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Sample records for hydrogel encapsulated tumor

  1. Manipulation of a Single Circulating Tumor Cell Using Visualization of Hydrogel Encapsulation toward Single-Cell Whole-Genome Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Seita; Negishi, Ryo; Hosokawa, Masahito; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2016-07-19

    Genetic characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could guide the choice of therapies for individual patients and also facilitate the development of new drugs. We previously developed a CTC recovery system using a microcavity array, which demonstrated highly efficient CTC recovery based on differences in cell size and deformability. However, the CTC recovery system lacked an efficient cell manipulation tool suitable for subsequent genetic analysis. Here, we resolve this issue and present a simple and rapid manipulation method for single CTCs using a photopolymerized hydrogel, polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), which is useful for subsequent genetic analysis. First, PEGDA was introduced into the cells entrapped on the microcavity array. Then, excitation light was projected onto the target single cells for encapsulation of each CTC by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The encapsulated single CTCs could be visualized by the naked eye and easily handled with tweezers. The single CTCs were only partially encapsulated on the PEGDA hydrogel, which allowed for sufficient whole-genome amplification and accurate genotyping. Our proposed methodology is a valuable tool for the rapid and simple manipulation of single CTCs and is expected to become widely utilized for analyses of mammalian cells and microorganisms in addition to CTCs. PMID:27299849

  2. Nanocellulose-alginate hydrogel for cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsung; Lee, Dajung; Hyun, Jinho

    2015-02-13

    TEMPO-oxidized bacterial cellulose (TOBC)-sodium alginate (SA) composites were prepared to improve the properties of hydrogel for cell encapsulation. TOBC fibers were obtained using a TEMPO/NaBr/NaClO system at pH 10 and room temperature. The fibrillated TOBCs mixed with SA were cross-linked in the presence of Ca(2+) solution to form hydrogel composites. The compression strength and chemical stability of the TOBC/SA composites were increased compared with the SA hydrogel, which indicated that TOBC performed an important function in enhancing the structural, mechanical and chemical stability of the composites. Cells were successfully encapsulated in the TOBC/SA composites, and the viability of cells was investigated. TOBC/SA composites can be a potential candidate for cell encapsulation engineering. PMID:25458293

  3. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microstructures encapsulating living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, Won-Gun; Revzin, Alexander; Pishko, Michael V.

    2002-01-01

    We present an easy and effective method for the encapsulation of cells inside PEG-based hydrogel microstructures fabricated using photolithography. High-density arrays of three-dimensional microstructures were created on substrates using this method. Mammalian cells were encapsulated in cylindrical hydrogel microstructures of 600 and 50 micrometers in diameter or in cubic hydrogel structures in microfluidic channels. Reducing lateral dimension of the individual hydrogel microstructure to 50 micrometers allowed us to isolate 1-3 cells per microstructure. Viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable inside these hydrogels after encapsulation for up to 7 days.

  4. Tumor Growth Suppression Induced by Biomimetic Silk Fibroin Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Ribeiro, Viviana P; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Correia, Cristina; da Silva Morais, Alain; Sousa, Rui A; Reis, Rui M; Oliveira, Ana L; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Reis, Rui L

    2016-01-01

    Protein-based hydrogels with distinct conformations which enable encapsulation or differentiation of cells are of great interest in 3D cancer research models. Conformational changes may cause macroscopic shifts in the hydrogels, allowing for its use as biosensors and drug carriers. In depth knowledge on how 3D conformational changes in proteins may affect cell fate and tumor formation is required. Thus, this study reports an enzymatically crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel system that can undergo intrinsic conformation changes from random coil to β-sheet conformation. In random coil status, the SF hydrogels are transparent, elastic, and present ionic strength and pH stimuli-responses. The random coil hydrogels become β-sheet conformation after 10 days in vitro incubation and 14 days in vivo subcutaneous implantation in rat. When encapsulated with ATDC-5 cells, the random coil SF hydrogel promotes cell survival up to 7 days, whereas the subsequent β-sheet transition induces cell apoptosis in vitro. HeLa cells are further incorporated in SF hydrogels and the constructs are investigated in vitro and in an in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane model for tumor formation. In vivo, Angiogenesis and tumor formation are suppressed in SF hydrogels. Therefore, these hydrogels provide new insights for cancer research and uses of biomaterials. PMID:27485515

  5. Tumor Growth Suppression Induced by Biomimetic Silk Fibroin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Ribeiro, Viviana P.; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Correia, Cristina; da Silva Morais, Alain; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui M.; Oliveira, Ana L.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Reis, Rui L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-based hydrogels with distinct conformations which enable encapsulation or differentiation of cells are of great interest in 3D cancer research models. Conformational changes may cause macroscopic shifts in the hydrogels, allowing for its use as biosensors and drug carriers. In depth knowledge on how 3D conformational changes in proteins may affect cell fate and tumor formation is required. Thus, this study reports an enzymatically crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel system that can undergo intrinsic conformation changes from random coil to β-sheet conformation. In random coil status, the SF hydrogels are transparent, elastic, and present ionic strength and pH stimuli-responses. The random coil hydrogels become β-sheet conformation after 10 days in vitro incubation and 14 days in vivo subcutaneous implantation in rat. When encapsulated with ATDC-5 cells, the random coil SF hydrogel promotes cell survival up to 7 days, whereas the subsequent β-sheet transition induces cell apoptosis in vitro. HeLa cells are further incorporated in SF hydrogels and the constructs are investigated in vitro and in an in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane model for tumor formation. In vivo, Angiogenesis and tumor formation are suppressed in SF hydrogels. Therefore, these hydrogels provide new insights for cancer research and uses of biomaterials. PMID:27485515

  6. Microscale Strategies for Generating Cell-Encapsulating Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Selimović, Šeila; Oh, Jonghyun; Bae, Hojae; Dokmeci, Mehmet; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogels in which cells are encapsulated are of great potential interest for tissue engineering applications. These gels provide a structure inside which cells can spread and proliferate. Such structures benefit from controlled microarchitectures that can affect the behavior of the enclosed cells. Microfabrication-based techniques are emerging as powerful approaches to generate such cell-encapsulating hydrogel structures. In this paper we introduce common hydrogels and their crosslinking methods and review the latest microscale approaches for generation of cell containing gel particles. We specifically focus on microfluidics-based methods and on techniques such as micromolding and electrospinning. PMID:23626908

  7. Encapsulation of 10-hydroxy camptothecin in supramolecular hydrogel as an injectable drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixin; Shu, Chang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Hui; Xu, Danke; Zhong, Wenying

    2015-07-01

    10-Hydroxy camptothecin (HCPT) has been proven to be a cell cycle-specific chemotherapeutic agent, which is a necessary choice to inhibit tumor residue growth and prevent tumor metastasis after surgery. But it suffers from light decomposition, poor solubility, relatively low bioavailability, and some side effects, which are the major obstacles toward its clinical use. Integration of hydrophobic HCPT with hydrophilic hydrogel is a facile approach to change the disadvantageous situation of HCPT. In this study, a novel supramolecular hydrogelator with improved synthetic strategy was triggered by chemical hydrolysis, and then self-assembled to hydrogel. Taking advantage of the high-equilibrium solubility of HCPT in hydrogelator solution, this hydrogel was utilized to load HCPT via encapsulation as an effective carrier. HCPT hydrogels were characterized by several techniques including transmission electronic microscopy, rheology, and UV spectroscopy. In vitro release experiment indicated HCPT hydrogel could maintain long term and sustained release of HCPT at high accumulated rate. 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that HCPT hydrogel had an optimized anticancer efficacy. Besides, with prominent physical properties of carrier, HCPT hydrogel possessed satisfactory stability, syringeability, and recoverability, demonstrating itself as a potential localized injectable drug delivery system. PMID:25980666

  8. Peptide Hydrogelation and Cell Encapsulation for 3D Culture of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiuzhi S.; Nguyen, Thu A.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture plays an invaluable role in tumor biology by providing in vivo like microenviroment and responses to therapeutic agents. Among many established 3D scaffolds, hydrogels demonstrate a distinct property as matrics for 3D cell culture. Most of the existing pre-gel solutions are limited under physiological conditions such as undesirable pH or temperature. Here, we report a peptide hydrogel that shows superior physiological properties as an in vitro matrix for 3D cell culture. The 3D matrix can be accomplished by mixing a self-assembling peptide directly with a cell culture medium without any pH or temperature adjustment. Results of dynamic rheological studies showed that this hydrogel can be delivered multiple times via pipetting without permanently destroying the hydrogel architecture, indicating the deformability and remodeling ability of the hydrogel. Human epithelial cancer cells, MCF-7, are encapsulated homogeneously in the hydrogel matrix during hydrogelation. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture, cells residing in the hydrogel matrix grow as tumor-like clusters in 3D formation. Relevant parameters related to cell morphology, survival, proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed using MCF-7 cells in 3D hydrogels. Interestingly, treatment of cisplatin, an anti-cancer drug, can cause a significant decrease of cell viability of MCF-7 clusters in hydrogels. The responses to cisplatin were dose- and time-dependent, indicating the potential usage of hydrogels for drug testing. Results of confocal microscopy and Western blotting showed that cells isolated from hydrogels are suitable for downstream proteomic analysis. The results provided evidence that this peptide hydrogel is a promising 3D cell culture material for drug testing. PMID:23527204

  9. Hydrogel-encapsulated 3D microwell array for neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Jong Min; Chung, Bong Geun

    2016-02-01

    We developed a photo-crosslinkable hydrogel-encapsulated three-dimensional (3D) microwell array for studying embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neuronal differentiation. ES cells were cultured for 5 d in microwells and were subsequently encapsulated by photo-crosslinkable gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels for an additional 7 d. We observed that ES cells cultured in PEG microwells became uniform-sized embryoid bodies (EBs) compared to those in GelMA microwells. Although ES cells were encapsulated by photo-crosslinkable GelMA and PEG hydrogels, they were highly viable. We demonstrated that uniform-sized EBs encapsulated by GelMA hydrogels in PEG microwells are largely differentiated into neuronal cells. It was revealed that neurites at the periphery of EBs in PEG microwells largely extended into the interface between GelMA hydrogels and PEG microwells for generating neuronal networks. Therefore, this photo-crosslinkable GelMA hydrogel-encapsulated PEG microwell array could be a potentially powerful tool for neurodegenerative disease applications. PMID:26928882

  10. Cell Encapsulation in Biodegradable Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nicodemus, Garret D.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Encapsulating cells in biodegradable hydrogels offers numerous attractive features for tissue engineering, including ease of handling, a highly hydrated tissue-like environment for cell and tissue growth, and the ability to form in vivo. Many properties important to the design of a hydrogel scaffold, such as swelling, mechanical properties, degradation, and diffusion, are closely linked to the crosslinked structure of the hydrogel, which is controlled through a variety of different processing conditions. Degradation may be tuned by incorporating hydrolytically or enzymatically labile segments into the hydrogel or by using natural biopolymers that are susceptible to enzymatic degradation. Because cells are present during the gelation process, the number of suitable chemistries and formulations are limited. In this review, we describe important considerations for designing biodegradable hydrogels for cell encapsulation and highlight recent advances in material design and their applications in tissue engineering. PMID:18498217

  11. Photodegradable macromers and hydrogels for live cell encapsulation and release

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Donald R.; Kasko, Andrea M.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogel scaffolds are commonly used as 3D carriers for cells because their properties can be tailored to match natural extra-cellular matrix. Hydrogels may be used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to deliver therapeutic cells to injured or diseased tissue through controlled degradation. Hydrolysis and enzymolysis are the two most common mechanisms employed for hydrogel degradation, but neither allows sequential or staged release of cells. In contrast, photodegradation allows external real-time spatial and temporal control over hydrogel degradation, and allows for staged and sequential release of cells. We synthesized and characterized a series of macromers incorporating photodegradbale ortho-nitrobenzyl (o-NB) groups in the macromer backbone. We formed hydrogels from these macromers via redox polymerization and quantified the apparent rate constants of degradation (kapp) of each via photorheology at 370 nm, 10 mW/cm2. Decreasing the number of aryl ethers on the o-NB group increases kapp, and changing the functionality from primary to seconday at the benzylic site dramatically increases kapp. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) survive encapsulation in the hydrogels (90% viability post-encapsulation). By exploiting the differences in reactivity of two different o-NB linkers, we quantitatively demonstrate the biased release of one stem cell population (green-fluroescent protein expressing hMSCs) over another (red-fluorescent protein expressing hMSCs). PMID:22765384

  12. Fibrous Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation: A Modular and Supramolecular Approach.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk-Biegun, Małgorzata K; Farbod, Kambiz; Werten, Marc W T; Slingerland, Cornelis J; de Wolf, Frits A; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Kamperman, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Artificial 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems, which mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM), hold great potential as models to study cellular processes under controlled conditions. The natural ECM is a 3D structure composed of a fibrous hydrogel that provides both mechanical and biochemical cues to instruct cell behavior. Here we present an ECM-mimicking genetically engineered protein-based hydrogel as a 3D cell culture system that combines several key features: (1) Mild and straightforward encapsulation meters (1) ease of ut I am not so sure.encapsulation of the cells, without the need of an external crosslinker. (2) Supramolecular assembly resulting in a fibrous architecture that recapitulates some of the unique mechanical characteristics of the ECM, i.e. strain-stiffening and self-healing behavior. (3) A modular approach allowing controlled incorporation of the biochemical cue density (integrin binding RGD domains). We tested the gels by encapsulating MG-63 osteoblastic cells and found that encapsulated cells not only respond to higher RGD density, but also to overall gel concentration. Cells in 1% and 2% (weight fraction) protein gels showed spreading and proliferation, provided a relative RGD density of at least 50%. In contrast, in 4% gels very little spreading and proliferation occurred, even for a relative RGD density of 100%. The independent control over both mechanical and biochemical cues obtained in this modular approach renders our hydrogels suitable to study cellular responses under highly defined conditions. PMID:27223105

  13. Fibrous Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation: A Modular and Supramolecular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk-Biegun, Małgorzata K.; Farbod, Kambiz; Werten, Marc W. T.; Slingerland, Cornelis J.; de Wolf, Frits A.; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C. G.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Kamperman, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Artificial 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems, which mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM), hold great potential as models to study cellular processes under controlled conditions. The natural ECM is a 3D structure composed of a fibrous hydrogel that provides both mechanical and biochemical cues to instruct cell behavior. Here we present an ECM-mimicking genetically engineered protein-based hydrogel as a 3D cell culture system that combines several key features: (1) Mild and straightforward encapsulation meters (1) ease of ut I am not so sure.encapsulation of the cells, without the need of an external crosslinker. (2) Supramolecular assembly resulting in a fibrous architecture that recapitulates some of the unique mechanical characteristics of the ECM, i.e. strain-stiffening and self-healing behavior. (3) A modular approach allowing controlled incorporation of the biochemical cue density (integrin binding RGD domains). We tested the gels by encapsulating MG-63 osteoblastic cells and found that encapsulated cells not only respond to higher RGD density, but also to overall gel concentration. Cells in 1% and 2% (weight fraction) protein gels showed spreading and proliferation, provided a relative RGD density of at least 50%. In contrast, in 4% gels very little spreading and proliferation occurred, even for a relative RGD density of 100%. The independent control over both mechanical and biochemical cues obtained in this modular approach renders our hydrogels suitable to study cellular responses under highly defined conditions. PMID:27223105

  14. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Hydrogels for Cellular Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Jessica D; Stabler, Cherie L

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and the resulting radical by-products cause significant toxicity and graft loss in cellular transplantation. Here, the engineering of an auto-catalytic, antioxidant, self-renewing cerium oxide nanoparticle (CONP)-composite hydrogel is reported. This enzyme-mimetic material ubiquitously scavenges ambient free radicals, with the potential to provide indefinite antioxidant protection. Here, we evaluated the potential of this system to enhance the protection of encapsulated beta cells. Co-incubation of CONPs, free in solution with beta cells, demonstrated potent cytoprotection from superoxide exposure; however, phagocytosis of the CONPs by the beta cells resulted in cytotoxicity at concentrations as low as 1 mM. When CONPs were embedded within alginate hydrogels, the composite hydrogel provided cytoprotection to encapsulated beta cells from free radical attack without cytotoxicity, even up to 10 mM concentrations. This nanocomposite hydrogel has wide applicability in cellular transplantation, with the unique advantage of localization of these potent antioxidant CONPs and their capacity for sustained, long-term scavenging. PMID:25620795

  15. Cellular encapsulation in 3D hydrogels for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Khetan, Sudhir; Burdick, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The 3D encapsulation of cells within hydrogels represents an increasingly important and popular technique for culturing cells and towards the development of constructs for tissue engineering. This environment better mimics what cells observe in vivo, compared to standard tissue culture, due to the tissue-like properties and 3D environment. Synthetic polymeric hydrogels are water-swollen networks that can be designed to be stable or to degrade through hydrolysis or proteolysis as new tissue is deposited by encapsulated cells. A wide variety of polymers have been explored for these applications, such as poly(ethylene glycol) and hyaluronic acid. Most commonly, the polymer is functionalized with reactive groups such as methacrylates or acrylates capable of undergoing crosslinking through various mechanisms. In the past decade, much progress has been made in engineering these microenvironments - e.g., via the physical or pendant covalent incorporation of biochemical cues - to improve viability and direct cellular phenotype, including the differentiation of encapsulated stem cells (Burdick et al.). The following methods for the 3D encapsulation of cells have been optimized in our and other laboratories to maximize cytocompatibility and minimize the number of hydrogel processing steps. In the following protocols (see Figure 1 for an illustration of the procedure), it is assumed that functionalized polymers capable of undergoing crosslinking are already in hand; excellent reviews of polymer chemistry as applied to the field of tissue engineering may be found elsewhere (Burdick et al.) and these methods are compatible with a range of polymer types. Further, the Michael-type addition (see Lutolf et al.) and light-initiated free radical (see Elisseeff et al.) mechanisms focused on here constitute only a small portion of the reported crosslinking techniques. Mixed mode crosslinking, in which a portion of reactive groups is first consumed by addition crosslinking and followed

  16. Biocompatible Hydrogels for Microarray Cell Printing and Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Datar, Akshata; Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-12-01

    Conventional drug screening processes are a time-consuming and expensive endeavor, but highly rewarding when they are successful. To identify promising lead compounds, millions of compounds are traditionally screened against therapeutic targets on human cells grown on the surface of 96-wells. These two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayers are physiologically irrelevant, thus, often providing false-positive or false-negative results, when compared to cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) structures such as hydrogel droplets. However, 3D cell culture systems are not easily amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS), thus inherently low throughput, and requiring relatively large volume for cell-based assays. In addition, it is difficult to control cellular microenvironments and hard to obtain reliable cell images due to focus position and transparency issues. To overcome these problems, miniaturized 3D cell cultures in hydrogels were developed via cell printing techniques where cell spots in hydrogels can be arrayed on the surface of glass slides or plastic chips by microarray spotters and cultured in growth media to form cells encapsulated 3D droplets for various cell-based assays. These approaches can dramatically reduce assay volume, provide accurate control over cellular microenvironments, and allow us to obtain clear 3D cell images for high-content imaging (HCI). In this review, several hydrogels that are compatible to microarray printing robots are discussed for miniaturized 3D cell cultures. PMID:26516921

  17. Biocompatible Hydrogels for Microarray Cell Printing and Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Datar, Akshata; Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-01-01

    Conventional drug screening processes are a time-consuming and expensive endeavor, but highly rewarding when they are successful. To identify promising lead compounds, millions of compounds are traditionally screened against therapeutic targets on human cells grown on the surface of 96-wells. These two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayers are physiologically irrelevant, thus, often providing false-positive or false-negative results, when compared to cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) structures such as hydrogel droplets. However, 3D cell culture systems are not easily amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS), thus inherently low throughput, and requiring relatively large volume for cell-based assays. In addition, it is difficult to control cellular microenvironments and hard to obtain reliable cell images due to focus position and transparency issues. To overcome these problems, miniaturized 3D cell cultures in hydrogels were developed via cell printing techniques where cell spots in hydrogels can be arrayed on the surface of glass slides or plastic chips by microarray spotters and cultured in growth media to form cells encapsulated 3D droplets for various cell-based assays. These approaches can dramatically reduce assay volume, provide accurate control over cellular microenvironments, and allow us to obtain clear 3D cell images for high-content imaging (HCI). In this review, several hydrogels that are compatible to microarray printing robots are discussed for miniaturized 3D cell cultures. PMID:26516921

  18. Dextran-based hydrogel formed by thiol-Michael addition reaction for 3D cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen Qi; Wei, Zhao; Zhu, Xv Long; Huang, Guo You; Xu, Feng; Yang, Jian Hai; Osada, Yoshihito; Zrínyi, Miklós; Li, Jian Hui; Chen, Yong Mei

    2015-04-01

    Cell encapsulation in three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels can mimic native cell microenvironment and plays a major role in cell-based transplantation therapies. In this contribution, a novel in situ-forming hydrogel, Dex-l-DTT hydrogel ("l" means "linked-by"), by cross-linking glycidyl methacrylate derivatized dextran (Dex-GMA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) under physiological conditions, has been developed using thiol-Michael addition reaction. The mechanical properties, gelation process and degree of swelling of the hydrogel can be easily adjusted by changing the pH of phosphate buffer saline. The 3D cell encapsulation ability is demonstrated by encapsulating rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts into the in situ-forming hydrogel with maintained high viability. The BMSCs also maintain their differentiation potential after encapsulation. These results demonstrate that the Dex-l-DTT hydrogel holds great potential for biomedical field. PMID:25744162

  19. Biodegradable liposome-encapsulated hydrogels for biomedical applications: a marriage of convenience.

    PubMed

    Grijalvo, Santiago; Mayr, Judith; Eritja, Ramon; Díaz, David Díaz

    2016-04-22

    Hydrogels are hydrophilic three-dimensional networks with demonstrated potential for medical and pharmaceutical applications. Specifically, biopolymer-based hydrogels offer certain advantages over synthetic polymers in terms of biocompatibility and biodegradability. Because of their inherent properties, hydrogels are able to efficiently encapsulate and liberate in a controlled release manner, different hydrophobic and hydrophilic therapeutic molecules, including nucleic acids, proteins and antibodies. Several strategies have been reported in the literature to minimize the potential burst release of encapsulated drugs, thus preventing their local accumulation and consequent toxic responses. Within this context, liposomes embedded in hydrogels have emerged as an attractive strategy to reduce this undesirable effect. This tutorial review covers a selection of the most promising cationic, neutral and anionic biopolymer-based hydrogels containing liposomes, niosomes or vesicles for drug delivery or tissue engineering applications. PMID:26818789

  20. Synthesis of Gold Nanoflowers Encapsulated with Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bae, Saet-Byeol; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2015-10-01

    In this work, hydrogel-coated gold nanoflowers (AuNFs@hydrogel) were facilely prepared. First, gold nanoflowers (AuNFs) were synthesized by reducing gold acid with ascorbic acid in the presence of chitosan biopolymers, and the chitosan-mediated AuNFs were subsequently conjugated with oleic acid with carboxylate groups. Finally, the olefin-conjugated AuNFs were encapsulated with P(NIPAM-co-AAC) hydrogels via a radical polymerization reaction with co-monomer ratio of [NIPAM:AAc = 91:9 wt%]. The encapsulated hydrogels had a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) slightly above the physiological temperature and demonstrated a thermo-sensitive variation of particle size. The hydrogel-coated AuNFs can be utilized as a promising thermo-responsive drug delivery system with a unique optical property. As-prepared samples were characterized by DLS, SEM, TEM, UV-vis and Zeta potential meter. PMID:26726447

  1. Encapsulation of lactase (β-galactosidase) into κ-carrageenan-based hydrogel beads: Impact of environmental conditions on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zipei; Zhang, Ruojie; Chen, Long; McClements, David Julian

    2016-06-01

    Encapsulation of enzymes in hydrogel beads may improve their utilization and activity in foods. In this study, the potential of carrageenan hydrogel beads for encapsulating β-galactosidase was investigated. Hydrogel beads were fabricated by injecting an aqueous solution, containing β-galactosidase (26 U) and carrageenan (1 wt%), into a hardening solution (5% potassium chloride). Around 63% of the β-galactosidase was initially encapsulated in the hydrogel beads. Encapsulated β-galactosidase had a higher activity than that of the free enzyme over a range of pH and thermal conditions, which was attributed to the stabilization of the enzyme structure by K(+) ions within the carrageenan beads. Release of the enzyme from the beads was observed during storage in aqueous solutions, which was attributed to the relatively large pore size of the hydrogel matrix. Our results suggest that carrageenan hydrogel beads may be useful encapsulation systems, but further work is needed to inhibit enzyme leakage. PMID:26830562

  2. Cell-selective encapsulation in hydrogel sheaths via biospecific identification and biochemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Liu, Yang; Sengoku, Mikako; Taya, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Selective encapsulation of a particular cell population from heterogeneous cell populations has potential applications such as studies in cell-to-cell communication, regenerative medicine, and cell therapies. However, there are no versatile methods for realizing this. Here we report a method based on biospecific identification of the target cells through antigen-antibody reaction and subsequent enzymatic hydrogel sheath formation on the cell surfaces by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Human hepatoma cell line HepG2 cells were selectively encapsulated in alginate-based hydrogel sheath from the mixture with mouse embryo fibroblast-like cell line 10T1/2 fibroblasts using anti-human CD326 antibody conjugated with HRP. The viability of the encapsulated cells was 93%. The cells released at 6 days of the encapsulation by degrading the sheath using alginate lyase grew almost the same as those free from encapsulation. The versatility of the method was confirmed using another antibody, cells, and hydrogel sheath material: Only human vein endothelial cells were encapsulated in gelatin-based hydrogel sheath from the mixture with 10T1/2 fibroblasts using anti-human CD31 antibody conjugated with HRP. The cell-selective encapsulation was also achieved by a system using a primary antibody with a secondary antibody conjugated with HRP. PMID:25890746

  3. Encapsulated Hydrogels by E-beam Lithography and Their Use in Enzyme Cascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Rock J; Paluck, Samantha J; Bat, Erhan; Maynard, Heather D

    2016-04-26

    Electron beam (e-beam) lithography was employed to prepare one protein immobilized hydrogel encapsulated inside another by first fabricating protein-reactive hydrogels of orthogonal reactivity and subsequently conjugating the biomolecules. Exposure of thin films of eight arm star poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) functionalized with biotin (Biotin-PEG), alkyne (Alkyne-PEG) or aminooxy (AO-PEG) end-groups to e-beam radiation resulted in cross-linked hydrogels with the respective functionality. It was determined via confocal microscopy that a nominal size exclusion effect exists for streptavidin immobilized on Biotin-PEG hydrogels of feature sizes ranging from 5 to 40 μm. AO-PEG was subsequently patterned as an encapsulated core inside a contiguous outer shell of Biotin-PEG. Similarly, Alkyne-PEG was patterned as a core inside an AO-PEG shell. The hydrogel reactive end-groups were conjugated to dyes or proteins of complementary reactivity, and the three-dimensional (3-D) spatial orientation was determined for both configurations using confocal microscopy. The enzyme glucose oxidase (GOX) was immobilized in the core of the encapsulated Alkyne-PEG core/ AO-PEG shell architecture, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was conjugated to the shell periphery. Bioactivity for the HRP-GOX enzyme pair was observed in this encapsulated configuration by demonstrating that the enzyme pair was capable of enzyme cascade reactions. PMID:27078573

  4. Injectable and Self-Healing Carbohydrate-Based Hydrogel for Cell Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shaoyu; Gao, Chunmei; Xu, Xiubin; Bai, Xiao; Duan, Haogang; Gao, Nannan; Feng, Chen; Xiong, Yun; Liu, Mingzhu

    2015-06-17

    With the fast development of cell therapy, there has been a shift toward the development of injectable hydrogels as cell carriers that can overcome current limitations in cell therapy. However, the hydrogels are prone to damage during use, inducing cell apoptosis. Therefore, this study was carried out to develop an injectable and self-healing hydrogel based on chondroitin sulfate multiple aldehyde (CSMA) and N-succinyl-chitosan (SC). By varying the CSMA to SC ratio, the hydrogel stiffness, water content, and kinetics of gelation could be controlled. Gelation readily occurred at physiological conditions, predominantly due to a Schiff base reaction between the aldehyde groups on CSMA and amino groups on SC. Meanwhile, because of the dynamic equilibrium of Schiff base linkage, the hydrogel was found to be self-healing. Cells encapsulated in the hydrogel remained viable and metabolically active. In addition, the hydrogel produced minimal inflammatory response when injected subcutaneously in a rat model and showed biodegradability in vivo. This work establishes an injectable and self-healing hydrogel derived from carbohydrates with potential applications as a cell carrier and in tissue engineering. PMID:26016388

  5. Development of a hybrid dextrin hydrogel encapsulating dextrin nanogel as protein delivery system.

    PubMed

    Molinos, Maria; Carvalho, Vera; Silva, Dina M; Gama, Francisco M

    2012-02-13

    Dextrin, a glucose polymer with low molecular weight, was used to develop a fully resorbable hydrogel, without using chemical initiators. Dextrin was first oxidized (oDex) with sodium periodate and then cross-linked with adipic acid dihidrazide, a nontoxic cross-linking molecule. Furthermore, a new bidimensional composite hydrogel, made of oxidized dextrin incorporating dextrin nanogels (oDex-nanogel), was also developed. The oDex hydrogels showed good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, allowing the proliferation of mouse embryo fibroblasts 3T3 cultured on top of the gel. The gelation time may be controlled selecting the concentrations of the polymer and reticulating agent. Both the oDex and oDex-nanogel hydrogels are biodegradable and present a 3-D network with a continuous porous structure. The obtained hybrid hydrogel enables the release of the dextrin nanogel over an extended period of time, paralleling the mass loss curve due to the degradation of the material. The dextrin nanogel allowed the efficient incorporation of interleukin-10 and insulin in the oDex hydrogel, providing a sophisticated system of controlled release. The new hydrogels present promising properties as an injectable carrier of bioactive molecules. Both proteins and poorly water-soluble low-molecular-weight drugs are efficiently encapsulated in the nanogel, which performs as a controlled release system entrapped in the hydrogel matrix. PMID:22288730

  6. Fabrication of hydrogel-encapsulated silica core bound with chitosan chains for efficient drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeol Bae, Saet; Lee, Sang Wha

    2016-06-01

    In this study, hydrogel-encapsulated silica nanoparticles were facilely prepared through the following three consecutive steps: i) silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized via a sol–gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) with ammonium hydroxide, ii) the resulting SNPs were functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propylmethacrylate (TPM) ligand with an olefin group, and iii) the TPM-functionalized SNPs were encapsulated with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid), NIPAM-co-AAc hydrogels by using a radical polymerization reaction of the co-monomers at the following ratio: \\text{NIPAM}:\\text{AAc} = 91:9 wt %. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the encapsulated hydrogels with a moiety of carboxylic groups was slightly above physiological temperature and they demonstrated a thermo-sensitive variation of particle size. The hydrogel-encapsulated SNPs (SNPs@Hyd) were finally bound with chitosan chains, which are bio-friendly and non-toxic polymers. When compared to SNPs@Hyd, chitosan-coated SNPs@Hyd (SNPs@Hyd@Chi) exhibited prolonged drug (ibuprofen) release and stable structural integrity during the release test.

  7. Programmable Self-Assembly of DNA-Protein Hybrid Hydrogel for Enzyme Encapsulation with Enhanced Biological Stability.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lan; Chen, Qiaoshu; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Huang, Jin; Li, Li; Guo, Xi; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Kemin

    2016-04-11

    A DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel was constructed based on a programmable assembly approach, which served as a biomimetic physiologic matrix for efficient enzyme encapsulation. A dsDNA building block tailored with precise biotin residues was fabricated based on supersandwich hybridization, and then the addition of streptavidin triggered the formation of the DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel. The biocompatible hydrogel, which formed a flower-like porous structure that was 6.7 ± 2.1 μm in size, served as a reservoir system for enzyme encapsulation. Alcohol oxidase (AOx), which served as a representative enzyme, was encapsulated in the hybrid hydrogel using a synchronous assembly approach. The enzyme-encapsulated hydrogel was utilized to extend the duration time for ethanol removal in serum plasma and the enzyme retained 78% activity after incubation with human serum for 24 h. The DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel can mediate the intact immobilization on a streptavidin-modified and positively charged substrate, which is very beneficial to solid-phase biosensing applications. The hydrogel-encapsulated enzyme exhibited improved stability in the presence of various denaturants. For example, the encapsulated enzyme retained 60% activity after incubation at 55 °C for 30 min. The encapsulated enzyme also retains its total activity after five freeze-thaw cycles and even suspended in solution containing organic solvents. PMID:27008186

  8. Developing robust, hydrogel-based, nanofiber-enabled encapsulation devices (NEEDs) for cell therapies.

    PubMed

    An, Duo; Ji, Yewei; Chiu, Alan; Lu, Yen-Chun; Song, Wei; Zhai, Lei; Qi, Ling; Luo, Dan; Ma, Minglin

    2015-01-01

    Cell encapsulation holds enormous potential to treat a number of hormone deficient diseases and endocrine disorders. We report a simple and universal approach to fabricate robust, hydrogel-based, nanofiber-enabled encapsulation devices (NEEDs) with macroscopic dimensions. In this design, we take advantage of the well-known capillary action that holds wetting liquid in porous media. By impregnating the highly porous electrospun nanofiber membranes of pre-made tubular or planar devices with hydrogel precursor solutions and subsequent crosslinking, we obtained various nanofiber-enabled hydrogel devices. This approach is broadly applicable and does not alter the water content or the intrinsic chemistry of the hydrogels. The devices retained the properties of both the hydrogel (e.g. the biocompatibility) and the nanofibers (e.g. the mechanical robustness). The facile mass transfer was confirmed by encapsulation and culture of different types of cells. Additional compartmentalization of the devices enabled paracrine cell co-cultures in single implantable devices. Lastly, we provided a proof-of-concept study on potential therapeutic applications of the devices by encapsulating and delivering rat pancreatic islets into chemically-induced diabetic mice. The diabetes was corrected for the duration of the experiment (8 weeks) before the implants were retrieved. The retrieved devices showed minimal fibrosis and as expected, live and functional islets were observed within the devices. This study suggests that the design concept of NEEDs may potentially help to overcome some of the challenges in the cell encapsulation field and therefore contribute to the development of cell therapies in future. PMID:25453936

  9. Time-Dependent Effect of Encapsulating Alginate Hydrogel on Neurogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Khosravizadeh, Zahra; Bahramian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective Due to the restricted potential of neural stem cells for regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) after injury, providing an alternative source for neural stem cells is essential. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent cells with properties suitable for tissue engineering. In addition, alginate hydrogel is a biocompatible polysaccharide polymer that has been used to encapsulate many types of cells. The aim of this study was to assess the proliferation rate and level of expression of neural markers; NESTIN, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in encapsulated human ADSCs (hADSCs) 10 and14 days after neural induction. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, ADSCs isolated from human were cultured in neural induction media and seeded into alginate hydrogel. The rate of proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated cells were evaluated by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, immunocytoflourescent and realtime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyzes 10 and 14 days after induction. Results The rate of proliferation of encapsulated cells was not significantly changed with time passage. The expression of NESTIN and GFAP significantly decreased on day 14 relative to day 10 (P<0.001) but MAP2 expression was increased. Conclusion Alginate hydrogel can promote the neural differentiation of encapsulated hADSCs with time passage. PMID:26199909

  10. Hydrophobic Drug Encapsulation Mechanisms of an Injectable Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jessie E. P.; Schneider, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.

    2012-02-01

    We examined a beta-hairpin peptide network that is a shear thinning injectable solid with immediate rehealing behavior. These rheological properties result from the entangled and branched fibrillar nanostructure of the hydrogel networks. The fibrils are formed by the intramolecular folding and subsequent intermolecular assembly of the self-assembling peptides. Taking advantage of the nanofibrillar peptide structures, the hydrogel can be used to encapsulate curcumin, a hydrophobic, natural anticancer agent and indian spice. The hydrogel shields curcumin from the environment while depositing it exactly where it is intended through syringe injection, taking advantage of the hydrogel shear thinning and rehealing behavior. How the network envelopes and interacts with the curcumin is examined using fluoresence and electron microscopy methods to better understand the exact mechanisms and behaviors of the gel itself and the gel-curcumin construct.

