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Sample records for hydrogen balmer emission

  1. Hydrogen recycling study by Balmer lines emissions in linear plasma machine TPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, K.; Tanabe, T.; Causey, R.; Venhaus, T.; Okuno, K.

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the influence of target materials and temperatures on Balmer series emission in a linear plasma apparatus, Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE). The intensities of the Balmer series emission in front of the target were higher for heavier mass target and also for lower target temperature, showing rather linear relationship between the emission intensity and hydrogen reflection coefficient. For exothermic hydrogen occluders of Ti and Ta, the intensity ratio of Dβ/ Dα increased with the target temperature markedly, whereas the intensity ratio stayed rather constant for endothermic hydrogen occluders of Ni, Cu and W. This is a clear demonstration that the target materials and temperatures modify the boundary plasma. In addition the intensity ratio Dβ/Dα is not simply a function of plasma temperature but has clear target temperature dependence.

  2. Resolution of the discrepancy between Balmer alpha emission rates, the solar Lyman beta flux, and models of geocoronal hydrogen concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur, A.-C.; Meier, R. R.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New satellite Balmer alpha measurements and solar Lyman beta flux and line profile measurements, together with new measurements of the zodiacal light intensity used in correcting both ground and satellite Balmer alpha measurements for the effects of the Fraunhofer line in the zodiacal light, have been used in a reevaluation of the long-standing discrepancy between ground-based Balmer alpha emission rates and other geocoronal hydrogen parameters. The solar Lyman beta line center flux is found to be (4.1 plus or minus 1.3) billion photons per sq cm per sec per angstrom at S(10.7) equals 110 and, together with a current hydrogen model which has 92,000 atoms per cu cm at 650 km for T(inf) equals 950 K, gives good agreement between calculated Balmer alpha emission rates and the ground-based and satellite measurements.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of the hydrogen airglow emissions of Lyman alpha, Lyman beta, and Balmer alpha.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, C. S.; Meier, R. R.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1971-01-01

    Comparison of Lyman-alpha, 740- to 1050-A, and Balmer-alpha airglow measurements made at 134 deg solar-zenith angle on Oct. 13, 1969, with resonance-scattering models of solar radiation. Model comparison with Lyman-alpha data fixes the hydrogen column abundance over 215 km to 2 x 10 to the 13th per cu cm within a factor of 2. Differences between the Lyman-alpha model and data indicate a polar-equatorial departure from spherical symmetry in the hydrogen distribution. A Lyman-beta model based on the hydrogen distribution found to fit the Lyman-alpha data fits the spatial variation of the 740- to 1050-A data well from 100 to 130 km, but it does not fit the data well at higher altitudes; thus the presence of more rapidly absorbed shorter-wavelength radiation is indicated. This same resonance-scattering model yields Balmer-alpha intensities that result in good spatial agreement with the Balmer-alpha measurements, but a fivefold increase in the measured solar line center Lyman-beta flux is required (as required for the Lyman-beta measurement). The intensity ratio of Lyman-beta and Balmer-alpha at night is found to be a simple measure of the hydrogen optical depth if measurements with good accuracy can be made in the visible and ultraviolet spectrum.

  4. Doppler shift measurement of Balmer-alpha line spectrum emission from a plasma in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Doi, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-04-08

    Balmer-α light emission from the extraction region of the LHD one-third ion source has shown a characteristic Doppler broadening in the wavelength spectrum detected by a high resolution spectrometer. The spectrum resembles Gaussian distribution near the wavelength of the intensity peak, while it has an additional component of a broader foot. The measured broadening near the wavelength of the intensity peak corresponds to 0.6 eV hydrogen atom temperature. The spectrum exhibits a larger expansion in the blue wing which becomes smaller when the line of sight is tilted toward the driver region from the original observation axis parallel to the plasma grid. A surface collision simulation model predicts the possibility of hydrogen reflection at the plasma grid surface to form a broad Balmer-α light emission spectrum.

  5. Collisionless Shocks in a Partially Ionized Medium. II. Balmer Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlino, G.; Bandiera, R.; Blasi, P.; Amato, E.

    2012-12-01

    Strong shocks propagating into a partially ionized medium are often associated with optical Balmer lines. This emission is due to impact excitation of neutral hydrogen by hot protons and electrons in the shocked gas. The structure of such Balmer-dominated shocks has been computed in a previous paper, where the distribution function of neutral particles was derived from the appropriate Boltzmann equation including coupling with ions and electrons through charge exchange and ionization. This calculation showed how the presence of neutrals can significantly modify the shock structure through the formation of a neutral-induced precursor ahead of the shock. Here we follow up on our previous work and investigate the properties of the resulting Balmer emission, with the aim of using the observed radiation as a diagnostic tool for shock parameters. Our main focus is on supernova remnant shocks, and we find that, for typical parameters, the Hα emission typically has a three-component spectral profile, where (1) a narrow component originates from upstream cold hydrogen atoms, (2) a broad component comes from hydrogen atoms that have undergone charge exchange with shocked protons downstream of the shock, and (3) an intermediate component is due to hydrogen atoms that have undergone charge exchange with warm protons in the neutral-induced precursor. The relative importance of these three components depends on the shock velocity, on the original degree of ionization, and on the electron-ion temperature equilibration level. The intermediate component, which is the main signature of the presence of a neutral-induced precursor, becomes negligible for shock velocities <~ 1500 km s-1. The width of the intermediate line reflects the temperature in the precursor, while the width of the narrow one is left unaltered by the precursor. In addition, we show that the profiles of both the intermediate and broad components generally depart from a thermal distribution, as a consequence of the

  6. Theoretical quasar emission-line ratios. V - Balmer continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puetter, R. C.; Levan, P. D.

    1982-01-01

    Isothermal, isobaric models of quasar emission line regions are presented which include an improved treatment of radiative transfer in the bound-free continua, based on a generalization of frequency-integrated line transfer techniques and on the use of a probabilistic radiative transfer equation which explicitly distinguishes between the flux divergence coefficient and the photon escape probability. It is found that Balmer continuum emission can be obtained without compromising observed line ratios. It is also established that optically thin or thick Balmer continuum emission models with blended Fe II line are consistent with 4000-2000 A 'blue bump' observations, and that the improved radiative transfer treatment makes order-of-magnitude corrections to level populations and local cooling rates calculated with past techniques.

  7. Self-broadening of the hydrogen Balmer α line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, N. F.; Kielkopf, J. F.; Cayrel, R.; van't Veer-Menneret, C.

    2008-03-01

    Context: Profiles of hydrogen lines in stellar spectra are determined by the properties of the hydrogen atom and the structure of the star's atmosphere. Hydrogen line profiles are therefore a very important diagnostic tool in stellar modeling. In particular they are widely used as effective temperature criterion for stellar atmospheres in the range T_eff 5500-7000 K. Aims: In cool stars such as the Sun hydrogen is largely neutral and the electron density is low. The line center width at half maximum and the spectral energy distribution in the wings are determined primarily by collisions with hydrogen atoms due to their high relative density. This work aims to provide benchmark calculations of Balmer α based on recent H2 potentials. Methods: For the first time an accurate determination of the broadening of Balmer α by atomic hydrogen is made in a unified theory of collisional line profiles using ab initio calculations of molecular hydrogen potential energies and transition matrix elements among singlet and triplet electronic states. Results: We computed the shape, width and shift of the Balmer α line perturbed by neutral hydrogen and studied their dependence on temperature. We present results over the full range of temperatures from 3000 to 12 000 K needed for stellar spectra models. Conclusions: Our calculations lead to larger values than those obtained with the commonly used Ali & Griem (1966, Phys. Rev. A, 144, 366) theory and are closer to the recent calculations of Barklem et al. (2000a, A&A, 355, L5; 2000b, A&A, 363, 1091). We conclude that the line parameters are dependent on the sum of many contributing molecular transitions, each with a different temperature dependence, and we provide tables for Balmer α. The unified line shape theory with complete molecular potentials also predicts additional opacity in the far non-Lorentzian wing.

  8. HYDROGEN BALMER CONTINUUM IN SOLAR FLARES DETECTED BY THE INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzel, P.; Kleint, L.

    2014-10-20

    We present a novel observation of the white light flare (WLF) continuum, which was significantly enhanced during the X1 flare on 2014 March 29 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48). Data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in its near-UV channel show that at the peak of the continuum enhancement, the contrast at the quasi-continuum window above 2813 Å reached 100%-200% and can be even larger closer to Mg II lines. This is fully consistent with the hydrogen recombination Balmer-continuum emission, which follows an impulsive thermal and non-thermal ionization caused by the precipitation of electron beams through the chromosphere. However, a less probable photospheric continuum enhancement cannot be excluded. The light curves of the Balmer continuum have an impulsive character with a gradual fading, similar to those detected recently in the optical region on the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. This observation represents a first Balmer-continuum detection from space far beyond the Balmer limit (3646 Å), eliminating seeing effects known to complicate the WLF detection. Moreover, we use a spectral window so far unexplored for flare studies, which provides the potential to study the Balmer continuum, as well as many metallic lines appearing in emission during flares. Combined with future ground-based observations of the continuum near the Balmer limit, we will be able to disentangle various scenarios of the WLF origin. IRIS observations also provide a critical quantitative measure of the energy radiated in the Balmer continuum, which constrains various models of the energy transport and deposit during flares.

  9. Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer series in laboratory air.

    PubMed

    Swafford, Lauren D; Parigger, Christian G

    2014-01-01

    Stark-broadened emission profiles for the hydrogen alpha and beta Balmer series lines in plasma are measured to characterize electron density and temperature. Plasma is generated using a typical laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) arrangement that employs a focused Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd : YAG) laser, operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The temporal evolution of the hydrogen Balmer series lines is explored using LIBS. Spectra from the plasma are measured following laser-induced optical breakdown in laboratory air. The electron density is primarily inferred from the Stark-broadened experimental data collected at various time delays. Due to the presence of nitrogen and oxygen in air, the hydrogen alpha and beta lines become clearly discernible from background radiation for time delays of 0.4 and 1.4 μs, respectively. PMID:25226255

  10. A Guided-Inquiry Lab for the Analysis of the Balmer Series of the Hydrogen Atomic Spectrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.

    2011-01-01

    A guided-inquiry lab was developed to analyze the Balmer series of the hydrogen atomic spectrum. The emission spectrum of hydrogen was recorded with a homemade benchtop spectrophotometer. By drawing graphs and a trial-and-error approach, students discover the linear relationship presented in the Rydberg formula and connect it with the Bohr model…

  11. Hydrogen Balmer line formation in solar flares affected by return currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štepán, J. Å.; Kašparová, J.; Karlický, M.; Heinzel, P.

    2007-09-01

    Aims:We investigate the effect of the electric return currents in solar flares on the profiles of hydrogen Balmer lines. We consider the monoenergetic approximation for the primary beam and runaway model of the neutralizing return current. Methods: Propagation of the 10 keV electron beam from a coronal reconnection site is considered for the semiempirical chromosphere model F1. We estimate the local number density of return current using two approximations for beam energy fluxes between 4 × 1011 and 1 × 1012 erg cm-2 s-1. Inelastic collisions of beam and return-current electrons with hydrogen are included according to their energy distributions, and the hydrogen Balmer line intensities are computed using an NLTE radiative transfer approach. Results: In comparison to traditional NLTE models of solar flares that neglect the return-current effects, we found a significant increase emission in the Balmer line cores due to nonthermal excitation by return current. Contrary to the model without return current, the line shapes are sensitive to a beam flux. It is the result of variation in the return-current energy that is close to the hydrogen excitation thresholds and the density of return-current electrons.

  12. Hydrogen Balmer-alpha broadening in dense plasmas.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, S; Leboucher-Dalimier, E

    1999-09-01

    This work presents a theoretical analysis of experimental results for the hydrogen Balmer-alpha line in dense plasmas, with electron densities between 2x10(18) and 9x10(18) e/cm(3) A simulation of both electrons and ions is employed to produce reliable theoretical widths. These results are essentially in agreement with standard theory results and, for the most part, disagree with the experimental results. Consequently, either mechanisms not accounted for in the theoretical results (such as quadrupoles) are more important than previously thought at these densities, or else there is a problem in the experimental data (such as a possible reabsorption, which is not ruled out by the experimental data). PMID:11970167

  13. Modelling of passive spectroscopy in the ITER divertor: the first hydrogen Balmer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Kotov, V.; Reiter, D.

    2010-07-01

    The first lines of the hydrogen Balmer series are investigated in ITER divertor conditions using a line shape code and a plasma edge transport code. It is shown that most of the emissivity originates from a localized, cold and dense region close to the divertor target plates, where the plasma is in the recombining regime. We simulate the signal obtained by pointing a spectrometer at this zone. The physical processes which contribute to the spectral line formation are examined, with a special emphasis on the Stark effect, photon absorption and stimulated emission. It is shown that, even though the Stark effect is significant, local information on the Doppler atomic temperature can be obtained from a fitting analysis of the Dα spectral line shape.

  14. Hydrogen Balmer Series Self-Absorption Measurement in Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Parigger, Christian

    2015-05-01

    In experimental studies of laser-induced plasma, we use focused Nd:YAG laser radiation to generate optical breakdown in laboratory air. A Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and an ICCD camera are utilized to record spatially and temporally resolved spectra. Time-resolved spectroscopy methods are employed to record plasma dynamics for various time delays in the range of 0.300 microsecond to typically 10 microsecond after plasma initiation. Early plasma emission spectra reveal hydrogen alpha and ionized nitrogen lines for time delays larger than 0.3 microsecond, the hydrogen beta line emerges from the free-electron background radiation later in the plasma decay for time delays in excess of 1 microsecond. The self-absorption analyses include comparisons of recorded data without and with the use of a doubling mirror. The extent of self-absorption of the hydrogen Balmer series is investigated for various time delays from plasma generation. There are indications of self-absorption of hydrogen alpha by comparison with ionized nitrogen lines at a time delay of 0.3 microsecond. For subsequent time delays, self-absorption effects on line-widths are hardly noticeable, despite the fact of the apparent line-shape distortions. Of interest are comparisons of inferred electron densities from hydrogen alpha and hydrogen beta lines as the plasma decays, including assessments of spatial variation of electron density.

  15. Hydrogen Balmer alpha intensity distributions and line profiles from multiple scattering theory using realistic geocoronal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The H Balmer alpha nightglow is investigated by using Monte Carlo models of asymmetric geocoronal atomic hydrogen distributions as input to a radiative transfer model of solar Lyman-beta radiation in the thermosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that it is essential to include multiple scattering of Lyman-beta radiation in the interpretation of Balmer alpha airglow data. Observations of diurnal variation in the Balmer alpha airglow showing slightly greater intensities in the morning relative to evening are consistent with theory. No evidence is found for anything other than a single sinusoidal diurnal variation of exobase density. Dramatic changes in effective temperature derived from the observed Balmer alpha line profiles are expected on the basis of changing illumination conditions in the thermosphere and exosphere as different regions of the sky are scanned.

  16. Calculation of auroral Balmer volume emission height profiles in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigernes, F.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Deehr, C. S.; Henriksen, K.

    1994-03-01

    Energetic protons entering the atmosphere will either travel as auroral protons or as neutral hydrogen atoms due to charge-exchange and excitation interactions with atmospheric constituents. Our objective is to develop a simple procedure to evaluate the Balmer excitation rates of H(sub alpha) and H(sub beta) and produce the corresponding volume emission rates vs height, using semi-empirical range relations in air, starting from proton spectra observed from rockets above the main collision region as measured by REASONER et al. (1968) and Soraas et al. (1974). The main assumptions are that the geomagnetic field is parallel and vertical, and that the pitch angle of the proton/hydrogen atom is preserved in collisions with atmospheric constituents before being thermalized. Calculations show that the largest energy losses occur in the height interval between 100 and 125 km, and the corresponding volume emission rate vs height profiles have maximum values in this height interval. The calculated volume emission rate height profile of H(sub beta) compares favorably with that measured with a rocket-borne photometer.

  17. Variations of the ultraviolet Fe II and Balmer continuum emission in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maoz, D.; Netzer, H.; Peterson, B. M.; Bechtold, J.; Bertram, R.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Carone, T. E.; Dietrich, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Kollatschny, W.

    1993-01-01

    We present measurements of the Balmer continuum/Fe II emission blend between 2160 and 4130 A in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548. The measurements are from spectra obtained as part of the combined space-based and ground-based monitoring program of this object in 1988-1989. An iterative scheme is used to determine and subtract the continuum emission underlying the emission blend so as to obtain a light curve sampled once every four days. The small blue bump is an important component of the emission-line cooling, constituting about one third of the line flux in this object. Its flux varies with an amplitude of approximately +/- 20 percent about the mean, similar to the amplitude of the Balmer line variations during the same period. Its light curve resembles that of Ly-alpha, with a lag of about 10 days behind the continuum variations. The bump variation amplitude is independent of the wavelength interval where it is measured, which indicates that both the Balmer continuum and Fe II emission have comparable variation amplitudes. These results suggest that the Fe II UV multiplets and the Balmer continuum are emitted in the same parts of the broad-line region as most other broad emission lines in this object.

  18. Physical properties of Be star envelopes from Balmer and Fe II emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slettebak, Arne; Collins, George W., II; Truax, Ryland

    1992-07-01

    The study obtains H-alpha, B-beta, H-gamma, and Fe II 6516 line profiles with resolution 0.45 A for 41 bright Be stars with a CCD detonator during two observing periods in 1989. Analysis of the structure of the emission profiles indicates that the Be star emitting envelope is most likely axially symmetric, consistent with a rotating, equatorial disk. A number of Be stars show either a 'wine bottle' structure or inflection points on one side of their H-alpha emission profiles, suggesting a two-component structure for the emitting envelope: an inner disk, possibly turbulent, and an outer extended disk. Differentially rotating disks producing weak H-alpha emission are closer to the central star where rotation broadens the line more strongly, relative to stars with extended envelopes which emit strongly but rotate more slowly. From the Balmer emission decrements it is found that Be star envelopes with Te near 10,000 K have electron densities in the range 10 exp 11 to 10 exp 13/cu cm. Be stars with weak Balmer emission have, on average, somewhat flatter Balmer decrements than stars with strong emission, suggesting envelopes with higher electron densities.

  19. Inferring divertor plasma properties from hydrogen Balmer and Paschen series spectroscopy in JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomanowski, B. A.; Meigs, A. G.; Sharples, R. M.; Stamp, M.; Guillemaut, C.; Contributors, JET

    2015-11-01

    A parametrised spectral line profile model is formulated to investigate the diagnostic scope for recovering plasma parameters from hydrogenic Balmer and Paschen series spectroscopy in the context of JET-ILW divertor plasmas. The separate treatment of Zeeman and Stark contributions in the line model is tested against the PPP-B code which accounts for their combined influence on the spectral line shape. The proposed simplified model does not fully reproduce the Stark-Zeeman features for the α and β transitions, but good agreement is observed in the line width and wing profiles, especially for n  >  5. The line model has been applied to infer radial density profiles in the JET-ILW divertor with generally good agreement between the D 5\\to 2 , 5\\to 3 , 6\\to 2 , 7\\to 2 and 9\\to 2 lines for high recycling and detached conditions. In an L-mode detached plasma pulse the Langmuir probe measurements typically underestimated the density by a factor 2-3 and overestimated the electron temperature by a factor of 5-10 compared to spectroscopically derived values. The line model is further used to generate synthetic high-resolution spectra for low-n transitions to assess the potential for parameter recovery using a multi-parametric fitting technique. In cases with 4 parameter fits with a single Maxwellian neutral temperature component the D 4\\to 3 line yields the best results with parameter estimates within 10% of the input values. For cases with 9 parameter fits inclusive of a multi-component neutral velocity distribution function the quality of the fits is degraded. Simultaneous fitting of the D 3\\to 2 and 4\\to 3 profiles improves the fit quality significantly, highlighting the importance of complementary spectroscopic measurements for divertor plasma emission studies.

  20. Stimulated emission and the flat Balmer decrements of cataclysmic variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, M.; Ferland, G. J.; Mathews, S. G.; Shields, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Balmer emission lines from cataclysmic variables often have nearly equal intensities rather than the rapid decrement predicted by simple nebular theory. Traditionally, this has been interpreted in terms of local thermodynamic equilibrium emission from a dense gas with small volume located just above the accretion disk. It is shown that the intense radiation field within a close binary system can affect excited state populations and optical emission in ways which allow a relatively low density gas to closely mimic the high density situation. In at least one case, the old nova V603 Aql, the emitting gas has a low density and nearly fills the orbital plane of the system. If this is characteristic of other systems, then the determination of orbital parameters and masses of cataclysmic variables from emission line radial velocities, as well as the prediction of soft X-ray emission from accreting binaries, will be affected.

  1. Hydrogen Balmer series measurements and determination of Rydberg's constant using two different spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, D.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the use of two different methods, the optical and the computer-aided diffraction-grating spectrometer, to measure the wavelength of visible lines of Balmer series from the hydrogen atomic spectrum and estimate the value of Rydberg's constant. Analysis and interpretation of data showed that both methods, despite their difference in terms of the type of equipment used, displayed good performance in terms of precision of measurements of wavelengths of spectral lines. A comparison was carried out between the experimental value of Rydberg's constant obtained with both methods and the accepted value. The results of Rydberg's constant obtained with both the optical and computer-aided spectrometers were 1.099 28 × 10-7 m-1 and 1.095 13 × 10-7 m-1 with an error difference of 0.17% and 0.20% compared to the accepted value 1.097 373 × 10-7 m-1, respectively.

  2. Evaluation of hydrogen atom density in the plasma core region based on the Balmer-α line profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, M.; Sawada, K.; Fujii, K.; Hasuo, M.; Morita, S.

    2011-02-01

    The Balmer-α line profile is measured with high wavelength resolution for a discharge in the Large Helical Device. The line profile is regarded as a superposition of continuously varying Doppler broadened components and is expressed as the Laplace transform. Numerical Laplace inversion of the measured line profile gives the distribution function of line emissivity in terms of atom temperature. The temperature dependence of the line emissivity is interpreted as spatial dependence so that the ionization rate and atom density of neutral hydrogen are determined. The temperature range of the detected atoms extends beyond 2 keV which corresponds to a penetration depth of about 1 m in the plasma, or the location at ρ ~ 0.3, where ρ is the normalized minor radius. The atom density of approximately 1013 m-3 is derived in the plasma core region which is more than four orders smaller than that at the plasma boundary. Calculation of neutral transport with a Monte-Carlo simulation code gives satisfactory consistency with the experimental results.

  3. Hydrogen Balmer α line behavior in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy depth scans of Au, Cu, Mn, Pb targets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, G. S.; Benedetti, P. A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2010-07-01

    The behavior of hydrogen spectral emission of the plasmas obtained by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) measurement of four metal targets (Au, Cu, Mn, Pb) in air was investigated. The plasma was produced by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser emitting in the fundamental wavelength. A systematic study of the spatial-integrated plasma emission obtained by an in-depth scanning of the target was performed for each metal, both in single pulse and collinear double-pulse configurations. Further, a spatial-resolved analysis of the emission of plasma produced on the Al target by a single laser pulse was performed, in order to describe the spatial distribution of emitters deriving from the target and air elements. The line intensities of the main plasma components (target metal, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen) were measured in both experimental conditions. Results show that the hydrogen line intensity varies greatly as a function of the metal considered, and exhibits a marked decrease after the first laser shots. However, differently from emission lines due to surface impurities, the hydrogen line intensity reaches a constant level deep inside the target. The spatial-resolved measurements indicate that hydrogen atoms in the plasma mainly derive from the target surface and, only at a minor extent, from the dissociation of molecular hydrogen present in the surrounding air. These findings show that the calculation of plasma electron number density through the measurement of the Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer α line is possible also in depth scanning measurements.

  4. Black Hole Masses of Active Galaxies with Double-peaked Balmer Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Karen T.; Eracleous, Michael

    2006-05-01

    We have obtained near-IR spectra of five AGNs that exhibit double-peaked Balmer emission lines (NGC 1097, Pictor A, PKS 0921-213, 1E 0450.30-1817, and IRAS 0236.6-3101). The stellar velocity dispersions of the host galaxies were measured from the Ca II λλ8494, 8542, 8662 absorption lines and were found to range from 140 to 200 km s-1. Using the well-known correlation between the black hole mass and the stellar velocity dispersion, the black hole masses in these galaxies were estimated to range from 4×107 to 1.2×108 Msolar. We supplement the observations presented here with estimates of the black holes masses for five additional double-peaked emitters (Arp 102B, 3C 390.3, NGC 4579, NGC 4203, and M81) obtained by other authors using similar methods. Using these black hole masses, we infer the ratio of the bolometric luminosity to the Eddington luminosity, (Lbol/LEdd). We find that two objects (Pictor A and PKS 0921-213) have Lbol/LEdd~0.2, whereas the other objects have Lbol/LEdd<~10-2 (nearby, low-luminosity double-peaked emitters are the most extreme, with Lbol/LEdd<~10-4). The physical timescales in the outer regions of the accretion disks (at r~103GM/c2) in these objects were also estimated and range from a few months for the dynamical timescale to several decades for the sound crossing timescale. The profile variability in these objects is typically an order of magnitude longer than the dynamical time, but we note that variability occurring on the dynamical timescale has not been ruled out by the observations. Based on observations carried out at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  5. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

  6. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-03-30

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  7. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  8. Are Boltzmann plots of hydrogen Balmer lines a tool for identifying a subclass of S1 AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafanelli, P.; Ciroi, S.; Cracco, V.; Di Mille, F.; Ilić, D.; La Mura, G.; Popović, L. Č.

    2014-10-01

    It is becoming clear that we can define two different types of nearby AGN belonging to the Seyfert 1 class (S1), on the basis of the match of the intensities of their Broad Balmer Lines (BBL) with the Boltzmann Plots (BP). These two types of S1 galaxies, that we call BP-S1 and NoBP-S1, are characterized, in first approximation, by Broad Line Regions (BLR) with different structural and physical properties. In this communication, we show that these features can be well pointed out by a multi-wavelength analysis of the continuum and of the broad recombination Hydrogen lines, that we carry out on a sample of objects detected at optical and X-ray frequencies. The investigation is addressed to verify whether BP-S1 are the ideal candidates for the study of the kinematical and structural properties of the BLR, in order to derive reliable estimates of the mass of their central engine and to constrain the properties of their nuclear continuum spectrum.

  9. Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines in a hollow cathode glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2008-11-15

    The results of Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines from a stainless steel (SS) and copper (Cu) hollow cathode (HC) glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture are reported. The experimental profiles in ammonia discharge are fitted well by superposing three Gaussian profiles. The half widths, in energy units, of narrow and medium Gaussians are in the ranges 0.3-0.4 eV and 3-4 eV, respectively, for both hollow cathodes what is expected on the basis of earlier electron beam{yields}NH{sub 3} experiments. The half widths of the largest Gaussian in ammonia are 46 and 55 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. In argon-ammonia discharge, three Gaussians are also required to fit experimental profiles. While half widths of narrow and medium Gaussians are similar to those in ammonia, the half widths of the largest Gaussians are 35 and 42 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. The half widths of the largest Gaussians in ammonia and in argon-ammonia mixture indicate the presence of excessive Doppler broadening.

