow SAPO-34 crystals are created via selective etching of their precursor under controlled alkaline or acid conditions. The abundant/interconnected Si-O-Al domains and Si-O-Si networks at the outer layer of SAPO-34 crystals are revealed to be decisive factors for the base and acid treatments respectively to achieve a well-preserved hollow structure. PMID:27042708

  5. In situ atomic force microscopy and image analysis of dentine submitted to acid etching.

    PubMed

    Paciornik, S; De-Deus, G; Reis, C M; Pinho Mauricio, M H; Prioli, R

    2007-03-01

    The effect of acid etching on root dentine was analyzed with Atomic Force Microscopy using a liquid cell that allowed image acquisition while the sample was kept in contact with the etching solution. The time evolution of the etching process was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Image sequences against etching time were obtained showing a clear trend of surface cleaning and opening of dentine tubules. Image analysis methods were employed to quantify the changes on the dentine surface, through the detection and morphological measurement of dentine tubules over time. The measurements indicated an overall increase in the diameter of the tubules against time, with a saturation value between 3.5 and 5.5 microm reached after approximately 300 seconds. PMID:17371446

  6. A relative humidity sensing probe based on etched thin-core fiber coated with polyvinyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Yang, Zaihang; Zhou, Libin; Liu, Nan; Gang, Tingting; Qiao, Xueguang; Hu, Manli

    2015-12-01

    A relative humidity (RH) sensing probe based on etched thin-core fiber (TCF) coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated.This sensor is constructed by splicing a section of TCF with a single mode fiber (SMF), then part of the TCF's cladding is etched by hydrofluoric acid solution and finally the tip of TCF is coated with PVA. Experimental results demonstrate that this sensor can measure the ambient RH by demodulating the power variation of reflection spectrum. The power demodulation method make this sensor can ignore the temperature cross-sensitivity and have an extensive application prospect.

  7. Acid Etching and Plasma Sterilization Fail to Improve Osseointegration of Grit Blasted Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Saksø, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Stig S; Saksø, Henrik; Baas, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation was evaluated by implant osseointegration and biomechanical fixation. The study consisted of two paired animal sub-studies where 10 skeletally mature Labrador dogs were used. Grit blasted titanium alloy implants were inserted press fit in each proximal tibia. In the first study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time. Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner. PMID:22962567

  8. Noble gases and nitrogen released from lunar soils by acid etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, Paul E.; Pepin, Robert O.; Becker, Richard H.

    1995-12-01

    A stepwise acid-etching technique similar to the closed system stepwise etching (CSSE) method developed at ETH Zurich was used to examine the solar wind reservoirs of lunar soil grains. Samples were treated with weak acids (H 2O, H 2SO 3) to facilitate the release of the most shallowly implanted gases. Noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions, including Kr and Xe in some cases, and a few nitrogen data were obtained for mineral or grain-size separates of three lunar soils (plagioclase from 60051, pyroxene from 75081, and <25 ym bulk 79035). The 60051 plagioclase grains, considered to be a possibly unique resource for determining the modern-day solar wind composition, show unusually low contents of solar wind He, Ne, and particularly Ar, but do not otherwise possess any characteristics clearly attributable to a modem-day solar wind exposure. Initial water and acid treatments of the grains, however, release an apparently pure SEP component. The 75081 pyroxene and the size separate of bulk 79035 both yield Kr and Xe compositions in initial etch steps that are characteristic of undiffused solar wind, significantly increasing the database for measurements of solar wind Kr and Xe where possible laboratory thermal diffusion and fractionation effects are not a concern. Pyroxene in particular appears to be a suitable alternative to ilmenite for the purpose of making measurements of this kind. Nitrogen release by acid etching is not at present quantitative, and while it appears possible to obtain reasonable isotopic ratios for solar wind N, we are unable to use the technique to determine solar nitrogen to noble gas ratios. Light noble gases in all three soil separates, other than the aforementioned behavior of 60051, appear to behave in accord with expectations based on acid-etching analyses performed by the Züirich group.

  9. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by macroscopic galvanic cell-driven metal catalyzed electroless etching in aerated HF solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Peng, Kui-Qing; Hu, Ya; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-03-01

    Macroscopic galvanic cell-driven metal catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE) of silicon in aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution is devised to fabricate silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with dissolved oxygen acting as the one and only oxidizing agent. The key aspect of this strategy is the use of a graphite or other noble metal electrode that is electrically coupled with silicon substrate. PMID:24323873

  10. Acid-etched microtexture for enhancement of bone growth into porous-coated implants.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Harvey, E J; Tanzer, M; Krygier, J J; Bobyn, J D

    2003-11-01

    We designed an in vivo study to determine if the superimposition of a microtexture on the surface of sintered titanium beads affected the extent of bone ingrowth. Cylindrical titanium intramedullary implants were coated with titanium beads to form a porous finish using commercial sintering techniques. A control group of implants was left in the as-sintered condition. The test group was etched in a boiling acidic solution to create an irregular surface over the entire porous coating. Six experimental dogs underwent simultaneous bilateral femoral intramedullary implantation of a control implant and an acid etched implant. At 12 weeks, the implants were harvested in situ and the femora processed for undecalcified, histological examination. Eight transverse serial sections for each implant were analysed by backscattered electron microscopy and the extent of bone ingrowth was quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The extent of bone ingrowth into the control implants was 15.8% while the extent of bone ingrowth into the etched implants was 25.3%, a difference of 60% that was statistically significant. These results are consistent with other research that documents the positive effect of microtextured surfaces on bone formation at an implant surface. The acid etching process developed for this study represents a simple method for enhancing the potential of commonly available porous coatings for biological fixation. PMID:14653605

  11. Miniature tapered photonic crystal fiber interferometer with enhanced sensitivity by acid microdroplets etching.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Sun-jie; Chen, Ye; Kou, Jun-long; Xu, Fei; Lu, Yan-qing

    2011-08-01

    We fabricate a miniature tapered photonic crystal fiber (PCF) interferometer with enhanced sensitivity by acid microdroplets etching. This method is very simple and cost effective, avoiding elongating the PCF, moving and refixing the device during etching, and measuring. The refractive index sensing properties with different PCF diameters are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The tapering velocity can be controlled by the microdroplet size and position. The sensitivity greatly increases (five times, 750 nm/RIU) and the size decreases after slightly tapering the PCF. The device keeps low temperature dependence before and after tapering. More uniformly and thinly tapered PCFs can be realized with higher sensitivity (∼100 times) by optimizing the etching process. PMID:21833106

  12. Chemically Etched Open Tubular and Monolithic Emitters for Nanoelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Luo, Quanzhou; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-15

    We have developed a new procedure for fabricating fused silica emitters for electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in which the end of a bare fused silica capillary is immersed into aqueous hydrofluoric acid, and water is pumped through the capillary to prevent etching of the interior. Surface tension causes the etchant to climb the capillary exterior, and the etch rate in the resulting meniscus decreases as a function of distance from the bulk solution. Etching continues until the silica touching the hydrofluoric acid reservoir is completely removed, essentially stopping the etch process. The resulting emitters have no internal taper, making them much less prone to clogging compared to e.g. pulled emitters. The high aspect ratios and extremely thin walls at the orifice facilitate very low flow rate operation; stable ESI-MS signals were obtained for model analytes from 5-μm-diameter emitters at a flow rate of 5 nL/min with a high degree of inter-emitter reproducibility. In extensive evaluation, the etched emitters were found to enable approximately four times as many LC-MS analyses of proteomic samples before failing compared with conventional pulled emitters. The fabrication procedure was also employed to taper the ends of polymer monolith-containing silica capillaries for use as ESI emitters. In contrast to previous work, the monolithic material protrudes beyond the fused silica capillaries, improving the monolith-assisted electrospray process.

  13. Formation of nanostructured silicon surfaces by stain etching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of ordered silicon structures by chemical etching of silicon in vanadium oxide (V2O5)/hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution. The effects of the different etching parameters including the solution concentration, temperature, and the presence of metal catalyst film deposition (Pd) on the morphologies and reflective properties of the etched Si surfaces were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to explore the morphologies of the etched surfaces with and without the presence of catalyst. In this case, the attack on the surfaces with a palladium deposit begins by creating uniform circular pores on silicon in which we distinguish the formation of pyramidal structures of silicon. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrates that the surfaces are H-terminated. A UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer was used to study the reflectance of the structures obtained. A reflectance of 2.21% from the etched Si surfaces in the wavelength range of 400 to 1,000 nm was obtained after 120 min of etching while it is of 4.33% from the Pd/Si surfaces etched for 15 min. PMID:25435830

  14. Formation of nanostructured silicon surfaces by stain etching.

    PubMed

    Ayat, Maha; Belhousse, Samia; Boarino, Luca; Gabouze, Noureddine; Boukherroub, Rabah; Kechouane, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of ordered silicon structures by chemical etching of silicon in vanadium oxide (V2O5)/hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution. The effects of the different etching parameters including the solution concentration, temperature, and the presence of metal catalyst film deposition (Pd) on the morphologies and reflective properties of the etched Si surfaces were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to explore the morphologies of the etched surfaces with and without the presence of catalyst. In this case, the attack on the surfaces with a palladium deposit begins by creating uniform circular pores on silicon in which we distinguish the formation of pyramidal structures of silicon. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrates that the surfaces are H-terminated. A UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer was used to study the reflectance of the structures obtained. A reflectance of 2.21% from the etched Si surfaces in the wavelength range of 400 to 1,000 nm was obtained after 120 min of etching while it is of 4.33% from the Pd/Si surfaces etched for 15 min. PMID:25435830

  15. Optimization of silver-assisted nano-pillar etching process in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhari, Ayu Wazira; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Desa, Mohd Khairunaz Mat; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a respond surface methodology (RSM) model is developed using three-level Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD) technique. This model is developed to investigate the influence of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process variables on the nanopillars profiles created in single crystalline silicon (Si) substrate. Design-Expert® software (version 7.1) is employed in formulating the RSM model based on five critical process variables: (A) concentration of silver (Ag), (B) concentration of hydrofluoric acid (HF), (C) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), (D) deposition time, and (E) etching time. This model is supported by data from 46 experimental configurations. Etched profiles as a function of lateral etching rate, vertical etching rate, height, size and separation between the Si trenches and etching uniformity are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). A quadratic regression model is developed to correlate critical process variables and is validated using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) methodology. The model exhibits near-linear dependence of lateral and vertical etching rates on both the H2O2 concentration and etching time. The predicted model is in good agreement with the experimental data where R2 is equal to 0.80 and 0.67 for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. The optimized result shows minimum lateral etching with the average pore size of about 69 nm while the maximum etching rate is estimated at around 360 nm/min. The model demonstrates that the etching process uniformity is not influenced by either the etchant concentration or the etching time. This lack of uniformity could be attributed to the surface condition of the wafer. Optimization of the process parameters show adequate accuracy of the model with acceptable percentage errors of 6%, 59%, 1.8%, 38% and 61% for determination of the height, separation, size, the pore size and the etching rate respectively.

  16. Metal etching composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otousa, Joseph E. (Inventor); Thomas, Clark S. (Inventor); Foster, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a chemical etching composition for etching metals or metallic alloys. The composition includes a solution of hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, ethylene glycol, and an oxidizing agent. The etching composition is particularly useful for etching metal surfaces in preparation for subsequent fluorescent penetrant inspection.

  17. Effect of acid etching on bond strength of nanoionomer as an orthodontic bonding adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saba; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A new Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement known as nanoionomer containing nanofillers of fluoroaluminosilicate glass and nanofiller 'clusters' has been introduced. An in-vitro study aimed at evaluating shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of nanoionomer under etching/unetched condition for use as an orthodontic bonding agent. Material and Methods: A total of 75 extracted premolars were used, which were divided into three equal groups of 25 each: 1-Conventional adhesive (Enlight Light Cure, SDS, Ormco, CA, USA) was used after and etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, followed by Ortho Solo application 2-nanoionomer (Ketac™ N100, 3M, ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was used after etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s 3-nanoionomer was used without etching. The SBS testing was performed using a digital universal testing machine (UTM-G-410B, Shanta Engineering). Evaluation of ARI was done using scanning electron microscopy. The SBS were compared using ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test for intergroup comparisons and ARI scores were compared with Chi-square test. Results: ANOVA (SBS, F = 104.75) and Chi-square (ARI, Chi-square = 30.71) tests revealed significant differences between groups (P < 0.01). The mean (SD) SBS achieved with conventional light cure adhesive was significantly higher (P < 0.05) (10.59 ± 2.03 Mpa, 95% CI, 9.74-11.41) than the nanoionomer groups (unetched 4.13 ± 0.88 Mpa, 95% CI, 3.79-4.47 and etched 9.32 ± 1.87 Mpa, 95% CI, 8.58-10.06). However, nanoionomer with etching, registered SBS in the clinically acceptable range of 5.9–7.8 MPa, as suggested by Reynolds (1975). The nanoionomer groups gave significantly lower ARI values than the conventional adhesive group. Conclusion: Based on this in-vitro study, nanoionomer with etching can be successfully used as an orthodontic bonding agent leaving less adhesive remnant on enamel surface, making cleaning easier. However, in-vivo studies are needed to confirm the validity of present findings. PMID:26955629

  18. Effects of laser and acid etching and air abrasion on mineral content of dentin.

    PubMed

    Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ta?demir, Serife Tuba; Ozturk, A Nilgun; Ozturk, Bora; Berk, Gizem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineral content of dentin prepared using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser at four different power settings, acid etching, and air abrasion. The study teeth comprised 35 molars which were randomly divided into seven equal groups. The occlusal third of the crowns were cut with a slow-speed diamond saw. The groups were as follows: group A, control group; group B, dentin etched with 35% buffered phosphoric acid for 30 s; group C, dentin abraded at 60 psi with 50-m aluminium oxide for 1 s; groups D-G, dentin irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 1.50 W (group D), 2.25 W (group E), 3.00 W (group F), and 3.50 W (group G). The levels of Mg, P, Ca, K and Na in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. There were no significant differences between the groups in the levels of Ca, P and Na, and the Ca/P ratio (p>0.05); however, there were significant differences in the levels of K (p<0.001) and Mg (p=0.13). In addition, the levels of Mg in the air abrasion group were higher than in the other groups (p<0.01). Etching with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser system, air abrasion and acid etching did not affect the levels of Ca, P and Na, or the Ca/P ratio, in the dentin surface. PMID:20084534

  19. Investigation of acid-etched CO2 laser ablated enamel surfaces using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, Byung J.; Kang, Hobin; Chan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser operating at the highly absorbed wavelength of 9.3μm with a pulse duration of 10-15μs is ideally suited for caries removal and caries prevention. The enamel thermally modified by the laser has enhanced resistance to acid dissolution. This is an obvious advantage for caries prevention; however, it is often necessary to etch the enamel surface to increase adhesion to composite restorative materials and such surfaces may be more resistant to etching. The purpose of the study was to non-destructively measure the susceptibility of laser-ablated enamel surfaces to acid dissolution before and after acid-etching using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT). PS-OCT was used to acquire images of bovine enamel surfaces after exposure to laser irradiation at ablative fluence, acid-etching, and a surface softened dissolution model. The integrated reflectivity from lesion and the lesion depth were measured using PS-OCT. Samples were also sectioned for examination by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM). PS-OCT images showed that acid-etching greatly accelerated the formation of subsurface lesions on both laser-irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces (P<0.05). A 37.5% phosphoric acid etch removed the laser modified enamel layer after 5-10 seconds.

  20. Investigation of Acid-Etched CO2 Laser Ablated Enamel Surfaces Using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Byung J; Kang, Hobin; Chan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    A carbon dioxide laser operating at the highly absorbed wavelength of 9.3μm with a pulse duration of 10-15μs is ideally suited for caries removal and caries prevention. The enamel thermally modified by the laser has enhanced resistance to acid dissolution. This is an obvious advantage for caries prevention; however, it is often necessary to etch the enamel surface to increase adhesion to composite restorative materials and such surfaces may be more resistant to etching. The purpose of the study was to non-destructively measure the susceptibility of laser-ablated enamel surfaces to acid dissolution before and after acid-etching using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT). PS-OCT was used to acquire images of bovine enamel surfaces after exposure to laser irradiation at ablative fluence, acid-etching, and a surface softened dissolution model. The integrated reflectivity from lesion and the lesion depth were measured using PS-OCT. Samples were also sectioned for examination by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM). PS-OCT images showed that acid-etching greatly accelerated the formation of subsurface lesions on both laser-irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces (P<0.05). A 37.5% phosphoric acid etch removed the laser modified enamel layer after 5-10 seconds. PMID:23539418

  1. Investigation of Acid-Etched CO2 Laser Ablated Enamel Surfaces Using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Byung J.; Kang, Hobin; Chan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser operating at the highly absorbed wavelength of 9.3μm with a pulse duration of 10–15μs is ideally suited for caries removal and caries prevention. The enamel thermally modified by the laser has enhanced resistance to acid dissolution. This is an obvious advantage for caries prevention; however, it is often necessary to etch the enamel surface to increase adhesion to composite restorative materials and such surfaces may be more resistant to etching. The purpose of the study was to non-destructively measure the susceptibility of laser-ablated enamel surfaces to acid dissolution before and after acid-etching using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT). PS-OCT was used to acquire images of bovine enamel surfaces after exposure to laser irradiation at ablative fluence, acid-etching, and a surface softened dissolution model. The integrated reflectivity from lesion and the lesion depth were measured using PS-OCT. Samples were also sectioned for examination by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM). PS-OCT images showed that acid-etching greatly accelerated the formation of subsurface lesions on both laser-irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces (P<0.05). A 37.5% phosphoric acid etch removed the laser modified enamel layer after 5–10 seconds. PMID:23539418

  2. Uniform vertical trench etching on silicon with high aspect ratio by metal-assisted chemical etching using nanoporous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Liyi; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Xueying; Lin, Ziyin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Recently, metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) has been proposed as a promising wet-etching method for the fabrication of micro- and nanostructures on silicon with low cost. However, uniform vertical trench etching with high aspect ratio is still of great challenge for traditional MaCE. Here we report an innovated MaCE method, which combined the use of a nanoporous gold thin film as the catalyst and a hydrofluoric acid (HF)-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) mixture solution with a low HF-to-H2O2 concentration ratio (?) as the etchant. The reported method successfully fabricated vertical trenches on silicon with a width down to 2 ?m and an aspect ratio of 16. The geometry of the trenches was highly uniform throughout the 3D space. The vertical etching direction was favored on both (100)- and (111)-oriented silicon substrates. The reported method was also capable of producing multiple trenches on the same substrate with individually-tunable lateral geometry. An etching mechanism including a through-catalyst mass-transport process and an electropolishing-favored charge-transport process was identified by a comparative study. The novel method fundamentally solves the problems of distortion and random movement of isolated catalysts in MaCE. The results mark a breakthrough in high-quality silicon trench-etching technology with a cost of more than 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the currently available methods. PMID:24261312

  3. Characterization of deep wet etching of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Chen, Bangtao; Tay, Francis E. H.; Xu, Guolin; Miao, Jianmin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a characterization of wet etching of glass in HF-based solutions with a focus on etching rate, masking layers and quality of the generated surface. The first important factor that affects the deep wet etching process is the glass composition. The presence of oxides such as CaO, MgO or Al IIO 3 that give insoluble products after reaction with HF can generate rough surface and modify the etching rate. A second factor that influences especially the etch rate is the annealing process (560°C / 6 hours in N II environment). For annealed glass samples an increase of the etch rate with 50-60% was achieved. Another important factor is the concentration of the HF solution. For deep wet etching of Pyrex glass in hydrofluoric acid solution, different masking layers such as Cr/Au, PECVD amorphous silicon, LPCVD polysilicon and silicon carbide are analyzed. Detailed studies show that the stress in the masking layer is a critical factor for deep wet etching of glass. A low value of compressive stress is recommended. High value of tensile stress in the masking layer (200-300 MPa) can be an important factor in the generation of the pinholes. Another factor is the surface hydrophilicity. A hydrophobic surface of the masking layer will prevent the etching solution from flowing through the deposition defects (micro/nano channels or cracks) and the generation of pinholes is reduced. The stress gradient in the masking layer can also be an important factor in generation of the notching defects on the edges. Using these considerations a special multilayer masks Cr/Au/Photoresist (AZ7220) and amorphous silicon/silicon carbide/Photoresist were fabricated for deep wet etching of a 500 μm and 1mm-thick respectively Pyrex glass wafers. In both cases the etching was performed through wafer. From our knowledge these are the best results reported in the literature. The quality of the generated surface is another important factor in the fabrication process. We notice that the roughness of generated surface can be significantly improved by adding HCl in HF solution (the optimal ratio between HF (49%) and HCl (37%) was 10/1).

  4. Micro/nanofabrication of poly(L-lactic acid) using focused ion beam direct etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Tomoko Gowa; Hinata, Toru; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Oshima, Akihiro; Washio, Masakazu; Tagawa, Seiichi; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2013-10-01

    Micro/nanofabrication of biocompatible and biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) using focused Ga ion beam direct etching was evaluated for future bio-device applications. The fabrication performance was determined with different ion fluences and fluxes (beam currents), and it was found that the etching speed and fabrication accuracy were affected by irradiation-induced heat. Focused ion beam (FIB)-irradiated surfaces were analyzed using micro-area X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Owing to reactions such as the physical sputtering of atoms and radiation-induced decomposition, PLLA was gradually carbonized with increasing C=C bonds. Controlled micro/nanostructures of PLLA were fabricated with C=C bond-rich surfaces expected to have good cell attachment properties.

  5. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  6. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-02-01

    Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  7. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  8. Shear bond strength and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with conventional acid-etch and self-etch primer systems: An in-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh; Moghimi, Mahsan; Shahrbaf, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Background Different in-vitro studies have reported various results regarding shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets when SEP technique is compared to conventional system. This in-vivo study was designed to compare the effect of conventional acid-etching and self-etching primer adhesive (SEP) systems on SBS and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods 120 intact first maxillary and mandibular premolars of 30 orthodontic patients were selected and bonded with metal and ceramic brackets using conventional acid-etch or self-etch primer system. The bonded brackets were incorporated into the wire during the study period to simulate the real orthodontic treatment condition. The teeth were extracted and debonded after 30 days. The SBS, debonding characteristics and adhesive remnant indices (ARI) were determined in all groups. Results The mean SBS of metal brackets was 10.63±1.42 MPa in conventional and 9.38±1.53 MPa in SEP system, (P=0.004). No statistically significant difference was noted between conventional and SEP systems in ceramic brackets. The frequency of 1, 2 and 3 ARI scores and debonding within the adhesive were the most common among all groups. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding ARI or failure mode of debonded specimens in different brackets or bonding systems. Conclusions The SBS of metal brackets bonded using conventional system was significantly higher than SEP system, although the SBS of SEP system was clinically acceptable. No significant difference was found between conventional and SEP systems used with ceramic brackets. Total SBS of metal brackets was significantly higher than ceramic brackets. Due to adequate SBS of SEP system in bonding the metal brackets, it can be used as an alternative for conventional system. Key words:Shear bond strength, Orthodontic brackets, Adhesive remnant index, self-etch. PMID:26855704

  9. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin.

    PubMed

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.11.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.63.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.63.5 MPa), laser etching (14.13.4 MPa) and control (8.12.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  10. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  11. Etching process for improving the strength of a laser-machined silicon-based ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Copley, S.M.; Tao, H.; Todd-Copley, J.A.

    1991-06-11

    A process is disclosed for improving the strength of laser-machined articles formed of a silicon-based ceramic material such as silicon nitride, in which the laser-machined surface is immersed in an etching solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid for a duration sufficient to remove substantially all of a silicon film residue on the surface but insufficient to allow the solution to unduly attack the grain boundaries of the underlying silicon nitride substrate. This effectively removes the silicon film as a source of cracks that otherwise could propagate downwardly into the silicon nitride substrate and significantly reduce its strength. 1 figure.

  12. Etching process for improving the strength of a laser-machined silicon-based ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Copley, Stephen M.; Tao, Hongyi; Todd-Copley, Judith A.

    1991-01-01

    A process for improving the strength of laser-machined articles formed of a silicon-based ceramic material such as silicon nitride, in which the laser-machined surface is immersed in an etching solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid for a duration sufficient to remove substantially all of a silicon film residue on the surface but insufficient to allow the solution to unduly attack the grain boundaries of the underlying silicon nitride substrate. This effectively removes the silicon film as a source of cracks that otherwise could propagate downwardly into the silicon nitride substrate and significantly reduce its strength.

  13. Improvement of enamel bond strengths for conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers: acid-etching vs. conditioning*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Tang, Tian; Zhang, Zhen-liang; Liang, Bing; Wang, Xiao-miao; Fu, Bai-ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study deals with the effect of phosphoric acid etching and conditioning on enamel micro-tensile bond strengths (μTBSs) of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs/RMGICs). Methods: Forty-eight bovine incisors were prepared into rectangular blocks. Highly-polished labial enamel surfaces were either acid-etched, conditioned with liquids of cements, or not further treated (control). Subsequently, two matching pre-treated enamel surfaces were cemented together with one of four cements [two GICs: Fuji I (GC), Ketac Cem Easymix (3M ESPE); two RMGICs: Fuji Plus (GC), RelyX Luting (3M ESPE)] in preparation for μTBS tests. Pre-treated enamel surfaces and cement-enamel interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBS of GICs/RMGICs. Conditioning with the liquids of the cements produced significantly weaker or equivalent enamel μTBS compared to the control. Regardless of etching, RMGICs yielded stronger enamel μTBS than GICs. A visible hybrid layer was found at certain enamel-cement interfaces of the etched enamels. Conclusions: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBSs of GICs/RMGICs. Phosphoric acid etching should be recommended to etch the enamel margins before the cementation of the prostheses such as inlays and onlays, using GICs/RMGICs to improve the bond strengths. RMGICs provided stronger enamel bond strength than GICs and conditioning did not increase enamel bond strength. PMID:24190447

  14. Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio silicon nanopores by electrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Zhang, Miao; Yu, Shun; Linnros, Jan

    2014-09-01

    We report on the formation of ultra-high aspect ratio nanopores in silicon bulk material using photo-assisted electrochemical etching. Here, n-type silicon is used as anode in contact with hydrofluoric acid. Based on the local dissolution of surface atoms in pre-defined etching pits, pore growth and pore diameter are, respectively, driven and controlled by the supply of minority charge carriers generated by backside illumination. Thus, arrays with sub-100 nm wide pores were fabricated. Similar to macropore etching, it was found that the pore diameter is proportional to the etching current, i.e., smaller etching currents result in smaller pore diameters. To find the limits under which nanopores with controllable diameter still can be obtained, etching was performed at very low current densities (several μA cm-2). By local etching, straight nanopores with aspect ratios above 1000 (˜19 μm deep and ˜15 nm pore tip diameter) were achieved. However, inherent to the formation of such narrow pores is a radius of curvature of a few nanometers at the pore tip, which favors electrical breakdown resulting in rough pore wall morphologies. Lowering the applied bias is adequate to reduce spiking pores but in most cases also causes etch stop. Our findings on bulk silicon provide a realistic chance towards sub-10 nm pore arrays on silicon membranes, which are of great interest for molecular filtering and possibly DNA sequencing.

  15. Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio silicon nanopores by electrochemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Torsten; Zhang, Miao; Linnros, Jan; Yu, Shun

    2014-09-22

    We report on the formation of ultra-high aspect ratio nanopores in silicon bulk material using photo-assisted electrochemical etching. Here, n-type silicon is used as anode in contact with hydrofluoric acid. Based on the local dissolution of surface atoms in pre-defined etching pits, pore growth and pore diameter are, respectively, driven and controlled by the supply of minority charge carriers generated by backside illumination. Thus, arrays with sub-100 nm wide pores were fabricated. Similar to macropore etching, it was found that the pore diameter is proportional to the etching current, i.e., smaller etching currents result in smaller pore diameters. To find the limits under which nanopores with controllable diameter still can be obtained, etching was performed at very low current densities (several μA cm{sup −2}). By local etching, straight nanopores with aspect ratios above 1000 (∼19 μm deep and ∼15 nm pore tip diameter) were achieved. However, inherent to the formation of such narrow pores is a radius of curvature of a few nanometers at the pore tip, which favors electrical breakdown resulting in rough pore wall morphologies. Lowering the applied bias is adequate to reduce spiking pores but in most cases also causes etch stop. Our findings on bulk silicon provide a realistic chance towards sub-10 nm pore arrays on silicon membranes, which are of great interest for molecular filtering and possibly DNA sequencing.

  16. Ultrastructure of the surface of dental enamel with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) with and without acid etching.

    PubMed

    Bozal, Carola B; Kaplan, Andrea; Ortolani, Andrea; Cortese, Silvina G; Biondi, Ana M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to analyze the ultrastructure and mineral composition of the surface of the enamel on a molar with MIH, with and without acid etching. A permanent tooth without clinical MIH lesions (control) and a tooth with clinical diagnosis of mild and moderate MIH, with indication for extraction, were processed with and without acid etching (H3PO4 37%, 20") for observation with scanning electron microscope (SEM) ZEISS (Supra 40) and mineral composition analysis with an EDS detector (Oxford Instruments). The control enamel showed normal prismatic surface and etching pattern. The clinically healthy enamel on the tooth with MIH revealed partial loss of prismatic pattern. The mild lesion was porous with occasional cracks. The moderate lesion was more porous, with larger cracks and many scales. The mineral composition of the affected surfaces had lower Ca and P content and higher O and C. On the tooth with MIH, even on normal looking enamel, the demineralization does not correspond to an etching pattern, and exhibits exposure of crystals with rods with rounded ends and less demineralization in the inter-prismatic spaces. Acid etching increased the presence of cracks and deep pores in the adamantine structure of the enamel with lesion. In moderate lesions, the mineral composition had higher content of Ca, P and Cl. Enamel with MIH, even on clinically intact adamantine surfaces, shows severe alterations in the ultrastructure and changes in ionic composition, which affect the acid etching pattern and may interfere with adhesion. PMID:26355892

  17. Color Stability of Enamel following Different Acid Etching and Color Exposure Times

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbin, Arezoo; Basafa, Mohammad; Moazzami, Mostafa; Basafa, Behnoush; Eslami, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different etching times on enamel color stability after immediate versus delayed exposure to colored artificial saliva (CAS). Materials and methods. Human first premolars were divided into five groups of twenty. A colorimeter was used according to the CIE system on the mid-buccal and mid-lingual surfaces to evaluate initial tooth color. Samples in group A remained unetched. In groups B to E, buccal and lingual surfaces were initially etched with phosphoric acid for 15 and 60 seconds, respectively. Then, the samples in groups A and C were immersed in colored artificial saliva (cola+saliva). In group B, the teeth were immersed in simple artificial saliva (AS). Samples in groups D and E were immersed in AS for 24 and 72 hours, respectively before being immersed in colored AS. The teeth were immersed for one month in each solution before color measurement. During the test period, the teeth were retrieved from the staining solution and stored in AS for five minutes. This was repeated 60 times. Color changes of buccal and lingual surfaces were calculated. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical analysis (α ≤0.05). Results. There were no significant differences between the groups in term of ΔE of buccal (P = 0.148) and lingual surfaces (P = 0.73). Conclusion. Extended time of etching did not result in significant enamel color change. Immediate and delayed exposure of etched enamel to staining solutions did not result in clinically detectable tooth color changes. PMID:25093048

  18. Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetric determination of Cd, Pb, and Cu in a hydrofluoric acid solution of siliceous spicules of marine sponges (from the Ligurian Sea, Italy, and the Ross Sea, Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Truzzi, C; Annibaldi, A; Illuminati, S; Bassotti, E; Scarponi, G

    2008-09-01

    Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was set up and optimized for simultaneous determination of cadmium, lead, and copper in siliceous spicules of marine sponges, directly in the hydrofluoric acid solution (approximately 0.55 mol L(-1) HF, pH approximately 1.9). A thin mercury-film electrode (TMFE) plated on to an HF-resistant epoxy-impregnated graphite rotating-disc support was used. The optimum experimental conditions, evaluated also in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio, were as follows: deposition potential -1100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, KCl 3 mol L(-1), deposition time 3-10 min, electrode rotation 3000 rpm, SW scan from -1100 mV to +100 mV, SW pulse amplitude 25 mV, frequency 100 Hz, DeltaE(step) 8 mV, t(step) 100 ms, t(wait) 60 ms, t(delay) 2 ms, t(meas) 3 ms. Under these conditions the metal peak potentials were Cd -654 +/- 1 mV, Pb -458 +/- 1 mV, Cu -198 +/- 1 mV. The electrochemical behaviour was reversible for Pb, quasi-reversible for Cd, and kinetically controlled (possibly following chemical reaction) for Cu. The linearity of the response with concentration was verified up to approximately 4 microg L(-1) for Cd and Pb and approximately 20 microg L(-1) for Cu. The detection limits were 5.8 ng L(-1), 3.6 ng L(-1), and 4.3 ng L(-1) for Cd, Pb, and Cu, respectively, with t(d) = 5 min. The method was applied for determination of the metals in spicules of two specimens of marine sponges (Demosponges) from the Portofino natural reserve (Ligurian Sea, Italy, Petrosia ficiformis) and Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica, Sphaerotylus antarcticus). The metal contents varied from tens of ng g(-1) to approximately 1 microg g(-1), depending on the metal considered and with significant differences between the two sponge species. PMID:18642105

  19. Failure rate of self-ligating and edgewise brackets bonded with conventional acid etching and a self-etching primer: a prospective in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Polychronopoulou, Argyro; Eliades, Theodore

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to comparatively assess the failure rate of self-ligating and edgewise brackets bonded with a self-etching adhesive and conventional phosphoric acid in patients followed for 12 months of active treatment. Sixty-two patients with complete permanent dentitions, similar treatment plans, and mechanotherapy were selected for the study. GAC Microarch edgewise brackets and ORMCO Damon2 brackets were bonded using a split mouth design, using the 3M Transbond Plus Self-etching primer (SEP) and Transbond XT paste; and conventional acid etching, with Orthosolo primer and Enlight paste, applied at an alternate sequence so that the adhesives were equally distributed on the maxillary and mandibular right and left quadrants. Data analysis was conducted with the use of logistic regression modeling. No difference in failure incidence was noted for either bracket-adhesive and mandibular or maxillary arch combinations, whereas a statistically significant difference was shown for right-sided appliances. On the basis of the results of this study, bonding of self-ligating brackets with SEP does not demonstrate higher probability for failure relative to standard bonding procedures and conventional brackets. PMID:16448280

  20. Distinguishing shocked from tectonically deformed quartz by the use of the SEM and chemical etching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gratz, A.J.; Fisler, D.K.; Bohor, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple sets of crystallographically-oriented planar deformation features (PDFs) are generated by high-strain-rate shock waves at pressures of > 12 GPa in naturally shocked quartz samples. On surfaces, PDFs appear as narrow (50-500 nm) lamellae filled with amorphosed quartz (diaplectic glass) which can be etched with hydrofluoric acid or with hydrothermal alkaline solutions. In contrast, slow-strain-rate tectonic deformation pressure produces wider, semi-linear and widely spaced arrays of dislocation loops that are not glass filled. Etching samples with HF before examination in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for unambiguous visual distinction between glass-filled PDFs and glass-free tectonic deformation arrays in quartz. This etching also reveals the internal 'pillaring' often characteristic of shock-induced PDFs. This technique is useful for easily distinguishing between shock and tectonic deformation in quartz, but does not replace optical techniques for characterizing the shock features.

  1. Comparative Study of the Effect of Acid Etching on Enamel Surface Roughness between Pumiced and Non-pumiced Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Lucas Guimarães; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pretti, Henrique; Lages, Elizabeth Maria Bastos; Júnior, João Batista Novães; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective was to perform a comparative analysis of the effect of acid etching on enamel roughness between pumiced and non-pumiced teeth. Materials and Methods: The sample was composed of 32 dental surfaces divided into two groups: Group 1-16 surfaces having received pumice prophylaxis; and Group 2-16 surfaces not having received pumice prophylaxis. The teeth were kept in saline until the first record of surface roughness prior to etching. For each surface, a roughness graph was obtained through trials using a surface roughness tester. This procedure was repeated two more times at different locations for a total of three readings which, later, were converted in a mean value. The teeth were then acid etched with a 37% phosphoric acid for 60 s, rinsed with water, air dried, and tested with the roughness tester again using the same protocol described for baseline. The Quantikov image analysis program was used to measure the length of the graphs. The average value of the lengths was recorded for each surface before and after etching. The increase in roughness caused by acid etching was calculated and compared between groups. Results: The mean increase in roughness caused by the etching was 301 µm (11.37%) in Group 1 and 214 µm (8.33%) in Group 2. No statistically significant difference was found between samples with and without pumice prophylaxis (P = 0.283). Conclusion: The present study showed that the effect of acid etching on enamel roughness was not significantly affected by prior pumice prophylaxis. PMID:26435607

  2. Bond strengths of orthodontic bracket after acid-etched, Er:YAG laser-irradiated and combined treatment on enamel surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Hsieh, Tseng-Ting; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Lan, Wan-Hong; Hsu, Yao-Jeng; Wen, Ping-Han; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2003-10-01

    Laser ablation has been proposed as an alternative method to acid etching: however, previous studies have obtained contrasting results. The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strengths after acid etching, laser ablation, acid etching followed by laser ablation, and laser ablation followed by acid etching. Forty specimens were randomly assigned to one of the four groups. Two more specimens in each group did not undergo bond test and were prepared for observation with scanning electron microscope (SEM) after the four kinds of surface treatment. After the bond test, all specimens were inspected under the digital stereomicroscope and SEM to record the bond failure mode. Student's t-test results showed that the mean bond strength (13.0 +/- 2.4 N) of the laser group was not significantly different from that of the acid-etched group (11.8 +/- 1.8 N) (P > .05). However, this strength was significantly higher than that of the acid-etched then laser-ablated group (10.4 +/- 1.4 N) or that of the laser-ablated then acid-etched group (9.1 +/- 1.8 N). The failure modes occurred predominantly at the bracket-resin interface. Er:YAG laser ablation consumed less time compared with the acid-etching technique. Therefore, Er:YAG laser ablation can be an alternative tool to conventional acid etching. PMID:14580025

  3. Cell Adhesion and in Vivo Osseointegration of Sandblasted/Acid Etched/Anodized Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20% ± 10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58% ± 8.63%), SLA (58.47% ± 12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62% ± 18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  4. Stretchability of Silver Films on Thin Acid-Etched Rough Polydimethylsiloxane Substrates Fabricated by Electrospray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, S. M.; Cho, K. H.; Kang, C. N.; Choi, K. H.

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the fabrication of Ag films through the electrospray deposition (ESD) technique on sub-millimeter-thick acid-etched rough polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates having both low and high modulus of elasticity. The main focus of the study is on the stretchable behavior of ESD-deposited Ag nanoparticles-based thin films on these substrates when subjected to axial strains. Experimental results suggest that the as-fabricated films on thin acid-etched rough low modulus PDMS has an average stretchability of 5.6% with an average increase in the resistance that is 23 times that of the initial resistance at electrical failure (complete rupture of the films). Comparatively, the stretchability of Ag films on the high modulus PDMS was found to be 3 times higher with 4.65 times increase in the resistance at electrical failure. Also, a high positive value of the piezoresistive coefficient for these films suggests that the resistivity changes during stretching, and thus deviation from the simplified models is inevitable. Based on these results, new models are presented that quantify the changes in resistance with strain.

  5. Cell adhesion and in vivo osseointegration of sandblasted/acid etched/anodized dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20%10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58%8.63%), SLA (58.47%12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62%18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  6. Reliability evaluation of alumina-blasted/acid-etched versus laser-sintered dental implants.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Erika O; Júnior, Amilcar C Freitas; Bonfante, Estevam A; Silva, Nelson R F A; Coelho, Paulo G

    2013-05-01

    Step-stress accelerated life testing (SSALT) and fractographic analysis were performed to evaluate the reliability and failure modes of dental implant fabricated by machining (surface treated with alumina blasting/acid etching) or laser sintering for anterior single-unit replacements. Forty-two dental implants (3.75 × 10 mm) were divided in two groups (n=21 each): laser sintered (LS) and alumina blasting/acid etching (AB/AE). The abutments were screwed to the implants and standardized maxillary central incisor metallic crowns were cemented and subjected to SSALT in water. Use-level probability Weibull curves and reliability for a mission of 50,000 cycles at 200 N were calculated. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopes were used for failure analyses. The Beta (β) value derived from use-level probability Weibull calculation of 1.48 for group AB/AE indicated that damage accumulation likely was an accelerating factor, whereas the β of 0.78 for group LS indicated that load alone likely dictated the failure mechanism for this group, and that fatigue damage did not appear to accumulate. The reliability was not significantly different (p>0.9) between AB/AE (61 %) and LS (62 %). Fracture of the abutment and fixation screw was the chief failure mode. No implant fractures were observed. No differences in reliability and fracture mode were observed between LS and AB/AE implants used for anterior single-unit crowns. PMID:22843309

  7. In vitro remineralization of acid-etched human enamel with Ca 3SiO 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihong; Chang, Jiang; Deng, Yan; Joiner, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Bioactive and inductive silicate-based bioceramics play an important role in hard tissue prosthetics such as bone and teeth. In the present study, a model was established to study the acid-etched enamel remineralization with tricalcium silicate (Ca 3SiO 5, C 3S) paste in vitro. After soaking in simulated oral fluid (SOF), Ca-P precipitation layer was formed on the enamel surface, with the prolonged soaking time, apatite layer turned into density and uniformity and thickness increasingly from 250 to 350 nm for 1 day to 1.7-1.9 μm for 7 days. Structure of apatite crystals was similar to that of hydroxyapatite (HAp). At the same time, surface smoothness of the remineralized layer is favorable for the oral hygiene. These results suggested that C 3S treated the acid-etched enamel can induce apatite formation, indicating the biomimic mineralization ability, and C 3S could be used as an agent of inductive biomineralization for the enamel prosthesis and protection.

  8. Restoration of obliterated engraved marks on steel surfaces by chemical etching reagent.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingfang

    2015-05-01

    Chemical etching technique is widely used for restoration of obliterated engraved marks on steel surface in the field of public security. The consumed thickness of steel surface during restoration process is considered as a major criterion for evaluating the efficiency of the chemical etching reagent. The thinner the consumed thickness, the higher the restoration efficiency. According to chemical principles, maintaining the continuous oxidative capabilities of etching reagents and increasing the kinetic rate difference of the reaction between the engraved and non-engraved area with the chemical etching reagent can effectively reduce the consumed steel thickness. The study employed steel surface from the engine case of motorcycle and the car frame of automobile. The chemical etching reagents are composed of nitric acid as the oxidizer, hydrofluoric acid as the coordination agent and mixed with glacial acetic acid or acetone as the solvents. Based on the performance evaluation of three different etching reagents, the one composed of HNO3, HF and acetone gave the best result. PMID:25771134

  9. Noble Gases and Nitrogen Released from a Lunar Soil Pyroxene Separate by Acid Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, P. E.

    1993-07-01

    We report initial results from a series of experiments designed to measure recently implanted solar wind (SW) ions in lunar soil mineral grains [1]. An acid-etching technique similar to the CSSE method developed at ETH Zurich was used to make abundance and isotope measurements of the SW noble gas and nitrogen compositions. Among the samples examined was a pyroxene separate from soil 75081. It was first washed with H2O to remove contamination from the sample finger walls and grain surfaces. H2O also acted as a weak acid, releasing gases from near-surface sites. Treatment with H2SO3 followed the water washes. Acid pH (~1.8 to ~1.0) and temperature (~23 degrees C to ~90 degrees C) and duration of acid attack (several minutes to several days) were varied from step to step. Finally, the sample was pyrolyzed in several steps to remove the remaining gases, culminating with a high-temperature pyrolysis at 1200 degrees C. Measurements of the light noble gases were mostly consistent with those from previous CSSE experiments performed on pyroxene [2,3]. It should be noted, however, that the Zurich SEP component was not easily distinguishable in the steps where it was expected to be observed. We suspect our experimental protocol masked the SEP reservoir, preventing us from seeing its distinctive signature. The most interesting results from this sample are its Kr and Xe isotopic and elemental compositions. Pyroxene apparently retains heavy noble gases as well as ilmenite (and plagioclase [4]). The heavy noble gas element ratios from this sample along with those previously reported [5,6] are, however, considerably heavier than the theoretically determined "solar system" values [7,8]. Explanations for the difference include the possibility that the derivations are incorrect, that there is another component of lunar origin mixing with the solar component, or that some type of loss mechanism is altering the noble gas reservoirs of the grains. The Kr and Xe isotopic compositions for the two acid-etch steps most likely to have released SW gases were identical to the "solar" values reported by the Zurich group [5]. The krypton from both steps appeared to be mixtures of "solar" krypton, an isotopically heavier component (perhaps the Zurich SEP component [5]), and a spallation component. There was, however, no evidence for such a mixture in the xenon. The compositions of the two acid-etch steps were clearly combinations of a solar Xe component and a Xe spallation component. They were also identical to that of U-Xe [9] for isotopes up to 132Xe, with the exception of an ~300 per mil enhancement of the 126Xe/132Xe ratio. This anomaly does not appear to be an artifact of spallation correction. These measurements constitute the first experimental verification of the U-Xe composition for isotopes lighter than 134Xe. Persistent contamination problems and the possibility of nitrogen being held back in the acid residue during the etching process make interpretation of the nitrogen data uncertain. However, results from the steps not obviously affected by contamination show an enhancement of N over Ar by 2x to 12x the "solar" value (from [8]). References: [1] Rider P. E. and Pepin R. O. (1993) GCA, submitted. [2] Wieler R. et al. (1986) GCA, 50, 1997-2017. [3] Benkert J.-P. (1989) Ph.D. thesis, ETH Zurich (No. 8812). [4] Wieler R. (1993) personal communication. [5] Wieler R. et al. (1992) LPS XXIII, 1525-1526. [6] Wieler R. et al. (1993) LPS XXIV, 1519-1520. [7] Anders E. and Grevesse N. (1989) GCA, 53, 197-214. [8] Cameron A. G. W. (1982) In Essays in Nuclear Physics (Barnes et al., eds.), 23-43. [9] Pepin R. O.(1991) Icarus, 92, 2-79.