  11. In-situ formation of growth-factor-loaded coacervate microparticle-embedded hydrogels for directing encapsulated stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Oju; Wolfson, David W; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-04-01

    The spontaneous formation of coacervate microdroplet-laden photo-crosslinked hydrogels derived from the simple mixing of oxidized, methacrylated alginate (OMA) and methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) enables simultaneous creation of drug-laden microdroplets and encapsulation of stem cells in photopolymerized coacervate hydrogels under physiological conditions. This can be utilized as a novel platform for in situ formation of localized, sustained bioactive molecule delivery to encapsulate stem cells for therapeutic applications. PMID:25708428

  12. Cell compatible encapsulation of filaments into 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Katharina S U; Gorkin, Robert; Beirne, Stephen; Stewart, Elise; Thompson, Brianna C; Quigley, Anita F; Kapsa, Robert M I; Wallace, Gordon G

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds for nerve regeneration, or artificial nerve conduits, are particularly challenging due to the high level of complexity the structure of the nerve presents. The list of requirements for artificial nerve conduits is long and includes the ability to physically guide nerve growth using physical and chemical cues as well as electrical stimulation. Combining these characteristics into a conduit, while maintaining biocompatibility and biodegradability, has not been satisfactorily achieved by currently employed fabrication techniques. Here we present a method combining pultrusion and wet-spinning techniques facilitating incorporation of pre-formed filaments into ionically crosslinkable hydrogels. This new biofabrication technique allows the incorporation of conducting or drug-laden filaments, controlled guidance channels and living cells into hydrogels, creating new improved conduit designs. PMID:27213861

  13. Impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in a paper-based microchamber.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-15

    Recently, 3D cell culture technique was proposed to provide a more physiologically-meaningful environment for cell-based assays. With the development of microfluidics technology, cellular response can be quantified by impedance measurement technique in a real-time and non-invasive manner. However, handling of these microfluidic systems requires a trained engineering personnel and the operation is not compatible to traditional biological research laboratories. In this work, we incorporated the impedance measurement technique to paper-based 3D cell culture model and demonstrated non-invasive quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel during the culture course. A cellulose filter paper was patterned with an array of circular microchambers. Cells were encapsulated in hydrogel and loaded to the microchambers for culturing cells in 3D environment. At the preset schedule during the culture course, the paper was placed on a glass substrate with measurement electrodes for the impedance measurement. Cells in each microchamber was represented by impedance magnitude and cell proliferation could be studied over time. Also, conventional bio-assay was performed to further confirm the feasibility of the impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in the paper-based microchamber. This technique provides a convenient, fast, and non-invasive approach to monitor cells cultured in 3D environment. It has potential to be developed for routine 3D cell culture protocol in biological research laboratories. PMID:26592655

  14. Protein-Engineered Hydrogel Encapsulation for 3-D Culture of Murine Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David T.; Chai, Renjie; DiMarco, Rebecca; Heilshorn, Sarah C.; Cheng, Alan G.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis Elastin-like protein (ELP) hydrogel helps maintain the three-dimensional (3-D) cochlear structure in culture. Background Whole-organ culture of the cochlea is a useful model system facilitating manipulation and analysis of live sensory cells and surrounding nonsensory cells. The precisely organized 3-D cochlear structure demands a culture method that preserves this delicate architecture; however, current methods have not been optimized to serve such a purpose. Methods A protein-engineered ELP hydrogel was used to encapsulate organ of Corti isolated from neonatal mice. Cultured cochleae were immunostained for markers of hair cells and supporting cells. Organ of Corti hair cell and supporting cell density and organ dimensions were compared between the ELP and nonencapsulated systems. These culture systems were then compared with noncultured cochlea. Results After 3 days in vitro, vital dye uptake and immunostaining for sensory and nonsensory cells show that encapsulated cochlea contain viable cells with an organized architecture. In comparison with nonencapsulated cultured cochlea, ELP-encapsulated cochleae exhibit higher densities of hair cells and supporting cells and taller and narrower organ of Corti dimensions that more closely resemble those of noncultured cochleae. However, we found compromised cell viability when the culture period extended beyond 3 days. Conclusion We conclude that the ELP hydrogel can help preserve the 3-D architecture of neonatal cochlea in short-term culture, which may be applicable to in vitro study of the physiology and pathophysiology of the inner ear. PMID:25111520

  15. Photoclick Hydrogels Prepared from Functionalized Cyclodextrin and Poly(ethylene glycol) for Drug Delivery and in Situ Cell Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2015-07-13

    Polymers or hydrogels containing modified cyclodextrin (CD) are highly useful in drug delivery applications, as CD is a cytocompatible amphiphilic molecule that can complex with a variety of hydrophobic drugs. Here, we designed modular photoclick thiol-ene hydrogels from derivatives of βCD and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), including βCD-allylether (βCD-AE), βCD-thiol (βCD-SH), PEG-thiol (PEGSH), and PEG-norbornene (PEGNB). Two types of CD-PEG hybrid hydrogels were prepared using radical-mediated thiol-ene photoclick reactions. Specifically, thiol-allylether hydrogels were formed by reacting multiarm PEGSH and βCD-AE, and thiol-norbornene hydrogels were formed by cross-linking βCD-SH and multiarm PEGNB. We characterized the properties of these two types of thiol-ene hydrogels, including gelation kinetics, gel fractions, hydrolytic stability, and cytocompatibility. Compared with thiol-allylether hydrogels, thiol-norbornene photoclick reaction formed hydrogels with faster gelation kinetics at equivalent macromer contents. Using curcumin, an anti-inflammatory and anticancer hydrophobic molecule, we demonstrated that CD-cross-linked PEG-based hydrogels, when compared with pure PEG-based hydrogels, afforded higher drug loading efficiency and prolonged delivery in vitro. Cytocompatibility of these CD-cross-linked hydrogels were evaluated by in situ encapsulation of radical sensitive pancreatic MIN6 β-cells. All formulations and cross-linking conditions tested were cytocompatible for cell encapsulation. Furthermore, hydrogels cross-linked by βCD-SH showed enhanced cell proliferation and insulin secretion as compared to gels cross-linked by either dithiothreitol (DTT) or βCD-AE, suggesting the profound impact of both macromer compositions and gelation chemistry on cell fate in chemically cross-linked hydrogels. PMID:25996903

  16. Thermoresponsive, in situ crosslinkable hydrogels based on N-isopropylacrylamide: Fabrication, characterization and mesenchymal stem cell encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Klouda, Leda; Perkins, Kevin R.; Watson, Brendan M.; Hacker, Michael C.; Bryant, Stephanie J.; Raphael, Robert M.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogels that solidify in response to a dual, physical and chemical, mechanism upon temperature increase were fabricated and characterized. The hydrogels were based on N-isopropylacrylamide, which renders them thermoresponsive, and contained covalently crosslinkable moieties in the macromers. The effects of the macromer end group, namely acrylate or methacrylate, and the fabrication conditions were investigated on the degradative and swelling properties of the hydrogels. The hydrogels exhibited higher swelling below their lower critical solution temperature (LCST). When immersed in cell culture media at physiological temperature, which was above their LCST, hydrogels showed constant swelling and no degradation over eight weeks, with methacrylated hydrogels having higher swelling than their acrylated analogs. In addition, hydrogels immersed in cell culture media under the same conditions showed lower swelling as compared to phosphate buffered saline. The interplay between chemical crosslinking and thermally induced phase separation affected the swelling characteristics of hydrogels in different media. Mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in the hydrogels in vitro were viable over three weeks and markers of osteogenic differentiation were detected when the cells were cultured with osteogenic supplements. Hydrogel mineralization in the absence of cells was observed in cell culture medium with the addition of fetal bovine serum and β-glycerol phosphate. The results suggest that these hydrogels may be suitable as carriers for cell delivery in tissue engineering. PMID:21187170

  17. Impact of Nanotopography, Heparin Hydrogel Microstructures, and Encapsulated Fibroblasts on Phenotype of Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocytes, the main epithelial cell type in the liver, perform most of the biochemical functions of the liver. Thus, maintenance of a primary hepatocyte phenotype is crucial for investigations of in vitro drug metabolism, toxicity, and development of bioartificial liver constructs. Here, we report the impact of topographic cues alone and in combination with soluble signals provided by encapsulated feeder cells on maintenance of the primary hepatocyte phenotype. Topographic features were 300 nm deep with pitches of either 400, 1400, or 4000 nm. Hepatocyte cell attachment, morphology and function were markedly better on 400 nm pitch patterns compared with larger scale topographies or planar substrates. Interestingly, topographic features having biomimetic size scale dramatically increased cell adhesion whether or not substrates had been precoated with collagen I. Albumin production in primary hepatocytes cultured on 400 nm pitch substrates without collagen I was maintained over 10 days and was considerably higher compared to albumin synthesis on collagen-coated flat substrates. In order to investigate the potential interaction of soluble cytoactive factors supplied by feeder cells with topographic cues in determining cell phenotype, bioactive heparin-containing hydrogel microstructures were molded (100 μm spacing, 100 μm width) over the surface of the topographically patterned substrates. These hydrogel microstructures either carried encapsulated fibroblasts or were free of cells. Hepatocytes cultured on nanopatterned substrates next to fibroblast carrying hydrogel microstructures were significantly more functional than hepatocytes cultured on nanopatterned surfaces without hydrogels or stromal cells significantly elevated albumin expression and cell junction formation compared to cells provided with topographic cues only. The simultaneous presentation of topographic biomechanical cues along with soluble signaling molecules provided by encapsulated fibroblasts

  18. A mild strategy to encapsulate enzyme into hydrogel layer grafted on polymeric substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xing; Ma, Yuhong; Zhao, Changwen; Lin, Zhifeng; Zhang, Lihua; Chen, Ruichao; Yang, Wantai

    2014-12-23

    Although the hydrogel network has been widely investigated as a carrier for enzyme immobilization, to in situ encapsulate enzymes into a hydrogel network in an efficient, practical, and active way is still one of the great challenges in the field of biochemical engineering. Here, we report a new protocol to address this issue by encapsulating enzyme into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network grafted on polymeric substrates. In our strategy, isopropyl thioxanthone semipinacol (ITXSP) dormant groups were first planted onto the surface of a plastic matrix with low density polyethylene (LDPE) film as a model by a UV-induced abstracting hydrogen-coupling reaction. As a proof of concept, lipase, which could catalyze esterification of glucose with palmitic acid, then was in situ net-immobilized into a PEG-based hydrogel network layer through a visible light-induced surface controlled/living graft cross-linking polymerization. This strategy demonstrates the following novel significant merits: (1) in comparison with the UV irradiation or high temperature, the visible light and room temperature used provide a friendly condition to maintain activity of enzyme during immobilization; (2) the uniqueness of controlled/living cross-linking polymerization not only makes it easy to form a uniform PEG hydrogel network, which is a benefit to avoid the leakage of net-immobilizing enzyme, but also to tune the net-thickness or capacity to accommodate enzyme; and (3) as compared to systems of nanoparticles and porous matrixes, the flexible/robust end-products of the surface net-immobilizing enzyme with polymer film are more suitable to be applied in a bioreactor due to their features of easier separation and reuse. We confirmed that this catalytic film could retain almost all of its initial activity after seven batches of 24 h esterifications. The proposed strategy provides an extremely simple, effective, and flexible method for enzyme immobilization. PMID:25489918

  19. Hydrogel Encapsulation of Cells in Core-Shell Microcapsules for Cell Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy Khiem; Son, Young Min; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2015-07-15

    A newly designed 3D core-shell microcapsule structure composed of a cell-containing liquid core and an alginate hydrogel shell is fabricated using a coaxial dual-nozzle electrospinning system. Spherical alginate microcapsules are successfully generated with a core-shell structure and less than 300 μm in average diameter using this system. The thickness of the core and shell can be easily controlled by manipulating the core and shell flow rates. Cells encapsulated in core-shell microcapsules demonstrate better cell encapsulation and immune protection than those encapsulated in microbeads. The observation of a high percentage of live cells (≈80%) after encapsulation demonstrates that the voltage applied for generation of microcapsules does not significantly affect the viability of encapsulated cells. The viability of encapsulated cells does not change even after 3 d in culture, which suggests that the core-shell structure with culture medium in the core can maintain high cell survival by providing nutrients and oxygen to all cells. This newly designed core-shell structure can be extended to use in multifunctional platforms not only for delivery of cells but also for factor delivery, imaging, or diagnosis by loading other components in the core or shell. PMID:25963828

  20. Encapsulation of liver microsomes into a thermosensitive hydrogel for characterization of drug metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiying; Zheng, Yuanting; Zhao, Bei; Shao, Tengfei; Shi, Qingling; Zhou, Ning; Cai, Weimin

    2013-12-01

    This study reported the encapsulation of liver microsomes into a thermosensitive hydrogel to characterize drug metabolism and predict drug effects. Pluronic(®)F-127 (F127) and acrylamide-bisacrylamide (Acr-Bis) were utilized as the two precursors. After chemical crosslinking catalyzed by ammonium persulfate (APS) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED), the resulting Pluronic F127-acrylamide-bisacrylamide (FAB) hydrogel could encapsulate microsomes at 4 °C and facilitate metabolic reactions at 37 °C. The gel morphology at different Acr-Bis concentrations was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Higher concentrations of Acr-Bis could lead to higher degrees of cross-linking of the gel. A fluorescent staining assay was subsequently used to demonstrate successful encapsulation of microsomes into the gel as well as the free diffusion process of micromolecular substrates. The thermosensitivity of the FAB gel was studied using swelling ratio and protein release assay to verify its ability to encapsulate microsomes. The metabolic activity of microsomes encapsulated in gels was investigated by detecting the metabolites of FDA-approved substrates, including dextromethorphan, chlorzoxazone and testosterone. Compared with the traditional method of microsomal incubation, the FAB gel maintained 60%-70% of microsome activity. Lastly, the classic anticancer prodrug cyclophosphamide (CTX) was chosen as a model drug for the study of drug metabolism and the prediction of drug effects. When the microsomes encapsulated in the FAB gel were used in the cell culture system, CTX induced a higher level of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells compared with traditional microsomes. PMID:24075480

  1. Long-term theranostic hydrogel system for solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Il; Lee, Beom Suk; Chun, Changju; Cho, Jung-Kyo; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Song, Soo-Chang

    2012-03-01

    The long-term theranostic hydrogel system for solid tumors was prepared via simple physical mixing, which consisted of three major parts: the thermosensitive/biodegradable poly(organophosphazene) hydrogel, PEGylated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, and paclitaxel (PTX). The PEGylated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles showed extremely low cytotoxicity due to the surface modification using PEG chains. The long-term theranostic hydrogel system showed adequate properties to be used for long-term MR theragnosis. In particular, the theranostic hydrogel gradually degraded over 28 days, and the PTX was sustainedly released out from the theranostic hydrogel over the same period in vitro. Furthermore, the in vivo efficacy of long-term MR theragnosis using the theranostic hydrogel system was estimated successfully over 3 weeks by using high field (4.7 T) animal MRI and solid tumor-bearing mice. Based on our results, we expect that this system can supply multiple data regarding a) the progress of therapy and b) the treatment processes via one- or two-time i.t. administration for cases in which surgical approaches are difficult to apply. Meanwhile, cancer patients can be free from the pain of multiple surgical treatments and have the advantage of therapy through a simple i.t. administration. PMID:22189146

  2. In vivo triarylmethyl radical stabilization through encapsulation in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Kahina; Boutier-Pischon, Audrey; Auger, Florian; Françon, Dominique; Almario, Antonio; Frapart, Yves-Michel

    2016-09-01

    In vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging and spectroscopy are non-invasive technologies used to specifically detect and quantify paramagnetic species. However, the relative instability of spin probes such as triarylmethyl radicals limits their application to conduct oxygen quantification and mapping. In this study we encapsulated tetrathiatriarylmethyl radical (TAM; known as "Finland" probe) in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel (PF-127) in order to limit its degradation and evaluate its in vitro and in vivo EPR properties as a function of oxygen. Our results show that the EPR signal of encapsulated TAM in PF-127 hydrogel is similar to the one in solution. Although it is less sensitive to oxygen, it is suitable for oximetry. We also demonstrated that the incorporation of TAM in PF-127 hydrogel leads to an improved in vivo EPR stability of the radical under anesthesia. This new formulation enables high quality EPR imaging and oximetry and paves the way for the application of TAM radical-based probes in various biomedical fields.

  3. Nanofibrous Microposts and Microwells of Controlled Shapes and Their Hybridization with Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A simple, robust, and cost-effective method is developed to fabricate nanofibrous micropatterns particularly microposts and microwells of controlled shapes. The key to this method is the use of an easily micropatternable and intrinsically conductive metal alloy as a template to collect electrospun fibers. The micropatterned alloy allows conformal fiber deposition with high fidelity on its topographical features and in situ formation of diverse, free-standing micropatterned nanofibrous membranes. Interestingly, these membranes can serve as structural frames to form robust hydrogel micropatterns that may otherwise be fragile on their own. These hybrid micropatterns represent a new platform for cell encapsulation where the nanofiber frames enhance the mechanical integrity of hydrogel and the micropatterns provide additional surface area for mass transfer and cell loading. PMID:24806031

  4. Disruption of Cell-Cell Contact-mediated Notch Signaling via Hydrogel Encapsulation Reduces Mesenchymal Stem Cell Chondrogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Amanda X.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Chen, Caressa S.; Shubin, Andrew D.; Reynolds, Daniel S.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell contact-mediated Notch signaling is essential for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis during development. However, subsequent deactivation of Notch signaling is also required to allow for stem cell chondrogenic progression. Recent literature has shown that Notch signaling can also influence Wnt/β-catenin signaling, critical for MSC differentiation, through perturbations in cell-cell contacts. Traditionally, abundant cell-cell contacts, consistent with development, are emulated in vitro using pellet cultures for chondrogenesis. However, cells are often encapsulated within biomaterials-based scaffolds, such as hydrogels, to improve therapeutic cell localization in vivo. To explore the role of Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the context of hydrogel-encapsulated MSC chondrogenesis, we compared signaling and differentiation capacity of MSCs in both hydrogels and traditional pellet cultures. We demonstrate that encapsulation within poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels reduces cell-cell contacts, and both Notch (7.5-fold) and Wnt/β-catenin (84.7-fold) pathway activation. Finally, we demonstrate that following establishment of cell-cell contacts and transient Notch signaling in pellet cultures, followed by Notch signaling deactivation, resulted in a 1.5-fold increase in MSC chondrogenesis. Taken together, these findings support that cellular condensation, and the establishment of initial cell-cell contacts is critical for MSC chondrogenesis, and this process is inhibited by hydrogel encapsulation. PMID:25504509

  5. Injectable hydrogel as cell carriers: Mechanism of beta-hairpin peptide hydrogel shear thinning, immediate recovery and effects on encapsulated cell payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Congqi

    To facilitate future biomedical treatment with localized delivery and higher therapy efficacy, much research effort has been devoted recently to the development of hydrogel biomaterials to transport a therapy to in vivo target sites via simple syringe or catheter injection. Most injectable hydrogel materials are free flowing precursor solutions ex vivo that become crosslinked into hydrogels once injected in vivo in response to exposure to environmental stimuli. However, properties of the final hydrogel formed in vivo are unpredictable due to possible leakage, dilution or change of injected gel precursor solution. As an alternate, more recent strategy for injectable hydrogel therapies, beta-hairpin peptide-based hydrogels are a class of injectable hydrogel solids with significant potential use in injectable therapies. These physical hydrogels can shear-thin and consequently flow as a low-viscosity material under a sufficient shear stress but immediately recover back into a solid upon removal of the stress, allowing them to be injected as preformed gel solids. The shear-thinning and immediate self-healing properties of self-assembled beta-hairpin peptide hydrogels enable a direct delivery of gel-encapsulated cells via benign injection to tissue defect sites with well-defined final gel properties in vivo. In this dissertation, mechanisms of gel shear-thinning and immediate recovery were elucidated by investigating gel behavior during and after flow via mechanical and structural characterizations. All studied beta-hairpin hydrogels shear-thin during flow (gel network fracture into large hydrogel domains) and instantly recover after cessation of flow (gel domains are percolated which immediately reforms the solid hydrogel). Importantly, hydrogel flow behavior was further studied in a capillary geometry that mimicked the actual situation of syringe injection. It was observed that all beta-hairpin peptide hydrogels investigated displayed a promising flow profile for

  6. Phospholipid fatty acids as physiological indicators of Paracoccus denitrificans encapsulated in silica sol-gel hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Trögl, Josef; Jirková, Ivana; Kuráň, Pavel; Akhmetshina, Elmira; Brovdyová, Taťjána; Sirotkin, Alexander; Kirilina, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) content was determined in samples of Paracoccus denitrificans encapsulated in silica hydrogel films prepared from prepolymerized tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). Immediately after encapsulation the total PLFA concentration was linearly proportional to the optical density (600 nm) of the input microbial suspension (R2 = 0.99). After 7 days this relationship remained linear, but with significantly decreased slope, indicating a higher extinction of bacteria in suspensions of input concentration 108 cells/mL and higher. trans-Fatty acids, indicators of cytoplasmatic membrane disturbances, were below the detection limit. The cy/pre ratio (i.e., ratio of cyclopropylated fatty acids (cy17:0 + cy19:0) to their metabolic precursors (16:1ω7 + 18:1ω7)), an indicator of the transition of the culture to a stationary growth-phase, decreased depending on co-immobilization of nutrients in the order phosphate buffer > mineral medium > Luria Broth rich medium. The ratio, too, was logarithmically proportional to cell concentration. These results confirm the applicability of total PLFA as an indicator for the determination of living biomass and cy/pre ratio for determination of nutrient limitation of microorganisms encapsulated in sol-gel matrices. This may be of interest for monitoring of sol-gel encapsulated bacteria proposed as optical recognition elements in biosensor construction, as well as other biotechnological applications. PMID:25690547

  7. Phospholipid Fatty Acids as Physiological Indicators of Paracoccus denitrificans Encapsulated in Silica Sol-Gel Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Trögl, Josef; Jirková, Ivana; Kuráň, Pavel; Akhmetshina, Elmira; Brovdyová, Tat′jána; Sirotkin, Alexander; Kirilina, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) content was determined in samples of Paracoccus denitrificans encapsulated in silica hydrogel films prepared from prepolymerized tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). Immediately after encapsulation the total PLFA concentration was linearly proportional to the optical density (600 nm) of the input microbial suspension (R2 = 0.99). After 7 days this relationship remained linear, but with significantly decreased slope, indicating a higher extinction of bacteria in suspensions of input concentration 108 cells/mL and higher. trans-Fatty acids, indicators of cytoplasmatic membrane disturbances, were below the detection limit. The cy/pre ratio (i.e., ratio of cyclopropylated fatty acids (cy17:0 + cy19:0) to their metabolic precursors (16:1ω7 + 18:1ω7)), an indicator of the transition of the culture to a stationary growth-phase, decreased depending on co-immobilization of nutrients in the order phosphate buffer > mineral medium > Luria Broth rich medium. The ratio, too, was logarithmically proportional to cell concentration. These results confirm the applicability of total PLFA as an indicator for the determination of living biomass and cy/pre ratio for determination of nutrient limitation of microorganisms encapsulated in sol-gel matrices. This may be of interest for monitoring of sol-gel encapsulated bacteria proposed as optical recognition elements in biosensor construction, as well as other biotechnological applications. PMID:25690547

  8. Hydrogels of sodium alginate in cationic surfactants: Surfactant dependent modulation of encapsulation/release toward Ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Suraya; Chat, Oyais Ahmad; Maswal, Masrat; Ashraf, Uzma; Rather, Ghulam Mohammad; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-11-20

    The interaction of cetyltrimethylammoium bromide (CTAB) and its gemini homologue (butanediyl-1,4-bis (dimethylcetylammonium bromide), 16-4-16 with biocompatible polymer sodium alginate (SA) has been investigated in aqueous medium. Addition of K2CO3 influences viscoelastic properties of surfactant impregnated SA via competition between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Viscosity of these polymer-surfactant systems increases with increase in concentration of K2CO3, and a cryogel is formed at about 0.5M K2CO3 concentration. The thermal stability of gel (5% SA+0.5M K2CO3) decreases with increase in surfactant concentration, a minimum is observed with increase in 16-4-16 concentration. The impact of surfactant addition on the alginate structure vis-à-vis its drug loading capability and release thereof was studied using Ibuprofen (IBU) as the model drug. The hydrogel with 16-4-16 exhibits higher IBU encapsulation and faster release in comparison to the one containing CTAB. This higher encapsulation-cum-faster release capability has been related to micelle mediated solubilization and greater porosity of the hydrogel with gemini surfactant. PMID:26344266

  9. Vibration Stimulates Vocal Mucosa-like Matrix Expression by Hydrogel-encapsulated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kutty, Jaishankar K.; Webb, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The composition and organization of the vocal fold extracellular matrix (ECM) provide the viscoelastic mechanical properties that are required to sustain high frequency vibration during voice production. Although vocal injury and pathology are known to produce alterations in matrix physiology, the mechanisms responsible for the development and maintenance of vocal fold ECM are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of physiologically-relevant vibratory stimulation on ECM gene expression and synthesis by fibroblasts encapsulated within hyaluronic acid hydrogels that approximate the viscoelastic properties of vocal mucosa. Relative to static controls, samples exposed to vibration exhibited significant increases in mRNA expression levels of HA synthase 2, decorin, fibromodulin, and MMP-1, while collagen and elastin expression were relatively unchanged. Expression levels exhibited a temporal response, with maximum increases observed after 3 and 5 days of vibratory stimulation and significant downregulation observed at 10 days. Quantitative assays of matrix accumulation confirmed significant increases in sulfated glycosaminoglycans and significant decreases in collagen after 5 and 10 days of vibratory culture relative to static controls. Cellular remodeling and hydrogel viscosity were affected by vibratory stimulation and were influenced by varying the encapsulated cell density. These results indicate that vibration is a critical epigenetic factor regulating vocal fold ECM and suggest that rapid restoration of the phonatory microenvironment may provide a basis for reducing vocal scarring, restoring native matrix composition, and improving vocal quality. PMID:19842110

  10. Hydrogel-encapsulated soil: A tool to measure contaminant attenuation in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Scott C; Spalding, Brian Patrick; Watson, David B

    2010-01-01

    After intervals of groundwater immersion, polyacrylamide hydrogel-encapsulated solid specimens were retrieved, assayed non-destructively for uranium and other elements using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and replaced in groundwater for continued reaction. Desorption dynamics of uranium from contaminated soils and other solids, when moved to uncontaminated groundwater, were fit to a general two-component kinetic retention model with slow-release and fast-release fractions of the total uranium. In a group of Oak Ridge soils with varying ambient uranium contamination (169-1360 mg/kg), the uranium fraction retained under long-term in situ kinetic behavior was strongly correlated (r2 = 0.89) with the residual uranium retained after laboratory sequential extraction of water-soluble and cation-exchangeable fractions of the same soils. To illustrate how potential remedial techniques can be compared to natural attenuation, thermal stabilization of one soil increased the size of its long-term retained fraction from 50 to 88% of the total uranium and increased the in situ retention half-life of the long-term retained fraction from 990 to 40,000 days. Hydrogel encapsulation presents a novel and powerful general method to observe many water-solids interactions in situ for a variety of aqueous media besides groundwater, with a variety of non-destructive analytical methods, and with a variety of solids besides contaminated soil.

  11. A biodegradable hydrogel system containing curcumin encapsulated in micelles for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gong, ChangYang; Wu, QinJie; Wang, YuJun; Zhang, DouDou; Luo, Feng; Zhao, Xia; Wei, YuQuan; Qian, ZhiYong

    2013-09-01

    A biodegradable in situ gel-forming controlled drug delivery system composed of curcumin loaded micelles and thermosensitive hydrogel was prepared and applied for cutaneous wound repair. Curcumin is believed to be a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Due to its high hydrophobicity, curcumin was encapsulated in polymeric micelles (Cur-M) with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency. Cur-M loaded thermosensitive hydrogel (Cur-M-H) was prepared and applied as wound dressing to enhance the cutaneous wound healing. Cur-M-H was a free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and instantly converted into a non-flowing gel at body temperature. In vitro studies suggested that Cur-M-H exhibited well tissue adhesiveness and could release curcumin in an extended period. Furthermore, linear incision and full-thickness excision wound models were employed to evaluate the in vivo wound healing activity of Cur-M-H. In incision model, Cur-M-H-treated group showed higher tensile strength and thicker epidermis. In excision model, Cur-M-H group exhibited enhancement of wound closure. Besides, in both models, Cur-M-H-treated groups showed higher collagen content, better granulation, higher wound maturity, dramatic decrease in superoxide dismutase, and slight increase in catalase. Histopathologic examination also implied that Cur-M-H could enhance cutaneous wound repair. In conclusion, biodegradable Cur-M-H composite might have great application for wound healing. PMID:23726229

  12. Alginate Hydrogel Protects Encapsulated Hepatic HuH-7 Cells against Hepatitis C Virus and Other Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nhu-Mai; Dufresne, Murielle; Helle, François; Hoffmann, Thomas Walter; François, Catherine; Brochot, Etienne; Paullier, Patrick; Legallais, Cécile; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation in alginate hydrogel has shown interesting applications in regenerative medicine and the biomedical field through implantation of encapsulated tissue or for bioartificial organ development. Although alginate solution is known to have low antiviral activity, the same property regarding alginate gel has not yet been studied. The aim of this work is to investigate the potential protective effect of alginate encapsulation against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection for a hepatic cell line (HuH-7) normally permissive to the virus. Our results showed that alginate hydrogel protects HuH-7 cells against HCV when the supernatant was loaded with HCV. In addition, alginate hydrogel blocked HCV particle release out of the beads when the HuH-7 cells were previously infected and encapsulated. There was evidence of interaction between the molecules of alginate hydrogel and HCV, which was dose- and incubation time-dependent. The protective efficiency of alginate hydrogel towards HCV infection was confirmed against a variety of viruses, whether or not they were enveloped. This promising interaction between an alginate matrix and viruses, whose chemical mechanisms are discussed, is of great interest for further medical therapeutic applications based on tissue engineering. PMID:25310111

  13. Muscle Tissue Engineering Using Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells Encapsulated in Alginate Hydrogels Containing Multiple Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Sahar; Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Annabi, Nasim; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Wu, Benjamin M; Khademhosseini, Ali; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2016-06-01

    Repair and regeneration of muscle tissue following traumatic injuries or muscle diseases often presents a challenging clinical situation. If a significant amount of tissue is lost the native regenerative potential of skeletal muscle will not be able to grow to fill the defect site completely. Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in combination with appropriate scaffold material, present an advantageous alternative therapeutic option for muscle tissue engineering in comparison to current treatment modalities available. To date, there has been no report on application of gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of the current study were to develop an injectable 3D RGD-coupled alginate scaffold with multiple growth factor delivery capacity for encapsulating GMSCs, and to evaluate the capacity of encapsulated GMSCs to differentiate into myogenic tissue in vitro and in vivo where encapsulated GMSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. The results demonstrate that after 4 weeks of differentiation in vitro, GMSCs as well as the positive control human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) exhibited muscle cell-like morphology with high levels of mRNA expression for gene markers related to muscle regeneration (MyoD, Myf5, and MyoG) via qPCR measurement. Our quantitative PCR analyzes revealed that the stiffness of the RGD-coupled alginate regulates the myogenic differentiation of encapsulated GMSCs. Histological and immunohistochemical/fluorescence staining for protein markers specific for myogenic tissue confirmed muscle regeneration in subcutaneous transplantation in our in vivo animal model. GMSCs showed significantly greater capacity for myogenic regeneration in comparison to hBMMSCs (p < 0.05). Altogether, our findings confirmed that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel with multiple growth factor delivery capacity is a promising

  14. Immune-protected xenogeneic bioartificial livers with liver-specific microarchitecture and hydrogel-encapsulated cells.

    PubMed

    No, Da Yoon; Jeong, Gi Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-10-01

    Development of a xenogeneic biological liver support is important in providing a bridge to transplantation or liver regeneration, thus helping to overcome the chronic shortage of liver donors. Among the critical factors in developing biological liver support are the creation of in vivo mimetic micro liver tissue (mLT), especially mLTs containing liver-specific ultrastructure, and an encapsulation method that can package massive numbers of cells while providing immune-protection from the host immune system. We describe here the development of mLTs that include liver microarchitecture and their in situ encapsulation in hydrogel composites. Concave microwells and the tri-culture of three types of primary liver cells were applied for the construction of mLTs showing excellent liver functions and long-term (>1 month) viability in vitro. Large quantities of rat mLTs were encapsulated in collagen-alginate composites, implanted into hepatic failure mice and sustained their survival during regeneration of the remaining liver. The proposed liver support system offers xenogeneic hepatic assistance by mimicking native liver microarchitecture and providing immune-protection without the need for complicated devices or processes, and as such represents a promising system for recovery of organ function. PMID:25088727

  15. Encapsulation of cardiomyocytes in a fibrin hydrogel for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan Ye, Kathy; Sullivan, Kelly Elizabeth; Black, Lauren Deems

    2011-01-01

    Culturing cells in a three dimensional hydrogel environment is an important technique for developing constructs for tissue engineering as well as studying cellular responses under various culture conditions in vitro. The three dimensional environment more closely mimics what the cells observe in vivo due to the application of mechanical and chemical stimuli in all dimensions (1). Three-dimensional hydrogels can either be made from synthetic polymers such as PEG-DA (2) and PLGA (3) or a number of naturally occurring proteins such as collagen (4), hyaluronic acid (5) or fibrin (6,7). Hydrogels created from fibrin, a naturally occurring blood clotting protein, can polymerize to form a mesh that is part of the body's natural wound healing processes (8). Fibrin is cell-degradable and potentially autologous (9), making it an ideal temporary scaffold for tissue engineering. Here we describe in detail the isolation of neonatal cardiomyocytes from three day old rat pups and the preparation of the cells for encapsulation in fibrin hydrogel constructs for tissue engineering. Neonatal myocytes are a common cell source used for in vitro studies in cardiac tissue formation and engineering (4). Fibrin gel is created by mixing fibrinogen with the enzyme thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinopeptides FpA and FpB from fibrinogen, revealing binding sites that interact with other monomers (10). These interactions cause the monomers to self-assemble into fibers that form the hydrogel mesh. Because the timing of this enzymatic reaction can be adjusted by altering the ratio of thrombin to fibrinogen, or the ratio of calcium to thrombin, one can injection mold constructs with a number of different geometries (11,12). Further we can generate alignment of the resulting tissue by how we constrain the gel during culture (13). After culturing the engineered cardiac tissue constructs for two weeks under static conditions, the cardiac cells have begun to remodel the construct and can generate a

  16. Tubular Hydrogels of Circumferentially Aligned Nanofibers to Encapsulate and Orient Vascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Mark T.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    There is a great clinical need for tissue engineered blood vessels that could be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts will depend strongly on their ability to mimic the cellular and matrix organization found in native arteries, but currently available cell scaffolds such as electrospun fibers or hydrogels lack the ability to simultaneously encapsulate and align cells. Our laboratory has recently developed liquid crystalline solutions of peptide amphiphile nanofibers that form aligned domains at exceedingly low concentrations (<1wt%), and can be trapped as gels with macroscopic alignment using low shear rates and ionic crosslinking. We describe here the use of these systems to fabricate tubes with macroscopic circumferential alignment and demonstrate their potential as arterial cell scaffolds. The nanofibers in these tubes were circumferentially aligned by applying small amounts of shear in a custom built flow chamber prior to gelation. Small angle X-ray scattering confirmed that the direction of nanofiber alignment was the same as the direction of shear flow. We also show the encapsulation of smooth muscle cells during the fabrication process without compromising cell viability. After two days in culture the encapsulated cells oriented their long axis in the direction of nanofiber alignment thus mimicking the circumferential alignment seen in native arteries. Cell density roughly doubled after 12 days demonstrating the scaffold’s ability to facilitate necessary graft maturation. Since these nanofiber gels are composed of >99% water by weight, the cells have abundant room for proliferation and remodeling. In contrast to previously reported arterial cell scaffolds, this new material can encapsulate cells and direct cellular organization without the requirement of external stimuli or gel compaction. PMID:22591610

  17. Hydrogel-based encapsulation of biological, functional tissue: fundamentals, technologies and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, H.; Ehrhart, F.; Zimmermann, D.; Müller, K.; Katsen-Globa, A.; Behringer, M.; Feilen, P. J.; Gessner, P.; Zimmermann, G.; Shirley, S. G.; Weber, M. M.; Metze, J.; Zimmermann, U.

    2007-12-01

    Replacing dysfunctional endocrine cells or tissues (e.g. islets, parathyroid tissue) by functional, foreign material without using immunosuppressives could soon become reality. Immunological reactions are avoided by encapsulating cells/tissues in hydrogel (e.g. alginate) microcapsules, preventing interaction of the enclosed material with the host’s immune system while permitting the unhindered passage of nutrients, oxygen and secreted therapeutic factors. Detailed investigations of the physical, physico-chemical and immunological parameters of alginate-based microcapsules have led recently to the development of a novel class of cell-entrapping microcapsules that meet the demands of biocompatibility, long-term integrity and function. This together with the development of ‘good medical practice’ microfluidic chip technology and of advanced cryopreservation technology for generation and storage of immunoisolated transplants will bring cell-based therapy to clinics and the market.

  18. Techniques for the Isolation of High-Quality RNA from Cells Encapsulated in Chitosan Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Claire; Young, Stuart; Russo, Valerio; Amsden, Brian G.

    2013-01-01

    Extracting high-quality RNA from hydrogels containing polysaccharide components is challenging, as traditional RNA isolation techniques designed for cells and tissues can have limited yields and purity due to physiochemical interactions between the nucleic acids and the biomaterials. In this study, a comparative analysis of several different RNA isolation methods was performed on human adipose-derived stem cells photo-encapsulated within methacrylated glycol chitosan hydrogels. The results demonstrated that RNA isolation methods with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) buffer followed by purification with an RNeasy® mini kit resulted in low yields of RNA, except when the samples were preminced directly within the buffer. In addition, genomic DNA contamination during reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was observed in the hydrogels processed with the CTAB-based methods. Isolation methods using TRIzol® in combination with one of a Qiaex® gel extraction kit, an RNeasy® mini kit, or an extended solvent purification method extracted RNA suitable for gene amplification, with no evidence of genomic contamination. The latter two methods yielded the best results in terms of yield and amplification efficiency. Predigestion of the scaffolds with lysozyme was investigated as a possible means of enhancing RNA extraction from the polysaccharide gels, with no improvements observed in terms of the purity, yield, or amplification efficiency. Overall, this work highlights the application of a TRIzol®+extended solvent purification method for optimizing RNA extraction that can be applied to obtain reliable and accurate gene expression data in studies investigating cells seeded in chitosan-based scaffolds. PMID:23448167

  19. Scalable Production of Glioblastoma Tumor-initiating Cells in 3 Dimension Thermoreversible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Lin, Haishuang; Wang, Ou; Qiu, Xuefeng; Kidambi, Srivatsan; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lei, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing drugs that specifically target glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Current cell culture methods, however, cannot cost-effectively produce the large numbers of glioblastoma TICs required for drug discovery and development. In this paper we report a new method that encapsulates patient-derived primary glioblastoma TICs and grows them in 3 dimension thermoreversible hydrogels. Our method allows long-term culture (~50 days, 10 passages tested, accumulative ~>1010-fold expansion) with both high growth rate (~20-fold expansion/7 days) and high volumetric yield (~2.0 × 107 cells/ml) without the loss of stemness. The scalable method can be used to produce sufficient, affordable glioblastoma TICs for drug discovery. PMID:27549983

  20. Scalable Production of Glioblastoma Tumor-initiating Cells in 3 Dimension Thermoreversible Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Lin, Haishuang; Wang, Ou; Qiu, Xuefeng; Kidambi, Srivatsan; Deleyrolle, Loic P; Reynolds, Brent A; Lei, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing drugs that specifically target glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Current cell culture methods, however, cannot cost-effectively produce the large numbers of glioblastoma TICs required for drug discovery and development. In this paper we report a new method that encapsulates patient-derived primary glioblastoma TICs and grows them in 3 dimension thermoreversible hydrogels. Our method allows long-term culture (~50 days, 10 passages tested, accumulative ~>10(10)-fold expansion) with both high growth rate (~20-fold expansion/7 days) and high volumetric yield (~2.0 × 10(7) cells/ml) without the loss of stemness. The scalable method can be used to produce sufficient, affordable glioblastoma TICs for drug discovery. PMID:27549983

  1. The Co-axial Flow of Injectable Solid Hydrogels with Encapsulated Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brandon; Pochan, Darrin; Sathaye, Sameer

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogels are quickly becoming an important biomaterial that can be used for the safe, localized injection of cancer drugs, the injection of stem cells into areas of interest or other biological applications. Our peptides can be self-assembled in a syringe where they form a gel, sheared by injection and, once in the body, immediately reform a localized pocket of stiff gel. My project has been designed around looking at the possibility of having a co-axial strand, in which one gel can surround another. This co-axial flow can be used to change the physical properties of our gel during injection, such as stiffening our gel using hyaluronic acid or encapsulating cells in the gel and surrounding the gel with growth medium or other biological factors. Rheology on hyaluron stiffened gels and cells encapsulated in gels was performed for comparison to the results from co-axial flow. Confocal microscopy was used to examine the coaxial gels after flow and to determine how the co-axial nature of the gels is affected by the concentration of peptide.

