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Sample records for hydrogen desorption process

  1. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  2. Complex surface analytical investigations on hydrogen absorption and desorption processes of a TiMn2-based alloy.

    PubMed

    Schülke, Mark; Kiss, Gábor; Paulus, Hubert; Lammers, Martin; Ramachandran, Vaidyanath; Sankaran, Kannan; Müller, Karl-Heinz

    2009-04-01

    Metal hydrides are one of the most promising technologies in the field of hydrogen storage due to their high volumetric storage density. Important reaction steps take place at the very surface of the solid during hydrogen absorption. Since these reaction steps are drastically influenced by the properties and potential contamination of the solid, it is very important to understand the characteristics of the surface, and a variety of analytical methods are required to achieve this. In this work, a TiMn(2)-type metal hydride alloy is investigated by means of high-pressure activation measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS). In particular, TDMS is an analytical tool that, in contrast to SIMS or SNMS, allows the hydrogen content in a metal to be quantified. Furthermore, it allows the activation energy for desorption to be determined from TDMS profiles; the method used to achieve this is presented here in detail. In the results section, it is shown that the oxide layer formed during manufacture and long-term storage prevents any hydrogen from being absorbed, and so an activation process is required. XPS measurements show the oxide states of the main alloy elements, and a layer 18 nm thick is determined via SNMS. Furthermore, defined oxide layers are produced and characterized in UHV using XPS. The influence of these thin oxide layers on the hydrogen sorption process is examined using TDMS. Finally, the activation energy of desorption is determined for the investigated alloy using the method presented here, and values of 46 kJ/mol for hydrogen sorbed in UHV and 103 kJ/mol for hydrogen originating from the manufacturing process are obtained. PMID:19294368

  3. Diffusion Analysis Of Hydrogen-Desorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1988-01-01

    Distribution of hydrogen in metal explains observed desorption rate. Report describes application of diffusion theory to anaylsis of experimental data on uptake and elimination of hydrogen in high-strength alloys of 25 degree C. Study part of program aimed at understanding embrittlement of metals by hydrogen. Two nickel-base alloys, Rene 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, studied. Desorption of hydrogen explained by distribution of hydrogen in metal. "Fast" hydrogen apparently not due to formation of hydrides on and below surface as proposed.

  4. Preparation of ultrafine jet-milled powders for Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets using hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination and hydrogen decrepitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Michihide; Matsuura, Masashi; Tezuka, Nobuki; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Une, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Hirokazu; Sagawa, Masato

    2013-07-01

    Dy addition is used to increase the coercivity of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets. Given that Dy is rare and expensive, a method is needed for reducing the Dy content in such magnets without decreasing their coercivity. Refining Nd2Fe14B grains is a prospective method for increasing the coercivity of Nd-Fe-B magnets. Conventional jet milling, however, cannot crush strip-casted Nd-Fe-B alloys into powders less than 1 μm in size. We report a process for preparing ultrafine jet-milled powders with an average size of 0.33 μm for Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets: a combination of hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination, hydrogen decrepitation, and He jet milling.

  5. Current-Driven Hydrogen Desorption from Graphene: Experiment and Theory.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Pal, Partha Pratim; Seideman, Tamar; Guisinger, Nathan P; Guest, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    Electron-stimulated desorption of hydrogen from the graphene/SiC(0001) surface at room temperature was investigated with ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations in order to elucidate the desorption mechanisms and pathways. Two different desorption processes were observed. In the high electron energy regime (4-8 eV), the desorption yield is independent of both voltage and current, which is attributed to the direct electronic excitation of the C-H bond. In the low electron energy regime (2-4 eV), however, the desorption yield exhibits a threshold dependence on voltage, which is explained by the vibrational excitation of the C-H bond via transient ionization induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. The observed current independence of the desorption yield suggests that the vibrational excitation is a single-electron process. We also observed that the curvature of graphene dramatically affects hydrogen desorption. Desorption from concave regions was measured to be much more probable than desorption from convex regions in the low electron energy regime (∼2 eV), as would be expected from the identified desorption mechanism. PMID:26787160

  6. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  7. Thermal desorption of hydrogen from the diamond C(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Lin, J.-C.