  10. Extended Pre-Transit Structures and the Exosphere Detected for HD189733b in Optical Hydrogen Balmer Line Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Seth; Cauley, P. Wilson; Jensen, Adam G.; Barman, Travis; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William

    2015-12-01

    We present two separate observations of HD189733b in the three strongest hydrogen Balmer lines (H-alpha, H-beta, and H-gamma), with HiRES on Keck I that show definitive in-transit absorption, confirming the detection with the HET by Jensen et al. (2012), as well as, significant pre-transit absorption. Recently, pre-transit absorption in UV metal transitions of the hot Jupiter exoplanets HD 189733b and WASP12-b have been interpreted as being caused by material compressed in a planetary bow shock, however our observations are the first to densely time-sample and redundantly detect these extended planetary structures. While our first observations (obtained in 2013 and presented in Cauley et al. 2015), were consistent with a bow shock, our subsequent observation taken in August 2015 show pre-transit absorption but with a pattern that is inconsistent with the 2013 model. Instead, the observations indicate significant variability in the strength and timing of the pre-transit absorption. We also find differences in the strength of the in-transit exospheric absorption as well. These changes could be indicative of variability in the extreme stellar wind properties found at just 8 stellar radii, which could drive the extended atmospheric interaction between star and planet. The pre-transit absorption in 2013 was first observed 65 minutes prior to transit (corresponding to a linear distance of ~7 planetary radii), although it could have started earlier. The pre-transit signal in 2015, which is well sampled, is first detected 165 minutes prior to transit (a linear distance of ~17 planetary radii). The line shape of the pre-transit feature and the shape of the time series absorption provide the strongest constraints on the morphology and physical characteristics of extended structures around the exoplanet. The absorption strength observed in the Balmer lines indicates an optically thick, but physically small, geometry. If part of this extended structure is a bow shock mediated

  11. EFFECTS OF AN ACCRETION DISK WIND ON THE PROFILE OF THE BALMER EMISSION LINES FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Flohic, Helene M. L. G.; Eracleous, Michael; Bogdanovic, Tamara E-mail: mce@astro.psu.edu

    2012-07-10

    We explore the connection between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with single- and double-peaked broad Balmer emission lines by using models dealing with radiative transfer effects through a disk wind. Our primary goal is to assess the applicability of the Murray and Chiang model by making an extensive and systematic comparison of the model predictions with data. In the process, we also verify the original derivation and evaluate the importance of general relativistic effects. As the optical depth through the emission layer increases, the peaks of a double-peaked profile move closer and eventually merge, producing a single peak. The properties of the emission line profile depend as sensitively on the geometric parameters of the line-emitting portion of the disk as they do on the disk-wind parameters. Using a parameter range that encompasses the expected characteristics of the broad-line regions in AGNs, we construct a database of model profiles and measure a set of diagnostic properties. Comparisons of the model profiles with emission lines from a subset of Sloan digital Sky Survey quasars show that observed lines are consistent with moderately large optical depth in the disk wind and a range of disk inclinations i {approx}< 45 Degree-Sign . Including relativistic effects is necessary to produce the asymmetries of observed line profiles.

  12. On Production Mechanisms For Balmer Line Radiation From 'Cold' Atomic Hydrogen and Deuterium In Fusion Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, John Douglas

    2010-10-29

    Published arguments, which assign dominant roles to atomic metastability and molecular ion dissociation in the production of 'narrow' Zeeman component Balmer line radiation from the tokamak edge plasma, have been examined critically in relation to: l-redistribution by proton collisions, molecular ion-proton equipartition, and ion acceleration by the plasma sheath (scrape-off layer) potential. These processes are found to constrain the contributions from metastable atoms and from dissociative excitation of molecular ions to 'narrow' Balmer spectra emitted from the plasma edge, in relation to the corresponding contributions from electron impact-induced dissociative excitation of neutral molecules.

  13. Asymmetry of the Balmer-alpha line shape and recovery of the effective hydrogen temperature in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Neverov, V. S. Kukushkin, A. B.; Lisgo, S. W. Kukushkin, A. S.; Alekseev, A. G.

    2015-02-15

    An algorithm for recovering the effective temperature of atoms of hydrogen (and its isotopes) in the tokamak scrape-off layer from the asymmetry of the Balmer-alpha line shape is proposed. The algorithm is based on the parametrization of the asymmetry of the line shape caused by the nonlocal character of neutral hydrogen flux from the wall into the tokamak plasma. The accuracy of the algorithm is tested against the results of simulations of the velocity distribution function of deuterium neutrals in the scrape-off layer by the EIRENE code with the use of the source data on the main plasma component in the quasi-stationary stage of the inductive mode of ITER operation calculated by the SOLPS4.3 (B2-EIRENE) code.

  14. Digital imaging technique for optical emission spectroscopy of a hydrogen arcjet plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Ruyten, Wim M.

    1995-07-01

    A digital imaging technique has been developed for optical emission spectroscopy measurements of a 1.6-kW hydrogen arcjet plume. Emissions from the Balmer alpha and beta transitions of excited atomic hydrogen were measured with a computer-controlled red-green-blue color CCD detector with and without line-centered bandpass interference filters. A method for extending the effective dynamic range of the detector was developed, whereby images obtained with a wide range of exposure times are combined to form a single composite nonsaturated map of the plume emission structure. The line-of-sight measurements were deconvoluted to obtain the true radial intensity distribution with an inverse Abel transformation. Analysis of the inverted measurements indicates that the upper levels of the Balmer alpha and beta transitions are not thermalized with the electrons in the plasma. The local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption fails for this plasma, and the electron temperature is not equivalent to the apparent excitation

  15. Atmosphere Explorer observations of the geocoronal H Balmer alpha nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrage, M. D.; Yee, J. H.; Abreu, V. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Balmer alpha nightglow emission of geocoronal atomic hydrogen has been investigated using photometric data obtained by the Visible Airglow Experiment on board the Atmosphere Explorer E satellite. The measured H Balmer alpha intensities are presented as a function of solar depression angle, observation zenith angle, and azimuth relative to the sun for solar minimum conditions. The results are at variance with the earlier D2A satellite observations but in better agreement with previous ground-based studies. As a result of comparison with theoretical predictions, the present observations reaffirm the findings of the ground-based investigations in implying that values for the Lyman beta line center flux are a factor of 2 greater than those derived from direct measurements.

  16. On the role of atomic metastability in the production of Balmer line radiation from ‘cold’ atomic hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogenic ion impurities in fusion edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2012-03-01

    Published arguments, which assign an important role to atomic metastability in the production of ‘narrow’ Zeeman component radiation from the boundary region of fusion plasmas, are examined critically in relation to l-redistribution by proton and electron collisions, and mixing of unperturbed atomic states by the ion microfield and microfield gradient. It is concluded that these important processes indeed severely constrain the contribution from ‘metastable’ states to the generation of the hydrogen Balmer spectra, for electron concentrations above 1012 cm-3, as pointed out before by the present author (Hey et al 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3555). The analysis of collision-induced l-redistribution represents an extension of that used previously (Hey et al 1996 Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36 583), applicable up to higher electron densities. For comparison purposes, we also consider the question of metastability of ionized helium in a low-temperature plasma, and that of some common hydrogenic impurities (C5+ and Ne9+) in a hydrogen (deuterium) fusion plasma. While for low nuclear charge Z the metastability of 2s1/2 levels is quenched by the plasma environment, it is much reduced in high-Z ions owing to the rapid increase with Z of the two-photon electric dipole (2E1) and magnetic dipole (M1) spontaneous transition rates to the ground state, whereas the role of the plasma in these cases is less important. The main new principle elaborated in this work is the sensitivity of atomic line strengths, and hence collision strengths, to perturbation by the plasma environment for transitions between fine-structure sublevels of the same principal quantum number. As the plasma microfield strength grows, ‘allowed’ transitions diminish in strength, while ‘forbidden’ transitions grow. However, owing to violation of the parity selection rule, there is an overall loss of collision strength available to transitions, resulting from the appearance of significant

  17. LS Pegasi: A Low-Inclination SW Sextantis-Type Cataclysmic Binary with High-Velocity Balmer Emission-Line Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Cynthia J.; Thorstensen, John R.; Patterson, Joseph

    1999-02-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of the bright cataclysmic variable LS Peg (=S193; V~13.0-Szkody et al.). The Balmer lines exhibit broad, asymmetric wings Doppler-shifted by about 2000 km s^-1 at the edges, while the He I lines show phase-dependent absorption features strikingly similar to SW Sextantis stars, as well as emission through most of the phase. The C III/N III emission blend does not show any phase dependence. From velocities of Hα emission lines, we determine an orbital period of 0.174774+/-0.000003 days (=4.1946 hr), which agrees with Szkody's value of approximately 4.2 hr. No stable photometric signal was found at the orbital period. A noncoherent quasi-periodic photometric signal was seen at a period of 20.7+/-0.3 minutes. The high-velocity Balmer wings most probably arise from a stream reimpact point close to the white dwarf. We present simulated spectra based on a kinematic model similar to the modified disk-overflow scenario of Hellier & Robinson. The models reproduce the broad line wings, though some other details are unexplained. Using an estimate of dynamical phase based on the model, we show that the phasing of the emission- and absorption-line variations is consistent with that in (eclipsing) SW Sex stars. We therefore identify LS Peg as a low-inclination SW Sex star. Our model suggests i=30^deg, and the observed absence of any photometric signal at the orbital frequency establishes i<60^deg. This constraint puts a severe strain on interpretations of the SW Sex phenomenon which rely on disk structures lying slightly out of the orbital plane.

  18. Broad Balmer-Line Absorption in SDSS J172341.10+555340.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kentaro

    2010-10-01

    We present the discovery of Balmer-line absorption from Hα to H9 in an iron low-ionizaton broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar, SDSS J172341.10+555340.5, by near-infrared spectroscopy with the Cooled Infrared Spectrograph and Camera for OHS (CISCO) attached to the Subaru Telescope. The redshift of the Balmer-line absorption troughs is 2.0530±0.0003, and it is blueshifted by 5370 km s-1 from the Balmer emission lines. It is more than 4000 km s-1 blueshifted from the previously known UV absorption lines. We detected relatively strong (EWrest = 20 Å) [OIII] emission lines that are similar to those found in other broad absorption line quasars with Balmer-line absorption. We also derived the column density of neutral hydrogen of 5.2 × 1017 cm-2 by using the curve of growth and taking account of Lyα trapping. We searched for UV absorption lines that had the same redshift with Balmer-line absorption, and found Ali III and Fe III absorption lines at z = 2.053 that correspond to previously unidentified absorption lines, and the presence of other blended troughs that were difficult to identify.

  19. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in omicron Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen emission lines in Mira variable stars are a well-known phenomenon whose origin has been established as related to the propagation of radiative hypersonic shock waves throughout the stellar atmosphere. A polarimetric observation by McLean and Coyne [1] made on omicron Ceti (the prototype of Mira variable stars) has revealed the existence of linear polarization signatures associated with Balmer emission lines. However, the polarizing mechanism has never been properly explained so far. The study presented here is the first of its kind since it displays the results of a spectropolarimetric survey of omicron Ceti in the Balmer lines. The survey was made with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter (Telescope Bernard Lyot, France) in full Stokes mode. We did not just confirm the appearance of this polarization but we also and above all showed the temporal variation of the linear polarization in the lines. We conclude that the polarizing mechanism is definitely intrinsic to the shock wave propagation throughout the stellar atmosphere of Mira and give some leads about the nature of this mechanism.

  20. The continuum emission spectrum of Hf 2-2 near the Balmer limit and the ORL versus CEL abundance and temperature discrepancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2014-05-01

    The continuum spectrum of the planetary nebula Hf 2-2 close to the Balmer discontinuity is modelled in the context of the long-standing problem of the abundance and temperature discrepancy found when analysing optical recombination lines and collisionally excited forbidden lines in nebulae. Models are constructed using single and double Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions as well as κ-distributions for the energies of the free electrons. New results for the necessary continuum and line emission coefficients are presented calculated with κ-distributed energies. The best fit to the observed continuum spectrum is found to be a model comprising two components with dramatically different temperatures and with a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of electron energies. On the basis of a χ2 analysis, this model is strongly favoured over a model with κ-distributed electron energies.

  1. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  2. Digital imaging technique for optical emission spectroscopy of a hydrogen arcjet plume.

    PubMed

    Litchford, R J; Ruyten, W M

    1995-07-20

    A digital imaging technique has been developed for optical emission spectroscopy measurements of a 1.6-kW hydrogen arcjet plume. Emissions from the Balmer α and β transitions of excited atomic hydrogen were measured with a computer-controlled red-green-blue color CCD detector with and without line-centered bandpass interference filters. A method for extending the effective dynamic range of the detector was developed, whereby images obtained with a wide range of exposure times are combined to form a single composite nonsaturated map of the plume emission structure. The line-of-sight measurements were deconvoluted to obtain the true radial intensity distribution with an inverse Abel transformation. Analysis of the inverted measurements indicates that the upper levels of the Balmer α and β transitions are not thermalized with the electrons in the plasma. The local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption fails for this plasma, and the electron temperature is not equivalent to the apparent excitation temperature obtained when a Boltzmann energy distribution is assumed for the atomic hydrogen excited states. PMID:21052286

  3. Balmer decrements of T Tau stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katysheva, N. A.

    1981-04-01

    The relative intensities of Balmer lines calculated on the basis of Sobolev's probability method (1947) and the observed decrements of T Tau stars in the catalog of Cohen and Kuhi (1979) are compared with spectral classes between K5 and M5. For the group of stars, G5-K5, studied by Grinin (1980), emission was found to be predominantly of an envelope type, with less of a part played by chromospheric radiation. In K5-M5 stars, however, the envelope makes a smaller contribution to the total radiation, and most of the emission arises in the dense gas at the surface of the star. A comparison of the Balmer decrements of T Tau stars of different spectral classes and flare stars shows that in a transition to stars of lower luminosity, the role of chromospheric radiation increases.

  4. Formation of broad Balmer wings in symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seok-Jun; Heo, Jeong-Eun; Hong, Chae-Lin; Lee, Hee-Won

    2016-07-01

    Symbiotic stars are binary systems composed of a hot white dwarf and a mass losing giant. In addition to many prominent emission lines symbiotic stars exhibit Raman scattered O VI features at 6825 and 7088 Å. Another notable feature present in the spectra of many symbiotics is the broad wings around Balmer lines. Astrophysical mechanisms that can produce broad wings include Thomson scattering by free electrons and Raman scattering of Ly,β and higher series by neutral hydrogen. In this poster presentation we produce broad wings around Hα and H,β adopting a Monte Carlo techinique in order to make a quantitative comparison of these two mechanisms. Thomson wings are characterized by the exponential cutoff given by the termal width whereas the Raman wings are dependent on the column density and continuum shape in the far UV region. A brief discussion is provided.

  5. Theoretical quasar emission-line ratios. VII - Energy-balance models for finite hydrogen slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, E. N.; Puetter, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The present energy balance calculations for finite, isobaric, hydrogen-slab quasar emission line clouds incorporate probabilistic radiative transfer (RT) in all lines and bound-free continua of a five-level continuum model hydrogen atom. Attention is given to the line ratios, line formation regions, level populations and model applicability results obtained. H lines and a variety of other considerations suggest the possibility of emission line cloud densities in excess of 10 to the 10th/cu cm. Lyman-beta/Lyman-alpha line ratios that are in agreement with observed values are obtained by the models. The observed Lyman/Balmer ratios can be achieved with clouds whose column depths are about 10 to the 22nd/sq cm.

  6. Segunda discontinuidad de Balmer y procesos físicos en envolturas extendidas de estrellas Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibbo, I.; Cruzado, A.; Ringuelet, A.

    We study a group of Be stars in which the second Balmer jump is observed. Our aim is to correlate the second Balmer jump with other spectral features. Spectroscopic observations were performed with the 2.15 m telescope at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito, CASLEO (San Juan, Argentina). In December 2001 and August 2002 high resolution echelle spectra were obtained with a REOSC echelle spectrograph. We find that, when a second Balmer jump in emission is observed, an emission in λ = 4233,17 Å of FeII multiplet 27 is also, generally seen. Besides, the electron temperature of the region of the envelope where the second jump is formed is estimated assuming that radiative recombinations cause the flux emission in the Balmer continuum. The temperature values obtained in this way are found correlated with the measure of the second Balmer jump.

  7. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in the Mira star o Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2011-11-01

    Context. In the spectra of variable pulsating stars, especially Mira stars, the detection of intense hydrogen emission lines has been explained by the presence of a radiative and hypersonic shock wave, periodically propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere. Previous observation of the Mira star o Ceti around one of its brightest maximum light led to the detection of a strong level of linear polarization associated to Balmer emissions, although the origin of this phenomenon is not fully explained yet. Aims: With the help of spectropolarimetry, we propose to investigate the nature of shock waves propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere and present, for o Ceti (the prototype of Mira stars), a full observational study of hydrogen emission lines formed in the radiative region of such a shock. Methods: Using the instrument NARVAL mounted on the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) in Pic du Midi Observatory (France), we performed a spectropolarimetric monitoring of o Ceti during three consecutive pulsation cycles. For this survey, the four Stokes parameters (I for intensity, Q and U for linear polarization, and V for circular polarization) were systematically collected, with a particular emphasis on the maxima of luminosity, i.e. when a radiative shock wave is supposed to emerge from the photosphere and starts to propagate outward. Results: On hydrogen Balmer lines, over a large part of the luminosity cycle, we report clear detection of polarimetric structures in Q and U Stokes spectra (and also in V Stokes spectra but to a lesser extent). We report a temporal evolution of these spectropolarimetric signatures, which appear strongly correlated to the presence of an intense shock wave responsible for the hydrogen emission lines. We establish that the hydrogen lines are polarized by a physical process inherent to the mechanism responsible for the emission line formation: the shock wave itself. Two mechanisms are thus considered: a global one that implies a polarization

  8. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sam Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-07-07

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer α emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical γ discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  9. Balmer line shifts in quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J. W.; Marziani, P.; Del Olmo, A.; Zamfir, S.

    2016-02-01

    We offer a broad review of Balmer line phenomenology in type 1 active galactic nuclei, briefly summarising luminosity and radio loudness effects, and discussing interpretation in terms of nebular physics along the 4D eigenvector 1 sequence of quasars. We stress that relatively rare, peculiar Balmer line profiles (i.e., with large shifts with respect to the rest frame or double and multiple peaked) that start attracted attentions since the 1970s are still passable of multiple dynamical interpretation. More mainstream objects are still not fully understood as well, since competing dynamical models and geometries are possible. Further progress may come from inter-line comparison across the 4D Eigenvector 1 sequence.

  10. Stationary Inverted Balmer and Lyman populations for a CW HI water-plasma laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Randell L.

    2002-10-01

    Stationary inverted H Balmer and Lyman populations were observed from a low pressure water-vapor microwave discharge plasma. The ionization and population of excited atomic hydrogen levels was attributed to energy provided by a catalytic resonance energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and molecular oxygen formed in the water plasma. The catalysis mechanism was supported by the observation of O^2+ and H Balmer line broadening of 55 eV compared to 1 eV for hydrogen alone. The high hydrogen atom temperature with a relatively low electron temperature, Te = 2 eV, exhibited characteristics of cold recombining plasmas. These conditions of a water plasma favored an inverted population in the lower levels. Thus, the catalysis of atomic hydrogen may pump a cw HI laser. From our results, laser oscillations are may be possible from (i) n = 3, n = 4, n = 5, n = 6, n = 7, and n = 8 to n = 2, (ii) n = 4, n = 5, n = 6, and n = 7 to n = 3 and (iii) n = 5 and n = 6 to n = 4. Lines of the Balmer series of n = 5, and n = 6 to n = 2 and the Paschen series of n = 5 to n = 3 were of particular importance because of the potential to design blue and 1.3 micron infrared lasers, respectively, which are ideal for many communications and microelectronics applications. At a microwave input power of 9W/cm^3, a collisional radiative model showed that the hydrogen excited state population distribution was consistent with an n = 1arrow5,6 pumping power of an unprecedented 200W/cm^3. High power hydrogen gas lasers are anticipated at wavelengths, over a broad spectral range from far infrared to violet which may be miniaturized to micron dimensions. Such a hydrogen laser represents the first new atomic gas laser in over a decade, and it may prove to be the most efficient, versatile, and useful of all. A further application is the direct generation of electrical power using photovoltaic conversion of the spontaneous or stimulated water vapor plasma emission.

  11. Hydrogen/Air Fuel Nozzle Emissions Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.

    2001-01-01

    The use of hydrogen combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines provides significant opportunities to reduce harmful exhaust emissions. Hydrogen has many advantages (no CO2 production, high reaction rates, high heating value, and future availability), along with some disadvantages (high current cost of production and storage, high volume per BTU, and an unknown safety profile when in wide use). One of the primary reasons for switching to hydrogen is the elimination of CO2 emissions. Also, with hydrogen, design challenges such as fuel coking in the fuel nozzle and particulate emissions are no longer an issue. However, because it takes place at high temperatures, hydrogen-air combustion can still produce significant levels of NOx emissions. Much of the current research into conventional hydrocarbon-fueled aircraft gas turbine combustors is focused on NOx reduction methods. The Zero CO2 Emission Technology (ZCET) hydrogen combustion project will focus on meeting the Office of Aerospace Technology goal 2 within pillar one for Global Civil Aviation reducing the emissions of future aircraft by a factor of 3 within 10 years and by a factor of 5 within 25 years. Recent advances in hydrocarbon-based gas turbine combustion components have expanded the horizons for fuel nozzle development. Both new fluid designs and manufacturing technologies have led to the development of fuel nozzles that significantly reduce aircraft emissions. The goal of the ZCET program is to mesh the current technology of Lean Direct Injection and rocket injectors to provide quick mixing, low emissions, and high-performance fuel nozzle designs. An experimental program is planned to investigate the fuel nozzle concepts in a flametube test rig. Currently, a hydrogen system is being installed in cell 23 at NASA Glenn Research Center's Research Combustion Laboratory. Testing will be conducted on a variety of fuel nozzle concepts up to combustion pressures of 350 psia and inlet air temperatures of 1200 F

  12. Hydrogen emission in meteors as a potential marker for the exogenous delivery of organics and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Mandell, Avram M.

    2004-01-01

    We detected hydrogen Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) emission in the spectra of bright meteors and investigated its potential use as a tracer for exogenous delivery of organic matter. We found that it is critical to observe the meteors with high enough spatial resolution to distinguish the 656.46 nm H(alpha) emission from the 657.46 nm intercombination line of neutral calcium, which was bright in the meteor afterglow. The H(alpha) line peak stayed in constant ratio to the atmospheric emissions of nitrogen during descent of the meteoroid. If all of the hydrogen originates in the Earth's atmosphere, the hydrogen atoms are expected to have been excited at T = 4400 K. In that case, we measured an H(2)O abundance in excess of 150 +/- 20 ppm at 80-90 km altitude (assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the air plasma). This compares with an expected <20 ppm from H(2)O in the gas phase. Alternatively, meteoric refractory organic matter (and water bound in meteoroid minerals) could have caused the observed H(alpha) emission, but only if the line is excited in a hot T approximately 10000 K plasma component that is unique to meteoric ablation vapor emissions such as Si(+). Assuming that the Si(+) lines of the Leonid spectrum would need the same hot excitation conditions, and a typical [H]/[C] = 1 in cometary refractory organics, we calculated an abundance ratio [C]/[Si] = 3.9 +/- 1.4 for the dust of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This range agreed with the value of [C]/[Si] = 4.4 measured for comet 1P/Halley dust. Unless there is 10 times more water vapor in the upper atmosphere than expected, we conclude that a significant fraction of the hydrogen atoms in the observed meteor plasma originated in the meteoroid.

  13. Hydrogen emission in meteors as a potential marker for the exogenous delivery of organics and water.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Mandell, Avram M

    2004-01-01

    We detected hydrogen Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) emission in the spectra of bright meteors and investigated its potential use as a tracer for exogenous delivery of organic matter. We found that it is critical to observe the meteors with high enough spatial resolution to distinguish the 656.46 nm H(alpha) emission from the 657.46 nm intercombination line of neutral calcium, which was bright in the meteor afterglow. The H(alpha) line peak stayed in constant ratio to the atmospheric emissions of nitrogen during descent of the meteoroid. If all of the hydrogen originates in the Earth's atmosphere, the hydrogen atoms are expected to have been excited at T = 4400 K. In that case, we measured an H(2)O abundance in excess of 150 +/- 20 ppm at 80-90 km altitude (assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the air plasma). This compares with an expected <20 ppm from H(2)O in the gas phase. Alternatively, meteoric refractory organic matter (and water bound in meteoroid minerals) could have caused the observed H(alpha) emission, but only if the line is excited in a hot T approximately 10000 K plasma component that is unique to meteoric ablation vapor emissions such as Si(+). Assuming that the Si(+) lines of the Leonid spectrum would need the same hot excitation conditions, and a typical [H]/[C] = 1 in cometary refractory organics, we calculated an abundance ratio [C]/[Si] = 3.9 +/- 1.4 for the dust of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This range agreed with the value of [C]/[Si] = 4.4 measured for comet 1P/Halley dust. Unless there is 10 times more water vapor in the upper atmosphere than expected, we conclude that a significant fraction of the hydrogen atoms in the observed meteor plasma originated in the meteoroid. PMID:15104908

  14. Constraining sub-parsec binary supermassive black holes in quasars with multi-epoch spectroscopy. II. The population with kinematically offset broad Balmer emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Bian, Fuyan; Loeb, Abraham; Tremaine, Scott

    2014-07-10

    A small fraction of quasars have long been known to show bulk velocity offsets (of a few hundred to thousands of km s{sup –1}) in the broad Balmer lines with respect to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy. Models to explain these offsets usually invoke broad-line region gas kinematics/asymmetry around single black holes (BHs), orbital motion of massive (∼sub-parsec (sub-pc)) binary black holes (BBHs), or recoil BHs, but single-epoch spectra are unable to distinguish between these scenarios. The line-of-sight (LOS) radial velocity (RV) shifts from long-term spectroscopic monitoring can be used to test the BBH hypothesis. We have selected a sample of 399 quasars with kinematically offset broad Hβ lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release quasar catalog, and have conducted second-epoch optical spectroscopy for 50 of them. Combined with the existing SDSS spectra, the new observations enable us to constrain the LOS RV shifts of broad Hβ lines with a rest-frame baseline of a few years to nearly a decade. While previous work focused on objects with extreme velocity offset (>10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}), we explore the parameter space with smaller (a few hundred km s{sup –1}) yet significant offsets (99.7% confidence). Using cross-correlation analysis, we detect significant (99% confidence) radial accelerations in the broad Hβ lines in 24 of the 50 objects, of ∼10-200 km s{sup –1} yr{sup –1} with a median measurement uncertainty of ∼10 km s{sup –1} yr{sup –1}, implying a high fraction of variability of the broad-line velocity on multi-year timescales. We suggest that 9 of the 24 detections are sub-pc BBH candidates, which show consistent velocity shifts independently measured from a second broad line (either Hα or Mg II) without significant changes in the broad-line profiles. Combining the results on the general quasar population studied in Paper I, we find a tentative anti-correlation between the velocity offset in the

  15. Hydrogen emissivity in realistic nebulae - The effects of velocity fields and internal dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, S. A.; Ferland, G. J.

    1988-03-01

    The paper presents calculations of the H-beta emissivity expected from nebulae with velocity gradients or internal dust. As has been found by Capriotti, Cox, and Mathews, Lyman line escape and destruction can prevent the 100 percent conversion of high-n Lyman lines into Ly-alpha and Balmer lines. For dusty environments such as the Orion Nebula or the general interstellar medium, the H-beta emissivity can be reduced by less than about 15 percent. Lyman line escape may cause still larger deviations in environments such as nova shells where the expansion velocities are large and velocity gradients likely. Although the partial conversion of Lyman lines only lowers the H-beta emissivity by typically less than about 10 percent under most circumstances, this introduces a systematic error in abundance measurements; the abundance of other elements relative to hydrogen will be overestimated by this amount. This effect must be considered in detail if very accurate abundance measurements are to be made. The present predictions of the deviation from case B emissivity are presented in a way in which they can be easily used by observers or incorporated into photoionization or shock codes.