  2. Micropatterned cell-cell interactions enable functional encapsulation of primary hepatocytes in hydrogel microtissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheri Y; Stevens, Kelly R; Schwartz, Robert E; Alejandro, Brian S; Huang, Joanne H; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2014-08-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a major cause of drug development failures and postmarket withdrawals. In vitro models that incorporate primary hepatocytes have been shown to be more predictive than model systems which rely on liver microsomes or hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Methods to phenotypically stabilize primary hepatocytes ex vivo often rely on mimicry of hepatic microenvironmental cues such as cell-cell interactions and cell-matrix interactions. In this work, we sought to incorporate phenotypically stable hepatocytes into three-dimensional (3D) microtissues, which, in turn, could be deployed in drug-screening platforms such as multiwell plates and diverse organ-on-a-chip devices. We first utilize micropatterning on collagen I to specify cell-cell interactions in two-dimensions, followed by collagenase digestion to produce well-controlled aggregates for 3D encapsulation in polyethylene glycol (PEG) diacrylate. Using this approach, we examined the influence of homotypic hepatocyte interactions and composition of the encapsulating hydrogel, and achieved the maintenance of liver-specific function for over 50 days. Optimally preaggregated structures were subsequently encapsulated using a microfluidic droplet-generator to produce 3D microtissues. Interactions of engineered hepatic microtissues with drugs was characterized by flow cytometry, and yielded both induction of P450 enzymes in response to prototypic small molecules and drug-drug interactions that give rise to hepatotoxicity. Collectively, this study establishes a pipeline for the manufacturing of 3D hepatic microtissues that exhibit stabilized liver-specific functions and can be incorporated into a wide array of emerging drug development platforms. PMID:24498910

  3. Micropatterned Cell–Cell Interactions Enable Functional Encapsulation of Primary Hepatocytes in Hydrogel Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheri Y.; Stevens, Kelly R.; Schwartz, Robert E.; Alejandro, Brian S.; Huang, Joanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a major cause of drug development failures and postmarket withdrawals. In vitro models that incorporate primary hepatocytes have been shown to be more predictive than model systems which rely on liver microsomes or hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Methods to phenotypically stabilize primary hepatocytes ex vivo often rely on mimicry of hepatic microenvironmental cues such as cell–cell interactions and cell–matrix interactions. In this work, we sought to incorporate phenotypically stable hepatocytes into three-dimensional (3D) microtissues, which, in turn, could be deployed in drug-screening platforms such as multiwell plates and diverse organ-on-a-chip devices. We first utilize micropatterning on collagen I to specify cell–cell interactions in two-dimensions, followed by collagenase digestion to produce well-controlled aggregates for 3D encapsulation in polyethylene glycol (PEG) diacrylate. Using this approach, we examined the influence of homotypic hepatocyte interactions and composition of the encapsulating hydrogel, and achieved the maintenance of liver-specific function for over 50 days. Optimally preaggregated structures were subsequently encapsulated using a microfluidic droplet-generator to produce 3D microtissues. Interactions of engineered hepatic microtissues with drugs was characterized by flow cytometry, and yielded both induction of P450 enzymes in response to prototypic small molecules and drug–drug interactions that give rise to hepatotoxicity. Collectively, this study establishes a pipeline for the manufacturing of 3D hepatic microtissues that exhibit stabilized liver-specific functions and can be incorporated into a wide array of emerging drug development platforms. PMID:24498910

  4. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Grist, S M; Nasseri, S S; Cheng, E; Hwang, Y-C E; Ni, C; Cheung, K C

    2015-03-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  5. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L.; Grist, S. M.; Nasseri, S. S.; Ni, C.; Cheung, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  6. Self-Assembled DNA Hydrogel Based on Enzymatically Polymerized DNA for Protein Encapsulation and Enzyme/DNAzyme Hybrid Cascade Reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Binbin; He, Kaiyu; Zhu, Rong; Liu, Zhuoliang; Zeng, Shu; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-09-01

    DNA hydrogel is a promising biomaterial for biological and medical applications due to its native biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we provide a novel, versatile, and cost-effective approach for self-assembly of DNA hydrogel using the enzymatically polymerized DNA building blocks. The X-shaped DNA motif was elongated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) to form the building blocks, and hybridization between dual building blocks via their complementary TdT-polymerized DNA tails led to gel formation. TdT polymerization dramatically reduced the required amount of original DNA motifs, and the hybridization-mediated cross-linking of building blocks endows the gel with high mechanical strength. The DNA hydrogel can be applied for encapsulation and controllable release of protein cargos (for instance, green fluorescent protein) due to its enzymatic responsive properties. Moreover, this versatile strategy was extended to construct a functional DNAzyme hydrogel by integrating the peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme into DNA motifs. Furthermore, a hybrid cascade enzymatic reaction system was constructed by coencapsulating glucose oxidase and β-galactosidase into DNAzyme hydrogel. This efficient cascade reaction provides not only a potential method for glucose/lactose detection by naked eye but also a promising modular platform for constructing a multiple enzyme or enzyme/DNAzyme hybrid system. PMID:27526861

  7. Biomechanical study of the edge outgrowth phenomenon of encapsulated chondrocytic isogenous groups in the surface layer of hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ng, Soon Seng; Su, Kai; Li, Chuan; Chan-Park, Mary B; Wang, Dong-An; Chan, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering, hydrogel is widely used as the scaffold for hosting and culturing chondrocyte suspension during neo-tissue formation. In order to develop cultured chondrocytes into a functional cartilage equivalent, the hydrogel must provide an ideal microenvironment for the rapidly proliferating chondrocytes. At the same time, the essential functions of chondrocytes, such as the secretion of type II collagen and glycosaminoglycans, must be maintained. In these studies, we quantitatively characterize the mechanobiology underlying a newly discovered "edge flourish" phenomenon of cultured chondrocytes within a three-dimensional agarose hydrogel, which may ultimately nurture scaffold-free cartilaginous tissue regeneration. First, real-time microscopy was used to track the spatiotemporal distributions of chondrocytes at different focal planes. The chondrocytes were observed to exhibit abundant neo-tissue outgrowth and significant cartilaginous phenotype at the edge of the hydrogel compared to those inside the hydrogel bulk. Secondly, the hydrogel surface stresses induced by the encapsulated chondrocytes were characterized quantitatively in real time using the finite-element method. Finally, the real-time three-dimensional matrix deformations of agarose hydrogel under the influence of chondrocytes were measured using a multiple-particle tracking assay. Our results indicate that the mechanism of the "edge flourish" phenomenon is induced by the oriented outgrowth of chondrocytic isogenous groups located at the edge of hydrogel. These isogenous groups exhibit directed outgrowth towards the surface of the hydrogel and eventually generate substantial surface tension on the interface of hydrogel and medium. Ultimately, the encapsulated chondrocytes closest to the hydrogel/medium interface will spontaneously sprout out of the hydrogel and form a layer of rich proliferative and chondrocytic extracellular matrix secreting chondrocytes at the surface of the

  8. Vitronectin-Based, Biomimetic Encapsulating Hydrogel Scaffolds Support Adipogenesis of Adipose Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Tracy N; Hinman, Cassidy R; Ashley Rubin, Rebekah K; Smither, Kate; Burke, Daniel J; Hawker, Craig J; Messina, Darin; Van Epps, Dennis; Clegg, Dennis O

    2016-04-01

    Soft tissue defects are relatively common, yet currently used reconstructive treatments have varying success rates, and serious potential complications such as unpredictable volume loss and reabsorption. Human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), isolated from liposuction aspirate have great potential for use in soft tissue regeneration, especially when combined with a supportive scaffold. To design scaffolds that promote differentiation of these cells down an adipogenic lineage, we characterized changes in the surrounding extracellular environment during adipogenic differentiation. We found expression changes in both extracellular matrix proteins, including increases in expression of collagen-IV and vitronectin, as well as changes in the integrin expression profile, with an increase in expression of integrins such as αVβ5 and α1β1. These integrins are known to specifically interact with vitronectin and collagen-IV, respectively, through binding to an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence. When three different short RGD-containing peptides were incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel cultures, it was found that an RGD-containing peptide derived from vitronectin provided strong initial attachment, maintained the desired morphology, and created optimal conditions for in vitro 3D adipogenic differentiation of ASCs. These results describe a simple, nontoxic encapsulating scaffold, capable of supporting the survival and desired differentiation of ASCs for the treatment of soft tissue defects. PMID:26956095

  9. The Assembly of Cell-Encapsulating Microscale Hydrogels Using Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Finley, Thomas Dylan; Turkaydin, Muge; Sung, Yuree; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Yavuz, Ahmet Sinan; Guldiken, Rasim; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Microscale hydrogels find widespread applications in medicine and biology, e.g., as building blocks for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In these applications, these microgels are assembled to fabricate large complex 3D constructs. The success of this approach requires non-destructive and high throughput assembly of the microgels. Although various assembly methods have been developed based on modifying interfaces, and using microfluidics, so far, none of the available assembly technologies have shown the ability to assembly microgels using non-invasive fields rapidly within seconds in an efficient way. Acoustics has been widely used in biomedical area to manipulatedroplets, cells and biomolecules. In this study, we developed a simple, non-invasiveacoustic assembler for cell-encapsulating microgels with maintained cell viability (>93%). We assessed the assembler for both microbeads (with diameter of 50 µm and 100 µm) and microgels of different sizes and shapes (e.g., cubes, lock-and-key shapes, tetris, saw) in microdroplets (with volume of 10 µL, 20 µL, 40 µL, 80 µL). The microgels were assembled in second sin a non-invasive manner. These results indicate that the developed acoustic approach could become an enabling biotechnology tool for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, pharmacology studies and high throughput screening applications. PMID:21820734

  10. Phenotypic Stability, Matrix Elaboration, and Functional Maturation of Nucleus Pulposus Cells Encapsulated in Photocrosslinkable Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hwa; Martin, John T.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of the nucleus pulposus (NP) is an early hallmark of intervertebral disc degeneration. The capacity for endogenous regeneration in the NP is limited due to the low cellularity and poor nutrient supply of this avascular tissue. Towards restoring the NP, a number of biomaterials have been explored for cell delivery. These materials must support the NP cell phenotype while promoting the elaboration of an NP-like extracellular matrix in the shortest possible time. Our previous work with chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that hydrogels based on hyaluronic acid (HA) are effective at promoting matrix production and the development of functional material properties. However, this material has not been evaluated in the context of NP cells. Therefore, to test this material for NP regeneration, bovine NP cells were encapsulated in 1% w/vol HA hydrogels at either a low seeding density (20 × 106 cells/ml) or a high seeding density (60 × 106 cells/ml), and constructs were cultured over an 8 week period. These engineered NP cell-laden HA hydrogels showed functional matrix accumulation, with increasing matrix content and mechanical properties with time in culture at both seeding densities. Furthermore, encapsulated cells showed NP-specific gene expression profiles that were significantly higher than expanded NP cells prior to encapsulation, suggesting a restoration of phenotype. Interestingly, these levels were higher at the lower seeding density compared to the higher seeding density. These findings support the use of HA-based hydrogels for NP tissue engineering and cellular therapies directed at restoration or replacement of the endogenous NP. PMID:25448344

  11. Injectable and responsively degradable hydrogel for personalized photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changping; Wang, Xinyu; Dong, Kunyu; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-10-01

    Near infrared-absorbing hydrogels are used for the repeated photothermal treatments of cancer. However, a long-term retention of hydrogel in the body leads to increased risk of toxicity. Here we developed an injectable and on-demand degradable hydrogel to conduct the repeated photothermal therapies (PTTs). Alginate-calcium hydrogel immobilized dendrimer-encapsulated platinum nanoparticles (DEPts) in its matrix represented excellent biocompatibility, and was degraded upon injecting chelates. Results from the in vivo studies reveal that the hydrogel/DEPts-mediated repeated PTTs suppressed tumor growth efficiently, and the hydrogel was degraded on-demand to allow renal secretion of DEPts out of the body. Furthermore, coating hydrogel/DEPts on the tumor instead of intratumoral injection could still ablate tumor efficiently. Our investigation provides a smart and safe hydrogel for photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:27449949

  12. Oxidative stability of n-3 fatty acids encapsulated in filled hydrogel particles and of pork meat systems containing them.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Matalanis, Alison; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The effect of storage time (2°C, 19 days) and heating (70°C, 30 min) on physical characteristics and oxidative stability of fish oil encapsulated in filled hydrogel particles was determined and compared with a conventional oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion with the same oil content (8.5%). Subsequently they were used to enrich meat systems with n-3 LCPUFAs, and their lipid oxidation was evaluated and compared with two other meat systems: one containing all animal fat and another with fish oil added directly. Filled hydrogel particles were more effective in lowering the oxidation rate than O/W emulsion, even when thermal treatment was applied. Oxidative stability over the storage time was best in the n-3 LCPUFA-enriched meat system containing filled hydrogel particles, in which TBARS levels were up to 62% lower than other systems containing fish oil. Hydrogel particles offer a promising means of controlling lipid oxidation in n-3 LCPUFA-enriched meat products. PMID:25872446

  13. Tumor homing indocyanine green encapsulated micelles for near infrared and photoacoustic imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Uthaman, Saji; Bom, Joon-Suk; Kim, Hyeon Sik; John, Johnson V; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Seon-Jong; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Il; Park, In-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging analytical modality that is under intense preclinical development for the early diagnosis of various medical conditions, including cancer. However, the lack of specific tumor targeting by various contrast agents used in PAI obstructs its clinical applications. In this study, we developed indocyanine green (ICG)-encapsulated micelles specific for the CD 44 receptor and used in near infrared and photoacoustic imaging of tumors. ICG was hydrophobically modified prior to loading into hyaluronic acid (HA)-based micelles utilized for CD 44 based-targeting. We investigated the physicochemical characteristics of prepared HA only and ICG-encapsulated HA micelles (HA-ICG micelles). After intravenous injection of tumor-bearing mice, the bio-distribution and in vivo photoacoustic images of ICG-encapsulated HA micelles accumulating in tumors were also investigated. Our study further encourages the application of this HA-ICG-based nano-platform as a tumor-specific contrast agent for PAI. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 825-834, 2016. PMID:26743660

  14. Biocompatible fluorescent supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel for long-term cell tracking and tumor imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaimin; Mao, Duo; Wang, Youzhi; Wang, Kai; Yi, Xiaoyong; Kong, Deling; Yang, Zhimou; Liu, Qian; Ding, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Biocompatible peptide-based supramolecular hydrogel has recently emerged as a new and promising system for biomedical applications. In this work, Rhodamine B is employed as a new capping group of self-assembling peptide, which not only provides the driving force for supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel formation, but also endows the hydrogel with intrinsic fluroescence signal, allowing for various bioimaging applications. The fluorescent peptide nanofibrous hydrogel can be formed via disulfide bond reduction. After dilution of the hydrogel with aqueous solution, the fluorescent nanofiber suspension can be obtained. The resultant nanofibers are able to be internalized by the cancer cells and effectively track the HeLa cells for as long as 7 passages. Using a tumor-bearing mouse model, it is also demonstrated that the fluorescent supramolecular nanofibers can serve as an efficient probe for tumor imaging in a high-contrast manner.

  15. Biocompatible fluorescent supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel for long-term cell tracking and tumor imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaimin; Mao, Duo; Wang, Youzhi; Wang, Kai; Yi, Xiaoyong; Kong, Deling; Yang, Zhimou; Liu, Qian; Ding, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatible peptide-based supramolecular hydrogel has recently emerged as a new and promising system for biomedical applications. In this work, Rhodamine B is employed as a new capping group of self-assembling peptide, which not only provides the driving force for supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel formation, but also endows the hydrogel with intrinsic fluroescence signal, allowing for various bioimaging applications. The fluorescent peptide nanofibrous hydrogel can be formed via disulfide bond reduction. After dilution of the hydrogel with aqueous solution, the fluorescent nanofiber suspension can be obtained. The resultant nanofibers are able to be internalized by the cancer cells and effectively track the HeLa cells for as long as 7 passages. Using a tumor-bearing mouse model, it is also demonstrated that the fluorescent supramolecular nanofibers can serve as an efficient probe for tumor imaging in a high-contrast manner. PMID:26573372

  16. Injectable in situ forming xylitol-PEG-based hydrogels for cell encapsulation and delivery.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Shivaram; Pithapuram, Madhav V; Victor, Sunita P; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2015-02-01

    Injectable in situ crosslinking hydrogels offer unique advantages over conventional prefabricated hydrogel methodologies. Herein, we synthesize poly(xylitol-co-maleate-co-PEG) (pXMP) macromers and evaluate their performance as injectable cell carriers for tissue engineering applications. The designed pXMP elastomers were non-toxic and water-soluble with viscosity values permissible for subcutaneous injectable systems. pXMP-based hydrogels prepared via free radical polymerization with acrylic acid as crosslinker possessed high crosslink density and exhibited a broad range of compressive moduli that could match the natural mechanical environment of various native tissues. The hydrogels displayed controlled degradability and exhibited gradual increase in matrix porosity upon degradation. The hydrophobic hydrogel surfaces preferentially adsorbed albumin and promoted cell adhesion and growth in vitro. Actin staining on cells cultured on thin hydrogel films revealed subconfluent cell monolayers composed of strong, adherent cells. Furthermore, fabricated 3D pXMP cell-hydrogel constructs promoted cell survival and proliferation in vitro. Cumulatively, our results demonstrate that injectable xylitol-PEG-based hydrogels possess excellent physical characteristics and exhibit exceptional cytocompatibility in vitro. Consequently, they show great promise as injectable hydrogel systems for in situ tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:25543981

  17. Hydrogel-Based 3D Model of Patient-Derived Prostate Xenograft Tumors Suitable for Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The lack of effective therapies for bone metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) underscores the need for accurate models of the disease to enable the discovery of new therapeutic targets and to test drug sensitivities of individual tumors. To this end, the patient-derived xenograft (PDX) PCa model using immunocompromised mice was established to model the disease with greater fidelity than is possible with currently employed cell lines grown on tissue culture plastic. However, poorly adherent PDX tumor cells exhibit low viability in standard culture, making it difficult to manipulate these cells for subsequent controlled mechanistic studies. To overcome this challenge, we encapsulated PDX tumor cells within a three-dimensional hyaluronan-based hydrogel and demonstrated that the hydrogel maintains PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression. Furthermore, a differential sensitivity to docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic drug, was observed as compared to a traditional PCa cell line. These findings underscore the potential impact of this novel 3D PDX PCa model as a diagnostic platform for rapid drug evaluation and ultimately push personalized medicine toward clinical reality. PMID:24779589

  18. Synthesis of stiffness-tunable and cell-responsive Gelatin-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel for three-dimensional cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ye; Lee, Bae Hoon; Peled, Havazelet Bianco; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2016-10-01

    Biosynthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels have been extensively investigated as extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking gels as they retain the benefits of both ECM (biological cues) and synthetic hydrogels (tunable mechanical properties). In this article, we developed and characterized a new gelatin-PEG (GP) hydrogel that retains the benefits of gelatin and synthetic hydrogels. In this strategy, the thiolation of gelatin was accomplished by reacting with Traut's reagent; the thiolated gelatin was then conjugated to one end of PEG diacrylate (PEGDA) by Michael-type addition reaction. Two kinds of GP precursors, GP30 and GP60, were synthesized by changing the amount of Traut's reagent, while the weight ratio between thiolated-gelatin and PEGDA of GP30 and GP60 was 1.451:1 and 0.785:1, respectively. Finally, neonatal human dermal fibroblasts were encapsulated into the hydrogel by cross-linking the remaining double bonds of precursor under ultraviolet light. These GP hydrogels can encapsulate the fibroblasts in situ with high cell viability. Moreover, the behaviors of cells within the GP hydrogels can be modulated by varying the cross-linking density of GP hydrogel (storage modulus from 40 to 2000 Pa). In particular, this article showed that a minimum amount of cell-binding motifs (gelatin >2.30 wt/vol % and 44.0% dry weight percentage) are required for attachment; and appropriate initial rheological and structural properties (storage modulus <∼100 Pa and mesh size >∼150 nm) can accelerate the attachment of cells and improve cell viability. Hence, this mixed-hydrogel platform allows an easily control hydrogel structure and modulates cell behavior to reconstruct new tissue in the three-dimensional microenvironments. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2401-2411, 2016. PMID:27170015

  19. Modified chitosan thermosensitive hydrogel enables sustained and efficient anti-tumor therapy via intratumoral injection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yingchun; Meng, Xuanyu; Wu, Zhenghong; Qi, Xiaole

    2016-06-25

    Thermosensitive in situ hydrogels are potential candidates to achieve intratumoral administration, nevertheless their weak mechanical strength always lead to serious drug leakage and burst. Herein, we developed a chitosan based thermosensitive hydrogel of high mechanical strength, which was modified by glutaraldehyde (GA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), for intratumoral delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). The modified hydrogel system could achieve sol-gel transition at 35.79±0.4°C and exhibit a 7.03-fold greater mechanical strength compared with simple chitosan hydrogel. Moreover, the drug release of PTX loaded modified hydrogel in PBS (pH 7.4) was found to be extended to 13 days. After intratumoral administration in mice bearing H22 tumors, PTX-loaded modified hydrogels exhibited a 3.72-fold greater antitumor activity compared with Taxol(®). Overall, these modified hydrogel systems demonstrated to be a promising way to achieve efficient sustained release and enhanced anti-tumor therapy efficiency of anticancer drugs through in situ tumor injectable administration. PMID:27083815

  20. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  1. Transport Properties of Ibuprofen Encapsulated in Cyclodextrin Nanosponge Hydrogels: A Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The chemical cross-linking of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) led to branched polymers referred to as cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNSEDTA). Two different preparations are described with 1:4 and 1:8 CD-EDTA molar ratios. The corresponding cross-linked polymers were contacted with 0.27 M aqueous solution of ibuprofen sodium salt (IP) leading to homogeneous, colorless, drug loaded hydrogels. The systems were characterized by high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Pulsed field gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the mean square displacement (MSD) of IP inside the polymeric gel at different observation times td. The data were further processed in order to study the time dependence of MSD: MSD = f(td). The proposed methodology is useful to characterize the different diffusion regimes that, in principle, the solute may experience inside the hydrogel, namely normal or anomalous diffusion. The full protocols including the polymer preparation and purification, the obtainment of drug-loaded hydrogels, the NMR sample preparation, the measurement of MSD by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy and the final data processing to achieve the time dependence of MSD are here reported and discussed. The presented experiments represent a paradigmatic case and the data are discussed in terms of innovative approach to the characterization of the transport properties of an encapsulated guest within a polymeric host of potential application for drug delivery. PMID:27585291

  2. Injectable calcium phosphate with hydrogel fibers encapsulating induced pluripotent, dental pulp and bone marrow stem cells for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Chi; Li, Chunyan; Weir, Michael D; Wang, Ping; Reynolds, Mark A; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs), dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and bone marrow MSCs (hBMSCs) are exciting cell sources in regenerative medicine. However, there has been no report comparing hDPSCs, hBMSCs and hiPSC-MSCs for bone engineering in an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel injectable CPC containing hydrogel fibers encapsulating stem cells for bone engineering, and (2) compare cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow (BM-hiPSC-MSCs) and from foreskin (FS-hiPSC-MSCs), and hBMSCs in CPC for the first time. The results showed that the injection did not harm cell viability. The porosity of injectable CPC was 62%. All four types of cells proliferated and differentiated down the osteogenic lineage inside hydrogel fibers in CPC. hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited high alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor, collagen I, and osteocalcin gene expressions. Cell-synthesized minerals increased with time (p<0.05), with no significant difference among hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs (p>0.1). Mineralization by hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs inside CPC at 14d was 14-fold that at 1d. FS-hiPSC-MSCs were inferior in osteogenic differentiation compared to the other cells. In conclusion, hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs are similarly and highly promising for bone tissue engineering; however, FS-hiPSC-MSCs were relatively inferior in osteogenesis. The novel injectable CPC with cell-encapsulating hydrogel fibers may enhance bone regeneration in dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. PMID:27612810

  3. Long-circulating gadolinium-encapsulated liposomes for potential application in tumor neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Le, Uyen M; Cui, Zhengrong

    2006-04-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality. One of the key factors for a successful Gd-NCT is to deliver and maintain a sufficient amount of Gd in tumor tissues during neutron irradiation. We proposed to prepare a Gd delivery system by complexing a Gd-containing compound, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), with a polycationic peptide, poly-L-lysine (pLL), and then encapsulate the complexed Gd-DTPA into PEGylated liposomes. Complexation of Gd-DTPA with pLL not only enhanced the encapsulation efficiency of Gd-DTPA in liposomes, but also significantly limited the release of Gd-DTPA from the liposomes. A Gd-DTPA-encapsulated liposome formulation that contained 6.8+/-0.3 mg/mL of pure encapsulated Gd was prepared. The blood half-life of the Gd encapsulated into the liposome formulation was estimated to be about 24 h in healthy tumor-free mice. About 12 h after the Gd-encapsulated liposomes were intravenously injected into mice with pre-established model tumors, the Gd content in the tumors reached an average of 159 microg/g of wet tumor tissue. This Gd-DTPA encapsulated liposome may be used to deliver Gd into solid tumors for NCT and tumor imaging. PMID:16457973

  4. Bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on glioblastoma cell behavior using PEG-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christine; Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan

    2014-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12-15 months, and the mechanisms underlying GBM tumor progression remain largely elusive. Given the importance of tumor niche signaling in driving GBM progression, there is a strong need to develop in vitro models to facilitate analysis of brain tumor cell-niche interactions in a physiologically relevant and controllable manner. Here we report the development of a bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to help elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate using poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with brain-mimicking biochemical and mechanical properties. We have chosen PEG given its bioinert nature and tunable physical property, and the resulting hydrogels allow tunable matrix stiffness without changing the biochemical contents. To facilitate cell proliferation and migration, CRGDS and a MMP-cleavable peptide were chemically incorporated. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was also incorporated to mimic the concentration in the brain extracellular matrix. Using U87 cells as a model GBM cell line, we demonstrate that such biomimetic hydrogels support U87 cell growth, spreading, and migration in 3D over the course of 3 weeks in culture. Gene expression analyses showed U87 cells actively deposited extracellular matrix and continued to upregulate matrix remodeling genes. To examine the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate in 3D, we encapsulated U87 cells in soft (1 kPa) or stiff (26 kPa) hydrogels, which respectively mimics the matrix stiffness of normal brain or GBM tumor tissues. Our results suggest that changes in matrix stiffness induce differential GBM cell proliferation, morphology, and migration modes in 3D. Increasing matrix stiffness led to delayed U87 cell proliferation inside hydrogels, but cells formed denser spheroids with extended cell protrusions. Cells cultured in stiff hydrogels also showed upregulation of HA synthase 1 and matrix

  5. Hydrogel-PLGA delivery system prolongs 2-methoxyestradiol-mediated anti-tumor effects in osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Maran, Avudaiappan; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Buenz, Colleen M; Shogren, Kristen L; Lu, Lichun; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Osteosarcoma is a bone tumor that affects children and young adults. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME), a naturally occurring estrogen metabolite, kills osteosarcoma cells, but does not affect normal osteoblasts. In order to effectively target osteosarcoma and improve the therapeutic index of the drug 2-ME, we have encapsulated 2-ME in a composite of oligo-(polyethylene glycol) fumarate (OPF) hydrogel and poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and investigated the effect of polymer composition on 2-ME release kinetics and osteosarcoma cell survival. The in vitro study shows that 2-ME can be released in a controlled manner over 21-days. The initial burst releases observed on day 1 were 50% and 32% for OPF and OPF/PLGA composites, respectively. The extended release kinetics show that 100% of the encapsulated 2-ME is released by day 12 from OPF, whereas the OPF/PLGA composites showed a release of 85% on day 21. 2-ME released from the polymers was biologically active and blocked osteosarcoma cell proliferation in vitro. Also, comparison of 2-ME delivery in osteosarcoma cells in culture, shows that direct treatment has no effect after 3 days, whereas polymer-mediated delivery produces anti-tumor effects that could be sustained for 21 days. These findings show that the OPF and PLGA polymeric system may prove to be useful in controlled and sustained delivery of 2-ME and could be further explored in the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:23355512

  6. Coaxial electrospray of liquid core-hydrogel shell microcapsules for encapsulation and miniaturized 3D culture of pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuting; Agarwal, Pranay; Rao, Wei; Huang, Haishui; Zhang, Renliang; Liu, Zhenguo; Yu, Jianhua; Weisleder, Noah; Zhang, Wujie; He, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    A novel coaxial electrospray technology is developed to generate microcapsules with a hydrogel shell of alginate and an aqueous liquid core of living cells using two aqueous fluids in one step. Approximately 50 murine embryonic stem (ES) cells encapsulated in the core with high viability (92.3 ± 2.9%) can proliferate to form a single ES cell aggregate of 128.9 ± 17.4 μm in each microcapsule within 7 days. Quantitative analyses of gene and protein expression indicate that ES cells cultured in the miniaturized 3D liquid core of the core-shell microcapsules have significantly higher pluripotency on average than the cells cultured on 2D substrate or in the conventional 3D alginate hydrogel microbeads without a core-shell architecture. The higher pluripotency is further suggested by their significantly higher capability of differentiation into beating cardiomyocytes and higher expression of cardiomyocyte specific gene markers on average after directed differentiation under the same conditions. Considering its wide availability, easiness to set up and operate, reusability, and high production rate, the novel coaxial electrospray technology together with the microcapsule system is of importance for mass production of ES cells with high pluripotency to facilitate translation of the emerging pluripotent stem cell-based regenerative medicine into the clinic. PMID:25036382

  7. Hyperthermia-induced drug delivery from thermosensitive liposomes encapsulated in an injectable hydrogel for local chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    López-Noriega, Adolfo; Hastings, Conn L; Ozbakir, Burcin; O'Donnell, Kathleen E; O'Brien, Fergal J; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E; Duffy, Garry P; Ruiz-Hernández, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    A novel drug delivery system, enabling an in situ, thermally triggered drug release is described, consisting of an injectable thermoresponsive chitosan hydrogel containing doxorubicin-loaded thermosensitive liposomes. The design, fabrication, characterization, and an assessment of in vitro bioactivity of this formulation is detailed. Combining on-demand drug delivery with in situ gelation results in a promising candidate for local chemotherapy. PMID:24436226

  8. Controlled drug delivery through a novel PEG hydrogel encapsulated silica aerogel system.

    PubMed

    Giray, Seda; Bal, Tuğba; Kartal, Ayse M; Kızılel, Seda; Erkey, Can

    2012-05-01

    A novel composite material consisting of a silica aerogel core coated by a poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) hydrogel was developed. The potential of this novel composite as a drug delivery system was tested with ketoprofen as a model drug due to its solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide. The results indicated that both drug loading capacity and drug release profiles could be tuned by changing hydrophobicity of aerogels, and that drug loading capacity increased with decreased hydrophobicity, while slower release rates were achieved with increased hydrophobicity. Furthermore, higher concentration of PEG diacrylate in the prepolymer solution of the hydrogel coating delayed the release of the drug which can be attributed to the lower permeability at higher PEG diacrylate concentrations. The novel composite developed in this study can be easily implemented to achieve the controlled delivery of various drugs and/or proteins for specific applications. PMID:22374682

  9. Facile synthesis of magnetic-/pH-responsive hydrogel beads based on Fe3O4 nanoparticles and chitosan hydrogel as MTX carriers for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Jiang, Wei; Tian, Renbing; Shen, Yewen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, methotrexate (MTX)-encapsulated magnetic-/pH-responsive hydrogel beads based on Fe3O4 nanoparticles and chitosan were successfully prepared through a one-step gelation process, which is a very facile, economic and environmentally friendly route. The developed hydrogel beads exhibited homogeneous porous structure and super-paramagnetic responsibility. MTX can be successfully encapsulated into magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads, and the drug encapsulation efficiency (%) and encapsulation content (%) were 93.8 and 6.28%, respectively. In addition, the drug release studies in vitro indicated that the MTX-encapsulated magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads had excellent pH-sensitivity, 90.6% MTX was released from the magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads within 48 h at pH 4.0. WST-1 assays in human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) demonstrated that the MTX-encapsulated magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads had good cytocompatibility and high anti-tumor activity. Therefore, our results revealed that the MTX-encapsulated magnetic chitosan hydrogel beads would be a competitive candidate for controlled drug release in the area of targeted cancer therapy in the near future. PMID:27464586

  10. Encapsulated therapeutic stem cells implanted in the tumor resection cavity induce cell death in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kauer, Timo M; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Hingtgen, Shawn; Shah, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutically engineered stem cells have shown promise for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapy; however, key preclinical studies are urgently needed for their clinical translation. In this study, we investigated a new approach to GBM treatment using therapeutic stem cells encapsulated in biodegradable, synthetic extracellular matrix (sECM) in mouse models of human GBM resection. Using multimodal imaging, we first showed quantitative surgical debulking of human GBM tumors in mice, which resulted in increased survival. Next, sECM encapsulation of engineered stem cells increased their retention in the tumor resection cavity, permitted tumor-selective migration and release of diagnostic and therapeutic proteins in vivo. Simulating the clinical scenario of GBM treatment, the release of tumor-selective S-TRAIL (secretable tumor necrosis factor apoptosis inducing ligand) from sECM-encapsulated stem cells in the resection cavity eradicated residual tumor cells by inducing caspase-mediated apoptosis, delayed tumor regrowth and significantly increased survival of mice. This study demonstrates the efficacy of encapsulated therapeutic stem cells in mouse models of GBM resection and may have implications for developing effective therapies for GBM. PMID:22197831

  11. EGF and curcumin co-encapsulated nanoparticle/hydrogel system as potent skin regeneration agent

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoling; Ye, Xianlong; Qi, Jianying; Fan, Rangrang; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Yunzhou; Zhou, Liangxue; Tong, Aiping; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex multifactorial process that relies on coordinated signaling molecules to succeed. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a mitogenic polypeptide that stimulates wound repair; however, precise control over its application is necessary to reduce the side effects and achieve desired therapeutic benefits. Moreover, the extensive oxidative stress during the wound healing process generally inhibits repair of the injured tissues. Topical applications of antioxidants like curcumin (Cur) could protect tissues from oxidative damage and significantly improve tissue remodeling. To achieve much accelerated wound healing effects, we designed a novel dual drug co-loaded in situ gel-forming nanoparticle/hydrogel system (EGF-Cur-NP/H) which acted not only as a supportive matrix for the regenerative tissue, but also as a sustained drug depot for EGF and Cur. In the established excisional full-thickness wound model, EGF-Cur-NP/H treatment significantly enhanced wound closure through increasing granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, and angiogenesis, relative to normal saline, nanoparticle/hydrogel (NP/H), Cur-NP/H, and EGF-NP/H treated groups. In conclusion, this study provides a biocompatible in situ gel-forming system for efficient topical application of EGF and Cur in the landscape of tissue repair. PMID:27574428

  12. EGF and curcumin co-encapsulated nanoparticle/hydrogel system as potent skin regeneration agent.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Ye, Xianlong; Qi, Jianying; Fan, Rangrang; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Yunzhou; Zhou, Liangxue; Tong, Aiping; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex multifactorial process that relies on coordinated signaling molecules to succeed. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a mitogenic polypeptide that stimulates wound repair; however, precise control over its application is necessary to reduce the side effects and achieve desired therapeutic benefits. Moreover, the extensive oxidative stress during the wound healing process generally inhibits repair of the injured tissues. Topical applications of antioxidants like curcumin (Cur) could protect tissues from oxidative damage and significantly improve tissue remodeling. To achieve much accelerated wound healing effects, we designed a novel dual drug co-loaded in situ gel-forming nanoparticle/hydrogel system (EGF-Cur-NP/H) which acted not only as a supportive matrix for the regenerative tissue, but also as a sustained drug depot for EGF and Cur. In the established excisional full-thickness wound model, EGF-Cur-NP/H treatment significantly enhanced wound closure through increasing granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, and angiogenesis, relative to normal saline, nanoparticle/hydrogel (NP/H), Cur-NP/H, and EGF-NP/H treated groups. In conclusion, this study provides a biocompatible in situ gel-forming system for efficient topical application of EGF and Cur in the landscape of tissue repair. PMID:27574428

  13. Biocompatibility of nanofilm-encapsulated silicone and silicone-hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hirotsugu

    2006-02-10

    A material placed in or in contact with a biological system, that causes the minimum perturbation that can be tolerated by the host biological system, can be considered to be biocompatible. The major effects caused by a contact lens can be considered to be 1) the blocking of the natural supply of oxygen to the epithelium cells of the cornea, 2) interference with the normal evaporation of water from the tear fluid layer, and 3) hindrance of the normal functions of blinking for replenishing oxygen-saturated tear fluid and removing dead epithelium cells, which result from apoptosis. The encapsulation of a highly oxygen-permeable contact lens by a nanofilm with an imperturbable surface state minimizes all these terms. The encapsulated contact lens can be worn safely in extended wear. PMID:16416462

  14. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  15. Hydrogels to Model 3D in vitro Microenvironment of Tumor Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ho Greco; Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of failing clinical trials for cancer therapy is substantiating the need to upgrade the current practice in culturing tumor cells and modeling tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Many attempts have been made to engineer vasculature in vitro by utilizing hydrogels, but the application of these tools in simulating in vivo tumor angiogenesis is still very new. In this review, we explore current use of hydrogels and their design parameters to engineer vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and to evaluate the angiogenic capability of cancerous cells and tissues. When coupled with other technologies such as lithography and three-dimensional printing, one can even create an advanced microvessel model as microfluidic channels to more accurately capture the native angiogenesis process. PMID:24969477

  16. Anti-Tumor Activity of Peptide Amphiphile Nanofiber-Encapsulated Camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Soukasene, Stephen; Toft, Daniel J.; Moyer, Tyson J.; Lu, Hsuming; Lee, Hyung-Kun; Standley, Stephany M.; Cryns, Vincent L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers were used to encapsulate camptothecin (CPT), a naturally occurring hydrophobic chemotherapy agent, using a solvent evaporation technique. Encapsulation by PA nanofibers was found to improve the aqueous solubility of the CPT molecule by more than 50-fold. PAs self-assembled into nanofibers in the presence of CPT as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Small-angle X-ray scattering results suggest a slight increase in diameter of the nanofiber to accommodate the hydrophobic cargo. In vitro studies using human breast cancer cells show an enhancement in antitumor activity of the CPT when encapsulated by the PA nanofibers. In addition, using a mouse orthotopic model of human breast cancer, treatment with PA nanofiber encapsulated CPT inhibited tumor growth. These results highlight the potential of this model PA system to be adapted for delivery of hydrophobic therapies to treat a variety of diseases including cancer. PMID:22044255

  17. Development of a Biomimetic Chondroitin Sulfate-modified Hydrogel to Enhance the Metastasis of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Shujun; Sun, Dongsheng; Liu, Yongdong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Liu, Chang; Wu, Hao; Lv, Yan; Ren, Ying; Guo, Xin; Sun, Guangwei; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Tumor metastasis with resistance to anticancer therapies is the main cause of death in cancer patients. It is necessary to develop reliable tumor metastasis models that can closely recapitulate the pathophysiological features of the native tumor tissue. In this study, chondroitin sulfate (CS)-modified alginate hydrogel beads (ALG-CS) are developed to mimic the in vivo tumor microenvironment with an abnormally increased expression of CS for the promotion of tumor cell metastasis. The modification mechanism of CS on alginate hydrogel is due to the cross-linking between CS and alginate molecules via coordination of calcium ions, which enables ALG-CS to possess significantly different physical characteristics than the traditional alginate beads (ALG). And quantum chemistry calculations show that in addition to the traditional egg-box structure, novel asymmetric egg-box-like structures based on the interaction between these two kinds of polymers are also formed within ALG-CS. Moreover, tumor cell metastasis is significantly enhanced in ALG-CS compared with that in ALG, as confirmed by the increased expression of MMP genes and proteins and greater in vitro invasion ability. Therefore, ALG-CS could be a convenient and effective 3D biomimetic scaffold that would be used to construct standardized tumor metastasis models for tumor research and anticancer drug screening. PMID:27432752

  18. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram encapsulated PLGA NPs on tumor growth: Different administration routes.