    1998-05-01

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) is used to measure the kinetics of hydrogen desorption from the C(100) surface. Two major desorption channels, attributed to hydrogen desorption from (2×1) domains ( α sites) and disordered domain boundaries sites ( β sites) were observed. The change in the morphology of the C(100) surface upon hydrogen adsorption/desorption leads to a variation in the intensity ratio between the two hydrogen desorption peaks. The degradation results in smaller (2×1) domains, as evidenced by deteriorated LEED patterns in which the characteristic (2×1) half-order spots disappear. The (2×1) LEED pattern can be restored on the degraded C(100) surface by repeated hydrogenation-annealing cycles in the temperature range 300-1100 K. Fitting the experimental TPD data with simulated curves from the two-site model shows that desorption from the α site obeys first-order kinetics with a prefactor of 1.4±0.9×10 13 s -1 and an activation energy of 80.3±1.3 kcal mol -1, whereas the process giving rise to the β peak follows second-order kinetics with a prefactor of 2.3±0.9×10 13 s -1 (expressed in first-order units) and an activation energy of 75.1±0.5 kcal mol -1. Possible mechanisms for first-order recombinative hydrogen desorption from the C(100)-(2×1) surface are also discussed.

  8. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material

    SciTech Connect

    Guterl, Jerome Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2015-07-28

    Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks in TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.

  9. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I.; Zaika, Yury V.

    2015-12-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition.

  10. HYDROGEN AND ITS DESORPTION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.

    2002-11-11

    Hydrogen is the dominating gas specie in room temperature, ultrahigh vacuum systems of particle accelerators and storage rings, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven. Rapid pressure increase of a few decades in hydrogen and other residual gases was observed during RHIC's recent high intensity gold and proton runs. The type and magnitude of the pressure increase were analyzed and compared with vacuum conditioning, beam intensity, number of bunches and bunch spacing. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by beam loss and/or electron stimulated desorption from electron multipacting.

  11. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  12. Hydrogen retention in tungsten materials studied by Laser Induced Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobinski, M.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Huber, A.; Reinhart, M.; Möller, S.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.; 't Hoen, M. H. J.; Manhard, A.; Schmid, K.; Textor Team

    2013-07-01

    Development of methods to characterise the first wall in ITER and future fusion devices without removal of wall tiles is important to support safety assessments for tritium retention and dust production and to understand plasma wall processes in general. Laser based techniques are presently under investigation to provide these requirements, among which Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is proposed to measure the deuterium and tritium load of the plasma facing surfaces by thermal desorption and spectroscopic detection of the desorbed fuel in the edge of the fusion plasma. The method relies on its capability to desorb the hydrogen isotopes in a laser heated spot. The application of LID on bulk tungsten targets exposed to a wide range of deuterium fluxes, fluences and impact energies under different surface temperatures is investigated in this paper. The results are compared with Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and a diffusion model.

  13. Adsorption and Desorption of Hydrogen by Gas-Phase Palladium Clusters Revealed by In Situ Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, Masato; Kudoh, Satoshi; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen by gas-phase Pd clusters, Pdn(+), were investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The desorption processes were examined by heating the clusters that had adsorbed hydrogen at room temperature. The clusters remaining after heating were monitored by mass spectrometry as a function of temperature up to 1000 K, and the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) curve was obtained for each Pdn(+). It was found that hydrogen molecules were released from the clusters into the gas phase with increasing temperature until bare Pdn(+) was formed. The threshold energy for desorption, estimated from the TPD curve, was compared to the desorption energy calculated by using DFT, indicating that smaller Pdn(+) clusters (n ≤ 6) tended to have weakly adsorbed hydrogen molecules, whereas larger Pdn(+) clusters (n ≥ 7) had dissociatively adsorbed hydrogen atoms on the surface. Highly likely, the nonmetallic nature of the small Pd clusters prevents hydrogen molecule from adsorbing dissociatively on the surface. PMID:26043808

  14. Desorption of hydrogen trapped in carbon and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumi, H.; Takemura, Y.; Miyabe, T.; Konishi, T.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2013-11-01