  10. Nanofabrication on monocrystalline silicon through friction-induced selective etching of Si3N4 mask

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A new fabrication method is proposed to produce nanostructures on monocrystalline silicon based on the friction-induced selective etching of its Si3N4 mask. With low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si3N4 film as etching mask on Si(100) surface, the fabrication can be realized by nanoscratching on the Si3N4 mask and post-etching in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution in sequence. Scanning Auger nanoprobe analysis indicated that the HF solution could selectively etch the scratched Si3N4 mask and then provide the gap for post-etching of silicon substrate in KOH solution. Experimental results suggested that the fabrication depth increased with the increase of the scratching load or KOH etching period. Because of the excellent masking ability of the Si3N4 film, the maximum fabrication depth of nanostructure on silicon can reach several microns. Compared to the traditional friction-induced selective etching technique, the present method can fabricate structures with lesser damage and deeper depths. Since the proposed method has been demonstrated to be a less destructive and flexible way to fabricate a large-area texture structure, it will provide new opportunities for Si-based nanofabrication. PMID:24940174

  11. Comparative evaluation of retentive properties of acid etched resin bonded fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vimal; Sharma, M.C.; Dwivedi, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Background Little consensus exist in suitable tooth preparation design and alloy pre-treatment methods for improving the retention of resin bonded fixed partial dentures (RBFPDs). Methods An in-vitro experiment was done with four designs. Group A: standard form, B: wings and proximal slices, C: wings, proximal slice and grooves, D: wings, proximal slice, grooves and occlusal coverage. Alloys were subjected to pre-treatment procedures like Group I: control, II: sand blasting, III: electro etching, IV: tin plating. Debonding forces of the castings were recorded in a universal testing machine and results were analyzed by student's ‘t’ test. Results Group B, C and D showed higher debonding forces compared to A. However, there were no significant differences in mean force values among Groups B, C and D. Group II, III and IV with different alloy pre-treatment methods demonstrated higher values against control. Inter group variations among Group II, III and IV were not significant. Conclusion Tooth preparation with adequate surface extensions and pre-treatment procedures of casting alloys are two parameters that play important role in determining the retentive features of RBFPDs. Different types of tooth preparation designs and alloy pre-treatment methods exert almost similar influence in increasing the retention of acid etched RBFPDs. PMID:24623948

  12. Acid Etching and Surface Coating of Glass-Fiber Posts: Bond Strength and Interface Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula; Vitti, Rafael Pino; Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Bacchi, Ataís; Spazzin, Aloísio Oro

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to glass-fiber post (GFP) treated or not with phosphoric acid, silane coupling agent, and unfilled resin. GFPs were etched or not with 37% phosphoric acid and different surface coating applied: silane coupling agent, unfilled resin, or both. Composite resin blocks were built around a 4-mm height on the GFP. Unfilled resin (20 s) and composite resin (40 s) were light activated by a light-emitting diode unit. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. Microtensile bond test was performed using a mechanical testing machine until failure (n=10). The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls' test (p<0.05). Failure modes were classified as adhesive, mixed, or cohesive failures. Additional specimens (n=3) were made to analyze the bonded interfaces by scanning electron microscopy. The statistical analysis showed the factor 'surface coating' was significant (p<0.05), whereas the factor 'HP etching' (p=0.131) and interaction between the factors (p=0.171) were not significant. The highest bond strength was found for the silane and unfilled resin group (p<0.05). A predominance of adhesive and cohesive failures was found. Differences regarding the homogeneity and thickness of the unfilled resin layer formed by different GFP surface treatments were observed. The application of silane and unfilled resin can improve the bond strength between GFP and resin composite. PMID:27058389

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Tensile – Bond Strength of An Orthodontic Adhesive with and without Fluoride Application, After Acid Etching -An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yugandhar, G; Ramana, I Venkata; Srinivas, K; Yadav, S. Sarjeev Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background Fixed appliances hinder the effective control of plaque accumulation and white spot lesions may develop under the ill fitting bands or adjacent to the stainless steel brackets during orthodontic treatment particularly the etching process. Aims and Objectives Comparative study of tensile bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive with and without fluoride application after acid etching to know the effect of fluoride on bond strength. Materials and Methods This study is carried out on 90 non carious human premolar teeth, and divided in 6 groups with each group of 15 specimens. In those Groups I and IV were control group acid etch treatment, Group II and V is 1.23% APF gel (acid etch plus APF gel treatment,) and group III and VI is 8% SnF2 (acid etch plus SnF2 treatment). Samples of Group I, II and III bond strength were tested after 24 h and groups IV, V and VI after one month on microtechtensometer machine. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation was carried out for the 2 specimens for the control group after acid etch and 4 specimens after acid etch with fluoride application for fluoride groups. Results Control and SnF2 treated groups was found to be nearly similar to the control group whereas APF treated group showed less focal holes than the other 2 groups. Conclusion Fluoride application after acid etching without having an adverse effect on bond strength but we can prevent the white spot lesions and caries. PMID:26023648

  14. Effect of etching time and light source on the bond strength of metallic brackets to ceramic.

    PubMed

    Gonalves, Paulo Roberto Amaral; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de; Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Amrico Bortolazzo; Nouer, Paulo Roberto Aranha; Sinhoreti, Mrio Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Loureno

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of brackets to ceramic testing different etching times and light sources for photo-activation of the bonding agent. Cylinders of feldspathic ceramic were etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 or 60 s. After application of silane on the ceramic surface, metallic brackets were bonded to the cylinders using Transbond XT (3M Unitek). The specimens for each etching time were assigned to 4 groups (n=15), according to the light source: XL2500 halogen light, UltraLume 5 LED, AccuCure 3000 argon laser, and Apollo 95E plasma arc. Light-activation was carried out with total exposure times of 40, 40, 20 and 12 s, respectively. Shear strength testing was carried out after 24 h. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated under magnification. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (?=0.05). Specimens etched for 20 s presented significantly lower bond strength (p<0.05) compared with those etched for 60 s. No significant differences (p>0.05) were detected among the light sources. The ARI showed a predominance of scores 0 in all groups, with an increase in scores 1, 2 and 3 for the 60 s time. In conclusion, only the etching time had significant influence on the bond strength of brackets to ceramic. PMID:21915523

  15. The impact of etching during microfabrication on the microstructure and the electrical conductivity of gadolinia-doped ceria thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle-Htter, Anja; Reinhard, Patrick; Rupp, Jennifer L. M.; Gauckler, Ludwig J.

    2011-08-01

    Gadolinia-doped ceria, Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9-x (CGO), thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis and annealed to different degree of crystallinity between 0% and 95% are exposed to different etchants and etching methods. The attack of the etchants on the CGO thin films is analyzed with respect to changes in microstructure and in-plane electrical conductivity. It is found that amorphous CGO films are dissolved in hydrochloric acid after elongated etching times. Hydrofluoric acid severely attacks CGO thin films after already short times of exposure (1 min), more intense the less crystalline the thin film is. Ar ion etching smoothens the surface of the CGO thin films without considerable removal of material. No microstructural attack of NaOH, CHF3/O2 and SF6/Ar is found. The electrical conductivity is in general only affected when microstructural changes are severe. Therefore, it is concluded that CGO thin films can be well used as functional layers in micro-fabricated devices and that micro-fabrication is, with the exception of hydrofluoric, not harmful for the electrical properties of crystalline CGO thin films.

  16. Inactivation of Matrix-bound MMPs by Cross-linking Agents in Acid Etched Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Hebling, Josimeri; Scheffel, Régis Henke; Agee, Kelly A.; Turco, Gianluca; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Pashley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Published TEM analysis of in vivo resin-dentin bonds shows that in 44 months almost 70% of collagen fibrils from the hybrid layer disappear. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in that process and are thought to be the main factor responsible for the solubitization of dentin collagen. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the inactivation of matrix-bound MMPs by carbodiimide (EDC) or proanthocyanidin (PA) both cross-linking agents, or the MMP-inhibitor, chlorhexidine (CHX), on acid-etched dentin using a simplified MMP assay method. Methods Dentin beams (1×1×6mm) were obtained from mid-coronal dentin of sound third molars and randomly divided into 6 groups (G) according to the dentin treatment: G1: Deionized water (control), G2: 0.1M EDC, G3: 0.5M EDC, G4: 0.5M EDC+35% HEMA, G5: 5% Proanthocyanidin (PA) and G6: 2% CHX. The beams were etched for 15s with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed and then immersed for 60s in one of the treatment solutions. The total MMP activity of dentin was analyzed for 1 h by colorimetric assay (Sensolyte). Data were submitted to Wilcoxon non-parametric test and Mann-Whitney tests (p>0.05). Results All experimental cross-linking solutions significantly reduced MMP activity compared to control, except 0.1M EDC (53.6% ±16.1). No difference was observed between cross-linking agents and 2% CHX 0.5M EDC + 35% HEMA (92.3% ±8.0) was similar to 0.5M EDC (89.1% ±6.4), 5% PA (100.8% ±10.9) and 2% CHX (83.4% ±10.9). Conclusion Dentin treatment with cross-linking agents is effective to significantly reduce MMP activity. Mixing 0.5M EDC and 35% HEMA did not influence EDC inhibitor potential. PMID:23786610

  17. HF-(NH₄)₂S₂O₈-HCl Mixtures for HNO₃- and NOx-free Etching of Diamond Wire- and SiC-Slurry-Sawn Silicon Wafers: Reactivity Studies, Surface Chemistry, and Unexpected Pyramidal Surface Morphologies.

    PubMed

    Stapf, André; Gondek, Christoph; Lippold, Marcus; Kroke, Edwin

    2015-04-29

    The wet-chemical treatment of silicon wafers is an important production step in photovoltaic and semiconductor industries. Solutions containing hydrofluoric acid, ammonium peroxodisulfate, and hydrochloric acid were investigated as novel acidic, NOx-free etching mixtures for texturization and polishing of monocrystalline silicon wafers. Etching rates as well as generated surface morphologies and properties are discussed in terms of the composition of the etching mixture. The solutions were analyzed with Raman and UV/vis spectroscopy as well as ion chromatography (IC). The silicon surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surprisingly, pyramidal surface structures were found after etching SiC-slurry as well as diamond wire-sawn monocrystalline Si(100) wafers with hydrochloric acid-rich HF-(NH4)2S2O8-HCl mixtures. Acidic etching solutions are generally not known for anisotropic etching. Thus, the HNO3-free mixtures might allow to replace KOH/i-propanol and similar alkaline solutions for texturization of monosilicon wafers at room temperature with less surface contamination. Besides, common HNO3-based etching mixtures may be replaced by the nitrate-free system, leading to significant economic and ecological advantages. PMID:25826145

  18. Bone contact around acid-etched implants: a histological and histomorphometrical evaluation of two human-retrieved implants.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Degidi M; Petrone G; Iezzi G; Piattelli A

    2003-01-01

    The surface characteristics of dental implants play an important role in their clinical success. One of the most important surface characteristics of implants is their surface topography or roughness. Many techniques for preparing dental implant surfaces are in clinical use: turning, plasma spraying, coating, abrasive blasting, acid etching, and electropolishing. The Osseotite surface is prepared by a process of thermal dual etching with hydrochloric and sulfuric acid, which results in a clean, highly detailed surface texture devoid of entrapped foreign material and impurities. This seems to enhance fibrin attachment to the implant surface during the clotting process. The authors retrieved 2 Osseotite implants after 6 months to repair damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. Histologically, both implants appeared to be surrounded by newly formed bone. No gaps or fibrous tissues were present at the interface. The mean bone-implant contact percentage was 61.3% (+/- 3.8%).

  19. Porous siliconformation and etching process for use in silicon micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Kelly, Michael J.; Martin, Jr., Samuel B.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    A reproducible process for uniformly etching silicon from a series of micromechanical structures used in electrical devices and the like includes providing a micromechanical structure having a silicon layer with defined areas for removal thereon and an electrochemical cell containing an aqueous hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. The micromechanical structure is submerged in the electrochemical cell and the defined areas of the silicon layer thereon are anodically biased by passing a current through the electrochemical cell for a time period sufficient to cause the defined areas of the silicon layer to become porous. The formation of the depth of the porous silicon is regulated by controlling the amount of current passing through the electrochemical cell. The micromechanical structure is then removed from the electrochemical cell and submerged in a hydroxide solution to remove the porous silicon. The process is subsequently repeated for each of the series of micromechanical structures to achieve a reproducibility better than 0.3%.

  20. Comparison of separation performance of laser-ablated and wet-etched microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher A.; Bulloch, Rayford; Roper, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation of glass allows for production of microfluidic devices without the need of hydrofluoric acid and photolithography. The goal of this study was to compare the separation performance of microfluidic devices produced using a low-cost laser ablation system and conventional wet etching. During laser ablation, cracking of the glass substrate was prevented by heating the glass to 300°C. A range of laser energy densities was found to produce channel depths ranging from 4 – 35 μm and channel widths from 118 – 162 μm. The electroosmotic flow velocity was lower in laser-ablated devices, 0.110 ± 0.005 cm s−1, as compared to wet-etched microfluidic chips, 0.126 ± 0.003 cm s−1. Separations of both small and large molecules performed on both wet- and laser-ablated devices were compared by examining limits of detection, theoretical plate count, and peak asymmetry. Laser-induced fluorescence detection limits were 10 pM fluorescein for both types of devices. Laser-ablated and wet-etched microfluidic chips had reproducible migration times with ≤ 2.8% RSD and peak asymmetries ranging from 1.0 – 1.8. Numbers of theoretical plates were between 2.8- and 6.2-fold higher on the wet-etched devices compared to laser-ablated devices. Nevertheless, resolution between small and large analytes was accomplished, which indicates that laser ablation may find an application in pedagogical studies of electrophoresis or microfluidic devices, or in settings where hydrofluoric acid cannot be used. PMID:20827468

  1. Formation of Mach angle profiles during wet etching of silica and silicon nitride materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulinyan, M.; Bernard, M.; Bartali, R.; Pucker, G.

    2015-12-01

    In integrated circuit technology peeling of masking photoresist films is a major drawback during the long-timed wet etching of materials. It causes an undesired film underetching, which is often accompanied by a formation of complex etch profiles. Here we report on a detailed study of wedge-shaped profile formation in a series of silicon oxide, silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride materials during wet etching in a buffered hydrofluoric acid (BHF) solution. The shape of etched profiles reflects the time-dependent adhesion properties of the photoresist to a particular material and can be perfectly circular, purely linear or a combination of both, separated by a knee feature. Starting from a formal analogy between the sonic boom propagation and the wet underetching process, we model the wedge formation mechanism analytically. This model predicts the final form of the profile as a function of time and fits the experimental data perfectly. We discuss how this knowledge can be extended to the design and the realization of optical components such as highly efficient etch-less vertical tapers for passive silicon photonics.

  2. Unveiling the shape-diversified silicon nanowires made by HF/HNO3 isotropic etching with the assistance of silver.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yun; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-01-21

    Hydrofluoric (HF)/nitric (HNO3)/acetic (CH3COOH) acid, normally referred to as the HNA method, is a widely utilized technique for performing isotropic etching on silicon (Si) in industrial Si-based processing and device construction. Here, we reported a novel etching strategy based on a HF/HNO3 process with the assistance of silver (Ag) nano-seeds, offering good controllability in preparing diversified Si nanostructure arrays with particularly smooth top surfaces. The involved mechanism was visualized by systematically investigating both the time and temperature dependencies on the etching kinetics with various ratios of HF to HNO3. Moreover, by testing different Ag(+)-ion containing oxidants on Si etching, we have re-examined the state-of-the-art metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) using HF/AgNO3 etchants. In contrast with previous reports, we found that the interplay of hole injections from Ag(+) and NO3(-) ions to the valence band of Si collectively contributes to the unidirectional dissolution of Si. Finally, we explored the engineering of the Ag nano-seeds to regularize the orientation of the etched nanowires formed on non-Si (100) wafers, which further provides a reliable pathway for constructing the desired morphologies of one-dimensional Si nanostructures regardless of wafer orientation. PMID:25489862

  3. TMAH wet etching of silicon micro- and nano-fins for selective sidewall epitaxy of III-Nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianci; Myasishchev, Denis; Kuryatkov, Vladimir; Nikishin, Sergey; Holtz, Mark; Harris, Rusty

    2011-10-01

    We describe formation of silicon micro- and nano-fins, with (111)-plane sidewall facets, for selective sidewall epitaxy of III-Nitride semiconductors. The fins are produced by wet etching (110)-oriented silicon wafers. Silicon dioxide is deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for producing a hard mask. The silicon dioxide is patterned using photo- and electron-beam lithography for micro- and nano-fins, respectively, followed by wet etching in hydrofluoric acid. Wet etching to produce the silicon fins is carried out using tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) diluted with isopropyl alcohol (IPA). Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to determine morphology including the surface roughness of the area between fins and the etching rate of silicon. We tune the etching time, temperature, and percentage of IPA in order to get the best surface on both (111) and (110) planes. Adding IPA is found to alter the etch rate and improve the surface between the fins without adversely affecting the sidewall morphology.

  4. Effect of Fluoride on the Morphology of Calcium Phosphate Crystals Grown on Acid-Etched Human Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Y.; Sun, Z.; Moradian-Oldak, J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride ion concentration on the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals grown on acid-etched enamel as a model for tooth enamel erosion. Samples were immersed in calcification solution for 16 h and changes in crystal morphology were monitored by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Without fluoride, plate-like octacalcium phosphate crystals (20 nm thick, 2–10 μm wide) were formed. With 1–10 mg/l fluoride, arrays of denser needle-like nanocrystals (20–30 nm wide, >500 nm in length) were formed. We conclude that there is a minimal fluoride concentration (1 mg/l) that dramatically affects the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals grown on etched enamel in vitro. PMID:19321991

  5. Micro/nanofabrication of poly({sub L}-lactic acid) using focused ion beam direct etching

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Tomoko Gowa; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Hinata, Toru; Washio, Masakazu; Oshima, Akihiro; Tagawa, Seiichi; The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047

    2013-10-14

    Micro/nanofabrication of biocompatible and biodegradable poly({sub L}-lactic acid) (PLLA) using focused Ga ion beam direct etching was evaluated for future bio-device applications. The fabrication performance was determined with different ion fluences and fluxes (beam currents), and it was found that the etching speed and fabrication accuracy were affected by irradiation-induced heat. Focused ion beam (FIB)-irradiated surfaces were analyzed using micro-area X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Owing to reactions such as the physical sputtering of atoms and radiation-induced decomposition, PLLA was gradually carbonized with increasing C=C bonds. Controlled micro/nanostructures of PLLA were fabricated with C=C bond-rich surfaces expected to have good cell attachment properties.

  6. Deep wet etching of borosilicate glass and fused silica with dehydrated AZ4330 and a Cr/Au mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Joo-Young; Yoo, Sunghyun; Bae, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2014-01-01

    This research highlights a superior glass-wet-etch technique which enables a glass wafer to be etched for more than 20 h in 49 wt% hydrofluoric acid (HF) only with Cr/Au film and a common positive photoresist, AZ4330. We demonstrated that pits on the wet-etched glass wafer were generated not only due to HF diffusion through the Cr/Au film but also due to pinholes on the Cr/Au films created by the diffusion of the Cr/Au etchant through a photoresist etching-mask during the Cr/Au wet etching process. These two types of diffusion, HF diffusion and Cr/Au etchant diffusion, were eliminated by the thermal curing of a photoresist (PR), AZ4330, before the Cr/Au wet etching process. The curing process allowed the PR to dehydrate, increased the hydrophobicity, and prevented the diffusion of the hydrophilic HF and Cr/Au etchant. Optimization of the curing process was performed, showing that curing at 130 °C for 20 min was the proper condition. With the optimized process, a 525 µm thick borosilicate glass wafer was penetrated with 49%wt HF. A fused silica wafer 525 µm thick was also wet-etched and penetrated with 49 wt% HF at 10 h. Moreover, no pits were found in wet etching of the fused silica for 20 h in 49 wt% HF. These findings demonstrate that the proposed technique allows the wet etching of a glass wafer for more than 20 h in 49%wt HF, the best result thus far. We fabricated a glass substrate with a 217.0 µm deep cavity and a penetrating through-via using the proposed technique, proving the feasibility of the product as an optical component with a surface roughness of 45.5 Å in the cavity.

  7. Time-varying wetting behavior on copper wafer treated by wet-etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Sheng-Hung; Wu, Chuan-Chang; Wu, Hsing-Chen; Cheng, Shao-Liang; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2015-06-01

    The wet cleaning process in semiconductor fabrication often involves the immersion of the copper wafer into etching solutions and thereby its surface properties are significantly altered. The wetting behavior of a copper film deposited on silicon wafer is investigated after a short dip in various etching solutions. The etchants include glacial acetic acid and dilute solutions of nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and tetramethylammonium hydroxide. It was found that in most cases a thin oxide layer still remains on the surface of as-received Cu wafers when they are subject to etching treatments. However, a pure Cu wafer can be obtained by the glacial acetic acid treatment and its water contact angle (CA) is about 45°. As the pure Cu wafer is placed in the ambient condition, the oxide thickness grows rapidly to the range of 10-20 Å within 3 h and the CA on the hydrophilic surface also rises. In the vacuum, it is surprising to find that the CA and surface roughness of the pure Cu wafer can grow significantly. These interesting results may be attributed to the rearrangement of surface Cu atoms to reduce the surface free energy.

  8. Early endosseous integration enhanced by dual acid etching of titanium: a torque removal study in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Klokkevold, P R; Johnson, P; Dadgostari, S; Caputo, A; Davies, J E; Nishimura, R D

    2001-08-01

    Textured implant surfaces are thought to enhance endosseous integration. Torque removal forces have been used as a biomechanical measure of anchorage, or endosseous integration, in which the greater forces required to remove implants may be interpreted as an increase in the strength of bony integration. The purpose of this study was to compare the torque resistance to removal of screw-shaped titanium implants having a dual acid-etched surface (Osseotite) with implants having either a machined surface, or a titanium plasma spray surface that exhibited a significantly more complex surface topography. Three custom screw-shaped implant types - machined, dual acid-etched (DAE), and titanium plasma sprayed (TPS) - were used in this study. Each implant surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. One DAE implant was placed into each distal femur of eighteen adult New Zealand White rabbits along with one of the other implant types. Thus, each rabbit received two DAE implants and one each of the machined, or TPS, implants. All implants measured 3.25 mm in diameter x 4.00 mm in length without holes, grooves or slots to resist rotation. Eighteen rabbits were used for reverse torque measurements. Groups of six rabbits were sacrificed following one, two and three month healing periods. Implants were removed by reverse torque rotation with a digital torque-measuring device. Three implants with the machined surface preparation failed to achieve endosseous integration. All other implants were anchored by bone. Mean torque values for machined, DAE and TPS implants at one, two and three months were 6.00+/-0.64 N-cm, 9.07+/-0.67 N-cm and 6.73+/-0.95 N-cm; 21.86+/-1.37 N-cm, 27.63+/-3.41 N-cm and 27.40+/-3.89 N-cm; and 27.48+/-1.61 N-cm, 44.28+/-4.53 N-cm and 59.23+/-3.88 N-cm, respectively. Clearly, at the earliest time point the stability of DAE implants was comparable to that of TPS implants, while that of the machined implants was an order of magnitude lower. The TPS implants increased resistance to reverse torque removal over the three-month period. The results of this study confirm our previous results that demonstrated enhanced bony anchorage to dual acid-etched implants as compared to machined implants. Furthermore, the present results indicate that dual acid etching of titanium enhances early endosseous integration to a level which is comparable to that achieved by the topographically more complex TPS surfaces. PMID:11488864

  9. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, F. L. A.; Carvalho, J. G.; Andrade, M. F.; Saad, J. R. C.; Hebling, J.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturers instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1?W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49?mm2) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (? = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher -TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p < 0.05). Laser irradiation alone did not lead to differences in -TBS (p > 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher -TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturers technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin.

  10. Optical fibre nanotips fabricated by a dynamic chemical etching for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucci, A.; Cosi, F.; Giannetti, A.; Pelli, S.; Griffini, D.; Insinna, M.; Salvadori, S.; Tiribilli, B.; Righini, G. C.

    2015-02-01

    Nanoprobe tips are key components in many applications such as scanning probe microscopes, nanoscale imaging, nanofabrication and sensing. This paper describes a dynamic chemical etching method for the fabrication of optical nanoprobes. The tips are produced by mechanically rotating and dipping a silica optical fibre in a chemical etching solution (aqueous hydrofluoric acid) covered with a protection layer. Using different dynamic regimes of the mechanical movements during the chemical etching process, it is possible to vary the cone angle, the shape, and the roughness of the nanoprobes. It is found that the tip profiles are determined by the nonlinear dynamic evolution of the meniscus of the etchant near the fibre. Computational fluid dynamic simulations have been performed, showing that different flow regimes correspond to different shear forces acting on the forming nanotip, in agreement with experimental results. With this method, a high yield of reproducible nanotips can be obtained, thus overcoming the drawbacks of conventional etching techniques. Typical tip features are short taper length (200 ?m), large cone angle (up to 40), and small probe tip dimension (less than 30 nm).

  11. Surface Topographical Changes of a Failing Acid-Etched Long-Term in Function Retrieved Dental Implant.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, María Luisa; Del Amo, Fernando Suarez-Lopez; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Monje, Florencio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the main topographical and chemical changes of a failing 18-year in function retrieved acid-etching implant in the micro- and nanoscales. A partially edentulous 45 year old rehabilitated with a dental implant at 18 years of age exhibited mobility. After careful examination, a 3.25 × 13-mm press-fit dental implant was retrieved. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was carried out to study topographical changes of the retrieved implant compared with an unused implant with similar topographical characteristics. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to study the surface composition of the retrieved failing implant. Clear changes related to the dual dioxide layer are present as visible in ≥×500 magnification. In addition, it was found that, for the retrieved implant, the surface composition consisted mainly of Ti2p, O1s, C1s, and Al2p. Also, a meaningful decrease of N and C was noticed, whereas the peaks of Ti2p, Al2p, and O1s increased when analyzing deeper (up to ×2000s) in the sample. It was shown that the superficial surface of a retrieved press-fit dual acid-etched implant 18 years after placement is impaired. However, the causes and consequences for these changes cannot be determined. PMID:25642739

  12. Effect of ceramic etching protocols on resin bond strength to a feldspar ceramic.

    PubMed

    Bottino, M A; Snellaert, A; Bergoli, C D; Özcan, M; Bottino, M C; Valandro, L F

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the resin microtensile bond strength (MTBS) stability of a leucite-reinforced ceramic after different ceramic etching protocols. The microtensile test had 40 ceramic blocks (5×5×6 mm) assigned to five groups (n=8), in accordance with the following surface etching protocols: NE nonetched (control); 9HF: hydrofluoric (HF) acid etching (9%HF)+wash/dry; 4HF: 4%HF+wash/dry; 5HF: 5%HF+wash/dry; and 5HF+N: 5%HF+neutralizer+wash/dry+ultrasonic-cleaning. Etched ceramic surfaces were treated with a silane agent. Next, resin cement blocks were built on the prepared ceramic surface and stored for 24 hours in distilled water at 37°C. The specimens were then sectioned to obtain microtensile beams (32/block), which were randomly assigned to the following conditions, nonaged (immediate test) and aged (water storage for 150 days plus 12,000 thermal cycles), before the microtensile test. Bond strength data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α=0.05). Additional ceramic samples were subjected to the different ceramic etching protocols and evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (n=2) and atomic force microscopy (n=2). Aging led to a statistically significant decrease in the MTBS for all groups, except the untreated one (NE). Among the groups submitted to the same aging conditions, the untreated (NE) revealed inferior MTBS values compared to the 9HF and 4HF groups. The 5HF and 5HF+N groups had intermediate mean values, being statistically similar to the higher values presented by the 9HF and 4HF groups and to the lower value associated with the NE group. The neutralization procedure did not enhance the ceramic/resin cement bond strength. HF acid etching is a crucial step in resin/ceramic bonding. PMID:25535782

  13. Study on morphology of high-aspect-ratio grooves fabricated by using femtosecond laser irradiation and wet etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Pan, An; Li, Cunxia; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Morphologies of high-aspect-ratio silicon grooves fabricated by using femtosecond laser irradiation and selective chemical etching of hydrofluoric acid (HF) were studied. Oxygen was deeply doped into silicon under femtosecond laser irradiation in air, and then the oxygen-doped regions were removed by HF etching to form high-aspect-ratio grooves. After HF etching, periodic nano-ripples which were induced in silicon by femtosecond laser were observed on the groove sidewalls. The ripple orientation was perpendicular or parallel to the laser propagation direction (z direction), which depended on the relative direction between the laser polarization direction and the scanning direction. The formation of nano-ripples with orientations perpendicular to z direction could be attributed to the standing wave generated by the interference of the incident light and the reflected light in z direction. The formation of nano-ripples with orientations parallel to z direction could be attributed to the formation of self-organized periodic nanoplanes (bulk nanogratings) induced by femtosecond laser inside silicon. Materials in the tail portion of laser-induced oxygen doping (LIOD) regions were difficult to be etched by HF solution due to low oxygen concentration. The specimen was etched further in KOH solution to remove remaining materials in LIOD regions and all-silicon grooves were fabricated.

  14. Investigations of AlGaN/GaN HFETs utilizing post-metallization etching by nitric acid treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Bo-Yi; Hsu, Wei-Chou; Lee, Ching-Sung; Liu, Han-Yin; Tsai, Chih-Ming; Ho, Chiu-Sheng

    2013-07-01

    This work investigates AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) processed by using a simple post-metallization etching (PME) treatment. Decreased gate length (LG) can be achieved by using nitric acid (HNO3) PME treatment owing to the high etching selectivity of HNO3 of Ni against the Au and GaN layer. Influences on LG, etched gate profiles and device characteristics with respect to different PME processing parameters by HNO3 treatment are systematically investigated. Optimum device performance is obtained as LG was reduced to 0.5 µm by using a 1 µm long gate mask by immersing the device into a 45% diluted HNO3 solution for 35 s. Improved device performances, including maximum drain-source current density (IDS, max: 657.6 mA mm-1 → 898.5 mA mm-1), drain-source saturation current density at zero gate bias (IDSS0: 448.3 mA mm-1 → 653.4 mA mm-1), maximum extrinsic transconductance (gm, max: 158.3 mS mm-1 → 219.2 mS mm-1), unity-gain cut-off frequency (fT: 12.35 GHz → 22.05 GHz), maximum oscillation frequency (fmax: 17.55 GHz → 29.4 GHz) and power-added efficiency (P.A.E.: 26.3% → 34.5%) compared to the untreated reference device, have been successfully achieved.

  15. UV-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid in the sub-micronchannels of oxidized PET track-etched membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Ilya V.; Mashentseva, Anastassiya A.; Güven, Olgun; Taltenov, Abzal A.

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we report on functionalization of track-etched membrane based on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET TeMs) oxidized by advanced oxidation systems and by grafting of acrylic acid using photochemical initiation technique for the purpose of increasing functionality thus expanding its practical application. Among advanced oxidation processes (H2O2/UV) system had been chosen to introduce maximum concentration of carboxylic acid groups. Benzophenone (BP) photo-initiator was first immobilized on the surfaces of cylindrical pores which were later filled with aq. acrylic acid solution. UV-irradiation from both sides of PET TeMs has led to the formation of grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) chains inside the membrane sub-micronchannels. Effect of oxygen-rich surface of PET TeMs on BP adsorption and subsequent process of photo-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) were studied by ESR. The surface of oxidized and AA grafted PET TeMs was characterized by UV-vis, ATR-FTIR, XPS spectroscopies and by SEM.

  16. Evaluation of Bone Healing on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Implants Coated with Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite: An In Vivo Study in Rabbit Femur

    PubMed Central

    Melin Svanborg, Lory; Meirelles, Luiz; Franke Stenport, Victoria; Currie, Fredrik; Andersson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating if a coating of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals would enhance bone healing over time in trabecular bone. Sandblasted and acid etched titanium implants with and without a submicron thick coat of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nano-HA) were implanted in rabbit femur with healing times of 2, 4, and 9 weeks. Removal torque analyses and histological evaluations were performed. The torque analysis did not show any significant differences between the implants at any healing time. The control implant showed a tendency of more newly formed bone after 4 weeks of healing and significantly higher bone area values after 9 weeks of healing. According to the results from this present study, both control and nano-HA surfaces were biocompatible and osteoconductive. A submicron thick coating of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals deposited onto blasted and acid etched screw shaped titanium implants did not enhance bone healing, as compared to blasted and etched control implants when placed in trabecular bone. PMID:24723952

  17. Patterning of platinum (Pt) thin films by chemical wet etching in Aqua Regia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köllensperger, P. A.; Karl, W. J.; Ahmad, M. M.; Pike, W. T.; Green, M.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical and physical properties of platinum (Pt) make it a useful material for microelectromechanical systems and microfluidic applications such as lab-on-a-chip devices. Platinum thin-films are frequently employed in applications where electrodes with high chemical stability, low electrical resistance or a high melting point are needed. Due to its chemical inertness it is however also one of the most difficult metals to pattern. The gold standard for patterning is chlorine RIE etching, a capital-intensive process not available in all labs. Here we present simple fabrication protocols for wet etching Pt thin-films in hot Aqua Regia based on sputtered Ti/Pt/Cr and Cr/Pt/Cr metal multilayers. Chromium (Cr) or titanium (Ti) is used as an adhesion layer for the Pt. Cr is used as a hard masking layer during the Pt etch as it can be easily and accurately patterned with photoresist and withstands the Aqua Regia. The Cr pattern is transferred into the Pt and the Cr mask later removed. Only standard chemicals and cleanroom equipment/tools are required. Prior to the Aqua Regia etch any surface passivation on the Pt is needs to be removed. This is usually achieved by a quick dip in dilute hydrofluoric acid (HF). HF is usually also used for wet-etching the Ti adhesion layer. We avoid the use of HF for both steps by replacing the HF-dip with an argon (Ar) plasma treatment and etching the Ti layer with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based etchant.

  18. Changes in the surface of bone and acid-etched and sandblasted implants following implantation and removal

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Eskitascioglu, Murat; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any changes in the surface of bone or implant structures following the removal of a screwed dental implant. Materials and Methods: For this, six individual samples of acid-etched and sandblasted implants from three different manufacturers’ implant systems were used. They were screwed in a D1 bovine bone, and they were removed after primary stabilization. The bone and implant surfaces are evaluated with scanning electron microscope. Results: Through examination of the surfaces of the bone prior to implantation and of the used and unused implant surfaces, it was found that inhomogeneity in the implant surface can cause microcracking in the bone. Conclusions: This is attributed to the stress induced during the implantation of self-tapping implants and suggests that a tap drill may be required in some instances to protect the implant surface. PMID:27011744

  19. Scalable shape-controlled fabrication of curved microstructures using a femtosecond laser wet-etching process.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hao; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Liu, Hewei; Du, Guangqing; Deng, Zefang; Si, Jinhai; Yun, Feng; Hou, Xun

    2013-07-01

    Materials with curvilinear surface microstructures are highly desirable for micro-optical and biomedical devices. However, realization of such devices efficiently remains technically challenging. This paper demonstrates a facile and flexible method to fabricate curvilinear microstructures with controllable shapes and dimensions. The method composes of femtosecond laser exposures and chemical etching process with the hydrofluoric acid solutions. By fixed-point and step-in laser irradiations followed by the chemical treatments, concave microstructures with different profiles such as spherical, conical, bell-like and parabola were fabricated on silica glasses. The convex structures were replicated on polymers by the casting replication process. In this work, we used this technique to fabricate high-quality microlens arrays and high-aspect-ratio microwells which can be used in 3D cell culture. This approach offers several advantages such as high-efficient, scalable shape-controllable and easy manipulations. PMID:23623098

  20. Apparatus For Etching Or Depositing A Desired Profile Onto A Surface

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.; Britten, Jerald A.

    2004-05-25

    An apparatus and method for modifying the surface of an object by contacting said surface with a liquid processing solution using the liquid applicator geometry and Marangoni effect (surface tension gradient-driven flow) to define and confine the dimensions of the wetted zone on said object surface. In particular, the method and apparatus involve contouring or figuring the surface of an object using an etchant solution as the wetting fluid and using real-time metrology (e.g. interferometry) to control the placement and dwell time of this wetted zone locally on the surface of said object, thereby removing material from the surface of the object in a controlled manner. One demonstrated manifestation is in the deterministic optical figuring of thin glasses by wet chemical etching using a buffered hydrofluoric acid solution and Marangoni effect.

  1. Effects of N-methacryloyl-omega-amino acid primer pretreatment on the bond strength of the resin to acid-etched dentin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Nishiyama, N; Nemoto, K; Asakura, T; Nakai, H

    1997-11-01

    To ascertain the adhesion mechanism of resins to etched dentin treated with hydrophilic primers such as N-methacryloyl-omega-amino acids (NM omega A), the effect of the application of NM omega A primers on the bond strength of the resin and also the characteristics of the "hybrid layer" were investigated. Here, the concept of "hybrid layer" has been proposed previously by Nakabayashi et al. When the demineralized dentin was treated with the NM omega A solution, the bond strength increased remarkably, thus indicating the formation of a hybrid layer. It can be construed that NM omega A primers allowed for diffusion of the bonding agent to the dentinal collageous layer that was exposed by acid etching, and thereby the creation of a hybrid layer. To obtain an understanding of how NM omega A primers improved bond strength at the interface between the resin and dentinal collagen, the 13C-NMR spectra of NM alpha A were observed in the absence and presence of demineralized dentin. The 13C peak intensities of all of the carbons of the NM alpha A species were dramatically reduced in the presence of the dentin. Specifically, the reduction of the carbon peak intensity of carboxylic acid in the NM alpha A species was reduced by 30%. This indicated that the unionized carboxylic acid in the NM alpha A primer interacted with the dentinal collagen. Thus, the composite resin can be considered to adhere to the dentinal collagen through the unionized NM alpha A that interacts with the dentinal collagen. PMID:9358320

  2. Magnetic field sensing based on fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy and etched fiber interacting with magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Yong; Lv, Riqing; Hu, Haifeng; Li, Jin

    2015-12-01

    A novel magnetic field sensing system based on fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy (FLRDS) and etched fiber interacting with magnetic fluid (MF) is proposed and demonstrated for the first time. The enhanced evanescent field effect in the sensing part was achieved by etching the fiber with hydrofluoric acid. The influence of diameters of etched fiber to the performance of the sensor was investigated and discussed. In the sensing system, the etched fiber surrounded by MF was used as the sensing head and on account of the tunable refractive index and absorption coefficient of MF, the transmission spectrum would change with the magnetic field strength. In this letter, the FLRDS sensing system was theoretically modeled and FLRDS technique was utilized to modulate the transmission spectrum. The sensitivity of magnetic field sensing was enhanced significantly. In the experiment, performances of the magnetic field sensing system were tested by applying different measured magnetic field. The final results indicated that a sensitivity of 12.56 G/μs was achieved.

  3. Novel and low reflective silicon surface fabricated by Ni-assisted electroless etching and coated with atomic layer deposited Al2O3 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Zhihao; Shen, Honglie; Jiang, Ye; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jiale

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) were deposited on planar silicon and pyramidal silicon wafers by the magnetron sputtering method, and then these Ni NP-covered samples were etched in a hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and deionized water mixed solution at room temperature to fabricate a low reflective silicon surface. An alumina (Al2O3) film was then deposited on the surface of the as-etched pyramidal sample by atomic layer deposition to further reduce the reflectance. The morphologies and compositions of these samples were studied by using a field emission scanning electron microscope attached to an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The surface reflectance measurements were carried out with a UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer in a wavelength range of 200-1100 nm. The SEM images show that the as-etched planar and pyramidal silicon samples were covered with many rhombic nanostructures and that some nanostructures on the planar silicon surface were ready to exhibit a flower-like burst. The reflectances of the as-etched planar and pyramidal silicon samples were 5.22 % and 3.21 % in the wavelength range of 400-800 nm, respectively. After being coated with a 75-nm-thick Al2O3 film, the etched pyramidal silicon sample showed an even lower reflectance of 2.37 % from 400 nm to 800 nm.

  4. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Enamel Prepared By Er:YAG Laser and Conventional Acid-Etching

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, M.H.; Namvar, F.; Chalipa, J.; Saber, K.; Chiniforush, N.; Sarmadi, S.; Mirhashemi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel prepared by Er:YAG laser with two different powers and conventional acid-etching. Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly assigned to three groups based on conditioning method: Group 1- conventional etching with 37% phosphoric acid; Group 2- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1 W; and Group 3- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1.5 W. Metal brackets were bonded on prepared enamel using a light-cured composite. All groups were subjected to thermocycling process. Then, the specimens mounted in auto-cure acryle and shear bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per second. After debonding, the amount of resin remaining on the teeth was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scored 1 to 5. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare shear bond strengths and the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate differences in the ARI for different etching types. Results: The mean and standard deviation of conventional acid-etch group, 1W laser group and 1.5W laser group was 3.82 ± 1.16, 6.97 ± 3.64 and 6.93 ± 4.87, respectively. Conclusion: The mean SBS obtained with an Er:YAG laser operated at 1W or 1.5W is approximately similar to that of conventional etching. However, the high variability of values in bond strength of irradiated enamel should be considered to find the appropriate parameters for applying Er:YAG laser as a favorable alternative for surface conditioning. PMID:22924098

  5. Balloon-borne observations of mid-latitude hydrofluoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, B.; Toon, G.C.; Blavier, J.F.

    1995-04-01

    Measurements of stratospheric HF have been made by the JPL MkIV interferometer during high-altitude balloon flights. Infrared solar absorption spectra were acquired near 35{degrees}N at altitudes between local tropopause and 38 km. Volume mixing ratio profiles of HF derived from 4 flights (1990-93), in conjunction with simultaneously observed N{sub 2}O profiles, indicate an average rate of HF increase of (5.5{+-}0.3)% per year, in agreement with time-dependent, two-dimensional model simulations (6% per year) and ATMOS measurements. 17 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Ultra-Trace Detection of Fluoride Ion and Hydrofluoric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy M. Swager

    2005-03-17

    Describes general synthetic strategies developed under this grant to control interchain electronic communications within conjugated polymers (CPs). Novel chemical architectures built on iptycenes, metallorotaxanes, and canopied pyrroles restrict the dimensionality of electronic structures responsible for excition and charge transport. Structure-property relationships emerging from studies of selected systems are discussed, focusing on their implications for the sensitivity of these materials as sensors.

  7. Unveiling the shape-diversified silicon nanowires made by HF/HNO3 isotropic etching with the assistance of silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Yun; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Hydrofluoric (HF)/nitric (HNO3)/acetic (CH3COOH) acid, normally referred to as the HNA method, is a widely utilized technique for performing isotropic etching on silicon (Si) in industrial Si-based processing and device construction. Here, we reported a novel etching strategy based on a HF/HNO3 process with the assistance of silver (Ag) nano-seeds, offering good controllability in preparing diversified Si nanostructure arrays with particularly smooth top surfaces. The involved mechanism was visualized by systematically investigating both the time and temperature dependencies on the etching kinetics with various ratios of HF to HNO3. Moreover, by testing different Ag+-ion containing oxidants on Si etching, we have re-examined the state-of-the-art metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) using HF/AgNO3 etchants. In contrast with previous reports, we found that the interplay of hole injections from Ag+ and NO3- ions to the valence band of Si collectively contributes to the unidirectional dissolution of Si. Finally, we explored the engineering of the Ag nano-seeds to regularize the orientation of the etched nanowires formed on non-Si (100) wafers, which further provides a reliable pathway for constructing the desired morphologies of one-dimensional Si nanostructures regardless of wafer orientation.Hydrofluoric (HF)/nitric (HNO3)/acetic (CH3COOH) acid, normally referred to as the HNA method, is a widely utilized technique for performing isotropic etching on silicon (Si) in industrial Si-based processing and device construction. Here, we reported a novel etching strategy based on a HF/HNO3 process with the assistance of silver (Ag) nano-seeds, offering good controllability in preparing diversified Si nanostructure arrays with particularly smooth top surfaces. The involved mechanism was visualized by systematically investigating both the time and temperature dependencies on the etching kinetics with various ratios of HF to HNO3. Moreover, by testing different Ag+-ion containing oxidants on Si etching, we have re-examined the state-of-the-art metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) using HF/AgNO3 etchants. In contrast with previous reports, we found that the interplay of hole injections from Ag+ and NO3- ions to the valence band of Si collectively contributes to the unidirectional dissolution of Si. Finally, we explored the engineering of the Ag nano-seeds to regularize the orientation of the etched nanowires formed on non-Si (100) wafers, which further provides a reliable pathway for constructing the desired morphologies of one-dimensional Si nanostructures regardless of wafer orientation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05949b

  8. From acid etching treatments to tribocorrosive properties of dental implants: do some experimental results on surface treatments have an influence on the tribocorrosion behaviour of dental implants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geringer, Jean; Demanget, Nicolas; Pellier, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Surface treatments of dental implants aim at promoting osseointegration, i.e. the anchorage of the metallic part. Titanium-, grade II-V, based material is used as a bulk material for dental implants. For promoting the anchorage of this metallic biomaterial in human jaw, some strategies have been applied for improving the surface state, i.e. roughness, topography and coatings. A case study, experimental study, is described with the method of acid etching on titanium grade 4, CpTi. The main goal is to find the right proportion in a mixture of two acids in order to obtain the best surface state. Finally, a pure theoretical prediction is quite impossible and some experimental investigations are necessary to improve the surface state. The described acid etching is compared with some other acid etching treatments and some coatings available on dental implants. Thus, the discussion is focused on the tribocorrosion behaviour of titanium-based materials. The purpose of the coating is that the lifetime under tribocorrosion is limited. Moreover, the surgery related to the implantation has a huge impact on the stability of dental implants. Thus, the performance of dental implants depends on factors related to surgery (implantation) that are difficult to predict from the biomaterial characteristics. From the tribocorrosion point of view, i.e. during the mastication step, the titanium material is submitted to some deleterious factors that cause the performance of dental implants to decrease.

  9. Creation of superhydrophobic stainless steel surfaces by acid treatments and hydrophobic film deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Lester; Breedveld, Victor; Hess, Dennis W

    2012-09-26

    In this work, we present a method to render stainless steel surfaces superhydrophobic while maintaining their corrosion resistance. Creation of surface roughness on 304 and 316 grade stainless steels was performed using a hydrofluoric acid bath. New insight into the etch process is developed through a detailed analysis of the chemical and physical changes that occur on the stainless steel surfaces. As a result of intergranular corrosion, along with metallic oxide and fluoride redeposition, surface roughness was generated on the nano- and microscales. Differences in alloy composition between 304 and 316 grades of stainless steel led to variations in etch rate and different levels of surface roughness for similar etch times. After fluorocarbon film deposition to lower the surface energy, etched samples of 304 and 316 stainless steel displayed maximum static water contact angles of 159.9 and 146.6°, respectively. However, etching in HF also caused both grades of stainless steel to be susceptible to corrosion. By passivating the HF-etched samples in a nitric acid bath, the corrosion resistant properties of stainless steels were recovered. When a three step process was used, consisting of etching, passivation and fluorocarbon deposition, 304 and 316 stainless steel samples exhibited maximum contact angles of 157.3 and 134.9°, respectively, while maintaining corrosion resistance. PMID:22913317

  10. The Effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Sandblasting with Large Grit and Acid Etching (SLA) Surface

    PubMed Central

    Foroutan, Tahereh; Ayoubian, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 6W power Carbon Dioxide Laser (CO2) on the biologic compatibility of the Sandblasting with large grit and acid etching (SLA) titanium discs through studying of the Sarcoma Osteogenic (SaOS-2) human osteoblast-like cells viability. Methods: Sterilized titanium discs were used together with SaOS-2 human osteoblast-like cells. 6 sterilized SLA titanium discs of the experimental group were exposed to irradiation by CO2 laser with a power of 6W and 10.600nm wavelength, at fixed frequency of 80Hz during 45 seconds in both pulse and non-contact settings. SaOS-2 human osteoblast-like cells were incubated under 37°C in humid atmosphere (95% weather, 5% CO2) for 72 hours. MTT test was performed to measure the ratio level of cellular proliferation. Results: The results indicated that at 570nm wavelength, the 6W CO2 laser power have not affected the cellular viability. Conclusion: CO2 laser in 6w power has had no effect on the biologic compatibility of the SLA titanium surface PMID:25606313

  11. Petrologic and experimental evidence for the etching of garnets by organic acids in the upper Jurassic Morrision Formation, northwestern New Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Etching of garnets and partial to complete dissolution of other aluminosilicate minerals were caused by high concentrations of organic acids generated during the maturation of epigenetic organic matter (predominantly type-III kerogen) in the Morrison Formation. The presence of authigenic phases that form near 100oC indicates that temperatures were high enough during diagenesis to cause the thermal degradation of kerogen.-from Author

  12. No Positive Effect of Acid Etching or Plasma Cleaning on Osseointegration of Titanium Implants in a Canine Femoral Condyle Press-Fit Model

    PubMed Central

    Saksø, H; Jakobsen, T; Saksø, M; Baas, J; Jakobsen, SS; Soballe, K

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Implant surface treatments that improve early osseointegration may prove useful in long-term survival of uncemented implants. We investigated Acid Etching and Plasma Cleaning on titanium implants. Methods: In a randomized, paired animal study, four porous coated Ti implants were inserted into the femurs of each of ten dogs. PC (Porous Coating; control)PC+PSHA (Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite; positive control)PC+ET (Acid Etch)PC+ET+PLCN (Plasma Cleaning) After four weeks mechanical fixation was evaluated by push-out test and osseointegration by histomorphometry. Results: The PSHA-coated implants were better osseointegrated than the three other groups on outer surface implant porosity (p<0.05) while there was no statistical difference in deep surface implant porosity when compared with nontreated implant. Within the deep surface implant porosity, there was more newly formed bone in the control group compared to the ET and ET+PCLN groups (p<0.05). In all compared groups, there was no statistical difference in any biomechanical parameter. Conclusions: In terms of osseointegration on outer surface implant porosity PC+PSHA was superior to the other three groups. Neither the acid etching nor the plasma cleaning offered any advantage in terms of implant osseointegration. There was no statistical difference in any of the biomechanical parameters among all groups in the press-fit model at 4 weeks of evaluation time. PMID:23341850

  13. Formation of silicon nanowire packed films from metallurgical-grade silicon powder using a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we use a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce films of silicon nanowires shaped in micrograins from metallurgical-grade polycrystalline silicon powder. The first step is an electroless plating process where the powder was dipped for few minutes in an aqueous solution of silver nitrite and hydrofluoric acid to permit Ag plating of the Si micrograins. During the second step, corresponding to silicon dissolution, we add a small quantity of hydrogen peroxide to the plating solution and we leave the samples to be etched for three various duration (30, 60, and 90 min). We try elucidating the mechanisms leading to the formation of silver clusters and silicon nanowires obtained at the end of the silver plating step and the silver-assisted silicon dissolution step, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that the processed Si micrograins were covered with densely packed films of self-organized silicon nanowires. Some of these nanowires stand vertically, and some others tilt to the silicon micrograin facets. The thickness of the nanowire films increases from 0.2 to 10 μm with increasing etching time. Based on SEM characterizations, laser scattering estimations, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and Raman spectroscopy, we present a correlative study dealing with the effect of the silver-assisted etching process on the morphological and structural properties of the processed silicon nanowire films. PMID:25349554

  14. Formation of silicon nanowire packed films from metallurgical-grade silicon powder using a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouertani, Rachid; Hamdi, Abderrahmen; Amri, Chohdi; Khalifa, Marouan; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we use a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce films of silicon nanowires shaped in micrograins from metallurgical-grade polycrystalline silicon powder. The first step is an electroless plating process where the powder was dipped for few minutes in an aqueous solution of silver nitrite and hydrofluoric acid to permit Ag plating of the Si micrograins. During the second step, corresponding to silicon dissolution, we add a small quantity of hydrogen peroxide to the plating solution and we leave the samples to be etched for three various duration (30, 60, and 90 min). We try elucidating the mechanisms leading to the formation of silver clusters and silicon nanowires obtained at the end of the silver plating step and the silver-assisted silicon dissolution step, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that the processed Si micrograins were covered with densely packed films of self-organized silicon nanowires. Some of these nanowires stand vertically, and some others tilt to the silicon micrograin facets. The thickness of the nanowire films increases from 0.2 to 10 μm with increasing etching time. Based on SEM characterizations, laser scattering estimations, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and Raman spectroscopy, we present a correlative study dealing with the effect of the silver-assisted etching process on the morphological and structural properties of the processed silicon nanowire films.