    PubMed

    Fasehee, Hamidreza; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Ghaffari, Seyed Hamidollah; Faghihi, Shahab

    2016-06-01

    The strong anticancer activity of disulfiram is hindered by its rapid degradation in blood system. A novel folate-receptor-targeted poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanoparticle (NP) is developed for encapsulation and delivery of disulfiram into breast cancer tumor using passive (EPR effect) and active (folate receptor) targeting. The anticancer activity of disulfiram and its effect on caspase-3 activity and cell cycle are studied. The administration of encapsulated PLGA NPs using intra-peritoneal, intravenous and intra-tumor routes is investigated using animal model. Disulfiram shows strong cytotoxicity against MCF7 cell line. The activity of caspase-3 inhibited with disulfiram via dose dependent manner while the drug causes cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 and S phase time-dependently. The encapsulated disulfiram shows higher activity in apoptosis induction as compared to free drug. In nontoxic dose of encapsulated disulfiram, the highest and lowest efficacy of NPs in tumor growth inhibition is observed for intravenous injection and intraperitoneal injection. It is suggested that administration of disulfiram by targeted PLGA nanoparticles using intravenous injection would present an alternative therapeutic approach for solid tumor treatment. PMID:27040254

  19. Tissue responses against tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of chondrocytes encapsulated within non-absorbable hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Sanshiro; Fujihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Komura, Makoto; Nagata, Satoru; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    To disclose the influence of foreign body responses raised against a non-absorbable hydrogel consisting of tissue-engineered cartilage, we embedded human/canine chondrocytes within agarose and transplanted them into subcutaneous pockets in nude mice and donor beagles. One month after transplantation, cartilage formation was observed in the experiments using human chondrocytes in nude mice. No significant invasion of blood cells was noted in the areas where the cartilage was newly formed. Around the tissue-engineered cartilage, agarose fragments, a dense fibrous connective tissue and many macrophages were observed. On the other hand, no cartilage tissue was detected in the autologous transplantation of canine chondrocytes. Few surviving chondrocytes were observed in the agarose and no accumulation of blood cells was observed in the inner parts of the transplants. Localizations of IgG and complements were noted in areas of agarose, and also in the devitalized cells embedded within the agarose. Even if we had inhibited the proximity of the blood cells to the transplanted cells, the survival of the cells could not be secured. We suggest that these cytotoxic mechanisms seem to be associated not only with macrophages but also with soluble factors, including antibodies and complements. PMID:21916014

  20. Using chondroitin sulfate to improve the viability and biosynthesis of chondrocytes encapsulated in interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Dormer, Nathan H; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    We recently introduced agarose-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels to cartilage tissue engineering that were able to encapsulate viable cells and provide a significant improvement in mechanical performance relative to its two constituent hydrogels. The goal of the current study was to develop a novel synthesis protocol to incorporate methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (MCS) into the IPN design hypothesized to improve cell viability and biosynthesis. The IPN was formed by encapsulating porcine chondrocytes in agarose, soaking the construct in a solution of 1:10 MCS:PEGDA, which was then photopolymerized to form a copolymer network as the second network. The IPN with incorporated CS (CS-IPN) (~0.5 wt%) resulted in a 4- to 5-fold increase in the compressive elastic modulus relative to either the PEGDA or agarose gels. After 6 weeks of in vitro culture, more than 50% of the encapsulated chondrocytes remained viable within the CS-modified IPN, in contrast to 35% viability observed in the unmodified. At week 6, the CS-IPN had significantly higher normalized GAG contents (347 ± 34 μg/μg) than unmodified IPNs (158 ± 27 μg/μg, P < 0.05). Overall, the approach of incorporating biopolymers such as CS from native tissue may provide favorable micro-environment and beneficial signals to cells to enhance their overall performance in IPNs. PMID:22116661

  1. A synthetic modular approach for modeling the role of the 3D microenvironment in tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S. P.; Schwartz, M. P.; Tokuda, E. Y.; Luo, Y.; Rogers, R. E.; Fujita, M.; Ahn, N. G.; Anseth, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the flexibility of peptide-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels for modeling tumor progression. The PEG hydrogels were formed using thiol-ene chemistry to incorporate a matrix metalloproteinase-degradable peptide crosslinker (KKCGGPQG↓IWGQGCKK) permissive to proteolytic remodeling and the adhesive CRGDS peptide ligand. Tumor cell function was investigated by culturing WM239A melanoma cells on PEG hydrogel surfaces or encapsulating cells within the hydrogels, and either as monocultures or indirect (non-contact) cocultures with primary human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs). WM239A cluster size and proliferation rate depended on the shear elastic modulus for cells cultured on PEG hydrogels, while growth was inhibited by coculture with hDFs regardless of hydrogel stiffness. Cluster size was also suppressed by hDFs for WM239A cells encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, which is consistent with cells seeded on top of hydrogels. Notably, encapsulated WM239A clusters and single cells adopted invasive phenotypes in the hDF coculture model, which included single cell and collective migration modes that resembled invasion from human melanoma patient-derived xenograft tumors encapsulated in equivalent PEG hydrogels. Our combined results demonstrate that peptide-functionalized PEG hydrogels provide a useful platform for investigating aspects of tumor progression in 2D and 3D microenvironments, including single cell migration, cluster growth and invasion. PMID:26638791

  2. A synthetic modular approach for modeling the role of the 3D microenvironment in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Schwartz, M P; Tokuda, E Y; Luo, Y; Rogers, R E; Fujita, M; Ahn, N G; Anseth, K S

    2015-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the flexibility of peptide-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels for modeling tumor progression. The PEG hydrogels were formed using thiol-ene chemistry to incorporate a matrix metalloproteinase-degradable peptide crosslinker (KKCGGPQG↓IWGQGCKK) permissive to proteolytic remodeling and the adhesive CRGDS peptide ligand. Tumor cell function was investigated by culturing WM239A melanoma cells on PEG hydrogel surfaces or encapsulating cells within the hydrogels, and either as monocultures or indirect (non-contact) cocultures with primary human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs). WM239A cluster size and proliferation rate depended on the shear elastic modulus for cells cultured on PEG hydrogels, while growth was inhibited by coculture with hDFs regardless of hydrogel stiffness. Cluster size was also suppressed by hDFs for WM239A cells encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, which is consistent with cells seeded on top of hydrogels. Notably, encapsulated WM239A clusters and single cells adopted invasive phenotypes in the hDF coculture model, which included single cell and collective migration modes that resembled invasion from human melanoma patient-derived xenograft tumors encapsulated in equivalent PEG hydrogels. Our combined results demonstrate that peptide-functionalized PEG hydrogels provide a useful platform for investigating aspects of tumor progression in 2D and 3D microenvironments, including single cell migration, cluster growth and invasion. PMID:26638791

  3. Monitoring of cell viability and proliferation in hydrogel-encapsulated system by resazurin assay.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jianzheng; Yu, Weiting; Wang, Wei; Ma, Xiaojun

    2010-11-01

    Cell microencapsulation is a promising approach for cell implantation, cell-based gene therapy and large-scale cell culture. For better quality control, it is important to accurately measure the microencapsulated cell viability and proliferation in the culture. A number of assays have been used for this purpose, but limitations arise. In this study, we investigated the feasibility and reliability of resazurin as a cell growth indicator in microencapsulated culture system. According to the experiment data, there was a reversible, time- and dose-dependent growth inhibition as observed for resazurin application in encapsulated cells. A positive relationship was observed between reduction of resazurin and CHO cell number in microcapsule. Moreover, the resazurin assay provided an equivalent result to the commonly used MTT method in determining CHO cell proliferation in APA microcapsule with no notable influence on cell distribution and organization pattern. In conclusion, resazurin assay is offered as a simple, rapid and non-invasive method for in vitro microencapsulated cell viability and proliferation measurement. PMID:20437208

  4. Photothermal tumor ablation in mice with repeated therapy sessions using NIR-absorbing micellar hydrogels formed in situ.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chun-Wen; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Wan, Dehui; Korupalli, Chiranjeevi; Liao, Zi-Xian; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Chia, Wei-Tso; Lin, Kun-Ju; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Repeated cancer treatments are common, owing to the aggressive and resistant nature of tumors. This work presents a chitosan (CS) derivative that contains self-doped polyaniline (PANI) side chains, capable of self-assembling to form micelles and then transforming into hydrogels driven by a local change in pH. Analysis results of small-angle X-ray scattering indicate that the sol-gel transition of this CS derivative may provide the mechanical integrity to maintain its spatial stability in the microenvironment of solid tumors. The micelles formed in the CS hydrogel function as nanoscaled heating sources upon exposure to near-infrared light, thereby enabling the selective killing of cancer cells in a light-treated area. Additionally, photothermal efficacy of the micellar hydrogel is evaluated using a tumor-bearing mouse model; hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) are used for comparison. Given the ability of the micellar hydrogel to provide spatial stability within a solid tumor, which prevents its leakage from the injection site, the therapeutic efficacy of this hydrogel, as a photothermal therapeutic agent for repeated treatments, exceeds that of nanosized HGNs. Results of this study demonstrate that this in situ-formed micellar hydrogel is a highly promising modality for repeated cancer treatments, providing a clinically viable, minimally invasive phototherapeutic option for therapeutic treatment. PMID:25934276

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta 3 stimulates cartilage matrix elaboration by human marrow-derived stromal cells encapsulated in photocrosslinked carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels: potential for nucleus pulposus replacement.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Michelle S; Cooper, Elana S; Nicoll, Steven B

    2011-12-01

    Degeneration of the nucleus pulposus (NP) has been implicated as a major cause of low back pain. Tissue engineering strategies using marrow-derived stromal cells (MSCs) have been used to develop cartilaginous tissue constructs, which may serve as viable NP replacements. Supplementation with growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-β3), has been shown to enhance the differentiation of MSCs and promote functional tissue development of such constructs. A potential candidate material that may be useful as a scaffold for NP tissue engineering is carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), a biocompatible, cost-effective derivative of cellulose. Photocrosslinked CMC hydrogels have been shown to support NP cell viability and promote phenotypic matrix deposition capable of maintaining mechanical properties when cultured in serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM) supplemented with TGF-β3. However, MSCs have not been characterized using this hydrogel system. In this study, human MSCs (hMSCs) were encapsulated in photocrosslinked CMC hydrogels and cultured in CDM with and without TGF-β3 to determine the effect of the growth factor on the differentiation of hMSCs toward an NP-like phenotype. Constructs were evaluated for matrix elaboration and functional properties consistent with native NP tissue. CDM supplemented with TGF-β3 resulted in significantly higher glycosaminoglycan content (762.69±220.79 ng/mg wet weight) and type II collagen (COL II) content (6.25±1.64 ng/mg wet weight) at day 21 compared with untreated samples. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed uniform, pericellular, and interterritorial staining for chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and COL II in growth factor-supplemented constructs compared with faint, strictly pericellular staining in untreated constructs at 21 days. Consistent with matrix deposition, mechanical properties of hydrogels treated with TGF-β3 increased over time and exhibited the highest peak stress in stress-relaxation (

  6. A Hydrogel-Based Tumor Model for the Evaluation of Nanoparticle-Based Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xian; Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Harrington, Daniel A.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue-engineered tumor models have the potential to bridge the gap between monolayer cultures and patient-derived xenografts for the testing of nanoparticle (NP)-based cancer therapeutics. In this study, a hydrogel-derived prostate cancer (PCa) model was developed for the in vitro evaluation of doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded polymer NPs (Dox-NPs). The hydrogels were synthesized using chemically modified hyaluronic acid (HA) carrying acrylate groups (HA-AC) or reactive thiols (HA-SH). The crosslinked hydrogel networks exhibited an estimated pore size of 70-100 nm, similar to the spacing of the extracellular matrices (ECM) surrounding tumor tissues. LNCaP PCa cells entrapped in the HA matrices formed distinct tumor-like multicellular aggregates with an average diameter of 50 μm after 7 days of culture. Compared to cells grown on two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture plates, cells from the engineered tumoroids expressed significantly higher levels of multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, including multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and lung resistance-related protein (LRP), both at the mRNA and the protein levels. Separately, Dox-NPs with an average diameter of 54 ± 1 nm were prepared from amphiphilic block copolymers based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) bearing pendant cyclic ketals. Dox-NPs were able to diffuse through the hydrogel matrices, penetrate into the tumoroid and be internalized by LNCaP PCa cells through caveolae-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis pathways. Compared to 2D cultures, LNCaP PCa cells cultured as multicellular aggregates in HA hydrogel were more resistant to Dox and Dox-NPs treatments. Moreover, the NP-based Dox formulation could bypass the drug efflux function of MRP1, thereby partially reversing the resistance to free Dox in 3D cultures. Overall, the engineered tumor model has the potential to provide predictable results on the efficacy of NP-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:24447463

  7. Modulation of Hydrogel Nanoparticle Intracellular Trafficking by Multivalent Surface Engineering with Tumor Targeting Peptide†

    PubMed Central

    Karamchand, Leshern; Kim, Gwangseong; Wang, Shouyan; Hah, Hoe Jin; Ray, Aniruddha; Jiddou, Ruba; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Philbert, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Surface engineering of a hydrogel nanoparticle (NP) with the tumor-targeting ligand, F3 peptide, enhances both the NP’s binding affinity for, and internalization by, nucleolin overexpressing tumor cells. Remarkably, the F3-functionalized NPs consistently exhibited significantly lower trafficking to the degradative lysosomes than the non-functionalized NPs, in the tumor cells, after internalization. This is attributed to the non-functionalized NPs, but not the F3-functionalized NPs, being co-internalized with Lysosome-associated Membrane Protein-1 (LAMP1) from the surface of the tumor cells. Furthermore, it is shown that the intracellular trafficking of the F3-functionalized NPs differs significantly from that of the single F3 peptides. This has important implications for designing effective, chemically-responsive, controlled-release and multifunctional nanodrugs for multi-drug-resistant cancers. PMID:24056573

  8. Modulation of hydrogel nanoparticle intracellular trafficking by multivalent surface engineering with tumor targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Karamchand, Leshern; Kim, Gwangseong; Wang, Shouyan; Hah, Hoe Jin; Ray, Aniruddha; Jiddou, Ruba; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Philbert, Martin A; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-11-01

    Surface engineering of a hydrogel nanoparticle (NP) with the tumor-targeting ligand, F3 peptide, enhances both the NP's binding affinity for, and internalization by, nucleolin overexpressing tumor cells. Remarkably, the F3-functionalized NPs consistently exhibited significantly lower trafficking to the degradative lysosomes than the non-functionalized NPs, in the tumor cells, after internalization. This is attributed to the non-functionalized NPs, but not the F3-functionalized NPs, being co-internalized with Lysosome-associated Membrane Protein-1 (LAMP1) from the surface of the tumor cells. Furthermore, it is shown that the intracellular trafficking of the F3-functionalized NPs differs significantly from that of the molecular F3 peptides (untethered to NPs). This has important implications for designing effective, chemically-responsive, controlled-release and multifunctional nanodrugs for multi-drug-resistant cancers. PMID:24056573

  9. Intra-articular delivery of sinomenium encapsulated by chitosan microspheres and photo-crosslinked GelMA hydrogel ameliorates osteoarthritis by effectively regulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengfei; Xia, Chen; Mei, Sheng; Wang, Jiying; Shan, Zhi; Lin, Xianfeng; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-03-01

    Reduced expression of autophagy regulators has been observed in pathological cartilage in humans and mice. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic therapeutic effect of promotion of chondrocyte autophagy via exposure to sinomenium (SIN) encapsulated by chitosan microspheres (CM-SIN) and photo-crosslinked gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel, with the goal of evaluating CM-SIN as a treatment for patients with osteoarthritis. First, we fabricated and characterized GelMA hydrogels and chitosan microspheres. Next, we measured the effect of SIN on cartilage matrix degradation induced by IL1-β in chondrocytes and an ex vivo model. SIN ameliorated the pathological changes induced by IL1-β at least partially through activation of autophagy. Moreover, we surgically induced osteoarthritis in mice, which were injected intra-articularly with CM-SIN and GelMA. Cartilage matrix degradation and chondrocyte autophagy were evaluated 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. Treatment with the combination of CM-SIN and GelMA retarded the progression of surgically induced OA. SIN ameliorated cartilage matrix degradation at least partially by inducing autophagy in vivo. Our results demonstrate that injection of the combination of GelMA hydrogel and CM-SIN could be a promising strategy for treating patients with osteoarthritis. PMID:26713680

  10. Modulation of hydrogel nanoparticle intracellular trafficking by multivalent surface engineering with tumor targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamchand, Leshern; Kim, Gwangseong; Wang, Shouyan; Hah, Hoe Jin; Ray, Aniruddha; Jiddou, Ruba; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Philbert, Martin A.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    Surface engineering of a hydrogel nanoparticle (NP) with the tumor-targeting ligand, F3 peptide, enhances both the NP's binding affinity for, and internalization by, nucleolin overexpressing tumor cells. Remarkably, the F3-functionalized NPs consistently exhibited significantly lower trafficking to the degradative lysosomes than the non-functionalized NPs, in the tumor cells, after internalization. This is attributed to the non-functionalized NPs, but not the F3-functionalized NPs, being co-internalized with Lysosome-associated Membrane Protein-1 (LAMP1) from the surface of the tumor cells. Furthermore, it is shown that the intracellular trafficking of the F3-functionalized NPs differs significantly from that of the molecular F3 peptides (untethered to NPs). This has important implications for designing effective, chemically-responsive, controlled-release and multifunctional nanodrugs for multi-drug-resistant cancers.Surface engineering of a hydrogel nanoparticle (NP) with the tumor-targeting ligand, F3 peptide, enhances both the NP's binding affinity for, and internalization by, nucleolin overexpressing tumor cells. Remarkably, the F3-functionalized NPs consistently exhibited significantly lower trafficking to the degradative lysosomes than the non-functionalized NPs, in the tumor cells, after internalization. This is attributed to the non-functionalized NPs, but not the F3-functionalized NPs, being co-internalized with Lysosome-associated Membrane Protein-1 (LAMP1) from the surface of the tumor cells. Furthermore, it is shown that the intracellular trafficking of the F3-functionalized NPs differs significantly from that of the molecular F3 peptides (untethered to NPs). This has important implications for designing effective, chemically-responsive, controlled-release and multifunctional nanodrugs for multi-drug-resistant cancers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Effect of Potassium depletion on F3 peptide subcellular localization, MTT

  11. Functionalized graphene oxide-based thermosensitive hydrogel for magnetic hyperthermia therapy on tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiali; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Heqing; Zhang, Yingjie; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-09-11

    A novel locally injectable, biodegradable, and thermo-sensitive hydrogel made from chitosan and β-glycerophosphate salt was prepared. It incorporated polyethylenimine (PEI)-modified super-paramagnetic graphene oxide (GO/IONP/PEI) as a form of minimally invasive treatment of cancer lesions by magnetically induced local hyperthermia. Doxorubicin (DOX) was mixed into the hydrogel which was pre-loaded on GO/IONP/PEI to create a drug delivery system DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel. In addition to the evaluation of in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities, the physicochemical properties, magnetic properties and DOX release profile of the DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel were determined. The aqueous solution of the hydrogel showed a sol-gel transition behavior depending on temperature changes. Magnetization loops indicated the super-paramagnetic properties of GO/IONP/PEI. Compared with free DOX, DOX-GO/IONP/PEI could efficiently pass through cell membranes, leading to more apoptosis and demonstrating higher antitumor efficacy on MCF-7 cells in vitro. Furthermore, DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel intratumorally injected (i.t.) showed high antitumor efficacy on tumor-bearing mice in vivo, with no obvious toxicity. The antitumor efficacy was higher when combined with an alternating magnetic field (AMF), showing that DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel under AMF has great potential for cancer magnetic hyperthermia therapy. PMID:26291977

  12. Functionalized graphene oxide-based thermosensitive hydrogel for magnetic hyperthermia therapy on tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiali; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Heqing; Zhang, Yingjie; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-09-01

    A novel locally injectable, biodegradable, and thermo-sensitive hydrogel made from chitosan and β-glycerophosphate salt was prepared. It incorporated polyethylenimine (PEI)-modified super-paramagnetic graphene oxide (GO/IONP/PEI) as a form of minimally invasive treatment of cancer lesions by magnetically induced local hyperthermia. Doxorubicin (DOX) was mixed into the hydrogel which was pre-loaded on GO/IONP/PEI to create a drug delivery system DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel. In addition to the evaluation of in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities, the physicochemical properties, magnetic properties and DOX release profile of the DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel were determined. The aqueous solution of the hydrogel showed a sol-gel transition behavior depending on temperature changes. Magnetization loops indicated the super-paramagnetic properties of GO/IONP/PEI. Compared with free DOX, DOX-GO/IONP/PEI could efficiently pass through cell membranes, leading to more apoptosis and demonstrating higher antitumor efficacy on MCF-7 cells in vitro. Furthermore, DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel intratumorally injected (i.t.) showed high antitumor efficacy on tumor-bearing mice in vivo, with no obvious toxicity. The antitumor efficacy was higher when combined with an alternating magnetic field (AMF), showing that DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel under AMF has great potential for cancer magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

  13. Supplemented αMEM/F12-based medium enables the survival and growth of primary ovarian follicles encapsulated in alginate hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Tagler, David; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Anderson, Nicholas R.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogel-encapsulating culture systems for ovarian follicles support the in vitro growth of secondary follicles from various species including mouse, non-primate human, and human; however, the growth of early stage follicles (primary and primordial) has been limited. While encapsulation maintains the structure of early stage follicles, feeder cell populations, such as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), are required to stimulate growth and development. Hence, in this report, we investigated feeder-free culture environments for early stage follicle development. Mouse ovarian follicles were encapsulated within alginate hydrogels and cultured in various growth medium formulations. Initial studies employed embryonic stem cell medium formulations as a tool to identify factors that influence the survival, growth, and meiotic competence of early stage follicles. The medium formulation that maximized survival and growth was identified as αMEM/F12 supplemented with fetuin, insulin, transferrin, selenium, and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). This medium stimulated the growth of late primary (average initial diameter of 80 µm) and early secondary (average initial diameter of 90 µm) follicles, which developed antral cavities and increased to terminal diameters exceeding 300 µm in 14 days. Survival ranged from 18% for 80 µm follicles to 36% for 90 µm follicles. Furthermore, 80% of the oocytes from surviving follicles with an initial diameter of 90–100 µm underwent germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), and the percentage of metaphase II (MII) eggs was 50%. Follicle/oocyte growth and GVBD/MII rates were not significantly different from MEF co-culture. Survival was reduced relative to MEF co-culture, yet substantially increased relative to the control medium that had been previously used for secondary follicles. Continued development of culture medium could enable mechanistic studies of early stage folliculogenesis and emerging strategies for fertility preservation. PMID

  14. Light-Induced Hydrogel Based on Tumor-Targeting Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as a Theranostic Platform for Sustained Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Liu, Zhongning; Parker, Stephen G; Zhang, Xiaojin; Gooding, J Justin; Ru, Yanyan; Liu, Yuhong; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-06-29

    Herein, we report a facile fabrication of a polymer (azobenzene and α-cyclodextrin-functionalized hyaluronic acid) and gold nanobipyramids (AuNBs) conjugated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) to be used as an injectable drug delivery system for sustained cancer treatment. Because of the specific affinity between the hyaluronic acid (HA) on MSNs and the CD44 antigen overexpressed on tumor cells, the MSNs can selectively attach to tumor cells. The nanocomposite material then exploits thermoresponsive interactions between α-cyclodextrin and azobenzene, and the photothermal properties of gold nanobipyramids, to in situ self-assemble into a hydrogel under near-infrared (NIR) radiation. Upon gelation, the drug (doxorubicin)-loaded MSNs carriers were enclosed in the HA network of the hydrogel, whereas further degradation of the HA in the hydrogel due to the upregulation of hyaluronidase (HAase) around the tumor tissue will result in the release of MSNs from the hydrogel, which can then be taken by tumor cells and deliver their drug to the cell nuclei. This design is able to provide a microenvironment with rich anticancer drugs in, and around, the tumor tissue for time periods long enough to prevent the recrudescence of the disease. The extra efficacy that this strategy affords builds upon the capabilities of conventional therapies. PMID:27265514

  15. Dynamic loading stimulates chondrocyte biosynthesis when encapsulated in charged hydrogels prepared from poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Idalis; Gladem, Sara K.; Kessler, Jeff; Bryant, Stephanie J.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the role of charge in mediating chondrocyte response to loading by employing synthetic 3D hydrogels. Specifically, neutral poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels were employed where negatively charged chondroitin sulfate (ChS), one of the main extracellular matrix components of cartilage, was systematically incorporated into the PEG network at 0%, 20% or 40% to control the fixed charge density. PEG hydrogels were employed as a control environment for extracellular events which occur as a result of loading, but which are not associated with a charged matrix (e.g., cell deformation and fluid flow). Freshly isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were embedded in the hydrogels and subject to dynamic mechanical stimulation (0.3 Hz, 15% amplitude strains, 6 hours) and assayed for nitric oxide production, cell proliferation, proteoglycan synthesis, and collagen deposition. In the absence of loading, incorporation of charge inhibited cell proliferation by ~75%, proteoglycan synthesis by ~22–50% depending on ChS content, but had no affect on collagen deposition. Dynamic loading had no effect on cellular responses in PEG hydrogels. However, dynamically loading 20% ChS gels inhibited nitrite production by 50%, cell proliferation by 40%, but stimulated proteoglycan and collagen deposition by 162% and 565%, respectively. Dynamic loading of 40% ChS hydrogels stimulated nitrite production by 62% and proteoglycan synthesis by 123%, but inhibited cell proliferation by 54% and collagen deposition by 52%. Upon removing the load and culturing under free swelling conditions for 36 hrs, the enhanced matrix synthesis observed in the 20% ChS gels was not maintained suggesting that loading is necessary to stimulate matrix production. In conclusion, extracellular events associated with a charged matrix has a dramatic affect on how chondrocytes respond to mechanical stimulation within these artificial 3D matrices suggesting that streaming potentials and

  16. Preclinical Evaluation of Poly(HEMA-co-acrylamide) Hydrogels Encapsulating Glucose Oxidase and Palladium Benzoporphyrin as Fully Implantable Glucose Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Rachel M.; Roberts, Jason R.; Nichols, Scott P.; Gamsey, Soya; Wisniewski, Natalie A.; McShane, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) require percutaneous wire probes to monitor glucose. Sensors based on luminescent hydrogels are being explored as fully implantable alternatives to traditional CGMs. Our previous work investigated hydrogel matrices functionalized with enzymes and oxygen-quenched phosphors, demonstrating sensitivity to glucose, range of response, and biofouling strongly depend on the matrix material. Here, we further investigate the effect of matrix composition on overall performance in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Sensors based on three hydrogels, a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) homopolymer and 2 poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-acrylamide) (pHEMA-co-AAm) copolymers, were compared. These were used to entrap glucose oxidase (GOx), catalase, and an oxygen-sensitive benzoporphyrin phosphor. All sensor formulations were evaluated for glucose response and stability at physiological temperatures. Selected sensors were then evaluated as implanted sensors in a porcine model challenged with glucose and insulin. The animal protocol used in this study was approved by an IACUC committee at Texas A&M University. Results: PHEMA-co-AAm copolymer hydrogels (75:25 HEMA:AAm) yielded the most even GOx and dye dispersion throughout the hydrogel matrix and best preserved GOx apparent activity. In response to in vitro glucose challenges, this formulation exhibited a dynamic range of 12-167 mg/dL, a sensitivity of 1.44 ± 0.46 µs/(mg/dL), and tracked closely with reference capillary blood glucose values in vivo. Conclusions: The hydrogel-based sensors exhibited excellent sensitivity and sufficiently rapid response to the glucose levels achieved in vivo, proving feasibility of these materials for use in real-time glucose tracking. Extending the dynamic range and assessing long-term effects in vivo are ongoing efforts. PMID:26085565

  17. Enhanced adsorption of cesium on PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide hydrogel beads in a fixed-bed column system.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-10-01

    A continuous fixed-bed column study was performed using PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide (PB-GO) hydrogel beads as a novel adsorbent for the removal of cesium from aqueous solutions. The effects of different operating parameters, such as initial cesium concentration, pH, bed height, flow rate, and bead size, were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of the PB-GO hydrogel beads was 164.5mg/g at an initial cesium concentration of 5mM, bed height of 20cm, and flow rate of 0.83mL/min at pH 7. The Thomas, Adams-Bohart, and Yoon-Nelson models were applied to the experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves using non-linear regression. Although both the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models showed good agreement with the experimental data, the Yoon-Nelson model was found to provide the best representation for cesium adsorption on the adsorbent, based on the χ(2) analysis. PMID:27372009

  18. Au@Pt nanoparticle encapsulated target-responsive hydrogel with volumetric bar-chart chip readout for quantitative point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Guan, Zhichao; Jia, Shasha; Lei, Zhichao; Lin, Shuichao; Zhang, Huimin; Ma, Yanli; Tian, Zhong-Qun; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2014-11-10

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) with the advantages of speed, simplicity, portability, and low cost is critical for the measurement of analytes in a variety of environments where access to laboratory infrastructure is lacking. While qualitative POCTs are widely available, quantitative POCTs present significant challenges. Here we describe a novel method that integrates an Au core/Pt shell nanoparticle (Au@PtNP) encapsulated target-responsive hydrogel with a volumetric bar-chart chip (V-Chip) for quantitative POCT. Upon target introduction, the hydrogel immediately dissolves and releases Au@PtNPs, which can efficiently catalyze the decomposition of H2 O2 to generate a large volume of O2 to move of an ink bar in the V-Chip. The concentration of the target introduced can be visually quantified by reading the traveling distance of the ink bar. This method has the potential to be used for portable and quantitative detection of a wide range of targets without any external instrument. PMID:25113247

  19. Microbes encapsulated within crosslinkable polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Chidambaram, Devicharan; Liu, Ying; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to porous films comprising crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. Viable microbes are encapsulated within the crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. The crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers are water insoluble and permeable. The invention also relates to methods of making and using such porous films.

  20. Chitosan-Based Thermoreversible Hydrogel as an in Vitro Tumor Microenvironment for Testing Breast Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem for women worldwide. Although in vitro culture of established breast cancer cell lines is the most widely used model for preclinical assessment, it poorly represents the behavior of breast cancers in vivo. Acceleration of the development of effective therapeutic strategies requires a cost-efficient in vitro model that can more accurately resemble the in vivo tumor microenvironment. Here, we report the use of a thermoreversible poly(ethylene glycol)-g-chitosan hydrogel (PCgel) as an in vitro breast cancer model. We hypothesized that PCgel could provide a tumor microenvironment that promotes cultured cancer cells to a more malignant phenotype with drug and immune resistance. Traditional tissue culture plates and Matrigel were applied as controls in our studies. In vitro cellular proliferation and morphology, the secretion of angiogenesis-related growth factors and cytokines, and drug and immune resistance were assessed. Our results show that PCgel cultures promoted tumor aggregate formation, increased secretion of various angiogenesis- and metastasis-related growth factors and cytokines, and increased tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and immunotherapeutic T cells. This PCgel platform may offer a valuable strategy to bridge the gap between standard in vitro and costly animal studies for a wide variety of experimental designs. PMID:24779767

  1. Chitosan-based thermoreversible hydrogel as an in vitro tumor microenvironment for testing breast cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Ching-Ting; Kievit, Forrest M; Wang, Kui; Erickson, Ariane E; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem for women worldwide. Although in vitro culture of established breast cancer cell lines is the most widely used model for preclinical assessment, it poorly represents the behavior of breast cancers in vivo. Acceleration of the development of effective therapeutic strategies requires a cost-efficient in vitro model that can more accurately resemble the in vivo tumor microenvironment. Here, we report the use of a thermoreversible poly(ethylene glycol)-g-chitosan hydrogel (PCgel) as an in vitro breast cancer model. We hypothesized that PCgel could provide a tumor microenvironment that promotes cultured cancer cells to a more malignant phenotype with drug and immune resistance. Traditional tissue culture plates and Matrigel were applied as controls in our studies. In vitro cellular proliferation and morphology, the secretion of angiogenesis-related growth factors and cytokines, and drug and immune resistance were assessed. Our results show that PCgel cultures promoted tumor aggregate formation, increased secretion of various angiogenesis- and metastasis-related growth factors and cytokines, and increased tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and immunotherapeutic T cells. This PCgel platform may offer a valuable strategy to bridge the gap between standard in vitro and costly animal studies for a wide variety of experimental designs. PMID:24779767

  2. Biodegradable polymeric micelles encapsulated JK184 suppress tumor growth through inhibiting Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Ning; Deng, Senyi; Song, Linjiang; Wu, Qinjie; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Xie, Yongmei; Gong, Changyang

    2015-01-01

    JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in vitro release behavior and had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of HUVECs than free JK184. Furthermore, JK184 micelles had stronger tumor growth inhibiting effects in subcutaneous Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor models. Histological analysis showed that JK184 micelles improved anti-tumor activity by inducing more apoptosis, decreasing microvessel density and reducing expression of CD31, Ki67, and VEGF in tumor tissues. JK184 micelles showed a stronger inhibition of Gli expression in Hh signaling, which played an important role in pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore, circulation time of JK184 in blood was prolonged after entrapment in polymeric micelles. Our results suggested that JK184 micelles are a promising drug candidate for treating pancreatic tumors with a highly inhibitory effect on Hh activity.JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in

  3. Dynamic loading stimulates chondrocyte biosynthesis when encapsulated in charged hydrogels prepared from poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Idalis; Gladem, Sara K; Kessler, Jeff; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the role of charge in mediating chondrocyte response to loading by employing synthetic 3D hydrogels. Specifically, neutral poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels were employed where negatively charged chondroitin sulfate (ChS), one of the main extracellular matrix components of cartilage, was systematically incorporated into the PEG network at 0%, 20% or 40% to control the fixed charge density. PEG hydrogels were employed as a control environment for extracellular events which occur as a result of loading, but which are not associated with a charged matrix (e.g., cell deformation and fluid flow). Freshly isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were embedded in the hydrogels and subject to dynamic mechanical stimulation (0.3Hz, 15% amplitude strains, 6h) and assayed for nitric oxide production, cell proliferation, proteoglycan synthesis, and collagen deposition. In the absence of loading, incorporation of charge inhibited cell proliferation by approximately 75%, proteoglycan synthesis by approximately 22-50% depending on ChS content, but had no affect on collagen deposition. Dynamic loading had no effect on cellular responses in PEG hydrogels. However, dynamically loading 20% ChS gels inhibited nitrite production by 50%, cell proliferation by 40%, but stimulated proteoglycan and collagen deposition by 162% and 565%, respectively. Dynamic loading of 40% ChS hydrogels stimulated nitrite production by 62% and proteoglycan synthesis by 123%, but inhibited cell proliferation by 54% and collagen deposition by 52%. Upon removing the load and culturing under free-swelling conditions for 36h, the enhanced matrix synthesis observed in the 20% ChS gels was not maintained suggesting that loading is necessary to stimulate matrix production. In conclusion, extracellular events associated with a charged matrix have a dramatic affect on how chondrocytes respond to mechanical stimulation within these artificial 3D matrices suggesting that streaming

  4. Hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel for regional delivery of paclitaxel to intraperitoneal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Gaurav; Kim, Mi Ran; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Yeo, Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy is an effective way of treating local and regional malignancies confined in the peritoneal cavity such as ovarian cancer. However, a persistent major challenge in IP chemotherapy is the need to provide effective drug concentrations in the peritoneal cavity for an extended period of time. We hypothesized that hyaluronic acid (HA)-based in-situ crosslinkable hydrogel would serve as a carrier of paclitaxel (PTX) particles to improve their IP retention and therapeutic effects. In-vitro gel degradation and release kinetics studies demonstrated that HA gels could entrap microparticulate PTX (>100 μm) and release the drug over 10 days, gradually degraded by hyaluronidase, but had limited effect on retention of Taxol, a 14-nm micelle form of PTX. When administered IP to tumor-bearing nude mice, PTX was best retained in the peritoneal cavity as PTX-gel (microparticulate PTX entrapped in the HA gel), whereas Taxol-gel and other Taxol-based formulations left negligible amount of PTX in the cavity after 14 days. Despite the increase in IP retention of PTX, PTX-gel did not further decrease the tumor burdens than Taxol-based formulations, presumably due to the limited dissolution of PTX. This result indicates that spatial availability of a drug does not necessarily translate to the enhanced anti-tumor effect unless it is accompanied by the temporal availability. PMID:22178261

  5. Recreating the tumor microenvironment in a bilayer, hyaluronic acid hydrogel construct for the growth of prostate cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian; Gurski, Lisa A; Zhang, Chu; Harrington, Daniel A; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cells cultured in physiologically relevant, three-dimensional (3D) matrices can recapture many essential features of native tumor tissues. In this study, a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based bilayer hydrogel system that not only supports the tumoroid formation from LNCaP prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but also simulates their reciprocal interactions with the tumor-associated stroma was developed and characterized. HA hydrogels were prepared by mixing solutions of HA precursors functionalized with acrylate groups (HA-AC) and reactive thiols (HA-SH) under physiological conditions. The resultant viscoelastic gels have an average elastic modulus of 234 ± 30 Pa and can be degraded readily by hyaluronidase. The orthogonal and cytocompatible nature of the crosslinking chemistry permits facile incorporation of cytokine-releasing particles and PCa cells. In our bilayer hydrogel construct, the top layer contains heparin (HP)-decorated, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) capable of releasing heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in a sustained manner at a rate of 2.5 wt%/day cumulatively. LNCaP cells embedded in the bottom layer receive the growth factor signals from the top, and in response form enlarging tumoroids with an average diameter of 85 μm by day 7. Cells in 3D hydrogels assemble into spherical tumoroids, form close cellular contacts through E-cadherin, and show cortical organization of F-actin, whereas those plated as 2D monolayers adopt a spread-out morphology. Compared to cells cultured on 2D, the engineered tumoroids significantly increased the expression of two pro-angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF(165)) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), both at mRNA and protein levels. Overall, the HA model system provides a useful platform for the study of tumor cell responses to growth factors and for screening of anticancer drugs targeting these pathways. PMID:22999468

  6. Recreating the Tumor Microenvironment in a Bilayer, Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel Construct for the Growth of Prostate Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xian; Gurski, Lisa A.; Zhang, Chu; Harrington, Daniel A.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells cultured in physiologically relevant, three-dimensional (3D) matrices can recapture many essential features of native tumor tissues. In this study, a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based bilayer hydrogel system that not only supports the tumoroid formation from LNCaP prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but also simulates their reciprocal interactions with the tumor-associated stroma was developed and characterized. HA hydrogels were prepared by mixing solutions of HA precursors functionalized with acrylate groups (HA-AC) and reactive thiols (HA-SH) under physiological conditions. The resultant viscoelastic gels have an average elastic modulus of 234 ± 30 Pa and can be degraded readily by hyaluronidase. The orthogonal and cytocompatible nature of the crosslinking chemistry permits facile incorporation of cytokine-releasing particles and PCa cells. In our bilayer hydrogel construct, the top layer contains heparin (HP)-decorated, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) capable of releasing heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in a sustained manner at a rate of 2.5wt%/day cumulatively. LNCaP cells embedded in the bottom layer receive the growth factor signals from the top, and in response form enlarging tumoroids with an average diameter of 85 μm by day 7. Cells in 3D hydrogels assemble into spherical tumoroids, form close cellular contacts through E-cadherin, and show cortical organization of F-actin, whereas those plated as 2D monolayers adopt a spread-out morphology. Compared to cells cultured on 2D, the engineered tumoroids significantly increased the expression of two pro-angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF165) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), both at mRNA and protein levels. Overall, the HA model system provides a useful platform for the study of tumor cell responses to growth factors and for screening of anticancer drugs targeting these pathways. PMID:22999468

  7. Simultaneous quantification of tumor uptake for targeted and non-targeted liposomes and their encapsulated contents by ICP-MS

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhiliang; Zaki, Ajlan Al; Hui, James Z; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Liposomes are intensively being developed for biomedical applications including drug and gene delivery. However, targeted liposomal delivery in cancer treatment is a very complicated multi-step process. Unfavorable liposome biodistribution upon intravenous administration and membrane destabilization in blood circulation could result in only a very small fraction of cargo reaching the tumors. It would therefore be desirable to develop new quantitative strategies to track liposomal delivery systems to improve the therapeutic index and decrease systemic toxicity. Here, we developed a simple and non-radiative method to quantify the tumor uptake of targeted and non-targeted control liposomes as well as their encapsulated contents simultaneously. Specifically, four different chelated lanthanide metals were encapsulated or surface-conjugated onto tumor-targeted and non-targeted liposomes, respectively. The two liposome formulations were then injected into tumor-bearing mice simultaneously and their tumor delivery was determined quantitatively via inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), allowing for direct comparisons. Tumor uptake of the liposomes themselves and their encapsulated contents were consistent with targeted and non-targeted liposome formulations that were injected individually. PMID:22882145

  8. Elucidating the mechanobiology of malignant brain tumors using a brain matrix-mimetic hyaluronic acid hydrogel platform

    PubMed Central

    Ananthanarayanan, Badriprasad; Kim, Yushan; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor characterized by diffuse infiltration of single cells into the brain parenchyma, which is a process that relies in part on aberrant biochemical and biophysical interactions between tumor cells and the brain extracellular matrix (ECM). A major obstacle to understanding ECM regulation of GBM invasion is the absence of model matrix systems that recapitulate the distinct composition and physical structure of brain ECM while allowing independent control of adhesive ligand density, mechanics, and microstructure. To address this need, we synthesized brain-mimetic ECMs based on hyaluronic acid (HA) with a range of stiffnesses that encompasses normal and tumorigenic brain tissue and functionalized these materials with short Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides to facilitate cell adhesion. Scanning electron micrographs of the hydrogels revealed a dense, sheet-like microstructure with apparent nanoscale porosity similar to brain extracellular space. On flat hydrogel substrates, glioma cell spreading area and actin stress fiber assembly increased strongly with increasing density of RGD peptide. Increasing HA stiffness under constant RGD density produced similar trends and increased the speed of random motility. In a three-dimensional (3D) spheroid paradigm, glioma cells invaded HA hydrogels with morphological patterns distinct from those observed on flat surfaces or in 3D collagen-based ECMs but highly reminiscent of those seen in brain slices. This material system represents a brain-mimetic model ECM with tunable ligand density and stiffness amenable to investigations of the mechanobiological regulation of brain tumor progression. PMID:21820737

  9. Targeted PRINT Hydrogels: The Role of Nanoparticle Size and Ligand Density on Cell Association, Biodistribution, and Tumor Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Kevin G; Perry, Jillian L; Kim, Dongwook; Luft, J Christopher; Liu, Rihe; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-10-14

    In this Letter, we varied targeting ligand density of an EGFR binding affibody on the surface of two different hydrogel PRINT nanoparticles (80 nm × 320 and 55 nm × 60 nm) and monitored effects on target-cell association, off-target phagocytic uptake, biodistribution, and tumor accumulation. Interestingly, variations in ligand density only significantly altered in vitro internalization rates for the 80 nm × 320 nm particle. However, in vivo, both particle sizes experienced significant changes in biodistribution and pharmacokinetics as a function of ligand density. Overall, nanoparticle size and passive accumulation were the dominant factors eliciting tumor sequestration. PMID:26389971

  10. Preparation of magnetic polybutylcyanoacrylate nanospheres encapsulated with aclacinomycin A and its effect on gastric tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong; Wang, Ji-Yao; Shen, Xi-Zhong; Deng, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of aclacinomycin A-loaded magnetic polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles on gastric tumor growth in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: Magnetic polybutylcyanoacrylate (PBCA) nanospheres encapsulated with aclacinomycin A (MPNS-ACM) were prepared by interfacial polymerization. Particle size, shape and drug content were examined. Female BABL/c nude mice were implanted with MKN-45 gastric carcinoma tissues subcutaneously to establish human gastric carcinoma model. The mice were randomly divided into 5 groups of 6 each: ACM group (8 mg/kg bm); group of high dosage of MPNS-ACM (8 mg/kg bm); group of low dosage of MPNS-ACM (1.6 mg/kg bm); group of magnetic PBCA nanosphere (MPNS) and control group (normal saline). Magnets (2.5 T) were implanted into the tumor masses in all of the mice one day before the therapy. Above-mentioned drugs were administered intravenously to the mice of every group on the first day and sixth day. When the mice were sacrificed, tumor weight was measured, and the assay of granulocyte- macrophage colony forming-unit (CFU-GM) was performed on semi-solid culture. White blood cell, alanine aminotransferase and creatine were examined. 3-[4-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) was used to examine the viability of MKN-45 cells after incubation with different concentrations of ACM, MPNS and MPNS-ACM suspension respectively for 48 h. RESULTS: Content of ACM in MPNS-ACM was 12.0% and the average diameter of the particles was 210 nm. The inhibitory rates of ACM (8 mg/kg bm), high dosage of MPNS-ACM (8 mg/kg bm), low dosage of MPNS-ACM (1.6 mg/kg bm) and MPNS on human gastric carcinoma in nude mice were 22.63%, 52.55%, 30.66% and 10.22%, respectively. There was a significant decrease in the number of CFU-GM of bone marrow in ACM group compared with control group, whereas no obvious change was observed in that of the nanosphere groups. The values of 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of ACM, MPNS and MPNS-ACM were 0

  11. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  12. Invasion rather than nuclear features correlates with outcome in encapsulated follicular tumors: further evidence for the reclassification of the encapsulated papillary thyroid carcinoma follicular variant☆

    PubMed Central

    Ganly, Ian; Wang, Laura; Tuttle, R. Michael; Katabi, Nora; Ceballos, Gustavo A.; Harach, H. Ruben; Ghossein, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Summary The prognosis of the encapsulated follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (EFVPTC) and its relationship to encapsulated follicular carcinoma (EFC) and follicular adenoma (FA) is subject to controversy. All EFVPTCs, EFCs, and FAs identified at a single institution between 1981 and 2003 were analyzed microscopically. A cohort of FAs from a different hospital was also examined. EFVPTCs were subdivided into noninvasive EFVPTC (NIEFVPTC) and invasive EFVPTC (IEFVPTC) displaying capsular/vascular invasion. There were 83 EFVPTCs (57 noninvasive, 26 invasive), 14 EFCs, and 52 FAs. Similar to FA, over a median follow-up of 9.5 years, none of the NIEFVPTCs manifested lymph node metastasis (LNM) or recurred. Furthermore, with a median follow-up of 10.5 years, none of 39 NIEFVPTCs without radioactive iodine therapy recurred. Four (15%) of 26 IEFVPTCs and none of 14 EFCs harbored distant metastasis (P = .29). There was no difference in LNM rate and degree of vascular or capsular invasion between IEFVPTC and EFC (P > .1). All 4 IEFVPTCs with adverse behavior presented with distant metastasis and no LNM. Sixteen percent of IEFVPTCs had poor outcome, whereas there was none in the NIEFVPTCs (P = .007). In conclusion, NIEFVPTC seems to behave similarly to FA, whereas IEFVPTC can metastasize and spread like EFC. Thus, invasion rather than nuclear features drives outcome in encapsulated follicular tumors. Non-IEFVPTC could be treated in a conservative manner sparing patients unnecessary total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine therapy. The position of the EFVPTC in the classification of thyroid neoplasia should be reconsidered. PMID:25721865

  13. Invasion rather than nuclear features correlates with outcome in encapsulated follicular tumors: further evidence for the reclassification of the encapsulated papillary thyroid carcinoma follicular variant.