  16. Development of multiwavelength-range fine-resolution spectrometer for hydrogen emissions and its application to large helical device periphery plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Mizushiri, K.; Nishioka, T.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Iwamae, A.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Kado, S; Sawada, K.

    2010-03-15

    We developed a spectrometer specialized for simultaneous observation of the hydrogen Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, -{gamma} lines and the Fulcher-{alpha} v'=v''=2 rovibronic transition band. The spectrometer was optimized for the light input coupled by nine optical fibers having 400 {mu}m core diameters. The spectral resolutions were 0.02-0.03 nm for these wavelength ranges at the entrance slit width of 20 {mu}m. The polarization resolved spectra of these emissions from the peripheral region of large helical device (LHD) plasmas were measured simultaneously and showed the polarization dependence coming from the magnetic field in the LHD plasma.

  17. Variability of Balmer Profiles in Magnetic Ap/Bp Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyavin, G.; Lee, B.-C.; Shulyak, D.; Han, I.; Kochukhov, O.; Khang, D.-I.; Kim, K.-M.

    2007-06-01

    A set of high precision measurements of weak variations of hydrogen lines in spectra of seven magnetic Ap/Bp stars was carried out using the BOES echelle spectrograph of the Bohuynsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (South Korea). A weak (1-2 %) periodic variability of the Balmer line wings has been detected in the spectra of 2 program stars. Upper limits of possible variations are presented for the remaining 5 objects. We discuss the discovered variability in the framework of model atmospheres with magnetic force terms included. The periodic changes in the Balmer profiles are caused by perturbations in atmospheres of Ap/Bp stars due to their rotationally modulated non-force-free magnetic fields.

  18. Balmer's Manuscripts and the Construction of His Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banet, Leo

    1970-01-01

    Presents the results of an analysis of Balmer's draft manuscripts, which revealed new and pertinent details about the genesis of the Balmer series. In particular the origin and nature of Balmer's geometrical construction for the series is described. In addition, it is shown that the Balmer series played a direct role in the formulation of the…

  19. Data-model comparison search analysis of coincident PBO Balmer α, EURD Lyman β geocoronal measurements from March 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Gómez, J. F.; Morales, C.

    2004-05-01

    Recent Lyman series and Balmer series airglow measurements provide a fresh opportunity to investigate the density distribution and variability of atomic hydrogen in the upper atmosphere. Dedicated nightside Balmer α Fabry-Perot spectrometer measurements at the Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO), University of Wisconsin-Madison, have been acquired since late 1999 taking advantage of several technological advances. Extreme ultraviolet spectral radiance measurements by the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) instrument on the Spanish MINISAT-1 satellite from October 1997 to December 2001 provide extensive sets of geocoronal Lyman β, Lyman γ and He 584 Å emission intensities. In this paper, coincident EURD Lyman β and PBO Balmer α radiance measurements from the early March 2000 new moon period are presented. In addition to serving as examples of the data sets now available, the data volume poses an analysis challenge not faced in prior geocoronal studies. A data-model comparison search procedure employing resonance radiation transport results for extensive sets of parametric density distribution models is being developed for use in analyses of multiple large data sets; this is described, and example results for the PBO and EURD March 2000 data sets are presented. The tightness of the constraints obtained for the solar line-center Lyman β irradiance and the atomic hydrogen column abundance is somewhat surprising, given the crudeness of the parameter binning in the search procedure and the fact that a small number of recognized corrections remain to be made to each data set.

  20. Hydrogen emissions from Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, Yves; Oppenheimer, Clive; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Giudice, Gaetano; Moussallam, Manuel; Kyle, Philip

    2012-11-01

    The continuous measurement of molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions from passively degassing volcanoes has recently been made possible using a new generation of low-cost electrochemical sensors. We have used such sensors to measure H2, along with SO2, H2O and CO2, in the gas and aerosol plume emitted from the phonolite lava lake at Erebus volcano, Antarctica. The measurements were made at the crater rim between December 2010 and January 2011. Combined with measurements of the long-term SO2 emission rate for Erebus, they indicate a characteristic H2 flux of 0.03 kg s-1 (2.8 Mg day-1). The observed H2 content in the plume is consistent with previous estimates of redox conditions in the lava lake inferred from mineral compositions and the observed CO2/CO ratio in the gas plume (˜0.9 log units below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer). These measurements suggest that H2 does not combust at the surface of the lake, and that H2 is kinetically inert in the gas/aerosol plume, retaining the signature of the high-temperature chemical equilibrium reached in the lava lake. We also observe a cyclical variation in the H2/SO2 ratio with a period of ˜10 min. These cycles correspond to oscillatory patterns of surface motion of the lava lake that have been interpreted as signs of a pulsatory magma supply at the top of the magmatic conduit.

  1. Hydrogen sensing characteristics from carbon nanotube field emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Changkun; Luo, Haijun; Cai, Jianqiu; Wang, Fuquan; Zhao, Yangyang; Li, Detian

    2016-03-01

    An innovative hydrogen sensing concept is demonstrated based on the field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, where the low emission currents rise in proportion to hydrogen partial pressures above 10-9 Torr. Experimental and first principles studies reveal that the sensing mechanism is attributed to the effective work function reduction from dissociative hydrogen chemisorption. The embedded Ni catalyst would assist both the hydrogen dissociation and work function reduction. This technique is promising to build miniature low cost hydrogen sensors for multiple applications. This work is valuable for studies of nanocarbon-gas reaction mechanisms and the work function properties in adsorption related applications, including field emission, hydrogen storage, energy cells, and gas sensing.

  2. Hydrogen sensing characteristics from carbon nanotube field emissions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Changkun; Luo, Haijun; Cai, Jianqiu; Wang, Fuquan; Zhao, Yangyang; Li, Detian

    2016-03-14

    An innovative hydrogen sensing concept is demonstrated based on the field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, where the low emission currents rise in proportion to hydrogen partial pressures above 10(-9) Torr. Experimental and first principles studies reveal that the sensing mechanism is attributed to the effective work function reduction from dissociative hydrogen chemisorption. The embedded Ni catalyst would assist both the hydrogen dissociation and work function reduction. This technique is promising to build miniature low cost hydrogen sensors for multiple applications. This work is valuable for studies of nanocarbon-gas reaction mechanisms and the work function properties in adsorption related applications, including field emission, hydrogen storage, energy cells, and gas sensing. PMID:26890686

  3. EMISSION CORRECTIONS FOR HYDROGEN FEATURES OF THE GRAVES ET AL. SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY AVERAGES OF EARLY-TYPE, NON-LINER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Serven, Jedidiah; Worthey, Guy E-mail: gworthey@wsu.ed

    2010-07-15

    For purposes of recovering correct absorption line strengths for stellar population analysis, emission corrections for Balmer series indices on the Lick index system in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) stacked quiescent galaxy spectra are derived as a function of the Mg b index strength. These corrections are obtained by comparing the observed Lick index measurements of the SDSS composite spectra with new observed measurements of 13 Virgo Cluster galaxies, and checked with model grids. From the H{alpha}-Mg b diagram, a linear correction for the observed measurement is constructed using best-fit trend lines. Corrections for H{beta}, H{gamma}, and H{delta} are constructed using stellar population models to predict continuum shape changes as a function of Mg b plus Balmer series emission intensities typical of H II regions. The corrections themselves are fairly secure, but the interpretation for H{delta} and H{gamma} indices is complicated by the fact that the H{delta} and H{gamma} indices are sensitive to elemental abundances other than hydrogen.

  4. Nebular Hydrogen Absorption in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of Eta Carinae and immediate ejecta reveal narrow Balmer absorption lines in addition to the nebular-scattered broad P-Cygni absorptions. The narrow absorption correlates with apparent disk structure that separates the two Homunculus lobes. We trace these features about half way up the Northern lobe until the scattered stellar Balmer line doppler-shifts redward beyond the nebular absorption feature. Three-dimensional data cubes, made by mapping the Homunculus at Balmer alpha and Balmer beta with the 52 x 0.1 arcsecond aperture and about 5000 spectral resolving power, demonstrate that the absorption feature changes slowly in velocity with nebular position. We have monitored the stellar Balmer alpha line profile of the central source over the past four years. The equivalent width of the nebular absorption feature changes considerably between observations. The changes do not correlate with measured brightness of Eta Carinae. Likely clumps of neutral hydrogen with a scale size comparable to the stellar disk diameter are passing through the intervening light path on the timescales less than several months. The excitation mechanism involves Lyman alpha radiation (possibly the Lyman series plus Lyman continuum) and collisions leading to populating the 2S metastable state. Before the electron can jump to the ground state by two photon emission (lifetime about 1/8 second), a stellar Balmer photon is absorbed and the electron shifts to an NP level. We see the absorption feature in higher Balmer lines, and but not in Paschen lines. Indeed we see narrow nebular Paschen emission lines. At present, we do not completely understand the details of the absorption. Better understanding should lead to improved insight of the unique conditions around Eta Carinae that leads to these absorptions.

  5. Flare model sensitivity of the Balmer spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falchi, A.; Falciani, R.; Smaldone, L. A.; Tozzi, G. P.

    1989-01-01

    Careful studies of various chromospheric spectral signatures are very important in order to explore their possible sensitivity to the modifications of the thermodynamic quantities produced by the flare occurrence. Pioneer work of Canfield and co-workers have shown how the H alpha behavior is able to indicate different changes in the atmospheric parameters structure associated to the flare event. It was decided to study the behavior of the highest Balmer lines and of the Balmer continuum in different solar flare model atmospheres. These spectral features, originating in the deep photosphere in a quiet area, may have a sensitivity different from H alpha to the modification of a flare atmosphere. The details of the method used to compute the Stark profile of the higher Balmer line (n is greater than or equal to 6) and their merging were extensively given elsewhere (Donati-Falchi et al., 1985; Falchi et al., 1989). The models used were developed by Ricchiazzi in his thesis (1982) evaluating the chromospheric response to both the nonthermal electron flux, for energy greater than 20 kev, (F sub 20) and to the thermal conduction, (F sub c). The effect of the coronal pressure values (P sub O) at the apex of the flare loop is also included.

  6. Hydrogen line and continuum emission in young stellar objects. I - Excitation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, John; Alonso-Costa, Jose L.

    1988-01-01

    Two mechanisms that populate the n = 2 level of hydrogen after the Lyman continuum is depleted are identified. They are ionization of N I from its excited states, followed by charge-exchange between N II and H I, and Ly-beta line wing absorption. Both processes involve absorption of the sub-Lyman continuum between 11 and 13.6 eV. With population in level n = 2 thus maintained, the strong Brackett line fluxes observed are then produced as a result of Balmer photoionization. The magnitude of the sub-Lyman continuum dictates the fraction of Balmer continuum that will be absorbed. Numerical calculations for four young stellar objects with luminosity ranging from 10 to 10,000 solar are performed, and it is concluded that this two-step process of sub-Lyman continuum absorption followed by Balmer photoionization can account for the great majority of observed Brackett line fluxes. The location and mass of the emitting as as determined from the Brackett line fluxes are reported. The Br-alpha luminosity is calculated as a function of the mass loss rate.

  7. Hydrogen emission in fatigue process of hydrogen-charged austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Hisao; Endo, Masahiro

    2010-03-01

    The acceleration of hydrogen diffusion in the fatigue process of AISI type 304 and 316L meta-stable austenitic stainless steels was studied by paying attention to the relation between fatigue slip bands and hydrogen emission. Slip bands were formed in tension-compression fatigue tests of round specimens in ambient air, and then the specimens were cathodically charged with hydrogen. The location of hydrogen emission was microscopically visualized by means of the hydrogen microprint technique (HMT). Hydrogen was mainly emitted from slip bands on the surface of fatigued specimens. The depth of hydrogen diffusion into the specimens was also observed on the fatigue fracture surfaces by the HMT. The depth for a specimen hydrogen-charged before fatigue testing was about 50 μm at a maximum, whereas the depth for a specimen that was hydrogen-charged after slip bands had been formed in a preliminary fatigue test was about 300 μm. Those results suggested that slip bands act as a pathway where hydrogen will move preferentially.

  8. Hydrogen emission in fatigue process of hydrogen-charged austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Hisao; Endo, Masahiro

    2009-12-01

    The acceleration of hydrogen diffusion in the fatigue process of AISI type 304 and 316L meta-stable austenitic stainless steels was studied by paying attention to the relation between fatigue slip bands and hydrogen emission. Slip bands were formed in tension-compression fatigue tests of round specimens in ambient air, and then the specimens were cathodically charged with hydrogen. The location of hydrogen emission was microscopically visualized by means of the hydrogen microprint technique (HMT). Hydrogen was mainly emitted from slip bands on the surface of fatigued specimens. The depth of hydrogen diffusion into the specimens was also observed on the fatigue fracture surfaces by the HMT. The depth for a specimen hydrogen-charged before fatigue testing was about 50 μm at a maximum, whereas the depth for a specimen that was hydrogen-charged after slip bands had been formed in a preliminary fatigue test was about 300 μm. Those results suggested that slip bands act as a pathway where hydrogen will move preferentially.

  9. The relationship between visible light emission and species fraction of the hydrogen ion beams extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharge.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions with extracted H(+), H2(+), and H3(+) ions is demonstrated for a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Ion mass spectra and optical measurements of Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions have been obtained with a Wien Filter having an optical view-port on the plasma chamber axis. The beam of approximately 1 mA is analyzed for different plasma conditions simultaneously with the measurement of light emissions both with temporal resolution. The use of visible light emissions as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring the species fraction of the extracted beams is proposed. PMID:26329183

  10. The relationship between visible light emission and species fraction of the hydrogen ion beams extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Megía-Macías, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions with extracted H+, H2 + , and H3 + ions is demonstrated for a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Ion mass spectra and optical measurements of Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions have been obtained with a Wien Filter having an optical view-port on the plasma chamber axis. The beam of approximately 1 mA is analyzed for different plasma conditions simultaneously with the measurement of light emissions both with temporal resolution. The use of visible light emissions as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring the species fraction of the extracted beams is proposed.

  11. Balmer-α spectrum measurements of the LHD one-third ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Nishiura, M.; Tsumori, K.

    2016-02-01

    Wavelength spectra of Balmer-α light from plasmas in the extraction region of the Large Helical Device-R&D negative ion source, or the LHD one-third ion source have exhibited a blue shift as a negative bias voltage was applied to the plasma grid. The blue shift increased as the negative bias voltage with respect to the local plasma potential was increased. The measured spectra were compared with the velocity distributions of surface reflected hydrogen atoms calculated by atomic collisions in amorphous target code. The arc power and the source H2 pressure also affected the shift and broadening in the observed Balmer-α spectra. The possibility of identifying the negative hydrogen ions produced at the low work function plasma grid surface by high resolution spectroscopy is discussed.

  12. Balmer-α spectrum measurements of the LHD one-third ion source.

    PubMed

    Wada, M; Kenmotsu, T; Kisaki, M; Nakano, H; Nishiura, M; Tsumori, K

    2016-02-01

    Wavelength spectra of Balmer-α light from plasmas in the extraction region of the Large Helical Device-R&D negative ion source, or the LHD one-third ion source have exhibited a blue shift as a negative bias voltage was applied to the plasma grid. The blue shift increased as the negative bias voltage with respect to the local plasma potential was increased. The measured spectra were compared with the velocity distributions of surface reflected hydrogen atoms calculated by atomic collisions in amorphous target code. The arc power and the source H2 pressure also affected the shift and broadening in the observed Balmer-α spectra. The possibility of identifying the negative hydrogen ions produced at the low work function plasma grid surface by high resolution spectroscopy is discussed. PMID:26931989

  13. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-time Spectra of a Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; De Cia, A.; Masci, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83-148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ˜1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ˜ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70-220 M⊙), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ˜ 1051 erg, Ekin ˜ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmeremission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ˜4500 km s-1 and a ˜300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ˜2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ˜4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M⊙. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M⊙ H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95-150) M⊙ about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ˜15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and... to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP... following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and halogen HAP emissions...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and... to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP... following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and halogen HAP emissions...

  16. Hydrogen enrichment for low-emission jet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Simultaneous gaseous pollutant emission indexes (g pollutant/kg fuel) for a research combustor with inlet air at 120,900 N/sq m (11.9 atm) pressure and 727 K (849 F) temperature are as low as 1.0 for NOx and CO and 0.5 for unburned HC. Emissions data are presented for hydrogen/jet fuel (JP-5) mixes and for jet fuel only for premixed equivalence ratios from lean blowout to 0.65. Minimized emissions were achieved at an equivalence ratio of 0.38 using 10-12 mass percent hydrogen in the total fuel to depress the lean blowout limit. They were not achievable with jet fuel alone because of the onset of lean blowout at an equivalence ratio too high to reduce the NOx emission sufficiently.

  17. Secondary-electron emission from hydrogen-terminated diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Wang E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Dimitrov, D.A.; T. Xin, T.

    2012-05-20

    Diamond amplifiers demonstrably are an electron source with the potential to support high-brightness, high-average-current emission into a vacuum. We recently developed a reliable hydrogenation procedure for the diamond amplifier. The systematic study of hydrogenation resulted in the reproducible fabrication of high gain diamond amplifier. Furthermore, we measured the emission probability of diamond amplifier as a function of the external field and modelled the process with resulting changes in the vacuum level due to the Schottky effect. We demonstrated that the decrease in the secondary electrons average emission gain was a function of the pulse width and related this to the trapping of electrons by the effective NEA surface. The findings from the model agree well with our experimental measurements. As an application of the model, the energy spread of secondary electrons inside the diamond was estimated from the measured emission.

  18. Spatial imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, J. T.; Weaver, H. A.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Fastie, W. G.; Opal, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    A sounding rocket measurement of the H I L-alpha emission from Jupiter made on Dec. 1, 1978 shows limb darkening and an average disk brightness of 13 kR. This brightness is significantly higher than in previous measurements, and was confirmed by an IUE observation on Dec. 10, 1978. Comparison with a plane-parallel hydrogen layer model indicates that there is enhanced emission from the equatorial regions, reaching a peak near 80 deg longitude.

  19. Hybrid and conventional hydrogen engine vehicles that meet EZEV emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

    1996-12-10

    In this paper, a time-dependent engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. A The validated engine model is then used to calculate fuel economy and emissions for three hydrogen-fueled vehicles: a conventional, a parallel hybrid, and a series hybrid. All vehicles use liquid hydrogen as a fuel. The hybrid vehicles use a flywheel for energy storage. Comparable ultra capacitor or battery energy storage performance would give similar results. This paper analyzes the engine and flywheel sizing requirements for obtaining a desired level of performance. The results indicate that hydrogen lean-burn spark-ignited engines can provide a high fuel economy and Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) levels in the three vehicle configurations being analyzed.

  20. Molecular hydrogen emission from W51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckwith, S.; Zuckerman, B.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of emission from the v = 1 approaches 0 S(1) quadrupole transition of H2 toward the cluster of intense infrared and H2O maser sources in W51 (north) is reported. The apparent luminosity of this line in W51 (north) is only about 4% of the luminosity of the same line toward the Kleinmann-Low infrared cluster in Orion; however, additional line-of-sight extinction and spatial extent of the source may account for the lower apparent power in W51. Similarity in the infrared and H2O properties of these clusters is addressed. The implications of the H2 emission for mass loss in the W51 region is discussed and some proposed models of radiation-driven mass outflow from pre-main sequence stars are briefly considered.

  1. Recombination and collisionally excited Balmer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raga, A. C.; Castellanos-Ramírez, A.; Esquivel, A.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a model for the statistical equilibrium of the levels of H, considering recombinations to excited levels, collisional excitations up from the ground state and spontaneous radiative transitions. This problem has a simple "cascade matrix" solution, describing a cascade of downwards spontaneous transitions fed by both recombinations and collisional excitations. The resulting predicted Balmer line ratios show a transition between a low temperature and a high temperature regime (dominated by recombinations and by collisional excitations, respectively), both with only a weak line ratio vs. temperature dependence. This clear characteristic allows a direct observational identification of regions in which the Balmer lines are either recombination or collisionally excited transitions. We find that for a gas in coronal ionization equilibrium the Halpha and Hbeta lines are collisionally excited for all temperatures. In order to have recombination Halpha and Hbeta it is necessary to have higher ionization fractions of H than the ones obtained from coronal equilibrium (e.g., such as the ones found in a photoionized gas).

  2. Analysis of experimental hydrogen engine data and hydrogen vehicle performance and emissions simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    This paper reports the engine and vehicle simulation and analysis done at Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) as a part of a joint optimized hydrogen engine development effort. Project participants are: Sandia National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Miami. Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios. NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency. In this paper, a simplified engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. The experimental data are used to adjust the empirical constants in the heat release rate and heat transfer correlation. The results indicate that hydrogen lean-burn spark-ignite engines can provide Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) levels in either a series hybrid or a conventional automobile.

  3. Hydrogen emission under laser exposure of colloidal solutions of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Simakin, A. V.; Shafeev, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the generation of molecular hydrogen from water by laser irradiation, without any electrodes and photocatalysts. A near infrared pulsed nanosecond laser is used for exposure of colloidal solution of Au nanoparticles suspended in water. Laser exposure of the colloidal solution results in formation of breakdown plasma in liquid and emission of H2. The rate of H2 emission depends critically on the energy of laser pulses. There is a certain threshold in laser fluence in liquid (around 50 J/cm2) below which plasma disappears and H2 emission stops. H2 emission from colloidal solution of Au nanoparticles in ethanol is higher than that from similar water colloid. It is found that formation of plasma and emission of H2 or D2 can be induced by laser exposure of pure liquids, either H2O or D2O, respectively. The results are interpreted as water molecules splitting by direct electron impact from breakdown plasma.

  4. Molecular Hydrogen Line Emission from Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysostomou, Antonio

    1993-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is dedicated to the study of the physical properties of photodissociation regions (PDRs), the surface layers of molecular clouds which are irradiated by ultraviolet radiation. The structure of PDRs is investigated with the development of an anlytical model which incorporates the essential heating and cooling mechanisms in a PDR. The main parameters in the model are the density and the incident ulttraviolet radiation field (G0) impinging on the surface which dissociates the molecules in the PDR. It is demonstrated that when the ratio (n / G0) is high (> 100 cm-3) the attenuation of ultraviolet photons is dominated by H2 self shielding, which brings the Hi/H2 transition zone close to the surface of the cloud (Av < 1). When the ratio is of order unity then the attenuation of ultraviolet photons is dominated by dust grains in the PDR. In this case, the Hi / H2 transition zone occurs at a depth of Av ~2-3. Images of the PDR in the northern bar of M17 show that there is a spatial coincidence, accurate to ~1 arcsec, of the H2 and 3.28 micron emission regions (the 3.28 micron emission being a tracer of the hot edge of the PDR delineated by the Hii / Hi transition) placing a lower limit to the density in the clumps of 105 cm-3. This coincidence is also observed in other PDR sources (eg. NGC 2023) and can be readily explained if the sources are clumpy. It is not clear in the northern bar of M17, where G0 ~104, whether shielding by dust or H2 molecules is dominated the attenuation of ultraviolet photons. A uniform, high density PDR model is sufficient to reproduce the observed H2 line intensity, however the images clearly reveal structures at the 2 arcsec level suggesting that a clumpy model is a realistic solution. Long slit K band spectroscopy measurements were taken in the northern bar of M17, where up to 16 H2 lines were identified. Analysis of the data suggests that the emission can only be explained if the H2 molecules are being excited

  5. EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS USING HYDROGEN FROM PLASMATRON FUEL CONVERTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, L

    2000-08-20

    Substantial progress in engine emission control is needed in order to meet present and proposed regulations for both spark ignition and diesel engines. Tightening regulations throughout the world reflect the ongoing concern with vehicle emissions. Recently developed compact plasmatron fuel converters have features that are suitable for onboard production of hydrogen for both fuel pretreatment and for exhaust aftertreatment applications. Systems that make use of these devices in conjunction with aftertreatment catalysts have the potential to improve significantly prospects for reduction of diesel engine emissions. Plasmatron fuel converters can provide a rapid response compact means to transform efficiently a wide range of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen rich gas. They have been used to reform natural gas [Bromberg1], gasoline [Green], diesel [Bromberg2] and hard-to-reform biofuels [Cohn1] into hydrogen rich gas (H2 + CO). The development of these devices has been pursued for the purpose of reducing engine exhaust pollutants by providing hydrogen rich gas for combustion in spark ignition and possibly diesel engines, as shown in Figure 1 [Cohn2]. Recent developments in compact plasmatron reformer design at MIT have resulted in substantial decreases in electrical power requirements. These new developments also increase the lifetime of the electrodes.

  6. Direct hydrogen production from alcohol using pulse-electron emission in an unsymmetrical electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, H.; Tanikawa, T.; Takaba, H.; Fujiwara, Y.

    2004-05-01

    We report a means of instantaneously producing hydrogen directly from alcohol using pulse-electron emission in an unsymmetrical electric field. We selected 1-butanol as a hydrogen-rich material for producing hydrogen. A 1-butanol molecule has more than twice as many hydrogen atoms as the methanol molecule and is a good candidate for a hydrogen source. The direct electron emission on the surface of volatile 1-butanol prevented intense discharge and produced hydrogen at room temperature in air.

  7. Hydrogen cyanide exhaust emissions from in-use motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Baum, Marc M; Moss, John A; Pastel, Stephen H; Poskrebyshev, Gregory A

    2007-02-01

    Motor vehicle exhaust emissions are known to contain hydrogen cyanide (HCN), but emission rate data are scarce and, in the case of idling vehicles, date back over 20 years. For the first time, vehicular HCN exhaust emissions from a modern, in-use fleet at idle have been measured. The 14 tested light duty motor vehicles were operating at idle as these conditions are associated with the highest risk exposure scenarios (i.e., enclosed spaces). Vehicular HCN was detected in 89% of the sampled exhaust streams and did not correlate with instantaneous air-fuel-ratio or with any single, coemitted pollutant. However, a moderate correlation between HCN emissions and the product of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide emissions was observed under cold-start conditions. Fleet average, cold-start, undiluted HCN emissions were 105 +/- 97 ppbV (maximum: 278 ppbV), whereas corresponding emissions from vehicles operating under stabilized conditions were 79 +/- 71 ppbV (maximum: 245 ppbV); mean idle fleet HCN emission rates were 39 +/- 35 and 21 +/- 18 microg-min(-1) for cold-start and stabilized vehicles, respectively. The significance of these results is discussed in terms of HCN emissions inventories in the South Coast Air Basin of California and of health risks due to exposure to vehicular HCN. PMID:17328194

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and..., Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions... limit in the following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and...