  15. Formation of silicon nanowire packed films from metallurgical-grade silicon powder using a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method.

    PubMed

    Ouertani, Rachid; Hamdi, Abderrahmen; Amri, Chohdi; Khalifa, Marouan; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we use a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce films of silicon nanowires shaped in micrograins from metallurgical-grade polycrystalline silicon powder. The first step is an electroless plating process where the powder was dipped for few minutes in an aqueous solution of silver nitrite and hydrofluoric acid to permit Ag plating of the Si micrograins. During the second step, corresponding to silicon dissolution, we add a small quantity of hydrogen peroxide to the plating solution and we leave the samples to be etched for three various duration (30, 60, and 90min). We try elucidating the mechanisms leading to the formation of silver clusters and silicon nanowires obtained at the end of the silver plating step and the silver-assisted silicon dissolution step, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that the processed Si micrograins were covered with densely packed films of self-organized silicon nanowires. Some of these nanowires stand vertically, and some others tilt to the silicon micrograin facets. The thickness of the nanowire films increases from 0.2 to 10?m with increasing etching time. Based on SEM characterizations, laser scattering estimations, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and Raman spectroscopy, we present a correlative study dealing with the effect of the silver-assisted etching process on the morphological and structural properties of the processed silicon nanowire films. PMID:25349554

  16. Effects of Dextrose and Lipopolysaccharide on the Corrosion Behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V Alloy with a Smooth Surface or Treated with Double-Acid-Etching

    PubMed Central

    Faverani, Leonardo P.; Assunção, Wirley G.; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio P.; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino; Mathew, Mathew T.; Barao, Valentim A.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and infections are associated with a high risk of implant failure. However, the effects of such conditions on the electrochemical stability of titanium materials remain unclear. This study evaluated the corrosion behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy, with a smooth surface or conditioned by double-acid-etching, in simulated body fluid with different concentrations of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide. For the electrochemical assay, the open-circuit-potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic test were used. The disc surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Their surface roughness and Vickers microhardness were also tested. The quantitative data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation and independent t-tests (α = 0.05). In the corrosion parameters, there was a strong lipopolysaccharide correlation with the Ipass (passivation current density), Cdl (double-layer capacitance), and Rp (polarization resistance) values (p<0.05) for the Ti-6Al-4V alloy with surface treatment by double-acid-etching. The combination of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide was correlated with the Icorr (corrosion current density) and Ipass (p<0.05). The acid-treated groups showed a significant increase in Cdl values and reduced Rp values (p<0.05, t-test). According to the topography, there was an increase in surface roughness (R2 = 0.726, p<0.0001 for the smooth surface; R2 = 0.405, p = 0.036 for the double-acid-etching-treated surface). The microhardness of the smooth Ti-6Al-4V alloy decreased (p<0.05) and that of the treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy increased (p<0.0001). Atomic force microscopy showed changes in the microstructure of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy by increasing the surface thickness mainly in the group associated with dextrose and lipopolysaccharide. The combination of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide affected the corrosion behavior of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy surface treated with double-acid-etching. However, no dose-response corrosion behavior could be observed. These results suggest a greater susceptibility to corrosion of titanium implants in diabetic patients with associated infections. PMID:24671257

  17. Effect of acid vapor etching on morphological and opto-electric properties of flat silicon and silicon nanowire arrays: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amri, Chohdi; Ouertani, Rachid; Hamdi, Abderrahmen; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a comparative study between porous silicon (pSi) and porous silicon nanowires (pSiNWs). Acid Vapor Etching (AVE) treatment has been used to perform porous structure on flat Si and SiNWs array substrates respectively. SiNW structure is prepared by the widely used Silver catalyzed etching method. SEM and TEM images show that AVE treatment induces porous structure in the whole Si wafer and the SiNW sidewall. Comparatively to pSi, pSiNWs exhibit a low reflectivity in the whole spectral range which decreases with etching duration. However, the reflectivity of pSi changes with porous layer thickness. Both pSi and pSiNWs exhibit a significant PL peak situated at 2 eV. PL peaks are attributed to the quantum confinement effect in the silicon nanocrystallites (SiNCs). We discussed the significant enhancement in the peak intensities and a shift toward lower energy displayed in Raman spectra for both pSi and pSiNWs. We reported a correlative study of the AVE treatment effect on the minority carrier life time of flat silicon and SiNW arrays with the passivation effect of chemical induced silicon oxides highlighted by FTIR spectra.

  18. 24% Indigenously Prepared Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid Compared to Self-Etching Adhesives and their Effect on Shear Bond Strength of Composites in Primary Teeth: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagar, Priya; Tandil, Yogesh L.; T.P., Chandru; Gupta, Anamika; Kalaria, Devendra; Kumar, Prafful

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the years, it has been known that 34% phosphoric acid is the benchmark in etchants with the best shear bond strength shown with composites in primary teeth. However, with latest technological advancements and innovations, in order to reduce the number of steps and less damage to the tooth structure, non-rinse conditioner (NRC) & Single-Etch and various other etchants have been tried and tested. These etchants have been found to have shear bond strength comparable to phosphoric acid. In this study, indigenously prepared 24% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) has been compared with established etchants, as to prove if their shear bond strength was closely related. As it is a well-known fact that EDTA could be less damaging to the enamel during etching and hence can be an alternative for etching of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: For the study 60 caries-free primary molars were used, they were sectioned in the middle, after making area for bonding; the marked area was then etched using different etchants for 30 s. Each of the teeth was then rinsed and bonded with composite resin and thermocycling was done. Shear bond strength testing was done on the composite using Universal Testing Machine. Results: Results of the study showed that phosphoric acid showed the highest bond strength, closely followed by Single Etch (Adper Prompt) and NRC, then by EDTA. Conclusions: About 24% EDTA can be another comparable replacement for phosphoric acid if used with a Single Etch Primer, like Prime and Bond NT on primary teeth. 34% phosphoric acid has the highest bond strength values with composite resin. Single etch followed by NRC has the second and third highest bond strength values, which are comparable to phosphoric acid. PMID:26464540

  19. Effect of acid etching on marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate to apical dentin: microcomputed tomography and scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid; Al-Garawi, Ziad; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Javed, Fawad; Al-Shalan, Thakib; Rotstein, Ilan

    2012-12-01

    The present investigation assessed the effect of acid etching on marginal adaptation of white- and gray-colored mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to apical dentin using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sixty-four extracted single-rooted human maxillary teeth were used. Following root-end resection and apical preparation, the teeth were equally divided into four groups according to the following root end filling materials: (i) white-colored MTA (WMTA), (ii) etched WMTA (EWMTA), (iii) gray-colored MTA (GMTA) and (iv) etched GMTA (EGMTA). After 48 h, the interface between root-end filling materials and the dentinal walls was assessed using micro-CT and SEM. Data were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. Micro-CT analysis revealed gap volumes between the apical cavity dentin walls and EGMTA, GMTA, EWMTA and WMTA of (0.007 1±0.004) mm(3), (0.053±0.002) mm(3), (0.003 6±0.001) mm(3) and (0.005 9±0.002) mm(3) respectively. SEM analysis revealed gap sizes for EGMTA, WMTA, EWMTA and GMTA to be (492.3±13.8) µm, (594.5±17.12) µm, (543.1±15.33) µm and (910.7±26.2) µm respectively. A significant difference in gap size between root end preparations filled with GMTA and EGMTA was found (P<0.05). No significance difference in gap size between WMTA and EWMTA were found in either SEM or micro-CT analysis. In conclusion, pre-etching of apical dentin can provide a better seal for GMTA but not for WMTA. PMID:23306857

  20. Continuous-flow Mass Production of Silicon Nanowires via Substrate-Enhanced Metal-Catalyzed Electroless Etching of Silicon with Dissolved Oxygen as an Oxidant

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ya; Peng, Kui-Qing; Liu, Lin; Qiao, Zhen; Huang, Xing; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Meng, Xiang-Min; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are attracting growing interest due to their unique properties and promising applications in photovoltaic devices, thermoelectric devices, lithium-ion batteries, and biotechnology. Low-cost mass production of SiNWs is essential for SiNWs-based nanotechnology commercialization. However, economic, controlled large-scale production of SiNWs remains challenging and rarely attainable. Here, we demonstrate a facile strategy capable of low-cost, continuous-flow mass production of SiNWs on an industrial scale. The strategy relies on substrate-enhanced metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE) of silicon using dissolved oxygen in aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution as an oxidant. The distinct advantages of this novel MCEE approach, such as simplicity, scalability and flexibility, make it an attractive alternative to conventional MCEE methods. PMID:24413157

  1. Continuous-flow mass production of silicon nanowires via substrate-enhanced metal-catalyzed electroless etching of silicon with dissolved oxygen as an oxidant.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ya; Peng, Kui-Qing; Liu, Lin; Qiao, Zhen; Huang, Xing; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Meng, Xiang-Min; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are attracting growing interest due to their unique properties and promising applications in photovoltaic devices, thermoelectric devices, lithium-ion batteries, and biotechnology. Low-cost mass production of SiNWs is essential for SiNWs-based nanotechnology commercialization. However, economic, controlled large-scale production of SiNWs remains challenging and rarely attainable. Here, we demonstrate a facile strategy capable of low-cost, continuous-flow mass production of SiNWs on an industrial scale. The strategy relies on substrate-enhanced metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE) of silicon using dissolved oxygen in aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution as an oxidant. The distinct advantages of this novel MCEE approach, such as simplicity, scalability and flexibility, make it an attractive alternative to conventional MCEE methods. PMID:24413157

  2. Acid-etch interval and shear bond strength of Er,Cr:YSGG laser-prepared enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Obeidi, Ali; Liu, Perng-Ru; Ramp, Lance C; Beck, Preston; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    The formation of a superficial layer of tiny flakes has been observed on teeth prepared by Erbium lasers. It has been suggested that removing this layer (mechanically or chemically) may increase the bond strength of the resin composite. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of various etching times on bond strength of resin composite to enamel and dentin prepared by Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Sixty previously flattened human molars were irradiated for 10 s by an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Enamel (E) specimens were etched with 37% H(3)PO(4) for 20, 40 or 60 s and dentin (D) specimens were etched for 15 or 30 s. All specimens were prepared for a standard shear bond strength (SBS) test (1 mm/min). Data were analyzed [ANOVA, Tukey post-hoc, a < 0.05)] and the failure mode was studied under SEM. Mean SBS+/-sd (MPa) for each group was 16.97 +/- 7.77 (E20s), 21.34 +/- 3.55 (E40s), 14.08 +/- 4.77 (E60s), 13.62 +/- 7.28 (D15s) and 13.15 +/- 6.25 (D30s). SBS for E40s was significantly higher than E60s (p = 0.023). No difference was noted between the dentin groups. SEM evaluation showed predominantly cohesive failure. Within the limits of this study, etching time significantly influenced the SBS of composite resin to laser-prepared enamel. SEM showed subsurface cracks, fissures, and deformities leading to predominantly cohesive failure in both enamel and dentin. PMID:19288054

  3. Morphology of resin-dentin interfaces after Er,Cr:YSGG laser and acid etching preparation and application of different bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Beer, Franziska; Buchmair, Alfred; Körpert, Wolfram; Marvastian, Leila; Wernisch, Johann; Moritz, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to show the modifications in the ultrastructure of the dentin surface morphology following different surface treatments. The stability of the adhesive compound with dentin after laser preparation compared with conventional preparation using different bonding agents was evaluated. An Er,Cr:YSGG laser and 36% phosphoric acid in combination with various bonding systems were used. A total of 100 caries-free human third molars were used in this study. Immediately after surgical removal teeth were cut using a band saw and 1-mm thick dentin slices were created starting at a distance of 4 mm from the cusp plane to ensure complete removal of the enamel. The discs were polished with silicon carbide paper into rectangular shapes to a size of 6 × 4 mm (±0,2 mm).The discs as well as the remaining teeth stumps were stored in 0.9% NaCl at room temperature. The specimens were divided into three main groups (group I laser group, group II etch group, group III laser and etch group) and each group was subdivided into three subgroups which were allocated to the different bonding systems (subgroup A Excite, subgroup B Scotchbond, subgroup C Syntac). Each disc and the corresponding tooth stump were treated in the same way. After preparation the bonding composite material was applied according to the manufacturers' guidelines in a hollow tube of 2 mm diameter to the disc as well as to the corresponding tooth stump. Shear bond strength testing and environmental scanning electron microscopy were used to assess the morphology and stability of the resin-dentin interface. The self-etching bonding system showed the highest and the most constant shear values in all three main groups, thus enabling etching with phosphoric acid after laser preparation to be avoided. Thus we conclude that laser preparation creates a surface texture that allows prediction of the quality of the restoration without the risk of negative influences during the following treatment steps. This can easily and repeatedly be achieved. PMID:21948398

  4. Etching Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1983-01-01

    20-page report reviews methods available for etching specific layers on wafers and discusses automation techniques and features on one particular automated system. Compares two major etching methods, chemical (wet) and plasma (dry), and discusses areas in need of development. Methods covered include "dip-and-dunk" manual method of chemical etching, automated chemical etching, and plasma etching.

  5. Acidizing: A well completion reference

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Acidizing removes near-wellbore formation damage by dissolving or bypassing drilling mud, completion fluid or other restrictions. These treatments include matrix pump rate jobs, washes and chemical injection. Matrix stimulation techniques are performed without fracturing reservoir rock. Acid is used to remove drilling, completion, workover or production damage. Solvents and surfactants like crude, condensate, diesel or mutual solvents are used to change pore fluid or formation wettability characteristics. Washes remove scale and other dispersible or soluble material from formations, perforations and casing. The purpose of the above methods is to improve well productivity by removing or mitigating formation damage. Hydrofluoric (HF) acid dissolves clay and fine particles in sandstones. Hydrochloric (HCl) acid etches wormholes that bypass damage in carbonates. Products are subdivided into groups that have similar function and performance. Where applicable, groups have been subdivided to reflect significant differences in additive chemical nature to emphasize uniqueness in the product lines of each company. Products and additives are grouped in 28 categories: water-base completion fluids; water-base polymers; friction reducers; fluid loss; diverting agents; polymer plugs; acid inhibitors; acid retarders; emulsifiers; clay stabilizers; surfactants; non-emulsifiers; fines suspender; anti-sludge agent; foamers; scale inhibitors; iron (Fe) control; oxygen scavenger; mutual solvents; corrosion inhibitors; paraffin control; miscellaneous products; acid systems; retarded acid system; mud acid plus surfactants; mud acid plus alcohol; SGMA; and retarded HF.

  6. Bone response to alteration of surface topography and surface composition of sandblasted and acid etched (SLA) implants.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Daniel; Szmukler-Moncler, Serge; Echikou, Casimir; Pointaire, Philippe; Bernard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-10-01

    The titanium surface obtained by sandblasting and etching (SLA) is an easily alterable surface that smears and loose its typical texture. In addition, the etching process modifies the surface composition of commercially pure titanium; the latter contains titanium and an added 20-40% of titanium hydride. Therefore, the influence of a heavy surface alteration and the influence of the composition at the SLA surface, i.e. with and without titanium hydride, were investigated in vivo. Three implant groups were inserted in the mandible of Land Race pigs and left to heal during 10 weeks in a submerged way: (1). a standard SLA control group (SLAstd) with the SLA surface containing titanium hydride; (2). a test group with the SLA surface heavily altered at the thread level (SLAalt); (3). a test group with an SLA surface devoid of titanium hydride (SLAT). Sample size was n = 8. Histomorphometry analysis did not show a statistically significant difference between the control group (SLAstd: 82.12 + 6.1%), the altered surface test group (SLAalt: 86.25 + 7.4%) and the SLA without titanium hydride test group (SLAT: 75.12 + 7.6%). The data suggest that alteration of the SLA surface, if it occurs, should not be detrimental to bone response. The soft and easy smearable SLA surface might even be an advantage when surface maintenance is required. Surface composition did not play a significant role in the bone response to the SLA surface and it can therefore be concluded that the osteophilic properties of the SLA surface are due to its surface topography and not to its specific surface composition. PMID:12453122

  7. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Ginley, David S.

    1994-01-01

    An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

  8. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

  9. Influence of different pre-etching times on fatigue strength of self-etch adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Scheidel, Donal D; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) testing to determine the influence on dentin bonding of phosphoric acid pre-etching times before the application of self-etch adhesives. Two single-step self-etch universal adhesives [Prime & Bond Elect (EL) and Scotchbond Universal (SU)], a conventional single-step self-etch adhesive [G-aenial Bond (GB)], and a two-step self-etch adhesive [OptiBond XTR (OX)] were used. The SBS and SFS values were obtained with phosphoric acid pre-etching times of 3, 10, or 15 s before application of the adhesives, and for a control without pre-etching. For groups with 3 s of pre-etching, SU and EL showed higher SBS values than control groups. No significant difference was observed for GB among the 3 s, 10 s, and control groups, but the 15 s pre-etching group showed significantly lower SBS and SFS values than the control group. No significant difference was found for OX among the pre-etching groups. Reducing phosphoric acid pre-etching time can minimize the adverse effect on dentin bonding durability for the conventional self-etch adhesives. Furthermore, a short phosphoric acid pre-etching time enhances the dentin bonding performance of universal adhesives. PMID:26918658

  10. Etched Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 June 2003

    This stunning THEMIS visible image was acquired in 'etched terrain' near the south pole of Mars. In several places in this image there are large areas with many dark spots. These spots have been noticed to appear and disappear as the seasons progress on Mars. As the southern hemisphere of Mars gets warmer, carbon dioxide frost present in this terrain sublimates, leaving behind the dark spots.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -73.5, Longitude 351.3 East (8.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Effective Light Absorptive Layer Using Mezo-Porous Silicon by Electrochemical Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae‑Hong; Lee, Soo‑Hong; Ju, Byeong‑Kwon

    2006-04-01

    Porous silicon (PS), an excellent light diffuser, can be used as an antireflective layer that does not need to be coated with other antireflection coating (ARC) materials. PS layers were obtained by electrochemical etching (ECE) anodization of silicon wafers in hydrofluoric acid/ethanol/deionized (DI) water solution (HF/EtOH/H2O). This technique selectively removes Si atoms from the sample surface, forming a PS layer with adjustable optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. A PS layer with optimal antireflection characteristics was obtained for a charge density (Q) of 5.2 C/cm2. The weighted reflectance was reduced from 24 to 4% in the wavelength range from 400 to 1000 nm. The weighted reflectance with optimized PS layers is much less than that with a commercial SiNX ARC on a potassium hydroxide (KOH) pretextured multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) surface. Therefore, it can be successfully used as an alternative way for the preparation of a PS antireflective layer for a silicon solar cell.

  12. Effect of dehiscences to the bone response of implants with an Acid-etched surface: an experimental study in miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Ruehe, Baerbel; Heberer, Susanne; Bayreuther, Katja; Nelson, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous early exposure of submerged implants during the healing phase as a factor for early crestal bone loss around the implants is still being controversially discussed. The aim of this study was to examine the potential impact of dehiscences on the osseointegration process of acid-etched dental implants with a shortened healing period in the maxilla. Five animals received a total of 15 titanium implants 8 weeks postextraction. Eight of these implants were placed in the maxilla to osseointegrate within a shortened healing period of 3 months, whereas the remaining implants were inserted in the lower jaw and served as controls with a regular healing time. Polyfluorochrome sequential labeling with xylenol orange, calcein green, and alizarin complexone was performed 2, 5, and 8 weeks after implant placement. After 12 weeks of unloaded and submerged healing, the animals were killed and the implants removed en bloc. After the processing of the undecalcified PMMA-embedded samples, thin ground sections (40-60 µm) were made. The histomorphometric determination of the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) was calculated using light microscopy. The peri-implant bone apposition rate and the direction of bone growth were determined with the fluorescence microscope. For statistical evaluation, the Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, and Friedman test were chosen. During the healing period, nonartificial dehiscences were observed at 9 implants. The average BIC was 54.19% (14.51%-68.97%). There were significantly lower BIC rates detected for the cervical part of the implants compared with the middle part. An influence of dehiscences on the osseointegration could not be proven. There were no significant differences between the BIC values of the upper and lower jaw. During the observation period from the third to the eighth week after implantation, the average new bone formation rate was 2.32 µm/d (1.76-2.82 µm/d). During this period, the amount of new bone growth decreased insignificantly. Based on the sequence of the polyfluorochrome labeling, an implantopetal (53.03%) as well as an implantofugal bone growth (46.97%) have been observed. It could be assumed that the acid-etched implants offered a prerequisite to osseointegrate under a shortened healing period. The observed dehiscences seemed not to have compromised the rate of osseointegration. PMID:20557147

  13. Quantification of proteins using enhanced etching of Ag coated Au nanorods by the Cu2+/bicinchoninic acid pair with improved sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenqi; Hou, Shuai; Yan, Jiao; Zhang, Hui; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2015-12-01

    Plasmonic nanosensors show great potential in ultrasensitive detection, especially with the plasmon peak position as the detection modality. Herein, a new sensitive but simple total protein quantification method termed the SPR-BCA assay is demonstrated by combining plasmonic nanosensors with protein oxidation by Cu2+. The easy tuning of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features of plasmonic nanostructures makes them ideal sensing platforms. We found that the Cu2+/bicinchoninic acid (BCA) pair exhibits accelerated etching of Au@Ag nanorods and results in the LSPR peak shift. A linear relationship between Cu2+ and the LSPR shift is found in a double logarithmic coordinate. Such double logarithm relationship is transferred to the concentration of proteins. Theoretical simulation shows that Au nanorods with large aspect ratios and small core sizes show high detection sensitivity. Via optimized sensor design, we achieved an increased sensitivity (the limit of detection was 3.4 ng ml-1) and a wide working range (0.5 to 1000 μg ml-1) compared with the traditional BCA assay. The universal applicability of our method to various proteins further proves its potential in practical applications.Plasmonic nanosensors show great potential in ultrasensitive detection, especially with the plasmon peak position as the detection modality. Herein, a new sensitive but simple total protein quantification method termed the SPR-BCA assay is demonstrated by combining plasmonic nanosensors with protein oxidation by Cu2+. The easy tuning of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features of plasmonic nanostructures makes them ideal sensing platforms. We found that the Cu2+/bicinchoninic acid (BCA) pair exhibits accelerated etching of Au@Ag nanorods and results in the LSPR peak shift. A linear relationship between Cu2+ and the LSPR shift is found in a double logarithmic coordinate. Such double logarithm relationship is transferred to the concentration of proteins. Theoretical simulation shows that Au nanorods with large aspect ratios and small core sizes show high detection sensitivity. Via optimized sensor design, we achieved an increased sensitivity (the limit of detection was 3.4 ng ml-1) and a wide working range (0.5 to 1000 μg ml-1) compared with the traditional BCA assay. The universal applicability of our method to various proteins further proves its potential in practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07924a

  14. Effects of rhBMP-2 on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Titanium Implant Surfaces on Bone Regeneration and Osseointegration: Spilt-Mouth Designed Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Lee, So-Hyoun; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of rhBMP-2 applied at different concentrations to sandblasted and acid etched (SLA) implants on osseointegration and bone regeneration in a bone defect of beagle dogs as pilot study using split-mouth design. Methods. For experimental groups, SLA implants were coated with different concentrations of rhBMP-2 (0.1, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL). After assessment of surface characteristics and rhBMP-2 releasing profile, the experimental groups and untreated control groups (n = 6 in each group, two animals in each group) were placed in split-mouth designed animal models with buccal open defect. At 8 weeks after implant placement, implant stability quotients (ISQ) values were recorded and vertical bone height (VBH, mm), bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %), and bone volume (BV, %) in the upper 3 mm defect areas were measured. Results. The ISQ values were highest in the 1.0 group. Mean values of VBH (mm), BIC (%), and BV (%) were greater in the 0.5 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL groups than those in 0.1 and control groups in buccal defect areas. Conclusion. In the open defect area surrounding the SLA implant, coating with 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL concentrations of rhBMP-2 was more effective, compared with untreated group, in promoting bone regeneration and osseointegration. PMID:26504807

  15. Effects of rhBMP-2 on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Titanium Implant Surfaces on Bone Regeneration and Osseointegration: Spilt-Mouth Designed Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Lee, So-Hyoun; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of rhBMP-2 applied at different concentrations to sandblasted and acid etched (SLA) implants on osseointegration and bone regeneration in a bone defect of beagle dogs as pilot study using split-mouth design. Methods. For experimental groups, SLA implants were coated with different concentrations of rhBMP-2 (0.1, 0.5, and 1?mg/mL). After assessment of surface characteristics and rhBMP-2 releasing profile, the experimental groups and untreated control groups (n = 6 in each group, two animals in each group) were placed in split-mouth designed animal models with buccal open defect. At 8 weeks after implant placement, implant stability quotients (ISQ) values were recorded and vertical bone height (VBH, mm), bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %), and bone volume (BV, %) in the upper 3?mm defect areas were measured. Results. The ISQ values were highest in the 1.0 group. Mean values of VBH (mm), BIC (%), and BV (%) were greater in the 0.5?mg/mL and 1.0?mg/mL groups than those in 0.1 and control groups in buccal defect areas. Conclusion. In the open defect area surrounding the SLA implant, coating with 0.5 and 1.0?mg/mL concentrations of rhBMP-2 was more effective, compared with untreated group, in promoting bone regeneration and osseointegration. PMID:26504807

  16. Adult stem cells properties in terms of commitment, aging and biological safety of grit-blasted and Acid-etched ti dental implants surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo-Guirado, José L; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces. PMID:25635249

  17. Effect of bulk microstructure of commercially pure titanium on surface characteristics and fatigue properties after surface modification by sand blasting and acid-etching.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, A E; Ng, H P; Lapovok, R; Estrin, Y; Lowe, T C; Anumalasetty, V N

    2016-04-01

    Surface modification techniques are widely used to enhance the biological response to the implant materials. These techniques generally create a roughened surface, effectively increasing the surface area thus promoting cell adhesion. However, a negative side effect is a higher susceptibility of a roughened surface to failure due to the presence of multiple stress concentrators. The purpose of the study reported here was to examine the effects of surface modification by sand blasting and acid-etching (SLA) on the microstructure and fatigue performance of coarse-grained and ultrafine-grained (UFG) commercially pure titanium. Finer grain sizes, produced by equal channel angular pressing, resulted in lower values of surface roughness in SLA-processed material. This effect was associated with greater resistance of the UFG structure to plastic deformation. The fatigue properties of UFG Ti were found to be superior to those of coarse-grained Ti and conventional Ti-6Al-4V, both before and after SLA-treatment. PMID:26703365

  18. Quantification of proteins using enhanced etching of Ag coated Au nanorods by the Cu(2+)/bicinchoninic acid pair with improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqi; Hou, Shuai; Yan, Jiao; Zhang, Hui; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2016-01-14

    Plasmonic nanosensors show great potential in ultrasensitive detection, especially with the plasmon peak position as the detection modality. Herein, a new sensitive but simple total protein quantification method termed the SPR-BCA assay is demonstrated by combining plasmonic nanosensors with protein oxidation by Cu(2+). The easy tuning of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features of plasmonic nanostructures makes them ideal sensing platforms. We found that the Cu(2+)/bicinchoninic acid (BCA) pair exhibits accelerated etching of Au@Ag nanorods and results in the LSPR peak shift. A linear relationship between Cu(2+) and the LSPR shift is found in a double logarithmic coordinate. Such double logarithm relationship is transferred to the concentration of proteins. Theoretical simulation shows that Au nanorods with large aspect ratios and small core sizes show high detection sensitivity. Via optimized sensor design, we achieved an increased sensitivity (the limit of detection was 3.4 ng ml(-1)) and a wide working range (0.5 to 1000 μg ml(-1)) compared with the traditional BCA assay. The universal applicability of our method to various proteins further proves its potential in practical applications. PMID:26669539

  19. Early bone response to machined, sandblasting acid etching (SLA) and novel surface-functionalization (SLAffinity) titanium implants: characterization, biomechanical analysis and histological evaluation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsi-Jen; Hsu, Heng-Jui; Peng, Pei-Wen; Wu, Ching-Zong; Ou, Keng-Liang; Cheng, Han-Yi; Walinski, Christopher J; Sugiatno, Erwan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine early tissue response and osseointegration in the animal model. The surface morphologies of SLAffinity were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The microstructures were examined by X-ray diffraction, and hardness was measured by nanoindentation. Moreover, the safety and toxicity properties were evaluated using computer-aided programs and cell cytotoxicity assays. In the animal model, implants were installed in the mandibular canine-premolar area of 12 miniature pigs. Each pig received three implants: machine, sandblasted, large grit, acid-etched, and SLAffinity-treated implants. The results showed that surface treatment did affect bone-to-implant contact (BIC) significantly. At 3 weeks, the SLAffinity-treated implants were found to present significantly higher BIC values than the untreated implants. The SLAffinity treatments enhanced osseointegration significantly, especially at early stages of bone tissue healing. As described above, the results of the present study demonstrate that the SLAffinity treatment is a reliable surface modification method. PMID:26418567

  20. Adult Stem Cells Properties in Terms of Commitment, Aging and Biological Safety of Grit-Blasted and Acid-Etched Ti Dental Implants Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo - Guirado, José L.; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces. PMID:25635249

  1. Photoassisted anodic etching of gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; Wu, Z.; Bhat, I.

    1997-01-01

    The first study of photo-assisted anodic etching of unintentionally doped n-GaN at room temperature is reported here. The electrolyte used is a mixture of buffered aqueous solution of tartaric acid and ethylene glycol. The etching rate varies from {approximately}20 {angstrom}/min to as high as 1600 {angstrom}/min. A systematic study shows that (1) the etch rate, as well as the surface roughness, increases with the current density; (2) the etching rate is the highest when the pH of the electrolyte is {approximately}7; and (3) the etching is faster when there is more ethylene glycol in the electrolyte solution. Ga-N-based III-V nitrides are important candidates for applications in blue light emitters and lasers, high voltage and high temperature electronics.

  2. Etch pits on caprolactam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, A. E. D. M.; Geertman, R. M.

    1992-09-01

    As an extension of the results on the morphology, we investigated the defect structure of solution-grown caprolactam crystals by means of slight etching in cyclohexane and subsequent microscopic observation of the resulting etch pits on the 200, 110, and faces. In case of the face (which is a cleavage plane), we confirmed that the etch pits are formed around dislocation lines by performing an "etch-and-match" experiment. Information is obtained on morphology and density of etch pits, the presence of grain boundaries, as well as qualitative information on the inclination of the dislocation lines.

  3. Alkaline etch system qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Goldammer, S.E.; Pemberton, S.E.; Tucker, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    Based on the data from this qualification activity, the Atotech etch system, even with minimum characterization, was capable of etching production printed circuit products as good as those from the Chemcut system. Further characterization of the Atotech system will improve its etching capability. In addition to the improved etch quality expected from further characterization, the Atotech etch system has additional features that help reduce waste and provide for better consistency in the etching process. The programmable logic controller and computer will allow operators to operate the system manually or from pre-established recipes. The evidence and capabilities of the Atotech system made it as good as or better than the Chemcut system for etching WR products. The Printed Wiring Board Engineering Department recommended that the Atotech system be released for production. In December 1995, the Atotech system was formerly qualified for production.

  4. Incinerator ash dissolution model for the system: Plutonium, nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E V

    1988-06-01

    This research accomplished two goals. The first was to develop a computer program to simulate a cascade dissolver system. This program would be used to predict the bulk rate of dissolution in incinerator ash. The other goal was to verify the model in a single-stage dissolver system using Dy/sub 2/O/sub 3/. PuO/sub 2/ (and all of the species in the incinerator ash) was assumed to exist as spherical particles. A model was used to calculate the bulk rate of plutonium oxide dissolution using fluoride as a catalyst. Once the bulk rate of PuO/sub 2/ dissolution and the dissolution rate of all soluble species were calculated, mass and energy balances were written. A computer program simulating the cascade dissolver system was then developed. Tests were conducted on a single-stage dissolver. A simulated incinerator ash mixture was made and added to the dissolver. CaF/sub 2/ was added to the mixture as a catalyst. A 9M HNO/sub 3/ solution was pumped into the dissolver system. Samples of the dissolver effluent were analyzed for dissolved and F concentrations. The computer program proved satisfactory in predicting the F concentrations in the dissolver effluent. The experimental sparge air flow rate was predicted to within 5.5%. The experimental percentage of solids dissolved (51.34%) compared favorably to the percentage of incinerator ash dissolved (47%) in previous work. No general conclusions on model verification could be reached. 56 refs., 11 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-06

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O{sub 2} neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O{sub 2}-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  6. Five-year retrospective radiographic follow-up study of dental implants with sandblasting with large grit, and acid etching-treated surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate five-year radiographic follow-up results of the Korean sandblasting with large grit, and acid etching (SLA)-treated implant system. Materials and Methods The subjects of the study are 54 patients who have been followed-up to date, of the patients who underwent implant surgery from May 1, 2009 to April 30, 2011. In all, 176 implant placements were performed. Radiographs were taken before the first surgery, immediately after the first and second surgeries, immediately and six months after the final prosthesis installation, and every year after that. Bone loss was evaluated by the method suggested by Romanos and Nentwig. Results A total of 176 implant placements were performed-122 in men and 54 in women. These patients have been followed-up for an average of 4.9 years. In terms of prosthetic appliances, there were 156 bridges and 20 single prostheses. Nine implants installed in the maxillary molar area, three in the mandibular molar area and two in the maxillary premolar area were included in group M, with bone loss less than 2 mm at the crestal aspect of the implant. Of these, eight implants were single prostheses. In all, six implants failed-four in the mandible and two in the maxilla. All of these failures occurred in single-implant cases. The implant survival rate was 98.1% on the maxilla and 94.3% on the mandible, with an overall survival of 96.6%. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, implants with the SLA surface have a very superior survival rate in relatively poor bone environments such as the maxilla. PMID:26734558

  7. Sputtered gold mask for deep chemical etching of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisciotta, B. P.; Gross, C.; Olive, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    Sputtered mask resists chemical attack from acid and has adherence to withstand prolonged submergence in etch solution without lifting from silicon surface. Even under prolonged etch conditions with significant undercutting, gold mask maintained excellent adhesion to silicon surface and imperviousness to acid.

  8. Investigation of the neutral-solution etch process for refractive SOE antireflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Antireflection of optically clear glass used in photovoltaic concentrator refractive secondary optical elements (SOE's) was investigated using the neutral-solution etch process developed by Schott Glass. Test coupons and SOE's made from barium zinc glass, which does not solarize under ultraviolet exposure, were successfully etched at the center point process variable conditions of 87{degrees}C and 24 hours. Reflectance of the plano-plano dropped from 7.7% to 0.8%, with a corresponding increase in transmission from 91.7% to 98.5%. The etching process uses non-hydrofluoric, relatively non-toxic chemicals in a low-cost process well suited for use by photovoltaic system manufacturers during production. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Optical properties of silicon nanowire arrays formed by metal-assisted chemical etching: evidences for light localization effect

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We study the structure and optical properties of arrays of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with a mean diameter of approximately 100?nm and length of about 125??m formed on crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrates by using metal-assisted chemical etching in hydrofluoric acid solutions. In the middle infrared spectral region, the reflectance and transmittance of the formed SiNW arrays can be described in the framework of an effective medium with the effective refractive index of about 1.3 (porosity, approximately 75%), while a strong light scattering for wavelength of 0.3 1??m results in a decrease of the total reflectance of 1%-5%, which cannot be described in the effective medium approximation. The Raman scattering intensity under excitation at approximately 1??m increases strongly in the sample with SiNWs in comparison with that in c-Si substrate. This effect is related to an increase of the light-matter interaction time due to the strong scattering of the excitation light in SiNW array. The prepared SiNWs are discussed as a kind of black silicon, which can be formed in a large scale and can be used for photonic applications as well as in molecular sensing. PMID:23009051

  10. Etch By-Products in Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Matthew T.; Coburn, J. W.; Graves, David B.

    2002-10-01

    Etch byproducts commonly play a major role in plasma composition, influencing etch rate, anisotropy, critical dimension control, and selectivity. Environmental implications associated with the etching process and subsequent chamber cleans are also a concern for new materials. In this work, experimental diagnostics were used to study silicon etch byproduct chemistry in Cl_2/O2 plasmas as a model case. We report studies using an inductively coupled plasma reactor equipped with a cooled, rf-biased chuck, a downstream FTIR spectrometer, a quartz crystal microbalance, a Langmuir probe, an ion flux wall probe, an ion mass spectrometer, a separate threshold ionization mass spectrometer for neutral radical detection, and an optical emission spectrometer . Neutral mass spectrometer measurements in pure SiCl4 were used to measure the SiCl4 electron impact direct ionization cross section and dissociative ionization thresholds for SiCl_x^+ ions. Ion and neutral mass spectrometry were used to measure plasma composition in order to demonstrate the relative importance of etch byproducts. Specie wall fluxes were then calculated and compared with in-situ wall deposition and ex-situ XPS measurements to study the wall deposition mechanism.

  11. The Effects of Using a Commercial Grade Plasma Etching Chamber to Etch Anodized Niobium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epperson, Christiana; Drake, Dereth; Winska, Kalina

    2015-11-01

    Anodized niobium surfaces are used in particle accelerators for construction of the superconducting cavities. These surfaces must be cleaned regularly to remove containments and maintain the surface smoothness. The most common method used is that of chemically etching the surface using acid baths; however, this process can affect the smoothness of the layer and is extremely time consuming and hazardous. Plasma etching is one alternative that has shown great promise. We are using a commercial grade plasma etching chamber to clean anodized niobium samples that have varying oxide layer thicknesses. Spectral profiles of the surfaces of the samples are taken before and after etching. All measured results are compared to a simple theoretical model in order to determine the effects of the etching process on each surface.

  12. Online Etching of a Neutron-Irradiated Acid-Resistant Residue of Allende — Clues to the Character and Origin of Phase Q?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holinger, S.; Riebe, M.; Clay, P. L.; Gilmour, J. D.; Ruzie, L.; Kuga, M.; Maden, C.; Busemann, H.

    2015-07-01

    The online etching noble gas study of the n-irradiated HF/HCl-residue of Allende yields a late I-Xe age, little Q-gas and a delayed gas release compared to an unirradiated residue run. First data for a larger Vigarano residue might also be presented.

  13. Shallow Etching of GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostructures in Context of HEMT Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ch. Ravi; Rajaram, G.

    2011-07-01

    Gate recess etching is a key step in the fabrication process of high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The thin n+ cap layer needs to be etched without destroying the underlying supply layer. Conventional GaAs etch solutions based on H2SO4 or H3PO4 acids have high etch rates and hence present difficulties in the control of etch rates for shallow etches. Etches using Citric acid (CA) based solutions have been reported to have potential in such applications. Such etches with varying ratio of CA:H2O2:H2O are compared. A suitable recipe has been obtained for shallow gate recess etch and a HEMT is fabricated using the process.

  14. Pre-etching vs. grinding in promotion of adhesion to intact enamel using self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Amir; Shimada, Yasushi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of grinding and pre-etching in promotion of adhesion to human intact enamel using the self-etch adhesive (SEA) Adper Easy Bond (3M ESPE). Etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE) served as control. Composite cylinders (AP-X Kuraray) were built and after 24 h micro-shear bond strengths (MSBS) were measured. Bonding interfaces were evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM). For evaluation of average roughness (Ra) and morphological analysis, treated enamel surfaces were observed under SEM and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) with 3D surface profiling. Highest bond strengths were obtained by pre-etching and grinding showed a less significant role. Phosphoric acid (PA) etching compare to grinding created significantly rougher surface (Ra: 0.72 and 0.43 m respectively). Therefore, this study recommends pre-etching the intact enamel prior to application of the adhesive instead of grinding. PMID:22673472

  15. Enhanced ferro-actuator with a porosity-controlled membrane using the sol-gel process and the HF etching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, KiSu; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a ferro-actuator using a porous polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane. In detail, we fabricated the silica-embedded PVDF membrane using a sol-gel process with PVDF solution and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) solution, where the size of the silica was determined by the ratio of the PVDF and TEOS solutions. Using hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching, the silica were removed from the silica-embedded PVDF membrane, and porous PVDF membranes with different porosities were obtained. Finally, through absorption of a ferrofluid on the porous PVDF membrane, the proposed ferro-actuator using porous PVDF membranes with different porosities was fabricated. We executed the characterization and actuation test as follows. First, the silica size of the silica-embedded PVDF membrane and the pore size of the porous PVDF membrane were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. Second, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that the silica had clearly been removed from the silica-embedded PVDF membrane by HF etching. Third, through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) of the ferro-actuators, we found that more ferrofluids were absorbed by the porous PVDF membrane when the pore of the membrane was smaller and uniformly distributed. Finally, we executed tip displacement and a blocking force test of the proposed ferro-actuator using the porous PVDF membrane. Similar to the VSM result, the ferro-actuator that used a porous PVDF membrane with smaller pores exhibited better actuation performance. The ferro-actuator that used a porous PVDF membrane displayed a tip displacement that was about 7.2-fold better and a blocking force that was about 6.5-fold better than the ferro-actuator that used a pure PVDF membrane. Thus, we controlled the pore size of the porous PVDF membrane and enhanced the actuation performance of the ferro-actuator using a porous PVDF membrane.

  16. Ion beam sputter etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1986-01-01

    An ion beam etching process which forms extremely high aspect ratio surface microstructures using thin sputter masks is utilized in the fabrication of integrated circuits. A carbon rich sputter mask together with unmasked portions of a substrate is bombarded with inert gas ions while simultaneous carbon deposition occurs. The arrival of the carbon deposit is adjusted to enable the sputter mask to have a near zero or even slightly positive increase in thickness with time while the unmasked portions have a high net sputter etch rate.

  17. Chemical downstream etching of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Simonson, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The downstream etching of tungsten and tungsten oxide has been investigated. Etching of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and e-beam deposited tungsten oxide samples was performed using atomic fluorine generated by a microwave discharge of argon and NF{sub 3}. Etching was found to be highly activated with activation energies approximated to be 6.0{plus_minus}0.5thinspkcal/mol and 5.4{plus_minus}0.4thinspkcal/mol for W and WO{sub 3}, respectively. In the case of F etching of tungsten, the addition of undischarged nitric oxide (NO) directly into the reaction chamber results in the competing effects of catalytic etch rate enhancement and the formation of a nearly stoichiometric WO{sub 3} passivating tungsten oxide film, which ultimately stops the etching process. For F etching of tungsten oxide, the introduction of downstream NO reduces the etch rate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  18. Etching fission tracks in zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique has been developed whereby fission tracks can be etched in zircon with a solution of sodium hydroxide at 220??C. Etching time varied between 15 minutes and 5 hours. Colored zircon required less etching time than the colorless varieties.

  19. Inverse metal-assisted chemical etching produces smooth high aspect ratio InP nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Mohseni, Parsian K; Song, Yi; Ishihara, Tatsumi; Li, Xiuling

    2015-01-14

    Creating high aspect ratio (AR) nanostructures by top-down fabrication without surface damage remains challenging for III-V semiconductors. Here, we demonstrate uniform, array-based InP nanostructures with lateral dimensions as small as sub-20 nm and AR > 35 using inverse metal-assisted chemical etching (I-MacEtch) in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4), a purely solution-based yet anisotropic etching method. The mechanism of I-MacEtch, in contrast to regular MacEtch, is explored through surface characterization. Unique to I-MacEtch, the sidewall etching profile is remarkably smooth, independent of metal pattern edge roughness. The capability of this simple method to create various InP nanostructures, including high AR fins, can potentially enable the aggressive scaling of InP based transistors and optoelectronic devices with better performance and at lower cost than conventional etching methods. PMID:25521615

  20. Power ultrasound irradiation during the alkaline etching process of the 2024 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutarlier, V.; Viennet, R.; Rolet, J.; Gigandet, M. P.; Hihn, J. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Prior to any surface treatment on an aluminum alloy, a surface preparation is necessary. This commonly consists in performing an alkaline etching followed by acid deoxidizing. In this work, the use of power ultrasound irradiation during the etching step on the 2024 aluminum alloy was studied. The etching rate was estimated by weight loss, and the alkaline film formed during the etching step was characterized by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The benefit of power ultrasound during the etching step was confirmed by pitting potential measurement in NaCl solution after a post-treatment (anodizing).