    PubMed

    Ganly, Ian; Wang, Laura; Tuttle, R Michael; Katabi, Nora; Ceballos, Gustavo A; Harach, H Ruben; Ghossein, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    The prognosis of the encapsulated follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (EFVPTC) and its relationship to encapsulated follicular carcinoma (EFC) and follicular adenoma (FA) is subject to controversy. All EFVPTCs, EFCs, and FAs identified at a single institution between 1981 and 2003 were analyzed microscopically. A cohort of FAs from a different hospital was also examined. EFVPTCs were subdivided into noninvasive EFVPTC (NIEFVPTC) and invasive EFVPTC (IEFVPTC) displaying capsular/vascular invasion. There were 83 EFVPTCs (57 noninvasive, 26 invasive), 14 EFCs, and 52 FAs. Similar to FA, over a median follow-up of 9.5 years, none of the NIEFVPTCs manifested lymph node metastasis (LNM) or recurred. Furthermore, with a median follow-up of 10.5 years, none of 39 NIEFVPTCs without radioactive iodine therapy recurred. Four (15%) of 26 IEFVPTCs and none of 14 EFCs harbored distant metastasis (P = .29). There was no difference in LNM rate and degree of vascular or capsular invasion between IEFVPTC and EFC (P > .1). All 4 IEFVPTCs with adverse behavior presented with distant metastasis and no LNM. Sixteen percent of IEFVPTCs had poor outcome, whereas there was none in the NIEFVPTCs (P = .007). In conclusion, NIEFVPTC seems to behave similarly to FA, whereas IEFVPTC can metastasize and spread like EFC. Thus, invasion rather than nuclear features drives outcome in encapsulated follicular tumors. Non-IEFVPTC could be treated in a conservative manner sparing patients unnecessary total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine therapy. The position of the EFVPTC in the classification of thyroid neoplasia should be reconsidered. PMID:25721865

  14. Dental mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in an alginate hydrogel co-delivery microencapsulation system for cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Xu, Xingtian; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Snead, Malcolm L; Shi, Songtao

    2013-12-01

    Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cartilage regeneration, with a high capacity for chondrogenic differentiation. This property helps make dental MSCs an advantageous therapeutic option compared to current treatment modalities. The MSC delivery vehicle is the principal determinant for the success of MSC-mediated cartilage regeneration therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel co-delivery system based on TGF-β1 loaded RGD-coupled alginate microspheres encapsulating periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) or gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate dental MSC viability and chondrogenic differentiation in alginate microspheres. The results revealed the sustained release of TGF-β1 from the alginate microspheres. After 4 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation in vitro, PDLSCs and GMSCs as well as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) (as positive control) revealed chondrogenic gene expression markers (Col II and Sox-9) via qPCR, as well as matrix positively stained by Toluidine Blue and Safranin-O. In animal studies, ectopic cartilage tissue regeneration was observed inside and around the transplanted microspheres, confirmed by histochemical and immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, PDLSCs showed more chondrogenesis than GMSCs and hBMMSCs (p<0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that RGD-modified alginate microencapsulating dental MSCs make a promising candidate for cartilage regeneration. Our results highlight the vital role played by the microenvironment, as well as value of presenting inductive signals for viability and differentiation of MSCs. PMID:23891740

  15. 3D modeling of human cancer: A PEG-fibrin hydrogel system to study the role of tumor microenvironment and recapitulate the in vivo effect of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Del Bufalo, Francesca; Manzo, Teresa; Hoyos, Valentina; Yagyu, Shigeki; Caruana, Ignazio; Jacot, Jeffrey; Benavides, Omar; Rosen, Daniel; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between malignant and stromal cells and the 3D spatial architecture of the tumor both substantially modify tumor behavior, including the responses to small molecule drugs and biological therapies. Conventional 2D culture systems cannot replicate this complexity. To overcome these limitations and more accurately model solid tumors, we developed a highly versatile 3D PEG-fibrin hydrogel model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Our model relevantly recapitulates the effect of oncolytic adenovirus; tumor responses in this setting nearly reproduce those observed in vivo. We have also validated the use of this model for complex, long-term, 3D cultures of cancer cells and their stroma (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Both tumor proliferation and invasiveness were enhanced in the presence of stromal components. These results validate our 3D hydrogel model as a relevant platform to study cancer biology and tumor responses to biological treatments. PMID:26826297

  16. Liposomes Encapsulating 10-Hydroxycamptothecin-Cyclodextrin Complexes and Their In Vitro Anti-Tumor Activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Chen, Cheng; Xiao, Yiyun; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Chen, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    Manufacturing and characterizing hydroxycamptothecin inclusion liposomes, establishing their quality standard and testing their in vitro anti-tumor activity is of significance for potential application. The neutralization agitation method was used to prepare hydroxycamptothecin inclusion and film evaporation method was utilized to manufacture hydroxycamptothecin inclusion liposomes. The phase solubility method, differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy were used to identify the prepared inclusion complex. The hydroxycamptothecin inclusion liposomes were characterized for particle morphology, size, in vitro release and stability. The hepatoma (HepG-2), lung cancer (A549), and gastric cancer (SGC-7901) cell lines were used as models for preliminary evaluation of anti-cancer effect from the hydroxycamptothecin inclusion liposomes, done by MTT colorimetry, cytometer experiments, and apoptosis staining. The anti-cancer evaluation was compared with commercially available hydroxycamptothecin. The results showed the hydroxycamptothecin inclusion was successfully prepared by neutralization agitation method. Phase solubility method, differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy proved the formation of the hydroxycamptothecin inclusion. The hydroxycamptothecin inclusion liposomes were successfully prepared by film evaporation method. (2) The inclusions were found to be spherical, with average particle size of 119.7 nm, zeta potential of - 45.6 mV, average inclusion rate of 70.55%, and drug-loading was 14.60%. The inclusions were also found to have a sustained release effect, when compared to the commercially available hydroxyccamptothecine. The hydroxyccamptothecine inclusion liposomes had better stability at 4 degrees. (3) The hydroxycamptothecin inclusion liposomes also exhibited better inhibition effect for the three kinds of cancer cell lines above, when compared to the commercially available hydroxycamptothecin the anti-cancer effect being

  17. Targeted Mesoporous Iron Oxide Nanoparticles-Encapsulated Perfluorohexane and a Hydrophobic Drug for Deep Tumor Penetration and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Lin; Fang, Jen-Hung; Liao, Chia-Ying; Lin, Chein-Ting; Li, Yun-Ting; Hu, Shang-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    A magneto-responsive energy/drug carrier that enhances deep tumor penetration with a porous nano-composite is constructed by using a tumor-targeted lactoferrin (Lf) bio-gate as a cap on mesoporous iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs). With a large payload of a gas-generated molecule, perfluorohexane (PFH), and a hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), Lf-MIONs can simultaneously perform bursting gas generation and on-demand drug release upon high-frequency magnetic field (MF) exposure. Biocompatible PFH was chosen and encapsulated in MIONs due to its favorable phase transition temperature (56 °C) and its hydrophobicity. After a short-duration MF treatment induces heat generation, the local pressure increase via the gasifying of the PFH embedded in MION can substantially rupture the three-dimensional tumor spheroids in vitro as well as enhance drug and carrier penetration. As the MF treatment duration increases, Lf-MIONs entering the tumor spheroids provide an intense heat and burst-like drug release, leading to superior drug delivery and deep tumor thermo-chemo-therapy. With their high efficiency for targeting tumors, Lf-MIONs/PTX-PFH suppressed subcutaneous tumors in 16 days after a single MF exposure. This work presents the first study of using MF-induced PFH gasification as a deep tumor-penetrating agent for drug delivery. PMID:26379789

  18. Enhanced Stimulation of Anti-Ovarian Cancer CD8+ T Cells by Dendritic Cells Loaded with Nanoparticle Encapsulated Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Douglas J; Aldo, Paulomi B.; Devine, Lesley; Alvero, Ayesha B.; Engberg, Anna K.; Edelson, Richard; Mor, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Problem Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer therapies are favored approaches to stimulate anti-tumor T cells responses. Unfortunately, tolerance to tumor antigens is difficult to overcome. Biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) are effective reagents in the delivery of drugs and tumor-associated antigens (TAA). In this study, we assessed the capacity of a PLGA NP-based delivery system to augment CD8 T cell responses to ovarian cancer TAA. Method of Study Human DC were generated from blood monocytes by conventional in vitro differentiation and loaded with either soluble tumor lysate or NP/lysate conjugates (NPL). These antigen-loaded DC were then used to stimulate autologous CD8+ T cells. Cytokine production and activation markers were evaluated in the CD8+T cells. Results DC loading with NPL increased cytokine production by stimulated CD8 T cells and induced T cell expression of cell surface co-stimulatory molecules, typical of anti-tumor immune responses. In contrast, delivery of naked tumor lysate antigens preferentially induced a T cell profile characteristic of tolerization/exhaustion. Conclusion These findings indicate that delivery of TAA in NP enables DC to efficiently activate anti-tumor CD8+ T cells. PLGA NP encapsulation of tumor-derived lysate protein antigens is an encouraging new preparative methodology for DC-based vaccination meriting clinical testing. PMID:21241402

  19. Encapsulated paclitaxel nanoparticles exhibit enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in A549 non-small lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guojin; Zang, Bao; Wang, Xiaowei; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Jianqiang

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, paclitaxel (PTX) were encapsulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polylactide (PLA)/D-α tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) (PEG-PLA/TPGS) and the enhanced anti-tumor activity of this PTX mixed micelles (PTX-MM) was evaluated in lung cancer cells. The PTX-MM prepared by a solvent evaporation method was demonstrated to have high drug-loading efficiency (23.2%), high encapsulation efficiency (76.4%), and small size (59 nm). In vitro release assay showed the slow release behavior of PTX-MM, suggesting the good stability of the PTX-MM essential for long circulation time. In vitro kinetics assay demonstrated that PTX-MM could promote absorption and increase relative bioavailability. The anti-cancer efficiency of PTX-MM was also examined by both in vitro and in vivo studies. PTX-MM exhibits obvious cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells with much lower IC50 value when compared with commercial formulated PTX or PTX + TPGS. The xenograft tumor model studies on nude mice indicated that PTX-MM inhibits tumor growth more effectively than other formulations. It was also found that most of mixed micelles were integral in tumor site to exhibit anti-cancer activity. Our results suggested that the use of PTX-MM as an anti-cancer drug may be an effective approach to treat lung cancer. PMID:26525950

  20. Sustained release of PTX-incorporated nanoparticles synergized by burst release of DOX⋅HCl from thermosensitive modified PEG/PCL hydrogel to improve anti-tumor efficiency.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuxin; Wang, Weiwei; Li, Xijing; Liu, Jianping; Dong, Anjie; Deng, Liandong

    2014-10-01

    As drug therapies become increasingly sophisticated, the synergistic benefits of two or more drugs are often required. In this study, we aimed at improving anti-tumor efficiency of paclitaxel (PTX)-incorporated thermo-sensitive injectable hydrogel by the synergy of burst release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX⋅HCl). Thermosensitive injectable hydrogel composed of nanoparticles assembled from amphiphilic copolymer poly(ε-caprolactone-co-1,4,8-trioxa[4.6]spiro-9-undecanone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolaone-co-1,4,8-trioxa[4.6]spiro-9-undecanone) (PECT) was fabricated. Hydrophobic PTX and hydrophilic DOX⋅HCl were loaded simultaneously in the thermo-sensitive injectable hydrogel by a two-stage entrapment. Thermosensitive gelling behaviors of drug-loading PECT nanoparticle aqueous dispersions were studied. In vitro release profiles of PTX and DOX⋅HCl and in vivo anti-tumor effect by dual drugs from PECT hydrogel were investigated. The results showed that hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs could be successfully entrapped in PECT hydrogel simultaneously without affecting its thermo-sensitive behavior. In vitro release profiles demonstrated the burst release of DOX⋅HCl and the sustained release of PTX. Anti-tumor effect was improved by a fast and tense attack caused by the burst release of hydrophilic DOX⋅HCl from hydrogel, which was continued by the sequent sustained release of PTX-incorporated nanoparticles and remnant DOX⋅HCl. Unintentionally, entrapped in PECT hydrogel, hydrophilic DOX⋅HCl was observed to have a sustained releasing pattern in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24931190

  1. Spatiotemporal release of BMP-2 and VEGF enhances osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial colony-forming cells co-encapsulated in a patterned hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Barati, Danial; Shariati, Seyed Ramin Pajoum; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Khademhosseini, Ali; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2016-02-10

    Reconstruction of large bone defects is limited by insufficient vascularization and slow bone regeneration. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on the extent of osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) encapsulated in a patterned hydrogel. Nanogels (NGs) based on polyethylene glycol (PEG) macromers chain-extended with short lactide (L) and glycolide (G) segments were used for grafting and timed-release of BMP2 and VEGF. NGs with 12kDa PEG molecular weight (MW), 24 LG segment length, and 60/40L/G ratio (P12-II, NG(10)) released the grafted VEGF in 10days. NGs with 8kDa PEG MW, 26 LG segment length, and 60/40L/G ratio (P8-I, NG(21)) released the grafted BMP2 in 21days. hMSCs and NG-BMP2 were encapsulated in a patterned matrix based on acrylate-functionalized lactide-chain-extended star polyethylene glycol (SPELA) hydrogel and microchannel patterns filled with a suspension of hMSCs+ECFCs and NG-VEGF in a crosslinked gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel. Groups included patterned constructs without BMP2/VEGF (None), with directly added BMP2/VEGF, and NG-BMP2/NG-VEGF. Based on the results, timed-release of VEGF in the microchannels in 10days from NG(10) and BMP2 in the matrix in 21days from NG(21) resulted in highest extent of osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation of the encapsulated hMSCs and ECFCs compared to direct addition of VEGF and BMP2. Further, timed-release of VEGF from NG(10) in hMSC+ECFC encapsulating microchannels and BMP2 from NG(21) in hMSC encapsulating matrix sharply increased bFGF expression in the patterned constructs. The results suggest that mineralization and vascularization are coupled by localized secretion of paracrine signaling factors by the differentiating hMSCs and ECFCs. PMID:26721447

  2. Three-Dimensional Microfluidic Collagen Hydrogels for Investigating Flow-Mediated Tumor-Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Organization

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Elizabeth E.; Szot, Christopher S.; Freeman, Joseph W.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpermeable tumor vessels are responsible for elevated interstitial fluid pressure and altered flow patterns within the tumor microenvironment. These aberrant hydrodynamic stresses may enhance tumor development by stimulating the angiogenic activity of endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature. However, it is currently not known to what extent shear forces affect endothelial organization or paracrine signaling during tumor angiogenesis. The objective of this study was to develop a three-dimensional (3D), in vitro microfluidic tumor vascular model for coculture of tumor and endothelial cells under varying flow shear stress conditions. A central microchannel embedded within a collagen hydrogel functions as a single neovessel through which tumor-relevant hydrodynamic stresses are introduced and quantified using microparticle image velocimetry (μ-PIV). This is the first use of μ-PIV in a tumor representative, 3D collagen matrix comprised of cylindrical microchannels, rather than planar geometries, to experimentally measure flow velocity and shear stress. Results demonstrate that endothelial cells develop a confluent endothelium on the microchannel lumen that maintains integrity under physiological flow shear stresses. Furthermore, this system provides downstream molecular analysis capability, as demonstrated by quantitative RT-PCR, in which, tumor cells significantly increase expression of proangiogenic genes in response to coculture with endothelial cells under low flow conditions. This work demonstrates that the microfluidic in vitro cell culture model can withstand a range of physiological flow rates and permit quantitative measurement of wall shear stress at the fluid–collagen interface using μ-PIV optical flow diagnostics, ultimately serving as a versatile platform for elucidating the role of fluid forces on tumor–endothelial cross talk. PMID:23730946

  3. Introduction to cell–hydrogel mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Ahearne, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The development of hydrogel-based biomaterials represents a promising approach to generating new strategies for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In order to develop more sophisticated cell-seeded hydrogel constructs, it is important to understand how cells mechanically interact with hydrogels. In this paper, we review the mechanisms by which cells remodel hydrogels, the influence that the hydrogel mechanical and structural properties have on cell behaviour and the role of mechanical stimulation in cell-seeded hydrogels. Cell-mediated remodelling of hydrogels is directed by several cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, contraction, degradation and extracellular matrix deposition. Variations in hydrogel stiffness, density, composition, orientation and viscoelastic characteristics all affect cell activity and phenotype. The application of mechanical force on cells encapsulated in hydrogels can also instigate changes in cell behaviour. By improving our understanding of cell–material mechano-interactions in hydrogels, this should enable a new generation of regenerative medical therapies to be developed. PMID:24748951

  4. Improved Mechanical Properties and Sustained Release Behavior of Cationic Cellulose Nanocrystals Reinforeced Cationic Cellulose Injectable Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    You, Jun; Cao, Jinfeng; Zhao, Yanteng; Zhang, Lina; Zhou, Jinping; Chen, Yun

    2016-09-12

    Polysaccharide-based injectable hydrogels have several advantages in the context of biomedical use. However, the main obstruction associated with the utilization of these hydrogels in clinical application is their poor mechanical properties. Herein, we describe in situ gelling of nanocomposite hydrogels based on quaternized cellulose (QC) and rigid rod-like cationic cellulose nanocrystals (CCNCs), which can overcome this challenge. In all cases, gelation immediately occurred with an increase of temperature, and the CCNCs were evenly distributed throughout the hydrogels. The nanocomposite hydrogels exhibited increasing orders-of-magnitude in the mechanical strength, high extension in degradation and the sustained release time, because of the strong interaction between CCNCs and QC chains mediated by the cross-linking agent (β-glycerophosphate, β-GP). The results of the in vitro toxicity and in vivo biocompatibility tests revealed that the hydrogels did not show obvious cytotoxicity and inflammatory reaction to cells and tissue. Moreover, DOX-encapsulated hydrogels were injected beside the tumors of mice bearing liver cancer xenografts to assess the potential utility as localized and sustained drug delivery depot systems for anticancer therapy. The results suggested that the QC/CCNC/β-GP nanocomposite hydrogels had great potential for application in subcutaneous and sustained delivery of anticancer drug to increase therapeutic efficacy and improve patient compliance. PMID:27519472

  5. High molecular weight chitosan derivative polymeric micelles encapsulating superparamagnetic iron oxide for tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunbin; Lin, Zuan Tao; Chen, Yanmei; Wang, He; Deng, Ya Li; Le, D Elizabeth; Bin, Jianguo; Li, Meiyu; Liao, Yulin; Liu, Yili; Jiang, Gangbiao; Bin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on chitosan derivatives have great potential for diagnosing diseases. However, stable tumor-targeted MRI contrast agents using micelles prepared from high molecular weight chitosan derivatives are seldom reported. In this study, we developed a novel tumor-targeted MRI vehicle via superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) encapsulated in self-aggregating polymeric folate-conjugated N-palmitoyl chitosan (FAPLCS) micelles. The tumor-targeting ability of FAPLCS/SPIONs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The results of dynamic light scattering experiments showed that the micelles had a relatively narrow size distribution (136.60±3.90 nm) and excellent stability. FAPLCS/SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility in cellular toxicity tests. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that FAPLCS/SPIONs bound specifically to folate receptor-positive HeLa cells, and that FAPLCS/SPIONs accumulated predominantly in established HeLa-derived tumors in mice. The signal intensities of T2-weighted images in established HeLa-derived tumors were reduced dramatically after intravenous micelle administration. Our study indicates that FAPLCS/SPION micelles can potentially serve as safe and effective MRI contrast agents for detecting tumors that overexpress folate receptors. PMID:25709439

  6. Anti-tumor activity of liposome encapsulated fluoroorotic acid as a single agent and in combination with liposome irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Riviere, Kareen; Jerger, Katherine; Szoka, Francis C.

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that co-delivery of synergistic drug combinations in the same liposome provides a better anti-tumor effect than the drugs administered in separate liposomes, fluoroorotic acid (FOA) alone and in combination with irinotecan (IRN) were encapsulated in liposomes and evaluated for their anti-tumor activity in the C26 colon carcinoma mouse model. Fluoroorotic acid was dissolved in 7 M urea to increase its solubility so it could be passively loaded into liposomes at a high concentration. IRN was remote loaded into liposomes that contained the ammonium salt of the multi-valent 1,2,3,4-butanetetratcarboxylic acid with a greater than 90% efficiency and at a drug to lipid ratio of 0.2/1. When the two molecules were loaded into the same liposome, FOA was used to remote load IRN. Modulation of the drug/lipid ratio, temperature, and loading time allowed for consistent co-encapsulation of FOA + IRN at various molar ratios. The anti-tumor activity of L-FOA, L-IRN, L-FOA-IRN (5:1), and the L-FOA + L-IRN mixture (5:1) were examined in the C26 mouse model. The maximum tolerated dose of L-FOA was 10 mg/kg given weekly as compared to 100 mg/kg of the non-encapsulated FOA. Delivering two drugs in the same liposome provided a statistically better antitumor effect than delivering the drugs in separate liposomes at the same drug ratio. However, the synergistic activity of the 5:1 ratio of free drugs measured on C26 cells in vitro was not observed in the C26 tumor mouse model. These findings point out the challenges to the design of synergistic treatment protocols based upon results from in vitro cytotoxicity studies. L-FOA at 10 mg/kg as a single agent provided the best anti-tumor efficacy which supports previous suggestions that L-FOA has useful properties as a liposome dependent drug. PMID:21600250

  7. Chitosan-Decorated Doxorubicin-Encapsulated Nanoparticle Targets and Eliminates Tumor Reinitiating Cancer Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Wei; Wang, Hai; Han, Jianfeng; Zhao, Shuting; Dumbleton, Jenna; Agarwal, Pranay; Zhang, Wujie; Zhao, Gang; Yu, Jianhua; Zynger, Debra L; Lu, Xiongbin; He, Xiaoming

    2015-06-23

    Tumor reinitiating cancer stem-like cells are responsible for cancer recurrence associated with conventional chemotherapy. We developed a doxorubicin-encapsulated polymeric nanoparticle surface-decorated with chitosan that can specifically target the CD44 receptors of these cells. This nanoparticle system was engineered to release the doxorubicin in acidic environments, which occurs when the nanoparticles are localized in the acidic tumor microenvironment and when they are internalized and localized in the cellular endosomes/lysosomes. This nanoparticle design strategy increases the cytotoxicity of the doxorubicin by six times in comparison to the use of free doxorubicin for eliminating CD44(+) cancer stem-like cells residing in 3D mammary tumor spheroids (i.e., mammospheres). We further show these nanoparticles reduced the size of tumors in an orthotopic xenograft tumor model with no evident systemic toxicity. The development of nanoparticle system to target cancer stem-like cells with low systemic toxicity provides a new treatment arsenal for improving the survival of cancer patients. PMID:26004286

  8. Near-Infrared Light-Responsive Hydrogel for Specific Recognition and Photothermal Site-Release of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Song-Wei; Liu, Ya; Xie, Min; Wang, Jing; Yan, Xue-Wei; Li, Zhen; Dong, Wei-Guo; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2016-06-28

    Isolation of single circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patients is a very challenging technique that may promote the process of individualized antitumor therapies. However, there exist few systems capable of highly efficient capture and release of single CTCs with high viability for downstream analysis and culture. Herein, we designed a near-infrared (NIR) light-responsive substrate for highly efficient immunocapture and biocompatible site-release of CTCs by a combination of the photothermal effect of gold nanorods (GNRs) and a thermoresponsive hydrogel. The substrate was fabricated by imprinting target cancer cells on a GNR-pre-embedded gelatin hydrogel. Micro/nanostructures generated by cell imprinting produce artificial receptors for cancer cells to improve capture efficiency. Temperature-responsive gelatin dissolves rapidly at 37 °C; this allows bulk recovery of captured CTCs at physiological temperature or site-specific release of single CTCs by NIR-mediated photothermal activation of embedded GNRs. Furthermore, the system has been applied to capture, individually release, and genetically analyze CTCs from the whole blood of cancer patients. The multifunctional NIR-responsive platform demonstrates excellent performance in capture and site-release of CTCs with high viability, which provides a robust and versatile means toward individualized antitumor therapies and also shows promising potential for dynamically manipulating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. PMID:27299807

  9. Anti-tumor effect via passive anti-angiogenesis of PEGylated liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin in drug resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Golam; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Sato, Yusuke; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-07-25

    The PEGylated liposomal (PEG-LP) Doxorubicin, PEG-LP (DOX), with a diameter of around 100nm, accumulates in tumors via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, and is used clinically for the treatment of several types of cancer. However, there are a number of tumor types that are resistant to DOX. We report herein on a unique anti-tumor effect of PEG-LP (DOX) in a DOX-resistant tumor xenograft model. PEG-LP (DOX) failed to suppress the growth of the DOX-resistant tumors (ex. non-small cell lung cancer, H69AR; renal cell carcinoma, OSRC-2) as observed in the xenograft model. Unexpectedly, tumor growth was suppressed in a DOX-resistant breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) xenograft model. We investigated the mechanism by which PEG-LP (DOX) responses differ in different drug resistant tumors. In hyperpermeable OSRC-2 tumors, PEG-LP was distributed to deep tumor tissues, where it delivers DOX to drug-resistant tumor cells. In contrast, extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as collagen, pericytes, cancer-associated fibroblasts render MDA-MB-231 tumors hypopermeable, which limits the extent of the penetration and distribution of PEG-LP, thereby enhancing the delivery of DOX to the vicinity of the tumor vasculature. Therefore, a remarkable anti-angiogenic effect with a preferential suppression in tumor growth is achieved. Based on the above findings, it appears that the response of PEG-LP (DOX) to drug-resistant tumors results from differences in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27234700

  10. Enhanced tumor targeting and antitumor efficacy via hydroxycamptothecin-encapsulated folate-modified N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyan; Cao, Jie; Cui, Sisi; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-04-01

    10-Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) is an effective anticancer drug against various types of solid tumors. But the antitumor efficacy of HCPT is far from satisfactory because of its poor physicochemical properties, short circulating half-life, low stability, and nonspecific toxicity to normal tissues. Therefore, a targeted delivery strategy for HCPT to pathological sites is eagerly needed to overcome these limitations. The folate-modified N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (folate-SOC) micelle was chosen in this study and served as the targeted delivery system for HCPT to improve the antitumor efficacy. The water-insoluble anticancer drug HCPT was encapsulated into the folate-SOC micelles by the dialysis method. The near-spherical HCPT-loaded folate-SOC (HCPT/folate-SOC) micelles were formed in aqueous media with diameter of about 100-200 nm. The HCPT/folate-SOC micelles displayed a good stability, reasonable drug-loading content (about 10%), and sustained release behavior for the water-insoluble HCPT. Compared with free HCPT, HCPT/folate-SOC micelles exhibited a significant enhancement of cellular uptake, higher cytotoxicity against folate receptor positive tumor cell (Bel-7402), excellent tumor-targeting capability and substantially better antitumor efficacy on the nude mice bearing Bel-7402 xenografts. These results demonstrate the potential of folate-SOC micelles as long-term stable and effective drug delivery systems in cancer therapy. PMID:23400693

  11. A thermo-sensitive polymeric gel containing a gadolinium (Gd) compound encapsulated into liposomes significantly extended the retention of the Gd in tumors.

    PubMed

    Le, Uyen Minh; Shaker, Dalia S; Sloat, Brian R; Cui, Zhengrong

    2008-04-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is a promising approach to fight cancer. One key factor for the success of Gd-NCT is to deliver and maintain a sufficient amount of Gd inside tumors. A large amount of Gd can be readily introduced into tumors by direct intratumor injection. However, an innovative approach is needed to maintain the Gd in the tumors. We encapsulated a Gd compound into a liposome formulation and then dispersed the liposomes into a thermo-sensitive polymeric gel. In murine tumor models, we showed that this liposome-in-thermo-sensitive gel system significantly extended the retention of the Gd compound in tumors. This similar concept may be applied to prolong the retention of other cytotoxic chemicals in tumors, and thus, improve their anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:18401783

  12. T1-Weighted MR imaging of liver tumor by gadolinium-encapsulated glycol chitosan nanoparticles without non-specific toxicity in normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jin Hee; Lee, Sangmin; Koo, Heebeom; Han, Hyounkoo; Lee, Kyung Eun; Han, Seung Jin; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Lee, Seulki; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we have synthesized Gd(iii)-encapsulated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (Gd(iii)-CNPs) for tumor-targeted T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 contrast agent, Gd(iii), was successfully encapsulated into 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-modified CNPs to form stable Gd(iii)-encapsulated CNPs (Gd(iii)-CNPs) with an average particle size of approximately 280 nm. The stable nanoparticle structure of Gd(iii)-CNPs is beneficial for liver tumor accumulation by the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Moreover, the amine groups on the surface of Gd(iii)-CNPs could be protonated and could induce fast cellular uptake at acidic pH in tumor tissue. To assay the tumor-targeting ability of Cy5.5-labeled Gd(iii)-CNPs, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and MR imaging were used in a liver tumor model as well as a subcutaneous tumor model. Cy5.5-labeled Gd(iii)-CNPs generated highly intense fluorescence and T1 MR signals in tumor tissues after intravenous injection, while DOTAREM®, the commercialized control MR contrast agent, showed very low tumor-targeting efficiency on MR images. Furthermore, damaged tissues were found in the livers and kidneys of mice injected with DOTAREM®, but there were no obvious adverse effects with Gd(iii)-CNPs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the superiority of Gd(iii)-CNPs as a tumor-targeting T1 MR agent.Herein, we have synthesized Gd(iii)-encapsulated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (Gd(iii)-CNPs) for tumor-targeted T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 contrast agent, Gd(iii), was successfully encapsulated into 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-modified CNPs to form stable Gd(iii)-encapsulated CNPs (Gd(iii)-CNPs) with an average particle size of approximately 280 nm. The stable nanoparticle structure of Gd(iii)-CNPs is beneficial for liver tumor accumulation by the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Moreover, the

  13. Tumor regression achieved by encapsulating a moderately soluble drug into a polymeric thermogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ci, Tianyuan; Chen, Liang; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-07-01

    For cancer chemotherapy, a tumor regression without any surgical resection and severe side effects is greatly preferred to merely slowing down the growth of tumors. Here, we report a formulation composed of irinotecan (IRN) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG-PLGA). IRN is a clinically used antitumor drug with active and inactive chemical forms in equilibrium, and the major form at physiological conditions is inactive but still has side effects. The aqueous solution of the PLGA-PEG-PLGA is a sol at room temperature and physically gels at body temperature, forming a thermogel. We successfully mixed this moderately soluble drug into the amphiphilic copolymer aqueous solution for the first time. The mixture was subcutaneously injected into nude mice with xenografted SW620 human colon tumors. Excellent in vivo antitumor efficacy was observed in the group that received the IRN-loaded thermogel. The tumor was significantly regressed after being treated with the IRN/thermogel, and the side effects (blood toxicity and body weight decrease) were very mild. These results might be attributed to the ideal sustained release profile and period of release of the drug from the thermogel and to the significant enhancement of the fraction of the active form of the drug by the thermogel.