  9. Measurement and Simulation of Deuterium Balmer-Alpha Emission from First-Orbit Fast Ions and the Application to Neutral Density and General Fast-Ion Loss Detection in the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, Nathan Glynn

    Spectra of the Balmer-alpha radiation of first-orbit fast ions after charge exchange with edge neutrals have been measured in the DIII-D tokamak. Several collimated optics systems view the edge region---while avoiding any active beams---and carry light to a spectrometer tuned to the region of the 656.1 nm deuterium-alpha line. Viewing geometry and the high energy of the lost ions produce Doppler shifts, which effectively separate the fast-ion contributions from the bright, cold edge light. Modulation of the fast-ion source allows for time-evolving background subtraction. A model has been developed for the spectra of these first-orbit fast ions. The passive fast-ion D-alpha simulation (P-FIDAsim) is a forward model consisting of an experimentally- validated beam model, an ion orbit-following code, a collisional-radiative model, and a synthetic spectrometer. Eighty-six experimental spectra were obtained using 6 different neutral beam fast-ion sources and 13 different viewing chords. Parameters such as plasma current, toroidal field, electron density, plasma cross-sectional shape, and number of x-points were varied. Uncalibrated experimental spectra have an overall Spearman rank correlation coefficient with the shape of simulated spectra of 0.58 with subsets of cases rising to a correlation of 0.80. A single set of calibrated spectra (shot 152817) was measured and is used to estimate the neutral density throughout the cross-section of the tokamak. This is done by inverting the simulated spectra in order to find the best neutral density (in a least squares sense) required to best match the experimental spectra. The resulting 2D neutral density shows the expected increase toward each x-point. The average neutral density is found to be 3.3 x 105cm -3 a the magnetic axis, 2.3 x 108cm -3 in the core, 8.1 x 109 cm-3 at the plasma boundary, and 1.1 x 10 11cm-3 near the wall. A technique is developed which--after us first-orbit light to calibrate the system--can quantify

  10. The Transition Zone in Balmer-dominated Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Kevin; van Adelsberg, Matthew; McCray, Richard; Raymond, John C.

    2007-10-01

    We examine the structure of the postshock region in supernova remnants (SNRs). The ``shock transition zone'' is set up by charge transfer and ionization events between atoms and ions and has a width ~(1015 cm-2)n-10, where n0 is the total preshock density (including both atoms and ions). For Balmer-dominated SNRs with shock velocity vs>~1000 km s-1, the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions for ion velocity and temperature are obeyed instantly, leaving the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the broad Hα line versus vs relation intact. However, the spatial variation in the postshock densities is relevant to the problem of Lyα resonant scattering in young, core-collapse SNRs. Both two- (preshock atoms and ions) and three-component (preshock atoms, broad neutrals, and ions) models are considered. We compute the spatial emissivities of the broad (ξb) and narrow (ξn) Hα lines; a calculation of these emissivities in SN 1006 is in general agreement with the computed ones of Raymond and coworkers. The (dimensionless) spatial shift, Θshift, between the centroids of ξb and ξn is unique for a given shock velocity and fion, the preshock ion fraction. Measurements of Θshift can be used to constrain n0.

  11. Hour-timescale profile variations in the broad Balmer lines of the Seyfert galaxy Hour-timescale profile variations in the broad Balmer lines of the Seyfert galaxy Markarian 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asatrian, Norayr S.

    2014-07-01

    Part of results of the multi-epoch intranight optical spectroscopic monitoring of the Markarian 6 nucleus carried out at the telescopes of 6-m of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia), 2.6-m of the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (Armenia) and 2-m of the Tautenburg Observatory (Germany) is presented. Observations were made in 1979, 1986, 1988-1991 and 2007-2009 during a total of 33 nights with an average sampling rate of 4 spectra per night. TV-scanner and long-slit spectrographs equipped with Image Tube and CCD detector arrays were used. Altogether we analyzed 110 Hβ and 58 Hα region spectra to search for intranight variability in the broad hydrogen emission line profiles. The typical spectral resolutions were 4 Å for scanner spectra, 6 Å for photographic spectra, and 5 Å and 10 Å for CCD spectra. The S/N ratio at the continuum level near the Hβ and Hα lines was in the range 15-50. The purpose of the search was to look for the characteristic variability signatures of different kinematical models of the broad emission-line region. We considered the centering and guiding errors which can result in differences between spectra. We found variations in the broad Balmer line difference profiles on time scale of hour with the level of significance of 3.6 σ to 5.0 σ. Variations take the form of narrow, small bumps located at the blue and red sides or only at the blue side of the lines. In the intermediate level of broad line flux, the Hβ and Hα profiles show fine structure. Detected profile changes occurred at the same radial velocity shifts as the details in the fine structure. The variability is at least 2 orders of magnitude more rapid than any observed for broad Balmer line profiles in AGNs that we are aware of in the literature. Discovered extremely rapid line-profile variability may be associated with reverberation effects. Two-sided profile changes may indicate the response of circularly rotating hydrogen clouds in the BLR to a light pulse

  12. Influence of cathode material on generation of energetic hydrogen atoms in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetanovic, N.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kuraica, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper influence of cathode material on formation of fast hydrogen atoms in an abnormal glow discharge is investigated using Balmer alpha emission spectroscopy. Energetic H atoms are generated in charge exchange reactions of hydrogen ions that are accelerated in the electric field, and also formed in the backscattering process at the cathode surface. Copper and graphite cathodes were used. Investigation was performed in two orthogonal directions of observation in pure hydrogen and argon-hydrogen mixture. The shapes of the profiles are examined together with the space intensity distribution of Balmer alpha line. Reduced atom reflection from graphite was manifested in the spectroscopic result, in accordance to the field acceleration model. The effect was evident only at high ion energies. This is explained by energy dependence of reflection coefficient for H atoms.

  13. A Possible Solution to the Lyman/Balmer Line Problem in Hot DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preval, Simon P.; Barstow, Martin A.; Badnell, Nigel R.; Holberg, Jay B.; Hubeny, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Arguably, the best method for determining the effective temperature (Teff) and surface gravity (log g) of a DA white dwarf is by fitting the Hydrogen Lyman and Balmer absorption features. However, as has been shown for white dwarfs with Teff>50,000K, the calculated value from the Lyman and Balmer lines are discrepant, which worsens with increasing temperature. Many different solutions have been suggested, ranging from the input physics used to calculate the models, to interstellar reddening. We will focus on the former, and consider three variables. The first is the atomic data used, namely the number of transitions included in line blanketing treatments and the photoionization cross sections. The second is the stark broadening treatment used to synthesise the Lyman and Balmer line profiles, namely the calculations performed by Lemke (1997) and Tremblay & Bergeron (2009). Finally, the third is the atmospheric content. The model grids are calculated with a pure H composition, and a metal polluted composition using the abundances of Preval et al. (2013). We present the preliminary results of our analysis, whereby we have determined the Teff for a small selection of white dwarfs. We plan to extend our analysis by allowing metallicity to vary in future model grids.

  14. Six Balmer-dominated supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.C.; Kirshner, R.P.; Blair, W.P.; Winkler, P.F. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Middlebury College, VT )

    1991-07-01

    Spectra of six Balmer-dominated SNRs are examined: the Galactic SNR of SN 1572 and SN 1006, the LMC SNR 0505-67.9, 0509-67.5, 0519-69.0, and 0548-70.4. A shock velocity is derived for each SNR with broad H-alpha and a possible lower limit of the shock velocity in 0509-67.5. Models are used which show that the use of the ratio of broad to narrow intensity as an indicator of shock velocity is not reliable. The observed intensity ratios do not correspond to either the commonly assumed case of no equilibration or to the other extreme of total equilibration. Distances to the filaments in SN 1572 and SN 1006 of 1.5-3.1 kpc and 1.4-2.8 kpc, respectively, are obtained. The ages are estimated to range from about 10,000 yr for 0505-67.9 and 0548-70.4 to less than 1500 yr for the small SNR 0509-67.5 and 0519-69.0.l. These two young SNR bring the number of SNe in the LMC to at least five in the past 1500 yr, making the SN rate per unit luminosity comparable to that reported for late spiral galaxies. 40 refs.

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide.... FFFF, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP... limit in the following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide.... FFFF, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP... limit in the following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and...

  17. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  18. Proton transport and auroral optical emissions. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, D.

    1993-12-31

    The hydrogen lines are the characteristic emissions of proton aurora and have been used to study the impact of protons upon the atmosphere. Observations of hydrogen emission on the long wavelength side of the unshifted lines were not explained by previous theories. To explain the observed optical emissions, a numerical code is developed to solve the one dimensional, steady state, linearly coupled transport equations of H(+)/H in a dipole magnetic field. The mirror force is included in the transport equations to produce backscattered particles which are responsible for emission at wavelengths longward of the unshifted lines. Both downward and upward particle intensities of H(+)/H are calculated. The mirror reflectivities of energy and particles are defined, and their dependences on proton input spectra and pitch angle distributions are studied. The results show that the mirror reflectivity increases both with characteristic energy and with pitch angle of the input proton flux, but is more sensitive to angular distributions than to energy spectra. Energy deposition rate, ionization rate, H alpha, H beta, and nitrogen first negative bands emission rates and profiles are calculated. Calculated fluxes of H(+)/H and emission properties of hydrogen Balmer lines are compared with a rocket measurement. The efficiency for production of the Balmer lines and the nitrogen first negative bands is obtained in terms of the energy input rate and the H(+) particle flux. A Doppler shift of about 3.0 A toward the blue for magnetic zenith profiles of H alpha is obtained, compared with observational results of 6.0 +/- 2.0 A. The calculated emissions on the red side of the unshifted hydrogen atomic emission lines when convolved with the instrumental function account for the observed emissions on the long wavelength side of the unshifted hydrogen Balmer lines.

  19. Spectropolarimetry of the molecular hydrogen line emission from OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael G.; Hough, J. H.; Axon, David J.; Hasegawa, T.; Tamura, M.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line at 35 km/s velocity resolution were obtained at several locations within OMC-1, including the molecular hydrogen reflection nebula. All line profiles are smooth and show no evidence for being composed of discrete components. The data are discussed with respect to a model for the H2 line formation in which the emission originates in discrete clumps moving at different velocities. It is suggested that the extended blue wing may come from fast-moving clumps embedded in a wind.

  20. Updated cost estimates of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1981-08-01

    A means of estimating the cost of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emission control was investigated. This study was designed to derive H/sub 2/S emission abatement cost functions and illustrate the cost of H/sub 2/S emission abatement at a hydrothermal site. Four tasks were undertaken: document the release of H/sub 2/S associated with geothermal development; review H/sub 2/S environmental standards; develop functional relationships that may be used to estimate the most cose-effective available H/sub 2/S abatement process; and use the cost functions to generate abatement cost estimates for a specific site. The conclusions and recommendations derived from the research are presented. The definition of the term impacts as used in this research is discussed and current estimates of the highest expected H/sub 2/S concentrations of in geothermal reservoirs are provided. Regulations governing H/sub 2/S emissions are reviewed and a review of H/sub 2/S control technology and a summary of the control cost functions are included. A case study is presented to illustrate H/sub 2/S abatement costs at the Baca KGRA in New Mexico.

  1. On emission from a hydrogen-like atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in the field of a point nucleus ( Ze) has been obtained as an eigenfunction of the Schrödinger Hamiltonian and the spin projection operator Σ3. With the use of this solution, the probability W (ν) of the emission of a neutrino per unit time from a hydrogen-like atom, (Ze)* to (Ze) + ν bar ν, has been calculated for the first time in the first order of the parameter Ze ≪ 1. The probability W (ν) appears to be rather small, and the corresponding lifetime τ(ν) = [ W (ν)]-1 is much larger than the age of the Universe; correspondingly, this process cannot affect the balance of low-energy neutrinos. The smallness of W (ν) is due not only to the presence of the obvious "weak" factor ( Gm p 2 )2( m/ mp)4 in the expression for W (ν), but also primarily to the "electromagnetic" factor ( Zα)12, which can be revealed only in a particular calculation. It has been argued within quantum electrodynamics with the mentioned wavefunctions that photon emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + γ, can be absent (analysis of photon emission requires the further development of the method), whereas axion emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + a, can occur, although the last two effects have not been considered in detail.

  2. Hydrogen recombination at high optical depth and the spectrum of SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yueming; Mccray, Richard; Oliva, Ernesto; Randich, Sofia

    1992-01-01

    A general theory is presented for hydrogen recombination line formation in an expanding medium in which some of the lines are optically thick. This theory is used to calculate the time evolution of the hydrogen lines of SN 1987A at t equal to or greater than 150 days, assuming that the supernova envelope is a homologously expanding uniform sphere. The theoretical luminosities and ratios of the recombination lines agree remarkably well with the observations. For the first 2 yr, the supernova envelope is optically thick to Balmer continuum. For t equal to or less than 400 days, hydrogen is ionized primarily from the n = 2 level by Balmer continuum photons, which are provided partly by the two-photon decay of the 2s state and partly by emission lines of heavy elements.

  3. Spectroscopy of Molecular Hydrogen Emission from KH 15D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Charbonneau, David; Harrington, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    We report infrared spectroscopy of the unusual eclipsing pre-main-sequence object KH 15D, obtained using NIRSPEC on Keck II. During eclipse, observations using low spectral resolution (λ/δλ~1000) reveal the presence of prominent molecular hydrogen emission in five lines near 2 μm. The relative line strengths are consistent with thermal excitation at T~2800+/-300 K. Observations out of eclipse, at both low and high spectral resolution (λ/δλ~2×104), show reduced contrast with the stellar continuum. The change in contrast for the strongest line, 1-0 S(1), is consistent with an approximately constant emission line superposed on a variable stellar continuum. Emission in the 1-0 S(1) line is observed to extend by >~4" both east and west of the stellar point-spread function (PSF; >~3000 AU). Observed at high spectral resolution, the velocity and the intensity structure of the 1-0 S(1) profile are both asymmetric. East of the stellar PSF (by 1.1"-2.3") the emission is blueshifted (-63 km s-1) and has significantly greater intensity than the marginally redshifted component (+2 km s-1, approximately consistent with zero) that dominates west of the stellar PSF. The spatial extent of the emission and the excitation temperature suggest shock excitation of ambient gas by a bipolar outflow from the star and/or the disk. However, it is difficult to account for the observed radial velocity unless the outflow axis is inclined significantly to the plane of the sky. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Laser plasma diagnostics and self-absorption measurements of the Hβ Balmer series line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Parigger, Christian G.; Surmick, David M.; EL Sherbini, Ashraf M.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the peak-separation of the Balmer series hydrogen beta line was measured to determine the electron density of laser-induced plasma from spatially and temporally resolved spectra collected in laboratory air at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The self-absorption phenomenon is investigated by using a mirror that retro-reflects the emitted radiation through the plasma. The experimental data with and without the mirror were analyzed with available hydrogen beta computer simulations. Hardly any self-absorption was found as indicated by the correction factors that only marginally differ from unity. The obtained electron density values are also compared with the electron densities from nearby nitrogen lines. The hydrogen beta Hβ peak-separation method yields reliable results for an electron density of the order of 1 ×1017cm-3 for time delays of 5 μs from plasma generation, which confirms that self-absorption is insignificant for such electron densities.

  5. The Influence of Gas Composition in Dielectric Barrier Discharges on the Broadening of the Hydrogen H{alpha} Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, H. W.

    2006-01-15

    The distribution of hydrogen atoms responsible for emission of the Balmer H{alpha} line in the region of the dielectric barrier discharges in the helium and hydrogen as well as in the argon and hydrogen mixtures, in the direction perpendicular to the electrode surfaces, has bee determined by the optical emission spectroscopy accounting for the polarization of the emitted light. The procedure of fitting the measured line profiles accounting for the Stark effect has been used for determination of the distribution of the electric field in the discharge region.

  6. Temperature enhancement of secondary electron emission from hydrogenated diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, A.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Akhvlediani, R.; Michaelson, Sh.; Hoffman, A.

    2009-09-15

    The effect of temperature on the stability of the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield from approx100-nm-thick continuous diamond films is reported. At room temperature, the SEE yield was found to decay as a function of electron irradiation dose. The SEE yield is observed to increase significantly upon heating of the diamond surface. Furthermore, by employing moderate temperatures, the decay of the SEE yield observed at room temperature is inhibited, showing a nearly constant yield with electron dose at 200 deg. C. The results are explained in terms of the temperature dependence of the electron beam-induced hydrogen desorption from the diamond surface and surface band bending. These findings demonstrate that the longevity of diamond films in practical applications of SEE can be increased by moderate heating.

  7. Mitigation of hydrogen sulfide emissions in The Geysers KGRA

    SciTech Connect

    Buell, R.

    1981-07-01

    Violations of the ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) are currently being experienced in The Geysers KGRA and could significantly increase in the future. Attainment and maintenance of the H/sub 2/S AAQS is a potential constraint to optimum development of this resource. The availability of reliable H/sub 2/S controls and the development of a validated air dispersion model are critical to alleviating this constraint. The purpose of this report is to assess the performance capabilities for state-of-the-art controls, to identify potential cost-effective alternative controls, and to identify the California Energy Commission (CEC) staff's efforts to develop a validated air dispersion model. Currently available controls (Stretford, Hydrogen Peroxide, and EIC) are capable of abating H/sub 2/S emissions from a proposed facility to five lbs/hr. Alternative controls, such as condensate stripping and condensate pH control, appear to be promising, cost-effective control options.

  8. The variability of the double-peaked Balmer lines in the active nucleus of NGC 1097

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Eracleous, Michael; Livio, Mario; Wilson, Andrew S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the nucleus of the Seyfert/low-ionization nuclear emission-line region galaxy NGC 1097 spanning the period 1991-1994. The goal was to monitor anticipated variations of the broad, double-peaked Balmer lines which appeared abruptly in 1991. We find that the broad Balmer lines have varied significantly over the monitoring period, both in their integrated fluxes and in their profile shapes. The integrated H-alpha flux has decreased by a factor of 2, the (H-alpha)/(H-beta) ratio has increased, and the originally asymmetric H-alpha profile has become symmetric. The decline of the H-alpha flux and the change in the (H-alpha)/(H-beta) ratio can be interpreted as consequences of either increased obscuration along the line of sight, or a decline in the ionizing continuum, but neither of these scenarios can account for the change in profile shapes. A model attributing the line emission to a precessing elliptical ring around a 10(exp 6) solar mass nuclear black hole can reproduce the observed profile variations. In this scenario, the line-emitting ring is the result of the tidal disruption of a star by the black hole. Alternative scenarios associating the broad-line emission with a collimated bipolar outflow also remain viable, but binary black holes and inhomogeneous accretion disks are disfavored by the observed pattern of variability.

  9. Variation in the Pre-transit Balmer Line Signal Around the Hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam G.; Barman, Travis

    2016-07-01

    As followup to our recent detection of a pre-transit signal around HD 189733 b, we obtained full pre-transit phase coverage of a single planetary transit. The pre-transit signal is again detected in the Balmer lines but with variable strength and timing, suggesting that the bow shock geometry reported in our previous work does not describe the signal from the latest transit. We also demonstrate the use of the Ca ii H and K residual core flux as a proxy for the stellar activity level throughout the transit. A moderate trend is found between the pre-transit absorption signal in the 2013 data and the Ca ii H flux. This suggests that some of the 2013 pre-transit hydrogen absorption can be attributed to varying stellar activity levels. A very weak correlation is found between the Ca ii H core flux and the Balmer line absorption in the 2015 transit, hinting at a smaller contribution from stellar activity compared to the 2013 transit. We simulate how varying stellar activity levels can produce changes in the Balmer line transmission spectra. These simulations show that the strength of the 2013 and 2015 pre-transit signals can be reproduced by stellar variability. If the pre-transit signature is attributed to circumplanetary material, its evolution in time can be described by accretion clumps spiraling toward the star, although this interpretation has serious limitations. Further high-cadence monitoring at Hα is necessary to distinguish between true absorption by transiting material and short-term variations in the stellar activity level.

  10. Echo mapping the Balmer-emission region in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanders, I.; Horne, K.

    1994-01-01

    We use a maximum-entropy method to show that the transfer function (TF) of the broad-line region (BLR) in the Seyfert-1 galaxy NGC 3516 is time-varying. The TF decreased by nearly a factor of two over a time scale less than half a year during a monitoring campaign in 1990. We conclude that the observed time dependency is likely to be either due to variations of the spectral index of the ionizing continuum spectrum; due to a change in the number or covering fraction of broad-line clouds; due to nonlinear line response; or due to nonstationary anisotropy of the continuum source on time scales of several weeks to months. An extended continuum source could also explain the observed time-dependency. The symmetry of the time lag for variations in the red and blue wings of H-alpha indicates that the BLR kinematics is not dominated by organized radial inflow or outflow. If we assume circular orbits, the observed time lag 14 days at velocity v = 4000 km/s suggests a mass of the central object of approximately 2 x 10(exp 7) solar mass. The H-alpha TF peaks away from zero delay, indicating that the H-alpa BLR is either non-spherical or inwardly emitting.

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  12. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  13. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  14. Synthetic Spectra of H Balmer and HE I Absorption Lines. I. Stellar Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.; Leitherer, Claus

    1999-12-01

    We present a grid of synthetic profiles of stellar H Balmer and He I lines at optical wavelengths with a sampling of 0.3 Å. The grid spans a range of effective temperature 50,000 K>=Teff>=4000 K, and gravity 0.0<=logg<=5.0 at solar metallicity. For Teff>=25,000 K, non-LTE stellar atmosphere models are computed using the code TLUSTY (Hubeny). For cooler stars, Kurucz LTE models are used to compute the synthetic spectra. The grid includes the profiles of the high-order hydrogen Balmer series and He I lines for effective temperatures and gravities that have not been previously synthesized. The behavior of H8 to H13 and He I λ3819 with effective temperature and gravity is very similar to that of the lower terms of the series (e.g., Hβ) and the other He I lines at longer wavelengths; therefore, they are suited for the determination of the atmospheric parameters of stars. These lines are potentially important to make predictions for these stellar absorption features in galaxies with active star formation. Evolutionary synthesis models of these lines for starburst and poststarburst galaxies are presented in a companion paper. The full set of the synthetic stellar spectra is available for retrieval at our website or on request from the authors.

  15. Molecular hydrogen emission as a density and temperature indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Ferland, Gary J.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Loh, Edwin D.; Fabian, Andy C.; Williams, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Infrared observations have discovered a variety of objects, including filaments in the Crab Nebula and cool-core clusters of galaxies, where the 1-0 S(1) line is stronger than the infrared H I lines. A variety of processes could be responsible for this emission. Although many complete shock or PDR calculations of emission have been published, we know of no previous simple calculation that shows the emission spectrum and level populations of thermally excited low-density . We present a range of purely thermal collisional simulations, corresponding to constant gas kinetic temperature at different densities. We consider the cases where the collisions affecting H2 are predominantly with atomic or molecular hydrogen. The resulting level population (often called "excitation") diagrams show that excitation temperatures are sometimes lower than the gas kinetic temperature when the density is too low for the level populations to go to LTE. The atomic case goes to LTE at much lower densities than the molecular case due to larger collision rates. At low densities for the v=1 and 2 vibrational manifolds level populations are quasi-thermal, which could be misinterpreted as showing the gas is in LTE at high density. At low densities for the molecular case the level population diagrams are discontinuous between v=0 and 1 vibrational manifolds and between v=2, J=0, 1 and other higher J levels within the same vibrational manifold. These jumps could be used as density diagnostics. We show how much the H2 mass would be underestimated using the 1-0 S(1) line strength if the density is below that required for LTE. We give diagnostic diagrams showing level populations over a range of density and temperature. The density where the level populations are given by a Boltzmann distribution relative to the total molecular abundance (required to get the correct H2 mass), is shown for various cases. We discuss the implications of these results for the interpretation of H2 observations of the

  16. Fuel economy and emissions evaluation of BMW hydrogen 7 mono-fuel demonstration vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Gurski, S.; Duoba, M.; Thiel, W.; Martin, D.; Korn, T.; Energy Systems; BMW Group Munich Germany; BMW Group Oxnard USA

    2008-12-01

    This article summarizes the testing of two BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF). The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles are derived from the BMW Hydrogen 7 bi-fuel vehicles and based on a BMW 760iL. The mono-fuel as well as the bi-fuel vehicle(s) is equipped with cryogenic hydrogen on-board storage and a gaseous hydrogen port fuel injection system. The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles were tested for fuel economy as well as emissions on the Federal Test Procedure FTP-75 cold-start test as well as the highway test. The results show that these vehicles achieve emissions levels that are only a fraction of the Super Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (SULEV) standard for nitric oxide (NO{sub x}) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. For non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions the cycle-averaged emissions are actually 0 g/mile, which require the car to actively reduce emissions compared to the ambient concentration. The fuel economy numbers on the FTP-75 test were 3.7 kg of hydrogen per 100 km, which, on an energy basis, is equivalent to a gasoline fuel consumption of 17 miles per gallon (mpg). Fuel economy numbers for the highway cycle were determined to be 2.1 kg of hydrogen per 100 km or 30 miles per gallon of gasoline equivalent (GGE). In addition to cycle-averaged emissions and fuel economy numbers, time-resolved (modal) emissions as well as air/fuel ratio data is analyzed to further investigate the root causes of the remaining emissions traces. The BMW Hydrogen 7 vehicles employ a switching strategy with lean engine operation at low engine loads and stoichiometric operation at high engine loads that avoids the NO{sub x} emissions critical operating regime with relative air/fuel ratios between 1 < {lambda} < 2. The switching between these operating modes was found to be a major source of the remaining NO{sub x} emissions. The emissions results collected

  17. Intermittent control procedures for the Geysers hydrogen sulfide emission abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Buick, B.D.; Mooney, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) operates the world's largest geothermal steam electric power generation facility, currently about 1.140 megawatts (Mw). This facility is located about 80 miles north of San Francisco, California and is within a region referred to as the Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Pollutants resulting from this method of electric power generation are due to impurities in the geothermal steam. A major contaminate in the steam is hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S), a regulated pollutant in California. The ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for this pollutant in California is 0.03 parts per million (ppM) averaged over one hour. H/sub 2/S is an invisible, unpleasant smelling gas present in varying concentrations in the geothermal steam. Its odor has been compared to the smell of rotten eggs. Since PG and E is increasingly relying on this source of electrical power generation, it has committed millions of dollars to the development, testing, acquisition, and installation of abatement equipment to reduce H/sub 2/S emissions during the past ten years. In order to reduce the number of exceeds of the AAQS during this developmental period, a predictive model was needed for interim abatement purposes. Most of the high hourly H/sub 2/S values occur with meteorological conditions having poor ventilation resulting from a combination of low wind speed and reduced mixing layer depths. This weather condition is most common during the months of June through October in California. A predictive model was developed from three years of hourly H/sub 2/S measurements of 0.03 ppM or greater in populated areas downwind of the generation facility and from observations of associated meteorological data.

  18. Anomalous Balmer continuum temperatures in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Donald L.; Dufour, Reginald J.

    1994-01-01

    New long-slit spectra of the Orion Nebula in the near-ultraviolet were used to calculate the Balmer recombination temperature, T(Bac), from the Balmer discontinuity at 3646 A. The spatially resolved data show a decrease in temperature moving to the west of Theta(sup 1) Ori C, from 8400 K at a distance of 40 sec to a low of 2800 K at a distance of 220 sec. Such values are much lower than previously reported. The effect of scattered starlight on these results is calculated and shown to be less than 10%. Previous studies which found scattered light to be important at the discontinuity are in error. Such low temperatures and their impact on nebular physics and abundances are disconcerting and require further study.

  19. Spatially Resolved Dust Maps from Balmer Decrements in Galaxies at z ~ 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Erica June; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Wuyts, Stijn; Franx, Marijn; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Skelton, Rosalind E.