  1. Etching of enamel for direct bonding with a thulium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabaş Sarp, Ayşe S.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2011-03-01

    Background: Laser etching of enamel for direct bonding can decrease the risk of surface enamel loss and demineralization which are the adverse effects of acid etching technique. However, in excess of +5.5°C can cause irreversible pulpal responses. In this study, a 1940- nm Thulium Fiber Laser in CW mode was used for laser etching. Aim: Determination of the suitable Laser parameters of enamel surface etching for direct bonding of ceramic brackets and keeping that intrapulpal temperature changes below the threshold value. Material and Method: Polycrystalline ceramic orthodontic brackets were bonded on bovine teeth by using 2 different kinds of etching techniques: Acid and Laser Etching. In addition to these 3 etched groups, there was also a group which was bonded without etching. Brackets were debonded with a material testing machine. Breaking time and the load at the breaking point were measured. Intrapulpal temperature changes were recorded by a K-type Thermocouple. For all laser groups, intrapulpal temperature rise was below the threshold value of 5.5°C. Results and Conclusion: Acid-etched group ( 11.73 MPa) significantly required more debonding force than 3- second- irradiated ( 5.03 MPa) and non-etched groups ( 3.4 MPa) but the results of acid etched group and 4- second- irradiated group (7.5 MPa) showed no significant difference. Moreover, 4- second irradiated group was over the minimum acceptable value for clinical use. Also, 3- second lasing caused a significant reduction in time according to acid-etch group. As a result, 1940- nm laser irradiation is a promising method for laser etching.

  2. Anisotropic plasma etching of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, S.E.; Kosicki, B.B.

    1984-03-13

    A method for dry anisotropic etching of semiconductor material by a reactive gas infused in the presence of a low-pressure plasma discharge uses a photoresist mask superposed on a semiconductive film with the slope of the photoresist edges defined within a critical angular range to allow selective formation of a protective polymer film which prevents lateral etching of the edges of the photoresist and sidewalls of the film, while not inhibiting vertical etching, thereby allowing precision definition of the etched pattern. A novel technique to determine the conditions of the photoresist sidewall geometry necessary for polymer film formation and predictable etching behavior encapsulates the film in a thick layer of photoresist, which after cleaving the structure permits selectively etching the photoresist to expose and retain the polymer film without deformation.

  3. Effects of Acid Treatment on Dental Zirconia: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Haifeng; Shen, Shuping; Qian, Mengke; Zhang, Feimin; Chen, Chen; Tay, Franklin R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric (HF) acid, acetic acid, and citric acid treatments on the physical properties and structure of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) at ambient temperature. In total, 110 bar-shaped zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to 11 groups. The specimens in the control group (C) received no surface treatment, while those in the Cage group were hydrothermally aged at 134°C and 0.2 MPa for 20 h. Ten specimens each were immersed at ambient temperature in 5% and 40% HF acid for 2 h (40HF0), 1 day (5HF1, 40HF1), and 5 days (5HF5, 40HF5), while 10 each were immersed at ambient temperature in 10% acetic acid and 20% citric acid for 7 (AC7, CI7) and 14 days (AC14, CI14). X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to quantitatively estimate the monoclinic phase. Furthermore, flexural strength, surface roughness, and surface Vickers hardness were measured after treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the surface morphology. The Cage group specimens exhibited an increased monoclinic phase and flexural strength. Furthermore, 40% HF acid immersion decreased the flexural strength and surface hardness and deteriorated the surface finish, while 5% HF acid immersion only decreased the surface hardness. All the HF acid-immersed specimens showed an etched surface texture on SEM observations, while the other groups did not. These findings suggest that the treatment of Y-TZP with 40% HF acid at ambient temperature causes potential damage, while treatment with 5% HF acid, acetic acid, and citric acid is safe. PMID:26301413

  4. Microtensile bond strength of a resin-based fissure sealant to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-etched primary enamel.

    PubMed

    Sungurtekin-Ekci, Elif; Oztas, Nurhan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser pre-treatment alone, or associated with acid-etching, on the microtensile bond strength of a resin-based fissure sealant to primary enamel. Twenty-five human primary molars were randomly divided into five groups including (1) 35 % acid etching, (2) 2.5-W laser etching, (3) 3.5-W laser etching, (4) 2.5-W laser etching + acid etching, and (5) 3.5-W laser etching + acid etching. Er,Cr:YSGG laser was used at a wavelength of 2.780 nm and pulse duration of 140-200 μs with a repetition rate of 20 Hz. Following surface pre-treatment, the fissure sealant (ClinPro™, 3M Dental Products) was applied. Each tooth was sectioned and subjected to microtensile testing. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. The microtensile bond strength values of group 1 were significantly higher than those of group 2, while no statistically significant difference was detected between groups 1, 3, 4, and 5. It was concluded that 3.5-W laser etching produced results comparable to conventional acid etching technique, whereas 2.5-W laser etching was not able to yield adequate bonding performance. PMID:25847685

  5. ZERODUR: bending strength data for etched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Leys, Antoine; Carré, Antoine; Kerz, Franca; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    In a continuous effort since 2007 a considerable amount of new data and information has been gathered on the bending strength of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR®. By fitting a three parameter Weibull distribution to the data it could be shown that for homogenously ground surfaces minimum breakage stresses exist lying much higher than the previously applied design limits. In order to achieve even higher allowable stress values diamond grain ground surfaces have been acid etched, a procedure widely accepted as strength increasing measure. If surfaces are etched taking off layers with thickness which are comparable to the maximum micro crack depth of the preceding grinding process they also show statistical distributions compatible with a three parameter Weibull distribution. SCHOTT has performed additional measurement series with etch solutions with variable composition testing the applicability of this distribution and the possibility to achieve further increase of the minimum breakage stress. For long term loading applications strength change with time and environmental media are important. The parameter needed for prediction calculations which is combining these influences is the stress corrosion constant. Results from the past differ significantly from each other. On the basis of new investigations better information will be provided for choosing the best value for the given application conditions.

  6. Submicron patterned metal hole etching

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.; Contolini, Robert J.; Liberman, Vladimir; Morse, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    A wet chemical process for etching submicron patterned holes in thin metal layers using electrochemical etching with the aid of a wetting agent. In this process, the processed wafer to be etched is immersed in a wetting agent, such as methanol, for a few seconds prior to inserting the processed wafer into an electrochemical etching setup, with the wafer maintained horizontal during transfer to maintain a film of methanol covering the patterned areas. The electrochemical etching setup includes a tube which seals the edges of the wafer preventing loss of the methanol. An electrolyte composed of 4:1 water: sulfuric is poured into the tube and the electrolyte replaces the wetting agent in the patterned holes. A working electrode is attached to a metal layer of the wafer, with reference and counter electrodes inserted in the electrolyte with all electrodes connected to a potentiostat. A single pulse on the counter electrode, such as a 100 ms pulse at +10.2 volts, is used to excite the electrochemical circuit and perform the etch. The process produces uniform etching of the patterned holes in the metal layers, such as chromium and molybdenum of the wafer without adversely effecting the patterned mask.

  7. Bond strength with various etching times on young permanent teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.N.; Lu, T.C. )

    1991-07-01

    Tensile bond strengths of an orthodontic resin cement were compared for 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, or 120-second etching times, with a 37% phosphoric acid solution on the enamel surfaces of young permanent teeth. Fifty extracted premolars from 9- to 16-year-old children were used for testing. An orthodontic composite resin was used to bond the bracket directly onto the buccal surface of the enamel. The tensile bond strengths were tested with an Instron machine. Bond failure interfaces between bracket bases and teeth surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope and calculated with mapping of energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The results of tensile bond strength for 15-, 30-, 60-, or 90-second etching times were not statistically different. For the 120-second etching time, the decrease was significant. Of the bond failures, 43%-49% occurred between bracket and resin interface, 12% to 24% within the resin itself, 32%-40% between resin and tooth interface, and 0% to 4% contained enamel fragments. There was no statistical difference in percentage of bond failure interface distribution between bracket base and resin, resin and enamel, or the enamel detachment. Cohesive failure within the resin itself at the 120-second etching time was less than at other etching times, with a statistical significance. To achieve good retention, to decrease enamel loss, and to reduce moisture contamination in the clinic, as well as to save chairside time, a 15-second etching time is suggested for teenage orthodontic patients.

  8. Decontamination of metals using chemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Lerch, Ronald E.; Partridge, Jerry A.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to chemical etching process for reclaiming contaminated equipment wherein a reduction-oxidation system is included in a solution of nitric acid to contact the metal to be decontaminated and effect reduction of the reduction-oxidation system, and includes disposing a pair of electrodes in the reduced solution to permit passage of an electrical current between said electrodes and effect oxidation of the reduction-oxidation system to thereby regenerate the solution and provide decontaminated equipment that is essentially radioactive contamination-free.

  9. On the influence of etch pits in the overall dissolution rate of apatite basal sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencar, Igor; Guedes, Sandro; Palissari, Rosane; Hadler, Julio C.

    2015-09-01

    Determination of efficiencies for particle detection plays a central role for proper estimation of reaction rates. If chemical etching is employed in the revelation of latent particle tracks in solid-state detectors, dissolution rates and etchable lengths are important factors governing the revelation and observation. In this work, the mask method, where a reference part of the sample is protected during dissolution, was employed to measure step heights in basal sections of apatite etched with a nitric acid, HNO, solution at a concentration of 1.1 M and a temperature of 20 C. We show a drastic increase in the etching velocity as the number of etch pits in the surface augments, in accordance with the dissolution stepwave model, where the outcrop of each etch pit generates a continuous sequence of stepwaves. The number of etch pits was varied by irradiation with neutrons and perpendicularly incident heavy ions. The size dependence of the etch-pit opening with etching duration for ion (200-300 MeV 152Sm and 238U) tracks was also investigated. There is no distinction for the etch pits between the different ions, and the dissolution seems to be governed by the opening velocity when a high number of etch pits are present in the surface. Measurements of the etchable lengths of these ion tracks show an increase in these lengths when samples are not pre-annealed before irradiation. We discuss the implications of these findings for fission-track modelling.

  10. Northern Arabia Etched Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 23 May 2002) The Science Many places on Mars display scabby, eroded landscapes that commonly are referred to as etched terrain. These places have a ragged, tortured look that reveals a geologic history of intense deposition and erosion. This THEMIS image shows such a place. Here a 10 km diameter crater is superposed on the floor of a 40 km diameter crater, most of which is outside of the image but apparent in the MOLA context image. The rugged crater rim material intermingles with low, flat-topped mesas and layers with irregular outlines along with dune-like ridges on many of the flat surfaces. The horizontal layers that occur throughout the scene at different elevations are evidence of repeated episodes of deposition. The apparent ease with which these deposits have been eroded, most likely by wind, suggests that they are composed of poorly consolidated material. Air-fall sediments are the likely candidate for this material rather than lava flows. The dune-like ridges are probably inactive granule ripples produced from the interaction of wind and erosional debris. The large interior crater displays features that are the result of deposition and subsequent erosion. Its raised rim is barely discernable due to burial while piles and blocks of slumped material along the interior circumference attest to the action of erosion. Some of the blocks retain the same texture as the surrounding undisrupted surface. It appears as if the crater had been buried long enough for the overlying material to be eroded into the texture seen today. Then at some point this overburden foundered and collapsed into the crater. Continuing erosion has caused the upper layer to retreat back from what was probably the original rim of the crater, producing the noncircular appearance seen today. The length of time represented by this sequence of events as well as the conditions necessary to produce them are unknown. The Story Have you ever seen an ink etching, where the artistic cross-hatching of lines creates the image of a town or a landscape? Click on the large THEMIS image above, and you'll see why this scabby, eroded landscape is known as etched terrain. Etched terrain is found in lots of areas of Mars. These places have a ragged, tortured look that reveals a geologic history where material has been deposited and eroded away with great intensity over time. Much of the terrain looks like peeling, layered-on paint. In a sense, that's what it's all about. Deposits of dust and dirt settled down from the air in layer after uneven layer, while the wind kept eroding it away. Dune-like ridges also mark the surface in tiny ripples. Unlike the loose sand dunes we're familiar with on Earth, these ridges are probably harder and more stationary, They are produced by long-term interactions between the sculpting, knife-like action of the Martian wind and the deposited materials of dust and 'dirt' on the surface. What we can also see in this image is a six-mile-wide crater. If you look at the context image to the right, you can see that it is actually a crater within a crater. The larger crater is about 24 miles wide in diameter. (Students! How many times bigger is the larger crater than the one that lies inside of it? If you look at the context image, you can get a really good sense of what 'four times bigger' really means.) What's interesting about this crater is that it doesn't have typical features known to many craters: it isn't nice-and-neatly round and its raised rim is barely noticeable. That's because there's been a whole lot of depositing and eroding going on here too. After the impact crater formed, it was probably entirely buried by deposits over time. In fact, it was probably buried long enough for the overlying material to be eroded into the texture seen today. At some point, the load on top foundered and collapsed into the crater. Around the inside circumference of the crater, you can see piles of slumped material (material that has slid downslope). Some of these blocks of material have the same texture as surrounding terrain that hasn't been disrupted. That's because of continuing erosion acting on all of these features. In the upper layers, continuing erosion has also caused a retreat from the original rim of the crater, producing the noncircular shape seen today.

  11. Sputter etching of hemispherical bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiesser, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Technique was developed for fabricating three dimensional pumping grooves on gas bearings by sputter etching. Method eliminates problems such as groove nonuniformity, profile, and finish, which are associated with normal grooving methods.

  12. Etching and Growth of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seabaugh, A. C.; Mattauch, R., J.

    1983-01-01

    In-place process for etching and growth of gallium arsenide calls for presaturation of etch and growth melts by arsenic source crystal. Procedure allows precise control of thickness of etch and newly grown layer on substrate. Etching and deposition setup is expected to simplify processing and improve characteristics of gallium arsenide lasers, high-frequency amplifiers, and advanced integrated circuits.

  13. Controlled in situ etch-back

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Seabaugh, A. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A controlled in situ etch-back technique is disclosed in which an etch melt and a growth melt are first saturated by a source-seed crystal and thereafter etch-back of a substrate takes place by the slightly undersaturated etch melt, followed by LPE growth of a layer by the growth melt, which is slightly supersaturated.

  14. Wet Etching of TiO2-Based Precursor Amorphous Films for Transparent Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Junpei; Hirose, Yasushi; Sakai, Enju; Nakao, Shoichiro; Hitosugi, Taro; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    We investigated wet etching of Nb-doped anatase TiO2 (TNO) transparent conducting thin films and their precursors in an amorphous phase deposited by rf sputtering on glass substrates. The polycrystalline TNO films showed a very low etching rate of less than 0.06 nm/min in concentrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4) even at elevated temperatures up to 95 °C. In contrast, H2SO4 etched the precursor films at a rate of 1.4 nm/min at 95 °C. The etching rate of the amorphous films followed the Arrhenius equation, leading us to conjecture that a much higher etching rate of ˜230 nm/min can be achieved at 170 °C. These results indicate that wet-etching of precursor amorphous films prior to crystallization represents a practical and low-cost lithographic technique for patterning TiO2-based transparent electrodes.

  15. Which self-etch bonding systems are suitable for which clinical indications?

    PubMed

    Haller, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Self-etch bonding systems are promoted as a time-saving and user-friendly alternative to etch-and-rinse bonding systems. Self-etch adhesives are characterized by a relatively mild etching effect, resulting in a relatively low incidence of postoperative hypersensitivity. On the other hand, their mild etching effect causes a reduction in bond strength to enamel compared to that achieved with phosphoric acid etching. All-in-one adhesives still suffer from less-than-optimal initial bond strengths and from inadequate durability of the bond. Future developments need to focus on the elimination of water deposits along the adhesive interface of all-in-one adhesives. While self-etch adhesives may yield acceptable results when applied in combination with light-cured composite resin, their acidic monomers inhibit the polymerization of auto-cured and dual-cured composite resins. Unfortunately, most "self-cure" or "dual-cure" activators do not overcome this problem. This incompatibility has to be taken into consideration when using self-etch adhesives for adhesive cementation and for core build-up restorations. When assessing self-etch bonding systems, it should be noted that they do not represent a homogenous category of materials but rather comprise a great variety of different types of products, each with specific strengths and weaknesses. PMID:23971056

  16. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  17. Method of etching zirconium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, L.S.; Kwiatkowski, B.

    1988-03-31

    The invention described herein may be manufactured, used, and licensed by or for the Government for governmental purposes without the payment to us of any royalty thereon. This invention relates in general to a method of etching, zirconium diboride(ZrB/sub 2/) and, in particular, to a method of dry etching a thin film of ZrB/sub 2/ that has been deposited onto a substrate and patterned using photolithography. U.S. patent application S.N. 156, 124, filed 16 February, 1988, of Linda S. Heath for Method of Etching Titanium Diboride and assigned to a common assignee and with which this application is copending describes and claims a method of etching titanium diboride with a dry etch. Zirconium diboride, like titanium diboride, TiB/sub 2/, has become of interest in laboratory research because of its resistance to change or degradation at high temperatures. By adjusting the process parameters, one is able to attain etch rates of 67 to 140 A/min for ZrB/sub 2/. This is useful for patterning ZrB/sub 2/ as a diffusion barrier or a Schottky contact to semiconductors. The ZrB/sub 2/ film may be on a GaAs substrate.

  18. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  19. Radical Beam Ion Beam Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Shashank Chandrashekhar

    High quality thin films of high temperature superconductors can be deposited by a number of techniques. However, superconducting devices cannot be realized unless a suitable etching technique is also developed. In this work, dry etching of rm Y_1Ba_2Cu_3O_{x } superconducting thin films was studied in a radical beam ion beam etching (RBIBE) reactor. Etching using ionic, molecular, and radical beams (individually or in combination) was performed. The Ar ^+ beam was characterized for ion energy distribution and flux. The Cl-radical beam was produced by dissociation of Cl_2 in a microwave-generated remote plasma. A combined theoretical/experimental analysis of the radical beam reactor was carried out to determine the radical flux impinging on the substrate. Models for the plasma (radical source) and the downstream section of the reactor were developed. The influence of reactor dimensions and operating conditions on the Cl-radical density and flux was determined. Model predictions were tested by optical emission actinometry and etching of heavily P-doped polysilicon. By using the wall recombination probability of radicals as the only adjustable parameter, good agreement between predicted and measured Cl-radical density in the plasma and at the reactor exit was obtained. The same methodology can be applied to remote plasma processing in general. The sputtering yield of rm Y_1Ba _2Cu_3O_{x}x under Ar^+ bombardment was determined. A damage-free lithographic process capable of exposing micron -size features was developed. rm Y_1Ba _2Cu_3O_{x} microbridges were etched using Ar-ion milling to study the intrinsic as well as modified properties of the superconductor. The resolution limit of ion milling was found to be 1600 A. Molecular chlorine did not etch the superconductor at temperatures up to 500^circC. In contrast, a Cl-radical beam was found to rapidly chlorinate the film, thereby destroying superconductivity in the exposed areas. Based on this finding, a new patterning technique was developed. Simultaneous exposure of the superconductor to an ion beam and a molecular or atomic beam resulted in an enhancement of the etch rate by up to 50% compared to the ion milling rate. Finally, a novel technique involving gas sequencing alternating with ion bombardment was developed to etch Cu thin films anisotropically, an unsolved problem up until now.

  20. Adiabatic tapered optical fiber fabrication in two step etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenari, Z.; Latifi, H.; Ghamari, S.; Hashemi, R. S.; Doroodmand, F.

    2016-01-01

    A two-step etching method using HF acid and Buffered HF is proposed to fabricate adiabatic biconical optical fiber tapers. Due to the fact that the etching rate in second step is almost 3 times slower than the previous droplet etching method, terminating the fabrication process is controllable enough to achieve a desirable fiber diameter. By monitoring transmitted spectrum, final diameter and adiabaticity of tapers are deduced. Tapers with losses about 0.3 dB in air and 4.2 dB in water are produced. The biconical fiber taper fabricated using this method is used to excite whispering gallery modes (WGMs) on a microsphere surface in an aquatic environment. So that they are suitable to be used in applications like WGM biosensors.

  1. An evaluation and comparison of orthodontic bracket bond strengths achieved with self-etching primer.

    PubMed

    Grubisa, Helen S I; Heo, Giseon; Raboud, Don; Glover, Kenneth E; Major, Paul W

    2004-08-01

    The bonding of orthodontic brackets to enamel is a multistep process. To simplify bonding and decrease chair time, Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) has been introduced; the primer combines the etching, rinsing, and priming steps. This in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strengths and interoperator variability of self-etching primer, as compared with conventional phosphoric acid etching with 2 common orthodontic resins. A total of 214 teeth were bonded, according to the following protocols: group A: self-etching primer plus Transbond XT light-cured resin (3M Unitek); group B: 35% phosphoric acid (15 seconds) plus Transbond XT resin; and group C: 37% phosphoric acid (15 seconds) plus Enlight bonding resin (Ormco, Glendora, Calif). Significantly higher bond strengths were seen in group B than in group A (P =.004) and group C (P =.002). The mean shear bond strengths of group A were not significantly different from those of group C (P =.99). When 3 orthodontists bonded a total of 60 premolars using the protocols of groups A and B, significant differences in shear bond strengths and strength ranking were found. The mean values they obtained using the self-etching primer were not significantly different, but significant differences in mean values were found between operators when the phosphoric acid-etching technique was used. PMID:15316477

  2. ION BEAM ETCHING EFFECTS IN BIOLOGICAL MICROANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygen ion beam sputter etching used in SIMS has been shown to produce morphologic effects which have similarities and differences in comparison to rf plasma etching of biological specimens. Sputter yield variations resulting from structural microheterogeneity are illustrated (e....

  3. Selective emitter using a screen printed etch barrier in crystalline silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyuwan; Kim, Bonggi; Lee, Hoongjoo; Lee, Youn-Jung; Park, Cheolmin; Balaji, Nagarajan; Ju, Minkyu; Choi, Jaewoo; Yi, Junsin

    2012-07-01

    The low level doping of a selective emitter by etch back is an easy and low cost process to obtain a better blue response from a solar cell. This work suggests that the contact resistance of the selective emitter can be controlled by wet etching with the commercial acid barrier paste that is commonly applied in screen printing. Wet etching conditions such as acid barrier curing time, etchant concentration, and etching time have been optimized for the process, which is controllable as well as fast. The acid barrier formed by screen printing was etched with HF and HNO3 (1:200) solution for 15 s, resulting in high sheet contact resistance of 90 Ω/sq. Doping concentrations of the electrode contact portion were 2 × 1021 cm-3 in the low sheet resistance (Rs) region and 7 × 1019 cm-3 in the high Rs region. Solar cells of 12.5 × 12.5 cm2 in dimensions with a wet etch back selective emitter J sc of 37 mAcm-2, open circuit voltage ( V oc) of 638.3 mV and efficiency of 18.13% were fabricated. The result showed an improvement of about 13 mV on V oc compared to those of the reference solar cell fabricated with the reactive-ion etching back selective emitter and with J sc of 36.90 mAcm-2, V oc of 625.7 mV, and efficiency of 17.60%.

  4. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  5. Semiconductor etching by hyperthermal neutral beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K. (Inventor); Giapis, Konstantinos P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An at-least dual chamber apparatus and method in which high flux beams of fast moving neutral reactive species are created, collimated and used to etch semiconductor or metal materials from the surface of a workpiece. Beams including halogen atoms are preferably used to achieve anisotropic etching with good selectivity at satisfactory etch rates. Surface damage and undercutting are minimized.

  6. The effect of additional etching and curing mechanism of composite resin on the dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Su; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of additional acid etching and curing mechanism (light-curing or self-curing) of a composite resin on the dentin bond strength and compatibility of one-step self-etching adhesives. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen human permanent molars were randomly divided into eight groups according to the adhesives used (All-Bond Universal: ABU, Clearfil S3 Bond: CS3), additional acid etching (additional acid etching performed: EO, no additional acid etching performed: EX), and composite resins (Filtek Z-250: Z250, Clearfil FII New Bond: CFNB). Group 1: ABU-EO-Z250, Group 2: ABU-EO-CFNB, Group 3: ABU-EX-Z250, Group 4: ABU-EX-CFNB, Group 5: CS3-EO-Z250, Group 6: CS3-EO-CFNB, Group 7: CS3-EX-Z250, Group 8: CS3-EX-CFNB. After bonding procedures, composite resins were built up on dentin surfaces. After 24-hour water storage, the teeth were sectioned to make 10 specimens for each group. The microtensile bond strength test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The failure mode of the fractured specimens was examined by means of an optical microscope at ×20 magnification. The data was analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post-hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS Additional etching groups showed significantly higher values than the no additional etching group when using All-Bond Universal. The light-cured composite resin groups showed significantly higher values than the self-cured composite resin groups in the Clearfil S3 Bond. CONCLUSION The additional acid etching is beneficial for the dentin bond strength when using low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives, and low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives are compatible with self-cured composite resin. The acidity of the one-step self-etch adhesives is an influencing factor in terms of the dentin bonding strength and incompatibility with a self-cured composite resin. PMID:24353889

  7. Note: Dissolved hydrogen detection in power transformer oil based on chemically etched fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Ma, Guo-ming; Song, Hong-tu; Zhou, Hong-yang; Li, Cheng-rong; Luo, Ying-ting; Wang, Hong-bin

    2015-10-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor based on chemically etched cladding to detect dissolved hydrogen is proposed and studied in this paper. Low hydrogen concentration tests have been carried out in mixed gases and transformer oil to investigate the repeatability and sensitivity. Moreover, to estimate the influence of etched cladding thickness, a physical model of FBG-based hydrogen sensor is analyzed. Experimental results prove that thin cladding chemically etched by HF acid solution improves the response to hydrogen detection in oil effectively. At last, the sensitivity of FBG sensor chemically etched 16 μm could be as high as 0.060 pm/(μl/l), increased by more than 30% in comparison to un-etched FBG.

  8. Post-Synthetic Anisotropic Wet-Chemical Etching of Colloidal Sodalite ZIF Crystals.

    PubMed

    Avci, Civan; Ariez-Soriano, Javier; Carn-Snchez, Arnau; Guillerm, Vincent; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2015-11-23

    Controlling the shape of metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals is important for understanding their crystallization and useful for myriad applications. However, despite the many advances in shaping of inorganic nanoparticles, post-synthetic shape control of MOFs and, in general, molecular crystals remains embryonic. Herein, we report using a simple wet-chemistry process at room temperature to control the anisotropic etching of colloidal ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 crystals. Our work enables uniform reshaping of these porous materials into unprecedented morphologies, including cubic and tetrahedral crystals, and even hollow boxes, by an acid-base reaction and subsequent sequestration of leached metal ions. Etching tests on these ZIFs reveal that etching occurs preferentially in the crystallographic directions richer in metal-ligand bonds; that, along these directions, the etching rate tends to be faster on the crystal surfaces of higher dimensionality; and that the etching can be modulated by adjusting the pH of the etchant solution. PMID:26458081

  9. Note: Dissolved hydrogen detection in power transformer oil based on chemically etched fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Ma, Guo-ming; Song, Hong-tu; Zhou, Hong-yang; Li, Cheng-rong; Luo, Ying-ting; Wang, Hong-bin

    2015-10-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor based on chemically etched cladding to detect dissolved hydrogen is proposed and studied in this paper. Low hydrogen concentration tests have been carried out in mixed gases and transformer oil to investigate the repeatability and sensitivity. Moreover, to estimate the influence of etched cladding thickness, a physical model of FBG-based hydrogen sensor is analyzed. Experimental results prove that thin cladding chemically etched by HF acid solution improves the response to hydrogen detection in oil effectively. At last, the sensitivity of FBG sensor chemically etched 16 μm could be as high as 0.060 pm/(μl/l), increased by more than 30% in comparison to un-etched FBG. PMID:26521000

  10. Coprecipitation of Ti, Zr, and Hf as Rf homologs with La fluoride from solutions of hydrofluoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, N. V.; Bozhikov, G. A.; Berdonosov, S. S.; Lebedev, V. Ya.; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2011-07-01

    The discovery of relatively longer half-lives of transactinides {104/267}Rf ( T 1/2 ˜ 1.3 h) and {105/268}Db( T 1/2 ˜ 29 h) offers new approaches for the study of chemical properties of Rf and Db in solutions. This work examines the effects that the pH of a solution, HF concentration, the concentration of proper ions in the solution, the presence of foreign multivalent ions in the solution, and the contact time of liquid and solid phases have on the coprecipitation of radioisotopes of group-4 elements Ti, Zr, and Hf with fluoride La. The morphology of the solid phase was studied using electron microscopy methods (SEM and TEM); an X-ray phase analysis of the obtained solid phases was performed. It was inferred that the fluoride forms of Zr and Hf cocrystallize with LaF3. The possibilities of using coprecipitation for examining the influence that the relativistic effects have on the chemical properties of Rf and Db were discussed.

  11. Effect of grain orientation on chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Peter J; Bonyár, Attila

    2012-02-01

    The effect of grain orientation on the effectiveness of pre-etching before color etching was investigated by the help of electron back scattering diffraction and atomic force microscopy in case of cast iron. Strong correlation was found between the angle between the specimen normal and the [001] orientation of the ferrite grains and the depth of the etching. If the angle between the specimen normal and the [001] direction of the ferritic grain is small, then the speed of the etching is low, but the lateral variation of the etching speed within the grain is larger. PMID:22030301

  12. Secret of formulating a selective etching or cleaning solution for boron nitride (BN) thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Wing C.

    2004-04-01

    Boron nitride thin film has a very unique characteristic of extremely high chemical inertness. Thus, it is a better hard mask than silicon nitride for aggressive etching solutions, such as the isotropic HF/HNO3/CH3COOH (or HNA) etchant for silicon. However, because of its high chemical inertness, it is also difficult to remove it. Plasma etching with Freon gases can etch the boron nitride film, but it is unselective to silicon, silicon dioxide or silicon nitride. Cleaning up the boron nitride film with plasma etching will usually leave a damaged or foggy surface. A special wet chemical solution has been developed for etching or cleaning boron nitride film selectively. It can etch boron nitride, but not the coatings or substrates of silicon, silicon nitride and silicon dioxide. It is a very strong oxidizing agent consisting of concentrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but different from the common Piranha Etch. It may be even more interesting to understand the logic or secret behind of how to formulate a new selective etching solution. Various chemical and chemical engineering aspects were considered carefully in our development process. These included creating the right electrochemical potential for the etchant, ensuring large differences in chemical kinetics to make the reactions selective, providing proper mass transfer for removing the by products, etc.

  13. Ion-beam-assisted etching of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efremow, N. N.; Geis, M. W.; Flanders, D. C.; Lincoln, G. A.; Economou, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity, low RF loss, and inertness of diamond make it useful in traveling wave tubes operating in excess of 500 GHz. Such use requires the controlled etching of type IIA diamond to produce grating like structures tens of micrometers deep. Previous work on reactive ion etching with O2 gave etching rates on the order of 20 nm/min and poor etch selectivity between the masking material (Ni or Cr) and the diamond. An alternative approach which uses a Xe(+) beam and a reactive gas flux of NO2 in an ion-beam-assisted etching system is reported. An etching rate of 200 nm/min was obtained with an etching rate ratio of 20 between the diamond and an aluminum mask.

  14. Improved device reliability in organic light emitting devices by controlling the etching of indium zinc oxide anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Jie; Lou, Yan-Hui; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    A controllable etching process for indium zinc oxide (IZO) films was developed by using a weak etchant of oxalic acid with a slow etching ratio. With controllable etching time and temperature, a patterned IZO electrode with smoothed surface morphology and slope edge was achieved. For the practical application in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), a suppression of the leak current in the current—voltage characteristics of OLEDs was observed. It resulted in a 1.6 times longer half lifetime in the IZO-based OLEDs compared to that using an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode etched by a conventional strong etchant of aqua regia.

  15. Evaluation of over-etching technique in the endodontically treated tooth restoration

    PubMed Central

    Migliau, Guido; Piccoli, Luca; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The main purpose of a post-endodontic restoration with posts is to guarantee the retention of the restorative material. The aim of the study was to examine, through the push-out test, how bond strength between the post and the dentin varied with etching time with 37% orthophosphoric acid, before cementation of a glass fiber post. Moreover, it has been examined if over-etching (application time of the acid: 2 minutes) was an effective technique to improve the adhesion to the endodontic substrate, after highlighting the problems of adhesion concerning its anatomical characteristics and the changes after the endodontic treatment. Highest bond strength values were found by etching the substrate for 30 sec., while over-etching didn’t improve bond strength to the endodontic substrate. PMID:26161247

  16. Evaluation of over-etching technique in the endodontically treated tooth restoration.

    PubMed

    Migliau, Guido; Piccoli, Luca; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of a post-endodontic restoration with posts is to guarantee the retention of the restorative material. The aim of the study was to examine, through the push-out test, how bond strength between the post and the dentin varied with etching time with 37% orthophosphoric acid, before cementation of a glass fiber post. Moreover, it has been examined if over-etching (application time of the acid: 2 minutes) was an effective technique to improve the adhesion to the endodontic substrate, after highlighting the problems of adhesion concerning its anatomical characteristics and the changes after the endodontic treatment. Highest bond strength values were found by etching the substrate for 30 sec., while over-etching didn't improve bond strength to the endodontic substrate. PMID:26161247

  17. Surface modification via wet chemical etching of single-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic application.

    PubMed

    Reshak, A H; Shahimin, M M; Shaari, S; Johan, N

    2013-11-01

    The potential of solar cells have not been fully tapped due to the lack of energy conversion efficiency. There are three important mechanisms in producing high efficiency cells to harvest solar energy; reduction of light reflectance, enhancement of light trapping in the cell and increment of light absorption. The current work represent studies conducted in surface modification of single-crystalline silicon solar cells using wet chemical etching techniques. Two etching types are applied; alkaline etching (KOH:IPA:DI) and acidic etching (HF:HNO3:DI). The alkaline solution resulted in anisotropic profile that leads to the formation of inverted pyramids. While acidic solution formed circular craters along the front surface of silicon wafer. This surface modification will leads to the reduction of light reflectance via texturizing the surface and thereby increases the short circuit current and conversion rate of the solar cells. PMID:24139943

  18. Method for etching thin films of niobium and niobium-containing compounds for preparing superconductive circuits

    DOEpatents

    Kampwirth, Robert T.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Falco, Charles M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method of preparing thin film superconducting electrical circuits of niobium or niobium compounds in which a thin film of the niobium or niobium compound is applied to a nonconductive substrate, and covered with a layer of photosensitive material. The sensitive material is in turn covered with a circuit pattern exposed and developed to form a mask of the circuit in photoresistive material on the surface of the film. The unmasked excess niobium film is removed by contacting the substrate with an aqueous etching solution of nitric acid, sulfuric acid and hydrogen fluoride, which will rapidly etch the niobium compound without undercutting the photoresist. A modification of the etching solution will permit thin films to be lifted from the substrate without further etching.

  19. Method for etching thin films of niboium and niobium-containing compounds for preparing superconductive circuits

    DOEpatents

    Kampwirth, R.T.; Schuller, I.K.; Falco, C.M.

    1979-11-23

    An improved method of preparing thin film superconducting electrical circuits of niobium or niobium compounds is provided in which a thin film of the niobium or niobium compound is applied to a nonconductive substrate and covered with a layer of photosensitive material. The sensitive material is in turn covered with a circuit pattern exposed and developed to form a mask of the circuit in photoresistive material on the surface of the film. The unmasked excess niobium film is removed by contacting the substrate with an aqueous etching solution of nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and hydrogen fluoride, which will rapidly etch the niobium compound without undercutting the photoresist. A modification of the etching solution will permit thin films to be lifted from the substrate without further etching.

  20. Fabrication of IR-transparent microfluidic devices by anisotropic etching of channels in CaF2.

    PubMed

    Lehmkuhl, Brynson; Noblitt, Scott D; Krummel, Amber T; Henry, Charles S

    2015-11-21

    A simple fabrication method for generating infrared (IR) transparent microfluidic devices using etched CaF2 is demonstrated. To etch microfluidic channels, a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic device was reversibly sealed on a CaF2 plate and acid was pumped through the channel network to perform anisotropic etching of the underlying CaF2 surface. To complete the CaF2 microfluidic device, another CaF2 plate was sealed over the etched channel using a 700 nm thick layer of PDMS adhesive. The impact of different acids and their concentrations on etching was studied, with HNO3 giving the best results in terms of channel roughness and etch rates. Etch rate was determined at etching times ranging from 4-48 hours and showed a linear correlation with etching time. The IR transparency of the CaF2 device was established using a Fourier Transform IR microscope and showed that the device could be used in the mid-IR region. Finally, utility of the device was demonstrated by following the reaction of N-methylacetamide and D2O, which results in an amide peak shift to 1625 cm(-1) from 1650 cm(-1), using an FTIR microscope. PMID:26450455

  1. Plasmoids for etching and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In this manuscript we show fascinating properties of plasmoids, which are known to be self-sustained plasma entities, and can exist without being in contact with any power supply. Plasmoids are produced in a filamentary discharge in a Ar/CH4 mixture with a high production rate of about 105 s-1. It is observed that plasmoids etch the solid amorphous hydrocarbon film with high efficiency. Energy density of the plasmoid, which is estimated on the basis of glowing area of plasmoids in the photographic image and sublimation enthalpy of the etched hydrocarbon film, amounts to about 90 J m-3. This value is much lower than the energy density of observed ball lightning (natural plasmoid). A very surprising property is an attraction between plasmoids, and the formation of plasmoid-groups. Because of this attractive force, carbon material, which is collected in plasmoids by etching of the hydrocarbon film or by propagation through a methane/argon gas mixture, is compressed into crystals.

  2. Reactive Ion Etching of Polymers in Oxygen Based Plasmas: a Study of Etch Mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Sandra Wolterman

    The reactive ion etching of polymers has been studied in oxygen-based plasmas in an effort to understand the contributions of various mechanisms to the etching of these materials. Of the four active etch mechanisms; surface damage promoted etching, chemical sputtering, chemically enhanced physical sputtering, and direct reactive ion etching; the emphasis of this work has been on determining the relative contribution of direct reactive ion etching to the overall etching process. The etching of photoresist, polyimide, and amorphous carbon in O_2-CF_4 plasmas was studied in an asymmetrical reactive ion etcher at pressures ranging from 5 to 100 mtorr. Etch yield, ion flux, and oxygen atom concentration data were collected. The fit of this data to a linear model proposed by Joubert et al. (J. Appl. Phys., 65, 1989, 5096) was compared to the fit of the data to a nonlinear model proposed by the author. The linear model accounts for contribution due to three of the four etch mechanisms, but does not include contributions due to direct reactive ion etching. The nonlinear model accounts for contributions due to all four etch mechanisms. Experimental results indicate that the nonlinear model provides a better fit to the data than does the linear model. The relative contribution of direct reactive ion etching to the etching of photoresist ranges from 27% to 81% as the pressure decreases from 100 to 5 mtorr. Similar results are obtained for polyimide and amorphous carbon.

  3. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with Er-YAG laser etching

    PubMed Central

    Raji, S. Hamid; Birang, Reza; Majdzade, Fateme; Ghorbanipour, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Based on contradictory findings concerning the use of lasers for enamel etching, the purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of teeth prepared for bonding with Er-YAG laser etching and compare them with phosphoric acid etching. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study forty – eight premolars, extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly divided in to three groups. Thirty-two teeth were exposed to laser energy for 25 s: 16 teeth at 100 mj setting and 16 teeth at 150 mj setting. Sixteen teeth were etched with 37% phosphoric acid. The shear bond strength of bonded brackets with the Transbond XT adhesive system was measured with the Zwick testing machine. Descriptive statistics, Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, of homogeneity of variances, one- way analysis of variances and Tukey's test and Kruskal Wallis were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean shear bond strength of the teeth lased with 150 mj was 12.26 ± 4.76 MPa, which was not significantly different from the group with acid etching (15.26 ± 4.16 MPa). Irradiation with 100 mj resulted in mean bond strengths of 9.05 ± 3.16 MPa, which was significantly different from that of acid etching (P < 0.001). Conclusions: laser etching at 150 and 100 mj was adequate for bond strength but the failure pattern of brackets bonded with laser etching is dominantly at adhesive – enamel interface and is not safe for enamel during debonding. PMID:23087733

  4. In-Plasma Photo-Assisted Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre

    2015-09-01

    A methodology to precisely control the ion energy distribution (IED) on a substrate allowed the study of silicon etching as a function of ion energy at near-threshold energies. Surprisingly, a substantial etching rate was observed, independent of ion energy, when the ion energy was below the ion-assisted etching threshold (~ 16 eV for etching silicon with chlorine plasma). Careful experiments led to the conclusion that this ``sub-threshold'' etching was due to photons, predominately at wavelengths <1700 Å. Among the plasmas investigated, photo-assisted etching (PAE) was lowest in Br2/Ar gas mixtures and highest in HBr/Cl2/Ar. Above threshold etching rates scaled with the square root of ion energy. PAE rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy (SEM and AFM) revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. In-plasma PAE may be be a complicating factor for processes that require low ion energies, such as atomic layer etching. On the other hand PAE could produce sub-10 nm high aspect ratio (6:1) features by highly selective plasma etching to transfer nascent nanopatterns in silicon. Work supported by DOE Plasma Science Center and NSF.

  5. Etching method for photoresists or polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R. (Inventor); Wydeven, Theodore J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method for etching or removing polymers, photoresists, and organic contaminants from a substrate is disclosed. The method includes creating a more reactive gas species by producing a plasma discharge in a reactive gas such as oxygen and contacting the resulting gas species with a sacrificial solid organic material such as polyethylene or polyvinyl fluoride, reproducing a highly reactive gas species, which in turn etches the starting polymer, organic contaminant, or photoresist. The sample to be etched is located away from the plasma glow discharge region so as to avoid damaging the substrate by exposure to high energy particles and electric fields encountered in that region. Greatly increased etching rates are obtained. This method is highly effective for etching polymers such as polyimides and photoresists that are otherwise difficult or slow to etch downstream from an electric discharge in a reactive gas.

  6. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.; Gerardo, James B.

    1989-01-01

    The surfaces of solid ionic substrates are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing an ionic substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g. a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrance of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic salt substrates, e.g., a solid inorganic salt such as LiNbO.sub.3, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  7. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1987-08-25

    The surfaces of solids are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing a substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g., a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrence of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic substrates, e.g., LiNbO/sub 3/, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  8. Calibrating etch model with SEM contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, François; Omran, A.; Jantzen, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    To ensure a high patterning quality, the etch effects have to be corrected within the OPC recipe in addition to the traditional lithographic effects. This requires the calibration of an accurate etch model and optimization of its implementation in the OPC flow. Using SEM contours is a promising approach to get numerous and highly reliable measurements especially for 2D structures for etch model calibration. A 28nm active layer was selected to calibrate and verify an etch model with 50 structures in total. We optimized the selection of the calibration structures as well as the model density. The implementation of the etch model to adjust the litho target layer allows a significant reduction of weak points. We also demonstrate that the etch model incorporated to the ORC recipe and run on large design can predict many hotspots.

  9. Etching of glass microchips with supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Karásek, Pavel; Grym, Jakub; Roth, Michal; Planeta, Josef; Foret, František

    2015-01-01

    A novel method of etching channels in glass microchips with the most tunable solvent, water, was tested as an alternative to common hydrogen fluoride-containing etchants. The etching properties of water strongly depend on temperature and pressure, especially in the vicinity of the water critical point. The chips were etched at the subcritical, supercritical and critical temperature of water, and the resulting channel shape, width, depth and surface morphology were studied by scanning electron microscopy and 3D laser profilometry. Channels etched with the hot water were compared with the chips etched with standard hydrogen fluoride-containing solution. Depending on the water pressure and temperature, the silicate dissolved from the glass could be re-deposited on the channel surface. This interesting phenomenon is described together with the conditions necessary for its utilization. The results illustrate the versatility of pure water as a glass etching and surface morphing agent. PMID:25372151

  10. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  11. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., George W.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  12. Etch challenges for DSA implementation in CMOS via patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta Barros, P.; Barnola, S.; Gharbi, A.; Argoud, M.; Servin, I.; Tiron, R.; Chevalier, X.; Navarro, C.; Nicolet, C.; Lapeyre, C.; Monget, C.; Martinez, E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on the etch challenges to overcome for the implementation of PS-b-PMMA block copolymer's Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) in CMOS via patterning level. Our process is based on a graphoepitaxy approach, employing an industrial PS-b-PMMA block copolymer (BCP) from Arkema with a cylindrical morphology. The process consists in the following steps: a) DSA of block copolymers inside guiding patterns, b) PMMA removal, c) brush layer opening and finally d) PS pattern transfer into typical MEOL or BEOL stacks. All results presented here have been performed on the DSA Leti's 300mm pilot line. The first etch challenge to overcome for BCP transfer involves in removing all PMMA selectively to PS block. In our process baseline, an acetic acid treatment is carried out to develop PMMA domains. However, this wet development has shown some limitations in terms of resists compatibility and will not be appropriated for lamellar BCPs. That is why we also investigate the possibility to remove PMMA by only dry etching. In this work the potential of a dry PMMA removal by using CO based chemistries is shown and compared to wet development. The advantages and limitations of each approach are reported. The second crucial step is the etching of brush layer (PS-r-PMMA) through a PS mask. We have optimized this step in order to preserve the PS patterns in terms of CD, holes features and film thickness. Several integrations flow with complex stacks are explored for contact shrinking by DSA. A study of CD uniformity has been addressed to evaluate the capabilities of DSA approach after graphoepitaxy and after etching.

  13. Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching

    DOEpatents

    Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

    2013-10-01

    A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

  14. Etching anisotropy mechanisms lead to morphology-controlled silicon nanoporous structures by metal assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bing; Li, Meicheng; Liang, Yu; Bai, Yang; Song, Dandan; Li, Yingfeng; Luo, Jian

    2016-01-28

    The etching anisotropy induced by the morphology and rotation of silver particles controls the morphology of silicon nanoporous structures, through various underlying complex etching mechanisms. The level of etching anisotropy can be modulated by controlling the morphology of the silver catalyst to obtain silicon nanoporous structures with straight pores, cone-shaped pores and pyramid-shaped pores. In addition, the structures with helical pores are obtained by taking advantage of the special anisotropic etching, which is induced by the rotation and revolution of silver particles during the etching process. An investigation of the etching anisotropy during metal assisted chemical etching will promote a deep understanding of the chemical etching mechanism of silicon, and provide a feasible approach to fabricate Si nanoporous structures with special morphologies. PMID:26785718

  15. Etching anisotropy mechanisms lead to morphology-controlled silicon nanoporous structures by metal assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bing; Li, Meicheng; Liang, Yu; Bai, Yang; Song, Dandan; Li, Yingfeng; Luo, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The etching anisotropy induced by the morphology and rotation of silver particles controls the morphology of silicon nanoporous structures, through various underlying complex etching mechanisms. The level of etching anisotropy can be modulated by controlling the morphology of the silver catalyst to obtain silicon nanoporous structures with straight pores, cone-shaped pores and pyramid-shaped pores. In addition, the structures with helical pores are obtained by taking advantage of the special anisotropic etching, which is induced by the rotation and revolution of silver particles during the etching process. An investigation of the etching anisotropy during metal assisted chemical etching will promote a deep understanding of the chemical etching mechanism of silicon, and provide a feasible approach to fabricate Si nanoporous structures with special morphologies.