  14. Tumor regression achieved by encapsulating a moderately soluble drug into a polymeric thermogel

    PubMed Central

    Ci, Tianyuan; Chen, Liang; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    For cancer chemotherapy, a tumor regression without any surgical resection and severe side effects is greatly preferred to merely slowing down the growth of tumors. Here, we report a formulation composed of irinotecan (IRN) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG-PLGA). IRN is a clinically used antitumor drug with active and inactive chemical forms in equilibrium, and the major form at physiological conditions is inactive but still has side effects. The aqueous solution of the PLGA-PEG-PLGA is a sol at room temperature and physically gels at body temperature, forming a thermogel. We successfully mixed this moderately soluble drug into the amphiphilic copolymer aqueous solution for the first time. The mixture was subcutaneously injected into nude mice with xenografted SW620 human colon tumors. Excellent in vivo antitumor efficacy was observed in the group that received the IRN-loaded thermogel. The tumor was significantly regressed after being treated with the IRN/thermogel, and the side effects (blood toxicity and body weight decrease) were very mild. These results might be attributed to the ideal sustained release profile and period of release of the drug from the thermogel and to the significant enhancement of the fraction of the active form of the drug by the thermogel. PMID:24980734

  15. Folic acid-targeted disulfide-based cross-linking micelle for enhanced drug encapsulation stability and site-specific drug delivery against tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Junhui; Yang, Cuihong; Wang, Weiwei; Chu, Liping; Huang, Fan; Liu, Qiang; Deng, Liandong; Kong, Deling; Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jinjian

    2016-01-01

    Although the shortcomings of small molecular antitumor drugs were efficiently improved by being entrapped into nanosized vehicles, premature drug release and insufficient tumor targeting demand innovative approaches that boost the stability and tumor responsiveness of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Here, we show the use of the core cross-linking method to generate a micelle with enhanced drug encapsulation ability and sensitivity of drug release in tumor. This kind of micelle could increase curcumin (Cur) delivery to HeLa cells in vitro and improve tumor accumulation in vivo. We designed and synthesized the core cross-linked micelle (CCM) with polyethylene glycol and folic acid-polyethylene glycol as the hydrophilic units, pyridyldisulfide as the cross-linkable and hydrophobic unit, and disulfide bond as the cross-linker. CCM showed spherical shape with a diameter of 91.2 nm by the characterization of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. Attributed to the core cross-linking, drug-loaded CCM displayed higher Nile Red or Cur-encapsulated stability and better sensitivity to glutathione than noncross-linked micelle (NCM). Cellular uptake and in vitro antitumor studies proved the enhanced endocytosis and better cytotoxicity of CCM-Cur against HeLa cells, which had a high level of glutathione. Meanwhile, the folate receptor-mediated drug delivery (FA-CCM-Cur) further enhanced the endocytosis and cytotoxicity. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that CCM-Cur and FA-CCM-Cur possessed higher tumor accumulation until 24 hours after injection. Concretely, FA-CCM-Cur exhibited the highest tumor accumulation with 1.7-fold of noncross-linked micelle Cur and 2.8-fold of free Cur. By combining cross-linking of the core with active tumor targeting of FA, we demonstrated a new and effective way to design nanocarriers for enhanced drug encapsulation, smart tumor responsiveness, and elevated tumor accumulation. PMID:27051287

  16. Folic acid-targeted disulfide-based cross-linking micelle for enhanced drug encapsulation stability and site-specific drug delivery against tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Junhui; Yang, Cuihong; Wang, Weiwei; Chu, Liping; Huang, Fan; Liu, Qiang; Deng, Liandong; Kong, Deling; Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jinjian

    2016-01-01

    Although the shortcomings of small molecular antitumor drugs were efficiently improved by being entrapped into nanosized vehicles, premature drug release and insufficient tumor targeting demand innovative approaches that boost the stability and tumor responsiveness of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Here, we show the use of the core cross-linking method to generate a micelle with enhanced drug encapsulation ability and sensitivity of drug release in tumor. This kind of micelle could increase curcumin (Cur) delivery to HeLa cells in vitro and improve tumor accumulation in vivo. We designed and synthesized the core cross-linked micelle (CCM) with polyethylene glycol and folic acid-polyethylene glycol as the hydrophilic units, pyridyldisulfide as the cross-linkable and hydrophobic unit, and disulfide bond as the cross-linker. CCM showed spherical shape with a diameter of 91.2 nm by the characterization of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. Attributed to the core cross-linking, drug-loaded CCM displayed higher Nile Red or Cur-encapsulated stability and better sensitivity to glutathione than noncross-linked micelle (NCM). Cellular uptake and in vitro antitumor studies proved the enhanced endocytosis and better cytotoxicity of CCM-Cur against HeLa cells, which had a high level of glutathione. Meanwhile, the folate receptor-mediated drug delivery (FA-CCM-Cur) further enhanced the endocytosis and cytotoxicity. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that CCM-Cur and FA-CCM-Cur possessed higher tumor accumulation until 24 hours after injection. Concretely, FA-CCM-Cur exhibited the highest tumor accumulation with 1.7-fold of noncross-linked micelle Cur and 2.8-fold of free Cur. By combining cross-linking of the core with active tumor targeting of FA, we demonstrated a new and effective way to design nanocarriers for enhanced drug encapsulation, smart tumor responsiveness, and elevated tumor accumulation. PMID:27051287

  17. T1-Weighted MR imaging of liver tumor by gadolinium-encapsulated glycol chitosan nanoparticles without non-specific toxicity in normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Na, Jin Hee; Lee, Sangmin; Koo, Heebeom; Han, Hyounkoo; Lee, Kyung Eun; Han, Seung Jin; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Lee, Seulki; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we have synthesized Gd(iii)-encapsulated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (Gd(iii)-CNPs) for tumor-targeted T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 contrast agent, Gd(iii), was successfully encapsulated into 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-modified CNPs to form stable Gd(iii)-encapsulated CNPs (Gd(iii)-CNPs) with an average particle size of approximately 280 nm. The stable nanoparticle structure of Gd(iii)-CNPs is beneficial for liver tumor accumulation by the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Moreover, the amine groups on the surface of Gd(iii)-CNPs could be protonated and could induce fast cellular uptake at acidic pH in tumor tissue. To assay the tumor-targeting ability of Cy5.5-labeled Gd(iii)-CNPs, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and MR imaging were used in a liver tumor model as well as a subcutaneous tumor model. Cy5.5-labeled Gd(iii)-CNPs generated highly intense fluorescence and T1 MR signals in tumor tissues after intravenous injection, while DOTAREM®, the commercialized control MR contrast agent, showed very low tumor-targeting efficiency on MR images. Furthermore, damaged tissues were found in the livers and kidneys of mice injected with DOTAREM®, but there were no obvious adverse effects with Gd(iii)-CNPs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the superiority of Gd(iii)-CNPs as a tumor-targeting T1 MR agent. PMID:27113247

  18. Tumour targeted delivery of encapsulated dextran-doxorubicin conjugate using chitosan nanoparticles as carrier.

    PubMed

    Mitra, S; Gaur, U; Ghosh, P C; Maitra, A N

    2001-07-01

    Doxorubicin (DXR) commonly used in cancer therapy produces undesirable side effects such as cardiotoxicity. To minimize these, attempts have been made to couple the drug with dextran (DEX) and then to encapsulate this drug conjugate in hydrogel nanoparticles. By encapsulation of the drug conjugate in biodegradable, biocompatible long circulating hydrogel nanoparticles, we further improved the therapeutic efficacy of the conjugate. The size of these nanoparticles as determined by quasi-elastic light scattering, was found to be 100+/-10 nm diameter, which favors the enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) as observed in most solid tumors. The antitumor effect of these DEX-DXR nanoparticles, was evaluated in J774A.1 macrophage tumor cells implanted in Balb/c mice. The in vivo efficacy of these nanoparticles as antitumor drug carriers, was determined by tumor regression and increased survival time as compared to drug conjugate and free drug. These results suggest that encapsulation of the conjugate in nanoparticles not only reduces the side effects, but also improves its therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:11489513

  19. Novel Injectable Pentablock Copolymer Based Thermoresponsive Hydrogels for Sustained Release Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bobbala, Sharan; Tamboli, Viral; McDowell, Arlene; Mitra, Ashim K; Hook, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The need for multiple vaccinations to enhance the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines may be reduced by delivering the vaccine over an extended period of time. Here, we report two novel injectable pentablock copolymer based thermoresponsive hydrogels made of polyethyleneglycol-polycaprolactone-polylactide-polycaprolactone-polyethyleneglycol (PEG-PCL-PLA-PCL-PEG) with varying ratios of polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactide (PLA), as single shot sustained release vaccines. Pentablock copolymer hydrogels were loaded with vaccine-encapsulated poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (PLGA-NP) or with the soluble vaccine components. Incorporation of PLGA-NP into the thermoresponsive hydrogels increased the complex viscosity of the gels, lowered the gelation temperature, and minimized the burst release of antigen and adjuvants. The two pentablock hydrogels stimulated both cellular and humoral responses. The addition of PLGA-NP to the hydrogels sustained immune responses for up to 49 days. The polymer with a higher ratio of PCL to PLA formed a more rigid gel, induced stronger immune responses, and stimulated effective anti-tumor responses in a prophylactic melanoma tumor model. PMID:26589309

  20. Polypyrrole-encapsulated iron tungstate nanocomposites: a versatile platform for multimodal tumor imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhiyin; Peng, Chen; Jiang, Xiaohong; Peng, Yuxuan; Huang, Xiaojuan; Guan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Wenlong; Liu, Xiaoming; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2016-06-01

    A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in animal experiments. Blood circulation and biodistribution of the nanocomposites were also investigated to understand their in vivo behaviours. Our results verified the platform of FeWO4@PPy nanocomposites as a promising photothermal agent for imaging-guided cancer theranostics.A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in

  1. Enabling Surgical Placement of Hydrogels Through Achieving Paste-Like Rheological Behavior in Hydrogel Precursor Solutions.

    PubMed

    Beck, Emily C; Lohman, Brooke L; Tabakh, Daniel B; Kieweg, Sarah L; Gehrke, Stevin H; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogels are a promising class of materials for tissue regeneration, but they lack the ability to be molded into a defect site by a surgeon because hydrogel precursors are liquid solutions that are prone to leaking during placement. Therefore, although the main focus of hydrogel technology and developments are on hydrogels in their crosslinked form, our primary focus is on improving the fluid behavior of hydrogel precursor solutions. In this work, we introduce a method to achieve paste-like hydrogel precursor solutions by combining hyaluronic acid nanoparticles with traditional crosslinked hyaluronic acid hydrogels. Prior to crosslinking, the samples underwent rheological testing to assess yield stress and recovery using linear hyaluronic acid as a control. The experimental groups containing nanoparticles were the only solutions that exhibited a yield stress, demonstrating that the nanoparticulate rather than the linear form of hyaluronic acid was necessary to achieve paste-like behavior. The gels were also photocrosslinked and further characterized as solids, where it was demonstrated that the inclusion of nanoparticles did not adversely affect the compressive modulus and that encapsulated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable. Overall, this nanoparticle-based approach provides a platform hydrogel system that exhibits a yield stress prior to crosslinking, and can then be crosslinked into a hydrogel that is capable of encapsulating cells that remain viable. This behavior may hold significant impact for hydrogel applications where a paste-like behavior is desired in the hydrogel precursor solution. PMID:25691398

  2. A composite hydrogel platform for the dissection of tumor cell migration at tissue interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rape, Andrew D; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent primary brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse infiltration of tumor cells into brain tissue, which severely complicates surgical resection and contributes to tumor recurrence. The most rapid mode of tissue infiltration occurs along blood vessels or white matter tracts, which represent topological interfaces thought to serve as "tracks" that speed cell migration. Despite this observation, the field lacks experimental paradigms that capture key features of these tissue interfaces and allow reductionist dissection of mechanisms of this interfacial motility. To address this need, we developed a culture system in which tumor cells are sandwiched between a fibronectin-coated ventral surface representing vascular basement membrane and a dorsal hyaluronic acid (HA) surface representing brain parenchyma. We find that inclusion of the dorsal HA surface induces formation of adhesive complexes and significantly slows cell migration relative to a free fibronectin-coated surface. This retardation is amplified by inclusion of integrin binding peptides in the dorsal layer and expression of CD44, suggesting that the dorsal surface slows migration through biochemically specific mechanisms rather than simple steric hindrance. Moreover, both the reduction in migration speed and assembly of dorsal adhesions depend on myosin activation and the stiffness of the ventral layer, implying that mechanochemical feedback directed by the ventral layer can influence adhesive signaling at the dorsal surface. PMID:25047626

  3. Polypyrrole-encapsulated iron tungstate nanocomposites: a versatile platform for multimodal tumor imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiyin; Peng, Chen; Jiang, Xiaohong; Peng, Yuxuan; Huang, Xiaojuan; Guan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Wenlong; Liu, Xiaoming; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2016-07-14

    A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in animal experiments. Blood circulation and biodistribution of the nanocomposites were also investigated to understand their in vivo behaviours. Our results verified the platform of FeWO4@PPy nanocomposites as a promising photothermal agent for imaging-guided cancer theranostics. PMID:27303912

  4. Reduced Graphene Oxide/Amaranth Extract/AuNPs Composite Hydrogel on Tumor Cells as Integrated Platform for Localized and Multiple Synergistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guanru; Wang, Yunlong; Gong, Baoyou; Xiao, Yazhong; Chen, Yan; Wang, Shaohua; Li, Shikuo; Huang, Fangzhi; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian

    2015-06-01

    Integration of multimodal treatment strategies combined with localized therapy to enhance antitumor efficacy and reduce side effects is still a challenge. Herein, a novel composite hydrogel containing rGO, amaranth extract (AE) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was prepared by using AE as both reductant and cross-linking agent. The chlorophyll derivatives in AE were also employed as a photodynamic therapy drug. Meanwhile, AuNPs and rGO both have obvious photothermal effects and can accelerate the generation of cytotoxic singlet oxygen (1O2). The temperature increase of rGO/AE/AuNPs precursor is up to 6.3 °C under 808 nm laser irradiation at a power density of 200 mW·cm(-2). The hydrogel shell on in situ tumor cells was easily formed and regulated by near-infrared irradiation within 10 min, which could both retain a high concentration of drugs on the lesion site and prevent them from migrating to normal tissue, thus reducing the side effects. Compared with rGO/AE and AE, rGO/AE/AuNPs showed a remarkably improved and synergistic antitumor effect. The hydrogel possesses good biocompatibility and high hydrophilicity and could be used for loading chemotherapeutics, which provides a new approach for located and multiple antitumor therapies. PMID:25978657

  5. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Laila C; Jeffs, Sydney E; Witt, Amber S; Gill, Bartley J; West, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm(2), circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization. PMID:27596933

  6. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization. PMID:27596933

  7. Ex vivo cultures of glioblastoma in three-dimensional hydrogel maintain the original tumor growth behavior and are suitable for preclinical drug and radiation sensitivity screening

    SciTech Connect

    Jiguet Jiglaire, Carine; Baeza-Kallee, Nathalie; Denicolaï, Emilie; Barets, Doriane; Metellus, Philippe; and others

    2014-02-15

    Identification of new drugs and predicting drug response are major challenges in oncology, especially for brain tumors, because total surgical resection is difficult and radiation therapy or chemotherapy is often ineffective. With the aim of developing a culture system close to in vivo conditions for testing new drugs, we characterized an ex vivo three-dimensional culture system based on a hyaluronic acid-rich hydrogel and compared it with classical two-dimensional culture conditions. U87-MG glioblastoma cells and seven primary cell cultures of human glioblastomas were subjected to radiation therapy and chemotherapy drugs. It appears that 3D hydrogel preserves the original cancer growth behavior and enables assessment of the sensitivity of malignant gliomas to radiation and drugs with regard to inter-tumoral heterogeneity of therapeutic response. It could be used for preclinical assessment of new therapies. - Highlights: • We have compared primary glioblastoma cell culture in a 2D versus 3D-matrix system. • In 3D morphology, organization and markers better recapitulate the original tumor. • 3D-matrix culture might represent a relevant system for more accurate drug screening.

  8. Click conjugation of peptide to hydrogel nanoparticles for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ming; Zong, Hong; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-10-13

    Here we introduce a modified peptide-decorated polymeric nanoparticle (NP) for cancer cell targeting, which can deliver drugs, such as doxorubicin (Dox), to several kinds of cancer cells. Specifically, we employ a nucleolin-targeting NP, with a matrix based on a copolymer of acrylamide (AAm) and 2-carboxyethyl acrylate (CEA). The negatively charged co(CEA-AAm) NP was conjugated with a nucleolin-targeting F3 peptide using a highly efficient and specific copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne click reaction. F3 peptide binds to angiogenic tumor vasculatures and other nucleolin overexpressing tumor cells. Attaching F3 peptide onto the NP increases the NP uptake by the nucleolin-expressing glioma cell line 9L and the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Notably, the F3-conjugated NPs show much higher uptake by the nucleolin-overexpressing glioma cell line 9L than that by the breast cancer cell line MCF-7, the latter having a lower expression of nucleolin on its plasma membrane surface. Moreover, the F3 peptide also dramatically enhances the uptake of co(CEA-AAm) NPs by the drug-resistant cell line NCI/ADR-RES. Also, with this F3-conjugated co(CEA-AAm) NP, a high loading and slow release of doxorubicin were achieved. PMID:25162488

  9. Hyaluronic acid hydrogel stiffness and oxygen tension affect cancer cell fate and endothelial sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu-I; Abaci, Hasan E.; Krupsi, Yoni; Weng, Lien-Chun; Burdick, Jason A.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue culture models may recapitulate aspects of the tumorigenic microenvironment in vivo, enabling the study of cancer progression in vitro. Both hypoxia and matrix stiffness are known to regulate tumor growth. Using a modular culture system employing an acrylated hyaluronic acid (AHA) hydrogel, three hydrogel matrices with distinctive degrees of viscoelasticity — soft (78±16 Pa), medium (309± 57 Pa), and stiff (596± 73 Pa) — were generated using the same concentration of adhesion ligands. Oxygen levels within the hydrogel in atmospheric (21 %), hypoxic (5 %), and severely hypoxic (1 %) conditions were assessed with a mathematical model. HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, encapsulated within the AHA hydrogels in high densities, generated nonuniform oxygen distributions, while lower cell densities resulted in more uniform oxygen distributions in the atmospheric and hypoxic environments. When we examined how varying viscoelasticity in atmospheric and hypoxic environments affects cell cycles and the expression of BNIP3 and BNIP3L (autophagy and apoptosis genes), and GLUT-1 (a glucose transport gene), we observed that HT1080 cells in 3D hydrogel adapted better to hypoxic conditions than those in a Petri dish, with no obvious correlation to matrix viscoelasticity, by recovering rapidly from possible autophagy/apoptotic events and alternating metabolism mechanisms. Further, we examined how HT1080 cells cultured in varying viscoelasticity and oxygen tension conditions affected endothelial sprouting and invasion. We observed that increased matrix stiffness reduced endothelial sprouting and invasion in atmospheric conditions; however, we observed increased endothelial sprouting and invasion under hypoxia at all levels of matrix stiffness with the upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoeitin-1 (ANG-1). Overall, HT1080 cells encapsulated in the AHA hydrogels under hypoxic stress recovered better from apoptosis and

  10. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S. P.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation. PMID:26184185

  11. Functional surface engineering of quantum dot hydrogels for selective fluorescence imaging of extracellular lactate release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Ding, Shushu; Cao, Sumei; Zhu, Anwei; Shi, Guoyue

    2016-06-15

    Selective and sensitive detection of extracellular lactate is of fundamental significance for studying the metabolic alterations in tumor progression. Here we report the rational design and synthesis of a quantum-dot-hydrogel-based fluorescent probe for biosensing and bioimaging the extracellular lactate. By surface engineering the destabilized quantum dot sol with Nile Blue, the destabilized Nile-Blue-functionalized quantum dot sol cannot only self-assemble forming quantum dot hydrogel but also monitor lactate in the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactor and lactate dehydrogenase through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Notably, the surface engineered quantum dot hydrogel show high selectivity toward lactate over common metal ions, amino acids and other small molecules that widely coexist in biological system. Moreover, the destabilized Nile-Blue-functionalized quantum dots can encapsulate isolated cancer cells when self-assembled into a hydrogel and thus specifically detect and image the extracellular lactate metabolism. By virtue of these properties, the functionalized quantum dot hydrogel was further successfully applied to monitor the effect of metabolic agents. PMID:26852200

  12. Zoledronic acid-encapsulating self-assembling nanoparticles and doxorubicin: a combinatorial approach to overcome simultaneously chemoresistance and immunoresistance in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Kopecka, Joanna; Porto, Stefania; Lusa, Sara; Gazzano, Elena; Salzano, Giuseppina; Pinzòn-Daza, Martha Leonor; Giordano, Antonio; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Ghigo, Dario; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Caraglia, Michele; Riganti, Chiara

    2016-04-12

    The resistance to chemotherapy and the tumor escape from host immunosurveillance are the main causes of the failure of anthracycline-based regimens in breast cancer, where an effective chemo-immunosensitizing strategy is lacking.The clinically used aminobisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZA) reverses chemoresistance and immunoresistance in vitro. Previously we developed a nanoparticle-based zoledronic acid-containing formulation (NZ) that allowed a higher intratumor delivery of the drug compared with free ZA in vivo. We tested its efficacy in combination with doxorubicin in breast tumors refractory to chemotherapy and immune system recognition as a new combinatorial approach to produce chemo- and immunosensitization.NZ reduced the IC50 of doxorubicin in human and murine chemoresistant breast cancer cells and restored the doxorubicin efficacy against chemo-immunoresistant tumors implanted in immunocompetent mice. By reducing the metabolic flux through the mevalonate pathway, NZ lowered the activity of Ras/ERK1/2/HIF-1α axis and the expression of P-glycoprotein, decreased the glycolysis and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, induced a cytochrome c/caspase 9/caspase 3-dependent apoptosis, thus restoring the direct cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on tumor cell. Moreover, NZ restored the doxorubicin-induced immunogenic cell death and reversed the tumor-induced immunosuppression due to the production of kynurenine, by inhibiting the STAT3/indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase axis. These events increased the number of dendritic cells and decreased the number of immunosuppressive T-regulatory cells infiltrating the tumors.Our work proposes the use of nanoparticle encapsulating zoledronic acid as an effective tool overcoming at the same time chemoresistance and immunoresistance in breast tumors, thanks to the effects exerted on tumor cell and tumor-infiltrating immune cells. PMID:26980746

  13. Zoledronic acid-encapsulating self-assembling nanoparticles and doxorubicin: a combinatorial approach to overcome simultaneously chemoresistance and immunoresistance in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kopecka, Joanna; Porto, Stefania; Lusa, Sara; Gazzano, Elena; Salzano, Giuseppina; Pinzòn-Daza, Martha Leonor; Giordano, Antonio; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Ghigo, Dario; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Caraglia, Michele; Riganti, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The resistance to chemotherapy and the tumor escape from host immunosurveillance are the main causes of the failure of anthracycline-based regimens in breast cancer, where an effective chemo-immunosensitizing strategy is lacking. The clinically used aminobisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZA) reverses chemoresistance and immunoresistance in vitro. Previously we developed a nanoparticle-based zoledronic acid-containing formulation (NZ) that allowed a higher intratumor delivery of the drug compared with free ZA in vivo. We tested its efficacy in combination with doxorubicin in breast tumors refractory to chemotherapy and immune system recognition as a new combinatorial approach to produce chemo- and immunosensitization. NZ reduced the IC50 of doxorubicin in human and murine chemoresistant breast cancer cells and restored the doxorubicin efficacy against chemo-immunoresistant tumors implanted in immunocompetent mice. By reducing the metabolic flux through the mevalonate pathway, NZ lowered the activity of Ras/ERK1/2/HIF-1α axis and the expression of P-glycoprotein, decreased the glycolysis and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, induced a cytochrome c/caspase 9/caspase 3-dependent apoptosis, thus restoring the direct cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on tumor cell. Moreover, NZ restored the doxorubicin-induced immunogenic cell death and reversed the tumor-induced immunosuppression due to the production of kynurenine, by inhibiting the STAT3/indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase axis. These events increased the number of dendritic cells and decreased the number of immunosuppressive T-regulatory cells infiltrating the tumors. Our work proposes the use of nanoparticle encapsulating zoledronic acid as an effective tool overcoming at the same time chemoresistance and immunoresistance in breast tumors, thanks to the effects exerted on tumor cell and tumor-infiltrating immune cells. PMID:26980746

  14. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in "Pocket" liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC(8,9)PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them "Pocket" liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0-5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5-8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  15. Enhanced antitumor effects by docetaxel/LL37-loaded thermosensitive hydrogel nanoparticles in peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rangrang; Tong, Aiping; Li, Xiaoling; Gao, Xiang; Mei, Lan; Zhou, Liangxue; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Intraperitoneal chemotherapy was explored in clinical trials as a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. In this work, we developed a biodegradable and injectable drug-delivery system by coencapsulation of docetaxel (Doc) and LL37 peptide polymeric nanoparticles (Doc+LL37 NPs) in a thermosensitive hydrogel system for colorectal peritoneal carcinoma therapy. Firstly, polylactic acid (PLA)-Pluronic L35-PLA (PLA-L35-PLA) was explored to prepare the biodegradable Doc+LL37 NPs using a water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion solvent-evaporation method. Then, biodegradable and injectable thermosensitive PLA-L64-PLA hydrogel with lower sol–gel transition temperature at around body temperature was also prepared. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Doc+LL37 NPs formed with the PLA-L35-PLA copolymer were spherical. Fourier-transform infrared spectra certified that Doc and LL37 were encapsulated successfully. X-ray diffraction diagrams indicated that Doc was encapsulated amorphously. Intraperitoneal administration of Doc+LL37 NPs–hydrogel significantly suppressed the growth of HCT116 peritoneal carcinomatosis in vivo and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results suggested that Doc+LL37 NPs–hydrogel may have potential clinical applications. PMID:26664119

  16. Release of Magnetic Nanoparticles from Cell-Encapsulating Biodegradable Nanobiomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Inci, Fatih; Mullick, Omer; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Sung, Yuree; Kavaz, Doga; Li, Baoqiang; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    The future of tissue engineering requires development of intelligent biomaterials using nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have several applications in biology and medicine; one example is Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, MNPs have been encapsulated within cell-encapsulating hydrogels to create novel nanobiomaterials (i.e., M-gels), which can be manipulated and assembled in magnetic fields. The M-gels can be used as building blocks for bottom-up tissue engineering to create 3D tissue constructs. For tissue engineering applications of M-gels, it is essential to study the release of encapsulated MNPs from the hydrogel polymer network and the effect of MNPs on hydrogel properties, including mechanical characteristics, porosity, swelling behavior, and cellular response (e.g., viability, growth). Therefore, we evaluated the release of MNPs from photocrosslinkable gelatin methacrylate hydrogels as the polymer network undergoes biodegradation using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. MNP release correlated linearly with hydrogel biodegradation rate with correlation factors (Pearson product moment correlation coefficient) of 0.96 ± 0.03 and 0.99 ± 0.01 for MNP concentrations of 1% and 5%, respectively. We also evaluated the effect of MNPs on hydrogel mechanical properties, porosity, and swelling behavior, as well as cell viability and growth in MNP-encapsulating hydrogels. Fibroblasts encapsulated with MNPs in hydrogels remained viable (>80% at t = 144 h) and formed microtissue constructs in culture (t = 144 h). These results indicated that MNP-encapsulating hydrogels show promise as intelligent nanobiomaterials, with great potential to impact broad areas of bioengineering, including tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:22680777

  17. Targeted delivery of let-7a microRNA encapsulated ephrin-A1 conjugated liposomal nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Kaye, Fredric; Sharma, Parvesh; Moudgil, Brij M; Clapp, William L; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small noncoding RNA sequences that negatively regulate the expression of target genes by posttranscriptional repression. miRs are dysregulated in various diseases, including cancer. let-7a miR, an antioncogenic miR, is downregulated in lung cancers. Our earlier studies demonstrated that let-7a miR inhibits tumor growth in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and could be a potential therapeutic against lung cancer. EphA2 (ephrin type-A receptor 2) tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in most cancer cells, including MPM and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Ephrin-A1, a specific ligand of the EphA2 receptor, inhibits cell proliferation and migration. In this study, to enhance the delivery of miR, the miRs were encapsulated in the DOTAP (N-[1-(2.3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium)/Cholesterol/DSPE (1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[cyanur(polyethylene glycol)-2000])-PEG (polyethylene glycol)-cyanur liposomal nanoparticles (LNP) and ephrin-A1 was conjugated on the surface of LNP to target receptor EphA2 on lung cancer cells. The LNP with an average diameter of 100 nm showed high stability, low cytotoxicity, and high loading efficiency of precursor let-7a miR and ephrin-A1. The ephrin-A1 conjugated LNP (ephrin-A1–LNP) and let-7a miR encapsulated LNP (miR–LNP) showed improved transfection efficiency against MPM and NSCLC. The effectiveness of targeted delivery of let-7a miR encapsulated ephrin-A1 conjugated LNP (miR–ephrin-A1–LNP) was determined on MPM and NSCLC tumor growth in vitro. miR–ephrin-A1–LNP significantly increased the delivery of let-7a miR in lung cancer cells when compared with free let-7a miR. In addition, the expression of target gene Ras was significantly repressed following miR–ephrin-A1–LNP treatment. Furthermore, the miR–ephrin-A1–LNP complex significantly inhibited MPM and NSCLC proliferation, migration, and tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that the engineered mi

  18. Mini-pillar array for hydrogel-supported 3D culture and high-content histologic analysis of human tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jihoon; Lee, Dong Woo; Hwang, Hyun Ju; Yeon, Sang-Eun; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-06-21

    Three-dimensional (3D) cancer cell culture models mimic the complex 3D organization and microenvironment of human solid tumor tissue and are thus considered as highly predictive models representing avascular tumor regions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for monitoring drug penetration and therapeutic responses in 3D tumor models; however, photonic attenuation at increasing imaging depths and limited penetration of common fluorescence tracers are significant technical challenges to imaging. Immunohistological staining would be a good alternative, but the preparation of tissue sections from rather fragile spheroids through fixing and embedding procedures is challenging. Here we introduce a novel 3 × 3 mini-pillar array chip that can be utilized for 3D cell culturing and sectioning for high-content histologic analysis. The mini-pillar array chip facilitated the generation of 3D spheroids of human cancer cells within hydrogels such as alginate, collagen, and Matrigel. As expected, visualization of the 3D distribution of calcein AM and doxorubicin by optical sectioning was limited by photonic attenuation and dye penetration. The integrity of the 3D microtissue section was confirmed by immunostaining on paraffin sections and cryo-sections. The applicability of the mini-pillar array for drug activity evaluation was tested by measuring viability changes in spheroids exposed to anti-cancer agents, 5-fluorouracil and tirapazamine. Thus, our novel mini-pillar array platform can potentially promote high-content histologic analysis of 3D cultures and can be further optimized for field-specific needs. PMID:27194205

  19. Enzyme-catalysed assembly of DNA hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Soong Ho; Lee, Jong Bum; Park, Nokyoung; Kwon, Sang Yeon; Umbach, Christopher C.; Luo, Dan

    2006-10-01

    DNA is a remarkable polymer that can be manipulated by a large number of molecular tools including enzymes. A variety of geometric objects, periodic arrays and nanoscale devices have been constructed. Previously we synthesized dendrimer-like DNA and DNA nanobarcodes from branched DNA via ligases. Here we report the construction of a hydrogel entirely from branched DNA that are three-dimensional and can be crosslinked in nature. These DNA hydrogels were biocompatible, biodegradable, inexpensive to fabricate and easily moulded into desired shapes and sizes. The distinct difference of the DNA hydrogel to other bio-inspired hydrogels (including peptide-based, alginate-based and DNA (linear)-polyacrylamide hydrogels) is that the crosslinking is realized via efficient, ligase-mediated reactions. The advantage is that the gelling processes are achieved under physiological conditions and the encapsulations are accomplished in situ-drugs including proteins and even live mammalian cells can be encapsulated in the liquid phase eliminating the drug-loading step and also avoiding denaturing conditions. Fine tuning of these hydrogels is easily accomplished by adjusting the initial concentrations and types of branched DNA monomers, thus allowing the hydrogels to be tailored for specific applications such as controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering, 3D cell culture, cell transplant therapy and other biomedical applications.

  20. 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable and Tough Hydrogels into Complex, Cellularized Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Sycks, Dalton; Chan, Hon Fai; Lin, Shaoting; Lopez, Gabriel P; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-07-15

    A 3D printable and highly stretchable tough hydrogel is developed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) and sodium alginate, which synergize to form a hydrogel tougher than natural cartilage. Encapsulated cells maintain high viability over a 7 d culture period and are highly deformed together with the hydrogel. By adding biocompatible nanoclay, the tough hydrogel is 3D printed in various shapes without requiring support material. PMID:26033288

  1. Enhanced fluorescence diffuse optical tomography with indocyanine green-encapsulating liposomes targeted to receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Xu, Yan; Hamby, Carl V.; Backer, Marina V.; Backer, Joseph M.; Zhu, Quing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. To develop an indocyanine green (ICG) tracer with slower clearance kinetics, we explored ICG-encapsulating liposomes (Lip) in three different formulations: untargeted (Lip/ICG), targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors (scVEGF-Lip/ICG) by the receptor-binding moiety single-chain VEGF (scVEGF), or decorated with inactivated scVEGF (inactive-Lip/ICG) that does not bind to VEGF receptors. Experiments were conducted with tumor-bearing mice that were placed in a scattering medium with tumors located at imaging depths of either 1.5 or 2.0 cm. Near-infrared fluorescence diffuse optical tomography that provides depth-resolved spatial distributions of fluorescence in tumor was used for the detection of postinjection fluorescent signals. All liposome-based tracers, as well as free ICG, were injected intravenously into mice in the amounts corresponding to 5 nmol of ICG/mouse, and the kinetics of increase and decrease of fluorescent signals in tumors were monitored. A signal from free ICG reached maximum at 15-min postinjection and then rapidly declined with t1/2 of ∼20  min. The signals from untargeted Lip/ICG and inactive-Lip/ICG also reached maximum at 15-min postinjection, however, declined somewhat slower than free ICG with t1/2 of ∼30  min. By contrast, a signal from targeted scVEGF-Lip/ICG grew slower than that of all other tracers, reaching maximum at 30-min postinjection and declined much slower than that of other tracers with t1/2 of ∼90  min, providing a more extended observation window. Higher scVEGF-Lip/ICG tumor accumulation was further confirmed by the analysis of fluorescence on cryosections of tumors that were harvested from animals at 400 min after injection with different tracers. PMID:24346856

  2. Dextran-doxorubicin/chitosan nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Savita; Maitra, Amarnath

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a major therapeutic approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized cancers. Whereas potent chemotherapeutic agents seem promising in the test tube, clinical trials often fail due to unfavorable pharmacokinetics, poor delivery, low local concentrations, and limited accumulation in the target cell. The pathophysiology of the tumor vasculature and stromal compartment presents a major obstacle to effective delivery of agents to solid tumors. Poor perfusion of the tumor, arterio-venous shunting, necrotic and hypoxic areas, as well as a high interstitial fluid pressure work against favorable drug uptake. Thus, targeted drug delivery using long-circulating particulate drug carriers such as hydrogels of controlled size (<100 nm diameter) holds immense potential to improve the treatment of cancer by selectively providing therapeutically effective drug concentrations at the tumor site [through enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect] while reducing undesirable side effects. This review focuses on the progress of targeted delivery of nanoparticulated anticancer drug such as doxorubicin chemically conjugated with dextran and encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles to solid tumor with reduced side effect of drug. Regulated particle size and long circulation of these hydrogel nanoparticles in blood help them accumulate in tumor tissue through EPR effect as evident from the significant regression of the tumor volume. The cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin can be minimized by coupling the drug with dextran and encapsulating it in chitosan nanoparticles. PMID:20049807

  3. Liposome-encapsulated actinomycin for cancer chemotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh-Erh; Cerny, Elizabeth A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for chemotherapy of malignant tumors by injection of antitumor drugs. The antitumor drug is encapsulated within liposomes and the liposomes containing the encapsulated drug are injected into the body. The encapsulated drug penetrates into the tumor cells where the drug is slowly released and induces degeneration and death of the tumor cells, while any toxicity to the host body is reduced. Liposome encapsulation of actinomycin D has been found to be particularly effective in treating cancerous abdominal tumors, while drastically reducing the toxicity of actinomycin D to the host.

  4. Facile synthesis of soybean phospholipid-encapsulated MoS2 nanosheets for efficient in vitro and in vivo photothermal regression of breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Gong, Yun; Zhou, Xiaoqian; Jin, Hui; Yan, Huanhuan; Wang, Shige; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet has been extensively explored as a photothermal agent for tumor regression; however, its surface modification remains a great challenge. Herein, as an alternative to surface polyethylene glycol modification (PEGylation), a facile approach based on "thin-film" strategy has been proposed for the first time to produce soybean phospholipid-encapsulated MoS2 (SP-MoS2) nanosheets. By simply vacuum-treating MoS2 nanosheets/soybean phospholipid/chloroform dispersion in a rotary evaporator, SP-MoS2 nanosheet was successfully constructed. Owing to the steric hindrance of polymer chains, the surface-coated soybean phospholipid endowed MoS2 nanosheets with excellent colloidal stability. Without showing detectable in vitro and in vivo hemolysis, coagulation, and cyto-/histotoxicity, the constructed SP-MoS2 nanosheets showed good photothermal conversion performance and photothermal stability. SP-MoS2 nanosheet was shown to be a promising platform for in vitro and in vivo breast tumor photothermal therapy. The produced SP-MoS2 nanosheets featured low cost, simple fabrication, and good in vivo hemo-/histocompatibility and hold promising potential for future clinical tumor therapy. PMID:27199557

  5. Facile synthesis of soybean phospholipid-encapsulated MoS2 nanosheets for efficient in vitro and in vivo photothermal regression of breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Gong, Yun; Zhou, Xiaoqian; Jin, Hui; Yan, Huanhuan; Wang, Shige; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet has been extensively explored as a photothermal agent for tumor regression; however, its surface modification remains a great challenge. Herein, as an alternative to surface polyethylene glycol modification (PEGylation), a facile approach based on “thin-film” strategy has been proposed for the first time to produce soybean phospholipid-encapsulated MoS2 (SP-MoS2) nanosheets. By simply vacuum-treating MoS2 nanosheets/soybean phospholipid/chloroform dispersion in a rotary evaporator, SP-MoS2 nanosheet was successfully constructed. Owing to the steric hindrance of polymer chains, the surface-coated soybean phospholipid endowed MoS2 nanosheets with excellent colloidal stability. Without showing detectable in vitro and in vivo hemolysis, coagulation, and cyto-/histotoxicity, the constructed SP-MoS2 nanosheets showed good photothermal conversion performance and photothermal stability. SP-MoS2 nanosheet was shown to be a promising platform for in vitro and in vivo breast tumor photothermal therapy. The produced SP-MoS2 nanosheets featured low cost, simple fabrication, and good in vivo hemo-/histocompatibility and hold promising potential for future clinical tumor therapy. PMID:27199557

  6. Highly stable microwave susceptible agents via encapsulation of Ti-mineral superfine powders in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules for tumor hyperthermia therapy.

    PubMed

    Long, Dan; Mao, Jingsong; Liu, Tianlong; Fu, Changhui; Tan, Longfei; Ren, Xiangling; Shi, Haitang; Su, Hongying; Ren, Jun; Meng, Xianwei

    2016-06-01

    In this study, Ti-mineral superfine powders (Ti-MSP) encapsulated in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules (Ti-MSP@UF-MC) were successfully prepared via a one-step microemulsion method for the first time. Because of the strong confinement effects, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC possessed perfect microwave heating effects. The temperature was 9.3 °C higher than that of the saline solution, superior to UF-MC (no significant microwave heating effect, 0 °C) and Ti-MSP (5.1 °C). The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed low toxicity and good biocompatibility via a series of studies, including a hemolysis study and the MTT assay in vitro and in vivo. When the concentration was below 1000 μg mL(-1), the hemolysis rate was lower than 5% (hemolysis study). When the concentration was below 400 μg mL(-1), the cell activity was higher than 80% (MTT assay). Moreover, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC exhibited an ideal CT imaging effect in vivo owing to the large molecular weight of Ti-MSP. The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed a favorable microwave therapy effect in vivo. Using mice bearing H22 tumor cells as an animal model, the tumor suppression rate could reach 100%. PMID:27174624

  7. Highly stable microwave susceptible agents via encapsulation of Ti-mineral superfine powders in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules for tumor hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Dan; Mao, Jingsong; Liu, Tianlong; Fu, Changhui; Tan, Longfei; Ren, Xiangling; Shi, Haitang; Su, Hongying; Ren, Jun; Meng, Xianwei

    2016-05-01

    In this study, Ti-mineral superfine powders (Ti-MSP) encapsulated in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules (Ti-MSP@UF-MC) were successfully prepared via a one-step microemulsion method for the first time. Because of the strong confinement effects, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC possessed perfect microwave heating effects. The temperature was 9.3 °C higher than that of the saline solution, superior to UF-MC (no significant microwave heating effect, 0 °C) and Ti-MSP (5.1 °C). The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed low toxicity and good biocompatibility via a series of studies, including a hemolysis study and the MTT assay in vitro and in vivo. When the concentration was below 1000 μg mL-1, the hemolysis rate was lower than 5% (hemolysis study). When the concentration was below 400 μg mL-1, the cell activity was higher than 80% (MTT assay). Moreover, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC exhibited an ideal CT imaging effect in vivo owing to the large molecular weight of Ti-MSP. The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed a favorable microwave therapy effect in vivo. Using mice bearing H22 tumor cells as an animal model, the tumor suppression rate could reach 100%.