    2016-01-01

    We derive average radial gradients in the dust attenuation toward H ii regions in 609 galaxies at z ˜ 1.4, using measurements of the Balmer decrement out to r ˜ 3 kpc. The Balmer decrements are derived from spatially resolved maps of Hα and Hβ emission from the 3D-HST survey. We find that with increasing stellar mass M both the normalization and strength of the gradient in dust attenuation increases. Galaxies with a mean mass of < {log} M> =9.2M⊙ have little dust attenuation at all radii, whereas galaxies with < {log} M> =10.2M⊙ have AHα ≈ 2 mag in their central regions. We parameterize this as {A}{{H}α }=b+c{log} r, with b=0.9+{log}1.0{M}10, c = -1.9-2.2 log M10, r in kpc, and M10 the stellar mass in units of 1010 M⊙. This expression can be used to correct spatially resolved measurements of Hα to radial distributions of star formation. When applied to our data, we find that the star formation rates (SFRs) in the central r < 1 kpc of galaxies in the highest mass bin are ˜6 M⊙ yr-1, six times higher than before correction and approximately half of the total SFR of these galaxies. If this high central SFR is maintained for several Gyr, a large fraction of the stars in present-day bulges likely formed in situ.

  20. Maximizing light emission from silicon nanocrystals - The role of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, A. R.; Elliman, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements are undertaken to determine the passivation kinetics of luminescence-quenching defects during isothermal and isochronal annealing in molecular and atomic hydrogen. The latter employs an alneal process in which atomic hydrogen is generated by reactions between a deposited Al layer and H2O or -OH radicals in the SiO2. Passivation and desorption kinetics are shown to be consistent with the existence of two classes of non-radiative defects: one that reacts with either atomic or molecular hydrogen, and the other that reacts only with atomic hydrogen.

  1. Influence of water injection on performance and emissions of a direct-injection hydrogen research engine.

    SciTech Connect

    Nande, A. M.; Wallner, T.; Naber, J.

    2008-10-06

    The application of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as an internal combustion (IC) engine fuel has been under investigation for several decades. The favorable physical properties of hydrogen make it an excellent alternative fuel for IC engines and hence it is widely regarded as the energy carrier of the future. Direct injection of hydrogen allows optimizing this potential as it provides multiple degrees of freedom to influence the in-cylinder combustion processes and consequently engine efficiency and exhaust emissions.

  2. A STUDY TO EVALUATE CARBON MONOXIDE AND HYDROGEN SULFIDE CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORS AT AN OIL REFINERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An eleven month field evaluation was done on five hydrogen sulfide and four carbon monoxide monitors located at an oil refinery. The hydrogen sulfide monitors sampled a fuel gas feed line and the carbon monoxide monitors sampled the emissions from a fluid cat cracker (FCC). Two o...

  3. Hydrogen production rate from comet Austin 1982g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, P.; Scherb, F.; Roesler, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    Meaningful measurements with respect to the cometary Balmer-alpha (H-alpha) emission are difficult and require the use of special equipment. The first ground-based observations of H-alpha emission from a cometary hydrogen corona were conducted on comet Kohoutek 1973 XII with a large-aperture Fabry-Perot spectrometer installed at the McMath solar telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. The present investigation is concerned with the second ground-based observations of cometary H-alpha emission carried out during the apparition of comet Austin 1982g. A 150 mm dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer was employed in the experiment. Use was made of an observatory which is designed for the high spectral resolution study of faint extended sources such as interstellar and geocoronal emission lines. The investigation demonstrates that hydrogen production rates from comets as faint as about 7th magnitude can be routinely measured from the ground at minimal cost.

  4. Hydrogen and methanol: a comparison of safety, economics, efficiencies and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Kerry-Ann; Pearson, Peter

    Fuel cell cars will appear on the market early in the next century. A question still remains — whether these vehicles will store onboard, hydrogen or, the hydrogen-rich carrier, methanol. There are a number of key areas surrounding this question, three of which are safety, economics and efficiency and emissions. Each of these issues was examined using the available literature. It can be seen that it is only with emissions that a clear difference appears and then hydrogen shows an advantage over methanol.

  5. Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

    2010-01-01

    Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2

  6. Manure ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from a Western dairy storage basin.

    PubMed

    Grant, Richard H; Boehm, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    The reporting of ammonia (NH) and hydrogen sulfide (HS) emissions from dairies to the federal government depends on the magnitude of the emissions. However, little is known about their daily NH and HS emissions and what influences those emissions. Emissions of NH and HS from two manure storage basins at a 4400-head western free-stall dairy were measured intermittently over 2 yr. Each basin went through stages of filling, drying, and then removal of the manure during the study period. Emissions were determined using backward Lagrangian Stochastic and vertical radial plume methods. Ammonia emissions ranged from 35 to 59 kg d in one basin and from 86 to 90 kg d in a second basin, corresponding to a range of 7 to 19 g d head. Basin NH emissions were highest during initial filling and when the manure was removed. Mean HS emissions ranged from 5 to 22 kg d (1.1-4.6 g d head). Basin HS emissions were highest when the basin was filling. Crusting of the basin surface reduced NH but not HS emissions. The cessation of basin filling reduced HS but not NH emissions. Air temperature and wind conditions were correlated with NH emissions. Barometric pressure decreases were correlated with episodic HS emissions. The variability in emissions with stage of manure handling and storage and meteorological conditions indicates that determining the maximum daily emissions and the annual emissions from such waste basins requires consideration of each stage in conjunction with the climatic conditions during the stage. PMID:25602327

  7. [Study on the Emission Spectrum of Hydrogen Production with Microwave Discharge Plasma in Ethanol Solution].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Wang, Bo; Zhu, Xiao-mei; Yan, Zhi-yu; Liu, Yong-jun; Liu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen is regarded as a kind of clean energy with high caloricity and non-pollution, which has been studied by many experts and scholars home and abroad. Microwave discharge plasma shows light future in the area of hydrogen production from ethanol solution, providing a new way to produce hydrogen. In order to further improve the technology and analyze the mechanism of hydrogen production with microwave discharge in liquid, emission spectrum of hydrogen production by microwave discharge plasma in ethanol solution was being studied. In this paper, plasma was generated on the top of electrode by 2.45 GHz microwave, and the spectral characteristics of hydrogen production from ethanol by microwave discharge in liquid were being studied using emission spectrometer. The results showed that a large number of H, O, OH, CH, C2 and other active particles could be produced in the process of hydrogen production from ethanol by microwave discharge in liquid. The emission spectrum intensity of OH, H, O radicals generated from ethanol is far more than that generated from pure water. Bond of O-H split by more high-energy particles from water molecule was more difficult than that from ethanol molecule, so in the process of hydrogen production by microwave discharge plasma in ethanol solution; the main source of hydrogen was the dehydrogenation and restructuring of ethanol molecules instead of water decomposition. Under the definite external pressure and temperature, the emission spectrum intensity of OH, H, O radicals increased with the increase of microwave power markedly, but the emission spectrum intensity of CH, C2 active particles had the tendency to decrease with the increase of microwave power. It indicated that the number of high energy electrons and active particles high energy electron energy increased as the increase of microwave power, so more CH, C2 active particles were split more thoroughly. PMID:27400531

  8. Effect of exogenous hydrogen peroxide on biophoton emission from radish root cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospísil, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Biophotons spontaneously emitted from radish root cells were detected using highly sensitive photomultiplier tube. Freshly isolated radish root cells exhibited spontaneous photon emission of about 4 counts s(-1). Addition of hydrogen peroxide to the cells caused significant enhancement in biophoton emission to about 500 counts s(-1). Removal of molecular oxygen using glucose/glucose oxidase system and scavengering of reactive oxygen species by reducing agents such are sodium ascorbate and cysteine completely diminished biophoton emission. Spectral analysis of the hydrogen peroxide-induced biophoton emission indicates that biophotons are emitted mainly in green-red region of the spectra. The data provided by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping technique showed that formation of singlet oxygen observed after addition of H2O2 correlates with enhancement in biophoton emission. These observations provide direct evidence that singlet oxygen is involved in biophoton emission from radish root cells. PMID:20106674

  9. Improvement of Electron Field Emission in Patterned Carbon Nanotubes by High Temperature Hydrogen Plasma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sigen; Sellin, Paul. J.; Lian, Jun; Özsan, Ersin; Chang, Sha

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a significant improvement of electron field emission property in patterned carbon nanotubes films by using a high temperature (650 °C) hydrogen plasma treatment. This treatment was found to greatly increase the emission current, emission uniformity and stability. The mechanism study showed that these enhanced properties are attributed to the lowering of the potential barrier and the creation of geometrical features through the removal of amorphous carbon, catalyst particles and the saturation of dangling bonds after such a hydrogen plasma treatment. PMID:19946566

  10. Hydrogen two-photon continuum emission from the Horseshoe filament in NGC 1275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, R. M.; Canning, R. E. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Ferland, G. J.; Lykins, M.; Porter, R. L.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R.

    2012-09-01

    Far-ultraviolet emission has been detected from a knot of Hα emission in the Horseshoe filament, far out in the NGC 1275 nebula. The flux detected relative to the brightness of the Hα line in the same spatial region is very close to that expected from hydrogen two-photon continuum emission in the particle heating model of Ferland et al. if reddening internal to the filaments is taken into account. We find no need to invoke other sources of far-ultraviolet emission such as hot stars or emission lines from C IV in intermediate-temperature gas to explain these data.

  11. Hydrogen Gas Emissions from Active Faults and Identification of Flow Pathway in a Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, T.; Niwa, M.; Kurosawa, H.; Shimada, K.

    2010-12-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen gas emissions from the subsurface along active faults exceed atmospheric concentrations (e.g. Sugisaki et. al., 1983). Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen gas is generated in a radical reaction of water with fractured silicate minerals due to rock fracturing caused by fault movement (e.g. Kita et al., 1982). Based on such research, we are studying an investigation method for an assessment of fault activity using hydrogen gas emissions from fracture zones. To start, we have devised portable equipment for rapid and simple in situ measurement of hydrogen gas emissions (Shimada et al., 2008). The key component of this equipment is a commercially available and compact hydrogen gas sensor with an integral data logger operable at atmospheric pressure. In the field, we have drilled shallow boreholes into incohesive fault rocks to depths ranging from 15 to 45 cm using a hand-operated drill with a 9mm drill-bit. Then, we have measured the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from active faults such as: the western part of the Atotsugawa fault zone, the Atera fault zone and the Neodani fault in central Japan; the Yamasaki fault zone in southwest Japan; and the Yamagata fault zone in northeast Japan. In addition, we have investigated the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from other major geological features such as tectonic lines: the Butsuzo Tectonic Line in the eastern Kii Peninsula and the Atokura Nappe in the Northeastern Kanto Mountains. As a result of the investigations, hydrogen gas concentration in emissions from the active faults was measured to be in the approximate range from 6,000 ppm to 26,000 ppm in two to three hours after drilling. A tendency for high concentrations of hydrogen gas in active faults was recognized, in contrast with low concentrations in emissions from tectonic lines that were observed to be in the range from 730 ppm to 2,000 ppm. It is inferred that the hydrogen gas migrates to ground

  12. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

  13. The interstellar wind - Mariner 10 measurements of hydrogen /1216 A/ and helium /584 A/ interplanetary emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadfoot, A. L.; Kumar, S.

    1978-01-01

    A set of unique observations of interplanetary emission at 1216 A and 584 A is presented which were made from Mariner 10 when that spacecraft was in interplanetary space on its way to Venus. The data provide simultaneous mapping of 1216-A hydrogen emission and 584-A helium emission, which allows a direct cross-correlation of these two aspects of the interstellar wind. The data are examined photometrically and compared with the principles of a simple model which provides a first-order understanding of the expected intensity variation over the celestial sphere. Hydrogen and helium sky maps are given which indicate the minima and maxima in emission intensity, a helium-focusing region in excess of 50 to 60 deg, and asymmetries in both emission profiles.

  14. Use of AERMOD to Determine a Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factor for Swine Operations by Inverse Modeling

    PubMed Central

    O’Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 µg/m2-s was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10−7 µg/yr-m2-kg was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1M kg), concentrations 0.5 km from the CAFO were 35 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels. PMID:21804761

  15. Use of AERMOD to Determine a Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factor for Swine Operations by Inverse Modeling.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 µg/m(2)-s was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10(-7) µg/yr-m(2)-kg was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1M kg), concentrations 0.5 km from the CAFO were 35 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels. PMID:21804761

  16. Use of AERMOD to determine a hydrogen sulfide emission factor for swine operations by inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 μg m -2 s -1 was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10 -7 μg yr -1 m -2 kg -1 was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1 M kg), concentrations within 0.5 km from the CAFO exceeded 25 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels.

  17. Doppler broadening of atomic-hydrogen lines in DC and capacitively coupled RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Kamran; Scharer, J. E.; Mills, R. L.

    2007-10-01

    The extraordinary broadening of Balmer lines of hydrogen admixed with Ar or He as opposed to Xe in DC glow and capacitively coupled rf discharges is studied over a wide range of pressure and gas compositions. High-resolution optical emission spectroscopy is performed parallel to (end-on) and perpendicular (side-on) to the electrode axis along with Langmuir probe measurements of plasma density and electron temperature for the RF capacitive discharge case. A broad and symmetric (Gaussian) Balmer emission line corresponding to 20-60 eV hydrogen atom temperatures is observed in Ar/H2 and He/H2 plasmas. Energy is transferred selectively to hydrogen atoms whereas the atoms of admixed He and Ar gases remain cold (<0.5 eV). In the field acceleration model [e.g., Cvetanovic et. al. J. App. Phys., Vol. 97, 033302-1, 2005] there apparently is no preferred species to which energy is coupled and according to the model one should observe enhanced temperatures of hydrogen and helium atoms in He/H2 discharges where the atomic mass is more comparable (4:1). We also briefly examine the experimental results using the Resonance Transfer Model of hydrogen heating [Mills et. al IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 31, 338, 2003] as the source of broadening.

  18. Spectroscopic investigations into extraordinary phenomena in hydrogen plasmas with certain catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijdam, Sander; van den Brink, Andreas; Driessen, Niels; van Noorden, Peter; de Regt, Ruud; Righart, Tim; Sitters, Gerrit; van Veldhuizen, Eddie; Wijtvliet, Ruud; Kroesen, Gerrit

    2007-10-01

    In recent years hydrogen plasmas have been created that display extraordinary behavior, like breakdown at low electric fields, anomalous plasma afterglow, excessive hydrogen Balmer-α spectral line broadening and EUV and VUV emission. Experiments have been done on three types of hydrogen discharges in order to reproduce the extraordinary plasma behavior observed. We have investigated these hydrogen discharges with different spectroscopic measuring devices. We focused on broadening of the hydrogen Balmer-α line and the emission of EUV and VUV radiation. The measurements in the visible part of the spectrum have been performed using a B&M-100 type (1000 mm) Czerny-Turner monochromator attached to a CCD camera or a photomultiplier. For the VUV and EUV measurements we have used three different monochromators: a Jobin Yvon LHT 30 (320 mm, near grazing incidence), a Jobin Yvon HR 1500 (1500 mm, normal incidence) and a McPherson Model 234/302 vacuum monochromator (200 mm, normal incidence). In all cases a scintillator plate has been used to convert the diffracted UV radiation into visible light which was quantified by a CCD camera or a photomultiplier.

  19. Low-Emission Hydrogen Combustors for Gas Turbines Using Lean Direct Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John; Smith, Timothy D.; Kundu, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. To investigate the combustion performance of gaseous hydrogen fuel injectors flame tube combustor experiments were performed. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 588 to 811 K, 0.4 to 1.4 MPa, and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen-based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over 7 times that of Jet-A. To reduce the risk, design mixing times were kept short and velocities high to minimize flashback. Five fuel injector designs were tested in 6.35- and 8.9-cm-diameter flame tubes with non-vitiated heated air and gaseous hydrogen. Data is presented on measurements of NO(x) emissions and combustion efficiency for the hydrogen injectors at 2.540, 7.937, and 13.652 cm from the injector face. Results show that for some configurations, NO(x) emissions are comparable to that of state of the art Jet-A LDI combustor concepts.

  20. Low Emission Hydrogen Combustors for Gas Turbines Using Lean Direct Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John; Smith, Timothy D.; Kundu, Krishna

    2005-01-01

    One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. To investigate the combustion performance of gaseous hydrogen fuel injectors flame tube combustor experiments were performed. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 600 to 1000 deg F, 60 to 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia), and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over seven times that of Jet-A. To reduce the risk, design mixing times were kept short and velocities high to minimize flashback. Five fuel injector designs were tested in 2.5 and 3.5-in. diameter flame tubes with non-vitiated heated air and gaseous hydrogen. Data is presented on measurements of NOx emissions and combustion efficiency for the hydrogen injectors at 1.0, 3.125, and 5.375 in. from the injector face. Results show that for some configurations, NOx emissions are comparable to that of state of the art Jet-A LDI combustor concepts.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hydrogen emission and recombination coefficients - SS2 (Storey+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, T.

    2014-10-01

    The data set consists of two files: e1bk.d and t1bk.d. The first file contains emission coefficients of hydrogen in units of erg.cm3/s as a function of electron density (Ne), temperature (Te) and kappa. The second file named 't1bk.d' contains the hydrogen total recombination coefficients in Case B and the total recombination coefficients to the 2s state of hydrogen in units of cm3/s as a function of Ne, Te and kappa. (5 data files).

  2. Detection of auroral hydrogen Lyman-Alpha emission from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.T.

    1982-12-15

    A series of observations of Uranus obtained with the short-wavelength spectrographs of the International Ultraviolet Explorer Observatory in 1982 April and June have revealed unexpectedly strong H Ly..cap alpha.. emission which varied between 430 and 850 Rayleighs in observed disk-averaged brightness over the course of these observations. The variability of the emission alone indicates that much of the emission must be produced by charged particle excitation of H in Uranus's upper atmosphere. In addition, comparison of these data with a model for resonant scattering of solar H Ly..cap alpha.. emission indicates that, over a wide range of model conditions, an emission brightness of even 430 Rayleighs (which was the lowest observed value) corresponds to an H column density on the order of 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -2/ in Uranus's upper atmosphere. At 20 AU from the Sun, solar EUV photodissociation of H/sub 2/ is insufficient to produce such a high column abundance of H, further supporting the identification of charged particle precipitation in Uranus's upper atmosphere. These data thus offer the first strong evidence for the presence of aurorae and therefore a magnetic field on Uranus.

  3. Estimating changes in urban ozone concentrations due to life cycle emissions from hydrogen transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.; Chang, Daniel P. Y.

    Hydrogen has been proposed as a low polluting alternative transportation fuel that could help improve urban air quality. This paper examines the potential impact of introducing a hydrogen-based transportation system on urban ambient ozone concentrations. This paper considers two scenarios, where significant numbers of new hydrogen vehicles are added to a constant number of gasoline vehicles. In our scenarios hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) are introduced in Sacramento, California at market penetrations of 9% and 20%. From a life cycle analysis (LCA) perspective, considering all the emissions involved in producing, transporting, and using hydrogen, this research compares three hypothetical natural gas to hydrogen pathways: (1) on-site hydrogen production; (2) central hydrogen production with pipeline delivery; and (3) central hydrogen production with liquid hydrogen truck delivery. Using a regression model, this research shows that the daily maximum temperature correlates well with atmospheric ozone formation. However, increases in initial VOC and NO x concentrations do not necessarily increase the peak ozone concentration, and may even cause it to decrease. It is found that ozone formation is generally limited by NO x in the summer and is mostly limited by VOC in the fall in Sacramento. Of the three hydrogen pathways, the truck delivery pathway contributes the most to ozone precursor emissions. Ozone precursor emissions from the truck pathway at 9% market penetration can cause additional 3-h average VOC (or NO x) concentrations up to approximately 0.05% (or 1%) of current pollution levels, and at 20% market penetration up to approximately 0.1% (or 2%) of current pollution levels. However, all of the hydrogen pathways would result in very small (either negative or positive) changes in ozone air quality. In some cases they will result in worse ozone air quality (mostly in July, August, and September), and in some cases they will result in better ozone air quality

  4. Exospheric and interplanetary hydrogen sensing from a translunar CubeSat platform by the Tomographic Hydrogen Emission Observatory (THEO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, L.; Sample, J. G.; Doe, R.; Noto, J.; Walsh, B.; Kamalabadi, F.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Kerr, R. B.; Immel, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The evaporation of neutral hydrogen (H) atmospheres into interplanetary space is a near-ubiquitous process in the universe that can be strongly perturbed by charge exchange coupling with ambient ions, influencing atmospheric evolution as well as the dissipation of plasma energy. Space-based observation of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation scattered by H atoms is a powerful means to infer the underlying exospheric density distribution and thus unravel the competing effects of thermal and non-thermal processes on H energization and escape. Numerous past and present NASA missions have obtained measurements of terrestrial H emission at 121.6 nm (Lyman alpha) from earth-orbiting satellite platforms. However, their separate targeting of either the optically thick emission in the lower exosphere or the optically thin emission in the outer exosphere, together with their lack of independent measurement of the interplanetary emission that constitutes a significant background contamination, renders such data insufficient to advance exospheric science beyond current understanding. Here, we describe a new nano-satellite mission concept for exospheric H investigation that overcomes these historical measurement limitations. The mission, known as the Tomographic Hydrogen Emission Observatory (THEO), is designed to provide 3-D photometric measurements of terrestrial H Lyman alpha emission from a highly autonomous, three-axis-stabilized, 6U CubeSat platform along a trans-lunar trajectory that is ideal for the unambiguous estimation of H density from the exobase to the magnetopause and beyond. In particular, we will describe the feasibility of meeting operational challenges associated with satellite navigation and communication at such large distances.

  5. Error Estimates for Emission Lines in the Hydrogen and Helium Isosequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. K.; Brickhouse, N. S.

    2000-05-01

    Emission lines from hydrogen and helium isosequence are among the strongest in X-ray spectra; they will soon be used to measure the temperature, density, and equilibrium state of collisionally excited, astrophysical plasmas. We have created a new plasma code, APEC, which calculates the emission from such a plasma. APEC calculates the line emission from the direct electron and proton excitation rate and the radiative and dielectronic recombination rate. We show how different collisional plasma codes give varying emissivities for some strong lines of O VII and Fe XXVI, where direct excitation is the primary effect. This variation is partly due to simple differences in the plasma code. However, the primary reason is that much work remains to be done on experimental and theoretical calculations of the atomic rates. Large (~ 50%) differences exist even for excitation rates for hydrogenic ions.

  6. Reduction of gaseous pollutant emissions from gas turbine combustors using hydrogen-enriched jet fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress in an evaluation of the applicability of the hydrogen enrichment concept to achieve ultralow gaseous pollutant emission from gas turbine combustion systems is described. The target emission indexes for the program are 1.0 for oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide, and 0.5 for unburned hydrocarbons. The basic concept utilizes premixed molecular hydrogen, conventional jet fuel, and air to depress the lean flammability limit of the mixed fuel. This is shown to permit very lean combustion with its low NOx production while simulataneously providing an increased flame stability margin with which to maintain low CO and HC emission. Experimental emission characteristics and selected analytical results are presented for a cylindrical research combustor designed for operation with inlet-air state conditions typical for a 30:1 compression ratio, high bypass ratio, turbofan commercial engine.

  7. Effect of hydrogen injection stability and emissions of an experimental premixed prevaporized propane burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen in quantities up to 5 percent by weight of the total fuel flow was injected into a premixed propane burner. The hydrogen was either premixed with the propane and air upstream of the burner or introduced as a torch at the flameholder. Emissions of total nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbon are reported as are combustion efficiencies and lean blowout limits. To maintain at least 99 percent combustion efficiency at a 700 K inlet mixture temperature with no hydrogen added, it was necessary to burn with a propane equivalence ratio of 0.525. When 4 percent hydrogen was premixed with the propane and air, a combustion efficiency greater than 99 percent was recorded at a propane equivalence ratio of 0.425. The total nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions corresponding to these two conditions were 0.8 g NO2/kg equivalent propane and 0.44 g NO2/kg equivalent propane, respectively. The hydrogen torch did not reduce NOx emissions.

  8. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  9. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  10. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  11. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  12. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  13. Emissions and Total Energy Consumption of a Multicylinder Piston Engine Running on Gasoline and a Hydrogen-gasoline Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    A multicylinder reciprocating engine was used to extend the efficient lean operating range of gasoline by adding hydrogen. Both bottled hydrogen and hydrogen produced by a research methanol steam reformer were used. These results were compared with results for all gasoline. A high-compression-ratio, displacement production engine was used. Apparent flame speed was used to describe the differences in emissions and performance. Therefore, engine emissions and performance, including apparent flame speed and energy lost to the cooling system and the exhaust gas, were measured over a range of equivalence ratios for each fuel. All emission levels decreased at the leaner conditions. Adding hydrogen significantly increased flame speed over all equivalence ratios.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide and nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions from broiler houses in the Southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions from two mechanically ventilated commercial broiler houses located in the Southeastern United States were continuously monitored over 12 flocks during the one-year period of 2006-2007 as a joint effort between Iowa State University a...

  15. Impact of Increased Use of Hydrogen on Petroleum Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, The

    EIA Publications

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Byron L. Dorgan for an analysis of the impacts on U.S. energy import dependence and emission reductions resulting from the commercialization of advanced hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in the transportation and distributed generation markets.

  16. Ultraviolet-pumped infrared fluorescent molecular hydrogen emission in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1986-01-01

    Strong molecular hydrogen emission at 2.41 microns has been observed in three out of six reflection nebulae surveyed. A spectrum of one nebula, Parsamyan 18, shows several H2 lines whose intensity ratios have values agreeing with those predicted if the excitation is due to UV-pumped fluoresence and disagreeing with those predicted for shock and X-ray excitations.

  17. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter emissions from California high-rise layer houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.-J.; Cortus, E. L.; Zhang, R.; Jiang, S.; Heber, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are hazardous substances that are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through community right-to-know legislation (EPCRA, EPA, 2011). The emissions of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide from large commercial layer facilities are of concern to legislators and nearby neighbors. Particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5) released from layer houses are two of seven criteria pollutants for which EPA has set National Ambient Air Quality Standards as required by the Clean Air Act. Therefore, it is important to quantify the baseline emissions of these pollutants. The emissions of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and PM from two California high-rise layer houses were monitored for two years from October 2007 to October 2009. Each house had 32,500 caged laying hens. The monitoring site was setup in compliance with a U.S. EPA-approved quality assurance project plan. The results showed the average daily mean emission rates of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide were 0.95 ± 0.67 (standard deviation) g d -1 bird -1, 1.27 ± 0.78 mg d -1 bird -1 and 91.4 ± 16.5 g d -1 bird -1, respectively. The average daily mean emission rates of PM 2.5, PM 10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) were 5.9 ± 12.6, 33.4 ± 27.4, and 78.0 ± 42.7 mg d -1 bird -1, respectively. It was observed that ammonia emission rates in summer were lower than in winter because the high airflow stabilized the manure by drying it. The reductions due to lower moisture content were greater than the increases due to higher temperature. However, PM 10 emission rates in summer were higher than in winter because the drier conditions coupled with higher internal air velocities increased PM 10 release from feathers, feed and manure.

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions.

    PubMed

    Parigger, Christian G; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10(17) cm(-3) for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 micros after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the Delta nu = +2 progression of the C(2) Swan system are discernable in the H(beta) and H(gamma) plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH(4) flow pressures of 2.7x10(5) Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10(5) Pa (80 psig). PMID:19122690

  19. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parigger, Christian G.; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 {mu}s after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the {delta}{nu}=+2 progression of the C2 Swan system are discernable in the H{beta} and H{gamma} plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH4 flow pressures of 2.7x10{sup 5} Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10{sup 5} Pa (80 psig)

  20. Tracing Ram-pressure Stripping with Warm Molecular Hydrogen Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rieke, George H.