  16. Influence of laser etching on enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive.

    PubMed

    Ustunkol, Ildem; Yazici, A Ruya; Gorucu, Jale; Dayangac, Berrin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of Silorane System Adhesive to enamel and dentin surfaces that had been etched with different procedures. Ninety freshly extracted human third molars were used for the study. After the teeth were embedded with buccal surfaces facing up, they were randomly divided into two groups. In group I, specimens were polished with a 600-grit silicon carbide (SiC) paper to obtain flat exposed enamel. In group II, the overlying enamel layer was removed and exposed dentin surfaces were polished with a 600-grit SiC paper. Then, the teeth in each group were randomly divided into three subgroups according to etching procedures: etched with erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser (a), etched with 35% phosphoric acid (b), and non-etched (c, control). Silorane System Adhesive was used to bond silorane restorative to both enamel and dentin. After 24-h storage in distilled water at room temperature, a SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests (p < 0.05). The highest SBS was found after additional phosphoric acid treatment in dentin groups (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the laser-etched and non-etched groups in enamel and dentin (p > 0.05). The SBS of self-etch adhesive to dentin was not statistically different from enamel (p > 0.05). Phosphoric acid treatment seems the most promising surface treatment for increasing the enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive. PMID:23912781

  17. In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of gas cluster ion beam etching of FeCo film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinoura, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Toyoda, Noriaki; Hara, Ken-ichi; Yamada, Isao

    2014-01-01

    FeCo films of the type used in spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory were etched by gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) irradiation with acetic acid vapor and characterized by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. After 20 keV O2-GCIB irradiation with acetic acid vapor, etching depth enhancement (10.7×) was observed compared with the results without acetic acid vapor. The etching model of FeCo can be described as follows: (1) FeCo oxide formation with O2-GCIB irradiation, (2) acetic acid adsorption on FeCo oxide, (3) reactions between FeCo oxide and acetic acid, and (4) the desorption of volatile compounds by local and transient heating owing to O2-GCIB bombardment. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron diffraction analysis, and electron energy loss spectroscopy results showed no significant etching damage or oxidation of FeCo films after etching by O2-GCIB irradiation with acetic acid vapor. Therefore, the low-damage etching of FeCo can be performed by O2-GCIB irradiation with acetic acid vapor.

  18. Effect of Selective Etch on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel Using a Silorane Adhesive.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, L; Wajdowicz, M; Ashcraft-Olmscheid, D; Vandewalle, K

    2015-01-01

    An improvement in bond strength to enamel has been demonstrated with the use of phosphoric acid prior to bonding with self-etch methacrylate-based adhesive agents. No research has evaluated the effect of phosphoric-acid etching of enamel with a newer self-etch silorane adhesive. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear-bond strength of composite to enamel using the self-etch silorane adhesive compared to other self-etching methacrylate-based adhesives, with or without a separate application of phosphoric acid. Bovine incisors were sectioned using a diamond saw and mounted in plastic pipe. The bonding agents were applied to flattened enamel surfaces with or without the application of 35% phosphoric acid. The bonded tooth specimens were inserted beneath a mold, and composite was placed incrementally and light cured. The specimens were stored for 24 hours and six months in water and tested in shear. Data were analyzed with a three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to evaluate the effects of surface treatment, adhesive agent, or time on the bond strength of composite to bovine enamel (α=0.05). Significant differences were found between the groups based on surface treatment (p<0.01) or adhesive agent (p<0.01), but not on time (p=0.19), with no significant interactions (p>0.14). Phosphoric-acid etching of bovine enamel significantly increased the bond strength of the self-etch methacrylate and the silorane adhesives. The methacrylate-based adhesives had significantly greater bond strength to enamel than the silorane adhesive. PMID:26244264

  19. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  20. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Esherick, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Parmeter, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Rieger, Dennis J. (Tijeras, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  1. Selective etching characteristics of the AgInSbTe phase-change film in laser thermal lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Geng, Yongyou; Wu, Yiqun

    2012-04-01

    In the current work, the etching selectivity of the AgInSbTe phase-change film in laser thermal lithography is reported for the first time. Film phase change induced by laser irradiation and etching selectivity to crystalline and amorphous states in different etchants, including hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, phosphoric acid, nitric acid, sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfide, ammonium sulfide and ammonium hydroxide, are investigated. The results indicated that ammonium sulfide solvent (2.5 mol/L) had excellent etching selectivity to crystalline and amorphous states of the AgInSbTe film, and the etching characteristics were strongly influenced by the laser power density and laser irradiation time. The etching rate of the crystalline state of the AgInSbTe film was 40.4 nm/min, 20 times higher than that of the amorphous state under optimized irradiation conditions (power density: 6.63 mW/μm2 and irradiation time: 330 ns), with ammonium sulfide solvent (2.5 mol/L) as etchant. The step profile produced in the selective etching was clear, and smooth surfaces remained both on the step-up and step-down with a roughness of less than 4 nm (10×10 μm). The excellent performance of the AgInSbTe phase-change film in selective etching is significant for fabrication of nanostructures with super-resolution in laser thermal lithography.

  2. Surface engineering on CeO2 nanorods by chemical redox etching and their enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyun; Li, Jing; Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan

    2015-07-01

    Controllable surface properties of nanocerias are desired for various catalytic processes. There is a lack of efficient approaches to adjust the surface properties of ceria to date. Herein, a redox chemical etching method was developed to controllably engineer the surface properties of ceria nanorods. Ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide were used to perform the redox chemical etching process, resulting in a rough surface and/or pores on the surface of ceria nanorods. Increasing the etching cycles induced a steady increase of the specific surface area, oxygen vacancies and surface Ce3+ fractions. As a result, the etched nanorods delivered enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation, compared to the non-etched ceria nanorods. Our method provides a novel and facile approach to continuously adjust the surface properties of ceria for practical applications.Controllable surface properties of nanocerias are desired for various catalytic processes. There is a lack of efficient approaches to adjust the surface properties of ceria to date. Herein, a redox chemical etching method was developed to controllably engineer the surface properties of ceria nanorods. Ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide were used to perform the redox chemical etching process, resulting in a rough surface and/or pores on the surface of ceria nanorods. Increasing the etching cycles induced a steady increase of the specific surface area, oxygen vacancies and surface Ce3+ fractions. As a result, the etched nanorods delivered enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation, compared to the non-etched ceria nanorods. Our method provides a novel and facile approach to continuously adjust the surface properties of ceria for practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Diameter distributions of as-prepared and etched samples, optical images, specific catalytic data of CO oxidation and comparison of CO oxidation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01846c

  3. Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Materials by Dry Etching.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Winfried; Oschatz, Martin; Rico-Francs, Soledad; Klosz, Stefan; Biemelt, Tim; Mondin, Giovanni; Eychmller, Alexander; Silvestre-Albero, Joaqun; Kaskel, Stefan

    2015-10-12

    A novel synthesis method for ordered mesoporous carbons is presented. The inverse replication of a silica template was achieved using the carbonization of sucrose within mesoporous KIT-6. Instead of liquid acid etching, as in classical nanocasting, a novel dry chlorine etching procedure for template removal is presented for the first time. The resultant ordered mesostructured carbon material outperforms carbons obtained by conventional hard templating with respect to high specific micro- and mesopore volumes (0.6 and 1.6 cm(3) g(-1) , respectively), due to the presence of a hierarchical pore system. A high specific surface area of 1671 m(2) g(-1) was achieved, rendering this synthesis route a highly convenient method to produce ordered mesoporous carbons. PMID:26306833

  4. Silver ion mediated shape control of platinum nanoparticles: Removal of silver by selective etching leads to increased catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, Michael E.; Yue, Yao; Habas, Susan E.; Rioux, Robert M.; Teall, Chelsea I.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-01-09

    A procedure has been developed for the selective etching of Ag from Pt nanoparticles of well-defined shape, resulting in the formation of elementally-pure Pt cubes, cuboctahedra, or octahedra, with a largest vertex-to-vertex distance of {approx}9.5 nm from Ag-modified Pt nanoparticles. A nitric acid etching process was applied Pt nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica, as well as nanoparticles dispersed in aqueous solution. The characterization of the silica-supported particles by XRD, TEM, and N{sub 2} adsorption measurements demonstrated that the structure of the nanoparticles and the mesoporous support remained conserved during etching in concentrated nitric acid. Both elemental analysis and ethylene hydrogenation indicated etching of Ag is only effective when [HNO{sub 3}] {ge} 7 M; below this concentration, the removal of Ag is only {approx}10%. Ethylene hydrogenation activity increased by four orders of magnitude after the etching of Pt octahedra that contained the highest fraction of silver. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the unsupported particles after etching demonstrated that etching does not alter the surface structure of the Pt nanoparticles. High [HNO{sub 3}] led to the decomposition of the capping agent, polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP); infrared spectroscopy confirmed that many decomposition products were present on the surface during etching, including carbon monoxide.

  5. Modeling and optimization of the chemical etching process in niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, S.; Xue, Q.; Trabia, M.; Chen, Y.; Schill, R. Jr.

    2002-07-01

    Niobium cavity is an important component of the integrated NC/SC high-power linacs. Over the years researchers in several countries have tested various cavity shapes. They concluded that elliptically shaped cells and buffered chemical polishing produce good results. The objective of this paper is to study the effect of chemical etching on the surface quality and to optimize this process. Chemical etching of the inner surface of the cavity is achieved by circulating acid through it. As the acid interacts with the surface, it eliminates imperfections and improves surface quality. During etching, a pipe with baffles is inserted within the cavity to direct the flow along the surfaces. A finite element computational fluid dynamics model is developed for the etching process. The problem is modeled as a two-dimensional, axisymmetric, steady state fluid flow problem. This model is used to evaluate the current etching process. An alternative design with an expanding baffle is proposed. The new design is optimized to improve the chemical etching process. (authors)

  6. Selective enamel etching: effect on marginal adaptation of self-etch LED-cured bond systems in aged Class I composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, E J; Prieto, L T; Araújo, C T P; Paulillo, L A M S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of previous enamel etch and light emitting diode (LED) curing on gap formation of self-etch adhesive systems in Class I composite restorations after thermomechanical aging (TMA). Thus, on 192 human molars, a box-shaped Class I cavity was prepared maintaining enamel margins. Self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE and Clearfil S3) were used to restore the preparation with a microhybrid composite. Before application of the adhesives, half of the teeth were enamel etched for 15 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid; the other half were not etched. For the photoactivation of the adhesives and composite, three light-curing units (LCUs) were used: one polywave (Ultra-Lume LED 5, UL) and two single-peak (FlashLite 1401, FL and Radii-cal, RD) LEDs. After this, epoxy resin replicas of the occlusal surface were made, and the specimens were submitted to TMA. New replicas were made from the aged specimens for marginal adaptation analysis by scanning electron microscopy. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05). Before TMA, when enamel was etched before the application of S3, no gap formation was observed; however, there were gaps at the interface for the other tested conditions, with a statistical difference (p≤0.05). After TMA, the selective enamel etching previous to the S3 application, regardless of the LCU, promoted higher marginal adaptation compared to the other tested groups (p≤0.05). Prior to TMA, higher marginal integrity was observed, in comparison with specimens after TMA (p≤0.05). With regard to Clearfil SE and Clearfil Tri-S cured with FL, no differences of gap formation were found between before and after aging (5.3 ± 3.8 and 7.4 ± 7.5, respectively), especially when the Clearfil Tri-S was used in the conventional protocol. When cured with RD or UL and not etched, Clearfil Tri-S presented the higher gap formation. In conclusion, additional enamel etching promoted better marginal integrity for Clearfil Tri-S, showing it to be an efficient technique for Class I composite restorations. The two-step self-etch adhesive was not influenced by selective enamel etching or by the LED-curing unit. PMID:22313271

  7. Etching with electron beam generated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, D.; Walton, S.G.; Muratore, C.; Fernsler, R.F.; Meger, R.A.

    2004-11-01

    A modulated electron beam generated plasma has been used to dry etch standard photoresist materials and silicon. Oxygen-argon mixtures were used to etch organic resist material and sulfur hexafluoride mixed with argon or oxygen was used for the silicon etching. Etch rates and anisotropy were determined with respect to gas compositions, incident ion energy (from an applied rf bias) and plasma duty factor. For 1818 negative resist and i-line resists the removal rate increased nearly linearly with ion energy (up to 220 nm/min at 100 eV), with reasonable anisotropic pattern transfer above 50 eV. Little change in etch rate was seen as gas composition went from pure oxygen to 70% argon, implying the resist removal mechanism in this system required the additional energy supplied by the ions. With silicon substrates at room temperature, mixtures of argon and sulfur hexafluoride etched approximately seven times faster (1375 nm/min) than mixtures of oxygen and sulfur hexafluoride ({approx}200 nm/min) with 200 eV ions, the difference is attributed to the passivation of the silicon by involatile silicon oxyfluoride (SiO{sub x}F{sub y}) compounds. At low incident ion energies, the Ar-SF{sub 6} mixtures showed a strong chemical (lateral) etch component before an ion-assisted regime, which started at {approx}75 eV. Etch rates were independent of the 0.5%-50% duty factors studied in this work.

  8. Simulation of Etching Profiles Using Level Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Using plasma discharges to etch trenches and via holes in substrates is an important process in semiconductor manufacturing. Ion enhanced etching involves both neutral fluxes, which are isotropic, and ion fluxes, which are anisotropic. The angular distributions for the ions determines the degree of vertical etch, while the amount of the neutral fluxes determines the etch rate. We have developed a 2D profile evolution simulation which uses level set methods to model the plasma-substrate interface. Using level sets instead of traditional string models avoids the use of complicated delooping algorithms. The simulation calculates the etch rate based on the fluxes and distribution functions of both ions and neutrals. We will present etching profiles of Si substrates in low pressure (10s mTorr) Ar/Cl2 discharges for a variety of incident ion angular distributions. Both ion and neutral re-emission fluxes are included in the calculation of the etch rate, and their contributions to the total etch profile will be demonstrated. In addition, we will show RIE lag effects as a function of different trench aspect ratios. (For sample profiles, please see http://www.ipt.arc.nasa.gov/hwangfig1.html)

  9. Aspect ratio dependent etching lag reduction in deep silicon etch processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.L.; Johnson, D.; Westerman, R.

    2006-07-15

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device fabrication often involves three dimensional structures with high aspect ratios. Moreover, MEMS designs require structures with different dimensions and aspect ratios to coexist on a single microchip. There is a well-documented aspect ratio dependent etching (ARDE) effect in deep silicon etching processes. For features with different dimensions etched simultaneously, the ARDE effect causes bigger features to be etched at faster rates. In practice, ARDE effect has many undesired complications to MEMS device fabrication. This article presents a physical model to describe the time division multiplex (TDM) plasma etch processes and thereafter the experimental results on ARDE lag reduction. The model breaks individual plasma etch cycles in the TDM plasma etch processes into polymer deposition, polymer removal, and spontaneous silicon etching stages. With the insights gained from the model and control over the passivation and etch steps, it has been demonstrated that ARDE lag can be controlled effectively. Experiments have shown that a normal ARDE lag can be changed to an inverse ARDE lag. Under optimized conditions, the ARDE lag is reduced to below 2%-3% for trenches with widths ranging from 2.5 to 100 {mu}m, while maintaining good etch profile in trenches with different dimensions. Such results are achieved at etch rates exceeding 2 {mu}m/min.

  10. Wet chemical etching of AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Mileham, J.R.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Shul, R.J.; Kilcoyne, S.P.

    1995-08-21

    Single-crystal AlN grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is found to be wet etched by AZ400K photoresist developer solution, in which the active component is KOH. The etching is thermally activated with an activation energy of 15.5{plus_minus}0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, and the etch rate is found to be strongly dependent on the crystalline quality of the AlN. There was no dependence of etch rate on solution agitation or any crystallographic dependence noted, and the etching is selective over other binary group III nitrides (GaN, InN) and substrate materials such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaAs. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. Graphene nanoribbons: Relevance of etching process

    SciTech Connect

    Simonet, P. Bischoff, D.; Moser, A.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2015-05-14

    Most graphene nanoribbons in the experimental literature are patterned using plasma etching. Various etching processes induce different types of defects and do not necessarily result in the same electronic and structural ribbon properties. This study focuses on two frequently used etching techniques, namely, O{sub 2} plasma ashing and O{sub 2 }+ Ar reactive ion etching (RIE). O{sub 2} plasma ashing represents an alternative to RIE physical etching for sensitive substrates, as it is a more gentle chemical process. We find that plasma ashing creates defective graphene in the exposed trenches, resulting in instabilities in the ribbon transport. These are probably caused by more or larger localized states at the edges of the ashed device compared to the RIE defined device.

  12. Etching Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang

    2014-11-01

    The etching treatment is an important process step in influencing the surface quality of anodized aluminum alloy extrusions. The aim of etching is to produce a homogeneously matte surface. However, in the etching process, further surface imperfections can be generated on the extrusion surface due to uneven materials loss from different microstructural components. These surface imperfections formed prior to anodizing can significantly influence the surface quality of the final anodized extrusion products. In this article, various factors that influence the materials loss during alkaline etching of aluminum alloy extrusions are investigated. The influencing variables considered include etching process parameters, Fe-rich particles, Mg-Si precipitates, and extrusion profiles. This study provides a basis for improving the surface quality in industrial extrusion products by optimizing various process parameters.

  13. Mechanisms of Hydrocarbon Based Polymer Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Barton; Ventzek, Peter; Matsukuma, Masaaki; Suzuki, Ayuta; Koshiishi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Dry etch of hydrocarbon based polymers is important for semiconductor device manufacturing. The etch mechanisms for oxygen rich plasma etch of hydrocarbon based polymers has been studied but the mechanism for lean chemistries has received little attention. We report on an experimental and analytic study of the mechanism for etching of a hydrocarbon based polymer using an Ar/O2 chemistry in a single frequency 13.56 MHz test bed. The experimental study employs an analysis of transients from sequential oxidation and Ar sputtering steps using OES and surface analytics to constrain conceptual models for the etch mechanism. The conceptual model is consistent with observations from MD studies and surface analysis performed by Vegh et al. and Oehrlein et al. and other similar studies. Parameters of the model are fit using published data and the experimentally observed time scales.

  14. Correlation between surface chemistry and ion energy dependence of the etch yield in multicomponent oxides etching

    SciTech Connect

    Berube, P.-M.; Poirier, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Stafford, L.; Ndione, P. F.; Chaker, M.; Morandotti, R.

    2009-09-15

    The influence of surface chemistry in plasma etching of multicomponent oxides was investigated through measurements of the ion energy dependence of the etch yield. Using pulsed-laser-deposited Ca{sub x}Ba{sub (1-x)}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (CBN) and SrTiO{sub 3} thin films as examples, it was found that the etching energy threshold shifts toward values larger or smaller than the sputtering threshold depending on whether or not ion-assisted chemical etching is the dominant etching pathway and whether surface chemistry is enhancing or inhibiting desorption of the film atoms. In the case of CBN films etched in an inductively coupled Cl{sub 2} plasma, it is found that the chlorine uptake is inhibiting the etching reaction, with the desorption of nonvolatile NbCl{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} compounds being the rate-limiting step.

  15. Etched silicon gratings for NGST

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, J.; Ciarlo, D.; Kuzmenko, P.; Macintosh, B.; Alcock, C.; Cook, K.

    1999-10-28

    The authors have developed the world's first etched silicon grisms at LLNL in September 1999. The high optical surface quality of the grisms allows diffraction-limited spectral resolution in the IR wavelengths where silicon has good transmission. They estimated that the scattering light level is less than 4% at 2.2 {micro}m. Silicon can significantly increase the dispersive power of spectroscopic instruments for NGST due to its very large refractive index (n = 3.4). For example, a silicon grism with 40 mm clear entrance aperture and a 46 wedge angle can provide R = 10,000--100,000 in {approximately} 1--10 {micro}m. The same grating working in the immersed reflection mode can provide {approximately} three times higher spectral resolution than in the transmission mode. To achieve a desired spectral resolution for NGST, the spectrograph size and weight can be significantly reduced if silicon gratings are used instead of conventional gratings.

  16. Etch-a-Sketch Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    2009-10-01

    The popular children's toy Etch-a-Sketch has motivated the invention of a new material capable of writing and erasing wires so small they approach the spacing between atoms. The interface between two normally insulating materials, strontium titanate and lanthanum aluminate, can be switched between the insulating and conducting state with the use of the sharp metallic probe of an atomic-force microscope. By ``sketching'' this probe in various patterns, one can create electronic materials with remarkably diverse properties. This material system shows promise both for ultra-high density storage and as possible replacements for silicon-based logic (CMOS). This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Army Research Office and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  17. Selective emitter using a screen printed etch barrier in crystalline silicon solar cell

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The low level doping of a selective emitter by etch back is an easy and low cost process to obtain a better blue response from a solar cell. This work suggests that the contact resistance of the selective emitter can be controlled by wet etching with the commercial acid barrier paste that is commonly applied in screen printing. Wet etching conditions such as acid barrier curing time, etchant concentration, and etching time have been optimized for the process, which is controllable as well as fast. The acid barrier formed by screen printing was etched with HF and HNO3 (1:200) solution for 15 s, resulting in high sheet contact resistance of 90 Ω/sq. Doping concentrations of the electrode contact portion were 2 × 1021 cm−3 in the low sheet resistance (Rs) region and 7 × 1019 cm−3 in the high Rs region. Solar cells of 12.5 × 12.5 cm2 in dimensions with a wet etch back selective emitter Jsc of 37 mAcm−2, open circuit voltage (Voc) of 638.3 mV and efficiency of 18.13% were fabricated. The result showed an improvement of about 13 mV on Voc compared to those of the reference solar cell fabricated with the reactive-ion etching back selective emitter and with Jsc of 36.90 mAcm−2, Voc of 625.7 mV, and efficiency of 17.60%. PMID:22823978

  18. Chemical etching in processing cortical bone specimens for scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Congiu, Terenzio; Pazzaglia, Ugo E; Basso, Petra; Quacci, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Transverse and longitudinal sectioning of undecalcified cortical bone is a commonly employed technique for investigating the lamellar structure of the osteons. Since a flat surface is required, the specimen has to be grinded and then polished. Whereas the smear of debris and inorganic/organic deposits left by these treatments cannot be removed by ultrasonication alone, a chemical treatment of the specimen surface with either a basic or an acid etching solution is currently employed. A further effect of the latter can be the enhancement of the lamellar bone pattern. The kind of etching solution, its pH, the concentration of etchants, and the contact time significantly affect the sectioned surface when it is observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The etching procedures can severely influence the obtained images. Homogeneous cortical bone specimens were sampled from the first metatarsal of two fresh human subjects. One or two cut surfaces were exposed to different acid and basic solutions in bonded conditions. Considering the type of chemical agents, the solution pH, and the exposure time of the specimens, the effects of several etching media have been investigated and compared. Strong etching, either acid or basic produced surface decalcification and severe damage of the collagen matrix, compromising any morphological or morphometric analysis. Weak acid etching (for example citric and acetic acid), even though causing distinctive alteration of the sample, enhanced the visibility of the lamellar pattern, while the polyphosphate treatment of the surface decalcified a thin layer matrix, ensuring a good visibility of fibrils and avoiding rough distortions. PMID:24861211

  19. Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. F.; Ng, F. M. F.; Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.

    2007-10-01

    Recently, Matiullah et al. described the use of NaOH/ethanol as an etchant for the CR-39 detector, and have determined the corresponding bulk and track etch properties from the track diameter method. In the present work, the bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 in NaOH/ethanol were derived from direct measurements. The bulk etch rate has been found to increase with the molarity of NaOH/ethanol, reach a maximum at ∼2.5 N and start to drop beyond 3 N. The bulk etch rate also increases with stirring. These phenomena can be explained by the insulation of the detector from the etchant by the etched products. Regarding the track etch, we have found a surprising result that the lengths of (pre-etched) tracks are actually shortened when the tracks are etched in NaOH/ethanol. Generally speaking, the remaining track depths obtained with stirring are longer than those for no stirring. The shortening of the tracks can be explained by the insulation of the pre-etched track wall from the etchant with the etched products.

  20. Etching-limiting process and origin of loading effects in silicon etching with hydrogen chloride gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, Naoya; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2014-01-01

    The etching-limiting step in slow Si etching with HCl/H2 at atmospheric pressure was investigated. The etching was performed at a low etching rate below 10 nm/min in the temperature range of 1000-1100 °C. In the case of bare Si etching, it was confirmed that the etching rate showed little temperature dependence and was proportional to the equilibrium pressure of the etching by-product SiCl2 calculated by thermochemical analysis. In addition, the etching rates of Si(100) and (110) faces were almost the same. These results indicate that SiCl2 diffusion in the gas phase is the rate-limiting step. In the etching of the Si surface with SiO2 mask patterns, a strong loading effect (mask/opening pattern dependence of the etching rate) was observed. The simulation of the diffusion of gas species immediately above the Si surface revealed that the loading effect was attributed to the pattern-dependent diffusion of SiCl2.

  1. Selective Etching of Wide Bandgap Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Bridges, M.M.; Han, J.; Lee, J.W.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; MacKensie, J.D.; Donovan, S.M.

    1997-12-31

    HIGH-DENSITY PLASMA ETCHING HAS BEEN AN EFFECTIVE PATTERNING TECHNIQUE FOR THE GROUP-III NITRIDES DUE TO ION FLUXES WHICH ARE 2 TO 4 ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE HIGHER THAN MORE CONVENTIONAL REACTIVE ION ETCH (RIE) SYSTEMS. GAN ETCH RATES EXCEEDING 0.68 MICROMETER/MIN HAVE BEEN REPORTED IN C12/H2/AR INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMAS (ICP) AT -280 V DC-BIAS. UNDER THESE CONDITIONS, THE ETCH MECHANISM IS DOMINATED BY ION BOMBARDMENT ENERGIES WHICH CAN INDUCE DAMAGE AND MINIMIZE ETCH SELECTIVITY. HIGH SELECTIVITY ETCH PROCESSES ARE OFTEN NECESSARY FOR HETEROSTRUCTURE DEVICES WHICH ARE BECOMING MORE PROMINENT AS GROWTH TECHNIQUES IMPROVE. IN THIS STUDY, WE WILL REPORT HIGH-DENSITY ICP ETCH RATES AND SELECTIVITIES FOR GAN, ALN, AND INN AS A FUNCTION OF CATHODE POWER, ICP-SOURCE POWER, AND CHAMBER PRESSURE. GAN:ALN SELECTIVITIES {gt} 8:1 were observed in a C12/Ar plasma at 10 mTorr pressure, 500 W ICP-source power, and 130 W cathode rf-power, while the GaN:InN selectivity was optimized at approx. 6.5:1 at 5 mTorr, 500 W ICP-source power, and 130 W cathode rf-power.

  2. Research on deep silicon etching for micro-channel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shun; Hu, Jiang; Zhu, Yufeng; Nie, Jing; Du, Jiaqiang

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) has become a key process in the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). By combining the etching power of reactive ion etching and sidewall passivation, it provides a precise anisotropic etch that can be used to create very deep etches as well as very narrow structures in silicon. The standard Bosch process for DRIE alternates between two steps: etching and passivation. This combination provides the ability to etch very deep, vertical structures. In this article, silicon was etched with the Bosch process and cryogenic processes for patterning high-aspect-ratio features. The two leading techniques were compared. The influences of process parameters on the aspect ratio, etching rate and sidewall roughness of silicon were studied. Strong dependence of etch rate on loading was observed. The result showed that the etching rate rely on the process parameters. The aspect ratio of 23 was obtained and is able to be further improved.

  3. Incorporation of stratospheric acids into water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Scott; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are absorbed within the water ice lattice at mole fractions maximizing below 0.00001 and 0.0001 in a variety of solid impurity studies. The absorption mechanism may be substitutional or interstitial, leading in either case to a weak permeation of stratospheric ices by the acids at equilibrium. Impurities could also inhabit grain boundaries, and the acid content of atmospheric ice crystals will then depend on details of their surface and internal microstructures. Limited evidence indicates similar properties for the absorption of HNO3. Water ice lattices saturated with acid cannot be a significant local reservoir for HCl in the polar stratosphere.

  4. Incorporation of stratospheric acids into water ice

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.; Turco, R.P. ); Toon, O.B. ); Hamill, P. )

    1990-03-01

    Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are absorbed within the water ice lattice at mole fractions maximizing below 10{sup {minus}5} and 10{sup {minus}4} in a variety of solid impurity studies. The absorption mechanism may be substitutional or interstitial, leading in either case to a weak permeation of stratospheric ices by the acids at equilibrium. Impurities could also inhabit grain boundaries, and the acid content of atmospheric ice crystals will then depend on details of their surface and internal microstructures. Limited evidence indicates similar properties for the absorption of HNO{sub 3}. Water ice lattices saturated with acid cannot be a significant local reservoir for HCl in the polar stratosphere.

  5. Influence of the LED curing source and selective enamel etching on dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the LED curing unit and selective enamel etching on dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) for self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations. On 96 human molars, box-shaped class I cavities were made maintaining enamel margins. Self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE - CSE and Clearfil S(3) - S3) were used to bond a microhybrid composite. Before adhesive application, half of the teeth were enamel acid-etched and the other half was not. Adhesives and composites were cured with the following light curing units (LCUs): one polywave (UltraLume 5 - UL) and two single-peak (FlashLite 1401 - FL and Radii Cal - RD) LEDs. The specimens were then submitted to thermomechanical aging and longitudinally sectioned to obtain bonded sticks (0.9 mm(2)) to be tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min. The failure mode was then recorded. The μTBS data were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and Tukey's (α = 0.05). For S3, the selective enamel-etching provided lower μTBS values (20.7 ± 2.7) compared to the non-etched specimens (26.7 ± 2.2). UL yielded higher μTBS values (24.1 ± 3.2) in comparison to the photoactivation approach with FL (18.8 ±3.9) and RD (19.9 ±1.8) for CSE. The two-step CSE was not influenced by the enamel etching (p ≥ 0.05). Enamel acid etching in class I composite restorations affects the dentin μTBS of the one-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil S(3), with no alterations for Clearfil SE bond strength. The polywave LED promoted better bond strength for the two-step adhesive compared to the single-peak ones. PMID:22120471

  6. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion.

  7. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, C.H. Jr.

    1984-02-14

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion. 4 figs.

  8. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Shul, R.J.; Constantine, C.

    1997-04-29

    A dry etching method is disclosed. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators. 1 fig.

  9. Electroless epitaxial etching for semiconductor applications

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon on insulator substrates using electroless etching for achieving efficient etch stopping on epitaxial silicon substrates. Microelectric circuits and devices are prepared on epitaxial silicon wafers in a standard fabrication facility. The wafers are bonded to a holding substrate. The silicon bulk is removed using electroless etching leaving the circuit contained within the epitaxial layer remaining on the holding substrate. A photolithographic operation is then performed to define streets and wire bond pad areas for electrical access to the circuit.

  10. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Shul, Randy J.; Constantine, Christopher

    1997-01-01

    A dry etching method. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators.

  11. An Effective Acid Combination for Enhanced Properties and Corrosion Control of Acidizing Sandstone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham

    2016-03-01

    To fulfill the demand of the world energy, more technologies to enhance the recovery of oil production are being developed. Sandstone acidizing has been introduced and it acts as one of the important means to increase oil and gas production. Sandstone acidizing operation generally uses acids, which create or enlarge the flow channels of formation around the wellbore. In sandstone matrix acidizing, acids are injected into the formation at a pressure below the formation fracturing pressure, in which the injected acids react with mineral particles that may restrict the flow of hydrocarbons. Most common combination is Hydrofluoric Acid - Hydrochloric with concentration (3% HF - 12% HCl) known as mud acid. But there are some problems associated with the use of mud acid i.e., corrosion, precipitation. In this paper several new combinations of acids were experimentally screened to identify the most effective combination. The combinations used consist of fluoboric, phosphoric, formic and hydrofluoric acids. Cores were allowed to react with these combinations and results are compared with the mud acid. The parameters, which are analyzed, are Improved Permeability Ratio, strength and mineralogy. The analysis showed that the new acid combination has the potential to be used in sandstone acidizing.

  12. Polymorph-dependent titanium dioxide nanoparticle dissolution in acidic and alkali digestions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple polymorphs (anatase, brookite and rutile) of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) with variable structures were quantified in environmental matrices via microwave-based hydrofluoric (HF) and nitric (HNO3) mixed acid digestion and muffle furnace (MF)-based potassium ...

  13. Carrier-lifetime-controlled selective etching process for semiconductors using photochemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01

    The minority carrier lifetime is significantly much shorter in semiconductor materials with very high impurity concentrations than it is in semiconductor materials with lower impurity concentration levels. This phenomenon of reduced minority carrier lifetime in semiconductor materials having high impurity concentration is utilized to advantage for permitting highly selective semiconductor material etching to be achieved using a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. Various means may be employed for increasing the local impurity concentration level in specific near-surface regions of a semiconductor prior to subjecting the semiconductor material to a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. The regions having the localized increased impurity concentration form a self-aligned mask inhibiting photochemical etching at such localized regions while the adjacent regions not having increased impurity concentrations are selectively photochemically etched. Liquid- or gas-phase etching may be performed.

  14. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Weckwerth, Mark V.; Baca, Wes E.

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  15. Metal assisted anodic etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chang Quan; Zheng, Wen; Choi, W. K.; Thompson, Carl V.

    2015-06-01

    Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P+-type and N+-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed, including solid Si nanowires, porous Si nanowires, a porous Si layer without Si nanowires, and porous Si nanowires on a thick porous Si layer. Formation of wires was the result of selective etching at the Au-Si interface. It was found that when the anodic contact was made through P-type or P+-type Si, regular anodic etching due to electronic hole injection leads to formation of porous silicon simultaneously with metal assisted anodic etching. When the anodic contact was made through N-type or N+-type Si, generation of electronic holes through processes such as impact ionization and tunnelling-assisted surface generation were required for etching. In addition, it was found that metal assisted anodic etching of Si with the anodic contact made through the patterned Au film essentially reproduces the phenomenology of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE), in which holes are generated through metal assisted reduction of H2O2 rather than current flow. These results clarify the linked roles of electrical and chemical processes that occur during electrochemical etching of Si.Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P+-type and N+-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed, including solid Si nanowires, porous Si nanowires, a porous Si layer without Si nanowires, and porous Si nanowires on a thick porous Si layer. Formation of wires was the result of selective etching at the Au-Si interface. It was found that when the anodic contact was made through P-type or P+-type Si, regular anodic etching due to electronic hole injection leads to formation of porous silicon simultaneously with metal assisted anodic etching. When the anodic contact was made through N-type or N+-type Si, generation of electronic holes through processes such as impact ionization and tunnelling-assisted surface generation were required for etching. In addition, it was found that metal assisted anodic etching of Si with the anodic contact made through the patterned Au film essentially reproduces the phenomenology of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE), in which holes are generated through metal assisted reduction of H2O2 rather than current flow. These results clarify the linked roles of electrical and chemical processes that occur during electrochemical etching of Si. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01916h

  16. Uniform Etching For Polycrystalline Photoconductor Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, John

    1988-01-01

    Prewetting surface overcomes problem of nonuniformity of etching often occuring in polycrystalline films at PbS and PbSe. Believed prewetting causes etchant to attack film uniformly. Because process involves wet chemistry, inexpensive and easy to use.

  17. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Koontz, Steven L.; Cross, Jon B.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2-20 eV, preferably 1-10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal (kinetic energy>1 eV) oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask-protected areas.

  18. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Cross, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by hyperthermal atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2 to 20 eV, preferably 1 to 10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask protected areas.

  19. Wet and dry etching of LiGaO{sub 2} and LiAlO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.W.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Zavada, J.M.; Chai, B.L.H.

    1996-08-01

    LiGaO{sub 2} and LiAlO{sub 2} have similar lattice constants to GaN, and may prove useful as substrates for III-nitride epitaxy. The authors have found that these materials may be wet chemically etched in some acid solutions, including HF, at rates between 150 and 4,000 {angstrom}/min. Dry etching with SF{sub 6}/Ar plasmas provides faster rates than Cl{sub 2}/Ar or CH{sub 4}H{sub 2}/Ar under electron cyclotron resonance conditions, indicating the fluoride etch products are more volatile than their chloride or metallorganic/hydride counterparts.

  20. Enhancement of RIE: etched Diffractive Optical Elements surfaces by using Ion Beam Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.; Bischoff, Ch.; Rädel, U.; Grau, M.; Wallrabe, U.; Völklein, F.

    2015-09-01

    Shaping of laser light intensities by using Diffractive Optical Elements allows the adaption of the incident light to its application. Fused silica is used where for example UV-light or high temperatures are mandatory. For high diffraction efficiency the quality of the etched surface areas is important. The investigation of different process parameters for Ion Beam and Reactive Ion Etching reveals that only Ion Beam Etching provides surfaces with optical quality. Measurements of the influence of the surface quality on the diffraction efficiencies prove that the surfaces generated by Reactive Ion Etching are not suitable. Due to the high selectivity of the process Reactive Ion Etching is nevertheless a reasonable choice for the fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements. To improve the quality of the etched surfaces a post processing with Ion Beam Etching is developed. Simulations in MATLAB display that the angle dependent removal of the surface during the Ion Beam Etching causes a smoothing of the surface roughness. The positive influence of a post processing on the diffraction efficiency is outlined by measurements. The ion beam post processing leads to an increase of the etching depth. For the fabrication of high efficient Diffractive Optical Elements this has to be taken into account. The relation is investigated and transferred to the fabrication of four-level gratings. Diffraction efficiencies up to 78 % instead of the ideal 81 % underline the practicability of the developed post processing.

  1. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  2. Metal assisted anodic etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Zheng, Wen; Choi, W K; Thompson, Carl V

    2015-07-01

    Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P(+)-type and N(+)-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed, including solid Si nanowires, porous Si nanowires, a porous Si layer without Si nanowires, and porous Si nanowires on a thick porous Si layer. Formation of wires was the result of selective etching at the Au-Si interface. It was found that when the anodic contact was made through P-type or P(+)-type Si, regular anodic etching due to electronic hole injection leads to formation of porous silicon simultaneously with metal assisted anodic etching. When the anodic contact was made through N-type or N(+)-type Si, generation of electronic holes through processes such as impact ionization and tunnelling-assisted surface generation were required for etching. In addition, it was found that metal assisted anodic etching of Si with the anodic contact made through the patterned Au film essentially reproduces the phenomenology of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE), in which holes are generated through metal assisted reduction of H2O2 rather than current flow. These results clarify the linked roles of electrical and chemical processes that occur during electrochemical etching of Si. PMID:26059556

  3. A simplified etching technique to improve the adhesion of fiber post

    PubMed Central

    Veeramachaneni, Chandrasekhar; Morisetty, Pradeep Kumar; Rao, Saggurti Anitha; Tummala, Muralidhar

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Numerous methods were used to etch the fiber posts to improve its bonding to root canal dentin. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of 37% phosphoric acid in etching fiber posts in comparison with 24% hydrogen peroxide. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety human maxillary central incisors were taken and post space preparation was done. Ninety fiber posts were taken and divided into three groups (n=30) based on the surface treatment they received (H3PO4, H2O2, distilled water) and each group was further divided (n=10) based on the time period of application (15 seconds, 30 seconds, 60 seconds). All the posts were luted into canals using Rely X UniCem-2. Each tooth was then sectioned into six slices and subjected to push out test. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis at P<.05. The surface topography was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS Highest bond strength values were noted in 15 seconds etched phosphoric acid group and 60 seconds etched hydrogen peroxide group with no significant difference between two groups. Surface topography revealed complete epoxy layer removal with no damage to its structural integrity in those groups. CONCLUSION H3PO4 etching for a period of 15 seconds is an effective alternative in improving the adhesion of fiber post to root dentin. PMID:25177473

  4. Plasma etching: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Vincent M.; Kornblit, Avinoam

    2013-09-15

    The field of plasma etching is reviewed. Plasma etching, a revolutionary extension of the technique of physical sputtering, was introduced to integrated circuit manufacturing as early as the mid 1960s and more widely in the early 1970s, in an effort to reduce liquid waste disposal in manufacturing and achieve selectivities that were difficult to obtain with wet chemistry. Quickly, the ability to anisotropically etch silicon, aluminum, and silicon dioxide in plasmas became the breakthrough that allowed the features in integrated circuits to continue to shrink over the next 40 years. Some of this early history is reviewed, and a discussion of the evolution in plasma reactor design is included. Some basic principles related to plasma etching such as evaporation rates and Langmuir–Hinshelwood adsorption are introduced. Etching mechanisms of selected materials, silicon, silicon dioxide, and low dielectric-constant materials are discussed in detail. A detailed treatment is presented of applications in current silicon integrated circuit fabrication. Finally, some predictions are offered for future needs and advances in plasma etching for silicon and nonsilicon-based devices.

  5. Plasma etching of diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, D. L.; Ianno, N. J.; Mahowald, M. A.

    The RF plasma-etched properties of sputter-deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) films in Ar/O2 and Ar/H2 gas mixtures were examined at 40 MHz as a function of the gas mixture and the externally applied dc bias. The samples were deposited on (100) n-type Si substrates. RF powers of 25 and 50 W, dc biases of 0 and 100 V, electron energies of 2.0 and 2.6 eV and 18 and 20 percent concentrations, respectively, were present in the two sample types tested. Measurements were made of the reactive ion etching peak in the two gas mixtures at various proportions of each gas component. Attention was also given to the etch rate as a function of the H2 content of the samples and the bias of the plasma. The results indicated that the films etched significantly faster in the Ar/O2 gas mixtures. The etch rate, however, is dependent on the dc bias used in depositing the films, during which time high voltages may increase the hardness and slow the etch rate of the film. The DLC films are showing great promise for solar cell and semiconductor applications.

  6. Investigation of Nitride Morphology After Self-Aligned Contact Etch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Keil, J.; Helmer, B. A.; Chien, T.; Gopaladasu, P.; Kim, J.; Shon, J.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Self-Aligned Contact (SAC) etch has emerged as a key enabling technology for the fabrication of very large-scale memory devices. However, this is also a very challenging technology to implement from an etch viewpoint. The issues that arise range from poor oxide etch selectivity to nitride to problems with post etch nitride surface morphology. Unfortunately, the mechanisms that drive nitride loss and surface behavior remain poorly understood. Using a simple langmuir site balance model, SAC nitride etch simulations have been performed and compared to actual etched results. This approach permits the study of various etch mechanisms that may play a role in determining nitride loss and surface morphology. Particle trajectories and fluxes are computed using Monte-Carlo techniques and initial data obtained from double Langmuir probe measurements. Etched surface advancement is implemented using a shock tracking algorithm. Sticking coefficients and etch yields are adjusted to obtain the best agreement between actual etched results and simulated profiles.

  7. Etching of lithium niobate using standard Ti indiffusion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, Vijay; Mitchell, Arnan; Bui, Lam; Holland, Anthony; Bhargava, Suresh; Priest, Timothy

    2007-12-01

    We present evidence of etching LiNbO3 when annealing two wafers in contact with an intermediate Ti strip. Etched features are characterized qualitatively using atomic force microscopy. The impact of the Ti strip thickness on the depth and roughness of the etched surface is quantified. Etched trenches of similar depths to the original Ti film are achieved with very smooth etched surface.

  8. Reactive Ion Etching for Randomly Distributed Texturing of Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    ZAIDI, SALEEM H

    2002-05-01

    The quality of low-cost multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) has improved to the point that it forms approximately 50% of the worldwide photovoltaic (PV) power production. The performance of commercial mc-Si solar cells still lags behind c-Si due in part to the inability to texture it effectively and inexpensively. Surface texturing of mc-Si has been an active field of research. Several techniques including anodic etching [1], wet acidic etching [2], lithographic patterning [3], and mechanical texturing [4] have been investigated with varying degrees of success. To date, a cost-effective technique has not emerged.

  9. Laser etching of enamel for direct bonding with an Er,Cr:YSGG hydrokinetic laser system.

    PubMed

    Uşümez, Serdar; Orhan, Metin; Uşümez, Aslihan

    2002-12-01

    Irradiation of enamel with laser energy changes the physical and chemical characteristics of the enamel surface, and these alterations hold promise for the conditioning of enamel for bonding procedures. This laboratory study examined the influence of laser irradiation of enamel at 2 different power settings with an erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) hydrokinetic laser system (Millennium System, Biolase Technology, Inc; San Clemente, Calif) on the shear bond strength of orthodontic appliances and compared these with that of acid-etching. The prepared surfaces of 40 noncarious, intact, extracted premolars were exposed to laser energy: 20 teeth at 2-W setting (5.6 J/cm(2)) and 20 teeth at 1-W setting (2.7 J/cm(2)) of the commercial laser unit. Twenty teeth were etched with 37% orthophosphoric acid. Brackets were bonded with an orthodontic no-mix adhesive, and shear bond strength was determined with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Etched and restored surfaces of an acid-etched tooth and a 2-W laser-irradiated tooth were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Laser treatment under 2 W resulted in bond strengths of 7.11 +/- 4.56 megapascals (MPa), which was not significantly different from that of acid etching (8.23 +/- 2.30 MPa). Laser irradiation at 1 W resulted in bond strengths of 5.64 +/- 3.19 MPa, which was significantly different from that of acid etching (P <.05). However, large SD and coefficient of variation values of both laser groups made reliability of this method as an enamel conditioner questionable. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the restored irradiated surfaces showed good surface characteristics, whereas the lased surface was still more irregular than the restored acid-etched sample. Although laser devices are effectively used in some other areas of dentistry, enamel conditioning with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser cannot be considered a successful alternative to the conventional methods of increasing bond strengths to enamel. PMID:12490877

  10. Two modes of surface roughening during plasma etching of silicon: Role of ionized etch products

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazaki, Nobuya Tsuda, Hirotaka; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-12-14

    Atomic- or nanometer-scale surface roughening has been investigated during Si etching in inductively coupled Cl{sub 2} plasmas, as a function of rf bias power or ion incident energy E{sub i}, by varying feed gas flow rate, wafer stage temperature, and etching time. The experiments revealed two modes of surface roughening which occur depending on E{sub i}: one is the roughening mode at low E{sub i} < 200–300 eV, where the root-mean-square (rms) roughness of etched surfaces increases with increasing E{sub i}, exhibiting an almost linear increase with time during etching (t < 20 min). The other is the smoothing mode at higher E{sub i}, where the rms surface roughness decreases substantially with E{sub i} down to a low level < 0.4 nm, exhibiting a quasi-steady state after some increase at the initial stage (t < 1 min). Correspondingly, two different behaviors depending on E{sub i} were also observed in the etch rate versus √(E{sub i}) curve, and in the evolution of the power spectral density distribution of surfaces. Such changes from the roughening to smoothing modes with increasing E{sub i} were found to correspond to changes in the predominant ion flux from feed gas ions Cl{sub x}{sup +} to ionized etch products SiCl{sub x}{sup +} caused by the increased etch rates at increased E{sub i}, in view of the results of several plasma diagnostics. Possible mechanisms for the formation and evolution of surface roughness during plasma etching are discussed with the help of Monte Carlo simulations of the surface feature evolution and classical molecular dynamics simulations of etch fundamentals, including stochastic roughening and effects of ion reflection and etch inhibitors.

  11. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-04-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  12. Low radio frequency biased electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samukawa, Seiji; Toyosato, Tomohiko; Wani, Etsuo

    1991-03-01

    A radio frequency (rf) biased electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etching technology has been developed to realize an efficient ion acceleration in high density and uniform ECR plasma for accurate Al-Si-Cu alloy film etching. In this technology, the substrate is located at the ECR position (875 G position) and the etching is carried out with a 400 kHz rf bias power. This Al-Si-Cu etching technology achieves a high etching rate (more than 5000 A/min), excellent etching uniformity (within ±5%), highly anisotropic etching, and Cu residue-free etching in only Cl2 gas plasma. These etching characteristics are accomplished by the combination of the dense and uniform ECR plasma generation at the ECR position with the efficient accelerated ion flux at the ECR position by using 400 kHz rf bias.

  13. Geometric characteristics of silicon cavities etched in EDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Hui; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Sasaki, Minoru; Hane, Kazuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2007-05-01

    Etching characteristics of hexagonal and triangular cavities on a lang1 1 1rang-oriented silicon wafer in the etchant of ethylene diamine, pyrocatechol and water (EDP/EPW) were investigated. The patterns are aligned to keep the sides perpendicular to lang1 1 0rang crystal orientations, in order that the sidewalls of cavities are parallel to {1 1 0} crystalline planes. RIE-ICP etching is used to define the depth of the triangular and hexagonal cavities, and EDP etching is followed for different etching times. The final self-etch-stop profiles of cavities are determined by the dimension of mask patterns and the depth of cavities in the wafer. The etching process of the hexagon and triangle cavities is modeled, based on the crystal structure and wet etching principle. The results of etched cavities confirm the condition to determine the final etching profiles.