    Thermal desorption behavior of deuterium (D2) from isotropic graphites and a carbon fiber carbon composite (CFC) charged with D2 gas has been investigated to obtain information concerning hydrogen recycling and tritium inventory in fusion experimental devices as well as a futuristic fusion reactor. After thermal desorption experiments were conducted at temperatures up to 1740 K, a desorption peak at approximately 1600 K (peak 4) was discovered. This is in addition to the previously known peak at approximately 1300 K (peak 3). Peak 3 can be attributed to the release of deuterium controlled by the diffusion process in a graphite filler grain and peak 4 can be attributed to the detrapping of deuterium released from an interstitial cluster loop edge site. Activation energies of peaks 3 and 4 are estimated to be 3.48 and 6.93 eV, respectively. TDS spectra of D2 from graphite and CFCs had previously not been thoroughly investigated. A desorption peak at approximately 1600 K was discovered in the TDS spectra for all samples heated with a linear ramp rate of 0.1 K/s. For an isotropic graphite, ISO-880U, four desorption peaks were recognized in the TDS spectra at approximately 660 K, 900 K, 1300 K, and 1600 K. These peaks were named as peaks 1, 2, 3, and 4 in order of increasing temperature. Major desorption peaks (i.e., peaks 3 and 4) were analyzed and discussed in detail. The temperature of peak 3 was dependent on the size of a graphite filler grain. The desorption process is suggested to be controlled by deuterium diffusion within the filler grain with a strong influence of trapping sites, where the migration takes place as a sequence of detrapping and retrapping. The desorption for peak 4 can be ascribed to the detrapping reaction from an interstitial cluster loop edge site. Activation energies were estimated from the peak shift by varying the heating rate of TDS to be 3.48 and 6.93 eV for peaks 3 and 4, respectively. Theoretical desorption curves for peaks 3 and 4 with

  15. Extremely fast hydrogen absorption/desorption through platinum overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Połczyński, Piotr; Jurczakowski, Rafał

    2016-02-01

    The hydrogen electrosorption in thin palladium films (50-1000 nm) was investigated at palladium electrodes covered with platinum overlayers. The results for this model system show that the rates of the hydrogen sorption/desorption are orders of magnitude higher for platinized samples with respect to pure palladium. The highest absorption kinetics have been observed for Pd electrodes fully covered with 1-3 platinum monolayers. By means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) we have shown that the process is diffusion limited at platinized Pd layers. Diffusion coefficient, DH, determined in EIS, is two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for thin palladium films and approaches DH for bulk palladium. The system stability after hydrogen absorption was assessed and the sorption mechanism was discussed. Surprisingly high durability of the platinized palladium enables its use in a variety of applications where fast and selective response in the presence of hydrogen is required.

  16. Selective photon-stimulated desorption of hydrogen from GaAs surfaces.

    PubMed

    Petravic, M; Deenapanray, P N; Comtet, G; Hellner, L; Dujardin, G; Usher, B F

    2000-03-01

    Photon-stimulated desorption of H(+) from hydrogenated GaAs (110) and (100) surfaces was studied as a function of photon energy. Distinct peaks, observed around As 3d core-level binding energy for desorption from the GaAs (100) surface and in the As 3d and Ga 3p region for desorption from the GaAs (110) surface, show a striking similarity with the fine structure (spin-orbit splitting) measured in the photoemission from As 3d and Ga 3p levels. These results provide clear evidence for direct desorption processes and represent a basis for selective modification of hydrogenated GaAs surfaces. PMID:11017257

  17. Hydrogen desorption properties of hydrogenated UThZr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwarno, Hadi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Ono, Futaba; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio

    1997-08-01

    Hydrogen desorption properties of hydrogenated UThZr alloys of varied compositions were investigated using a hydrogen absorption-desorption experimental system, TG-DTA and DSC analyzers. Isothermal desorption at 900°C of elemental ratio U:Th:Zr:H = 1:1:4:9.5 exhibited that there were two distinct plateau regions identified as ZrH 1.4-ZrH and ThZr 2H 7- x - ThZr 2 systems. TG-DTA and DSC measurements under the temperature range from room temperature to 1000°C have shown that there were three endothermic peaks identified as dehydrogenation reactions of ZrH 2 - x - ZrH and ThZr 2H 7-x. The DTA curve identified the first peak area as the ZrH 1.4-ZrH system, while the DSC curves identified that the second peak is the decomposition of ZrH and the third peak is the decomposition of ThZr 2H 7 - x. It was also shown that both ZrH 2 - x and ThZr 2H 7 - x are more stable in the alloy than the pure ones. Measured enthalpy changes during decomposition of the hydrogenated UThZr alloy are similar to the theoretical calculation. Oxidation during measurement of the U:Th:Zr:H = 2:1:6:13.1 resulted in a different measured enthalpy change and calculation. Isothermal decomposition of the U:Th:Zr:H = 1:1:4:9.5 without any disintegration indicates stability of the alloy against powdering on hydriding-dehydriding cycles. Stability of the samples at high temperature similar to that of UZrH 1.6 for TRIGA fuel can be maintained after the decomposition.

  18. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  19. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh; R, Kamal Raj.; Kumar, T. J. Dhilip

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  20. Kinetics of hydrogen desorption in surface-limited thin-film growth of SiGe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, J.W. ); Eres, G. )

    1993-05-31

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption in surface-limited thin-film growth of SiGe alloys from binary mixtures of disilane and digermane was investigated by surface differential reflectance. The hydrogen desorption process from the alloy surface was found to consist of two components. Both components are thermally activated, but the activation energies appear to equal neither the hydrogen desorption energy from pure silicon nor that from pure germanium surfaces. We suggest that the two components represent Ge- and Si-mediated hydrogen desorption, with the former being more rapid than the latter.

  1. Electron-stimulated desorption of hydrogen from the Si(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzkopff, M.; Radojkovic, P.; Enachescu, M.; Hartmann, E.; Koch, F.

    1996-03-01

    Preparation of suitable silicon (111) wafers in weakly alkaline HF solutions results in the formation of atomically flat, hydrogen-terminated surfaces. Under high-vacuum conditions, the scanning tunneling microscope has been employed to selectively desorb the passivating hydrogen from nanometer-sized surface regions. The hydrogen depassivation process is studied as a function of current and applied bias voltage, voltage polarity, and exposure time to incident electrons either on individual surface locations or by varying the speed of tip motion to control the electron dose. The experimental findings are interpreted in terms of two distinct desorption mechanisms and the respective desorption yields are specified. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  2. Patterning graphene at the nanometer scale via hydrogen desorption.

    SciTech Connect

    Sessi, P.; Guest, J. R.; Bode, M.; Guisinger, N.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Politecnico di Milano

    2009-12-01

    We have demonstrated the reversible and local modification of the electronic properties of graphene by hydrogen passivation and subsequent electron-stimulated hydrogen desorption with an scanning tunneling microscope tip. In addition to changing the morphology, we show that the hydrogen passivation is stable at room temperature and modifies the electronic properties of graphene, opening a gap in the local density of states. This insulating state is reversed by local desorption of the hydrogen, and the unaltered electronic properties of graphene are recovered. Using this mechanism, we have 'written' graphene patterns on nanometer length scales. For patterned regions that are roughly 20 nm or greater, the inherent electronic properties of graphene are completely recovered. Below 20 nm we observe dramatic variations in the electronic properties of the graphene as a function of pattern size. This reversible and local mechanism for modifying the electronic properties of graphene has far-reaching implications for nanoscale circuitry fabricated from this revolutionary material.

  3. Electrochemical desorption of hydrogen atoms adsorbed on liquid gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Krivenko, A.G.; Vekin, A.B.; Benderskii, V.A.

    1987-12-01

    Laser-pulse electron photoemission was used to measure absolute values of the rate constants, W/sub 3/, of electrochemical desorption (ECD) of hydrogen atoms from liquid gallium. The W/sub 3/ were shown to be a linear function of hydrogen concentration, in accord with the fact that both hydrogen ions and water molecules are involved in desorption. The components of W/sub 3/ arising from the two reaction channels are exponential functions of electrode potential, and in their order of magnitude (approx. 10/sup 8/ liter/mole x sec and approx. 10/sup 6/ sec/sup -1/) are close to the corresponding constants for mercury and bismuth. In the desorption involving hydrogen ions, the H/D isotope effect decreases from 5 to 3 as the overpotential is raised from 0.75 to 1.15 V. It was suggested that isotope effects which are higher than those found for Hg and Bi electrodes arise from longer proton tunneling distance.