    2014-12-01

    We use the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph to study four infalling cluster galaxies with signatures of ongoing ram-pressure stripping. H2 emission is detected in all four, and two show extraplanar H2 emission. The emission usually has a warm (T ~ 115-160 K) and a hot (T ~ 400-600 K) component that is approximately two orders of magnitude less massive than the warm one. The warm component column densities are typically 1019 to 1020 cm-2 with masses of 106 to 108 M ⊙. The warm H2 is anomalously bright compared with normal star-forming galaxies and therefore may be excited by ram-pressure. In the case of CGCG 97-073, the H2 is offset from the majority of star formation along the direction of the galaxy's motion in the cluster, suggesting that it is forming in the ram-pressure wake of the galaxy. Another galaxy, NGC 4522, exhibits a warm H2 tail approximately 4 kpc in length. These results support the hypothesis that H2 within these galaxies is shock-heated from the interaction with the intracluster medium. Stripping of dust is also a common feature of the galaxies. For NGC 4522, where the distribution of dust at 8 μm is well resolved, knots and ripples demonstrate the turbulent nature of the stripping process. The Hα and 24 μm luminosities show that most of the galaxies have star-formation rates comparable to similar mass counterparts in the field. Finally, we suggest a possible evolutionary sequence primarily related to the strength of ram-pressure that a galaxy experiences to explain the varied results observed in our sample.

  1. Tracing ram-pressure stripping with warm molecular hydrogen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rieke, George H.

    2014-12-01

    We use the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph to study four infalling cluster galaxies with signatures of ongoing ram-pressure stripping. H{sub 2} emission is detected in all four, and two show extraplanar H{sub 2} emission. The emission usually has a warm (T ∼ 115-160 K) and a hot (T ∼ 400-600 K) component that is approximately two orders of magnitude less massive than the warm one. The warm component column densities are typically 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} with masses of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. The warm H{sub 2} is anomalously bright compared with normal star-forming galaxies and therefore may be excited by ram-pressure. In the case of CGCG 97-073, the H{sub 2} is offset from the majority of star formation along the direction of the galaxy's motion in the cluster, suggesting that it is forming in the ram-pressure wake of the galaxy. Another galaxy, NGC 4522, exhibits a warm H{sub 2} tail approximately 4 kpc in length. These results support the hypothesis that H{sub 2} within these galaxies is shock-heated from the interaction with the intracluster medium. Stripping of dust is also a common feature of the galaxies. For NGC 4522, where the distribution of dust at 8 μm is well resolved, knots and ripples demonstrate the turbulent nature of the stripping process. The Hα and 24 μm luminosities show that most of the galaxies have star-formation rates comparable to similar mass counterparts in the field. Finally, we suggest a possible evolutionary sequence primarily related to the strength of ram-pressure that a galaxy experiences to explain the varied results observed in our sample.

  2. Hydrogen alpha laser ablation plasma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Parigger, C G; Surmick, D M; Gautam, G; El Sherbini, A M

    2015-08-01

    Spectral measurements of the H(α) Balmer series line and the continuum radiation are applied to draw inferences of electron density, temperature, and the level of self-absorption in laser ablation of a solid ice target in ambient air. Electron densities of 17 to 3.2×10(24) m(-3) are determined from absolute calibrated emission coefficients for time delays of 100-650 ns after generation of laser plasma using Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation. The corresponding temperatures of 4.5-0.95 eV were evaluated from the absolute spectral radiance of the continuum at the longer wavelengths. The redshifted, Stark-broadened hydrogen alpha line emerges from the continuum radiation after a time delay of 300 ns. The electron densities inferred from power law formulas agree with the values obtained from the plasma emission coefficients. PMID:26258326

  3. Voyager measurements of hydrogen Lyman-α diffuse emission from the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lallement, Rosine; Quémerais, Eric; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Sandel, Bill R; Izmodenov, Vlad

    2011-12-23

    Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha (Lyα) emission from galaxies is currently measured and used in cosmology as an indicator of star formation. Until now, the Milky Way emission has not been detected, owing to far brighter local sources, including the H (hydrogen) glow, i.e., solar Lyα radiation backscattered by interstellar atoms that flow within the solar system. Because observations from the Voyager spacecraft, now leaving the heliosphere, are decreasingly affected by the H glow, the ultraviolet spectrographs are detecting Lyα diffuse emission from our Galaxy. The surface brightness toward nearby star-forming regions is about 3 to 4 rayleighs. The escape fraction of the radiation from the brightest H II regions is on the order of 3% and is highly spatially variable. These results will help in constraining models of Lyα radiation transfer in distant galaxies. PMID:22144462

  4. Voyager Measurements of Hydrogen Lyman-α Diffuse Emission from the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, Rosine; Quémerais, Eric; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Sandel, Bill R.; Izmodenov, Vlad

    2011-12-01

    Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha (Lyα) emission from galaxies is currently measured and used in cosmology as an indicator of star formation. Until now, the Milky Way emission has not been detected, owing to far brighter local sources, including the H (hydrogen) glow, i.e., solar Lyα radiation backscattered by interstellar atoms that flow within the solar system. Because observations from the Voyager spacecraft, now leaving the heliosphere, are decreasingly affected by the H glow, the ultraviolet spectrographs are detecting Lyα diffuse emission from our Galaxy. The surface brightness toward nearby star-forming regions is about 3 to 4 rayleighs. The escape fraction of the radiation from the brightest H II regions is on the order of 3% and is highly spatially variable. These results will help in constraining models of Lyα radiation transfer in distant galaxies.

  5. Optical emission spectroscopy for simultaneous measurement of plasma electron density and temperature in a low-pressure microwave induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Konjevic, N.; Jovicevic, S.; Ivkovic, M.

    2009-10-15

    The simple optical emission spectroscopy technique for diagnostics of low pressure microwave induced plasma (MIP) in hydrogen or in MIP seeded with hydrogen is described and tested. This technique uses the Boltzmann plot of relative line intensities along Balmer spectral series in conjunction with the criterion for partial local thermodynamic equilibrium for low electron density (N{sub e}) plasma diagnostics. The proposed technique is tested in a low pressure MIP discharge for simultaneous determination of electron density N{sub e} (10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and temperature T{sub e}.

  6. Emissions of hydrogen cyanide from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Samar G.; Leithead, Amy; Li, Shao-Meng; Chan, Tak W.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Stroud, Craig; Zhang, Junhua; Lee, Patrick; Lu, Gang; Brook, Jeffery R.; Hayden, Katherine; Narayan, Julie; Liggio, John

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is considered a marker for biomass burning emissions and is a component of vehicle exhaust. Despite its potential health impacts, vehicular HCN emissions estimates and their contribution to regional budgets are highly uncertain. In the current study, Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) was used to measure HCN emission factors from the exhaust of individual diesel, biodiesel and gasoline vehicles. Laboratory emissions data as a function of fuel type and driving mode were combined with ambient measurement data and model predictions. The results indicate that gasoline vehicles have the highest emissions of HCN (relative to diesel fuel) and that biodiesel fuel has the potential to significantly reduce HCN emissions even at realistic 5% blend levels. The data further demonstrate that gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines emit more HCN than their port fuel injection (PFI) counterparts, suggesting that the expected full transition of vehicle fleets to GDI will increase HCN emissions. Ambient measurements of HCN in a traffic dominated area of Toronto, Canada were strongly correlated to vehicle emission markers and consistent with regional air quality model predictions of ambient air HCN, indicating that vehicle emissions of HCN are the dominant source of exposure in urban areas. The results further indicate that additional work is required to quantify HCN emissions from the modern vehicle fleet, particularly in light of continuously changing engine, fuel and after-treatment technologies.

  7. Stratospheric cooling and polar ozone loss due to H2 emissions of a global hydrogen economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feck, T.; Grooß, J.-U.; Riese, M.; Vogel, B.

    2009-04-01

    "Green" hydrogen is seen as a major element of the future energy supply to reduce greenhouse gas emissions substantially. However, due to the possible interactions of hydrogen (H2) with other atmospheric constituents there is a need to analyse the implications of additional atmospheric H2 that could result from hydrogen leakage of a global hydrogen infrastructure. Emissions of molecular H2 can occur along the whole hydrogen process chain which increase the tropospheric H2 burden. Across the tropical tropopause H2 reaches the stratosphere where it is oxidised and forms water vapour (H2O). This causes increased IR-emissions into space and hence a cooling of the stratosphere. Both effects, the increase of stratospheric H2O and the cooling, enhances the potential of chlorine activation on liquid sulfate aerosol and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which increase polar ozone destruction. Hence a global hydrogen economy could provoke polar ozone loss and could lead to a substantial delay of the current projected recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. Our investigations show that even if 90% of the current global fossil primary energy input could be replaced by hydrogen and approximately 9.5% of the product gas would leak to the atmosphere, the ozone loss would be increased between 15 to 26 Dobson Units (DU) if the stratospheric CFC loading would retain unchanged. A consistency check of the used approximation methods with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) shows that this additional ozone loss can probably be treated as an upper limit. Towards more realistic future H2 leakage rate assumptions (< 3%) the additional ozone loss would be rather small (? 10 DU). However, in all cases the full damage would only occur if stratospheric CFC-levels would retain unchanged. Due to the CFC-prohibition as a result of the Montreal Protocol the forecasts suggest a decline of the stratospheric CFC loading about 50% until 2050. In this case our calculations

  8. Hydrogen production and delivery analysis in US markets : cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions.

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, M.; Gillette, J.; Elgowainy, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen production cost conclusions are: (1) Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) is the least-cost production option at current natural gas prices and for initial hydrogen vehicle penetration rates, at high production rates, SMR may not be the least-cost option; (2) Unlike coal and nuclear technologies, the cost of natural gas feedstock is the largest contributor to SMR production cost; (3) Coal- and nuclear-based hydrogen production have significant penalties at small production rates (and benefits at large rates); (4) Nuclear production of hydrogen is likely to have large economies of scale, but because fixed O&M costs are uncertain, the magnitude of these effects may be understated; and (5) Given H2A default assumptions for fuel prices, process efficiencies and labor costs, nuclear-based hydrogen is likely to be more expensive to produce than coal-based hydrogen. Carbon taxes and caps can narrow the gap. Hydrogen delivery cost conclusions are: (1) For smaller urban markets, compressed gas delivery appears most economic, although cost inputs for high-pressure gas trucks are uncertain; (2) For larger urban markets, pipeline delivery is least costly; (3) Distance from hydrogen production plant to city gate may change relative costs (all results shown assume 100 km); (4) Pipeline costs may be reduced with system 'rationalization', primarily reductions in service pipeline mileage; and (5) Liquefier and pipeline capital costs are a hurdle, particularly at small market sizes. Some energy and greenhouse gas Observations: (1) Energy use (per kg of H2) declines slightly with increasing production or delivery rate for most components (unless energy efficiency varies appreciably with scale, e.g., liquefaction); (2) Energy use is a strong function of production technology and delivery mode; (3) GHG emissions reflect the energy efficiency and carbon content of each component in a production-delivery pathway; (4) Coal and natural gas production pathways have high energy consumption

  9. Micro-Mixing Lean-Premix System for Ultra-Low Emission Hydrogen/Syngas Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Erlendur Steinthorsson; Brian Hollon; Adel Mansour

    2010-06-30

    The focus of this project was to develop the next generation of fuel injection technologies for environmentally friendly, hydrogen syngas combustion in gas turbine engines that satisfy DOE's objectives of reducing NOx emissions to 3 ppm. Building on Parker Hannifin's proven Macrolamination technology for liquid fuels, Parker developed a scalable high-performing multi-point injector that utilizes multiple, small mixing cups in place of a single conventional large-scale premixer. Due to the small size, fuel and air mix rapidly within the cups, providing a well-premixed fuel-air mixture at the cup exit in a short time. Detailed studies and experimentation with single-cup micro-mixing injectors were conducted to elucidate the effects of various injector design attributes and operating conditions on combustion efficiency, lean stability and emissions and strategies were developed to mitigate the impact of flashback. In the final phase of the program, a full-scale 1.3-MWth multi-cup injector was built and tested at pressures from 6.9bar (100psi) to 12.4bar (180psi) and flame temperatures up to 2000K (3150 F) using mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas as fuel with nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The injector operated without flash back on fuel mixtures ranging from 100% natural gas to 100% hydrogen and emissions were shown to be insensitive to combustor pressure. NOx emissions of 3-ppm were achieved at a flame temperature of 1750K (2690 F) when operating on a fuel mixture containing 50% hydrogen and 50% natural gas by volume with 40% nitrogen dilution and 1.5-ppm NOx was achieved at a flame temperature of 1680K (2564 F) using only 10% nitrogen dilution. NOx emissions of 3.5-ppm were demonstrated at a flame temperature of 1730K (2650 F) with only 10% carbon dioxide dilution. Finally, 3.6-ppm NOx emissions were demonstrated at a flame temperature over 1600K (2420 F) when operating on 100% hydrogen fuel with 30% carbon dioxide dilution. Superior operability was

  10. New Insights into White-Light Flare Emission from Radiative-Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Chromospheric Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, S. L.; Carlsson, M.; Allred, J. C.; Uitenbroek, H.; Osten, R. A.; Holman, G.

    2015-12-01

    The heating mechanism at high densities during M-dwarf flares is poorly understood. Spectra of M-dwarf flares in the optical and near-ultraviolet wavelength regimes have revealed three continuum components during the impulsive phase: 1) an energetically dominant blackbody component with a color temperature of T≈104 K in the blue-optical, 2) a smaller amount of Balmer continuum emission in the near-ultraviolet at λ≤3 646 Å, and 3) an apparent pseudo-continuum of blended high-order Balmer lines between λ=3 646 Å and λ≈3 900 Å. These properties are not reproduced by models that employ a typical "solar-type" flare heating level of ≤ 10^{11} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} in nonthermal electrons, and therefore our understanding of these spectra is limited to a phenomenological three-component interpretation. We present a new 1D radiative-hydrodynamic model of an M-dwarf flare from precipitating nonthermal electrons with a high energy flux of 10^{13} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. The simulation produces bright near-ultraviolet and optical continuum emission from a dense (n>10^{15} cm^{-3}), hot (T ≈12 000 - 13 500 K) chromospheric condensation. For the first time, the observed color temperature and Balmer jump ratio are produced self-consistently in a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model. We find that a T≈104 K blackbody-like continuum component and a low Balmer jump ratio result from optically thick Balmer (∞→ n=2) and Paschen recombination (∞→ n=3) radiation, and thus the properties of the flux spectrum are caused by blue (λ≈4 300 Å) light escaping over a larger physical depth range than by red (λ≈6 700 Å) and near-ultraviolet (λ≈3 500 Å) light. To model the near-ultraviolet pseudo-continuum previously attributed to overlapping Balmer lines, we include the extra Balmer continuum opacity from Landau-Zener transitions that result from merged, high-order energy levels of hydrogen in a dense, partially ionized atmosphere. This reveals a new diagnostic of

  11. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  12. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, D. R.; Kim, H. S.; Saykally, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  13. Hydrogen production rates from ground-based Fabry-Perot observations of comet Kohoutek

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherb, F.

    1981-01-01

    The only ground-based observations of a cometary hydrogen corona that have been obtained up to the present were carried out during the appearance of comet Kohoutek (1973 XII). Hydrogen Balmer alpha (H-alpha) emission from the gas cloud surrounding the comet was detected using a Fabry-Perot spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory. These observations have been reexamined using (1) recently obtained solar full-disk Lyman beta emission line profiles, (2) a new calibration of the absolute sensitivity of the Fabry-Perot spectrometer based on comparison of NGC 7000 with standard stars and the planetary nebula NGC 7662, and (3) corrections for atmospheric extinction instead of the geocoronal H-alpha comparison method used previously to obtain comet H-alpha intensities. The new values for hydrogen production rates are in good agreement with results obtained from Lyman alpha observations of comet Kohoutek.

  14. Mid Infrared Hydrogen Recombination Line Emission from the Maser Star MWC 349A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Strelnitski, V.; Miles, J. W.; Kelly, D. M.; Lacy, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected and spectrally resolved the mid-IR hydrogen recombination lines H6(alpha)(12.372 micrometers), H7(alpha)(19.062 micrometers), H7(beta)(l1.309 micrometers) and H8(gamma)(12.385 micrometers) from the star MWC349A. This object has strong hydrogen maser emission (reported in the millimeter and submillimeter hydrogen recombination lines from H36(alpha) to H21(alpha)) and laser emission (reported in the H15(alpha), H12(alpha) and H10(alpha) lines). The lasers/masers are thought to arise predominantly in a Keplerian disk around the star. The mid-IR lines do not show evident signs of lasing, and can be well modeled as arising from the strong stellar wind, with a component arising from a quasi-static atmosphere around the disk, similar to what is hypothesized for the near IR (less than or equal to 4 micrometers) recombination lines. Since populations inversions in the levels producing these mid-IR transitions are expected at densities up to approximately 10(exp 11)/cu cm, these results imply either that the disk does not contain high-density ionized gas over long enough path lengths to produce a gain approximately 1, and/or that any laser emission from such regions is small compared to the spontaneous background emission from the rest of the source as observed with a large beam. The results reinforce the interpretation of the far-IR lines as true lasers.

  15. Hydrogen Pathways: Updated Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Ten Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsden, T.; Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

    2013-03-01

    This report describes a life-cycle assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of 10 hydrogen production, delivery, dispensing, and use pathways that were evaluated for cost, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This evaluation updates and expands on a previous assessment of seven pathways conducted in 2009. This study summarizes key results, parameters, and sensitivities to those parameters for the 10 hydrogen pathways, reporting on the levelized cost of hydrogen in 2007 U.S. dollars as well as life-cycle well-to-wheels energy use and GHG emissions associated with the pathways.

  16. Evolution of Balmer jump selected galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso Iribarren, P.; Infante, L.; Padilla, N.; Lacerna, I.; Garcia, S.; Orsi, A.; Muñoz Arancibia, A.; Moustakas, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Moles, M.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Martínez, V. J.; Cerviño, M.; Alfaro, E. J.; Ascaso, B.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; Nieves-Seoane, L.; Benítez, N.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Samples of star-forming galaxies at different redshifts have been traditionally selected via color techniques. The ALHAMBRA survey was designed to perform a uniform cosmic tomography of the Universe, and we here exploit it to trace the evolution of these galaxies. Aims: Our objective is to use the homogeneous optical coverage of the ALHAMBRA filter system to select samples of star-forming galaxies at different epochs of the Universe and study their properties. Methods: We present a new color-selection technique, based on the models of spectral evolution convolved with the ALHAMBRA bands and the redshifted position of the Balmer jump to select star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 Balmer-jump Galaxies (BJGs). We applied the iSEDfit Bayesian approach to fit each detailed spectral energy distribution and determined star-formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, age, and absolute magnitudes. The mass of the halos in which these samples reside were found through a clustering analysis. Results: Five volume-limited BJG subsamples with different mean redshifts are found to reside in halos of median masses ~1012.5 ± 0.2 M⊙ slightly increasing toward z = 0.5. This increment is similar to numerical simulations results, which suggests that we trace the evolution of an evolving population of halos as they grow to reach a mass of ~1012.7 ± 0.1 at z = 0.5. The likely progenitors of our samples at z ~ 3 are Lyman-break galaxies, which at z ~ 2 would evolve into star-forming BzK galaxies, and their descendants in the local Universe are galaxies with luminosities of 1-3 L∗. Hence, this allows us to follow the putative evolution of the SFR, stellar mass, and age of these galaxies. Conclusions: From z ~ 1.0 to z ~ 0.5, the stellar mass of the volume-limited BJG samples changes almost not at all with redshift, suggesting that major mergers play a minor role in the evolution of these galaxies. The SFR evolution accounts for the small

  17. Emissions of molecular hydrogen (H2) and its isotopic signature from residential heaters and waste incinerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S. W.; Roeckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric molecular hydrogen (H2) has recently received increased interest in the scientific community because of a potential shift to a global hydrogen energy economy which could potentially alter the atmospheric budget of H2 due to substantial leakage. This calls for an improved understanding of the present day's atmospheric H2 budget. One of the major sources of H2 are emissions from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel. While emissions of H2 from car exhaust have been studied extensively, those from fossil fuel based heating systems have remained a matter of speculation. Here we present results from measurements of a variety of residential heating systems covering oil, gas, and wood heating with various burner capacities. For oil and gas heating systems we surprisingly find no net H2 emissions, i.e. the exhaust air contains H2 at or below the mole fractions of the intake air (approx. 0.5 ppm). While H2 emissions are virtually absent, those of carbon monoxide (CO) are not. As a consequence, caution has to be exercised when modeling H2 emissions based on assumed H2/CO ratios and using CO emission inventories. We also find that the molecular hydrogen in the approx. 0.5 ppm exhaust air is isotopically strongly depleted (-20 permil to -200 permil) compared to the ambient air (+130 permil). This suggests that H2 is involved in the combustion processes, and therefore the H2 of the intake air is not the same H2 in the exhaust air. Exhausts from waste incinerator plants are generally also depleted in H2 mole fractions and in their H/D isotopic composition.

  18. Infrared emission from hydrogenated amorphous carbon and amorphous carbon grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duley, W. W.; Jones, A. P.; Taylor, S. D.; Williams, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The correlations deduced by Boulanger et al. (1990) from IRAS maps of the Chamaeleon, Taurus and Ursa Major molecular cloud complexes are interpreted in terms of the evolutionary hydrogenated amorphous carbon model of interstellar dust. In particular, regions of relatively strong 12-micron emission may be regions where recently accreted carbon is being converted by ambient UV to small PAHs in situ. Regions of weak 12-micron emission are probably quiescent regions where carbon has been annealed to amorphous carbon. Observational consequences of these inferences are briefly described.

  19. An interpretation of Mariner 10 helium /584 A/ and hydrogen /1216 A/ interplanetary emission observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the interplanetary emissions of both He(584 A) and H(1216 A) on January 28, 1974, a time of solar minimum, are reported and discussed. An analysis of the Mariner 10 ultraviolet spectrometer data shows that a simultaneous measurement of both emissions results in a self-consistent determination of the physical properties of the interstellar wind. With the aid of a model the number densities of helium and hydrogen outside the solar system were found to be 0.008 + or - 0.003/cu cm and 0.04 (+0.03, -0.02)/cu cm, respectively, which indicates a He/H ratio of 0.20 (+0.30, -0.13). Values characterizing the helium cone, interstellar wind temperature, effective lifetime of hydrogen atoms in the solar system, and downstream direction of the interstellar wind are presented.

  20. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus draws attention at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In front of the Headquarters Building at KSC, Center Director Roy Bridges (left) looks at the hydrogen-oxygen driven engine powering a Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by- product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. Available for viewing by employees, the ZE bus is also being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex Oct. 26-27.

  1. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus draws attention at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC employees, along with Center Director Roy Bridges (second from left), view the hydrogen-oxygen driven engine powering a Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. Available for viewing by employees, the ZE bus is also being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex Oct. 26-27.

  2. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by VUV-emission of filament driven hydrogen arc discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-08

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H{sup −} ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  3. Europa - Ultraviolet emissions and the possibility of atomic oxygen and hydrogen clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, F.-M.; Judge, D. L.; Carlson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Emission signals from Europa with wavelength below 800 A were detected by the Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer. In the present paper, improved procedures for data reduction are used to determine the spatial region as well as the intensity of the suggested emission sources. The observations indicate a cloud with a radius of about 1.5 Jupiter radii and an apparent brightness of approximately 10 rayleighs for a wavelength of 500 A. It is argued that neutral oxygen atoms, along with neutral hydrogen, are produced through dissociation of water ice on the surface of Europa by particle impact. Electron impact ionization excitation of oxygen atoms in the resulting cloud then gives rise to the observed emission. The present source brightness and cloud radius results are used to estimate an oxygen column density of the order of 10 trillion per sq cm, while the density of atomic hydrogen is at most 100 billion per sq cm and 1 trillion per sq cm for molecular hydrogen.

  4. Emission of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from the Martian subsolar magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.-D.; Alho, M.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have simulated the hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the subsolar magnetosheath of Mars using a hybrid model of the proton plasma charge exchanging with the Martian exosphere to study statistical features revealed from the observations of the Neutral Particle Detectors on Mars Express. The simulations reproduce well the observed enhancement of the hydrogen ENA emissions from the dayside magnetosheath in directions perpendicular to the Sun-Mars line. Our results show that the neutralized protons from the shocked solar wind are the dominant ENA population rather than those originating from the pickup planetary ions. The simulation also suggests that the observed stronger ENA emissions in the direction opposite to the solar wind convective electric field result from a stronger proton flux in the same direction at the lower magnetosheath; i.e., the proton fluxes in the magnetosheath are not cylindrically symmetric. We also confirm the observed increasing of the ENA fluxes with the solar wind dynamical pressure in the simulations. This feature is associated with a low altitude of the induced magnetic boundary when the dynamic pressure is high and the magnetosheath protons can reach to a denser exosphere, and thus, the charge exchange rate becomes higher. Overall, the analysis suggests that kinetic effects play an important and pronounced role in the morphology of the hydrogen ENA distribution and the plasma environment at Mars, in general.

  5. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  6. An intensity map of hydrogen 21-cm emission at redshift z approximately 0.8.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Bandura, Kevin; Peterson, Jeffrey B

    2010-07-22

    Observations of 21-cm radio emission by neutral hydrogen at redshifts z approximately 0.5 to approximately 2.5 are expected to provide a sensitive probe of cosmic dark energy. This is particularly true around the onset of acceleration at z approximately 1, where traditional optical cosmology becomes very difficult because of the infrared opacity of the atmosphere. Hitherto, 21-cm emission has been detected only to z = 0.24. More distant galaxies generally are too faint for individual detections but it is possible to measure the aggregate emission from many unresolved galaxies in the 'cosmic web'. Here we report a three-dimensional 21-cm intensity field at z = 0.53 to 1.12. We then co-add neutral-hydrogen (H i) emission from the volumes surrounding about 10,000 galaxies (from the DEEP2 optical galaxy redshift survey). We detect the aggregate 21-cm glow at a significance of approximately 4sigma. PMID:20651685

  7. Effect of primary-zone equivalence ratio and hydrogen addition on exhaust emission in a hydrocarbon-fueled combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of reducing the primary-zone equivalence ratio on the exhaust emission levels of oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbons in experimental hydrocarbon-fueled combustor segments at simulated supersonic cruise and idle conditions were investigated. In addition, the effects of the injection of hydrogen fuel (up to 4 percent of the total weight of fuel) on the stability of the hydrocarbon flame and exhaust emissions were studied and compared with results obtained without hydrogen addition.

  8. Emissions of oxides of nitrogen from an experimental premixed-hydrogen burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1976-01-01

    Flame-tube experiments using premixed hydrogen and air were conducted to determine the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) resulting from ultralean combustion. Measurements of NOx emissions and combustion efficiency were made for inlet mixture temperatures of 600 and 700 K, pressures of 3.8 x 10 to the 5th power and 5.2 x 10 to the 5th power N/m squared, reference velocities of 15 to 18 m/sec, and equivalence ratios of 0.2 to 0.4. At the 700 K inlet mixture temperature, NOx emissions were 0.06 ppmv, and combustion efficiency was 98 percent at an equivalence ratio of 0.24. The use of a high-blockage (92-percent blockage) flameholder made it possible to conduct tests without upstream burning in the premixing duct for mixtures with equivalence ratios less than 0.4. For richer mixtures upstream burning did occur and prevented further testing.