  14. Plasma etching a ceramic composite. [evaluating microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David R.; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma etching is found to be a superior metallographic technique for evaluating the microstructure of a ceramic matrix composite. The ceramic composite studied is composed of silicon carbide whiskers (SiC(sub W)) in a matrix of silicon nitride (Si3N4), glass, and pores. All four constituents are important in evaluating the microstructure of the composite. Conventionally prepared samples, both as-polished or polished and etched with molten salt, do not allow all four constituents to be observed in one specimen. As-polished specimens allow examination of the glass phase and porosity, while molten salt etching reveals the Si3N4 grain size by removing the glass phase. However, the latter obscures the porosity. Neither technique allows the SiC(sub W) to be distinguished from the Si3N4. Plasma etching with CF4 + 4 percent O2 selectively attacks the Si3N4 grains, leaving SiC(sub W) and glass in relief, while not disturbing the pores. An artifact of the plasma etching reaction is the deposition of a thin layer of carbon on Si3N4, allowing Si3N4 grains to be distinguished from SiC(sub W) by back scattered electron imaging.

  15. Process capability of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Kosuke; Iida nee Sakurai, Noriko; Kamo, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Hayashi, Naoya

    2015-10-01

    With shrinking pattern size at 0.33NA EUV lithography systems, mask 3D effects are expected to become stronger, such as horizontal/vertical shadowing, best focus shifts through pitch and pattern shift through focus. Etched multilayer EUV mask structures have been proposed in order to reduce mask 3D effects. It is estimated that etched multilayer type mask is also effective in reducing mask 3D effects at 0.33NA with lithographic simulation, and it is experimentally demonstrated with NXE3300 EUV Lithography system. We obtained cross-sectional TEM image of etched multilayer EUV mask pattern. It is observed that patterned multilayer width differs from pattern physical width. This means that effective reflecting width of etched multilayer pattern is smaller than pattern width measured by CD-SEM. In this work, we evaluate mask durability against both chemical and physical cleaning process to check the feasibility of etched multilayer EUV mask patterning against mask cleaning for 0.33NA EUV extension. As a result, effective width can be controlled by suitable cleaning chemicals because sidewall film works as a passivation film. And line and space pattern collapse is not detected by DUV mask pattern inspection tool after mask physical cleaning that includes both megasonic and binary spray steps with sufficient particle removal efficiency.

  16. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Wet etching characteristics of a HfSiON high-k dielectric in HF-based solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongliang, Li; Qiuxia, Xu

    2010-03-01

    The wet etching properties of a HfSiON high-k dielectric in HF-based solutions are investigated. HF-based solutions are the most promising wet chemistries for the removal of HfSiON, and etch selectivity of HF-based solutions can be improved by the addition of an acid and/or an alcohol to the HF solution. Due to densification during annealing, the etch rate of HfSiON annealed at 900 °C for 30 s is significantly reduced compared with as-deposited HfSiON in HF-based solutions. After the HfSiON film has been completely removed by HF-based solutions, it is not possible to etch the interfacial layer and the etched surface does not have a hydrophobic nature, since N diffuses to the interface layer or Si substrate formation of Si-N bonds that dissolves very slowly in HF-based solutions. Existing Si-N bonds at the interface between the new high-k dielectric deposit and the Si substrate may degrade the carrier mobility due to Coulomb scattering. In addition, we show that N2 plasma treatment before wet etching is not very effective in increasing the wet etch rate for a thin HfSiON film in our case.

  17. Maskless micro/nanofabrication on GaAs surface by friction-induced selective etching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a friction-induced selective etching method was developed to produce nanostructures on GaAs surface. Without any resist mask, the nanofabrication can be achieved by scratching and post-etching in sulfuric acid solution. The effects of the applied normal load and etching period on the formation of the nanostructure were studied. Results showed that the height of the nanostructure increased with the normal load or the etching period. XPS and Raman detection demonstrated that residual compressive stress and lattice densification were probably the main reason for selective etching, which eventually led to the protrusive nanostructures from the scratched area on the GaAs surface. Through a homemade multi-probe instrument, the capability of this fabrication method was demonstrated by producing various nanostructures on the GaAs surface, such as linear array, intersecting parallel, surface mesas, and special letters. In summary, the proposed method provided a straightforward and more maneuverable micro/nanofabrication method on the GaAs surface. PMID:24495647

  18. Metal-catalyzed etching of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guangjun; Calizo, Irene; Hight Walker, Angela

    2014-03-01

    We present a comparative investigation on the etching of graphene catalyzed by Fe and Cu. With combined evidence from scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the strikingly different etching behaviors between Fe and Cu are governed by their distinct interactions with carbon. Due to the strong Fe-C interactions, graphene is severely damaged through not only catalytic carbon hydrogenation but also carbon dissolution into Fe alone. In contrast, due to the weak Cu-C interactions and non-wetting behavior of Cu on graphene, Cu particles etch channels in graphene through carbon hydrogenation and the width of the channel width is much narrower than the diameter of catalytic particle. This work provides unprecedented insights into the metal-catalyzed carbon hydrogenation.

  19. ICP Etching of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Grow, J.M.; Lambers, E.S.; Ostling, M.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Wang, J.J.; Zetterling, C.-M.

    1999-02-04

    A number of different plasma chemistries, including NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/Ar, ICl, IBr, Cl{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, have been investigated for dry etching of 6H and 3C-SiC in a Inductively Coupled Plasma tool. Rates above 2,000 {angstrom} cm{sup {minus}1} are found with fluorine-based chemistries at high ion currents. Surprisingly, Cl{sub 2}-based etching does not provide high rates, even though the potential etch products (SiCi{sub 4} and CCl{sub 4}) are volatile. Photoresist masks have poor selectivity over SiC in F{sub 2}-based plasmas under normal conditions, and ITO or Ni are preferred.

  20. Halide etching for tin EUV optics cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyung Joo; Jurczyk, Brian E.; Ruzic, D. N.; Bristol, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Tin (Sn) has the advantage of delivering higher conversion efficiency than xenon. However, the use of a condensable fuel in a lithography system leads to some additional challenges for maintaining a satisfactory lifetime of the EUV optics. A critical issue leading to decreased mirror lifetime is the buildup of debris on the surface of the primary mirror optics that comes from the use of Sn in GDPP or LPP. This leads to a decreased reflectivity from the added material thickness and increased surface roughness that contributes to scattering. Reactive ion etching (RIE) with halide ions is one potential solution to this problem. Encouraging results were obtained using argon/chlorine and other gas mixtures in a PlasmaTherm SLR-770 inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etcher at the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory at the University of Illinois. The results showed that at low sample bias tin could be etched at a rate of 278 nm/min with a selectivity of tin removal rate to SiO2 removal rate over 9000. However, the use of the etcher at a multi-user facility did not provide adequate control over experimental parameters and reproducible cleanliness of the system. Moreover, the simulating the real optics in the PlasmaTherm SLR-770 was not allowed. Hence, a collector mock-up which can simulate the real collector optics was constructed. This work presents results for etch rate and selectivity for halide etching of tin in the Plasma-Material Interaction Group's new reactive ion etching experiment where control over important parameters such as gas mixture, RF power, sample bias, and sample temperature; as well as overall system cleanliness is maintained. The effect of these parameters on etch rate and selectivity will be presented. In addition, the results of our recipes in the optics mock-up will be shown.

  1. Alternative process for thin layer etching: Application to nitride spacer etching stopping on silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Posseme, N. Pollet, O.; Barnola, S.

    2014-08-04

    Silicon nitride spacer etching realization is considered today as one of the most challenging of the etch process for the new devices realization. For this step, the atomic etch precision to stop on silicon or silicon germanium with a perfect anisotropy (no foot formation) is required. The situation is that none of the current plasma technologies can meet all these requirements. To overcome these issues and meet the highly complex requirements imposed by device fabrication processes, we recently proposed an alternative etching process to the current plasma etch chemistries. This process is based on thin film modification by light ions implantation followed by a selective removal of the modified layer with respect to the non-modified material. In this Letter, we demonstrate the benefit of this alternative etch method in term of film damage control (silicon germanium recess obtained is less than 6 A), anisotropy (no foot formation), and its compatibility with other integration steps like epitaxial. The etch mechanisms of this approach are also addressed.

  2. Influence of voltage on etching rate of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with HNO3 studied using surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunmee, Sarayut; Nakaya, Yasuyuki; Zhou, XiaoLong; Arakawa, Satoru; Komatsu, Keiji; Ito, Haruhiko; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-01

    Etching of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films in 0.1 M nitric acid was evaluated using surface plasmon resonance at the applied voltages of 0.0, ‑1.0, and 1.0 V. The etching rates of the a-C:H films as functions of the applied voltages and etching duration were obtained to be 0.0368 (at 0.0 V), 0.0117 (at ‑1.0 V), and 0.0074 nm/min (at 1.0 V). These results clearly indicate that the etching rates decrease significantly under the conditions of applying positive or negative voltage, demonstrating the enhanced corrosion resistance of the a-C:H films upon applying voltage.

  3. Characterization of electric discharge machining, subsequent etching and shot-peening as a surface treatment for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stráský, Josef; Havlíková, Jana; Bačáková, Lucie; Harcuba, Petr; Mhaede, Mansour; Janeček, Miloš

    2013-09-01

    Presented work aims at multi-method characterization of combined surface treatment of Ti-6Al-4V alloy for biomedical use. Surface treatment consists of consequent use of electric discharge machining (EDM), acid etching and shot peening. Surface layers are analyzed employing scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Acid etching by strong Kroll's reagent is capable of removing surface layer of transformed material created by EDM. Acid etching also creates partly nanostructured surface and significantly contributes to the enhanced proliferation of the bone cells. The cell growth could be positively affected by the superimposed bone-inspired structure of the surface with the morphological features in macro-, micro- and nano-range. Shot peening significantly improves poor fatigue performance after EDM. Final fatigue performance is comparable to benchmark electropolished material without any adverse surface effect. The proposed three-step surface treatment is a low-cost process capable of producing material that is applicable in orthopedics.

  4. Vertical etching with isolated catalysts in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lianto, Prayudi; Yu, Sihang; Wu, Jiaxin; Thompson, C. V.; Choi, W. K.

    2012-11-01

    Metal assisted chemical etching with interconnected catalyst structures has been used to create a wide array of organized nanostructures. However, when patterned catalysts are not interconnected, but are isolated instead, vertical etching to form controlled features is difficult. A systematic study of the mechanism and catalyst stability of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of Si in HF and H2O2 using Au catalysts has been carried out. The effects of the etchants on the stability of Au catalysts were examined in detail. The role of excess electronic holes as a result of MACE was investigated via pit formation as a function of catalyst proximity and H2O2 concentration. We show that a suppression of excess holes can be achieved by either adding NaCl to or increasing the HF concentration of the etching solution. We demonstrate that an electric field can direct most of the excess holes to the back of the Si wafer and thus reduce pit formation at the surface of Si between the Au catalysts. The effect of hydrogen bubbles, generated as a consequence of MACE, on the stability of Au catalysts has also been investigated. We define a regime of etch chemistry and catalyst spacing for which catalyst stability and vertical etching can be achieved.Metal assisted chemical etching with interconnected catalyst structures has been used to create a wide array of organized nanostructures. However, when patterned catalysts are not interconnected, but are isolated instead, vertical etching to form controlled features is difficult. A systematic study of the mechanism and catalyst stability of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of Si in HF and H2O2 using Au catalysts has been carried out. The effects of the etchants on the stability of Au catalysts were examined in detail. The role of excess electronic holes as a result of MACE was investigated via pit formation as a function of catalyst proximity and H2O2 concentration. We show that a suppression of excess holes can be achieved by either adding NaCl to or increasing the HF concentration of the etching solution. We demonstrate that an electric field can direct most of the excess holes to the back of the Si wafer and thus reduce pit formation at the surface of Si between the Au catalysts. The effect of hydrogen bubbles, generated as a consequence of MACE, on the stability of Au catalysts has also been investigated. We define a regime of etch chemistry and catalyst spacing for which catalyst stability and vertical etching can be achieved. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32350h

  5. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  6. Wettability investigating on the wet etching textured multicrystalline silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangju; Niu, Yuchao; Zhai, Tongguang; Ma, Yuying; Zhen, Yongtai; Ma, Xiaoyu; Gao, Ying

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the wettability properties of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si), the different surface structures were fabricated on the as-cut p-type multi-wire slurry sawn mc-Si wafers, such as as-cut, polished and etched in various acid solutions. The contact angles and the XRD spectra of these samples were measured. It was noted that both the surface structures and the use of surfactant, such as Tween 80, made a stronger effect on wettability of the Si wafer. Due to the lipophilic groups of Tween 80 combined with the Si atoms while the hydrophilic groups of it were outward, a lipophilic surface of Si changed into a hydrophilic one and the rougher the surface, the stronger the hydrophily. Thus, it is feasible to add an appropriate surfactant into the etching solution during black-Si wafer fabrication for solar cells. In addition, different crystal plains of Si had different dangling bond density, so that their surface energies were different. A surface with higher surface energy could attract more water atoms and its wettability was better. However, the effect of crystal plain on the surface wettability was much weaker than surface morphology.

  7. Etch Profile Simulation Using Level Set Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Etching and deposition of materials are critical steps in semiconductor processing for device manufacturing. Both etching and deposition may have isotropic and anisotropic components, due to directional sputtering and redeposition of materials, for example. Previous attempts at modeling profile evolution have used so-called "string theory" to simulate the moving solid-gas interface between the semiconductor and the plasma. One complication of this method is that extensive de-looping schemes are required at the profile corners. We will present a 2D profile evolution simulation using level set theory to model the surface. (1) By embedding the location of the interface in a field variable, the need for de-looping schemes is eliminated and profile corners are more accurately modeled. This level set profile evolution model will calculate both isotropic and anisotropic etch and deposition rates of a substrate in low pressure (10s mTorr) plasmas, considering the incident ion energy angular distribution functions and neutral fluxes. We will present etching profiles of Si substrates in Ar/Cl2 discharges for various incident ion energies and trench geometries.

  8. Technique for etching monolayer and multilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Conley, Raymond P.; Divan, Ralu; Macrander, Albert

    2015-10-06

    A process is disclosed for sectioning by etching of monolayers and multilayers using an RIE technique with fluorine-based chemistry. In one embodiment, the process uses Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) alone or in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) using fluorine-based chemistry alone and using sufficient power to provide high ion energy to increase the etching rate and to obtain deeper anisotropic etching. In a second embodiment, a process is provided for sectioning of WSi.sub.2/Si multilayers using RIE in combination with ICP using a combination of fluorine-based and chlorine-based chemistries and using RF power and ICP power. According to the second embodiment, a high level of vertical anisotropy is achieved by a ratio of three gases; namely, CHF.sub.3, Cl.sub.2, and O.sub.2 with RF and ICP. Additionally, in conjunction with the second embodiment, a passivation layer can be formed on the surface of the multilayer which aids in anisotropic profile generation.

  9. Dry etching of III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; McLane, G.F.; Constantine, C.

    1995-12-01

    The chemical inertness and high bond strengths of the III-V nitrides lead to slower plasma etching rates than for more conventional III-V semiconductors under the same conditions. High ion density conditions (>3{times}l0{sup 9}cm{sup {minus}3}) such as those obtained in ECR or magnetron reactors produce etch rates up to an order of magnitude higher than for RIE, where the ion densities are in the 10{sup 9}cm{sup {minus}3} range. We have developed smooth anisotropic dry etches for GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys based on Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar, Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}/SF{sub 6}, HBr/H{sub 2} and HI/H{sub 2} plasma chemistries achieving etch rates up to {approximately}4,000{angstrom}/min at moderate dc bias voltages ({le}-150V). Ion-induced damage in the nitrides appears to be less apparent than in other III-V`s. One of the key remaining issues is the achievement of high selectivities for removal of one layer from another.

  10. Etched castings. An alternative approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Wood, M

    1985-04-01

    Resin-bonded restorations are a conservative alternative with excellent patient acceptance. Improvements in retainer design and electrolytic etching of cast metal allow these restorations to be utilized in a variety of clinical situations. The article reviews the development, indications and contraindications, design, and mouth preparation as well as variations of basic techniques, esthetics, and removal of retainers. PMID:3888703

  11. Energetic Atoms Would Etch Photoresists Anisotropically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven; Cross, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Directed beams of single oxygen atoms having kinetic energies between 1 and 5 eV used in anisotropic etching of oxygen-labile photoresist patterns on silicon wafers. Key step in manufacturing integrated circuits on semiconductor wafers. Damage to semiconductor material under photoresist layer reduced or eliminated. Method incorporated into lithographic processes for fabrication of integrated circuits.

  12. Optimization of TMAH etching for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brida, Sebastiano; Ferrario, Lorenza; Guarnieri, Vittorio; Giacomozzi, Flavio; Margesin, Benno; Paranjape, Makarand; Verzellesi, Giovanni; Zen, Mario

    1999-03-01

    Tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) is an anisotropic silicon etchant that is gaining considerable use in silicon sensor micromachining due to its excellent compatibility with CMOS processing, selectivity, anisotropy and relatively low toxicity, as compared to the more used KOH and EDP etchants. In this paper, the influence of temperature and concentration of the TMAH solution together with oxidizer additions is studied in order to optimize the anisotropic silicon etching for MEMS fabrication. In particular this optimized etchant formulation has been employed at ITC-Irst in the development of a basic fabrication process for piezoresistive pressure sensors based on a silicon membrane and four resistors connected in a Weatherstone bridge configuration. The active element of the sensor, i.e. the thin silicon membrane, is formed by etching anisotropically from the backside of the wafer. Both process and etching have to be tuned and matched in order to obtain an optimum fabrication sequence. Some improvements such as higher etch rate and better surface finish have been obtained by the addition of ammonium peroxidsulfate as oxidizing agent under different conditions. This simplifies both the post processing and the tech set-up. The process parameters and the thermo-electro-mechanical characteristics of the pressure sensors were tested and are compared with the analytical and numerical simulations.

  13. High index contrast polysiloxane waveguides fabricated by dry etching

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, S. J.; Zhang, M. Y.; Choi, D.-Y.; Luther-Davies, B.; Charters, R.

    2009-05-15

    The authors demonstrate the production of low loss enhanced index contrast waveguides by reactive ion etching of IPG trade mark sign polysiloxane thin films. The use of a silica mask and CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} etch gas led to large etch selectivity between the silica and IPG trade mark sign of >20 and etch rates of >100 nm/min. This work indicates that compact optical circuits could be successfully fabricated for telecommunication applications using polysiloxane films.

  14. Orientation Dependence of Etch Pit Density in (111) and (211) CdZnTe Everson Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Lindsay; Kumar, Francis Joseph; Mackenzie, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Everson solution is widely used for dislocation etching on (111)B and (211)B facets of CdTe and CdZnTe (CZT) wafers, but (211)B etch pit density (EPD) counts are lower. In this study, the correlation between the (111) and (211) Everson EPD counts was quantified by etching incrementally misoriented (111)B and (211)B facets of CdZnTe with counting by semi-automated optical microscopy. The EPD was found to decrease exponentially with increasing misorientation angle from (111)B. The results indicate that, for EPD to be a quantitative indicator of crystalline quality, precise crystal orientation angles must be taken into account. Based on the exponential curve fit, an estimation of the (111)B EPD values can be extrapolated from the EPD measured for (211)B etching.

  15. Comparison of plasma etch techniques for III V nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shul, R. J.; Vawter, G. A.; Willison, C. G.; Bridges, M. M.; Lee, J. W.; Pearton, S. J.; Abernathy, C. R.

    1998-12-01

    Fabrication of group-III nitride devices relies on the ability to pattern features to depths ranging from ˜1000 Å to >5 μm with anisotropic profiles, smooth morphologies, selective etching of one material over another and a low degree of plasma-induced damage. In this study, GaN etch rates and etch profiles are compared using reactive ion etch (RIE), reactive ion beam etching (RIBE), electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etch systems. RIE yielded the slowest etch rates and sloped etch profiles despite dc-biases >-900 V. ECR and ICP etching yielded the highest rates with anisotropic profiles due to their high plasma flux and the ability to control ion energies independently of plasma density. RIBE etch results also showed anisotropic profiles but with slower etch rates than either ECR or ICP possibly due to lower ion flux. InN and AlN etch characteristics are also compared using ICP and RIBE.

  16. Comparative evaluation of antibacterial activity of total-etch and self-etch adhesive systems: An ex vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Swathi; Shetty, Harish K.; Varma, Ravi K.; Amin, Vivek; Nair, Prathap M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare the antibacterial activity of total-etch and self-etch adhesive systems against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Actinomyces viscosus through disk diffusion method. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial effects of Single Bond (SB) and Adper Prompt (AP) and aqueous solution of chlorhexidine 0.2% (positive control) were tested against standard strain of S. mutans, L. acidophilus, and A. viscosus using the disk diffusion method. The diameters of inhibition zones were measured in millimeters. Data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Mann-Whitney U test was used for pairwise comparison. Result: Of all the materials tested, AP showed the maximum inhibitory action against S. mutans and L. acidophilus. Aqueous solution of chlorhexidine 0.2% showed the maximum inhibitory action against A. viscosus. Very minimal antibacterial effect was noted for SB. Conclusion: The antibacterial effects observed for the tested different dentin bonding systems may be related to the acidic nature of the materials. PMID:24944452

  17. Vertical etching with isolated catalysts in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Lianto, Prayudi; Yu, Sihang; Wu, Jiaxin; Thompson, C V; Choi, W K

    2012-12-01

    Metal assisted chemical etching with interconnected catalyst structures has been used to create a wide array of organized nanostructures. However, when patterned catalysts are not interconnected, but are isolated instead, vertical etching to form controlled features is difficult. A systematic study of the mechanism and catalyst stability of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of Si in HF and H(2)O(2) using Au catalysts has been carried out. The effects of the etchants on the stability of Au catalysts were examined in detail. The role of excess electronic holes as a result of MACE was investigated via pit formation as a function of catalyst proximity and H(2)O(2) concentration. We show that a suppression of excess holes can be achieved by either adding NaCl to or increasing the HF concentration of the etching solution. We demonstrate that an electric field can direct most of the excess holes to the back of the Si wafer and thus reduce pit formation at the surface of Si between the Au catalysts. The effect of hydrogen bubbles, generated as a consequence of MACE, on the stability of Au catalysts has also been investigated. We define a regime of etch chemistry and catalyst spacing for which catalyst stability and vertical etching can be achieved. PMID:23099475

  18. Etched profile control in anisotropic etching of silicon by TMAH+Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Prem; Gosálvez, M. A.; Sato, K.

    2012-06-01

    The adverse effect of mechanical agitation (magnetic bead stirring) as well as galvanic interaction between the evolving facets of the etch front on the amount of undercutting during anisotropic etching of Si{1 0 0} wafers in surfactant-added tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) is studied by etching different mask patterns in magnetically stirred and nonstirred solutions. Triton X-100, with formula C14H22O(C2H4O)n, where n = 9-10, is used as the surfactant. The stirring results conclude that the adsorption of the surfactant on the etched silicon surfaces is predominantly physical in nature rather than chemical (physisorption versus chemisorption). The proposed model to account for the galvanic interaction between the evolving facets indicates that the underlying chemical etching process can be significantly surpassed by the onset of an electrochemical etching contribution when the relative area of the exposed {1 0 0} surface becomes relatively small in comparison to that of the developed {1 1 1} sidewalls. This study is useful for engineering applications where surfactant-added TMAH is used for the fabrication of silicon MEMS structures that should contain negligible undercutting.

  19. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  20. Modeling Wet Chemical Etching of Surface Flaws on Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Suratwala, T I; Wong, L L; Steele, W A; Miller, P E; Bude, J D

    2009-10-28

    Fluoride-based wet chemical etching of fused silica optical components is useful to open up surface fractures for diagnostic purposes, to create surface topology, and as a possible mitigation technique to remove damaged material. To optimize the usefulness of etching , it is important to understand how the morphology of etched features changes as a function of the amount of material removed. In this study, we present two geometric etch models that describe the surface topology evolution as a function of the amount etched. The first model, referred to as the finite-difference etch model, represents the surface as an array of points in space where at each time-step the points move normal to the local surface. The second model, referred to as the surface area-volume model, more globally describes the surface evolution relating the volume of material removed to the exposed surface area. These etch models predict growth and coalescence of surface fractures such as those observed on scratches and ground surfaces. For typical surface fractures, simulations show that the transverse growth of the cracks at long etch times scales with the square root of etch time or the net material removed in agreement with experiment. The finite-difference etch model has also been applied to more complex structures such as the etching of a CO{sub 2} laser-mitigated laser damage site. The results indicate that etching has little effect on the initial morphology of this site implying little change in downstream scatter and modulation characteristics upon exposure to subsequent high fluence laser light. In the second part of the study, the geometric etch model is expanded to include fluid dynamics and mass transport. This later model serves as a foundation for understanding related processes such as the possibility of redeposition of etch reaction products during the etching, rinsing or drying processes.

  1. Silica Sand Etching Behavior During a Primary Step of its Leaching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkrim, Kheloufi; Yassine, Berbar; Aissa, Kefaifi; Nadjib, Drouiche

    2011-01-01

    The actual advances in mineral processing technologies aim mainly to increase the supply of newly mined metals and to reduce the cost of enrichment process. In this contest, the silicon solar grade SoG as feedstock for photovoltaic applications required a high purity. Its cycle of production consists firstly of enriching the silica by acid leaching, which is a suitable method for enriching silica sand and also can be realized at low temperature with low energy consumption and simple instruments. Fluoride acid (HF) is currently used as leachant agent for its reactivity with silica, and other eventual acids can be used successively, to improve the silica enrichment. The most influencing parameters on silica leaching are leaching time and particles sand size. Our work consists of the study of etching behavior of silica with HF, since this acid can significantly etch silica sand and change its particles size. Thus, we have studied etching effect on particle granulometric size during a primary step of leaching process on Algerian silica sand with HF at 20% during 2, 4 and 6 hours. Therefore, a new granulometric classification of the sand is noted. Particles with proportional high size are the latest influenced and the mass loss is increased with time of leaching.

  2. Effect of N2 Addition on Aluminum Alloy Etching by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Reactive Ion Etching and Magnetically Enhanced Reactive Ion Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Junko; Yoneda, Masahiro

    1995-04-01

    Aluminum alloy etching is an important process in ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) fabrication. We investigated the effect of N2 addition to Cl2+BCl3 gas mixture on aluminum-copper alloy etching by electron cyclotron resonance reactive ion etching (ECR-RIE) and magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE). In ECR-RIE, N2 addition was effective in suppressing residues and post-etch corrosion of aluminum alloy interconnects; on the other hand, in MERIE, N2 addition promoted the formation of residues and post-etch corrosion. This difference is probably caused by BClX+ in plasma, because it was found by mass spectral analysis that N2 addition increased the amount of BClX+ in plasma of ECR-RIE, but it decreased that in plasma of MERIE.

  3. ICP etching of GaAs via hole contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Baca, A.G.; Briggs, R.D.; McClellan, G.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Constantine, C.

    1996-09-01

    Deep etching of GaAs is a critical process step required for many device applications including fabrication of through-substrate via holes for monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). Use of high-density plasmas, including inductively coupled plasmas (ICP), offers an alternative approach to etching vias as compared to more conventional parallel plate reactive ion etch systems. This paper reports ICP etching of GaAs vias at etch rates of about 5.3 {mu}m/min with via profiles ranging from highly anistropic to conical.

  4. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of polycrystalline and (100)tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles

    1987-01-01

    A chemically assisted ion-beam etching technique is described which employs an ion beam from an electron-bombardment ion source and a directed flux of ClF3 neutrals. This technique enables the etching of tungsten foils and films in excess of 40 microns thick with good anisotropy and pattern definition over areas of 30 sq mm, and with a high degree of selectivity. (100) tungsten foils etched with this process exhibit preferred-orientation etching, while polycrystalline tungsten films exhibit high etch rates. This technique can be used to pattern the dispenser cathode surfaces serving as electron emitters in traveling-wave tubes to a controlled porosity.

  5. Molybdenum etching with chlorine atoms and molecular chlorine plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fischl, D.S.; Hess, D.W.

    1988-09-01

    Thin films of molybdenum were etched both within and downstream from a Cl/sub 2/ plasma at 200-mTorr pressure and temperatures below 180 /sup 0/C. When samples were positioned downstream from the discharge, etching proceeded solely by chemical reaction of the film with chlorine atoms. Without a discharge, molecular chlorine did not etch molybdenum. Downstream and in-discharge etch rates were <20 nm/min and etching by atoms was not observed below 100 /sup 0/C. The chemical reaction between chlorine atoms and molybdenum was proportional to the gas phase Cl atom mole fraction.

  6. Effect of a functional monomer (MDP) on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Kenji; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsubota, Keishi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Berry, Thomas P; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of the functional monomer, 10-methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives through integrating fatigue testing and long-term water storage. An MDP-containing self-etch adhesive, Clearfil Bond SE ONE (SE), and an experimental adhesive, MDP-free (MF), which comprised the same ingredients as SE apart from MDP, were used. Shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) were measured with or without phosphoric acid pre-etching. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 6 months, or 1 yr. Although similar SBS and SFS values were obtained for SE with pre-etching and for MF after 24 h of storage in distilled water, SE with pre-etching showed higher SBS and SFS values than MF after storage in water for 6 months or 1 yr. Regardless of the pre-etching procedure, SE showed higher SBS and SFS values after 6 months of storage in distilled water than after 24 h or 1 yr. To conclude, MDP might play an important role in enhancing not only bond strength but also bond durability with respect to repeated subcritical loading after long-term water storage. PMID:26620762

  7. Si etching with reactive neutral beams of very low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Hamagaki, Manabu; Mise, Takaya; Iwata, Naotaka; Hara, Tamio

    2014-12-14

    A Si etching process has been investigated with reactive neutral beams (NBs) extracted using a low acceleration voltage of less than 100 V from CF{sub 4} and Ar mixed plasmas. The etched Si profile shows that the etching process is predominantly anisotropic. The reactive NB has a constant Si etching rate in the acceleration voltage range from 20 V to 80 V. It is considered that low-energy NBs can trigger Si etching because F radicals adsorb onto the Si surface and weaken Si–Si bonds. The etching rate per unit beam flux is 33 times higher than that with Ar NB. These results show that the low-energy reactive NB is useful for damage-free high speed Si etching.

  8. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical probability of damage initiation at 12 J/cm{sup 2} of an ensemble of scratches decreased from {approx}100 mm{sup -1} of scratch length to {approx}0.001 mm{sup -1}.

  9. Characterization of aluminum surfaces: Sorption and etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkinghorne, Jeannette Clera

    Aluminum, due to its low density and low cost, is a key material for future lightweight applications. However, like other structural materials, aluminum is subject to various forms of corrosion damage that annually costs the United States approximately 5% of its GNP [1]. The main goal is to investigate the effects of various solution anions on aluminum surfaces, and specifically probe pit initiation and inhibition. Using surface analysis techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, results have been correlated with those obtained from electrochemical methods and a radiolabeling technique developed in the Wieckowski laboratory. Analysis of data has indicated that important variables include type of anion, solution pH, and applied electrode potential. While aggressive anions such as chloride are usually studied to elucidate corrosion processes to work ultimately toward inhibition, its corrosive properties can be successfully utilized in the drive for higher energy and smaller-scale storage devices. Fundamental information gained regarding anion interaction with the aluminum surface can be applied to tailor etch processes. Standard electrochemical techniques and SEM are respectively used to etch and analyze the aluminum substrate. Aluminum electrolytic capacitors are comprised of aluminum anode foil covered by an anodically grown aluminum oxide dielectric film, electrolytic paper impregnated with electrolyte, and aluminum cathode foil. Two main processes are involved in the fabrication of aluminum electrolytic capacitors, namely etching and anodic oxide formation. Etching of the anode foil results in a higher surface area (up to 20 times area enlargement compared to unetched foil) that translates into a higher capacitance gain, permitting more compact and lighter capacitor manufacture. Anodic oxide formation on the anode, creates the required dielectric to withstand high voltage operation. A detailed investigation of variables such as solution temperature, solution composition, and supplied charge used in these processes can lead to improved foil design and ultimately a better product.

  10. Photonic devices based on preferential etching.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Bob; Larchanché, Jean-François; Vilcot, Jean-Pierre; Decoster, Didier; Beccherelli, Romeo; d'Alessandro, Antonio

    2005-11-20

    We introduce a design concept of optical waveguides characterized by a practical and reproducible process based on preferential etching of crystalline silicon substrates. Low-loss waveguides, spot-size converters, and power dividers have been obtained with polymers. We have also aligned liquid crystals in the waveguides and demonstrated guided propagation. Therefore this technology is a suitable platform for soft-matter photonics and heterogeneous integration. PMID:16318190

  11. Etching of moldavities under natural conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knobloch, V.; Knoblochova, Z.; Urbanec, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The hypothesis that a part of the lechatellierites which originated by etching from a basic moldavite mass became broken off after deposition of moldavite in the sedimentation layer is advanced. Those found close to the original moldavite were measured for statistical averaging of length. The average length of lechatelierite fibers per cubic mm of moldavite mass volume was determined by measurement under a microscope in toluene. The data were used to calculate the depth of the moldavite layer that had to be etched to produce the corresponding amount of lechatelierite fragments. The calculations from five "fields" of moldavite surface, where layers of fixed lechatelierite fragments were preserved, produced values of 2.0, 3.1, 3.5, 3.9 and 4.5. Due to inadvertent loss of some fragments the determined values are somewhat lower than those found in references. The difference may be explained by the fact that the depth of the layer is only that caused by etching after moldavite deposition.

  12. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2015-10-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) EUV mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of not only a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope (PEM), but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam (EB) techniques such as CD metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients (SEECs) of the candidate materials for conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair-ML, 16 nm sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in hp 44 nm, 40 nm, and 32 nm line and space (L/S) patterns. Reducing 40-pair-ML to 20-pair-ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16 nm sized defects remained detectable. These defects were also detected after the etched part was refilled with Si. Moreover, the simulation shows a high sensitivity for detecting the residual-type defects (etching residues). A double layer structure with 2.5-nm-thik B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  13. Etching characteristics of LiNbO{sub 3} in reactive ion etching and inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Z.; Yu, S.; Heard, P. J.; Marshall, J. M.; Thomas, P. A.

    2008-02-01

    The etching characteristics of congruent LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals including doped LiNbO{sub 3} and proton-changed LiNbO{sub 3} have been studied in reactive ion etching (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching tools, using different recipes of gas mixtures. The effects of parameters including working pressure, RIE power, and ICP power are investigated and analyzed by measurement of etching depth, selectivity, uniformity, etched surface state, and sidewall profile by means of focused ion beam etching, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. The effects of a sample carrier wafer coating have also been investigated. Optimized processes with high etching rates, good mask selectivity, and a near-vertical profile have been achieved. Ridge waveguides on proton-exchanged LiNbO{sub 3} have been fabricated and optically measured.

  14. A spin-on photosensitive polymeric etch protection mask for anisotropic wet etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi-Malhotra, J.; Zhong, X. F.; Planje, C.; Brand, G.; Yess, K.

    2008-02-01

    Newly developed photosensitive etch protection materials have key advantages over standard photoresists typically used in today's MEMS applications. Using these new materials eliminates the need for silicon nitride (SiN) masks deposited via CVD processes, which require significant investments in processing equipment, utilize extreme processing conditions and contribute to an overall decrease in throughput. This new technology will enhance throughput by reducing the number of process steps and simplify the process flow with minimal impact on overall undercut performance. The polymeric coating serves as a SiN mask replacement for etching silicon substrates in alkaline anisotropic etchants such as KOH and TMAH. The undercut performance observed is larger than that of SiN when etched in KOH, but when alternative alkaline etchants such as TMAH are used, the undercut is identical (1-2% with respect to etch depth). Various factors, such as primer bake, topcoat final cure temperature, etchant concentration and substrate surface conditions, have all been shown to affect undercut results. An additional advantage of this new technology is that it can be easily reworked/removed by solvents, plasma etch, Nano-Strip®, Piranha and RCA cleaning solutions depending on where the removal takes place in the process.

  15. Optimization of etching and reading procedures for the Autoscan 60 track etch system

    SciTech Connect

    McKeever, R.; Devine, R.; Coennen, C.

    1997-02-11

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is charged with measuring the occupational exposure to radiological workers and contractors throughout the Laboratory, which includes many different sites with multiple and varied radiation fields. Of concern here are the high energy neutrons such as those generated during accelerator operations at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory purchased an Autoscan 60 automated reader for use with chemically etched CR39 detectors. The dosimeter design employed at LANL uses a plastic, hemispherical case, encompassing a polystyrene pyramidal detector holder. The pyramidal holder supports three detectors at a 35{degree} angle. Averaging the results of the three detectors minimizes the angular dependence normally associated with a planar dosimeter. The Autoscan 60 is an automated reading system for use with CR39 chemical etch detectors. The detectors are immersed in an etch solution to enhance the visibility of the damage sites caused by recoil proton impact with the hydrogen atoms in the detector. The authors decided to increase the etch time from six hours to 15 hours, while retaining the 70 C temperature. The reason for the change in the etch is to enhance the sensitivity and precision of the CR39 detector as indicated by this study.

  16. Improving UV laser damage threshold of fused silica optics by wet chemical etching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Li, Yaguo; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao; Yang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Fused silica is widely used in high-power laser systems because of its good optical performance and mechanical properties. However, laser damage initiation and growth induced by 355 nm laser illumination in optical elements have become a bottleneck in the development of high energy laser system. In order to improve the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), the fused silica optics were treated by two types of HF-based etchants: 1.7%wt. HF acid and buffer oxide etchant (BOE: the mixture of 0.4%wt. HF and 12%wt. NH4F), respectively, for varied etching time. Damage testing shows that both the etchants increase the damage threshold at a certain depth of material removal, but further removal of material lowers the LIDT markedly. The etching rates of both etchants keep steady in our processing procedure, ~58 μg/min and ~85 μg/min, respectively. The micro-surface roughness (RMS and PV) increases as etching time extends. The hardness (H) and Young's modulus (E) of the fused silica etched for diverse time, measured by nano-indenter, show no solid evidence that LIDT can be related to hardness or Young's modulus.

  17. Influence of microhybrid resin and etching times on bleached enamel for the bonding of ceramic brackets.

    PubMed

    Firoozmand, Leily Macedo; Brando, Juliana Viana Pereira; Fialho, Melissa Proena Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of polycrystalline ceramic brackets (PCB) bonded after bleaching treatment using different composite resins and enamel etching times. A total of 144 bovine incisors were randomly divided into two study groups (n = 72, each) as follows: G1, enamel bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide, and G2 (control group), enamel unbleached. After the bleaching treatment, the samples were stored in artificial saliva for 14 days. These groups were further divided into two subgroups (n = 36, each) as follows: GA, brackets bonded with Transbond XT (3M) and GB, brackets bonded with Filtek Z250 (3M). For each resin used, three different etching times with 37% phosphoric acid (15, 30 and 60 seconds) were tested. SBS tests were performed using a universal testing machine (EMIC), and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) score was verified. Significant differences among the three experimental conditions and interactions between the groups were observed. The type of composite resin accounted for 24% of the influence on the bond strength, whereas the etching time and bleaching treatment accounted for 14.5% and 10% of the influence on bond strength, respectively. The ARI revealed that the most common area of adhesion failure was at the composite resin-bracket interface. The type of composite resin, etching time and external bleaching significantly influenced the SBS of PCB on enamel, even after 14 days of saliva storage. PMID:23538425

  18. Acid inhibition of CRA`s: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.L.; Cassidy, J.M.; Lancaster, K.R.; McCoy, T.H.

    1994-12-31

    This paper will review the brief history in the literature of the inhibition of corrosion resistant alloys (CRA`s) in acidic stimulation fluids. This review primarily discusses the problems associated with inhibiting 13% Cr and 22% Cr duplex steels in hydrochloric (HCI) and hydrochloric-hydrofluoric (HCl-HF) acid systems using low alloy inhibitors and the successes achieved using high alloy inhibitors. Other areas briefly discussed are the repassivation of 13% Cr and 22% Cr, effect on nickel-based alloys and use of organic acids.

  19. [Restoration of composite on etched stainless steel crowns. (1)].

    PubMed

    Goto, G; Zang, Y; Hosoya, Y

    1990-01-01

    Object of investigation The retention of composite resin to etched stainless steel crowns was tested as a possible method for restoring primary anterior teeth. Method employed 1) SEM observation Stainless steel crowns (Sankin Manufacture Co.) were etched with an aqua resia to create surface roughness and undercut to retain the composite resin to the crowns. Etching times were 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 20 minutes, then washed in a 70% alcohol solution using an ultrasonic washer and dried. A total of 96 etched samples and non etched control samples were observed through the scanning electron microscope (Hitachi 520). 2) Shear bond strength test Stainless steel crowns were etched in an aqua resia from 1 to 20 minutes, then washed and dried. Composite resin (Photo Clearfil A, Kuraray Co.) with the bonding agent was placed on the crowns and the shear bond strength was tested in 56 samples using an Autograph (DCS-500, Shimazu). Results 1) SEM observation showed that the etching surface of stainless steel crowns created surface roughness and undercut. The most desirable surface was obtained in the 3 to 5 minute etching time specimens. 2) The highest bond strength was obtained in a 3 minute etching specimen. It was 42.12 MPa, although 29.26 MPa in mean value. Conclusion Etching with an aqua resia increased the adherence of composite resin to the surface of stainless steel crowns. PMID:2133964

  20. NiCr etching in a reactive gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.; Boucher, R.; Morgenroth, W.; Meyer, H. G.

    2007-05-15

    The authors have etched NiCr through a resist mask using Cl/Ar based chemistry in an electron cyclotron resonance etch system. The optimum gas mixture and etch parameters were found for various ratios of Ni to Cr, based on the etch rate, redeposits, and the etch ratio to the mask. The introduction of O{sub 2} into the chamber, which is often used in the etching of Cr, served to both increase and decrease the etch rate depending explicitly on the etching parameters. Etch rates of >50 nm min{sup -1} and ratios of >1 (NiCr:Mask) were achieved for NiCr (80:20). Pattern transfer from the mask into the NiCr was achieved with a high fidelity and without redeposits for a Cl/Ar mix of 10% Ar (90% Cl{sub 2}) at an etch rate of {approx_equal}50 nm min{sup -1} and a ratio of 0.42 (NiCr:ZEP 7000 e-beam mask)

  1. Anisotropic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} waveguide etching using inductively coupled plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Muttalib, Muhammad Firdaus A. Chen, Ruiqi Y.; Pearce, Stuart J.; Charlton, Martin D. B.

    2014-07-01

    Smooth and vertical sidewall profiles are required to create low loss rib and ridge waveguides for integrated optical device and solid state laser applications. In this work, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching processes are developed to produce high quality low loss tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) waveguides. A mixture of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and O{sub 2} gas are used in combination with chromium (Cr) hard mask for this purpose. In this paper, the authors make a detailed investigation of the etch process parameter window. Effects of process parameters such as ICP power, platen power, gas flow, and chamber pressure on etch rate and sidewall slope angle are investigated. Chamber pressure is found to be a particularly important factor, which can be used to tune the sidewall slope angle and so prevent undercut.

  2. Method for laser-assisted silicon etching using halocarbon ambients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Stephen D.; Sexton, Douglas A.; Orazi, Richard J.

    1994-09-01

    An etching process allows a selective single-step patterning of silicon devices in a noncorrosive environment. The etching of silicon relies on a maskless laser-assisted technique in a gaseous halocarbon ambient, such as the gaseous chlorofluorocarbons, dichlorodifluoromethane and chloropentafluoroethane. Laser-assisted photothermal chemical etching reactions on silicon occur in these ambients when the incident fluence from an excimer laser at 248 nm exceeds the melt threshold (approximately 0.75 J/sq cm). When incident fluence exceeds the ablation threshold (approximately 2.2 J/sq cm) an undesirable, increased surface roughness is observed. Etch rates as large as approximately 15 angstroms per pulse are attained within predetermined processing windows. This provides a means for thin membrane formation in silicon, rapid etches and processing of packaged devices or partially fabricated dies. The reduction in processing steps as compared to conventional wet chemical etches provides improvements in yield reliability and cost.

  3. Method for laser-assisted silicon etching using halocarbon ambients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Stephen D.; Sexton, Douglas A.; Orazi, Richard J.

    1995-01-01

    An etching process allows a selective single-step patterning of silicon devices in a noncorrosive environment. The etching of silicon relies on a maskless laser-assisted technique in a gaseous halocarbon ambient, such as the gaseous chlorofluorocarbons, dichlorodifluoromethane and chloropentafluoroethane. Laser-assisted photothermal chemical etching reactions on silicon occur in these ambients when the incident fluence from an excimer laser at 248 nm exceeds the melt threshold (approximately 0.75 J/sq cm). When incident fluence exceeds the ablation threshold (approximately 2.2 J/sq cm) an undesirable increased surface roughness is observed. Etch rates as large as approximately 15 angstroms per pulse are attained within predetermined processing windows. This provides a means for thin membrane formation in silicon, rapid etches and processing of packaged devices or partially fabricated dies. The reduction in processing steps as compared to conventional wet chemical etches provides improvements in yield, reliability and cost.

  4. Experiment and Results on Plasma Etching of SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Im, Do; Peshl, J; Vuskovic, Leposova; Popovic, Svetozar; Valente, Anne-Marie; Phillips, H Lawrence

    2015-09-01

    The inner surfaces of SRF cavities are currently chemically treated (etched or electro polished) to achieve the state of the art RF performance. We designed an apparatus and developed a method for plasma etching of the inner surface for SRF cavities. The process parameters (pressure, power, gas concentration, diameter and shape of the inner electrode, temperature and positive dc bias at inner electrode) are optimized for cylindrical geometry. The etch rate non-uniformity has been overcome by simultaneous translation of the gas point-of-entry and the inner electrode during the processing. A single cell SRF cavity has been centrifugally barrel polished, chemically etched and RF tested to establish a baseline performance. This cavity is plasma etched and RF tested afterwards. The effect of plasma etching on the RF performance of this cavity will be presented and discussed.

  5. ICP dry etching of III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Vartuli, C.B.; Lee, J.W.; MacKenzie, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma etching of GaN, AlN, InN, InGaN and InAlN was investigated in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas as a function of dc bias, and ICP power. The etch rates were generally quite low, as is common for III-nitrides in CH{sub 4} based chemistries. The etch rates increased with increasing dc bias. At low rf power (150 W), the etch rates increased with increasing ICP power, while at 350 W rf power, a peak was found between 500 and 750 W ICP power. The etched surfaces were found to be smooth, while selectivities of etch were {le} 6 for InN over GaN, AlN, InGaN and InAlN under all conditions.

  6. Development of TMAH anisotropic etching manufacturing process for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaur, Jiunn-Jye; Yang, Shih-I.; Du, Chen-Hsun; Lin, Zhongshen; Huang, Cheng-Tang; Lee, Cheng-Kuo

    2000-08-01

    An investigation on the influence of etchant concentration, dissolving silicon content and additives during silicon anisotropic etching in TMAH has been carried out. Based on the Taguchi method, the etch rates of Si, Al, and SiO2 were measured via under-etch experiments using the wagon- wheel mask pattern. The improvement on the surface quality was observed by agitating solution under ultrasonic vibration in TMAH solutions with additives. Furthermore, a new approach is developed to reduce wet etching time and to control etched gap depth between the released micro membrane and the silicon substrate. This method employs a polysilicon or an amorphous silicon thin layer embedded between the micro membrane and silicon substrate as a sacrificial layer, then this layer would be fast iso tropically etched away by TMAH solution.