  8. Combination between Taxol-Encapsulated Liposomes and Eruca sativa Seed Extract Suppresses Mammary Tumors in Female Rats Induced by 7,12 Dimethylbenz(α)anthracene.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Nadia; Abdel-Rahman, Salah; Haggag, Amany; Awad, Doaa; Bassiouny, Ahmad; Talaat, Iman

    2016-01-01

    Taxol (paclitaxel) is a powerful anti-cancer drug widely used against several types of malignant tumors. Because Taxol may exert several side effects, a variety of formulations have been developed. One of these features liposomes, regarded as one of the most promising drug carriers, biocompatible and best able to reduce drug toxicity without changing efficacy against tumor cells. Eruca sativa seed extract (SE) is considered a promising natural product from cruciferous vegetables against breast cancer, increasing chemotherapeutic and eliminating harmful side effects. The effects of Taxol-encapsulated liposomes (T) alone and in combination between Eruca sativa seed extract on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) gene expression levels were investigated in rat mammary gland carcinogenesis induced by 7,12 dimethylbenz(α) anthracene (DMBA) using qRT-PCR. The results showed that DMBA increased NF-κB, COX-2 and Bcl-2 gene expression levels and lipid peroxidation (LP), while decreasing glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and total antioxidant concentration (TAC) compared to the control group. T and T-SE treatment reduced NF-κB, COX-2 and Bcl-2 gene expression levels and LP. Hence, T and T-SE treatment appeared to reduce inflammation and cell proliferation, while increasing apoptosis, GST and SOD activities and TAC. PMID:26838195

  9. The influence of phospholipid on the physicochemical properties and anti-tumor efficacy of liposomes encapsulating cisplatin in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alavizadeh, Seyedeh Hoda; Badiee, Ali; Golmohammadzadeh, Shiva; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2014-10-01

    SPI-077, cisplatin stealth liposome, is the best illustration of poor cisplatin release from liposomes and the subsequent negligible therapeutic activity. For this reason, optimizing drug release kinetics is desirable. In this report, cisplatin was encapsulated in liposomes composed of different phosphatidylcholines with various phase transition temperatures (Tm) (HSPC, DPPC, DMPC, soy phosphatidylcholine (SPC)), cholesterol and mPEG2000-DSPE. In vitro cytotoxicity studies indicated that lowering Tm of lipids increases cisplatin release; the highest cytotoxicity was observed in SPCs. Cisplatin plasma concentration was also sensitive to the transition temperature. The highest platinum concentration observed after treatment with HSPC and DPPC liposomes, whilst the lowest was observed with SPC. HSPC and DPPC containing liposomes showed the highest therapeutic efficacy and survival with DPPC exhibited better efficacy in mouse model of C26. It seems that DPPC with Tm (41.5°C) nearly, or close to body temperature maintains good drug retention in blood circulation. Upon extravasation through permeable tumor microvasculature, it gradually releases its payload in the tumor area better than HSPC, with a greater Tm of 55°C. Our data suggests, the choice of Tm for lipid mixture directed to a considerable extent the rate of cisplatin elimination from plasma and therapeutic effects. PMID:25051111

  10. Adaptable Hydrogel Networks with Reversible Linkages for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptable hydrogels have recently emerged as a promising platform for three-dimensional (3D) cell encapsulation and culture. In conventional, covalently crosslinked hydrogels, degradation is typically required to allow complex cellular functions to occur, leading to bulk material degradation. In contrast, adaptable hydrogels are formed by reversible crosslinks. Through breaking and re-forming of the reversible linkages, adaptable hydrogels can be locally modified to permit complex cellular functions while maintaining their long-term integrity. In addition, these adaptable materials can have biomimetic viscoelastic properties that make them well suited for several biotechnology and medical applications. In this review, adaptable hydrogel design considerations and linkage selections are overviewed, with a focus on various cell compatible crosslinking mechanisms that can be exploited to form adaptable hydrogels for tissue engineering. PMID:25989348

  11. An injectable hyaluronic acid-tyramine hydrogel system for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fan; Chung, Joo Eun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2009-03-19

    Previously, we reported the independent tuning of mechanical strength (crosslinking density) and gelation rate of an injectable hydrogel system composed of hyaluronic acid-tyramine (HA-Tyr) conjugates. The hydrogels were formed through the oxidative coupling of tyramines which was catalyzed by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Herein, we studied the encapsulation and release of model proteins using the HA-Tyr hydrogel. It was shown that the rapid gelation achieved by an optimal concentration of HRP could effectively encapsulate the proteins within the hydrogel network and thus prevented the undesired leakage of proteins into the surrounding tissues after injection. Hydrogels with different mechanical strengths were formed by changing the concentration of H(2)O(2) while maintaining the rapid gelation rate. The mechanical strength of the hydrogel controlled the release rate of proteins: stiff hydrogels released proteins slower compared to weak hydrogels. In phosphate buffer saline, alpha-amylase (negatively charged) was released sustainably from the hydrogel. Conversely, the release of lysozyme (positively charged) discontinued after the fourth hour due to electrostatic interactions with HA. In the presence of hyaluronidase, lysozymes were released continuously and completely from the hydrogel due to degradation of the hydrogel network. The activities of the released proteins were mostly retained which suggested that the HA-Tyr hydrogel is a suitable injectable and biodegradable system for the delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19121348

  12. Thermoresponsive magnetic hydrogels as theranostic nanoconstructs.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manish K; De, Mrinmoy; Chou, Stanley S; Vasavada, Shaleen; Bleher, Reiner; Prasad, Pottumarthi V; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2014-05-14

    We report the development of thermoresponsive magnetic hydrogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) encapsulation of Fe3O4 magnetic nanostructures (MNS). In particular, we examined the effects of hydrogels encapsulated with poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) surface modified Fe3O4 MNS on magnetic resonance (MR) T2 (transverse spin relaxation) contrast enhancement and associated delivery efficacy of absorbed therapeutic cargo. The microstructural characterization reveal the regular spherical shape and size (∼200 nm) of the hydrogels with elevated hydrophilic to hydrophobic transition temperature (∼40 °C) characterized by LCST (lower critical solution temperature) due to the presence of encapsulated MNS. The hydrogel-MNS (HGMNS) system encapsulated with PEG functionalized Fe3O4 of 12 nm size (HGMNS-PEG-12) exhibited relaxivity rate (r2) of 173 mM(-1) s(-1) compared to 129 mM(-1) s(-1) obtained for hydrogel-MNS system encapsulated with POSS functionalized Fe3O4 (HGMNS-POSS-12) of the same size. Further studies with HGMNS-PEG-12 with absorbed drug doxorubicin (DOX) reveals approximately two-fold enhance in release during 1 h RF (radio-frequency) field exposure followed by 24 h incubation at 37 °C. Quantitatively, it is 2.1 μg mg(-1) (DOX/HGMNS) DOX release with RF exposure while only 0.9 μg mg(-1) release without RF exposure for the same period of incubation. Such enhanced release of therapeutic cargo is attributed to micro-environmental heating in the surroundings of MNS as well as magneto-mechanical vibrations under high frequency RF inside hydrogels. Similarly, RF-induced in vitro localized drug delivery studies with HeLa cell lines for HGMNS-PEG-12 resulted in more than 80% cell death with RF field exposures for 1 h. We therefore believe that magnetic hydrogel system has in vivo theranostic potential given high MR contrast enhancement from encapsulated MNS and RF-induced localized therapeutic delivery in one

  13. Thermoresponsive Magnetic Hydrogels as Theranostic Nanoconstructs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of thermoresponsive magnetic hydrogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) encapsulation of Fe3O4 magnetic nanostructures (MNS). In particular, we examined the effects of hydrogels encapsulated with poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) surface modified Fe3O4 MNS on magnetic resonance (MR) T2 (transverse spin relaxation) contrast enhancement and associated delivery efficacy of absorbed therapeutic cargo. The microstructural characterization reveal the regular spherical shape and size (∼200 nm) of the hydrogels with elevated hydrophilic to hydrophobic transition temperature (∼40 °C) characterized by LCST (lower critical solution temperature) due to the presence of encapsulated MNS. The hydrogel-MNS (HGMNS) system encapsulated with PEG functionalized Fe3O4 of 12 nm size (HGMNS-PEG-12) exhibited relaxivity rate (r2) of 173 mM–1s–1 compared to 129 mM–1s–1 obtained for hydrogel-MNS system encapsulated with POSS functionalized Fe3O4 (HGMNS-POSS-12) of the same size. Further studies with HGMNS-PEG-12 with absorbed drug doxorubicin (DOX) reveals approximately two-fold enhance in release during 1 h RF (radio-frequency) field exposure followed by 24 h incubation at 37 °C. Quantitatively, it is 2.1 μg mg–1 (DOX/HGMNS) DOX release with RF exposure while only 0.9 μg mg–1 release without RF exposure for the same period of incubation. Such enhanced release of therapeutic cargo is attributed to micro-environmental heating in the surroundings of MNS as well as magneto-mechanical vibrations under high frequency RF inside hydrogels. Similarly, RF-induced in vitro localized drug delivery studies with HeLa cell lines for HGMNS-PEG-12 resulted in more than 80% cell death with RF field exposures for 1 h. We therefore believe that magnetic hydrogel system has in vivo theranostic potential given high MR contrast enhancement from encapsulated MNS and RF-induced localized therapeutic delivery in one

  14. The In Vitro and In Vivo Response to MMP-Sensitive Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Amer, Luke D; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme-sensitive hydrogels are a promising class of materials for cell encapsulation and tissue engineering because their ability to be degraded by cell-secreted factors. However, it is well known that nearly all synthetic biomaterials elicit a foreign body response (FBR) upon implantation. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo response to an enzyme-sensitive hydrogel. Hydrogels were formed from poly(ethylene glycol) with the peptide crosslinker, C-VPLS↓LYSG-C, which is susceptible to matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. We evaluated the hydrogel by exogenously delivered enzymes, encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells as a tissue engineering relevant cell type, and by macrophage-secreted factors in vitro and for the FBR through macrophage attachment in vitro and in a subcutaneous mouse model. These hydrogels rapidly degraded upon exposure to exogenous MMP-2 and to lesser degree with MMP-9. Encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells were capable of degrading the hydrogels via matrix metalloproteinases. Inflammatory macrophages were confirmed to attach to the hydrogels, but were not capable of rapidly degrading the hydrogels. In vivo, these hydrogels remained intact after 4 weeks and exhibited a classic FBR with inflammatory cells at the hydrogel surface and a fibrous capsule. In summary, these findings suggest that while this MMP-2/9 sensitive hydrogel is readily degraded in vitro, it does not undergo rapid degradation by the FBR. Thus, the long term stability of these hydrogels in vivo coupled with the ability for encapsulated cells to degrade the hydrogel makes them promising materials for tissue engineering. PMID:27080375

  15. Designing degradable hydrogels for orthogonal control of cell microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Kharkar, Prathamesh M.

    2013-01-01

    Degradable and cell-compatible hydrogels can be designed to mimic the physical and biochemical characteristics of native extracellular matrices and provide tunability of degradation rates and related properties under physiological conditions. Hence, such hydrogels are finding widespread application in many bioengineering fields, including controlled bioactive molecule delivery, cell encapsulation for controlled three-dimensional culture, and tissue engineering. Cellular processes, such as adhesion, proliferation, spreading, migration, and differentiation, can be controlled within degradable, cell-compatible hydrogels with temporal tuning of biochemical or biophysical cues, such as growth factor presentation or hydrogel stiffness. However, thoughtful selection of hydrogel base materials, formation chemistries, and degradable moieties is necessary to achieve the appropriate level of property control and desired cellular response. In this review, hydrogel design considerations and materials for hydrogel preparation, ranging from natural polymers to synthetic polymers, are overviewed. Recent advances in chemical and physical methods to crosslink hydrogels are highlighted, as well as recent developments in controlling hydrogel degradation rates and modes of degradation. Special attention is given to spatial or temporal presentation of various biochemical and biophysical cues to modulate cell response in static (i.e., non-degradable) or dynamic (i.e., degradable) microenvironments. This review provides insight into the design of new cell-compatible, degradable hydrogels to understand and modulate cellular processes for various biomedical applications. PMID:23609001

  16. Injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel for delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fu, CuiXiang; Lin, XiaoXiao; Wang, Jun; Zheng, XiaoQun; Li, XingYi; Lin, ZhengFeng; Lin, GuangYong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel composed of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caplactone) (MPEG5000-PCL5000) micelles was developed by a simple method for hydrophobic anticancer drug delivery. By mixing α-CD aqueous solution and MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel could be formed under mild condition due to the inclusion complexation between α-CD and MPEG segment of MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles. The resultant supramolecular hydrogel was thereafter characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of α-CD amount on the gelation time, mechanical strength and thixotropic property was studied by a rheometer. Payload of hydrophobic paclitaxel (PTX) to supramolecular hydrogel was achieved by encapsulation of PTX into MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles prior mixing with α-CD aqueous solution. In vitro release study showed that the release behavior of PTX from hydrogel could be modulated by change the α-CD amount in hydrogel. Furthermore, such supramolecular hydrogel could enhance the biological activity of encapsulated PTX compared to free PTX, as indicated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay. All these results indicated that the developed micellar supramolecular hydrogel might be a promising injectable drug delivery system for anticancer therapy. PMID:26886821

  17. Efficient antitumor effect of co-drug-loaded nanoparticles with gelatin hydrogel by local implantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Tian, Yong; Zhu, Zhenshu; Xu, Huae; Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Donghui; Sun, Weihao

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet) could enhance the antitumor effect of Paclitaxel (Ptx) by increasing intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) levels, which leads to the possibility of co-delivery of both drugs for synergistic antitumor effect. In the current study, we reported an efficient, local therapeutic strategy employing effective Tet and Ptx delivery with a nanoparticle-loaded gelatin system. Tet- and Ptx co-loaded mPEG-PCL nanoparticles (P/T-NPs) were encapsulated into the physically cross-linked gelatin hydrogel and then implanted on the tumor site for continuous drug release. The drug-loaded gelatin hydrogel underwent a phase change when the temperature slowly increased. In vitro study showed that Tet/Ptx-loaded PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles encapsulated within a gelatin hydrogel (P/T-NPs-Gelatin) inhibited the growth and invasive ability of BGC-823 cells more effectively than the combination of free drugs or P/T-NPs. In vivo study validated the therapeutic potential of P/T-NPs-Gelatin. P/T-NPs-Gelatin significantly inhibited the activation of p-Akt and the downstream anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and also inducing the activation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Moreover, the molecular-modulating effect of P/T-NPs-Gelatin on related proteins varied slightly under the influence of NAC, which was supported by the observations of the tumor volumes and weights. Based on these findings, local implantation of P/T-NPs-Gelatin may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27226240

  18. Efficient antitumor effect of co-drug-loaded nanoparticles with gelatin hydrogel by local implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Tian, Yong; Zhu, Zhenshu; Xu, Huae; Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Donghui; Sun, Weihao

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet) could enhance the antitumor effect of Paclitaxel (Ptx) by increasing intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) levels, which leads to the possibility of co-delivery of both drugs for synergistic antitumor effect. In the current study, we reported an efficient, local therapeutic strategy employing effective Tet and Ptx delivery with a nanoparticle-loaded gelatin system. Tet- and Ptx co-loaded mPEG-PCL nanoparticles (P/T-NPs) were encapsulated into the physically cross-linked gelatin hydrogel and then implanted on the tumor site for continuous drug release. The drug-loaded gelatin hydrogel underwent a phase change when the temperature slowly increased. In vitro study showed that Tet/Ptx-loaded PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles encapsulated within a gelatin hydrogel (P/T-NPs-Gelatin) inhibited the growth and invasive ability of BGC-823 cells more effectively than the combination of free drugs or P/T-NPs. In vivo study validated the therapeutic potential of P/T-NPs-Gelatin. P/T-NPs-Gelatin significantly inhibited the activation of p-Akt and the downstream anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and also inducing the activation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Moreover, the molecular-modulating effect of P/T-NPs-Gelatin on related proteins varied slightly under the influence of NAC, which was supported by the observations of the tumor volumes and weights. Based on these findings, local implantation of P/T-NPs-Gelatin may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27226240

  19. Evaluation of a mPEG-polyester-based hydrogel as cell carrier for chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sydney; Yang, Shu-Rui; Ko, Chao-Yin; Peng, Yu-Shiang; Chu, I-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Temperature-sensitive hydrogels are attractive alternatives to porous cell-seeded scaffolds and is minimally invasive through simple injection and in situ gelling. In this study, we compared the performance of two types of temperature-sensitive hydrogels on chondrocytes encapsulation for the use of tissue engineering of cartilage. The two hydrogels are composed of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)- poly(lactic-co-valerolactone) (mPEG-PVLA), and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic- co-glycolide) (mPEG-PLGA). Osmolarity and pH were optimized through the manipulation of polymer concentration and dispersion medium. Chondrocytes proliferation in mPEG-PVLA hydrogels was observed as well as accumulation of GAGs and collagen. On the other hand, chondrocytes encapsulated in mPEG-PLGA hydrogels showed low viability and chondrogenesis. Also, mPEG-PVLA hydrogel, which is more hydrophobic, retained physical integrity after 14 days while mPEG-PLGA hydrogel underwent full degradation due to faster hydrolysis rate and more pronounced acidic self-catalyzed degradation. The mPEG-PVLA hydrogel can be furthered tuned by manipulation of molecular weights to obtain hydrogels with different swelling and degradation characteristics, which may be useful as producing a selection of hydrogels compatible with different cell types. Taken together, these results demonstrate that mPEG-PVLA hydrogels are promising to serve as three-dimensional cell carriers for chondrocytes and potentially applicable in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:24039062

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics evaluation of a thermosensitive chitosan based hydrogel containing liposomal doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shuangxia; Dai, Yu; Li, Cuiyun; Qiu, Zhixia; Wang, Xin; Tian, Fengjie; Zhou, Sufeng; Liu, Qi; Xing, Han; Lu, Yang; Chen, Xijing; Li, Ning

    2016-09-20

    In situ gelling thermosensitive hydrogel formulation has been reported to effectively sustain the release of macromolecules for a long time. However, the low-molecular-weight hydrophilic drugs, such as doxorubicin (DOX), are not suitable for intratumoral injection because the release will complete within one day. In this study, liposomal doxorubicin (LipDOX) was added into the hydrogel to form a novel thermosensitive formulation which prolonged the sustained release of DOX. DOX+C/GP (doxorubicin in chitosan/β-glycerophosphate) was prepared to compare with LipDOX+C/GP (liposomal doxorubicin in chitosan/β-glycerophosphate hydrogel). The particle size of DOX-loaded liposome was 94.2nm and the encapsulation efficiency of DOX was near 98%. In vitro release experiments, the release of DOX in both DOX+C/GP group and LipDOX+C/GP group increased along with the increasing pH of buffers. However, the LipDOX+C/GP group with lower initial burst release had a much longer releasing duration than DOX+C/GP group (21days vs. 24h). In vitro and in vivo antitumor experiments demonstrated that LipDOX+C/GP group had better antineoplastic effect and less toxicity than DOX+C/GP group. Pharmacokinetics study showed LipDOX+C/GP exhibited a higher AUC0-t and longer MRT than DOX+C/GP in blood and tumor, which indicated that LipDOX+C/GP obtained an enhanced antitumor activity compared with DOX+C/GP. In addition, the lower distribution index (the ratio of AUC of normal tissue/AUC of tumor tissue) of the LipDOX+C/GP implied it had lower toxicity to normal tissues than DOX+C/GP. Therefore, the novel thermosensitive hydrogel formulation was potential for clinical application in cancer treatment. PMID:27388491

  1. Temperature responsive hydroxypropyl cellulose for encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Heitfeld, Kevin A.; Guo, Tingtai; Yang, George; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2009-08-26

    This work focuses on the use of temperature responsive gels (TRGs) (polymeric hydrogels with a large temperature-dependent change in volume) for flavor retention at cooking temperatures. Specifically, we have studied a gel with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) that swells at low temperatures and collapses at high temperatures. In the collapsed state, the polymer acts as a transport barrier, keeping the volatile flavors inside. We have successfully synthesized a cellulose gel that exhibits this volume change and have encapsulated an oil phase inside the gel. The flavor-loaded encapsulated oil exhibited an increased release time when compared to similar gelatin capsules.

  2. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable and Tough Hydrogels into Complex, Cellularized Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Sycks, Dalton; Chan, Hon Fai; Lin, Shaoting; Lopez, Gabriel P; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-07-15

    X. Zhao and co-workers develop on page 4035 a new biocompatible hydrogel system that is extremely tough and stretchable and can be 3D printed into complex structures, such as the multilayer mesh shown. Cells encapsulated in the tough and printable hydrogel maintain high viability. 3D-printed structures of the tough hydrogel can sustain high mechanical loads and deformations. PMID:26172844

  3. Stiffness and Adhesivity Control Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell Behavior within Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kapetanovic, Edi; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive and biodegradable hydrogels that mimic the extracellular matrix and regulate valve interstitial cells (VIC) behavior are of great interest as three dimensional (3D) model systems for understanding mechanisms of valvular heart disease pathogenesis in vitro and the basis for regenerative templates for tissue engineering. However, the role of stiffness and adhesivity of hydrogels in VIC behavior remains poorly understood. This study reports synthesis of oxidized and methacrylated hyaluronic acid (Me-HA and MOHA) and subsequent development of hybrid hydrogels based on modified HA and methacrylated gelatin (Me-Gel) for VIC encapsulation. The mechanical stiffness and swelling ratio of the hydrogels were tunable with molecular weight of HA and concentration/composition of precursor solution. The encapsulated VIC in pure HA hydrogels with lower mechanical stiffness showed more spreading morphology comparing to stiffer counterparts and dramatically upregulated alpha smooth muscle actin expression indicating more activated myofibroblast properties. The addition of Me-Gel in Me-HA facilitated cell spreading, proliferation and VIC migration from encapsulated spheroids and better maintained VIC fibroblastic phenotype. The VIC phenotype transition during migration from encapsulated spheroids in both Me-HA and Me-HA/Me-Gel hydrogel matrix was also observed. These findings are important for the rational design of hydrogels for controlling VIC morphology, and for regulating VIC phenotype and function. The Me-HA/Me-Gel hybrid hydrogels accommodated with VIC are promising as valve tissue engineering scaffolds and 3D model for understanding valvular pathobiology. PMID:23648571

  4. Cell-laden microengineered gelatin methacrylate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Jason W; Koshy, Sandeep T; Bae, Hojae; Hwang, Chang M; Yamanlar, Seda; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-07-01

    The cellular microenvironment plays an integral role in improving the function of microengineered tissues. Control of the microarchitecture in engineered tissues can be achieved through photopatterning of cell-laden hydrogels. However, despite high pattern fidelity of photopolymerizable hydrogels, many such materials are not cell-responsive and have limited biodegradability. Here, we demonstrate gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) as an inexpensive, cell-responsive hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden microtissues and microfluidic devices. Cells readily bound to, proliferated, elongated, and migrated both when seeded on micropatterned GelMA substrates as well as when encapsulated in microfabricated GelMA hydrogels. The hydration and mechanical properties of GelMA were demonstrated to be tunable for various applications through modification of the methacrylation degree and gel concentration. The pattern fidelity and resolution of GelMA were high and it could be patterned to create perfusable microfluidic channels. Furthermore, GelMA micropatterns could be used to create cellular micropatterns for in vitro cell studies or 3D microtissue fabrication. These data suggest that GelMA hydrogels could be useful for creating complex, cell-responsive microtissues, such as endothelialized microvasculature, or for other applications that require cell-responsive microengineered hydrogels. PMID:20417964

  5. BIOMIMETIC GRADIENT HYDROGELS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Shilpa; Hancock, Matthew J.; Donnelly, Joseph P.; Iyer, Dharini; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    During tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, cells experience various signals in their environments, including gradients of physical and chemical cues. Spatial and temporal gradients regulate various cell behaviours such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation during development, inflammation, wound healing, and cancer. One of the goals of functional tissue engineering is to create microenvironments that mimic the cellular and tissue complexity found in vivo by incorporating physical, chemical, temporal, and spatial gradients within engineered three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Hydrogels are ideal materials for 3D tissue scaffolds that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Various techniques from material science, microscale engineering, and microfluidics are used to synthesise biomimetic hydrogels with encapsulated cells and tailored microenvironments. In particular, a host of methods exist to incorporate micrometer to centimetre scale chemical and physical gradients within hydrogels to mimic the cellular cues found in vivo. In this review, we draw on specific biological examples to motivate hydrogel gradients as tools for studying cell–material interactions. We provide a brief overview of techniques to generate gradient hydrogels and showcase their use to study particular cell behaviours in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D environments. We conclude by summarizing the current and future trends in gradient hydrogels and cell–material interactions in context with the long-term goals of tissue engineering. PMID:21874065

  6. BIOMIMETIC GRADIENT HYDROGELS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING.

    PubMed

    Sant, Shilpa; Hancock, Matthew J; Donnelly, Joseph P; Iyer, Dharini; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-12-01

    During tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, cells experience various signals in their environments, including gradients of physical and chemical cues. Spatial and temporal gradients regulate various cell behaviours such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation during development, inflammation, wound healing, and cancer. One of the goals of functional tissue engineering is to create microenvironments that mimic the cellular and tissue complexity found in vivo by incorporating physical, chemical, temporal, and spatial gradients within engineered three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Hydrogels are ideal materials for 3D tissue scaffolds that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Various techniques from material science, microscale engineering, and microfluidics are used to synthesise biomimetic hydrogels with encapsulated cells and tailored microenvironments. In particular, a host of methods exist to incorporate micrometer to centimetre scale chemical and physical gradients within hydrogels to mimic the cellular cues found in vivo. In this review, we draw on specific biological examples to motivate hydrogel gradients as tools for studying cell-material interactions. We provide a brief overview of techniques to generate gradient hydrogels and showcase their use to study particular cell behaviours in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D environments. We conclude by summarizing the current and future trends in gradient hydrogels and cell-material interactions in context with the long-term goals of tissue engineering. PMID:21874065

  7. Design properties of hydrogel tissue-engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junmin; Marchant, Roger E

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the recent progress in the design and synthesis of hydrogels as tissue-engineering scaffolds. Hydrogels are attractive scaffolding materials owing to their highly swollen network structure, ability to encapsulate cells and bioactive molecules, and efficient mass transfer. Various polymers, including natural, synthetic and natural/synthetic hybrid polymers, have been used to make hydrogels via chemical or physical crosslinking. Recently, bioactive synthetic hydrogels have emerged as promising scaffolds because they can provide molecularly tailored biofunctions and adjustable mechanical properties, as well as an extracellular matrix-like microenvironment for cell growth and tissue formation. This article addresses various strategies that have been explored to design synthetic hydrogels with extracellular matrix-mimetic bioactive properties, such as cell adhesion, proteolytic degradation and growth factor-binding. PMID:22026626

  8. A comparative study of the cellular uptake, localization and phototoxicity of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl) chlorin encapsulated in surface-modified submicronic oil/water carriers in HT29 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, O; Mosqueira, V; Legrand, P; Blais, J

    2000-01-01

    The poor selectivity of photosensitizers for tumor tissue remains a drawback in photodynamic therapy (PDT) and could be improved by adapted formulations. The cellular uptake, localization and phototoxicity of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) encapsulated in submicronic colloidal carriers have been studied in macrophage-like J774 cells and HT 29 human adenocarcinoma cells. Nanocapsules with an external layer made of poly(D,L lactic acid) (PLA NCs), PLA grafted with polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG NCs), PLA coated with poloxamer 188 (polox PLA NCs) and oil/water nanoemulsion (NE) have been examined. The cellular uptake by J774, as determined by microspectroflorimetry, is reduced with mTHPC encapsulated into surface-modified NCs--PLA-PEG and polox PLA--compared with naked PLA, indicating a possible limitation of the clearance of such carriers by the reticuloendothelial system. Encapsulation also modifies the interaction between mTHPC and HT29 cells. Compared with the manufacturer's solution (PEG, ethanol, water), the cellular uptake is strongly reduced. However, the HT29 phototoxicity is much less affected and a protecting effect against plasma proteins is observed. Fluorescence microscopy reveals a specific punctate fluorescence pattern with PLA-PEG and polox PLA NCs in contrast to a more diffuse distribution with NE and solution, indicating that photodamage targeting could be different. These findings suggest that photosensitizers encapsulated into surface-modified nanocapsules could be a promising approach for improving PDT efficacy and this has to be confirmed in vivo. PMID:10942081

  9. Injectable shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels for stem cell delivery.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Ashish; Jaiswal, Manish K; Peak, Charles W; Carrow, James K; Gentry, James; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2016-06-16

    Injectable hydrogels are investigated for cell encapsulation and delivery as they can shield cells from high shear forces. One of the approaches to obtain injectable hydrogels is to reinforce polymeric networks with high aspect ratio nanoparticles such as two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. 2D nanomaterials are an emerging class of ultrathin materials with a high degree of anisotropy and they strongly interact with polymers resulting in the formation of shear-thinning hydrogels. Here, we present 2D nanosilicate reinforced kappa-carrageenan (κCA) hydrogels for cellular delivery. κCA is a natural polysaccharide that resembles native glycosaminoglycans and can form brittle hydrogels via ionic crosslinking. The chemical modification of κCA with photocrosslinkable methacrylate groups renders the formation of a covalently crosslinked network (MκCA). Reinforcing the MκCA with 2D nanosilicates results in shear-thinning characteristics, and enhanced mechanical stiffness, elastomeric properties, and physiological stability. The shear-thinning characteristics of nanocomposite hydrogels are investigated for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. The hMSCs showed high cell viability after injection and encapsulated cells showed a circular morphology. The proposed shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels can be used for cell delivery for cartilage tissue regeneration and 3D bioprinting. PMID:27270567

  10. Photonic hydrogel beads for controlled release of risedronate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajuria, Deepak K.; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2014-03-01

    pH-sensitive photonic composite hydrogel beads composed of sodium alginate and risedronate sodium (SA/RIS) was prepared crosslinked by Ca2+ owing to the ionic gelation of SA. The structure and surface morphology of the composite hydrogel beads were characterized by SEM. pH-sensitivity of these composite hydrogels beads and the release behaviors of drug from them were investigated. The results showed that the composite hydrogel beads had good pH-sensitivity. The drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were 27.7% and 92% for RIS, respectively. The cumulative release ratios of RIS from the composite hydrogel beads were 2.47% in pH 2.1 solution and 83 % in pH 6.8 solutions within 24 h, respectively. However, the cumulative release ratio of RIS in pH 7.4 solution reached 91% within 7 h. It is proposed that the novel photonic SA/RIS composite hydrogel bead could possess the potential of an increased intestinal absorption and fewer adverse effects of RIS. The pH and salt response of photonic hydrogel bead, as well as the encapsulation of macromolecules, are promising for applications in biomedicine and biotechnology.

  11. Injectable shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels for stem cell delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Ashish; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Peak, Charles W.; Carrow, James K.; Gentry, James; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.

    2016-06-01

    Injectable hydrogels are investigated for cell encapsulation and delivery as they can shield cells from high shear forces. One of the approaches to obtain injectable hydrogels is to reinforce polymeric networks with high aspect ratio nanoparticles such as two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. 2D nanomaterials are an emerging class of ultrathin materials with a high degree of anisotropy and they strongly interact with polymers resulting in the formation of shear-thinning hydrogels. Here, we present 2D nanosilicate reinforced kappa-carrageenan (κCA) hydrogels for cellular delivery. κCA is a natural polysaccharide that resembles native glycosaminoglycans and can form brittle hydrogels via ionic crosslinking. The chemical modification of κCA with photocrosslinkable methacrylate groups renders the formation of a covalently crosslinked network (MκCA). Reinforcing the MκCA with 2D nanosilicates results in shear-thinning characteristics, and enhanced mechanical stiffness, elastomeric properties, and physiological stability. The shear-thinning characteristics of nanocomposite hydrogels are investigated for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. The hMSCs showed high cell viability after injection and encapsulated cells showed a circular morphology. The proposed shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels can be used for cell delivery for cartilage tissue regeneration and 3D bioprinting.

  12. Enhanced antitumor activity and mechanism of biodegradable polymeric micelles-encapsulated chetomin in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Li, Guoyou; Deng, Senyi; Ouyang, Liang; Li, Ling; Liu, Lei; Luo, Na; Song, Xiangrong; He, Gu; Gong, Changyang; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-09-01

    Chetomin is a promising molecule with anti-tumor activities in the epipolythiodioxopiperazine family of fungal secondary metabolites; however, strong hydrophobicity has limited its further applications. In this work, chetomin was encapsulated into polymeric micelles to obtain an aqueous formulation, and the chetomin loaded micelles (Che-M) exhibited small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency. When the concentration of copolymer was higher than the critical gelation concentration, the Che-M could form a thermosensitive hydrogel (Che-H), which was free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and converted into a non-flowing gel at body temperature. The molecular modeling study has indicated that chetomin interacted with PCL as a core, which was embraced by PEG as a shell. Che-M showed equal cytotoxicity with free chetomin, but the apoptosis inducing effects of Che-M were more significant. Besides, Che-M could increase the GSSG level, decrease the GSH level, and increase the ROS in CT26 cells. Furthermore, stronger inhibitory effects of Che-M were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth in transgenic zebrafish models. In addition, Che-M was effective in inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival in a subcutaneous CT26 tumor model. In a colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis model, both Che-M and Che-H showed excellent therapeutic effects, but Che-H was more effective. In conclusion, Che-M and Che-H may serve as candidates for cancer therapy.

  13. Templating hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Texter, John

    2009-03-01

    Templating processes for creating polymerized hydrogels are reviewed. The use of contact photonic crystals and of non-contact colloidal crystalline arrays as templates are described and applications to chemical sensing and device fabrication are illustrated. Emulsion templating is illustrated in the formation of microporous membranes, and templating on reverse emulsions and double emulsions is described. Templating in solutions of macromolecules and micelles is discussed and then various applications of hydrogel templating on surfactant liquid crystalline mesophases are illustrated, including a nanoscale analogue of colloidal crystalline array templating, except that the bead array in this case is a cubic array of nonionic micelles. The use of particles as templates in making core-shell and hollow microgel beads is described, as is the use of membrane pores as another illustration of confinement templating. PMID:19816529

  14. Modulation of Dental Pulp Stem Cell Odontogenesis in a Tunable PEG-Fibrinogen Hydrogel System

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiqi; Pandya, Mirali; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Rosa, Vinicius; Tong, Huei Jinn; Seliktar, Dror; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-01-01

    Injectable hydrogels have the great potential for clinical translation of dental pulp regeneration. A recently developed PEG-fibrinogen (PF) hydrogel, which comprises a bioactive fibrinogen backbone conjugated to polyethylene glycol (PEG) side chains, can be cross-linked after injection by photopolymerization. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of this hydrogel, which allows tuning of its mechanical properties, as a scaffold for dental pulp tissue engineering. The cross-linking degree of PF hydrogels could be controlled by varying the amounts of PEG-diacrylate (PEG-DA) cross-linker. PF hydrogels are generally cytocompatible with the encapsulated dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), yielding >85% cell viability in all hydrogels. It was found that the cell morphology of encapsulated DPSCs, odontogenic gene expression, and mineralization were strongly modulated by the hydrogel cross-linking degree and matrix stiffness. Notably, DPSCs cultured within the highest cross-linked hydrogel remained mostly rounded in aggregates and demonstrated the greatest enhancement in odontogenic gene expression. Consistently, the highest degree of mineralization was observed in the highest cross-linked hydrogel. Collectively, our results indicate that PF hydrogels can be used as a scaffold for DPSCs and offers the possibility of influencing DPSCs in ways that may be beneficial for applications in regenerative endodontics. PMID:26124841

  15. Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma of the Trunk: A Case Report and Review of Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Palisaded encapsulated neuroma is a rare, benign cutaneous tumor. It most commonly presents as a solitary, flesh-colored, dome-shaped nodule affecting the face. However, albeit rarely, palisaded encapsulated neuroma may also appear on the trunk, genitals, or extremities. We describe the clinical and pathologic findings of a male patient who presented with a palisaded encapsulated neuroma on his left flank. In addition, we review the characteristics of patients with truncal palisaded encapsulated neuromas and summarize the clinical and histologic differential diagnosis of this tumor.