  9. Global emissions of hydrogen chloride and chloromethane from coal combustion, incineration and industrial activities: Reactive Chlorine Emissions Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Archie; Aucott, Michael L.; Benkovitz, Carmen M.; Graedel, Thomas E.; Kleiman, Gary; Midgley, Pauline M.; Li, Yi-Fan

    1999-04-01

    Much if not all of the chlorine present in fossil fuels is released into the atmosphere as hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chloromethane (CH3Cl, methyl chloride). The chlorine content of oil-based fuels is so low that these sources can be neglected, but coal combustion provides significant releases. On the basis of national statistics for the quantity and quality of coal burned during 1990 in power and heat generation, industrial conversion and residential and commercial heating, coupled with information on the chlorine contents of coals, a global inventory of national HCl emissions from this source has been constructed. This was combined with an estimate of the national emissions of HCl from waste combustion (both large-scale incineration and trash burning) which was based on an estimate of the global quantity released from this source expressed per head of population. Account was taken of reduced emissions where flue gases were processed, for example to remove sulphur dioxide. The HCl emitted in 1990, comprising 4.6 ± 4.3 Tg Cl from fossil fuel and 2 ± 1.9 Tg Cl from waste burning, was spatially distributed using available information on point sources such as power generation utilities and population density by default. Also associated with these combustion sources are chloromethane emissions, calculated to be 0.075 ± 0.07 Tg as Cl (equivalent) from fossil fuels and 0.032 ± 0.023 Tg Cl (equivalent) from waste combustion. These were distributed spatially exactly as the HCl emissions, and a further 0.007 Tg Cl in chloromethane from industrial process activity was distributed by point sources.

  10. Effect of fuel nitrogen and hydrogen content on emissions in hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Wolfbrandt, G.

    1981-01-01

    How the emissions of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide are affected by: (1) the decreased hydrogen content and (2) the increased organic nitrogen content of coal derived fuels is investigated. Previous CRT experimental work in a two stage flame tube has shown the effectiveness of rich lean two stage combustion in reducing fuel nitrogen conversion to nitrogen oxides. Previous theoretical work gave preliminary indications that emissions trends from the flame tube experiment could be predicted by a two stage, well stirred reactor combustor model using a detailed chemical mechanism for propane oxidation and nitrogen oxide formation. Additional computations are reported and comparisons with experimental results for two additional fuels and a wide range of operating conditions are given. Fuels used in the modeling are pure propane, a propane toluene mixture and pure toluene. These give hydrogen contents 18, 11 and 9 percent by weight, respectively. Fuel bound nitrogen contents of 0.5 and 1.0 percent were used. Results are presented for oxides of nitrogen and also carbon monoxide concentrations as a function of primary equivalence ratio, hydrogen content and fuel bound nitrogen content.

  11. The Effect of Converting to a U.S. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Fleet on Emissions and Energy Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, W. G.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Golden, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    This study analyzes the potential change in emissions and energy use from replacing fossil-fuel based vehicles with hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. This study examines three different hydrogen production scenarios to determine their resultant emissions and energy usage: hydrogen produced via 1) steam reforming of methane, 2) coal gasification, or 3) wind electrolysis. The atmospheric model simulations require two primary sets of data: the actual emissions associated with hydrogen fuel production and use, and the corresponding reduction in emissions associated with reducing fossil fuel use. The net change in emissions is derived using 1) the U.S. EPA's National Emission Inventory (NEI) that incorporates several hundred categories of on-road vehicles and 2) a Process Chain Analysis (PCA) for the different hydrogen production scenarios. NEI: The quantity of hydrogen-related emission is ultimately a function of the projected hydrogen consumption in on-road vehicles. Data for hydrogen consumption from on-road vehicles was derived from the number of miles driven in each U.S. county based on 1999 NEI data, the average fleet mileage of all on-road vehicles, the average gasoline vehicle efficiency, and the efficiency of advanced 2004 fuel cell vehicles. PCA: PCA involves energy and mass balance calculations around the fuel extraction, production, transport, storage, and delivery processes. PCA was used to examine three different hydrogen production scenarios: In the first scenario, hydrogen is derived from natural gas, which is extracted from gas fields, stored, chemically processed, and transmitted through pipelines to distributed fuel processing units. The fuel processing units, situated in similar locations as gasoline refueling stations, convert natural gas to hydrogen via a combination of steam reforming and fuel oxidation. Purified hydrogen is compressed for use onboard fuel cell vehicles. In the second scenario, hydrogen is derived from coal, which is extracted from

  12. White-light emission from solid carbon in aqueous solution during hydrogen generation induced by nanosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Shota; Maeda, Kosuke

    2016-07-01

    We previously discovered a novel method of hydrogen generation from high-grade charcoal in an aqueous solution using nanosecond laser pulse irradiation. In this paper, white-light emission during this reaction is reported: A broad spectrum over the visible range is observed above a threshold excitation energy density. The white-light emission is a simultaneous product of the hydrogen generation reaction and is attributed to blackbody radiation in accordance with Planck's Law at a temperature above 3800 K. Consequently, we propose that hydrogen generation induced by laser irradiation proceeds similarly to classical coal gasification, which features reactions at high pressure and high temperature.

  13. Star formation activity in Balmer break galaxies at z< 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C.; Padilla, N.; Akiyama, M.; Fujishiro, N.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hanami, H.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present a spectroscopic study of the properties of 64 Balmer break galaxies that show signs of star formation. The studied sample of star-forming galaxies spans a redshift range from 0.094 to 1.475 with stellar masses in the range 108-1012M⊙. The sample also includes eight broad emission line galaxies with redshifts between 1.5 emission line luminosities and investigated the dependence of the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) on the stellar mass and color. Furthermore, we investigated the evolution of these relations with the redshift. Results: We found that the SFR correlates with the stellar mass; our data is consistent with previous results from other authors in that there is a break in the correlation, which reveals the presence of massive galaxies with lower SFR values (i.e., decreasing star formation). We also note an anticorrelation for the SSFR with the stellar mass. Again in this case, our data is also consistent with a break in the correlation, revealing the presence of massive star-forming galaxies with lower SSFR values, thereby increasing the anticorrelation. These results might suggest a characteristic mass (M0) at which the red sequence could mostly be assembled. In addition, at a given stellar mass, high-redshift galaxies have on average higher SFR and SSFR values than local galaxies. Finally, we explored whether a similar trend could be observed with redshift in the SSFR-(u - B) color diagram, and we hypothesize that a possible (u - B)0 break color may define a characteristic color for the formation of the red sequence.

  14. Electron emission and molecular fragmentation during hydrogen and deuterium ion impact on carbon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, A.; Schustereder, W.; Mair, C.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.; Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.

    2003-03-01

    Molecular fragmentation and electron emission during hydrogen ion impact on graphite surfaces has been investigated in the eV to keV impact energy region typical for fusion edge plasma conditions. As a target surface graphite tiles for the Tokamak experiment Tore Supra in CEA-Cadarache/France and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been used. For both surfaces studied, the experimentally observed threshold for electron emission is at about 50 eV/amu impact energy. Electron emission from the high conductivity side of the carbon tile is 15-20% less as compared to its low conductivity side, whereas results for HOPG are generally between these two cases. Deuterium and hydrogen ions are almost equally effective in liberating electrons from graphite when comparing results for the same impact velocity. Surface-induced dissociation of deuterium ions D 3+ upon impact on Tore Supra graphite tiles, in the collision energy range of 20-100 eV, produced only atomic fragment ions D +. The other possible fragment ion D 2+ could not be observed.

  15. Correlations between density distributions, optical spectra, and ion species in a hydrogen plasma (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Megía-Macías, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental study of plasma distributions in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge operated at 100 Hz repetition rate is presented. Ultrafast photography, time integrated visible light emission spectra, time resolved Balmer-alpha emission, time resolved Fulcher Band emission, ion species mass spectra, and time resolved ion species fraction measurements have been implemented as diagnostic tools in a broad range of plasma conditions. Results of plasma distributions and optical emissions correlated with H+, H2 + , and H3 + ion currents by using a Wien filter system with optical observation capability are reported. The magnetic field distribution and strength is found as the most critical factor for transitions between different plasma patterns and ion populations.

  16. Correlations between density distributions, optical spectra, and ion species in a hydrogen plasma (invited).

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2016-02-01

    An experimental study of plasma distributions in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge operated at 100 Hz repetition rate is presented. Ultrafast photography, time integrated visible light emission spectra, time resolved Balmer-alpha emission, time resolved Fulcher Band emission, ion species mass spectra, and time resolved ion species fraction measurements have been implemented as diagnostic tools in a broad range of plasma conditions. Results of plasma distributions and optical emissions correlated with H(+), H2 (+), and H3 (+) ion currents by using a Wien filter system with optical observation capability are reported. The magnetic field distribution and strength is found as the most critical factor for transitions between different plasma patterns and ion populations. PMID:26931922

  17. Combined borax and tannin treatment of stored dairy manure to reduce bacterial populations and hydrogen sulfide emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Anaerobic digestion of organic residues in stored livestock manure is associated with the production of odors and emissions. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one such emission that can reach hazardous levels during manure storage and handling, posing a risk to both farmers and livestock. New te...

  18. Measurement and modeling of hydrogen sulfide lagoon emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, Ian C; Aneja, Viney P

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions were determined from an anaerobic lagoon at a swine concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) in North Carolina. Measurements of H2S were made continuously from an anaerobic lagoon using a dynamic flow-through chamber for ∼ 1 week during each of the four seasonal periods from June 2007 through April 2008. H2S lagoon fluxes were highest in the summer with a flux of 3.81 ± 3.24 μg m(-2) min(-1) and lowest in the winter with a flux of 0.08 ± 0.09 μg m(-2) min(-1). An air-manure interface (A-MI) mass transfer model was developed to predict H2S manure emissions. The accuracy of the A-MI mass transfer model in predicting H2S manure emissions was comprehensively evaluated by comparing the model predicted emissions to the continuously measured lagoon emissions using data from all four seasonal periods. In comparison to this measurement data, the A-MI mass transfer model performed well in predicting H2S fluxes with a slope of 1.13 and an r(2) value of 0.60, and a mean bias value of 0.655 μg m(-2) min(-1). The A-MI mass transfer model also performed fairly well in predicting diurnal H2S lagoon flux trends. PMID:24387076

  19. Revealing the binary origin of Type Ic superluminous supernovae through nebular hydrogen emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Liu, Zheng-Wei; Mackey, Jonathan; Chen, Ting-Wan; Langer, Norbert

    2015-12-01

    We propose that nebular Hα emission, as detected in the Type Ic superluminous supernova iPTF13ehe, stems from matter that is stripped from a companion star when the supernova ejecta collide with it. The temporal evolution, the line broadening, and the overall blueshift of the emission are consistent with this interpretation. We scale the nebular Hα luminosity predicted for Type Ia supernovae in single-degenerate systems to derive the stripped mass required to explain the Hα luminosity of iPTF13ehe. We find a stripped mass of 0.1-0.9 solar masses, assuming that the supernova luminosity is powered by radioactivity or magnetar spin down. Because a central heating source is required to excite the Hα emission, an interaction-powered model is not favored for iPTF13ehe if the Hα emission is from stripped matter. We derive a companion mass of more than 20 solar masses and a binary separation of less than about 20 companion radii based on the stripping efficiency during the collision, indicating that the supernova progenitor and the companion formed a massive close binary system. If Type Ic superluminous supernovae generally occur in massive close binary systems, the early brightening observed previously in several Type Ic superluminous supernovae may also be due to the collision with a close companion. Observations of nebular hydrogen emission in future Type Ic superluminous supernovae will enable us to test this interpretation.

  20. Red Fluorescent Line Emission from Hydrogen Molecules in Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Spaans, Marco

    1996-01-01

    We have modeled the fluorescent pumping of electronic and vibrational emissions of molecular hydrogen (H2) within diffuse molecular clouds that are illuminated by ultraviolet continuum radiation. Fluorescent line intensities are predicted for transitions at ultraviolet, infrared, and red visible wavelengths as functions of the gas density, the visual extinction through the cloud, and the intensity of the incident UV continuum radiation. The observed intensity in each fluorescent transition is roughly proportional to the integrated rate of H2 photodissociation along the line of sight. Although the most luminous fluorescent emissions detectable from ground-based observatories lie at near-infrared wavelengths, we argue that the lower sky brightness at visible wavelengths makes the red fluorescent transitions a particularly sensitive probe. Fabry-Perot spectrographs of the type that have been designed to observe very faint diffuse Ha emissions are soon expected to yield sensitivities that will be adequate to detect H2 vibrational emissions from molecular clouds that are exposed to ultraviolet radiation no stronger than the mean radiation field within the Galaxy. Observations of red H2 fluorescent emission together with cospatial 21 cm H I observations could serve as a valuable probe of the gas density in diffuse molecular clouds.

  1. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a swine facility in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunden, Jessica

    Annual global source contributions of sulfur compounds to the natural atmospheric environment are estimated to be 142 x 106 tons. Although not quantified, volatilization from animal wastes may be an important source of gaseous reduced sulfur compounds. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a colorless gas emitted during decomposition of hog manure that produces an offensive "rotten egg" odor. Once released into the atmosphere, H 2S is oxidized and the eventual byproduct, sulfuric acid, may combine with other atmospheric constituents to form aerosol products such as ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate. In recent years, confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have increased in size, resulting in more geographically concentrated areas of animals and, subsequently, animal waste. In North Carolina and across the southeastern United States anaerobic waste treatment lagoons are traditionally used to store and treat hog excreta at commercial hog farms. Currently, no state regulations exist for H2S gaseous emissions from animal production facilities in North Carolina and the amount of H2S being emitted into the atmosphere from these potential sources is widely unknown. In response to the need for data, this research initiative has been undertaken in an effort to quantify emissions of H2S from swine CAFOs. An experimental study was conducted at a commercial swine farm in eastern North Carolina to measure hydrogen sulfide emissions from a hog housing unit utilizing a mechanical fan ventilation system and from an on-site waste storage treatment lagoon. A dynamic flow-through chamber system was employed to make lagoon flux measurements. Semi-continuous measurements were made over a one-year period (2004-2005) for a few days during each of the four predominant seasons in order to assess diurnal and temporal variability in emissions. Fan rpm from the barn was continuously measured and flow rates were calculated in order to accurately assess gaseous emissions from the system

  2. Investigation of SRS conversion of XeCl laser emission in lead vapor, methane, and hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Mel'chenko, S.V.; Panchenko, A.N.; Tarasenko, V.F.; Evtushenko, G.S. )

    1994-01-01

    The rapid advances in the development of electric-discharge exciplex lasers and powerful effective sources of UV coherent radiation have uncovered far-reaching prospects for their practical use in various fields of sciences and engineering, such as microelectronics, medicine, ecology (remote detection of contamination in the atmosphere), photochemistry, plasma diagnostics, and others. The wavelength range in which high-power coherent radiation is possible can be greatly expanded by using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in metal vapor and compressed gases. This paper is devoted to an investigation of the optimal conditions of SRS-conversion of XeCl-laser emission in lead vapor, methane, and hydrogen.

  3. Factors Affecting VUV Emission Spectrum near Lyman-{alpha} from a Hydrogen Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.; Kasuya, T.; Shimamoto, S.; Wada, M.; Kimura, Y.; Nishiura, M.

    2011-09-26

    Vacuum ultra violet (VUV) emission spectra from plasmas near walls of different metallic materials were measured to estimate the effect upon the local production rate of vibrational excited hydrogen molecules due to plasma wall interaction. Among Cu, Mo, Ni, Ta and Ti, the intensity of band spectrum around Lyman-{alpha} had become the largest when Cu wall was used while it was the smallest for Ti. The role of particle reflection from the plasma electrode surface upon the H{sup -} production by a pure electron volume process is discussed.

  4. On the hydrogen emission from the type Ia supernova 2002ic

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lifan; Baade, Dietrich; Hoflich, Peter; Wheeler, J. Craig; Kawabata, Koji; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2003-12-10

    The discovery of SN 2002ic by the Supernova Factory and the subsequent spectroscopic studies have led to the surprising finding that SN 2002ic is a type Ia supernova with strong ejecta-circumstellar interaction. Here we show that nearly 1 year after the explosion the supernova has become fainter overall, but the H-alpha emission has brightened and broadened dramatically compared to earlier observations. We have obtained spectropolarimetry data which show that the hydrogen-rich matter is highly aspherically distributed. These observations suggest that the supernova exploded inside a dense, clumpy, disk-like circumstellar environment.

  5. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus draws attention at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On view in front of the Headquarters Building, the Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus attracts an interested group of employees, including Center Director Roy Bridges (second from left in foreground). Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. Available for viewing by employees, the ZE bus is also being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex Oct. 26-27.

  6. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus drives around KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus passes a mock-up orbiter named Explorer on a trek through the KSC Visitor Complex. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. The ZE bus is being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex for two days to introduce the public to the concept.

  7. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus drives around KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus tours the KSC Visitor Complex for a test ride. In the background are a mock-up orbiter named Explorer (left) and a stack of solid rocket boosters and external tank (right), typically used on Shuttle launches. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. The ZE bus is being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex for two days to introduce the public to the concept.

  8. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus draws attention at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC workers, with Center Director Roy Bridges (at right next to bus), head for the open door of the Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus and a ride around the center. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. Available to employees for viewing and a ride, the ZE bus is also being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex Oct. 26-27.

  9. HLINOP: Hydrogen LINe OPacity in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.; Piskunov, N.

    2015-07-01

    HLINOP is a collection of codes for computing hydrogen line profiles and opacities in the conditions typical of stellar atmospheres. It includes HLINOP for approximate quick calculation of any line of neutral hydrogen (suitable for model atmosphere calculations), based on the Fortran code of Kurucz and Peterson found in ATLAS9. It also includes HLINPROF, for detailed, accurate calculation of lower Balmer line profiles (suitable for detailed analysis of Balmer lines) and HBOP, to implement the occupation probability formalism of Daeppen, Anderson and Milhalas (1987) and thus account for the merging of bound-bound and bound-free opacity (used often as a wrapper to HLINOP for model atmosphere calculations).

  10. Reduction of combustion emissions using hydrogen peroxide in a pilot scale combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.I.; Corredor, L.F.; Tamara, W.

    1997-12-31

    A hydrogen peroxide injection system was designed and installed in the stack of a 5,274 million J/hr industrial pilot plant scale combustion chamber using natural gas as fuel. The concentration of peroxide in the gas stream was precisely controlled by continuous injection using an electromagnetic dosage pump, the liquid 50% peroxide solution was finely dispersed into the gases by a water cooled custom designed delivery system with a spray nozzle at the tip. Residence times between 0.1 and 1.8 seconds and concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} between 280 ppm and 4,000 ppm were used during the test runs. CEMS for total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, as well as an ultrasonic gas flow monitor were used to measure the effect of hydrogen peroxide in reducing the emissions of these pollutants. Destruction removal efficiencies between 25% and 100% were observed for hydrocarbons, and concentrations of CO, as well as NO{sub x}. were reduced about 50%. The results indicate that this labscale proved technology yields similar results in reducing combustion emissions in pilot applications, and also a reliable injection system has been developed and tested successfully.

  11. New Observations of Balmer Continuum Flux in Solar Flares. Instrument Description and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Procházka, O.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-03-01

    Increase in the Balmer continuum radiation during solar flares was predicted by various authors, but has never been firmly confirmed observationally using ground-based slit spectrographs. Here we describe a new post-focal instrument, the image selector, with which the Balmer continuum flux can be measured from the whole flare area, in analogy to successful detections of flaring dMe stars. The system was developed and put into operation at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA2 of the Ondřejov Observatory. We measure the total flux by a fast spectrometer from a limited but well-defined region on the solar disk. Using a system of diaphragms, the disturbing contribution of a bright solar disk can be eliminated as much as possible. Light curves of the measured flux in the spectral range 350 - 440 nm are processed, together with the Hα images of the flaring area delimited by the appropriate diaphragm. The spectral flux data are flat-fielded, calibrated, and processed to be compared with model predictions. Our analysis of the data proves that the described device is sufficiently sensitive to detect variations in the Balmer continuum during solar flares. Assuming that the Balmer-continuum kernels have at least a similar size as those visible in Hα, we find the flux increase in the Balmer continuum to reach 230 - 550 % of the quiet continuum during the observed X-class flare. We also found temporal changes in the Balmer continuum flux starting well before the onset of the flare in Hα.

  12. Potential energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of hydrogen production from coke oven gas in U.S. Steel Mills.

    SciTech Connect

    Joseck, F.; Wang, M.; Wu, Y.; Energy Systems; DOE

    2008-02-01

    For this study, we examined the energy and emission effects of hydrogen production from coke oven gas (COG) on a well-to-wheels basis and compared these effects with those of other hydrogen production options, as well as with those of conventional gasoline and diesel options. We then estimated the magnitude of hydrogen production from COG in the United States and the number of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) that could potentially be fueled with the hydrogen produced from COG. Our analysis shows that this production pathway can achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction benefits. This pathway is especially worth considering because first, the sources of COG are concentrated in the upper Midwest and in the Northeast United States, which would facilitate relatively cost-effective collection, transportation, and distribution of the produced hydrogen to refueling stations in these regions. Second, the amount of hydrogen that could be produced may fuel about 1.7 million cars, thus providing a vital near-term hydrogen production option for FCV applications.

  13. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  14. Strongly lensed neutral hydrogen emission: detection predictions with current and future radio interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deane, R. P.; Obreschkow, D.; Heywood, I.

    2015-09-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides some of the deepest views of the Universe, enabling studies of high-redshift galaxies only possible with next-generation facilities without the lensing phenomenon. To date, 21-cm radio emission from neutral hydrogen has only been detected directly out to z ˜ 0.2, limited by the sensitivity and instantaneous bandwidth of current radio telescopes. We discuss how current and future radio interferometers such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will detect lensed H I emission in individual galaxies at high redshift. Our calculations rely on a semi-analytic galaxy simulation with realistic H I discs (by size, density profile and rotation), in a cosmological context, combined with general relativistic ray tracing. Wide-field, blind H I surveys with the SKA are predicted to be efficient at discovering lensed H I systems, increasingly so at z ≳ 2. This will be enabled by the combination of the magnification boosts, the steepness of the H I luminosity function at the high-mass end, and the fact that the H I spectral line is relatively isolated in frequency. These surveys will simultaneously provide a new technique for foreground lens selection and yield the highest redshift H I emission detections. More near term (and existing) cm-wave facilities will push the high-redshift H I envelope through targeted surveys of known lenses.

  15. Role of lubrication oil in particulate emissions from a hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Arthur L; Stipe, Christopher B; Habjan, Matthew C; Ahlstrand, Gilbert G

    2007-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that trace metals emitted by internal combustion engines are derived mainly from combustion of lubrication oil. This hypothesis was examined by investigation of the formation of particulate matter emitted from an internal combustion engine in the absence of fuel-derived soot. Emissions from a modified CAT 3304 diesel engine fueled with hydrogen gas were characterized. The role of organic carbon and metals from lubrication oil on particle formation was investigated under selected engine conditions. The engine produced exhaust aerosol with log normal-size distributions and particle concentrations between 10(5) and 10(7) cm(-3) with geometric mean diameters from 18 to 31 nm. The particles contained organic carbon, little or no elemental carbon, and a much larger percentage of metals than particles from diesel engines. The maximum total carbon emission rate was estimated at 1.08 g h(-1), which is much lower than the emission rate of the original diesel engine. There was also evidence that less volatile elements, such as iron, self-nucleated to form nanoparticles, some of which survive the coagulation process. PMID:17969702

  16. BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES BASED ON C IV ARE CONSISTENT WITH THOSE BASED ON THE BALMER LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Assef, R. J.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, B. M.; Kozlowski, S.; Dietrich, M.; Grier, C. J.; Khan, R.; Ageorges, N.; Buschkamp, P.; Gemperlein, H.; Hofmann, R.; Barrows, R. S.; Falco, E.; Kilic, M.; Feiz, C.; Germeroth, A.; Juette, M.; Knierim, V.; Laun, W.; and others

    2011-12-01

    Using a sample of high-redshift lensed quasars from the CASTLES project with observed-frame ultraviolet or optical and near-infrared spectra, we have searched for possible biases between supermassive black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the C IV, H{alpha}, and H{beta} broad emission lines. Our sample is based upon that of Greene, Peng, and Ludwig, expanded with new near-IR spectroscopic observations, consistently analyzed high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) optical spectra, and consistent continuum luminosity estimates at 5100 A. We find that BH mass estimates based on the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of C IV show a systematic offset with respect to those obtained from the line dispersion, {sigma}{sub l}, of the same emission line, but not with those obtained from the FWHM of H{alpha} and H{beta}. The magnitude of the offset depends on the treatment of the He II and Fe II emission blended with C IV, but there is little scatter for any fixed measurement prescription. While we otherwise find no systematic offsets between C IV and Balmer line mass estimates, we do find that the residuals between them are strongly correlated with the ratio of the UV and optical continuum luminosities. This means that much of the dispersion in previous comparisons of C IV and H{beta} BH mass estimates are due to the continuum luminosities rather than to any properties of the lines. Removing this dependency reduces the scatter between the UV- and optical-based BH mass estimates by a factor of approximately two, from roughly 0.35 to 0.18 dex. The dispersion is smallest when comparing the C IV {sigma}{sub l} mass estimate, after removing the offset from the FWHM estimates, and either Balmer line mass estimate. The correlation with the continuum slope is likely due to a combination of reddening, host contamination, and object-dependent SED shapes. When we add additional heterogeneous measurements from the literature, the results are unchanged. Moreover, in a trial observation of a

  17. Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jr., C. E.

    1981-03-01

    The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics (Thomson scattering, microwave/far-infrared interferometer, pyroelectric radiometer, hard x-ray detector).

  18. Numerical and experimental study of atomic transport and Balmer line intensity in Linac4 negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, T. Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.

    2015-04-08

    Time structure of Balmer H{sub α} line intensity in Linac4 RF plasma has been analyzed by the combined simulation model of atomic transport and Collisional-Radiative models. As a preliminary result, time variation of the line intensity in the ignition phase of RF plasma is calculated and compared with the experimental results by photometry. For the comparison, spatial distribution of the local H{sub α} photon emission rate at each time is calculated from the numerical model. The contribution of the local photon emission rates to the observed line intensity via optical viewing port is also investigated by application of the mock-up of the optical viewing port and the known light source. It has been clarified from the analyses that the higher and the lower peaks of the H{sub α} line intensity observed during 1 RF cycle is mainly due to the different spatial distributions in the electron energy distribution function and the resultant local photon emission rate. These results support previous suggestion that the existence of the capacitive electric field in axial direction leads to the higher/lower peaks of the line intensity.

  19. Hydrogen line ratios in Seyfert galaxies and low redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    New observations of the Lymal alpha radiation/hydrogen alpha radiation ratio in a set of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei and an archival study of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of Lymal alpha low redshift quasars and Seyfert galaxies have been used to form a large sample for studying the influence of soft X-rays on the enhancement of Balmer emission in the broad line region. In common models of broad line clouds, the Balmer lines are formed deep in the interior, largely by collisional excitation. Heating within the clouds is provided by soft X-ray radiation, while Lymal alpha is formed mainly by recombination after photoionization. The ratio Lymal alpha/Halpha is expected to depend weakly on the ratio of ionizing ultraviolet luminosity to X-ray luminosity (L sub UV/l sub x). If the Lymal alpha luminosity is used as a measure of L sub UV' a weak dependence of Lymal/H alpha on the X-ray luminosity is found similar to previous results.