  4. Features of hydrogen trapping and desorption during deposition of yttrium coating on zirconium in a gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, A. E.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Dovganyuk, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Transport of hydrogen isotopes during the various regimes of deposition of yttrium coating on zirconium in argon plasma with addition of deuterium is studied. The influence of oxygen contamination in plasma-generating gas on the processes of trapping and desorption of hydrogen isotopes is also investigated. It is shown that deposition of yttrium coating on zirconium in Ar+5%D2 plasma enhances both hydrogen desorption from zirconium and deuterium trapping into zirconium in comparison to those under plasma exposure without deposition. Yttrium deposition in Ar+25%O2+5%D2 plasma, conversely, mitigates both hydrogen desorption and deuterium trapping. Hydrogen desorption from zirconium increases with the increase of energy of ions, bombarding the sample during deposition of the coating in oxygen-free plasma, but it, on the contrary, decreases in oxygen-containing plasma.

  5. Superior hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior of Mg thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianglan; Wang, Yuntao; Xie, Lei; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Yang; Li, Xingguo

    Pd-capped Mg films prepared by magnetron sputtering achieved complete dehydrogenation in air at room temperature and behaved as favorable gasochromic switchable mirrors. Their cyclic hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics in air were investigated by using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The overall activation energy was 80 kJ mol -1, while the reaction orders controlling desorption were deduced to be n = 2 at 328 K and n = 1 at lower temperatures by analyzing the transmittance data. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient and the corresponding activation energy were calculated by electrochemical measurements. Mg thin films exhibited the smaller activation energy and remarkable diffusion kinetics at room temperature which implied potential applications in smart windows.

  6. Tunneling Desorption of Single Hydrogen on the Surface of Titanium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Minato, Taketoshi; Kajita, Seiji; Pang, Chi-Lun; Asao, Naoki; Yamamoto, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Takashi; Kawai, Maki; Kim, Yousoo

    2015-07-28

    We investigated the reaction mechanism of the desorption of single hydrogen from a titanium dioxide surface excited by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Analysis of the desorption yield, in combination with theoretical calculations, indicates the crucial role played by the applied electric field. Instead of facilitating desorption by reducing the barrier height, the applied electric field causes a reduction in the barrier width, which, when coupled with the electron excitation induced by the STM tip, leads to the tunneling desorption of the hydrogen. A significant reduction in the desorption yield was observed when deuterium was used instead of hydrogen, providing further support for the tunneling-desorption mechanism. PMID:26158720

  7. Plutonium desorption from mineral surfaces at environmental concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of Pu adsorption and desorption behavior on mineral surfaces is crucial for understanding its environmental mobility. Here we demonstrate that environmental concentrations of H2O2 can affect the stability of Pu adsorbed to goethite, montmorillonite, and quartz across a wide range of pH values. In batch experiments where Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite for 21 days at pH 4, 6, and 8, the addition of 5-500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant Pu desorption. At pH 6 and 8 this desorption was transient with readsorption of the Pu to goethite within 30 days. At pH 4, no Pu readsorption was observed. Experiments with both quartz and montmorillonite at 5 μM H2O2 desorbed far less Pu than in the goethite experiments highlighting the contribution of Fe redox couples in controlling Pu desorption at low H2O2 concentrations. Plutonium(IV) adsorbed to quartz and subsequently spiked with 500 μM H2O2 resulted in significant desorption of Pu, demonstrating the complexity of the desorption process. Our results provide the first evidence of H2O2-driven desorption of Pu(IV) from mineral surfaces. We suggest that this reaction pathway coupled with environmental levels of hydrogen peroxide may contribute to Pu mobility in the environment. PMID:24815745