  16. Structural Reinforcement of Cell-Laden Hydrogels with Microfabricated Three Dimensional Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chaenyung; Soman, Pranav; Zhu, Wei; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Camci-Unal, Gulden

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogels commonly used in tissue engineering are mechanically soft, thus often display structural weakness. Herein, we introduce a strategy for enhancing the structural integrity and fracture toughness of cell-laden hydrogels by incorporating a three-dimensional (3D) microfabricated scaffold as a structural element. A digital micromirror device projection printing (DMD-PP) system, a rapid prototyping technology which employs a layer-by-layer stereolithographic approach, was utilized to efficiently fabricate 3D scaffolds made from photocrosslinkable poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The scaffold was incorporated into a photocrosslinkable gelatin hydrogel by placing it in a pre-gel solution, and inducing in situ hydrogel formation. The resulting scaffold-reinforced hydrogels demonstrated significant increase in ultimate stress and provided structural support for weak hydrogels. In addition, the scaffold did not affect the rigidity of hydrogels, as it was not involved in the crosslinking reaction to form the hydrogel. Therefore, the presented approach could avoid inadvertent and undesired changes in the hydrogel rigidity which is a known regulator of cellular activities. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of scaffold-reinforced hydrogels was confirmed by evaluating the viability and proliferation of encapsulated fibroblasts. Overall, the strategy of incorporating 3D scaffolds into hydrogels as structural reinforcements presented in this study will be highly useful for enhancing the mechanical toughness of hydrogels for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:24778793

  17. Structural Reinforcement of Cell-Laden Hydrogels with Microfabricated Three Dimensional Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Cha, Chaenyung; Soman, Pranav; Zhu, Wei; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogels commonly used in tissue engineering are mechanically soft, thus often display structural weakness. Herein, we introduce a strategy for enhancing the structural integrity and fracture toughness of cell-laden hydrogels by incorporating a three-dimensional (3D) microfabricated scaffold as a structural element. A digital micromirror device projection printing (DMD-PP) system, a rapid prototyping technology which employs a layer-by-layer stereolithographic approach, was utilized to efficiently fabricate 3D scaffolds made from photocrosslinkable poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The scaffold was incorporated into a photocrosslinkable gelatin hydrogel by placing it in a pre-gel solution, and inducing in situ hydrogel formation. The resulting scaffold-reinforced hydrogels demonstrated significant increase in ultimate stress and provided structural support for weak hydrogels. In addition, the scaffold did not affect the rigidity of hydrogels, as it was not involved in the crosslinking reaction to form the hydrogel. Therefore, the presented approach could avoid inadvertent and undesired changes in the hydrogel rigidity which is a known regulator of cellular activities. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of scaffold-reinforced hydrogels was confirmed by evaluating the viability and proliferation of encapsulated fibroblasts. Overall, the strategy of incorporating 3D scaffolds into hydrogels as structural reinforcements presented in this study will be highly useful for enhancing the mechanical toughness of hydrogels for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:24778793

  18. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  19. Sustained release of active chemotherapeutics from injectable-solid β-hairpin peptide hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jessie E P; Stewart, Brandon; Litan, Alisa; Lee, Seung Joon; Schneider, Joel P; Langhans, Sigrid A; Pochan, Darrin J

    2016-05-26

    MAX8 β-hairpin peptide hydrogel is a solid, preformed gel that can be syringe injected due to shear-thinning properties and can recover solid gel properties immediately after injection. This behavior makes the hydrogel an excellent candidate as a local drug delivery vehicle. In this study, vincristine, a hydrophobic and commonly used chemotherapeutic, is encapsulated within MAX8 hydrogel and shown to release constantly over the course of one month. Vincristine was observed to be cytotoxic in vitro at picomolar to nanomolar concentrations. The amounts of drug released from the hydrogels over the entire time-course were in this concentration range. After encapsulation, release of vincristine from the hydrogel was observed for four weeks. Further characterization showed the vincristine released during the 28 days remained biologically active, well beyond its half-life in bulk aqueous solution. This study shows that vincristine-loaded MAX8 hydrogels are excellent candidates as drug delivery vehicles, through sustained, low, local and effective release of vincristine to a specific target. Oscillatory rheology was employed to show that the shear-thinning and re-healing, injectable-solid properties that make MAX8 a desirable drug delivery vehicle are unaffected by vincristine encapsulation. Rheology measurements also were used to monitor hydrogel nanostructure before and after drug encapsulation. PMID:26906463

  20. Photopolymerized hydrogel carriers for live vaccine ballistic delivery.

    PubMed

    Christie, R J; Findley, D J; Dunfee, M; Hansen, R D; Olsen, S C; Grainger, D W

    2006-02-27

    Photopolymerized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-crosslinked hydrogels were assessed for their ability to serve as a payload vehicle to deliver a viable bacterial vaccine (Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) to bison in Yellowstone National Park) ballistically using thermoplastic degradable Biobullets. PEG modified with degradable glycolide or lactide oligomers capped with photopolymerizable methacrylate groups served to crosslink the hydrogel vaccine carrier inside commercial hydroxypropylcellulose Biobullets. Release of 1 microm diameter model fluorescent particles from hydrogels followed known degradation trends for glycolide- and lactide-modified PEG hydrogels. All particles were released from PEG-co-glycolide hydrogels after approximately 10 days and PEG-co-lactide hydrogels after approximately 45 days following gel degradation. Minimal particle release was observed from pure PEG dimethacrylate hydrogels over 40 days. P. aeruginosa (strain PAO1) and RB51 live vaccines exhibit excellent viability following exposure to photopolymerization encapsulation within these gel matrices. Hydrogels photopolymerized into the payload chamber of Biobullets exhibit similar ballistic properties to commercially available Biobullets and penetrate and remain intact when fired intramuscularly into live elk for release of their gel payload in the host. PMID:16246467

  1. Smart Hydrogels with Inhomogeneous Structures Assembled Using Nanoclay-Cross-Linked Hydrogel Subunits as Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chen; Liu, Zhuang; Yang, Chao; Wang, Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2016-08-24

    A novel and facile assembly strategy has been successfully developed to construct smart nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels with inhomogeneous structures using nanoclay-cross-linked stimuli-responsive hydrogel subunits as building blocks via rearranged hydrogen bonding between polymers and clay nanosheets. The assembled thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) (poly(NIPAM-co-AM)) hydrogels with various inhomogeneous structures exhibit excellent mechanical properties due to plenty of new hydrogen bonding interactions created at the interface for locking the NC hydrogel subunits, which are strong enough to tolerate external forces such as high levels of elongations and multicycles of swelling/deswelling operations. The proposed approach is featured with flexibility and designability to build assembled hydrogels with diverse architectures for achieving various responsive deformations, which are highly promising for stimuli-responsive manipulation such as actuation, encapsulation, and cargo transportation. Our assembly strategy creates new opportunities for further developing mechanically strong hydrogel systems with complex architectures that composed of diverse internal structures, multistimuli-responsive properties, and controllable shape deformation behaviors in the soft robots and actuators fields. PMID:27490585

  2. Microencapsulation of purple Brazilian cherry juice in xanthan, tara gums and xanthan-tara hydrogel matrixes.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Josiane K; Zambiazi, Rui C; Borges, Caroline D; Krumreich, Fernanda D; da Luz, Suzane R; Hartwig, Naralice; da Rosa, Cleonice G

    2013-11-01

    The purple Brazilian cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.) juice was encapsulated in xanthan, tara and xanthan-tara hydrogel matrixes. Encapsulation efficiency, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffractometry, release profile, stability of carotenoids, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of microparticles were evaluated. Encapsulation was confirmed. The highest encapsulation efficiency was obtained with xanthan gum and hydrogel was mostly indicated for the release of carotenoids in GFS and IFS medium. Phenolic compounds had the highest release rate but not in a gradually way, regardless of wall material and fluids under analysis. Stored microparticles at 4 and 25 °C, showed carotenoid degradation. Xanthan and hydrogel wall material provided the greatest stability to these compounds. The microparticles' anti-oxidant activity decreased during storage due to the degradation of carotenoids. PMID:24053801

  3. Controlling Mechanical Properties of Cell-Laden Hydrogels by Covalent Incorporation of Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chaenyung; Shin, Su Ryon; Gao, Xiguang; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Tang, Xiaowu (Shirley); Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Graphene-based materials are useful reinforcing agents to modify the mechanical properties of hydrogels. Here, we present an approach to covalently incorporate graphene oxide (GO) into hydrogels via radical copolymerization to enhance the dispersion and conjugation of GO sheets within the hydrogels. GO is chemically modified to present surface-grafted methacrylate groups (MeGO). In comparison to GO, higher concentrations of MeGO can be stably dispersed in a pre-gel solution containing methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) without aggregation or significant increase in viscosity. In addition, the resulting MeGO-GelMA hydrogels demonstrate a significant increase in fracture strength with increasing MeGO concentration. Interestingly, the rigidity of the hydrogels is not significantly affected by the covalently incorporated GO. Therefore, our approach can be used to enhance the structural integrity and resistance to fracture of the hydrogels without inadvertently affecting their rigidity, which is known to affect the behavior of encapsulated cells. The biocompatibility of MeGO-GelMA hydrogels is confirmed by measuring the viability and proliferation of the encapsulated fibroblasts. Overall, this study highlights the advantage of covalently incorporating GO into a hydrogel system, and improves the quality of cell-laden hydrogels. PMID:24127350

  4. Controlling mechanical properties of cell-laden hydrogels by covalent incorporation of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Cha, Chaenyung; Shin, Su Ryon; Gao, Xiguang; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-02-12

    Graphene-based materials are useful reinforcing agents to modify the mechanical properties of hydrogels. Here, an approach is presented to covalently incorporate graphene oxide (GO) into hydrogels via radical copolymerization to enhance the dispersion and conjugation of GO sheets within the hydrogels. GO is chemically modified to present surface-grafted methacrylate groups (MeGO). In comparison to GO, higher concentrations of MeGO can be stably dispersed in a pre-gel solution containing methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) without aggregation or significant increase in viscosity. In addition, the resulting MeGO-GelMA hydrogels demonstrate a significant increase in fracture strength with increasing MeGO concentration. Interestingly, the rigidity of the hydrogels is not significantly affected by the covalently incorporated GO. Therefore, this approach can be used to enhance the structural integrity and resistance to fracture of the hydrogels without inadvertently affecting their rigidity, which is known to affect the behavior of encapsulated cells. The biocompatibility of MeGO-GelMA hydrogels is confirmed by measuring the viability and proliferation of the encapsulated fibroblasts. Overall, this study highlights the advantage of covalently incorporating GO into a hydrogel system, and improves the quality of cell-laden hydrogels. PMID:24127350

  5. Thiol-ene hydrogels as desmoplasia-mimetic matrices for modeling pancreatic cancer cell growth, invasion, and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Chang Seok; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Korc, Murray; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-01-01

    The development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is heavily influenced by local stromal tissues, or desmoplasia. Biomimetic hydrogels capable of mimicking tumor niches are particularly useful for discovering the role of independent matrix cues on cancer cell development. Here, we report a photo-curable and bio-orthogonal thiol-ene (i.e., cross-linked by mutually reactive norbornene and thiol groups via photoinitiation) hydrogel platform for studying the growth, morphogenesis, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell marker expression in PDAC cells cultured in 3D. The hydrogels were prepared from multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol)-norbornene cross-linked with protease sensitive peptide to permit cell-mediated matrix remodeling. Collagen 1 fibrils were incorporated into the covalent network while cytokines (e.g., EGF and TGF-β1) were supplemented in the culture media for controlling cell fate. We found that the presence of collagen 1 enhanced cell proliferation and Yes-associated protein (YAP) translocation to cell nuclei. Cytokines and collagen 1 synergistically up-regulated MT1-MMP expression and induced cell spreading, suggestive of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the encapsulated cells. Furthermore, PDAC cells cultured in 3D developed chemo-resistance even in the absence of collagen 1 and cytokines. This phenotype is likely a consequence of the enrichment of pancreatic cancer stem cells that expressed high levels of CD24, sonic hedgehog (SHH), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). PMID:25176061

  6. Antifungal hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Zumbuehl, Andreas; Ferreira, Lino; Kuhn, Duncan; Astashkina, Anna; Long, Lisa; Yeo, Yoon; Iaconis, Tiffany; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Fink, Gerald R.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    Fungi are increasingly identified as major pathogens in bloodstream infections, often involving indwelling devices. Materials with antifungal properties may provide an important deterrent to these infections. Here we describe amphogel, a dextran-based hydrogel into which amphotericin B is adsorbed. Amphogel kills fungi within 2 h of contact and can be reused for at least 53 days without losing its effectiveness against Candida albicans. The antifungal material is biocompatible in vivo and does not cause hemolysis in human blood. Amphogel inoculated with C. albicans and implanted in mice prevents fungal infection. Amphogel also mitigates fungal biofilm formation. An antifungal matrix with these properties could be used to coat a variety of medical devices such as catheters as well as industrial surfaces. PMID:17664427

  7. Hydrolytically degradable thiol–ene hydrogels for protein release

    PubMed Central

    Rehmann, Matthew S.; Garibian, Andrew C.; Kloxin, April M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A new degradable PEG-diester-dinorbornene/PEG-triester-trithiol hydrogel was evaluated for protein release. The hydrogel polymerized rapidly with seconds of UV irradiation and subsequently hydrolytically degraded in aqueous buffer over the course of approximately 3 weeks. Further, the hydrogel enabled the encapsulation and release of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), over 7 days with ~ 90% released at 48 h. This study serves as a proof-of-concept for the creation of hydrolytically degradable, PEG-ester-thiol-based hydrogels by a photoinitiated step growth mechanism for protein release. With this approach, degradation and release rates could be tuned by varying the monomer molecular weight and functionality in future studies. PMID:25309103

  8. Enhanced loading efficiency and sustained release of doxorubicin from hyaluronic acid/graphene oxide composite hydrogels by a mussel-inspired catecholamine.

    PubMed

    Byun, Eunkyoung; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogels have been widely investigated as depots and carriers for drug delivery. For example, hydrogels have been successfully used to encapsulate a variety of pharmaceuticals, such as peptides and proteins. Recently, carbon material/hydrogel hybrid systems have been of interest as new hydrogel systems because of the attractiveness of structural reinforcement for biomedical applications. In particular, graphene and graphene oxide (GO) have been recognized as novel biomaterials with unique physical, electrical, and thermal properties. Among the various applications of these materials, many research groups are intensively exploring the biomedical applications of graphene and GO. In this study, we propose a new role for GO in hybrid hydrogels, with the inclusion of GO in the gel network resulting in a nearly 90% enhancement in the loading of small, hydrophobic drugs (e.g., doxorubicin, Dox) compared to the hydrogel without encapsulated GO. The hydrogels were prepared from hyaluronic acid (HA), with a mussel-inspired crosslinking chemistry used to prepare the HA hydrogels. Dox was then loaded into the hydrogels. The HA/GO composite hydrogel not only enhanced the loading amount but also exhibited long-lasting anticancer activity over 10 days. We believe that these graphene oxide-containing composite hydrogels can solve one of the challenges in the application of hydrogels by improving the loading efficiency of small-molecule drugs. PMID:25942800

  9. Fiber-reinforced hydrogel scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Maryam; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Sant, Shilpa; Jung, Sungmi; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali; Javadi, Gholamreza; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Heart valve-related disorders are among the major causes of death worldwide. Although prosthetic valves are widely used to treat this pathology, current prosthetic grafts cannot grow with the patient while maintaining normal valve mechanical and hemodynamic properties. Tissue engineering may provide a possible solution to this issue through using biodegradable scaffolds and patients' own cells. Despite their similarity to heart valve tissue, most hydrogel scaffolds are not mechanically suitable for the dynamic stresses of the heart valve microenvironment. In this study, we integrated electrospun poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) microfiber scaffolds, which possess enhanced mechanical properties for heart valve engineering, within a hybrid hydrogel made from methacrylated hyaluronic acid and methacrylated gelatin. Sheep mitral valvular interstitial cells were encapsulated in the hydrogel and evaluated in hydrogel-only, PGS-PCL scaffold-only, and composite scaffold conditions. Although the cellular viability and metabolic activity were similar among all scaffold types, the presence of the hydrogel improved the three-dimensional distribution of mitral valvular interstitial cells. As seen by similar values in both the Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength between the PGS-PCL scaffolds and the composites, microfibrous scaffolds preserved their mechanical properties in the presence of the hydrogels. Compared to electrospun or hydrogel scaffolds alone, this combined system may provide a more suitable three-dimensional structure for generating scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:24733776

  10. Evaluation of photocrosslinked Lutrol hydrogel for tissue printing applications.

    PubMed

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Swennen, Ives; Girones, Jordi; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Schacht, Etienne; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2009-07-13

    Application of hydrogels in tissue engineering and innovative strategies such as organ printing, which is based on layered 3D deposition of cell-laden hydrogels, requires design of novel hydrogel matrices. Hydrogel demands for 3D printing include: 1) preservation of the printed shape after the deposition; 2) maintaining cell viability and cell function and 3) easy handling of the printed construct. In this study we analyze the applicability of a novel, photosensitive hydrogel (Lutrol) for printing of 3D structured bone grafts. We benefit from the fast temperature-responsive gelation ability of thermosensitive Lutrol-F127, ensuring organized 3D extrusion, and the additional stability provided by covalent photocrosslinking allows handling of the printed scaffolds. We studied the cytotoxicity of the hydrogel and osteogenic differentiation of embedded osteogenic progenitor cells. After photopolymerization of the modified Lutrol hydrogel, cells remain viable for up to three weeks and retain the ability to differentiate. Encapsulation of cells does not compromise the mechanical properties of the formed gels and multilayered porous Lutrol structures were successfully printed. PMID:19445533

  11. Photo-crosslinkable hydrogel-based 3D microfluidic culture device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youlee; Lee, Jong Min; Bae, Pan-Kee; Chung, Il Yup; Chung, Bong Hyun; Chung, Bong Geun

    2015-04-01

    We developed the photo-crosslinkable hydrogel-based 3D microfluidic device to culture neural stem cells (NSCs) and tumors. The photo-crosslinkable gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) polymer was used as a physical barrier in the microfluidic device and collagen type I gel was employed to culture NSCs in a 3D manner. We demonstrated that the pore size was inversely proportional to concentrations of GelMA hydrogels, showing the pore sizes of 5 and 25 w/v% GelMA hydrogels were 34 and 4 μm, respectively. It also revealed that the morphology of pores in 5 w/v% GelMA hydrogels was elliptical shape, whereas we observed circular-shaped pores in 25 w/v% GelMA hydrogels. To culture NSCs and tumors in the 3D microfluidic device, we investigated the molecular diffusion properties across GelMA hydrogels, indicating that 25 w/v% GelMA hydrogels inhibited the molecular diffusion for 6 days in the 3D microfluidic device. In contrast, the chemicals were diffused in 5 w/v% GelMA hydrogels. Finally, we cultured NSCs and tumors in the hydrogel-based 3D microfluidic device, showing that 53-75% NSCs differentiated into neurons, while tumors were cultured in the collagen gels. Therefore, this photo-crosslinkable hydrogel-based 3D microfluidic culture device could be a potentially powerful tool for regenerative tissue engineering applications. PMID:25641332

  12. Injectable, rapid gelling and highly flexible hydrogel composites as growth factor and cell carriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Li, Zhenqing; Khan, Mahmood; Tamama, Kenichi; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Wagner, William R; Sen, Chandan K; Guan, Jianjun

    2010-06-01

    A family of injectable, rapid gelling and highly flexible hydrogel composites capable of releasing insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and delivering mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) were developed. Hydrogel composites were fabricated from Type I collagen, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and a thermosensitive and degradable hydrogel copolymer based on N-isopropylacrylamide, acrylic acid, N-acryloxysuccinimide and a macromer poly(trimethylene carbonate)-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The hydrogel copolymer was gellable at body temperature before degradation and soluble at body temperature after degradation. Hydrogel composites exhibited LCSTs around room temperature. They could easily be injected through a 26-gauge needle at 4 degrees C, and were capable of gelling within 6s at 37 degrees C to form highly flexible gels with moduli matching those of the rat and human myocardium. The hydrogel composites showed good oxygen permeability; the oxygen pressure within the hydrogel composites was similar to that in the air. The effects of collagen and CS contents on LCST, gelation time, injectability, mechanical properties and degradation properties were investigated. IGF-1 was loaded into the hydrogel composites for enhanced cell survival/growth. The released IGF-1 remained bioactive during a 2-week release period. Small fraction of CS in the hydrogel composites significantly decreased IGF-1 release rate. The release kinetics appeared to be controlled mainly by hydrogel composite water content, degradation and interaction with IGF-1. Human MSC adhesion on the hydrogel composites was comparable to that on the tissue culture plate. MSCs were encapsulated in the hydrogel composites and were found to grow inside during a 7-day culture period. IGF-1 loading significantly accelerated MSC growth. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that MSCs maintained their multipotent differentiation potential in hydrogel composites with and without IGF-1. These injectable and rapid gelling hydrogel composites

  13. Encapsulated environment.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Tom M; Daanen, Hein A M; Cheung, Stephen S

    2013-07-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals who wear PPC often work in uncompensable heat stress conditions where body heat storage continues to rise and the risk of heat injury is greatly enhanced. Tolerance time while wearing PPC is influenced by three factors: (i) initial core temperature (Tc), affected by heat acclimation, precooling, hydration, aerobic fitness, circadian rhythm, and menstrual cycle (ii) Tc tolerated at exhaustion, influenced by state of encapsulation, hydration, and aerobic fitness; and (iii) the rate of increase in Tc from beginning to end of the heat-stress exposure, which is dependent on the clothing characteristics, thermal environment, work rate, and individual factors like body composition and economy of movement. Methods to reduce heat strain in PPC include increasing clothing permeability for air, adjusting pacing strategy, including work/rest schedules, physical training, and cooling interventions, although the additional weight and bulk of some personal cooling systems offset their intended advantage. Individuals with low body fatness who perform regular aerobic exercise have tolerance times in PPC that exceed those of their sedentary counterparts by as much as 100% due to lower resting Tc, the higher Tc tolerated at exhaustion and a slower increase in Tc during exercise. However, questions remain about the importance of activity levels, exercise intensity, cold water ingestion, and plasma volume expansion for thermotolerance. PMID:23897690

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Tunable Poly(Ethylene Glycol): Gelatin Methacrylate Composite Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Che B.; Nichol, Jason W.; Aubin, Hug; Bae, Hojae; Yamanlar, Seda; Al-Haque, Shahed; Koshy, Sandeep T.

    2011-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels are popular for cell culture and tissue-engineering applications because they are nontoxic and exhibit favorable hydration and nutrient transport properties. However, cells cannot adhere to, remodel, proliferate within, or degrade PEG hydrogels. Methacrylated gelatin (GelMA), derived from denatured collagen, yields an enzymatically degradable, photocrosslinkable hydrogel that cells can degrade, adhere to and spread within. To combine the desirable features of each of these materials we synthesized PEG-GelMA composite hydrogels, hypothesizing that copolymerization would enable adjustable cell binding, mechanical, and degradation properties. The addition of GelMA to PEG resulted in a composite hydrogel that exhibited tunable mechanical and biological profiles. Adding GelMA (5%–15% w/v) to PEG (5% and 10% w/v) proportionally increased fibroblast surface binding and spreading as compared to PEG hydrogels (p<0.05). Encapsulated fibroblasts were also able to form 3D cellular networks 7 days after photoencapsulation only within composite hydrogels as compared to PEG alone. Additionally, PEG-GelMA hydrogels displayed tunable enzymatic degradation and stiffness profiles. PEG-GelMA composite hydrogels show great promise as tunable, cell-responsive hydrogels for 3D cell culture and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:21306293

  15. Synthesis and characterization of tunable poly(ethylene glycol): gelatin methacrylate composite hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Che B; Nichol, Jason W; Aubin, Hug; Bae, Hojae; Yamanlar, Seda; Al-Haque, Shahed; Koshy, Sandeep T; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-07-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels are popular for cell culture and tissue-engineering applications because they are nontoxic and exhibit favorable hydration and nutrient transport properties. However, cells cannot adhere to, remodel, proliferate within, or degrade PEG hydrogels. Methacrylated gelatin (GelMA), derived from denatured collagen, yields an enzymatically degradable, photocrosslinkable hydrogel that cells can degrade, adhere to and spread within. To combine the desirable features of each of these materials we synthesized PEG-GelMA composite hydrogels, hypothesizing that copolymerization would enable adjustable cell binding, mechanical, and degradation properties. The addition of GelMA to PEG resulted in a composite hydrogel that exhibited tunable mechanical and biological profiles. Adding GelMA (5%-15% w/v) to PEG (5% and 10% w/v) proportionally increased fibroblast surface binding and spreading as compared to PEG hydrogels (p<0.05). Encapsulated fibroblasts were also able to form 3D cellular networks 7 days after photoencapsulation only within composite hydrogels as compared to PEG alone. Additionally, PEG-GelMA hydrogels displayed tunable enzymatic degradation and stiffness profiles. PEG-GelMA composite hydrogels show great promise as tunable, cell-responsive hydrogels for 3D cell culture and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:21306293

  16. Hyperbranched Polyester Hydrogels with Controlled Drug Release and Cell Adhesion Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbin; Patel, Alpesh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Mihaila, Silvia M.; Iviglia, Giorgio; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Bae, Hojae; Yang, Huai; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Hyperbranched polyesters (HPE) have a high efficiency to encapsulate bioactive agents, including drugs, genes and proteins, due to their globe-like nanostructure. However, the use of these highly branched polymeric systems for tissue engineering applications has not been broadly investigated. Here, we report synthesis and characterization of photocrosslinkable HPE hydrogels with sustained drug release characteristics for cellular therapies. These HPE can encapsulate hydrophobic drug molecules within the HPE cavities, due to the presence of hydrophobic inner structure that is otherwise difficult to achieve in conventional hydrogels. The functionalization of HPE with photocrosslinkable acrylate moieties renders the formation of hydrogels with highly porous interconnected structure, and mechanically tough network. The compressive modulus of HPE hydrogels was tunable by changing the crosslinking density. The feasibility of using these HPE networks for cellular therapies was investigated by evaluating cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation on hydrogel surface. Highly crosslinked and mechanically stiff HPE hydrogels have higher cell adhesion, spreading, proliferation compared to soft and complaint HPE hydrogels. Overall, we showed that hydrogels made from HPE could be used for biomedical applications that require control cell adhesion and control release of hydrophobic clues. PMID:23394067

  17. F3-targeted cisplatin-hydrogel nanoparticles as an effective therapeutic that targets both murine and human ovarian tumor endothelial cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Winer, I.; Wang, S.; Lee, Y-E K.; Fan, W.; Gong, Y.; Burgos-Ojeda, D.; Spahlinger, G.; Kopelman, R.; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that ovarian cancer may be highly responsive to anti-vascular therapeutics. We have developed an anti-vascular tumor therapeutic using the F3 peptide to target cisplatin loaded nanoparticles (F3-Cis-Np) to tumor vessels. We demonstrate that while F3-Cis-Np bind with high specificity to both human ovarian tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells in vitro, they only demonstrate cytotoxic activity against the tumor endothelial cells. In vivo these nanoparticles bind primarily to tumor endothelial cells. Therapeutic studies in both flank and orthotopic intraperitoneal murine ovarian tumor models, as well as human tumor xenograft models, demonstrate rapid tumor regression with treatment. Treatment was associated with significant vascular necrosis consistent with an anti-vascular effect. Furthermore treatment was active in both platinum sensitive and platinum resistant cell lines. Importantly we demonstrate that F3-Cis-Np bind to human tumor endothelial cells in vitro and to human tumor vessels in vivo. Therapy targeting human vasculature in vivo with F3-Cis-Np led to near complete loss of all human tumor vessels in a murine model of human tumor vasculature. Our studies indicate that F3-targeted vascular therapeutics may be an effective treatment modality in human ovarian cancer. PMID:20959470

  18. Subcutaneously Administered Self-Cleaving Hydrogel-Octreotide Conjugates Provide Very Long-Acting Octreotide.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eric L; Henise, Jeff; Reid, Ralph; Ashley, Gary W; Santi, Daniel V

    2016-07-20

    We developed a long-acting drug-delivery system that supports subcutaneous administration of the peptidic somatostatin agonist octreotide-a blockbuster drug used to treat acromegaly and neuroendocrine tumors. The current once-a-month polymer-encapsulated octreotide, Sandostatin LAR, requires a painful intragluteal injection through a large needle by a health-care professional. To overcome such shortcomings, Tetra-PEG hydrogel microspheres were covalently attached to the α-amine of d-Phe(1) or the ε-amine of Lys(5) of octreotide by a self-cleaving β-eliminative linker; upon subcutaneous injection in the rat using a small-bore needle, octreotide was slowly released. The released drug from the ε-octreotide conjugate showed a remarkably long serum half-life that exceeded two months. The α-octreotide conjugate had a half-life of ∼2 weeks, and showed an excellent correlation of in vitro and in vivo drug release. Pharmacokinetic models indicate these microspheres should support once-weekly to once-monthly self-administered subcutaneous dosing in humans. The hydrogel-octreotide conjugate shows the favorable pharmacokinetics of Sandostatin LAR without its drawbacks. PMID:27253622

  19. Controlled release of simvastatin from in situ forming hydrogel triggers bone formation in MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon Shin; David, Allan E; Park, Kyung Min; Lin, Chia-Ying; Than, Khoi D; Lee, Kyuri; Park, Jun Beom; Jo, Inho; Park, Ki Dong; Yang, Victor C

    2013-04-01

    Simvastatin (SIM), a drug commonly administered for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, has been recently reported to induce bone regeneration/formation. In this study, we investigated the properties of hydrogel composed of gelatin-poly(ethylene glycol)-tyramine (GPT) as an efficient SIM delivery vehicle that can trigger osteogenic differentiation. Sustained delivery of SIM was achieved through its encapsulation in an injectable, biodegradable GPT-hydrogel. Cross-linking of the gelatin-based GPT-hydrogel was induced by the reaction of horse radish peroxidase and H(2)O(2). GPT-hydrogels of three different matrix stiffness, 1,800 (GPT-hydrogel1), 5,800 (GPT-hydrogel2), and 8,400 Pa (GPT-hydrogel3) were used. The gelation/degradation time and SIM release profiles of hydrogels loaded with two different concentrations of SIM, 1 and 3 mg/ml, were also evaluated. Maximum swelling times of GPT-hydrogel1, GPT-hydrogel2, and GPT-hydrogel3 were observed to be 6, 12, and 20 days, respectively. All GPT-hydrogels showed complete degradation within 55 days. The in vitro SIM release profiles, investigated in PBS buffer (pH 7.4) at 37°C, exhibited typical biphasic release patterns with the initial burst being more rapid with GPT-hydrogel1 compared with GPT-hydrogel3. Substantial increase in matrix metalloproteinase-13, osteocalcin expression levels, and mineralization were seen in osteogenic differentiation system using MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with GPT-hydrogels loaded with SIM in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that controlled release of SIM from a biodegradable, injectable GPT-hydrogel had a promising role for long-term treatment of chronic degenerative diseases such as disc degenerative disease. PMID:23250670

  20. Thermoreversible Poly(ethylene glycol)-g-Chitosan Hydrogel as a Therapeutic T Lymphocyte Depot for Localized Glioblastoma Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The outcome for glioblastoma patients remains dismal for its invariably recrudesces within 2 cm of the resection cavity. Local immunotherapy has the potential to eradicate the residual infiltrative component of these tumors. Here, we report the development of a biodegradable hydrogel containing therapeutic T lymphocytes for localized delivery to glioblastoma cells for brain tumor immunotherapy. Thermoreversible poly(ethylene glycol)-g-chitosan hydrogels (PCgels) were optimized for steady T lymphocyte release. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed the chemical structure of poly(ethylene glycol)-g-chitosan, and rheological studies revealed that the sol-to-gel transition of the PCgel occurred around ≥32 °C. T lymphocyte invasion through the PCgel and subsequent cytotoxicity to glioblastoma were assessed in vitro. The PCgel was shown to be cellular compatible with T lymphocytes, and the T lymphocytes retain their anti-glioblastoma activity after being encapsulated in the PCgel. T lymphocytes in the PCgel were shown to be more effective in killing glioblastoma than those in the Matrigel control. This may be attributed to the optimal pore size of the PCgel allowing better invasion of T lymphocytes. Our study suggests that this unique PCgel depot may offer a viable approach for localized immunotherapy for glioblastoma. PMID:24890220

  1. Thermoreversible poly(ethylene glycol)-g-chitosan hydrogel as a therapeutic T lymphocyte depot for localized glioblastoma immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Ching-Ting; Kievit, Forrest M; Ravanpay, Ali; Erickson, Ariane E; Jensen, Michael C; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-07-14

    The outcome for glioblastoma patients remains dismal for its invariably recrudesces within 2 cm of the resection cavity. Local immunotherapy has the potential to eradicate the residual infiltrative component of these tumors. Here, we report the development of a biodegradable hydrogel containing therapeutic T lymphocytes for localized delivery to glioblastoma cells for brain tumor immunotherapy. Thermoreversible poly(ethylene glycol)-g-chitosan hydrogels (PCgels) were optimized for steady T lymphocyte release. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed the chemical structure of poly(ethylene glycol)-g-chitosan, and rheological studies revealed that the sol-to-gel transition of the PCgel occurred around ≥32 °C. T lymphocyte invasion through the PCgel and subsequent cytotoxicity to glioblastoma were assessed in vitro. The PCgel was shown to be cellular compatible with T lymphocytes, and the T lymphocytes retain their anti-glioblastoma activity after being encapsulated in the PCgel. T lymphocytes in the PCgel were shown to be more effective in killing glioblastoma than those in the Matrigel control. This may be attributed to the optimal pore size of the PCgel allowing better invasion of T lymphocytes. Our study suggests that this unique PCgel depot may offer a viable approach for localized immunotherapy for glioblastoma. PMID:24890220

  2. Engineered VEGF-releasing PEG-MAL hydrogel for pancreatic islet vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Edward A.; Templeman, Kellie L.; Thulé, Peter M.; García, Andrés J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofunctionalized polyethylene glycol maleimide (PEG-MAL) hydrogels were engineered as a platform to deliver pancreatic islets to the small bowel mesentery and promote graft vascularization. VEGF, a potent stimulator of angiogenesis, was incorporated into the hydrogel to be released in an on-demand manner through enzymatic degradation. PEG-MAL hydrogel enabled extended in vivo release of VEGF. Isolated rat islets encapsulated in PEG-MAL hydrogels remained viable in culture and secreted insulin. Islets encapsulated in PEG-MAL matrix and transplanted to the small bowel mesentery of healthy rats grafted to the host tissue and revascularized by 4 weeks. Addition of VEGF release to the PEG-MAL matrix greatly augmented the vascularization response. These results establish PEG-MAL engineered matrices as a vascular-inductive cell delivery vehicle and warrant their further investigation as islet transplantation vehicles in diabetic animal models. PMID:25787738

  3. Optical cell separation from three-dimensional environment in photodegradable hydrogels for pure culture techniques.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masato; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Sugiura, Shinji; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Sumaru, Kimio; Matsui, Hirofumi; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cell sorting is an essential and efficient experimental tool for the isolation and characterization of target cells. A three-dimensional environment is crucial in determining cell behavior and cell fate in biological analysis. Herein, we have applied photodegradable hydrogels to optical cell separation from a 3D environment using a computer-controlled light irradiation system. The hydrogel is composed of photocleavable tetra-arm polyethylene glycol and gelatin, which optimized cytocompatibility to adjust a composition of crosslinker and gelatin. Local light irradiation could degrade the hydrogel corresponding to the micropattern image designed on a laptop; minimum resolution of photodegradation was estimated at 20 µm. Light irradiation separated an encapsulated fluorescent microbead without any contamination of neighbor beads, even at multiple targets. Upon selective separation of target cells in the hydrogels, the separated cells have grown on another dish, resulting in pure culture. Cell encapsulation, light irradiation and degradation products exhibited negligible cytotoxicity in overall process. PMID:24810563

  4. Fabrication of Cell-Laden Macroporous Biodegradable Hydrogels with Tunable Porosities and Pore Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigated a cytocompatible particulate leaching method for the fabrication of cell-laden macroporous hydrogels. We used dehydrated and uncrosslinked gelatin microspheres as leachable porogens to create macroporous oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels. Varying gelatin content and size resulted in a wide range of porosities and pore sizes, respectively. Encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited high viability immediately following the fabrication process, and culture of cell-laden hydrogels revealed improved cell viability with increasing porosity. Additionally, the osteogenic potential of the encapsulated MSCs was evaluated over 16 days. Overall, this study presents a robust method for the preparation of cell-laden macroporous hydrogels with desired porosity and pore size for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25156274

  5. Crosslinkable Hydrogels Derived from Cartilage, Meniscus, and Tendon Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Jetze; Levett, Peter A.; te Moller, Nikae C.R.; Besems, Jeremy; Boere, Kristel W.M.; van Rijen, Mattie H.P.; de Grauw, Janny C.; Dhert, Wouter J.A.; van Weeren, P. René

    2015-01-01

    Decellularized tissues have proven to be versatile matrices for the engineering of tissues and organs. These matrices usually consist of collagens, matrix-specific proteins, and a set of largely undefined growth factors and signaling molecules. Although several decellularized tissues have found their way to clinical applications, their use in the engineering of cartilage tissue has only been explored to a limited extent. We set out to generate hydrogels from several tissue-derived matrices, as hydrogels are the current preferred cell carriers for cartilage repair. Equine cartilage, meniscus, and tendon tissue was harvested, decellularized, enzymatically digested, and functionalized with methacrylamide groups. After photo-cross-linking, these tissue digests were mechanically characterized. Next, gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) hydrogel was functionalized with these methacrylated tissue digests. Equine chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) (both from three donors) were encapsulated and cultured in vitro up to 6 weeks. Gene expression (COL1A1, COL2A1, ACAN, MMP-3, MMP-13, and MMP-14), cartilage-specific matrix formation, and hydrogel stiffness were analyzed after culture. The cartilage, meniscus, and tendon digests were successfully photo-cross-linked into hydrogels. The addition of the tissue-derived matrices to GelMA affected chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, although no consequent improvement was demonstrated. For chondrocytes, the tissue-derived matrix gels performed worse compared to GelMA alone. This work demonstrates for the first time that native tissues can be processed into crosslinkable hydrogels for the engineering of tissues. Moreover, the differentiation of encapsulated cells can be influenced in these stable, decellularized matrix hydrogels. PMID:25557049

  6. Crosslinkable hydrogels derived from cartilage, meniscus, and tendon tissue.

    PubMed

    Visser, Jetze; Levett, Peter A; te Moller, Nikae C R; Besems, Jeremy; Boere, Kristel W M; van Rijen, Mattie H P; de Grauw, Janny C; Dhert, Wouter J A; van Weeren, P René; Malda, Jos

    2015-04-01

    Decellularized tissues have proven to be versatile matrices for the engineering of tissues and organs. These matrices usually consist of collagens, matrix-specific proteins, and a set of largely undefined growth factors and signaling molecules. Although several decellularized tissues have found their way to clinical applications, their use in the engineering of cartilage tissue has only been explored to a limited extent. We set out to generate hydrogels from several tissue-derived matrices, as hydrogels are the current preferred cell carriers for cartilage repair. Equine cartilage, meniscus, and tendon tissue was harvested, decellularized, enzymatically digested, and functionalized with methacrylamide groups. After photo-cross-linking, these tissue digests were mechanically characterized. Next, gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) hydrogel was functionalized with these methacrylated tissue digests. Equine chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) (both from three donors) were encapsulated and cultured in vitro up to 6 weeks. Gene expression (COL1A1, COL2A1, ACAN, MMP-3, MMP-13, and MMP-14), cartilage-specific matrix formation, and hydrogel stiffness were analyzed after culture. The cartilage, meniscus, and tendon digests were successfully photo-cross-linked into hydrogels. The addition of the tissue-derived matrices to GelMA affected chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, although no consequent improvement was demonstrated. For chondrocytes, the tissue-derived matrix gels performed worse compared to GelMA alone. This work demonstrates for the first time that native tissues can be processed into crosslinkable hydrogels for the engineering of tissues. Moreover, the differentiation of encapsulated cells can be influenced in these stable, decellularized matrix hydrogels. PMID:25557049

  7. Repairable, nanostructured biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, M.; Brombosz, S.; Grubjesic, S.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins facilitate many key cellular processes, including signal recognition and energy transduction. The ability to harness this evolutionarily-optimized functionality could lead to the development of protein-based systems useful for advancing alternative energy storage and conversion. The future of protein-based, however, requires the development of materials that will stabilize, order and control the activity of the proteins. Recently we have developed a synthetic approach for the preparation of a durable biomimetic chemical hydrogel that can be reversibly swollen in water. The matrix has proven ideal for the stable encapsulation of both water- and membrane-soluble proteins. The material is composed of an aqueous dispersion of a diacrylate end-derivatized PEO-PPO-PEO macromer, a saturated phospholipid and a zwitterionic co-surfactant that self-assembles into a nanostructured physical gel at room temperature as determined by X-ray scattering. The addition of a water soluble PEGDA co-monomer and photoinitator does not alter the self-assembled structure and UV irradiation serves to crosslink the acrylate end groups on the macromer with the PEGDA forming a network within the aqueous domains as determined by FT-IR. More recently we have begun to incorporate reversible crosslinks employing Diels-Alder chemistry, allowing for the extraction and replacement of inactive proteins. The ability to replenish the materials with active, non-denatured forms of protein is an important step in advancing these materials for use in nanostructured devices This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, USDoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Hybrid elastin-like polypeptide-polyethylene glycol (ELP-PEG) hydrogels with improved transparency and independent control of matrix mechanics and cell ligand density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyuan; Cai, Lei; Paul, Alexandra; Enejder, Annika; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogels have been developed as extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics both for therapeutic applications and basic biological studies. In particular, elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) hydrogels, which can be tuned to mimic several biochemical and physical characteristics of native ECM, have been constructed to encapsulate various types of cells to create in vitro mimics of in vivo tissues. However, ELP hydrogels become opaque at body temperature because of ELP's lower critical solution temperature behavior. This opacity obstructs light-based observation of the morphology and behavior of encapsulated cells. In order to improve the transparency of ELP hydrogels for better imaging, we have designed a hybrid ELP-polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel system that rapidly cross-links with tris(hydroxymethyl) phosphine (THP) in aqueous solution via Mannich-type condensation. As expected, addition of the hydrophilic PEG component significantly improves the light transmittance. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy reveals that the hybrid ELP-PEG hydrogels have smaller hydrophobic ELP aggregates at 37 °C. Importantly, this hydrogel platform enables independent tuning of adhesion ligand density and matrix stiffness, which is desirable for studies of cell-matrix interactions. Human fibroblasts encapsulated in these hydrogels show high viability (>98%) after 7 days of culture. High-resolution confocal microscopy of encapsulated fibroblasts reveals that the cells adopt a more spread morphology in response to higher RGD ligand concentrations and softer gel mechanics. PMID:25111283

  9. Hybrid Elastin-like Polypeptide–Polyethylene Glycol (ELP-PEG) Hydrogels with Improved Transparency and Independent Control of Matrix Mechanics and Cell Ligand Density

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels have been developed as extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics both for therapeutic applications and basic biological studies. In particular, elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) hydrogels, which can be tuned to mimic several biochemical and physical characteristics of native ECM, have been constructed to encapsulate various types of cells to create in vitro mimics of in vivo tissues. However, ELP hydrogels become opaque at body temperature because of ELP’s lower critical solution temperature behavior. This opacity obstructs light-based observation of the morphology and behavior of encapsulated cells. In order to improve the transparency of ELP hydrogels for better imaging, we have designed a hybrid ELP-polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel system that rapidly cross-links with tris(hydroxymethyl) phosphine (THP) in aqueous solution via Mannich-type condensation. As expected, addition of the hydrophilic PEG component significantly improves the light transmittance. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy reveals that the hybrid ELP-PEG hydrogels have smaller hydrophobic ELP aggregates at 37 °C. Importantly, this hydrogel platform enables independent tuning of adhesion ligand density and matrix stiffness, which is desirable for studies of cell–matrix interactions. Human fibroblasts encapsulated in these hydrogels show high viability (>98%) after 7 days of culture. High-resolution confocal microscopy of encapsulated fibroblasts reveals that the cells adopt a more spread morphology in response to higher RGD ligand concentrations and softer gel mechanics. PMID:25111283

  10. Using selective withdrawal to encapsulate pancreatic islets for immunoisolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Jason; Murphy, William; Mrksich, Milan

    2005-11-01

    We apply selective-withdrawal for encapsulating insulin-producing pancreatic islets within thin poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coats. Islets placed in an aqueous PEG solution are drawn into the selective-withdrawal spout which then breaks up, leaving the islets surrounded by a thin, 20μm, polymer coat. These coats, whose thickness is independent of the size of the encapsulated islet, are photo-crosslinked to form hydrogel capsules. We can apply multiple coats of varying chemical composition. These coats provide a semi-permeable membrane which allows the islets to respond to changes in glucose concentration by producing insulin in a manner similar to that of unencapsulated islets. Furthermore, the hydrogel capsules exclude large molecules the size of the smallest antibodies. Our results suggest that this microencapsulation technique may be useful for the transplantation of islets for treatment of Type I diabetes.