  20. Hydrogen isotopes preclude marine hydrate CH4 emissions at the onset of Dansgaard-Oeschger events.

    PubMed

    Bock, Michael; Schmitt, Jochen; Möller, Lars; Spahni, Renato; Blunier, Thomas; Fischer, Hubertus

    2010-06-25

    The causes of past changes in the global methane cycle and especially the role of marine methane hydrate (clathrate) destabilization events are a matter of debate. Here we present evidence from the North Greenland Ice Core Project ice core based on the hydrogen isotopic composition of methane [deltaD(CH4)] that clathrates did not cause atmospheric methane concentration to rise at the onset of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events 7 and 8. Box modeling supports boreal wetland emissions as the most likely explanation for the interstadial increase. Moreover, our data show that deltaD(CH4) dropped 500 years before the onset of DO 8, with CH4 concentration rising only slightly. This can be explained by an early climate response of boreal wetlands, which carry the strongly depleted isotopic signature of high-latitude precipitation at that time. PMID:20576890

  1. The hydrogen sulfide emissions abatement program at the Geysers Geothermal Power Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. W.; Mccluer, H. K.

    1974-01-01

    The scope of the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) abatement program at The Geysers Geothermal Power Plant and the measures currently under way to reduce these emissions are discussed. The Geysers steam averages 223 ppm H2S by weight and after passing through the turbines leaves the plant both through the gas ejector system and by air-stripping in the cooling towers. The sulfide dissolved in the cooling water is controlled by the use of an oxidation catalyst such as an iron salt. The H2S in the low Btu ejector off gases may be burned to sulfur dioxide and scrubbed directly into the circulating water and reinjected into the steam field with the excess condensate. Details are included concerning the disposal of the impure sulfur, design requirements for retrofitting existing plants and modified plant operating procedures. Discussion of future research aimed at improving the H2S abatement system is also included.

  2. Feasibility of hydrogen density estimation from tomographic sensing of Lyman alpha emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, L.; Kamalabadi, F.; Ren, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we describe the scientific motivation, basic principles, and feasibility of a new approach to the estimation of neutral hydrogen (H) density in the terrestrial exosphere based on the 3-D tomographic sensing of optically thin H emission at 121.6 nm (Lyman alpha). In contrast to existing techniques, Lyman alpha tomography allows for model-independent reconstruction of the underlying H distribution in support of investigations regarding the origin and time-dependent evolution of exospheric structure. We quantitatively describe the trade-off space between the measurement sampling rate, viewing geometry, and the spatial and temporal resolution of the reconstruction that is supported by the data. We demonstrate that this approach is feasible from either earth-orbiting satellites such as the stereoscopic NASA TWINS mission or from a CubeSat platform along a trans-exosphere trajectory such as that enabled by the upcoming Exploration Mission 1 launch.

  3. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  4. Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Robert C.; Edmonds, Ryan G.; Williams, Joseph T.; Baldwin, Stephen P.

    2009-10-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  5. Measurement of the stratospheric hydrogen peroxide concentration profile using far infrared thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Johnson, D. G.; Traub, W. A.; Jucks, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    The first unequivocal measurement of hydrogen peroxide in the stratosphere have been made, a concentration profile obtained from a balloon platform using Fourier transform thermal emission spectroscopy in the far infrared. Measurements were made using the 112/cm R-Q5 branch of the rotational-torsional spectrum, with some confirmation from the 94/cm R-Q4 branch. The volume mixing ratio of H2O2 is 1.6 x 10 to the -10th at 38.4 km, decreasing to 0.6 x 10 to the -10th at 23.8 km, with uncertainties of about 16 percent. These measurements are compared to a recent stratospheric model calculation.

  6. Mitigation of Hydrogen Sulfide Emissions in the Geysers KGRA (Staff Draft)

    SciTech Connect

    Buell, Richard

    1981-07-01

    Violations of the ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are currently being experienced in The Geysers KGRA and could significantly increase in the future. Attainment and maintenance of the H2S AAQS is a potential constraint to optimum development of this resource. The availability of reliable H2S controls and the development of a validated air dispersion model are critical to alleviating this constraint. The purpose of this report is to assess the performance capabilities for state-of-the-art controls, to identify potential cost-effective alternative controls, and to identify the California Energy Commission (CEC) staffs efforts to develop a validated air dispersion model. Currently available controls (Stretford, Hydrogen Peroxide, and EIC) are capable of abating H2S emissions from a proposed facility to five lbs/hr. Alternative controls, such as condensate stripping and condensate pH control, appear to promising, cost-effective control option. The CEC staff is currently developing a validated air dispersion model for The Geysers KGRA. The CEC staff recommends investigation of retrofit control options for existing units, investigation of alternative control technologies, and dispersion analysis for optimum plant location in order to maximize the development potential of The Geysers KGRA. Energy cost studies suggest that the EIC process would be the most cost-effective for retrofits at The Geysers. (DJE-2005)

  7. Hydrogen-bond promoted nucleophilic fluorination: concept, mechanism and applications in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Woong; Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Jang, Hyeong Bin; Lee, Sungyul; Chi, Dae Yoon; Kim, Dong Wook; Song, Choong Eui

    2016-08-22

    Due to the tremendous interest in carbon-fluorine bond-forming reactions, research efforts in this area have been dedicated to the development of facile processes to synthesize small fluorine-containing organic molecules. Among others, PET (Positron Emission Tomography) is one of the most important applications of fluorine chemistry. Recognizing the specific requirements of PET processes, some groups have focused on fluorination reactions using alkali metal fluorides, particularly through SN2-type reactions. However, a common "misconception" about the role of protic solvents and hydrogen bonding interactions in this class of reactions has hampered the employment of these excellent promoters. Herein, we would like to review recent discoveries in this context, showing straightforward nucleophilic fluorination reactions using alkali metal fluorides promoted by protic solvents. Simultaneous dual activation of reacting partners by intermolecular hydrogen bonding and the enhancement of the "effective fluoride nucleophilicity", which is Nature's biocatalytic approach with the fluorinase enzyme, are the key to this unprecedentedly successful nucleophilic fluorination. PMID:27264160

  8. Molecular hydrogen emission in L1448 associated with a highly collimated molecular outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, Susan

    1991-01-01

    A near-infrared camera was used to search for jets around low-luminosity embedded infrared sources in nearby molecular clouds. The near-infrared offers the advantage that the extinction is very low compared with the optical. A jet is detected in molecular hydrogen at 2.12 microns toward a source in L1448. Given the sample size this indicates a detection rate of no more than a couple percent. The average visual extinction in L1448 is roughly 5 mag. The properties of the molecular hydrogen emission are similar to those measured for known Herbig-Haro objects, suggesting the jet is a buried Herbig-Haro object/jet that would be visible in the optical if the extinction were lower. The L1448 jet coincides with the unusual CO outflow that is highly collimated and contains high-velocity CO 'bullets'. The properties of the L1448 source suggest it defines a transition case between molecular outflows and Herbig-Haro jets, combining the characteristics of both.

  9. Effect of annealing in hydrogen atmosphere on ZnO films for field emission display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Zurita; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, M.

    2015-11-01

    Surface morphology, crystallinity, conductivity and optical transmittance of ZnO films can be modified by annealing process. Hydrogen is one of the popular annealing gases as well as nitrogen, argon, oxygen and air which are commonly used for thin film cleaning or the removal of native oxide. In general, annealing is done at high temperatures (> 600degC) to improve the film properties. From a view point of environment, however, lower annealing temperature is preferable. In this work, low annealing process was challenged to understand the effect of annealing temperature on properties of ZnO thin films and nanostructured film grown on glass substrates for transparent field emission device applications. The annealing temperature employed was 100, 200 and 450°C at 100 sccm hydrogen flow rate. ZnO thin films were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. The ZnO thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), UV-VIS and Raman spectroscopy. The sheet resistances reduced about 15 kohm/sq at low annealing temperature. By contrast, the optical transmittance did not show any significant changes after annealing. The FE current density increased after the ZnO nanostructures film was annealed in 100°C. The results obtained could motivate a surface treatment for flexible ZnO thin film since the substrate is always suffered by heat.

  10. The formation of emission lines in quasars and Seyfert nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, J.; Krolik, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The photoionization and heating throughout a quasar emission-line cloud optically thick at the Lyman edge are calculated. Photoionization and collisional ionization from excited states of hydrogen are included, which maintain a substantial electron fraction after the exhaustion of Lyman continuum photons halts ground-state photoionization. Observed values are explained for Ly-alpha/H-beta, H-alpha/H-beta, P-alpha/H-alpha, He I 5876/H-beta, O I 8446/H-alpha, and Mg II 2798/H-beta. The dependence of line strengths on physical conditions is discussed, and plotting Fe II/4570/H-beta versus Balmer continuum/H-beta is suggested. Other observations are also suggested, and the degree of asymmetry is given between the forward and backward emission of lines from a finite slab to make possible the use of comparative line profile studies to elucidate cloud kinematics.

  11. Exhaust Emissions and Fuel Properties of Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil Methyl Esters Blended with Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Important fuel properties and emissions characteristics of blends (20 vol%) of soybean oil methyl esters (SME) and partially hydrogenated SME (PHSME) in ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) were determined and compared with neat ULSD. The following changes in physical properties were noticed for B20...

  12. Borax and Octabor Treatment of Stored Swine Manure: Reduction in Hydrogen Sulfide Emissions and Phytotoxicity to Agronomic Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gaseous emissions from stored manure have become environmental and health issues for humans and animals as the livestock industry becomes specialized and concentrated. Of particular concern is hydrogen sulfide, which is being targeted for regulatory control in concentrated animal farm operations. ...

  13. Flame Emission Spectrometry in General Chemistry Labs: Solubility Product (K[subscript sp]) of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier W.; Cusworth, William, III; Lindquist, David; Mackin, John

    2007-01-01

    In this general chemistry laboratory, flame emission spectrometry is used to determine the potassium ion concentration in saturated solutions of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) in the 0-65 [degree]C temperature range. From these data the solubility products (K[subscript sp]), the Gibbs free energies of solution ([Delta][subscript…

  14. Borax and octabor treatment of stored swine manure to reduce sulfate reducing bacteria and hydrogen sulfide emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Odorous gas emissions from stored swine manure are becoming serious environmental and health issues as the livestock industry becomes more specialized, concentrated, and industrialized. These nuisance gasses include hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia, and methane, which are produced as a result of ana...

  15. The Balmer-dominated northeast limb of the Cygnus loop supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hester, J. Jeff; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.

    1994-01-01

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the Balmar-dominated northeast limb of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. Data presented include H alpha (O III), and X-ray images, UV and visible spectrophotometry, and high-resolution spectroscophy. The two relatively bright Balmer-dominated filaments visible on the POSS prints are seen to be part of a very smooth and regular complex of filaments. These filaments mark the current location of the blast wave and are seen to bound the sharply limb-brightened X-ray emission, including the previously reported X-ray, 'halo.' The (O III)/h beta ratio throughout the region is approximately 0.1, except for regions in which the shock is undergoing a transition from nonradiative to incomplete radiative to incomplete radiative conditions. At these locations (O III) emission from the cooling region is quite strong, while collisionally excited Balmer-line emission can be weak because of photoionization of the preshock medium by UV from the nascent cooling region. As a result (O III)/H beta is greater than 100 in some locations. The nonradiative/radiative transition is best studied along the length of the northwestern of the two brightest filaments, where the shock velocity and swept-up column go from approximately 180 km/s and 10(exp 17)/sq cm at one end to approximately 140 km/s and 8 x 10(exp 17)/cm at the other. There are also a number of locations of such incomplete radiative emission where the shock has recently encountered denser regions with characteristic sizes of approximately 10(exp 18) cm. There is a considerable amount of evidence that the shock has decelerated from approximately 400 km/s to less than 200 km/s in the last 1000 yr. We interpret this as the result of the blast wave hitting the wall of a cavity which surround the supernova precursor and succeed in matching a wide range of data with a reflected shock model in which the density ofthe cavity wall is approximately 1.2/cu cm and the density in the interior of the

  16. Quantifying Molecular Hydrogen Emissions and an Industrial Leakage Rate for the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, M. C.; Schroeder, J.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The poorly understood atmospheric budget and distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) have invited further research since the discovery that emissions from a hydrogen-based economy could have negative impacts on the global climate system and stratospheric ozone. The burgeoning fuel cell electric vehicle industry in the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) presents an opportunity to observe and constrain urban anthropogenic H2 emissions. This work presents the first H2 emissions estimate for the SoCAB and calculates an upper limit for the current rate of leakage from production and distribution infrastructure within the region. A top-down method utilized whole air samples collected during the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) onboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft from 23-25 June 2015 to estimate H2 emissions from combustion and non-combustion sources. H2:carbon monoxide (CO) and H2:carbon dioxide ratios from airborne observations were compared with experimentally established ratios from pure combustion source ratios and scaled with the well-constrained CO emissions inventory to yield H2 emissions of 24.9 ± 3.6 Gg a-1 (1σ) from combustion engines and 8.2 ± 4.7 Gg a-1 from non-combustion sources. Total daily production of H2 in the SoCAB was compared with the top-down results to estimate an upper limit leakage rate (5%) where all emissions not accounted for by incomplete combustion in engines were assumed to be emitted from H2 infrastructure. For bottom-up validation, the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory dispersion model was run iteratively with all known stationary sources in attempt to constrain emissions. While this investigation determined that H2 emissions from non-combustion sources in the SoCAB are likely significant, more in-depth analysis is required to better predict the atmospheric implications of a hydrogen economy.

  17. Neutron emission from JET DT plasmas with RF heating on minority hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, H.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Gorini, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Källne, J.; Tardocchi, M.; EFDA-JET Workprogramme, contributors to the

    2002-07-01

    The neutron emission spectrum from d+t→α+n reactions has been measured as a means to study the plasma response to radio frequency (RF) power coupled to hydrogen and deuteron minority components (through fundamental and second harmonic, respectively) in a tritium discharge at JET. The spectrum was measured with the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer and was analysed in terms of two spectral components due to thermal (TH) and high-energy (HE) deuterons interacting with the bulk ion population of thermal tritons. The results were used to derive information on the deuteron population in terms of temperatures (TTH and THE) as well as corresponding particle and kinetic energy densities of the plasma; the bulk ion temperature (Ti = TTH) was determined both before (with Ohmic heating only) and during the RF pulse. Similar information on protons was derived from other measurements in order to estimate the different RF effects on protons and deuterons. This paper illustrates qualitatively the type of empirical ion kinetic information that can be obtained from neutron emission spectroscopy; the data serves as a basis for comparison with results of predictive and interpretative models on RF effects in plasmas.

  18. The origin of molecular hydrogen emission in cooling-flow filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Fabian, A. C.; Hatch, N. A.; Johnstone, R. M.; Porter, R. L.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R.

    2008-05-01

    The optical filaments found in many cooling flows in galaxy clusters consist of low-density (~103cm-3) cool (~103 K) gas surrounded by significant amounts of cosmic-ray and magnetic field energy. Their spectra show anomalously strong low-ionization and molecular emission lines when compared with Galactic molecular clouds exposed to ionizing radiation such as the Orion complex. Previous studies have shown that the spectra cannot be produced by O-star photoionization. Here, we calculate the physical conditions in dusty gas that is well shielded from external sources of ionizing photons and is energized either by cosmic rays or dissipative magnetohydrodynamics waves. Strong molecular hydrogen lines, with relative intensities similar to those observed, are produced. Selection effects introduced by the microphysics produce a correlation between the H2 line upper level energy and the population temperature. These selection effects allow a purely collisional gas to produce H2 emission that masquerades as starlight-pumped H2 but with intensities that are far stronger. This physics may find application to any environment where a broad range of gas densities or heating rates occur. Contains material ©British Crown copyright 2008/MoD. E-mail: gary@pa.uky.edu

  19. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ROTATIONAL EMISSION TOWARDS TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, James G.; Bania, T. M.; Boulanger, F.; Draine, B. T.; Falgarone, E.; Hily-Blant, P. E-mail: bania@bu.edu E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu E-mail: pierre.hilyblant@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr

    2011-12-20

    Using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have detected emission in the S(0), S(1), and S(2) pure-rotational (v = 0-0) transitions of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) toward six positions in two translucent high Galactic latitude clouds, DCld 300.2-16.9 and LDN 1780. The detection of these lines raises important questions regarding the physical conditions inside low-extinction clouds that are far from ultraviolet radiation sources. The ratio between the S(2) flux and the flux from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 7.9 {mu}m averages 0.007 for these six positions. This is a factor of about four higher than the same ratio measured toward the central regions of non-active Galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. Thus, the environment of these translucent clouds is more efficient at producing rotationally excited H{sub 2} per PAH-exciting photon than the disks of entire galaxies. Excitation analysis finds that the S(1) and S(2) emitting regions are warm (T {approx}> 300 K), but comprise no more than 2% of the gas mass. We find that UV photons cannot be the sole source of excitation in these regions and suggest mechanical heating via shocks or turbulent dissipation as the dominant cause of the emission. The clouds are located on the outskirts of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association and may be dissipating recent bursts of mechanical energy input from supernova explosions. We suggest that pockets of warm gas in diffuse or translucent clouds, integrated over the disks of galaxies, may represent a major source of all non-active galaxy H{sub 2} emission.

  20. On the Apparent Associations Between Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen Structure and (WMAP) High-frequency Continuum Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2010-03-01

    Galactic neutral hydrogen (H I) within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun contains structure with an angular distribution that is similar to small-scale structure observed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). A total of 108 associated pairs of associated H I and WMAP features have now been cataloged using H I data mapped in 2 km s-1 intervals and these pairs show a typical offset of 0fdg8. A large-scale statistical test for a direct association is carried out that casts little additional light on whether the these small offsets are merely coincidental or carry information. To pursue the issue further, the nature of several of the features within the foreground H I most closely associated with WMAP structure is examined in detail and it is shown that the cross-correlation coefficient for well-matched pairs of structures is of order unity. It is shown that free-free emission from electrons in unresolved density enhancements in interstellar space could theoretically produce high-frequency radio continuum radiation at the levels observed by WMAP and that such emission will appear nearly flat across the WMAP frequency range. Evidence for such structure in the interstellar medium already exists in the literature. Until higher angular resolution observations of the high-frequency continuum emission structure as well as the apparently associated H I structure become available, it may be difficult to rule out the possibility that some if not all the small-scale structure usually attributed to the cosmic microwave background may have a galactic origin.

  1. ON THE APPARENT ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL HYDROGEN STRUCTURE AND (WMAP) HIGH-FREQUENCY CONTINUUM EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2010-03-10

    Galactic neutral hydrogen (H I) within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun contains structure with an angular distribution that is similar to small-scale structure observed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). A total of 108 associated pairs of associated H I and WMAP features have now been cataloged using H I data mapped in 2 km s{sup -1} intervals and these pairs show a typical offset of 0.{sup 0}8. A large-scale statistical test for a direct association is carried out that casts little additional light on whether the these small offsets are merely coincidental or carry information. To pursue the issue further, the nature of several of the features within the foreground H I most closely associated with WMAP structure is examined in detail and it is shown that the cross-correlation coefficient for well-matched pairs of structures is of order unity. It is shown that free-free emission from electrons in unresolved density enhancements in interstellar space could theoretically produce high-frequency radio continuum radiation at the levels observed by WMAP and that such emission will appear nearly flat across the WMAP frequency range. Evidence for such structure in the interstellar medium already exists in the literature. Until higher angular resolution observations of the high-frequency continuum emission structure as well as the apparently associated H I structure become available, it may be difficult to rule out the possibility that some if not all the small-scale structure usually attributed to the cosmic microwave background may have a galactic origin.

  2. THE BALMER-DOMINATED BOW SHOCK AND WIND NEBULA STRUCTURE OF {gamma}-RAY PULSAR PSR J1741-2054

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, Roger W.; Shaw, Michael S.; Camilo, Fernando; Cotter, Garret; Sivakoff, Gregory R. E-mail: msshaw@stanford.ed

    2010-12-01

    We have detected an H{alpha} bow shock nebula around PSR J1741-2054, a pulsar discovered through its GeV {gamma}-ray pulsations. The pulsar is only {approx}1.''5 behind the leading edge of the shock. Optical spectroscopy shows that the nebula is non-radiative, dominated by Balmer emission. The H{alpha} images and spectra suggest that the pulsar wind momentum is equatorially concentrated and implies a pulsar space velocity {approx}150 km s{sup -1}, directed 15{sup 0} {+-} 10{sup 0} out of the plane of the sky. The complex H{alpha} profile indicates that different portions of the post-shock flow dominate line emission as gas moves along the nebula and provide an opportunity to study the structure of this unusual slow non-radiative shock under a variety of conditions. CXO ACIS observations reveal an X-ray pulsar wind nebula within this nebula, with a compact {approx}2.''5 equatorial structure and a trail extending several arcminutes behind. Together these data support a close ({<=}0.5 kpc) distance, a spin geometry viewed edge-on, and highly efficient {gamma}-ray production for this unusual, energetic pulsar.

  3. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  4. Emission-Line Variability in the Iron Star XX Orphiuchus Over the Past Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, Bryan; Walter, D. K.; Howell, S. B.; Cash, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of nine years of spectra taken with the Coudé Feed telescope at KPNO of the Iron Star XX Oph. In addition to numerous iron lines, other metals such as Ti and the hydrogen Balmer series are seen in emission, while still others such as the H and K lines of Ca II are in absorption. Our study covers the years 2003 to 2012 and includes an episode in 2004 where photometry from the AAVSO shows a 1.5 magnitude drop in brightness as discussed in Cool et.al. (2005, PASP, 117, 462). Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, our data show Balmer lines with P-Cygni profiles , where the strength of the absorption components generally increase over time while the emission components are diminished. We discuss our results in comparison to the model of Howell et.al. (2009 PASAP, 121, 16) of AS 325, a similar iron emission-line star in a binary system. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814. We thank the director of KPNO for his generous allocation of telescope time to this project over the years.

  5. Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Characterization of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Fueled with Hydrogen/Natural Gas Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby S. Chapman; Amar Patil

    2007-06-30

    Hydrogen is an attractive fuel source not only because it is abundant and renewable but also because it produces almost zero regulated emissions. Internal combustion engines fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) are operated throughout a variety of industries in a number of mobile and stationary applications. While CNG engines offer many advantages over conventional gasoline and diesel combustion engines, CNG engine performance can be substantially improved in the lean operating region. Lean operation has a number of benefits, the most notable of which is reduced emissions. However, the extremely low flame propagation velocities of CNG greatly restrict the lean operating limits of CNG engines. Hydrogen, however, has a high flame speed and a wide operating limit that extends into the lean region. The addition of hydrogen to a CNG engine makes it a viable and economical method to significantly extend the lean operating limit and thereby improve performance and reduce emissions. Drawbacks of hydrogen as a fuel source, however, include lower power density due to a lower heating value per unit volume as compared to CNG, and susceptibility to pre-ignition and engine knock due to wide flammability limits and low minimum ignition energy. Combining hydrogen with CNG, however, overcomes the drawbacks inherent in each fuel type. Objectives of the current study were to evaluate the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas as a fuel for conventional natural gas engines. The experiment and data analysis included evaluation of engine performance, efficiency, and emissions along with detailed in-cylinder measurements of key physical parameters. This provided a detailed knowledge base of the impact of using hydrogen/natural gas blends. A four-stroke, 4.2 L, V-6 naturally aspirated natural gas engine coupled to an eddy current dynamometer was used to measure the impact of hydrogen/natural gas blends on performance, thermodynamic efficiency and exhaust gas emissions

  6. Removing hydrogen sulfide from geothermal gases: hypochlorite process reduces hydrogen sulfide emissions to acceptable levels. NTIS tech note

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This citation summarizes a one-page announcement of technology available for utilization. A hypochlorite process has been proposed as an alternative to other methods for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the exhaust gases of geothermal powerplants. An electrolytically-generated sodium hypochlorite solution converts the hydrogen sulfide to water, salt, and sulfur. The hypochlorite process appears to be less expensive than competing processes for most of the cases studied. ...FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Detailed information about the technology described may be obtained by ordering the NTIS report, order number: DOE/ER/1092-T7, price code: PC A03.

  7. Remote sensing and geologic studies of the Balmer-Kapteyn region of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, B. Ray; Gillis, J. J.; Giguere, T. A.; Blewett, D. T.; Lawrence, D. J.; Lucey, P. G.; Smith, G. A.; Spudis, P. D.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    The Balmer-Kapteyn (B-K) region is located just east of Mare Fecunditatis on the east limb of the Moon. It is centered on the Balmer-Kapteyn basin, a pre-Nectarian impact structure that exhibits two rings, approximately 225 km and 450 km in diameter. Clementine multispectral images and Lunar Prospector (LP) gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) data were used to investigate the composition, age, and origin of geologic units in the region. A major expanse of cryptomare was mapped within the B-K basin. Spectral and chemical data obtained for dark-haloed craters (DHCs) established that these impact craters excavated mare basalt from beneath higher-albedo, highland-rich surface units. The buried basalts exposed by DHCs in the region are dominated by low-titanium mare basalts. The fresh DHC FeO values (15.0-15.7 wt.%) that best represent those of buried mare basalts are well within the range of values exhibited by high-alumina mare basalts. While most cryptomare deposits occur beneath surfaces that range in age from Imbrian to Nectarian, it is possible that some mare flows were emplaced during pre-Nectarian time. Most cryptomare deposits in the B-K region were formed by the contamination of mare surfaces by highland-rich distal ejecta from surrounding impact craters. These Balmer-type cryptomare deposits are usually associated with light plains units. Major LP-GRS FeO enhancements are associated with cryptomaria in the Balmer-Kapteyn, Lomonosov-Fleming, Schiller-Schickard, and Mendel-Rydberg regions.

  8. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: The Proper Motions of Balmer Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the proper motions of Balmer-dominated filaments in Kepler’s supernova remnant using high resolution images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by about 10 years. We use the improved proper motion measurements and revised values of shock velocities to derive a distance to Kepler of {5.1}-0.7+0.8 kpc. The main shock around the northern rim of the remnant has a typical speed of 1690 km s-1 and is encountering material with densities of about 8 cm-3. We find evidence for the variation of shock properties over small spatial scales, including differences in the driving pressures as the shock wraps around a curved cloud surface. We find that the Balmer filaments ahead of the ejecta knot on the northwest boundary of the remnant are becoming fainter and more diffuse. We also find that the Balmer filaments associated with circumstellar material in the interior regions of the remnant are due to shocks with significantly lower velocities and that the brightness variations among these filaments trace the density distribution of the material, which may have a disk-like geometry. Based on observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  9. Zero Emissions Hydrogen Production by Fluidized Bed Catalytic Decomposition of Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, P.; Chirone, R.; Ruoppolo, G.

    The present paper deals with the strategic field of production of clean fuels with very low to zero emissions. A two stage fluidized bed process for catalytic decomposition of methane has been investigated. Firstly, the fluidized bed has been operated for the thermo-catalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane to produce hydrogen and solid carbon, which deposited on the catalyst. Secondly, the carbon oxy-combustion has been carried out to regenerate the catalyst producing a separated CO2 stream candidate to be directly fed to a sequestration unit. Experiments have been carried out in a laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor (26mm ill) using a home-made copper dispersed on γ-alumina as catalyst operated at 800°C. The carbon oxy-combustion regeneration strategy have been compared to the carbon combustion one on the basis of the efficiency of carbon removal and the performance ofregenerated catalyst with respect to the TCD process. The effect of multiple cycles of decomposition and regeneration steps has been also quantified. A reasonable cyclic process has been simulated switching between two different feeds, the first containing CH4 and the second containing the regeneration stream. Experimental activity confirmed the possibility ofproducing a CO2 stream that can be finalized to a sequestration unit but also indicated some drawbacks related to the oxy-combustion regeneration strategy which affect the production of COx species during the methane decomposition stage.

  10. Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Deng, B. H.; Knapp, K.; Sun, X.; Thompson, M. C.

    2012-10-15

    In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO{sub 2} interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.