  7. Influence of erbium, chromium-doped: Yttrium scandium-gallium-garnet laser etching and traditional etching systems on depth of resin penetration in enamel: A confocal laser scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Vishal; Rajasigamani, K.; Karthik, K.; Maroli, Sasidharan; Chakkarayan, Jitesh; Haris, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to assess the resin tag length penetration in enamel surface after bonding of brackets to identify which system was most efficient. Methodology: Our study was based on a more robust confocal microscopy for visualizing the resin tags in enamel. Totally, 100 extracted human first and second premolars have been selected for this study and were randomly divided into ten groups of 10 teeth each. In Group 1, the buccal enamel surface was etched with 37% phosphoric acid (3M ESPE), Group 2 with 37% phosphoric (Ultradent). In Groups 5, 6, and 7, erbium, chromium-doped: Yttrium scandium-gallium-garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser (Biolase) was used for etching the using following specifications: Group 5 (1.5 W/20 Hz, 15 s), Group 6 (2 W/10 Hz, 15 s), and Group 7 (2 W/20 Hz, 15 s). In Groups 8, 9, and 10, Er, Cr: YSGG laser (Biolase) using same specifications and additional to this step, conventional etching on the buccal enamel surface was etched with 37% (3M ESPE) after laser etching. In Groups 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 3M Unitek Transbond XT primer was mixed with Rhodamine B dye (Sigma-Aldrich, Germany) to etched surface and then cured for 20 s. In Group 2, Ultradents bonding agent was mixed with Rhodamine B. In Group 3, 3M Unitek Transbond PLUS, Monrovia, USA, which was mixed with Rhodamine B dye (Sigma-Aldrich, Germany). Group 4, with self-etching primer (Ultradent-Peak SE, USA) was mixed with Rhodamine B dye (Sigma-Aldrich, Germany). Later (3M Unitek, Transbond XT, Monrovia USA) [Figure 1] was used to bond the modified Begg brackets (T. P. Orthodontics) in Groups 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. In Groups 2, 4 Ultradent-Peak LC Bond was used to bond the modified brackets. After curing brackets were debonded, and enamel depth penetration was assessed using confocal laser scanning microscope. Results: Group J had a mean maximum depth of penetration of 100.876 μm, and Group D was the least having a maximum value of 44.254 μm. Conclusions: Laser alone groups had comparable depths of penetration to that of self-etching groups but much lower than conventional acid etched groups. PMID:26538930

  8. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanism and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  9. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanisms and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  10. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  11. Use of super acids to digest chrysotile and amosite asbestos in simple mixtures or matrices found in building materials compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Petrakis, L.; Webster, R.P.

    1999-12-21

    A composition for converting asbestos-containing material to environmentally benign components is provided. The composition comprises a fluoro acid decomposing agent which can be applied to either amosite-containing thermal insulation or chrysotile-containing fire-proof material or to any asbestos-containing material which includes of chrysotile and amosite asbestos. The fluoro acid decomposing agent includes FP{sub 0}(OH){sub 2}, hexafluorophosphoric acid, a mixture of hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid and a mixture of hexafluorophosphoric acid and phosphoric acid. A method for converting asbestos-containing material to environmentally benign components is also provided.

  12. Mask undercut in deep silicon etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraf, I.; Goeckner, M.; Goodlin, Brian; Kirmse, Karen; Overzet, L.

    2011-04-01

    Mask undercut in the time-multiplexed deep silicon etch process is becoming an increasingly significant issue as it is used to produce smaller critical dimension features. Models of the process must contain the necessary physics to reproduce the dependencies of mask undercut. We argue that the reason undercut develops is the dependence of the deposition step on ion flux. Our experiments of C4F8 (and CHF3 not shown) plasmas show that the film growth is dominantly ion-enhanced. This leads naturally to a mask undercut that increases in time. A more neutral flux dominant deposition step would result in reduced mask undercut.

  13. Diamond waveguides fabricated by reactive ion etching.

    PubMed

    Hiscocks, Mark P; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Gibson, Brant C; Huntington, Shane T; Ladouceur, François; Prawer, Steven

    2008-11-24

    We demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of all-diamond integrated optic devices over large areas using a combination of photolithography, reactive ion etching (RIE) and focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. We confirm the viability of this scalable process by demonstrating guidance in a two-moded ridge waveguide in type 1b single crystal diamond. This opens the door to the fabrication of a diamond-based optical chip integrating functional elements such as X-crossings, Y-junctions, evanescent couplers, Bragg reflectors/couplers and various interferometers. PMID:19030037

  14. Inductively coupled plasma etching of III-nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott Alan

    The principal focus of this research was the employment of an in-house designed and constructed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system for integrated studies pertaining to the etching rates and etching selectivity among AlN, GaN, and AlxGa1-xN. An (ICP) system was chosen because of its high plasma density and low cost relative to other high-density plasma etching systems. The etch rates were studied as a function of ICP power, pressure, DC bias, and gas composition. The use of a mixture of 2 sccm BCl 3 and 18 sccm Cl2 resulted in a maximum etch rate of 2.2 microm/min for GaN as well as nearly vertical sidewalls with proper masking. A selectivity value, i.e. the ratio of the etch rates between two materials, as high as 48 was achieved between GaN and AlN with the addition of low concentrations of O2 to a Cl2/Ar chemistry. The use of another selectivity technique, namely, low DC biases resulted in a maximum selectivity of 38. The mechanisms responsible for the GaN etching were determined by monitoring both the ion density with a Langmuir probe and the relative Cl radical density with an optical emission spectrometer. Increasing the ion density resulted in a non-linear increase in the etch rates; increasing the Cl radical density had a minimal affect on etch rate.

  15. Anisotropic etching of Al by a directed Cl2 flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efremow, N. N.; Geis, M. W.; Mountain, R. W.; Lincoln, G. A.; Randall, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    A new Al etching technique is described that uses an ion beam from a Kaufman ion source and a directed Cl2 flux. The ion beam is used primarily to remove the native oxide and to allow the Cl2 to spontaneously react with the Al film forming volatile Al2Cl6. By controlling both the flux equivalent pressure of Cl2 and the ion beam current, this etching technique makes possible the anisotropic etching of Al with etch rates from 100 nm/min to nearly 10 microns/min with a high degree of selectivity.

  16. Determination of the Efficiency of Mixed-Acid Digestions of Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta Vazquez, Alejandra I.; Gill, Gary A.

    2007-01-01

    Mixed-acid digestion is a method often used for the determination of elemental analysis of sediment samples. It is crucial that efficiency details associated with the digestion method be well understood on an element by element basis. Battelle’s Marine Sciences Laboratory Standard Operating Procedure for Sediment Mixed-Acid Digestions was modified to identify conditions which produce optimal recovery of elements. The parameters that were adjusted for testing were mass of sediment, mixed-acid volume, mixed-acid composition and digestion time. Digestion involves treatment of the sediment sample with mixed-acid mixtures at 135º C ± 10º in a Teflon® digestion bomb. Typical analytical methods include Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma – Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Initial experiments involved determining the optimal ratio of acid volume to mass of sediment. Experiments were designed to identify the point at which insufficient acid was used to effectively digest a given mass of sediment. When the mass of sediment was varied between 0.2 and 1.0 gram using a 4 mL aqua regia acid mixture (3 mL hydrochloric acid and 1 mL nitric acid), there was no effect on the recovery of the elements Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn. The next experiments focused on a time study to resolve the shortest digestive time for optimal elemental recovery. Two masses of sediment were investigated, 0.25 and 0.7 g, again utilizing aqua regia digestion (4 mL). Maximum recovery was reached after 4 hours of digestion; additional digestion time released no or only minimal amounts of elements from the sediments. The final set of experiments was designed to identify optimal conditions for the total digestion of sediment using a mixture of hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and boric acid. These experiments were designed to determine the optimal volume of hydrofluoric acid needed to achieve a total digestion. Utilizing two masses of sediment 0.25 and 0.5 g and varying the volume of hydrofluoric acid and boric acid. Total digestion was achieved with a minimum volume of 0.5 mL hydrofluoric acid and a .25 g of sediment. Future experiments incorporating the findings in these experiments will be executed using a heated carbon block as the source for thermal energy.

  17. Washable and wear-resistant superhydrophobic surfaces with self-cleaning property by chemical etching of fibers and hydrophobization.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Li, Ya-Ru; Zhang, Ping; Ma, Jian-Zhong; Jia, Shun-Tian

    2014-07-01

    Superhydrophobic poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) textile surfaces with a self-cleaning property were fabricated by treating the microscale fibers with alkali followed by coating with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that alkali treatment etched the PET and resulted in nanoscale pits on the fiber surfaces, making the textiles have hierarchical structures. Coating of PDMS on the etched fibers affected little the roughening structures while lowered the surface energy of the fibers, thus making the textiles show slippery superhydrophobicity with a self-cleaning effect. Wettability tests showed that the superhydrophobic textiles were robust to acid/alkaline etching, UV irradiation, and long-time laundering. Importantly, the textiles maintained superhydrophobicity even when the textiles are ruptured by severe abrasion. Also colorful images could be imparted to the superhydrophobic textiles by a conventional transfer printing without affecting the superhydrophobicity. PMID:24942304

  18. Bonding of polymers to enamel: influence of deposits formed during etching, etching time and period of water immersion.

    PubMed

    Beech, D R; Jalaly, T

    1980-07-01

    A technique for measuring the shear bond strength of composites to etched enamel was developed. The importance of thorough washing of the enamel surface to remove deposits formed during etching was demonstrated by measurements of bond strength and by scanning electron microscopy. One of three orthodontic adhesive systems showed a highly significant increase in bond strength after immersion in water for three months. Etching times as short as five seconds gave a bond strength not significantly different from that obtained after a one-minute etch. PMID:6991561

  19. Photoresist 3D profile related etch process simulation and its application to full chip etch compact modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-En; Yang, Wayne; Luan, Lan; Song, Hua

    2015-03-01

    The optical proximity correction (OPC) model and post-OPC verification that takes the developed photoresist (PR) 3D profile into account is needed in the advanced 2Xnm node. The etch process hotspots caused by poor resist profile may not be fully identified during the lithography inspection but will only be observed after the subsequent etch process. A complete mask correction that targets to final etch CD requires not only a lithography R3D profile model but also a etch process compact model. The drawback of existing etch model is to treat the etch CD bias as a function of visibility and pattern density which do not contain the information of resist profile. One important factor to affect the etch CD is the PR lateral erosion during the etch process due to non-vertical PR side wall angle (SWA) and anisotropy of etch plasma source. A simple example is in transferring patterns from PR layer to thin hard mask (HM) layer, which is frequently used in the double pattern (DPT) process. The PR lateral erosion contributes an extra HM etch CD bias which is deviated from PR CD defined by lithography process. This CD bias is found to have a nontrivial dependency on the PR profile and cannot be described by the pattern density or visibility. In this report, we study the etch CD variation to resist SWA under various etch conditions. Physical effects during etch process such as plasma ion reflection and source anisotropy, which modify the local etch rate, are taken into considerations in simulation. The virtual data are generated by Synopsys TCAD tool Sentaurus Topography 3D using Monte Carlo engine. A simple geometry compact model is applied first to explain the behavior of virtual data, however, it works to some extent but lacks accuracy when plasma ion reflection comes into play. A modified version is proposed, for the first time, by including the effects of plasma ion reflection and source anisotropy. The new compact model fits the nonlinear etch CD bias very well for a wide range of resist SWAs from 65 to 90 degrees, which covers the resist profile diversities in most real situations. This result offers a potential application for both resist profile aware and etch process aware mask correction model in the mask synthesis flow.

  20. Depth-resolved subsurface defects in chemically etched SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Doutt, D.; Merz, T.; Chakhalian, J.; Kareev, M.; Liu, J.; Brillson, L. J.

    2009-03-01

    Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of atomically flat TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 single crystal surfaces reveals dramatic differences in native point defects produced by conventional etching with buffered HF (BHF) and an alternative procedure using HCl-HNO3 acidic solution (HCLNO), which produces three times fewer oxygen vacancies before and nearly an order of magnitude fewer after pure oxygen annealing. BHF-produced defect densities extend hundreds of nanometers below the surface, whereas the lower HCLNO-treated densities extend less than 50 nm. This "Arkansas" HCLNO etch and anneal method avoids HF handling and provides high-quality SrTiO3 surfaces with low native defect density for complex oxide heterostructure growth.

  1. Reactive ion etching (RIE) technique for application in crystalline silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jinsu

    2010-04-15

    Saw damage removal (SDR) and texturing by conventional wet chemical processes with alkali solution etch about 20 micron of silicon wafer on both sides, resulting in thin wafers with which solar cell processing is difficult. Reactive ion etching (RIE) for silicon surface texturing is very effective in reducing surface reflectance of thin crystalline silicon wafers by trapping the light of longer wavelength. High efficiency solar cells were fabricated during this study using optimized RIE. Saw damage removal (SDR) with acidic mixture followed by RIE-texturing showed the decrease in silicon loss by {proportional_to}67% and {proportional_to}70% compared to conventional SDR and texturing by alkaline solution. Also, the crystalline silicon solar cells fabricated by using RIE-texturing showed conversion efficiency as high as 16.7% and 16.1% compared with 16.2%, which was obtained in the case of the cell fabricated with SDR and texturing with NaOH solution. (author)

  2. Adhesion of indirect MOD resin composite inlays luted with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements.

    PubMed

    Inukai, T; Abe, T; Ito, Y; Pilecki, P; Wilson, R F; Watson, T F; Foxton, R M

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of loading on the bond strength to dentin and microleakage of MOD indirect composite restorations bonded with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements with or without acid etching of the proximal enamel margins. Class II MOD cavities were prepared in 48 molar teeth into dentin and divided into three groups of 16 teeth. Impressions were taken and indirect composite inlays fabricated (Estenia C & B). The enamel margins of the proximal boxes of half the specimens were phosphoric acid etched, and the inlays were cemented with one of three cements (Panavia F 2.0, SA Cement, or Rely X Unicem). After luting, eight teeth in each cement group were mechanically loaded at 2.5 cycles/s for 250,000 cycles. Unloaded teeth acted as controls. Teeth were stored in Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours, sectioned buccolingually at the proximal boxes to examine microleakage using confocal microscopy, and further sectioned for ?TBS testing of the resin-dentin interface. Analysis of variance was performed to assess the effect of loading and acid etching on microleakage and bond strength. Acid etching had no effect on microleakage. No significant difference in the dentin bond strengths between the three cements existed after loading. Panavia F 2.0 exhibited a significant reduction in bond strength. With regard to microleakage at the proximal boxes, loading had no effect on dye penetration at the cavity floor. However, at the axial walls, loading had a significant deleterious effect on Panavia F 2.0. No difference in microleakage existed between the three cements at both sites before and after loading. In conclusion, the two tested self-adhesive cements exhibited similar bond strengths before and after loading to the self-etching resin cement. Loading reduced dentin bond strengths and increased microleakage at the resin-dentin interface. However, acid etching of the enamel margins had no significant effect on microleakage in the approximal regions of the bonded inlays. PMID:22360367

  3. Bulk filling of Class II cavities with a dual-cure composite: Effect of curing mode and enamel etching on marginal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Roig, Miguel; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study attempted to find a simple adhesive restorative technique for class I and II cavities on posterior teeth. Study Design: The tested materials were a self-etching adhesive (Parabond, Coltène/Whaledent) and a dual-cure composite (Paracore, Coltène/Whaledent) used in bulk to restore the cavities. Class II MO cavities were performed and assigned to 4 groups depending on the orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) conditioning of enamel and polymerization method used (chemical or dual). Specimens were subjected to quantitative marginal analysis before and after thermo-mechanical loading. Results: Higher percentages of marginal adaptation at the total margin length, both before and after thermo-mechanical loading, were found in groups in which enamel was etched with phosphoric acid, without significant differences between the chemically and dual-cured modes. The restorations performance was similar on enamel and dentin, obtaining low results of adaptation on occlusal enamel in the groups without enamel etching, the lowest scores were on cervical dentin in the group with no ortophosphoric acid and self-cured. Conclusions: A dual-cure composite applied in bulk on acid etched enamel obtained acceptable marginal adaptation results, and may be an alternative technique for the restoration of class II cavities. Key words:Dual-cure composite, bulk technique, class II restoration, selective enamel etching, marginal adaptation. PMID:25674316

  4. Feasibility of atomic layer etching of polymer material based on sequential O2 exposure and Ar low-pressure plasma-etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogli, Evelina; Metzler, Dominik; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2013-06-01

    We describe controlled, self-limited etching of a polystyrene polymer using a composite etching cycle consisting of sequential deposition of a thin reactive layer from precursors produced from a polymer-coated electrode within the etching chamber, modification using O2 exposure, and subsequent low-pressure Ar plasma etching, which removes the oxygen-modified deposited reactive layer along with ≈0.1 nm unmodified polymer. Deposition prevents net etching of the unmodified polymer during the etching step and enables self-limited etch rates of 0.1 nm/cycle.

  5. Feasibility of atomic layer etching of polymer material based on sequential O{sub 2} exposure and Ar low-pressure plasma-etching

    SciTech Connect

    Vogli, Evelina; Metzler, Dominik; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2013-06-24

    We describe controlled, self-limited etching of a polystyrene polymer using a composite etching cycle consisting of sequential deposition of a thin reactive layer from precursors produced from a polymer-coated electrode within the etching chamber, modification using O{sub 2} exposure, and subsequent low-pressure Ar plasma etching, which removes the oxygen-modified deposited reactive layer along with Almost-Equal-To 0.1 nm unmodified polymer. Deposition prevents net etching of the unmodified polymer during the etching step and enables self-limited etch rates of 0.1 nm/cycle.

  6. Point Group Determination of Calcium Tartrate by Etch Figure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Noriyuki

    1991-11-01

    Etch figures of gel-grown orthorhombic calcium tartrate tetrahydrate crystals have been examined in order to determine the point group symmetry. Making a thorough investigation of etch-figure characters on natural surfaces of rhombic dodecahedron crystals, we reached the firm conclusion that the point group is nonpolar 222.

  7. Laser etching: A new technology to identify Florida grapefruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beam etches the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allowing for pathogen entry. The long term effects of laser labeling o...

  8. Reactive ion etched substrates and methods of making and using

    DOEpatents

    Rucker, Victor C.; Shediac, Rene; Simmons, Blake A.; Havenstrite, Karen L.

    2007-08-07

    Disclosed herein are substrates comprising reactive ion etched surfaces and specific binding agents immobilized thereon. The substrates may be used in methods and devices for assaying or isolating analytes in a sample. Also disclosed are methods of making the reactive ion etched surfaces.

  9. Differential etching of chalcogenides for infrared photonic waveguide structures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2007-10-10

    Chemical etching rates for two different chalcogenide glass compositions (As2S3 and As24S38Se38) were studied using sodium hydroxide based etchant solutions. Etching was performed using a variation of standard photolithographic masking and wet-etching techniques. Variations in etch rate with NaOH concentration and glass composition were observed. The depth of etch was characterized using an optical profilometer. Etch rate differences as large as three orders of magnitude between these two glasses were observed at low NaOH concentration (0.053 M). We present a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time (nm/s) versus NaOH overall solution concentration (in M) for these two different chalcogenide glasses (As2S3 and As24S38Se38). This technology shows promise for fabricating highly asymmetrical photonic structures and has potential applications in fabricating novel photonic bandgap (PBG) structures that will function in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) regime.

  10. Reactive ion etching of quartz and Pyrex for microelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeze, D. A.; Forrest, R. D.; Carey, J. D.; Cox, D. C.; Robertson, I. D.; Weiss, B. L.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2002-10-01

    The reactive ion etching of quartz and Pyrex substrates was carried out using CF4/Ar and CF4/O2 gas mixtures in a combined radio frequency (rf)/microwave (μw) plasma. It was observed that the etch rate and the surface morphology of the etched regions depended on the gas mixture (CF4/Ar or CF4/O2), the relative concentration of CF4 in the gas mixture, the rf power (and the associated self-induced bias) and microwave power. An etch rate of 95 nm/min for quartz was achieved. For samples covered with a thin metal layer, ex situ high resolution scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that, during etching, surface roughness is produced on the surface beneath the thin metallic mask. Near vertical sidewalls with a taper angle greater than 80° and smooth etched surfaces at the nanometric scale were fabricated by carefully controlling the etching parameters and the masking technique. A simulation of the electrostatic field distribution was carried out to understand the etching process using these masks for the fabrication of high definition features.

  11. Rapid Dry Etching Of Photoresists Without Toxic Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R.; Wydeven, Theodore

    1991-01-01

    Experimental dry etching technique strips photoresists from semiconductor wafers without damaging semiconductor materials. Makes use of afterglow existing downstream from plasma generated by radio-frequency electric field. Constituents of afterglow react with sacrificial polymer to make reactive gases that quickly etch-away photoresist. Strips quickly at room temperature; not necessary to heat substrates. No hazardous or toxic chemicals used.

  12. Evaluation of bond strength of orthodontic brackets without enamel etching

    PubMed Central

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Motaghi, Shiva; Moghaddas, Mohmmadjavad

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the shear bond strength of brackets with and without enamel etching. Material and Methods In this study, 60 sound premolars were randomly divided into four different groups: 1- TXE group: Enamel etching+Transbond XT adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 2- TXS group: Transbond plus self-etch adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 3- PQ1E group: Enamel etching+ PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 4- PQ1 group: PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. The shear bond strengths of brackets were evaluated using universal testing machine at cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was also measured. One-way ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc, Kruskal-wallis and Mann-Witney U test were used for data analysis. Results There was a significant difference between etched and unetched groups respect to SBS and ARI (p<0.05), however; no significant difference was observed between unetched group and self-etch adhesive group (p>> 0.05). The shear bond strength of PQ1 group was the least but in acceptable range and its ARI was less than other groups. Conclusions PQ1 adhesive can be used for bracket bonding without enamel etching with adequate bond strength and minimal ARI. Key words:Bracket, shear bond strength, filled-adhesive, self-etch adhesive. PMID:26535100

  13. Method for laser-assisted silicon etching using halocarbon ambients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Stephen D.; Sexton, Douglas A.; Orazi, Richard J.

    1993-11-01

    An etching process allows a selective single-step patterning of silicon devices in a noncorrosive environment. The etching of silicon relies on a maskless laser-assisted technique in a gaseous halocarbon ambient, such as the gaseous chlorofluorocarbons, dichlorodifluoromethane and chloropentafluoroethane. Laser-assisted photothermal chemical etching reactions on silicon occur in these ambients when the incident fluence from an excimer laser at 248 nm exceeds the melt threshold (approximately 0.75 J/sq cm). When incident fluence exceeds the ablation threshold (approximately 2.2 J/sq cm) an undesirable, increased surface roughness is observed. Etch rates as large as approximately 15 A per pulse are attained within predetermined processing windows. This provides a means for thin membrane formation in silicon, rapid etches and processing of packaged devices or partially fabricated dies.

  14. UV-photoassisted etching of GaN in KOH

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.; Donovan, S.M.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Auh, K.H.; Han, J.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-03-01

    The etch rate of GaN under ultraviolet-assisted photoelectrochemical conditions in KOH solutions is found to be a strong function of illumination intensity, solution molarity, sample bias, and material doping level. At low e-h pair generation rates, grain boundaries are selectively etched, while at higher illumination intensities etch rates for unintentionally doped (n {approximately} 3 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3}) GaN are {ge} 1,000 {angstrom} {center_dot} min{sup {minus}1}. The etching is diffusion-limited under the conditions with an activation energy of {approximately} 0.8 kCal{center_dot}mol{sup {minus}1}. The etched surfaces are rough, but retain their stoichiometry.

  15. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1985-10-11

    Disclosed is a method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 2/, wherein Eg/sub 2/ > Eg/sub 1/, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method. The method comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg/sub 1/ but less than Eg/sub 2/, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  16. Effects of mask imperfections on InP etching profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, D.T.C.; Yan, M.F.; Wynn, J.D.; Wilt, D.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the quality of etch masks has a significant effect on the InP etching profiles. In particular, the authors have shown that mask imperfections can cause defective etching profiles, such as vertical sidewalls and extra mask undercutting in InP. The authors also discovered that the geometry of these defective profiles is determined by the orientation of the substrate relative to the direction of the mask imperfections. Along a {l angle}110{r angle} line mask defect, the downward etching process changes the {l angle}110{r angle} v-grooves to vertical sidewalls without extra undercutting. For v-grooves aligned along the {l angle}110{r angle} direction, defects on the mask give a significant extra undercutting without changing the etching profile.

  17. Development and characterization of multilevel metal interconnection etch process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Kim

    1997-08-01

    A more robust chlorine chemistry based reactive ion etch (RIE) process was developed, characterized and optimized to anisotropically etch the interconnecting metal layers for use in the fabrication of CMOS and BiCMOS IC devices, using the Lam 4600 single wafer etcher. The titanium nitride and titanium silicide buried layer, used in the metal 1 structure, present unique constraints on etch selectivity to the underlying film. The process must clear metal stringers with minimal lateral etching of the aluminum during the tiN/Ti etch and overetch steps. The new optimized process meets all requirements imposed by advanced technologies, such as vertical metal sidewalls, wide process latitude, tight CD control, minimal of TEOS oxide underlayer, less sensitivity to photoresist pattern, excellent reliability and reproducibility, and lower level of polymer (reaction by- product) build-up in reactor chamber which could lead to metal corrosion and cluster defects.

  18. Study of high aspect ratio silicon etching based on ICP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiang; Zhou, Shun; Hu, Shuai; Zhu, Yufeng; Liu, Weiguo

    2015-02-01

    The etching process of the high aspect ratio of Si deep trench is the key technology in MEMS field. Having used Oxford Plasmalabsystem100 ICP-180 etcher with SF6 and C4F8 as the etching gas, the influence on the deep Si etching process of Bosch under different ICP power, bias voltage, temperature, pressure and other parameters has been studied. The experimental result shows that under appropriate parameters, the high-aspect ratio of silicon deep trench is greater than 26:1, the sidewalls' vertical degree is 89.9°, and the etching rate is greater than 2μm/min the high aspect ratio of SOI deep trench is greater than 28:1, the sidewalls' vertical degree is 89.7°, and the etching rate is greater than 2μm/min.

  19. Morphology of gold films thinned by argon ion sputter etching

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkinson, I.J. ); Lemmon, J. )

    1990-06-01

    Evaporated gold films and gold films etched by argon ion bombardment to the same thickness are known to exhibit different optical and electrical properties. Transmission electron microscope observations presented in this paper confirm that these differences are caused by different growth/etch film morphologies. The density of islands in a globular film remains nearly constant during etching, in contrast to a steady decrease during deposition. Similarly, the particle density in a nested island film initially remains constant during etching but then increases slightly as some of the islands break up. Films that are initially fully coalesced remain continuous during etching until, when they are very thin, an array of holes of irregular shape and increasing size appears and finally they break up into islands of irregular shape.

  20. Consideration of VT5 etch-based OPC modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, ChinTeong; Temchenko, Vlad; Kaiser, Dieter; Meusel, Ingo; Schmidt, Sebastian; Schneider, Jens; Niehoff, Martin

    2008-03-01

    Including etch-based empirical data during OPC model calibration is a desired yet controversial decision for OPC modeling, especially for process with a large litho to etch biasing. While many OPC software tools are capable of providing this functionality nowadays; yet few were implemented in manufacturing due to various risks considerations such as compromises in resist and optical effects prediction, etch model accuracy or even runtime concern. Conventional method of applying rule-based alongside resist model is popular but requires a lot of lengthy code generation to provide a leaner OPC input. This work discusses risk factors and their considerations, together with introduction of techniques used within Mentor Calibre VT5 etch-based modeling at sub 90nm technology node. Various strategies are discussed with the aim of better handling of large etch bias offset without adding complexity into final OPC package. Finally, results were presented to assess the advantages and limitations of the final method chosen.

  1. High rate ECR etching of III-V nitride materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Howard, A.J.; Kilcoyne, S.P.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Vartuli, C.B.; Barnes, P.A.; Bozack, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    The III-V nitride compound semiconductors are attracting considerable attention for blue and ultraviolet light emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers as well as high temperature electronics due to their wide band gaps and high dielectric constants. The recent progress observed in the growth of these materials has not been matched by progress in processing techniques to fabricate more highly sophisticated devices. Patterning these materials has been especially difficult due to the relatively inert chemical nature of the group-III nitrides. The authors review dry etch techniques which have been used to pattern these materials including electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), reactive ion etch (RIE), and chemically assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE). ECR etch rates greater than 3,800 {angstrom}/min for InN, 3,500 {angstrom}/min for GaN, and 1,170 A/min for AlN are reported. Etch anisotropy, surface morphology, and near-surface stoichiometry will be discussed.

  2. Silicon nanostructures produced by laser direct etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müllenborn, M.; Dirac, H.; Petersen, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    A laser direct-write process has been applied to structure silicon on a nanometer scale. In this process, a silicon substrate, placed in a chlorine ambience, is locally heated above its melting point by a continuous-wave laser and translated by high-resolution direct-current motor stages. Only the molten silicon reacts spontaneously with the molecular chlorine, resulting in trenches with the width of the laser-generated melt. Trenches have been etched with a width of less than 70 nm. To explain the functional dependence of the melt size on absorbed power, the calculations based on a two-phase steady state heat model are presented, taking the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities and optical parameters into account.

  3. In-situ diagnostics and characterization of etch by-product deposition on chamber walls during halogen etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastgar, Neema; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Marsh, Ricky; Paterson, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Plasma etching is a critical technology for nanoelectronics fabrication, but the use of a vacuum chamber limits the number of in-situ, real-time diagnostics measurements that can be performed during an etch process. Byproduct deposition on chamber walls during etching can affect the run-to-run performance of an etch process if there is build-up or change of wall characteristics with time. Knowledge of chamber wall evolution and the composition of wall-deposited films are critical to understanding the performance of plasma etch processes, and an in-situ diagnostics measurement is useful for monitoring the chamber walls in real time. We report the use of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to perform in-situ diagnostics of a vacuum chamber's walls during plasma etching. Using ATR-FTIR, we are able to monitor the relative thickness and makeup of chamber wall deposits in real time. We then use this information to develop a chamber wall cleaning process in order to maintain reproducible etching conditions from wafer to wafer. In particular, we report mid-IR (4000-650 cm-1) absorption spectra of chamber wall-deposited silicon byproducts formed during halogen etching of silicon wafers.

  4. Optimization of graphene dry etching conditions via combined microscopic and spectroscopic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Prado, Mariana C.; Jariwala, Deep; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.; Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208

    2013-05-13

    Single-layer graphene structures and devices are commonly defined using reactive ion etching and plasma etching with O{sub 2} or Ar as the gaseous etchants. Although optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are widely used to determine the appropriate duration of dry etching, additional characterization with atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that residual graphene and/or etching byproducts persist beyond the point where the aforementioned methods suggest complete graphene etching. Recognizing that incomplete etching may have deleterious effects on devices and/or downstream processing, AFM characterization is used here to determine optimal etching conditions that eliminate graphene dry etching residues.

  5. Characterization of silicon isotropic etch by inductively coupled plasma etcher for microneedle array fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis E. H.; Miao, Jianmin; Sun, Jianbo

    2006-04-01

    This work investigates the isotropic etching properties in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher for microneedle arrays fabrication. The effects of process variables including powers, gas and pressure on needle structure generation are characterized by factorial design of experiment (DOE). The experimental responses of vertical etching depth, lateral etching length, ratio of vertical etching depth to lateral etching length and photoresist etching rate are reported. The relevance of the etching variables is also presented. The obtained etching behaviours for microneedle structure generation will be applied to develop recipes to fabricate microneedles in designed dimensions.

  6. CBr4-based in-situ etching of GaAs, assisted with TMAl and TMGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Casa, Pietro; Maaßdorf, Andre; Zeimer, Ute; Weyers, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In-situ etching of GaAs with CBr4 in metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy has been investigated at different temperatures using in-situ reflectivity to measure the etch rates. Deep (150 nm) etching of epitaxially-grown GaAs leads to the development of etch pits on the surface, corresponding to the emerging points of threading dislocations. Addition of trimethylgallium (TMGa) leads to a linear superposition of growth and etching. Trimethylaluminium (TMAl) added in moderate quantity enhances the etch rate and inhibits the development of etch pits. A model description for the enhanced etch rate is presented.

  7. Direct Visualization of Etching Trajectories in Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching of Si by the Chemical Oxidation of Porous Sidewalls.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Soo; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2015-09-29

    We demonstrate a simple method for the visualization of trajectories traced by noble metal nanoparticles during metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) of Si. The nanoporous Si layer formed around drilled pores is converted into SiO2 by simple chemical oxidation. Etch removal of the remaining Si using alkali hydroxide leaves SiO2 nanostructures that are the exact replica of those drilled pores or etching trajectories. The differences in etching characteristics between Ag and Au have been investigated using the proposed visualization method. The shape and chemical stability of metal nanoparticles used for MaCE have been found to be critical in determining etching paths. The proposed method would be very helpful in studying the fundamental mechanism of MaCE as well as in micro/nanostructuring of the Si surface for various applications. This approach can also be used for the generation of straight or helical SiO2 nanotubes. PMID:26352208

  8. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising plasma etched porous support

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Han; LaConti, Anthony B.

    2010-10-05

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a rigid, non-electrically-conducting support, the support preferably being a sheet of polyimide having a thickness of about 7.5 to 15 microns. The support has a plurality of cylindrical pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores, which preferably have a diameter of about 0.1 to 5 microns, are made by plasma etching and preferably are arranged in a defined pattern, for example, with fewer pores located in areas of high membrane stress and more pores located in areas of low membrane stress. The pores are filled with a first solid polymer electrolyte, such as a perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer. A second solid polymer electrolyte, which may be the same as or different than the first solid polymer electrolyte, may be deposited over the top and/or bottom of the first solid polymer electrolyte.

  9. Role of nitrogen in the downstream etching of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Stevens, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    Chemical downstream etching of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) requires the addition of nitrogen to the discharge for obtaining efficient etch rates. A 10{percent} addition of N{sub 2} to a CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} discharge (CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} = 1.2, 0.525 Torr) causes a factor of 6 increase in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etch rate and a 8{percent} decrease in the silicon dioxide etch rate. The result is selectivities approaching 9:1. Importantly, the conversion of CF{sub 4} to F and F-containing reactive species by the discharge decreases or remains constant as nitrogen is added to the discharge mix, indicating that the etching reaction is not limited by delivery of these species to the substrate. By measuring the amount of NO and NO{sub 2} in the etch chamber, it is found that the NO concentration increases by a factor of 6 as N{sub 2} is added, while the amount of NO{sub 2} remains small and constant. The NO signal is significantly reduced during nitride etching compared to the signal observed during a discharge with an empty etch chamber, implying that the increase in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etch rate is related to the formation of NO in the discharge. This view is consistent with the observation that an NF{sub 3} plasma in a quartz discharge tube results in a nitride etch rate which is a factor of 2 higher than for the same discharge in a sapphire tube. The conclusion is that the oxygen liberated by erosion of the quartz tube allows the formation of NO. That NO is a key Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etch reactant was confirmed by performing a series of experiments in which N{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O were injected into the discharge and then downstream in the reaction chamber during a CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} discharge. Nitride etch rates increased significantly upon injection of NO into both discharge and etch chamber as compared to injection of the other N{sub {ital x}}O{sub {ital y}} species. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  10. Comparision of Shear Bond Strength of Stainless Steel and Ceramic Brackets at 24 Hours after Etching Enamel with Different Proportions of Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Abinaya; Karthikeyan; Sarvanan; Vikram, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of stainless steel brackets and ceramic brackets at 24h after etching the enamel with acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (1.23% APF) at different proportions (40%,30%,20%) incorporated in conventional etchant (37% phosphoric acid). Materials and Methods: Eighty premolars (maxillary and mandibular first and second premolars) extracted for orthodontic purpose has been selected for the study and samples were divided into 4 groups containing 10 teeth each. Comprised of teeth etched Group 1 with 40% of APF gel etchant is Group 2 teeth etched with 30% of APF gel in Group 3 teeth etched with 20% of APF gel etchant and Group 4 teeth were etched with conventional etchant (37% phosphoric acid). Results: The experimental group of Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride (APF) at different proportion (40%, 30%, 20%) incorporated with etchant application for 40s on the enamel surface at 24h indicated that group 4 showed the higher bond strength of all other remaining groups and the groups 1, 2 and 3 showed satisfactory bond strength. The statistical evaluation also revealed that the bond strength of control group (37% phosphoric acid) was greater than those of experimental groups. Conclusion: The present study results shows that the ceramic brackets have higher bond strength than stainless steel brackets (material wise). PMID:25302260

  11. Network flow model analysis of the impact of chlorofluorocarbon phaseout on acid-grade fluorspar. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Slatnick, J.A.; Fulton, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC`s) are being phased out and eventually banned under extensive international agreements because the chlorine in CFC`s is thought to deplete the Earth`s ozone layer. As a result, the fluorspar mining industry, which is the source of fluorine in fluorocarbons through intermediate hydrofluoric acid, is being affected. Concern for this impact has led the U.S. Bureau of Mines to employ its capabilities to analyze various scenarios in the evolution of CFC replacements and substitutes to determine their effect on fluorspar mining. This report utilizes a network flow model to examine the effects of proposed replacements for CFC`s, in terms of fluorine content, on fluorspar operations worldwide and on hydrofluoric acid plants in North America and Europe.

  12. The magnetic properties and microstructure of Co-Pt thin films using wet etching process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyoung; Cho, Young-Lae; Lee, Won-Pyo; Suh, Su-Jeong

    2014-11-01

    Perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) is a promising candidate for high density magnetic recording and has already been applied to hard disk drive (HDD) systems. However, media noise still limits the recording density. To reduce the media noise and achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in hard disk media, the grains of the magnetic layer must be magnetically isolated from each other. This study examined whether sputter-deposited Co-Pt thin films can have adjacent grains that are physically isolated. To accomplish this, the effects of the sputtering conditions and wet etching process on magnetic properties and the microstructure of the films were investigated. The film structure was Co-Pt (30 nm)/Ru (30 nm)/NiFe (10 nm)/Ta (5 nm). The composition of the Co-Pt thin films was Co-30.7 at.% Pt. The Co-Pt thin films were deposited in Ar gas at 5, 10, 12.5, and 15 mTorr. Wet etching process was performed using 7% nitric acid solution at room temperature. These films had high out-of-plane coercivity of up to 7032 Oe, which is twice that of the as-deposited film. These results suggest that wet etched Co-Pt thin films have weaker exchange coupling and enhanced out-of-plane coercivity, which would reduce the medium noise. PMID:25958585

  13. Nanoporous Gallium Nitride Through Anisotropic Metal-Assisted Electroless Photochemical Wet Etching Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumal, R.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Nanoporous gallium nitride (GaN) has many potential applications in light-emitting diodes (LEDs), photovoltaics, templates and chemical sensors. This article reports the porosification of GaN through UV enhanced metal-assisted electroless photochemical wet etching technique using three different acid-based etchants and platinum served as catalyst for porosification. The etching process was conducted at room temperature for a duration of 90min. The morphological, structural, spectral and optical features of the developed porous GaN were studied with appropriate characterization techniques and the obtained results were presented. Field emission scanning electron micrographs exhibited the porosity nature along with excellent porous network of the etched samples. Structural studies confirmed the mono crystalline quality of the porous nanostructures. Raman spectral analyzes inferred the presenting phonon modes such as E2 (TO) and A1 (LO) in fabricated nanoporous structures. The resulted porous nanostructures hold the substantially enhanced photoluminescence intensity compared with the pristine GaN epitaxial film that is interesting and desirable for several advances in the applications of Nano-optoelectronic devices.

  14. An All-in-One Adhesive Does Not Etch beyond Hybrid Layers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.; Mai, S.; Carrilho, M.R.; Yiu, C.K.Y.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous etching of aggressive all-in-one adhesives occurs in wet dentin tubules after polymerization of the adhesives. This study challenged the hypothesis that unpolymerized acidic monomers from an aggressive all-in-one self-etching adhesive continue to etch beyond dentin hybrid layers. Dentin surfaces bonded with Adper Prompt L-Pop were sectioned into 0.3-mm-thick slabs. Some of the slabs were stored in water (pH 6.8) or glycine buffer (pH 11.1) for six weeks and then examined by CLSM, SEM, and TEM. The rest were immersed in a biomimetic remineralizing medium for up to 4 months. Morphologic analysis indicated no difference in demineralization thickness between the two 6-week storage groups. However, increased permeability and loss of integrity occurred along the base of the hybrid layers in the glycine buffer group, but not in the water storage group. These findings were also confirmed by the results of biomimetic remineralization along the bases of those hybrid layers. PMID:20200420

  15. Open tubular capillary electrochromatography of synthetic peptides on etched chemically modified columns.

    PubMed

    Pesek, Joseph J; Matyska, Maria T; Dawson, G Brent; Chen, Jenny I-Chen; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2004-01-01

    Two sets of peptides, each having structurally similar amino acid sequences, have been investigated by capillary electrochromatography (CEC) using etched chemically modified capillaries as the separation medium. In comparison to gradient RP-HPLC, the resolving power of the described CEC methods has been found to be superior. A number of variables have been examined with respect to optimization of the separation of these closely related peptides with several different etched chemically modified capillaries. These experimental variables included the nature of the bonded moiety, the pH, the organic modifier type, and the amount of organic modifier in the buffer electrolyte. Systematic variation of these parameters results in significant changes in the migrational behavior of the investigated peptides and provides important insight into the underlying molecular separation processes that prevail in open tubular CEC. Moreover, under optimized conditions, efficient separations characterized by highly symmetrical peaks were achieved. In addition, this study has permitted the long-term stability as well as the short-term and long-term reproducibility of the etched chemically modified capillaries to be documented. PMID:14697028

  16. Manganese-tuned chemical etching of a platinum-copper nanocatalyst with platinum-rich surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. Y.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhao, G.; Yan, X. H.; Xu, K.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a modified chemical etching strategy to fabricate binary metal nanocatalysts with large active areas. The strategy employs PtCu alloy particles with Pt-rich outer layers as the precursor and manganese species to manipulate the acid leaching processes. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are used to analyze the catalyst structures and the tuning mechanism of manganese species during etching. It is found that the introduction of manganese species allows more Pt active sites to be formed onto the catalyst surface after etching, possibly due to reduction in the number of Pt atoms enclosed inside particles. The electrochemically active surface area of the synthetic MnA-PtCu/C catalyst increases by 90% relative to commercial Pt/C catalyst. As a result of the increase in active areas and the additional promotion effects by Cu, the MnA-PtCu/C catalyst reveals a methanol oxidation activity 1.7 and 4.0 times higher than that of the synthetic PtCu/C and commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively.

  17. Effects of chlorhexidine in self-etching adhesive: 24 hours results.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Hosaka, Keiichi; Hoshika, Tomohiro; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Pashley, David H

    2013-01-01

    It is known that chlorhexidine (CHX) does not inhibit micro-tensile bond strengths (MTBS) when it is used in etch-and-rinse adhesives. In that technique, CHX is applied to dentin as a primer after phosphoric acid-etching before bonding with Single Bond. It would be more convenient if it is possible to incorporate CHX into the adhesive. The purpose of this study was to compare the MTBS and the FT-IR percent conversion of an all-in-one self-etching adhesives contained varying concentration of CHX. Extracted human third molars were bonded with a control all-in-one adhesive or experimental versions containing 0.5, 1, 2 or 5% CHX. The MTBS and the percent conversion of experimental adhesives containing up to 1% CHX were not significantly CHX-free control adhesives. However, addition of 2 or especially 5% CHX experimental adhesives produced significant reductions in both the MTBS and the percent conversion. PMID:23719003

  18. Toward a durable superhydrophobic aluminum surface by etching and ZnO nanoparticle deposition.

    PubMed

    Rezayi, Toktam; Entezari, Mohammad H

    2016-02-01

    Fabrication of suitable roughness is a fundamental step for acquiring superhydrophobic surfaces. For this purpose, a deposition of ZnO nanoparticles on Al surface was carried out by simple immersion and ultrasound approaches. Then, surface energy reduction was performed using stearic acid (STA) ethanol solution for both methods. The results demonstrated that ultrasound would lead to more stable superhydrophobic Al surfaces (STA-ZnO-Al-U) in comparison with simple immersion method (STA-ZnO-Al-I). Besides, etching in HCl solution in another sample was carried out before ZnO deposition for acquiring more mechanically stable superhydrophobic surface. The potentiodynamic measurements demonstrate that etching in HCl solution under ultrasound leads to superhydrophobic surface (STA-ZnO-Al(E)-U). This sample shows remarkable decrease in corrosion current density (icorr) and long-term stability improvement versus immersion in NaCl solution (3.5%) in comparison with the sample prepared without etching (STA-ZnO-Al-U). Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) confirmed a more condense and further particle deposition on Al substrate when ultrasound was applied in the system. The crystallite evaluation of deposited ZnO nanoparticles was carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Finally, for STA grafting verification on Al surface, Fourier transform infrared in conjunction with attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) was used as a proper technique. PMID:26513735

  19. UV-Photoassisted Etching of GaN in KOH

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Auh, K.H.; Cho, H.; Donovan, S.M.; Han, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren F.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-11-12

    The etch rate of GaN under W-assisted photoelectrochemical conditions in KOH solutions is found to be a strong function of illumination intensity, solution molarity, sample bias and material doping level. At low e-h pair generation rates, grain boundaries are selectively etched, while at higher illumination intensities etch rates for unintentionally doped (n - 3x 10^12Gcm-3) GaN are 2 1000 .min-l. The etching is diffusion limited under our conditions with an activation energy of - 0.8kCal.mol-1. The etched surfaces are rough, but retain their stoichiometry. PEC etching is found to selectively reveal grain boundaries in GaN under low light illumination conditions. At high lamp powers the rates increase with sample temperature and the application of bias to the PEC cell, while they go through a maximum with KOH solution molarity. The etching is diffusion-limited, producing rough surface morphologies that are suitable in a limited number of device fabrication steps. The surfaces however appear to remain relatively close to their stoichiometric composition.

  20. Porous silicon formation during Au-catalyzed etching

    SciTech Connect

    Algasinger, Michael; Bernt, Maximilian; Koynov, Svetoslav; Stutzmann, Martin

    2014-04-28

    The formation of black nano-textured Si during the Au-catalyzed wet-chemical etch process was investigated with respect to photovoltaic applications. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images recorded at different stages of the etch process exhibit an evolution of a two-layer structure, consisting of cone-like Si hillocks covered with a nano-porous Si (np-Si) layer. Optical measurements confirm the presence of a np-Si phase which appears after the first ?10?s of the etch process and continuously increases with the etch time. Furthermore, the etch process was investigated on Si substrates with different doping levels (?0.01100 ? cm). SEM images show a transition from the two-layer morphology to a structure consisting entirely of np-Si for higher doping levels (<0.1 ? cm). The experimental results are discussed on the basis of the model of a local electrochemical etch process. A better understanding of the metal-catalyzed etch process facilitates the fabrication of black Si on various Si substrates, which is of significant interest for photovoltaic applications.

  1. Super-selective cryogenic etching for sub-10 nm features.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuwei; Wu, Ying; Harteneck, Bruce; Olynick, Deirdre

    2013-01-11

    Plasma etching is a powerful technique for transferring high-resolution lithographic masks into functional materials. Significant challenges arise with shrinking feature sizes, such as etching with thin masks. Traditionally this has been addressed with hard masks and consequently additional costly steps. Here we present a pathway to high selectivity soft mask pattern transfer using cryogenic plasma etching towards low-cost high throughput sub-10 nm nanofabrication. Cryogenic SF(6)/O(2) gas chemistry is studied for high fidelity, high selectivity inductively coupled plasma etching of silicon. Selectivity was maximized on large features (400 nm-1.5 μm) with a focus on minimizing photoresist etch rates. An overall anisotropic profile with selectivity around 140:1 with a photoresist mask for feature size 1.5 μm was realized with this clean, low damage process. At the deep nanoscale, selectivity is reduced by an order of magnitude. Despite these limits, high selectivity is achieved for anisotropic high aspect ratio 10 nm scale etching with thin polymeric masks. Gentler ion bombardment resulted in planar-dependent etching and produced faceted sub-100 nm features. PMID:23220824

  2. In-situ chamber clean for chromium etch application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhigang; Chen, Xiaoyi; Knick, David; Grimbergen, Michael; Chandrahood, Madhavi; Ibrahim, Ibrahim; Kumar, Ajay

    2008-05-01

    As technology advances with feature size shrinking for the state-of-the-art integrated circuit (IC) fabrication, the degree of reduction in critical dimension (CD) features on a photomask shrinks at a faster pace, thanks to the ever aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) design. In addition to stringent CD requirement, defect control has also become one of the most difficult challenges for advanced photomask manufacturing as a result of reduction in printable defect size. Therefore, keeping a photomask etching chamber at an optimal condition becomes very critical for controlling in both defectivity and CD fidelity. In the present study, analyses on optical emission spectrum (OES) collected in an Applied Materials' TetraTM chrome etch module have been performed to understand (1) the impact of Cr etching on the chamber condition, and (2) the effectiveness of in-situ chamber dry clean for chamber condition control and potential particle reduction. Results showed that, with the right selection of chamber materials (to be compatible with process chemistry and etching condition), the main impact of Cr etching on chamber condition and particle performance is from resist etch-by-products. Various plasma dry clean chemistries have been explored to address the effectiveness for the removal of such etch-by-products. As a result, an in-situ chamber clean (ICC) procedure is developed and has been validated to be production-worthy for desired particle control and chamber stability control.

  3. Super-selective cryogenic etching for sub-10 nm features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zuwei; Wu, Ying; Harteneck, Bruce; Olynick, Deirdre

    2013-01-01

    Plasma etching is a powerful technique for transferring high-resolution lithographic masks into functional materials. Significant challenges arise with shrinking feature sizes, such as etching with thin masks. Traditionally this has been addressed with hard masks and consequently additional costly steps. Here we present a pathway to high selectivity soft mask pattern transfer using cryogenic plasma etching towards low-cost high throughput sub-10 nm nanofabrication. Cryogenic SF6/O2 gas chemistry is studied for high fidelity, high selectivity inductively coupled plasma etching of silicon. Selectivity was maximized on large features (400 nm-1.5 μm) with a focus on minimizing photoresist etch rates. An overall anisotropic profile with selectivity around 140:1 with a photoresist mask for feature size 1.5 μm was realized with this clean, low damage process. At the deep nanoscale, selectivity is reduced by an order of magnitude. Despite these limits, high selectivity is achieved for anisotropic high aspect ratio 10 nm scale etching with thin polymeric masks. Gentler ion bombardment resulted in planar-dependent etching and produced faceted sub-100 nm features.

  4. Etching of oxynitride thin films using inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungwhan; Lee, Dukwoo; Kim, Nam Jung; Lee, Byung Teak

    2005-05-01

    In this study, silicon oxynitride (SiON) has been etched in a C2F6 inductively coupled plasma. The process parameters examined include a radio frequency source power, bias power, pressure, and C2F6 flow rate. For process optimization, a statistical experimental design was employed to investigate parameter effects under various plasma conditions. The etch rate increased almost linearly with increasing the source or bias power. Main effect analysis revealed that the etch rate is dominated by the source power. The C2F6 flow rate exerted the least impact on both etch rate and profile angle. It was estimated that the C2F6 effect is transparent only as the etchant is supplied sufficiently. Depending on the pressure levels, the etch rate varied in a complicated way. Parameter effects on the profile angle were very small and the profile angle varied between 83° and 87° for all etching experiments. In nearly all experiments, microtrenching was observed. The etch rate and profile angle, optimized at 1000 W source power, 30 W bias power, 6 mTorr pressure, and 60 sccm C2F6 flow rate, are 434 nm/min and 86°, respectively.

  5. Etching of oxynitride thin films using inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byungwhan; Lee, Dukwoo; Kim, Nam Jung; Lee, Byung Teak

    2005-05-01

    In this study, silicon oxynitride (SiON) has been etched in a C{sub 2}F{sub 6} inductively coupled plasma. The process parameters examined include a radio frequency source power, bias power, pressure, and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} flow rate. For process optimization, a statistical experimental design was employed to investigate parameter effects under various plasma conditions. The etch rate increased almost linearly with increasing the source or bias power. Main effect analysis revealed that the etch rate is dominated by the source power. The C{sub 2}F{sub 6} flow rate exerted the least impact on both etch rate and profile angle. It was estimated that the C{sub 2}F{sub 6} effect is transparent only as the etchant is supplied sufficiently. Depending on the pressure levels, the etch rate varied in a complicated way. Parameter effects on the profile angle were very small and the profile angle varied between 83 deg. and 87 deg. for all etching experiments. In nearly all experiments, microtrenching was observed. The etch rate and profile angle, optimized at 1000 W source power, 30 W bias power, 6 mTorr pressure, and 60 sccm C{sub 2}F{sub 6} flow rate, are 434 nm/min and 86 deg., respectively.

  6. A Two-Dimensional Zirconium Carbide by Selective Etching of Al3 C3 from Nanolaminated Zr3 Al3 C5.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zha, Xianhu; Chen, Fan Y; Ye, Qun; Eklund, Per; Du, Shiyu; Huang, Qing

    2016-04-11

    The room-temperature synthesis of a new two-dimensional (2D) zirconium-containing carbide, Zr3 C2 Tz MXene is presented. In contrast to traditional preparation of MXene, the layered ternary Zr3 Al3 C5 material instead of MAX phases is used as source under hydrofluoric acid treatment. The structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of the synthesized 2D carbide are investigated, combined with first-principles density functional calculations. A comparative study on the structrual stability of our obtained 2D Zr3 C2 Tz and Ti3 C2 Tz MXenes at elevated temperatures is performed. The obtained 2D Zr3 C2 Tz exhibits relatively better ability to maintain 2D nature and strucural integrity compared to Ti-based Mxene. The difference in structural stability under high temperature condition is explained by a theoretical investigation on binding energy. PMID:26959082

  7. Wetting ability of an acetone/based etch&rinse adhesive after NaOCl-treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Fátima S.; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; Moura, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: to evaluate the effect of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) treatment on surface dentin roughness (Ra) and contact angle (CA) when using Prime&Bond NT adhesive (PB NT). Study Design: Extracted human third molars were sectioned to expose flat, superficial and deep dentin surfaces. CA and Ra were measured (1) before and (2) after 35% H3PO4 etching, and (3) H3PO4 etching + 5% NaOCl treated for 2 minutes before the application of PB NT. CA was measured by the Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis Technique using distilled and deionized water and PB NT. Roughness was evaluated with a profilometer, twelve radial measurements were performed in each treatment surface. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test procedures. Results: CA values decreased after acid etching and even more after NaOCl treatment on deep dentin when water was tested. With resin, there were not differences on CA results after H3PO4 neither after NaOCl treatment, in both dentin surfaces. Etching and NaOCl treatment resulted in surface roughness increase. Conclusions: In spite of the higher roughness after NaOCl treatment on superficial and deep dentin, the use of 5% NaOCl for 2 min after dentin demineralization when PB NT was employed did not improved the wettability of dentin, probably due to nanofiller content and/or hydrogen-bonding interactions with residues of the organic matrix on collagen-depleted dentin. Key words:Sodium hypochlorite, contact angle, roughness, Prime&Bond NT, superficial dentin, deep dentin. PMID:22322490

  8. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Bai, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. PMID:26635279

  9. Tailored surface birefringence by femtosecond laser assisted wet etching.

    PubMed

    Drevinskas, Rokas; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Beresna, Martynas; Bellouard, Yves; Kazansky, Peter G

    2015-01-26

    Surface texturing is demonstrated by the combination of wet etching and ultrafast laser nanostructuring of silica glass. Using potassium hydroxide (KOH) at room temperature as an etchant of laser modified glass, we show the polarization dependent linear increase in retardance reaching a threefold value within 25 hours. The dispersion control of birefringence by the etching procedure led to achromatic behaviour over the entire visible spectral range. The mechanism of enhanced KOH etching selectivity after femtosecond laser exposure is discussed and correlated to the formation of various laser-induced defects, such as silicon-rich oxygen deficiency and color centers. PMID:25835901

  10. Selectively-etched nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2004-11-16

    Nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices having selectively-etched nanolaminates located in the fluid transport channel. The normally flat surfaces of the nanolaminate having exposed conductive (metal) stripes are selectively-etched to form trenches and baffles. The modifications of the prior utilized flat exposed surfaces increase the amount of exposed metal to facilitate electrochemical redox reaction or control the exposure of the metal surfaces to analytes of large size. These etched areas variously increase the sensitivity of electrochemical detection devices to low concentrations of analyte, improve the plug flow characteristic of the channel, and allow additional discrimination of the colloidal particles during cyclic voltammetry.

  11. Metal-assisted chemical etch porous silicon formation method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiuling; Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2004-09-14

    A thin discontinuous layer of metal such as Au, Pt, or Au/Pd is deposited on a silicon surface. The surface is then etched in a solution including HF and an oxidant for a brief period, as little as a couple seconds to one hour. A preferred oxidant is H.sub.2 O.sub.2. Morphology and light emitting properties of porous silicon can be selectively controlled as a function of the type of metal deposited, Si doping type, silicon doping level, and/or etch time. Electrical assistance is unnecessary during the chemical etching of the invention, which may be conducted in the presence or absence of illumination.

  12. Chlorine-based plasma etching of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Briggs, R.D.; Pearton, S.J.; Vartuli, C.B.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lee, J.W.; Constantine, C.; Baratt, C.

    1997-02-01

    The wide band gap group-III nitride materials continue to generate interest in the semiconductor community with the fabrication of green, blue, and ultraviolet light emitting diodes (LEDs), blue lasers, and high temperature transistors. Realization of more advanced devices requires pattern transfer processes which are well controlled, smooth, highly anisotropic and have etch rates exceeding 0.5 {micro}m/min. The utilization of high-density chlorine-based plasmas including electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) systems has resulted in improved GaN etch quality over more conventional reactive ion etch (RIE) systems.

  13. Structural and magnetic etch damage in CoFeB

    SciTech Connect

    Krayer, L.; Lau, J. W.; Kirby, B. J.

    2014-05-07

    A detailed understanding of the interfacial properties of thin films used in magnetic media is critical for the aggressive component scaling required for continued improvement in storage density. In particular, it is important to understand how common etching and milling processes affect the interfacial magnetism. We have used polarized neutron reflectometry and transmission electron microscopy to characterize the structural and magnetic properties of an ion beam etched interface of a CoFeB film. We found that the etching process results in a sharp magnetic interface buried under a nanometer scale layer of non-magnetic, compositionally distinct material.

  14. Parametric study on the solderability of etched PWB copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Stevenson, J.O.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1996-10-01

    The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has resulted in a more engineered approach to designing and fabricating printed wiring board (PWB) surface features. Recent research at Sandia National Laboratories has demonstrated the importance of surface roughness on solder flow. This paper describes how chemical etching was used to enhance the solderability of surfaces that were normally difficult to wet. The effects of circuit geometry, etch concentration, and etching time on solder flow are discussed. Surface roughness and solder flow data are presented. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of surface roughness on the solderability of fine PWB surface mount features.

  15. Selectively-etched nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2006-06-27

    Nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices having selectively-etched nanolaminates located in the fluid transport channel. The normally flat surfaces of the nanolaminate having exposed conductive (metal) stripes are selectively-etched to form trenches and baffles. The modifications of the prior utilized flat exposed surfaces increase the amount of exposed metal to facilitate electrochemical redox reaction or control the exposure of the metal surfaces to analytes of large size. These etched areas variously increase the sensitivity of electrochemical detection devices to low concentrations of analyte, improve the plug flow characteristic of the channel, and allow additional discrimination of the colloidal particles during cyclic voltammetry.

  16. CDU improvement technology of etching pattern using photo lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, Masahide; Shinozuka, Shinichi; Jyousaka, Megumi; Ogata, Kunie; Morimoto, Tamotsu; Konishi, Yoshitaka

    2008-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing technology has shifted towards finer design rules, and demands for critical dimension uniformity (CDU) of resist patterns have become greater than ever. One of the methods for improving Resist Pattern CDU is to control post-exposure bake (PEB) temperature. When ArF resist is used, there is a certain relationship between critical dimension (CD) and PEB temperature. By utilizing this relationship, Resist Pattern CDU can be improved through control of within-wafer temperature distribution in the PEB process. Resist Pattern CDU improvement contributes to Etching Pattern CDU improvement to a certain degree. To further improve Etching Pattern CDU, etcher-specific CD variation needs to be controlled. In this evaluation, 1. We verified whether etcher-specific CD variation can be controlled and consequently Etching Pattern CDU can be further improved by controlling resist patterns through PEB control. 2. Verifying whether Etching Pattern CDU improvement through has any effect on the reduction in wiring resistance variation. The evaluation procedure is as follows.1. Wafers with base film of Doped Poly-Si (D-Poly) were prepared. 2. Resist patterns were created on them. 3. To determine etcher-specific characteristics, the first etching was performed, and after cleaning off the resist and BARC, CD of etched D-Poly was measured. 4. Using the obtained within-wafer CD distribution of the etching patterns, within-wafer temperature distribution in the PEB process was modified. 5. Resist patterns were created again, followed by the second etching and cleaning, which was followed by CD measurement. We used Optical CD Measurement (OCD) for measurement of resist patterns and etching patterns as OCD is minimally affected by Line Edge Roughness (LER). As a result, 1. We confirmed the effect of Resist Pattern CD control through PEB control on the reduction in etcher-specific CD variation and the improvement in Etching Pattern CDU. 2. The improvement in Etching Pattern CDU has an effect on the reduction in wiring resistance variation. The method for Etching Pattern CDU improvement through PEB control reduces within-wafer variation of MOS transistor's gate length. Therefore, with this method, we can expect to observe uniform within-wafer MOS transistor characteristics.

  17. Hydrothermal Etching Treatment to Rutile TiO2 Nanorod Arrays for Improving the Efficiency of CdS-Sensitized TiO2 Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jingshu; Liu, Rong; Tong, Yuzhu; Chen, Shuhuang; Hu, Yunxia; Wang, Baoyuan; Xu, Yang; Wang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    Highly ordered TiO2 nanorod arrays (NRAs) were directly grown on an F:SnO2 (FTO) substrate without any seed layer by hydrothermal route. For a larger surface area, the second-step hydrothermal treatment in hydrochloric acid was carried out to the as-prepared TiO2 NRAs. The results showed that the center portion of the TiO2 nanorods were dissolved in the etching solution to form a nanocave at the initial etching process. As the etching time extended, the tip parts of the nanocave wall split into lots of nanowires with a reduced diameter, giving rise to a remarkable increase of specific surface area for the TiO2 NRAs. The TiO2 films after etching treatment were sensitized by CdS quantum dots (QDs) to fabricate quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), which exhibited a significant improvement in the photocurrent density in comparison with that of the un-treated device, this mainly attributed to the enhancement of QD loading and diffused reflectance ability. Through modifying the etching TiO2 films with TiCl4, a relatively high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.14 % was obtained after optimizing the etching time. PMID:26754938

  18. Surface modification with alumina blasting and H2SO4-HCl etching for bonding two resin-composite veneers to titanium.

    PubMed

    Taira, Yohsuke; Egoshi, Takafumi; Kamada, Kohji; Sawase, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an experimental surface treatment with alumina blasting and acid etching on the bond strengths between each of two resin composites and commercially pure titanium. The titanium surface was blasted with alumina and then etched with 45wt% H2SO4 and 15wt% HCl (H2SO4-HCl). A light- and heat-curing resin composite (Estenia) and a light-curing resin composite (Ceramage) were used with adjunctive metal primers. Veneered specimens were subjected to thermal cycling between 4 and 60°C for 50,000 cycles, and the shear bond strengths were determined. The highest bond strengths were obtained for Blasting/H2SO4-HCl/Estenia (30.2 ± 4.5 MPa) and Blasting/Etching/Ceramage (26.0 ± 4.5 MPa), the values of which were not statistically different, followed by Blasting/No etching/Estenia (20.4 ± 2.4 MPa) and Blasting/No etching/Ceramage (0.8 ± 0.3 MPa). Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed that alumina blasting and H2SO4-HCl etching creates a number of micro- and nanoscale cavities on the titanium surface, which contribute to adhesive bonding. PMID:24372961

  19. Hydrothermal Etching Treatment to Rutile TiO2 Nanorod Arrays for Improving the Efficiency of CdS-Sensitized TiO2 Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jingshu; Liu, Rong; Tong, Yuzhu; Chen, Shuhuang; Hu, Yunxia; Wang, Baoyuan; Xu, Yang; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Highly ordered TiO2 nanorod arrays (NRAs) were directly grown on an F:SnO2 (FTO) substrate without any seed layer by hydrothermal route. For a larger surface area, the second-step hydrothermal treatment in hydrochloric acid was carried out to the as-prepared TiO2 NRAs. The results showed that the center portion of the TiO2 nanorods were dissolved in the etching solution to form a nanocave at the initial etching process. As the etching time extended, the tip parts of the nanocave wall split into lots of nanowires with a reduced diameter, giving rise to a remarkable increase of specific surface area for the TiO2 NRAs. The TiO2 films after etching treatment were sensitized by CdS quantum dots (QDs) to fabricate quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), which exhibited a significant improvement in the photocurrent density in comparison with that of the un-treated device, this mainly attributed to the enhancement of QD loading and diffused reflectance ability. Through modifying the etching TiO2 films with TiCl4, a relatively high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.14 % was obtained after optimizing the etching time.

  20. Investigation of electrochemical etch differences in AlGaAs heterostructures using Cl{sub 2} ion beam assisted etching

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, Kevin Goodhue, William D.; Swint, Reuel B.; Porter, Jeanne

    2015-03-15

    A deeply etched, anisotropic 45° and 90° mirror technology is developed for Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As heterostructures using a Cl{sub 2} ion beam assisted etching system. When etching vertically, using a conductive low-erosion Ni mask, electrochemical etch differences between layers with various Al mole fractions caused nonuniform sidewall profiles not seen in semi-insulating GaAs test samples. These variations, based on alloy composition, were found to be negligible when etching at a 45°. A Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Ni etch mask is designed in order to electrically isolate charge buildup caused by the incoming Ar{sup +} ion beam to the Ni layer, preventing conduction to the underlying epitaxial layers. This modification produced smoothly etched facets, up to 8 μm in depth, enabling fabrication of substrate–surface-emitting slab-coupled optical waveguide lasers and other optoelectronic devices.

  1. Effect of acid leaching on upgrading the graphite concentrate from West Kalimantan (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syarifuddin, Fahmi; Florena, Fenfen Fenda; Hanam, Eko Sulistio; Trisko, Nici; Kustiyanto, Eko; Enilisiana, Rianto, Anton; Arinton, Ghenadi

    2016-02-01

    In this research an attempt has been done for upgrading the carbon content on processed graphite concentrate obtained from Sanggau Regency, West Kalimantan, Indonesia by acid leaching. The purpose of this research was to find optimal conditions for increasing graphite purity by eliminating the impurities, in particular, sillica - which is easy to remove by hydrofluoric acid. The concentrate contained 69.74% FC ranging from 149 µm to 841 µm. The optimal leaching parameters were time reaction 120 minutes, temperature 180° C, solid-liquid ratio 1:5 and purity of acid 48%. The determination of the carbon content showed that the carbon grade was 98% FC.

  2. Carbonate acidizing

    SciTech Connect

    Daccord, G.; Touboul, E.; Lenormand, R.

    1989-02-01

    The authors present the first quantitative study and complete model of the wormholing phenomenon, leading to a means of predicting and optimizing carbonate acidizing treatments. Laboratory experiments on a gypsum model system and computer simulations show that for a given geometry, wormholes can be quantified by a unique parameter, their equivalent hydraulic length. The behavior of this quantifying parameter vs. all the system parameters is studied and allows the quantitative prediction of the efficiency of an acidizing treatment. This study highlights the fractal nature of the phenomenon, which is accounted for in the equations, and the strong effect of the sample geometry. Three types of etching can be obtained: compact, wormhole type, or homogeneous. The optimum conditions for achieving the best skin decrease correspond to the creation of wormholes and can then be defined in terms of fluid reactivity and injection rate.

  3. Integrated reactive ion etching to pattern cross-linked hydrophilic polymer structures for protein immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Strickland, Aaron D.; Kim, Il; Malliaras, George G.; Batt, Carl A.

    2007-04-01

    Patterning of cross-linked hydrophilic polymer features using reactive ion etching (RIE) capable of covalently immobilizing proteins has been achieved. Projection photolithography was used to pattern photoresist to create micromolds. Vapor phase molecular self-assembly of polymerizable monolayer in molds allowed covalent binding of hydrogel on surface during free-radical polymerization. Excess hydrogel blanket film was consumed with oxygen RIE resulting into hydrogel pattern of 1?m size aligned to prefabricated silicon oxide structures. Proteins were finally coupled through their primary amine groups selectively to acid functionalized hydrogel features through stable amide linkages using 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide.

  4. Ion orbits in plasma etching of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Madziwa-Nussinov, Tsitsi G.; Arnush, Donald; Chen, Francis F.

    2008-01-15

    Fabrication of high-speed semiconductor circuits depends on etching submicron trenches and holes with straight walls, guided by sheath accelerated ions, which strike the substrate at a normal angle. Electrons accumulate at the nonconductive entrance of each trench, charging it negatively and preventing the penetration of electrons to the bottom of the trench. This 'electron shading' effect causes an ion charge at the bottom, which is well known to cause damage to thin oxide layers. In addition, the deflection of ions by electric fields in the trench can cause deformation of the trench shape. To study this effect, the ion orbits are computed self-consistently with their charging of the trench walls. It is found that (a) the orbits depend only on the electric fields at the entrance and are sensitive to changes in the shape of the photoresist layer there; (b) there is an 'ion shading' effect that protects part of the wall; and (c) the number of ions striking the wall is too small to cause any deformation thereof.

  5. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2015-07-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) EUV mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of not only a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope (PEM), but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam (EB) techniques such as CD metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients (SEECs) of the candidate materials for conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair-ML, 16 nm sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in hp 44 nm, 40 nm, and 32 nm line and space (L/S) patterns. Reducing 40-pair-ML to 20-pair-ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16 nm sized defects remained detectable. A double layer structure with 2.5-nm-thik B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  6. Marginal permeability of self-etch and total-etch adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Owens, Barry M; Johnson, William W; Harris, Edward F

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated microleakage in vitro of self-etch and multi-step, total-etch adhesive systems. Ninety-six extracted non-carious human molars were randomly assigned to eight groups (n=12) and restored with different adhesive systems: Optibond Solo Plus, iBond, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Xeno III, Simplicity, Nano-Bond, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Touch & Bond. Each group was treated following the manufacturer's instructions. Class V cavities were prepared on the facial or lingual surfaces of each tooth with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in cementum (dentin). The teeth were restored with Z-100 resin composite. After polishing with Sof-Lex disks, the teeth were thermocycled for 1000 cycles and coated with nail varnish to within 1.0 mm of the restoration. The teeth were stained in 1% methylene blue dye for 24 hours and sectioned from the facial to lingual surface. Dye penetration (microleakage) was examined with a 20x binocular microscope. Enamel and dentin margin leakage was scored on a 0 to 3 ordinal scale. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis Analysis of Variance and Mann-Whitney U tests. Comparison of the adhesive groups at the enamel margin revealed: 1) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose exhibited significantly less leakage than the other adhesive groups (except iBond); 2) among the self-etch adhesive groups, iBond exhibited significantly less leakage than Nano-Bond and 3) the other adhesive groups clustered intermediately. In contrast, there were no significant differences among the adhesive groups when the dentin margin was evaluated. A Wilcoxin signed rank test showed significantly less leakage at the enamel margins compared to the dentin margins of the eight adhesive systems tested. All data were submitted to statistical analysis at p<0.05 level of significance. PMID:16536195

  7. Summary of Chalcogenide Glass Processing: Wet-Etching and Photolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a study designed to explore the different properties of two different chalcogenide materials, As2S3 and As24S38Se38, when subjected to photolithographic wet-etching techniques. Chalcogenide glasses are made by combining chalcogen elements S, Se, and Te with Group IV and/or V elements. The etchant was selected from the literature and was composed of sodium hydroxide, isopropyl alcohol, and deionized water and the types of chalcogenide glass for study were As2S3 and As24S38Se38. The main goals here were to obtain a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time versus NaOH overall solution concentration in M and to see the difference in etch rate between a given etchant when used on the different chalcogenide stoichiometries. Upon completion of these two goals, future studies will begin to explore creating complex, integrated photonic devices via these methods.

  8. Reactive Ion Etching in a VHF Parallel Plate Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahi, H.; Murnick, D. E.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    VHF (very high frequency) capacitive plasma reactors may allow development of new RIE (reactive ion etching) systems with high etch rates, excellent uniformity and anisotropy and low damage. High ion and radical fluxes can be obtained by raising the RF (radio frequency) frequency which increases plasma density dramatically at a fixed voltage. The effects of variation in frequency (25-120 MHz), pressure (10-250 mTorr), and flow rate (1-100 sccm) in a CF4 discharge have been investigated. The RF current versus voltage characteristics and spatially resolved optical emission are used as diagnostics. Experiments on etch rates, etch uniformity and anisotropy in silicon, silicon dioxide and silicon nitride will be discussed. Results of fluid model simulations are used to interpret the experimental data.

  9. Chemical etching for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical etching for automatic processing of integrated circuits is discussed. The wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading onto a sending air track are included.

  10. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOEpatents

    Contolini, Robert J.; Mayer, Steven T.; Tarte, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment.

  11. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOEpatents

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Tarte, L.A.

    1996-01-23

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment. 6 figs.

  12. Resist and etch modeling for the 45nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapeau, Martin; Beale, Dan

    2006-05-01

    For the 45nm node and beyond, ever smaller CD budgets require tighter control over the entire process, demanding more accuracy from optical proximity correction (OPC). With the industry adoption of model-based over the traditional rules-based approach, OPC has come a long way to improve accuracy. Today, it is time to do the same for another important step in the process: dry etch. Here we demonstrate the accuracy of etch modeling for a 45nm node process. All experiments were conducted at IMEC with an immersion scanner using off axis illumination. Etch was achieved using a non-optimal recipe to exhibit an iso-dense bias effect. SEM data was extracted using a novel tool to automatically remove any experimental noise. Model calibration was performed with Progen TM using standard and novel etch-sensitive structures. Model accuracy and predictability was verified with comparing modeled 2D contours against CD SEM measurements and images.

  13. 155. Copy of Louis Rosenberg Etching (original in the Tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    155. Copy of Louis Rosenberg Etching (original in the Tower City Development Office) EXCAVATION OF TRACK AREA TO THE SOUTH OF HURON ROAD, VIEW WEST TO EAST - Terminal Tower Building, Cleveland Union Terminal, 50 Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. Plasmaless dry etching of silicon with fluorine-containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibbotson, D. E.; Mucha, J. A.; Flamm, D. L.; Cook, J. M.

    1984-11-01

    Silicon is rapidly etched by the gas-phase halogen fluorides ClF3, BrF3, BrF5, and IF5, in analogy to XeF2 etching silicon. Nearly complete selectivity over SiO2 is achieved in all cases. By contrast, ClF and Groups III and V fluorides such as NF3, BF3, PF3, and PF5 do not spontaneously etch either Si or SiO2 under the same experimental conditions. These relatively inexpensive interhalogens can be applied to pattern silicon and more generally to remove silicon or polysilicon layers without a plasma. Low-temperature plasmaless gasification of substrates by these fluorine-containing interhalogens is an economically attractive alternative to fluorine-based plasma etching.

  15. 1. Photocopy of an early etching (Original in collection of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of an early etching (Original in collection of the Historical Society of Montana) BROADWAY AND JACKSON ELEVATIONS - Second Masonic Temple, Broadway & Jackson Streets, Helena, Lewis and Clark County, MT

  16. Visible luminescence from silicon wafers subjected to stain etches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    Etching of Si in a variety of solutions is known to cause staining. These stain layers consist of porous material similar to that produced by anodic etching of Si in HF solutions. In this work, photoluminescence peaked in the red from stain-etched Si wafers of different dopant types, concentrations, and orientations produced in solutions of HF:HNO3:H2O was observed. Luminescence is also observed in stain films produced in solutions of NaNO2 in HF, but not in stain films produced in solutions of CrO3 in HF. The luminescence spectra are similar to those reported recently for porous Si films produced by anodic etching in HF solutions. However, stain films are much easier to produce, requiring no special equipment.

  17. System for etching thick aluminum layers minimizes bridging and undercutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Four step photoresist process for etching thick aluminum layers for semiconductor device contacts produces uniform contact surfaces, eliminates bridging, minimizes undercutting, and may be used on various materials of any thickness.

  18. 40 CFR 413.60 - Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chemical etching and milling subcategory. 413.60 Section 413.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Etching and Milling Subcategory § 413.60 Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling... chemical milling or etching of ferrous or nonferrous materials....

  19. 40 CFR 413.60 - Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chemical etching and milling subcategory. 413.60 Section 413.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Etching and Milling Subcategory § 413.60 Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling... chemical milling or etching of ferrous or nonferrous materials....

  20. 40 CFR 413.60 - Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chemical etching and milling subcategory. 413.60 Section 413.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Etching and Milling Subcategory § 413.60 Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling... chemical milling or etching of ferrous or nonferrous materials....

  1. 40 CFR 413.60 - Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chemical etching and milling subcategory. 413.60 Section 413.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Etching and Milling Subcategory § 413.60 Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling... chemical milling or etching of ferrous or nonferrous materials....

  2. 40 CFR 413.60 - Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chemical etching and milling subcategory. 413.60 Section 413.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Etching and Milling Subcategory § 413.60 Applicability: Description of the chemical etching and milling... chemical milling or etching of ferrous or nonferrous materials....

  3. Evaluating the shear bond strength of enamel and dentin with or without etching: A comparative study between dimethacrylate-based and silorane-based adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Hila; Nasseh, Atefeh; Rahmanpour, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Background Silorane-based composites and their specific self-etch adhesive were introduced to conquest the polymerization shrinkage of methacrylate-based composites. It has been shown that additional etching of enamel and dentin can improve the bond strength of self-etch methacrylate-based adhesives but this claim is not apparent about silorane-based adhesives. Our objective was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of enamel and dentin between silorane-based adhesive resin and a methacrylate-based resin with or without additional etching. Material and Methods 40 sound human premolars were prepared and divided into two groups: 1- Filtek P60 composite and Clearfil SE Bond adhesive; 2- Filtek P90 composite and Silorane adhesive. Each group divided into two subgroups: with or without additional etching. For additional etching, 37% acid phosphoric was applied before bonding procedure. A cylinder of the composite was bonded to the surface. After 24 hours storage and 500 thermo cycling between 5-55°C, shear bond strength was assessed with the cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Then, bonded surfaces were observed under stereomicroscope to determine the failure mode. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Fischer exact test. Results Shear bond strength of Filtek P60 composite was significantly higher than Filtek P90 composite both in enamel and dentin surfaces (P<0.05). However, additional etching had no significant effect on shear bond strength in enamel or dentin for each of the composites (P>0.05). There was no interaction between composite type and additional etching (P>0.05). Failure pattern was mainly adhesive and no significant correlation was found between failure and composite type or additional etching (P>0.05). Conclusions Shear bond strength of methacrylate-based composite was significantly higher than silorane-based composite both in enamel and dentin surfaces and additional etching had no significant effect on shear bond strength in enamel or dentin for each of the composites. The mode of failure had no meaningful relation to the type of composite and etching factor. Key words:Shear bond strength, adhesive, composite resin, silorane, methacrylate. PMID:26644830

  4. Note: Electrochemical etching of cylindrical nanoprobes using a vibrating electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yufeng; Zeng, Yongbin Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2015-07-15

    An electrochemical etching process using a vibrating electrolyte of potassium hydroxide to prepare tungsten cylindrical nanotips is developed. The vibrating electrolyte eases the effects of a diffusion layer and extends the etching area, which aid in the production of cylindrical nanotips. Larger amplitudes and a vibration frequency of 35 Hz are recommended for producing cylindrical nanotips. Nanotips with a tip radius of approximately 43 nm and a conical angle of arctan 0.0216 are obtained.

  5. Growth and Etching of Monolayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wu, Bin; Jiang, Lili; Chen, Jisi; Li, Yongtao; Guo, Wei; Hu, Pingan; Liu, Yunqi

    2015-09-01

    The full spectrum from attachment-kinetic-dominated to diffusion-controlled modes is revealed for the cases of monolayer h-BN chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth and Ar/H2 etching. The sets of grown and etched structures exhibit well-defined shape evolution from Euclidian to fractal geometry. The detailed abnormal processes for merging h-BN flakes into continuous structures or film are first observed and explained. PMID:26183904

  6. Organization of silicon nanocrystals by localized electrochemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Ayari-Kanoun, Asma; Drouin, Dominique; Beauvais, Jacques; Lysenko, Vladimir; Nychyporuk, Tetyana; Souifi, Abdelkader

    2009-10-12

    An approach to form a monolayer of organized silicon nanocrystals on a monocrystalline Si wafer is reported. Ordered arrays of nanoholes in a silicon nitride layer were obtained by combining electron beam lithography and plasma etching. Then, a short electrochemical etching current pulse led to formation of a single Si nanocrystal per each nanohole. As a result, high quality silicon nanocrystal arrays were formed with well controlled and reproducible morphologies. In future, this approach can be used to fabricate single electron devices.

  7. Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of semiconductor nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical (QSC-PEC) etching provides a new route to the precision fabrication of epitaxial semiconductor nanostructures in the sub-10-nm size regime. For example, quantum dots (QDs) can be QSC-PEC-etched from epitaxial InGaN thin films using narrowband laser photoexcitation, and the QD sizes (and hence bandgaps and photoluminescence wavelengths) are determined by the photoexcitation wavelength.

  8. The chemical mechanisms of metal etching in high density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orland, Aaron Seth

    Films of magnetic materials are used in a variety of electronic devices. They are currently used primarily in both the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) read/write heads of hard drives and in magnetoresistive memory (MRAM). Patterning of the metals in GMR heads is usually accomplished using ion-milling techniques, whereas non-selective metal etch techniques are used in the patterning of MRAM devices. As the size of devices continues to shrink, new selective etch chemistries will become more important. The composition of CO/NH3, CO/H2, CO2/NH3, and CO2/H 2 plasmas suitable for the etching of magnetic materials has been studied by supersonic pulse, plasma sampling mass spectrometry. The composition of the plasma's major components has been determined by a variety of approaches including isotopic labeling, and the identification of clusters formed by the sampling technique. All four of the different etch chemistries were investigated individually. The major components of the gas flows and the plasmas for each system were identified. The chemical mechanism of etching has been identified for all four etch recipes.

  9. The grand challenges of plasma etching: a manufacturing perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris G. N.; Kanarik, Keren J.; Gottscho, Richard A.

    2014-07-01

    Plasma etching has been enabling nano-electronic fabrication since the 1980s; during this time, transistor size has shrunk by nearly two orders of magnitude, starting at 1.0 µm in the mid 80s to ˜0.01 µm today. The manufacturing of these devices requires overcoming a series of challenges, ranging from continuous innovation on device integration to extend Moore's law to breaking tradeoffs on the perennial challenge of aspect ratio-dependent etching. In this paper, we will review four key areas in etch manufacturing: uniformity, defects, surface precision and ‘sticky’/non-volatile etch materials. In the uniformity section, we will discuss the challenges for microscopic uniformity, such as localized feature dimension variations; macroscopic uniformity, such as performance at the extreme edge of the wafer; and repeatable uniformity, meaning wafer-to-wafer, lot-to-lot and chamber-to-chamber performance. While defect management is successful with in situ plasma cleans, one must be cognizant of the choice of clean chemistry. In surface precision, we look at the approach of atomic layer etching and how it can be successful in a manufacturing environment. Finally, in the non-volatile material section, we review technology drivers for DRAM (dynamic random access memory) and NAND flash memory in the microelectronics Si industry, with focus on the utilization of such materials and what it means to etch equipment manufacturers.

  10. Etching of silicon surfaces using atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzelt, H.; Böhm, G.; Arnold, Th

    2015-04-01

    Local plasma-assisted etching of crystalline silicon by fine focused plasma jets provides a method for high accuracy computer controlled surface waviness and figure error correction as well as free form processing and manufacturing. We investigate a radio-frequency powered atmospheric pressure He/N2/CF4 plasma jet for the local chemical etching of silicon using fluorine as reactive plasma gas component. This plasma jet tool has a typical tool function width of about 0.5 to 1.8 mm and a material removal rate up to 0.068 mm3 min-1. The relationship between etching rate and plasma jet parameters is discussed in detail regarding gas composition, working distance, scan velocity and RF power. Surface roughness after etching was characterized using atomic force microscopy and white light interferometry. A strong smoothing effect was observed for etching rough silicon surfaces like wet chemically-etched silicon wafer backsides. Using the dwell-time algorithm for a deterministic surface machining by superposition of the local removal function of the plasma tool we show a fast and efficient way for manufacturing complex silicon structures. In this article we present two examples of surface processing using small local plasma jets.

  11. Vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Porter, John D.; Yoshiyama, James M.; Contolini, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    A process involving vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials for creating high aspect ratio (i.e., length much greater than diameter), isolated cylindrical holes in dielectric materials that have been exposed to high-energy atomic particles. The process includes cleaning the surface of the tracked material and exposing the cleaned surface to a vapor of a suitable etchant. Independent control of the temperatures of the vapor and the tracked materials provide the means to vary separately the etch rates for the latent track region and the non-tracked material. As a rule, the tracked regions etch at a greater rate than the non-tracked regions. In addition, the vapor-etched holes can be enlarged and smoothed by subsequent dipping in a liquid etchant. The 20-1000 nm diameter holes resulting from the vapor etching process can be useful as molds for electroplating nanometer-sized filaments, etching gate cavities for deposition of nano-cones, developing high-aspect ratio holes in trackable resists, and as filters for a variety of molecular-sized particles in virtually any liquid or gas by selecting the dielectric material that is compatible with the liquid or gas of interest.

  12. Etching of photoresist with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew; van der Schans, Marc; Xu, Cigang; Gans, Timo; Cooke, Mike; Wagenaars, Erik

    2014-10-01

    Low-pressure oxygen plasmas are commonly used in semiconductor industry for removing photoresist from the surface of processed wafers; a process known as plasma ashing or plasma stripping. The possible use of atmospheric-pressure plasmas instead of low-pressure ones for plasma ashing is attractive from the point of view of reduction in equipment costs and processing time. We present investigations of photoresist etching with an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) in helium gas with oxygen admixtures driven by radio-frequency power. In these experiments, the neutral, radical rich effluent of the APPJ is used for etching, avoiding direct contact between the active plasma and the sensitive wafer, while maintaining a high etch rate. Photoresist etch rates and etch quality are measured for a range of plasma operating parameters such as power input, driving frequency, flow rate and wafer temperature. Etch rates of up to 10 micron/min were achieved with modest input power (45 W) and gas flow rate (10 slm). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that the quality of the photoresist removal was comparable to traditional plasma ashing techniques. This work was supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grant EP/K018388/1.

  13. Controlled Layer-by-Layer Etching of MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Lin, TaiZhe; Kang, BaoTao; Jeon, MinHwan; Huffman, Craig; Jeon, JeaHoo; Lee, SungJoo; Han, Wei; Lee, JinYong; Lee, SeHan; Yeom, GeunYoung; Kim, KyongNam

    2015-07-29

    Two-dimensional (2D) metal dichalcogenides like molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) may provide a pathway to high-mobility channel materials that are needed for beyond-complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. Controlling the thickness of these materials at the atomic level will be a key factor in the future development of MoS2 devices. In this study, we propose a layer-by-layer removal of MoS2 using the atomic layer etching (ALET) that is composed of the cyclic processing of chlorine (Cl)-radical adsorption and argon (Ar)(+) ion-beam desorption. MoS2 etching was not observed with only the Cl-radical adsorption or low-energy (<20 eV) Ar(+) ion-beam desorption steps; however, the use of sequential etching that is composed of the Cl-radical adsorption step and a subsequent Ar(+) ion-beam desorption step resulted in the complete etching of one monolayer of MoS2. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated the removal of one monolayer of MoS2 with each ALET cycle; therefore, the number of MoS2 layers could be precisely controlled by using this cyclical etch method. In addition, no noticeable damage or etch residue was observed on the exposed MoS2. PMID:26091282

  14. Optimization of (100)-Si TMAH etching for uncooled infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Y.; Wu, C. G.; Zhang, W. L.; Li, Y. R.; Liu, X. Z.; Zhu, J.

    2009-07-01

    The influences of concentration of the Tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution together with oxidizer additions were studied in order to optimize the anisotropic silicon etching in the development of a fabrication process for Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3 (BST) pyroelectric thin film infrared detectors. The detector active element was consisted of capacitance NiCr/BST/Pt and the thin silicon suspending membrane. The later one was formed by bulk anisotropically etching of the (100)-Si wafer. Both solution concentration and oxidizing agent were tuned in order to obtain an optimum etching process. Some improvements such as higher etch rate and lower surface roughness have been obtained by the addition of ammonium peroxide sulfate ((NH4)S2O8) as oxidizing agent under different conditions. The examination of etching speed and surface topography were performed by step surface profiler and scanned electronic microscopy. Furthermore, a simple approach was developed to fabric BST pyroelectric thin film detector based on the optimized TMAH etching parameters. A BST thin film capacitance was formed on a thin silicon membrane, where high sensitivity D* of 9.4×107cm•Hz1/2/W was measured.

  15. Etching properties and electrical characterization of surfaces of silicon-on-insulator substrates in presence of halogens

    SciTech Connect

    Abbadie, A.; Hamaide, G.; Chaupin, M.; Brunier, F.; Mariolle, D.; Martinez, E.; Maehliss, J.

    2012-03-15

    We have studied the etching properties of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates in recently developed chromium-free solutions containing halogens. We have shown that the presence of halogen compounds X (I{sup -}, Br{sup -}...) in HF/HNO{sub 3}/CH{sub 3}COOH solutions is required for a selective and preferential etching on SOI. The etching rate of such solutions increases with the dissolved halogen concentrations. The chemical reactivity of Si-X (X = Br{sup -}, I{sup -}..) bonds has been analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Pseudo-MOS (flatband potential) and Kelvin Force Microscopy (KFM) measurements. A negative shift of flatband potential values is explained by an increasing concentration of halogen compounds in the solution and a substitution of Si-H (F) bonds by Si-X bonds during the reaction. Though Si-X bonds, and more particularly Si-I bonds, have been confirmed only at trace levels using XPS, we believe that the formation of Si-X bonds is supported by a mechanism of surface dipoles. Unexpectedly, no significant change in work function could be detected using KFM measurements. Some suggestions, based on KFM technique improvements, are made to explain such results. Finally, though the interaction mechanism between silicon, fluoride, iodide, and nitric acid is not clearly elucidated by our experimental results, the formation of Si-halogen bonds is crucial for etching and defect decoration capability.

  16. Justification for Selecting Level A vs. Level B Personal Protective Equipment to Remediate a Room Containing Concentrated Acids, Bases and Radiological Constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Hylko, J. M.; Thompson, A. L.; Walter, J. F.; Deecke, T. A.

    2002-02-25

    Selecting the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is based on providing an adequate level of employee protection relative to the task-specific conditions and hazards. PPE is categorized into four ensembles, based on the degree of protection afforded; e.g., Levels A (most restrictive), B, C, and D (least restrictive). What is often overlooked in preparing an ensemble is that the PPE itself can create significant worker hazards; i.e., the greater the level of PPE, the greater the associated risks. Furthermore, there is confusion as to whether a more ''conservative approach'' should always be taken since Level B provides the same level of respiratory protection as Level A but less skin protection. This paper summarizes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations addressing Level A versus Level B, and provides justification for selecting Level B over Level A without under-protecting the employee during a particular remediation scenario. The scenario consisted of an entry team performing (1) an initial entry into a room containing concentrated acids (e.g., hydrofluoric acid), bases, and radiological constituents; (2) sampling and characterizing container contents; and (3) retrieving characterized containers. The invasive nature of the hydrofluoric acid sampling and characterization scenario created a high potential for splash, immersion, and exposure to hazardous vapors, requiring additional skin protection. The hazards associated with this scenario and the chemical nature of hydrofluoric acid provided qualitative evidence to justify Level A. Once the hydrofluoric acid was removed from the room, PPE performance was evaluated against the remaining chemical inventory. If chemical breakthrough from direct contact was not expected to occur and instrument readings confirmed the absence of any hazardous vapors, additional skin protection afforded by wearing a vapor-tight, totally-encapsulated suit was not required. Therefore, PPE performance and instrument data provided quantitative evidence to justify Level B.

  17. Bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel using different surface treatments: bond strength and etching pattern evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths and etching patterns of seven self-adhesive resin cements to human enamel specimens which were subjected to one of the following surface treatments: (1) Polishing with #600 polishing paper; (2) Phosphoric acid; (3) G-Bond one-step adhesive; or (4) Phosphoric acid and G-Bond. After surface treatment, the human incisor specimens were bonded to a resin composite using a self-adhesive resin cement [Maxcem (MA), RelyX Unicem (UN), Breeze (BR), BisCem (BI), seT (SE), Clearfil SA Luting (CL)] or a conventional resin cement [ResiCem (RE)]. Representative morphology formed with self-adhesive resin cements showed areas of etched enamel intermingled with areas of featureless enamel. In conclusion, etching efficacy influenced the bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive resin cements to unground enamel, and that a combined use of phosphoric acid and G-Bond for pretreatment of human enamel surfaces improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:20668359

  18. Improved deep-etched multilayer grating reconstruction by considering etching anisotropy and abnormal errors in optical scatterometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinlong; Liu, Shiyuan; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Chuanwei; Chen, Xiuguo

    2015-02-15

    Accurate, fast, and nondestructive reconstruction of the etched nanostructures is important for etching process control to achieve good fidelity, as well as high manufacturing yield. In this work, we have demonstrated the improved deep-etched multilayer grating reconstruction by simultaneously considering the model error of nonuniform side-wall angle (SWA) because of different etching anisotropies of various materials and by suppressing the abnormally distributed measurement errors using a robust statistics based method in optical scatterometry. More specifically, we introduce an additional parameter to perfect the profile model under measurement, and use a robust estimation procedure at the end of each iteration of the Gauss-Newton (GN) method to obtain the more accurate parameter departure vector. By applying the proposed methods, more accurate reconstructed results can be achieved. PMID:25680127

  19. Influences of temperature and etching voltage on the surface morphology of photo-electro-chemical etching for silicon microchannel arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao; Duanmu, Qingduo; Yu, Feng-yuan; Liang, Yong-zhao; Chai, Jin; Wang, Guo-zheng; Yang, Ji-kai

    2013-08-01

    The application fields of high aspect ratio Si microchannel arrays have increased considerably, for example, Si microchannel plates, MEMS devices and so on. By the method of photo-electrochemical etching (PEC), Si microchannel arrays are prepared using n-Si wafer covered by anti-corrosion layers and initiation array pits. The dark current intensity curve of an n-type silicon wafer was presented in aqueous HF. The relationship among temperature, etching voltage and carrier transportation was presented. The influences of temperature and etching voltage on the surface morphology of silicon microchannel arrays were researched. The perfect Si microchannel arrays structure with the pore depth of 297 μm, the pore size of 3 μm and the aspect ratio of 99 was obtained by the method of reducing etching voltage gradually.

  20. Defects in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Cyrstals Revealed by Etch-Pit Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Hossian, A.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Cui, Y; Yang, G; James, R

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrated the distribution of defects in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors by revealing etch pits on the surfaces with a chemical-etching method and Te inclusions in the bulk of the crystals. The dislocation networks observed from etch pits on the crystals' surfaces were traced down within the bulk by removing the material layer by layer, followed by sequential Nakagawa etching. We also identified the etch pits corresponding to Te inclusions, and correlated them with grain boundaries and dislocation lines.