  8. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Hydrogen in High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Hirakami, D.; Tarui, T.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal desorption analyses (TDA) were conducted in high strength martensitic steels containing carbon from 0.33 to 1.0 mass pct, which were charged with hydrogen at 1223 K (950 °C) under hydrogen of one atmospheric pressure and quenched to room temperature. In 0.33C steel, which had the highest M s temperature, only one desorption peak was observed around 373 K (100 °C), whereas two peaks, one at a similar temperature and the other around and above 573 K (300 °C), were observed in the other steels, the height of the second peak increasing with carbon content. In 0.82C steel, both peaks disappeared during exposure at room temperature in 1 week, whereas the peak heights decreased gradually over 2 weeks in specimens electrolytically charged with hydrogen and aged for varying times at room temperature. From computer simulation, by means of the McNabb-Foster theory coupled with theories of carbon segregation, these peaks are likely to be due to trapping of hydrogen in the strain fields and cores of dislocations, and presumably to a lesser extent in prior austenite grain boundaries. The results also indicate that carbon atoms prevent and even expel hydrogen from trapping sites during quenching and aging in these steels.

  9. A continuous hydrogen desorption model from zirconium hydride and subsequent metal in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, X.; Terrani, K. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2013-07-01

    Predictions of a one-dimensional, moving boundary model coupled with a kinetic description of hydrogen desorption from a two-phase region of {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.6{+-}}n and {alpha}-Zr have been compared with the hydrogen flux obtained in a thermal desorption spectroscopy experiment. The model accurately reproduces the major features of the hydrogen desorption flux on the sample surface after executing a parameter optimization. (authors)

  10. Controlling Hydrogen Activation, Spillover, and Desorption with Pd-Au Single-Atom Alloys.

    PubMed

    Lucci, Felicia R; Darby, Matthew T; Mattera, Michael F G; Ivimey, Christopher J; Therrien, Andrew J; Michaelides, Angelos; Stamatakis, Michail; Sykes, E Charles H

    2016-02-01

    Key descriptors in hydrogenation catalysis are the nature of the active sites for H2 activation and the adsorption strength of H atoms to the surface. Using atomically resolved model systems of dilute Pd-Au surface alloys and density functional theory calculations, we determine key aspects of H2 activation, diffusion, and desorption. Pd monomers in a Au(111) surface catalyze the dissociative adsorption of H2 at temperatures as low as 85 K, a process previously expected to require contiguous Pd sites. H atoms preside at the Pd sites and desorb at temperatures significantly lower than those from pure Pd (175 versus 310 K). This facile H2 activation and weak adsorption of H atom intermediates are key requirements for active and selective hydrogenations. We also demonstrate weak adsorption of CO, a common catalyst poison, which is sufficient to force H atoms to spill over from Pd to Au sites, as evidenced by low-temperature H2 desorption. PMID:26747698

  11. Discovery of spontaneous deformation of Pd metal during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu; Sato, Masaharu; Itoh, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    A drastic deformation was observed in Pd metal of various shapes after hydrogen absorption and desorption cycles at 150 °C at a gas pressure of 1–5 MPa. All of the phenomena observed indicate that some strong internal force is induced spontaneously during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to produce a collective deformation so as to minimize the surface. PMID:19444010

  12. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1994-09-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for this enhancement the authors have investigated the adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and water from lithium oxide (a leading candidate for the breeder material) by temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy. The results from these studies indicate that several different types of hydroxide groups are formed on the lithium oxide surface. They also suggest that under certain conditions hydride species form on the surface. The role of these species in tritium release from lithium oxide is discussed.

  13. Effect of Synthesized MgNi4Y Catalyst on Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Milled MgH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ChitsazKhoyi, Leila; Raygan, Shahram; Pourabdoli, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    It has been reported that ball milling and adding catalyst can improve hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2. In this study, simultaneous effect of adding catalyst and ball milling on hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2 was studied. Mechanical alloying and heat treatment methods were used to synthesize MgNi4Y intermetallic as a catalyst. In this regard, pure Mg, Ni, and Y elemental powders were ball milled in different conditions and then heat treated at 1073 K (800 °C) for 4 hours. XRD and FESEM methods were used to investigate properties of the samples. It was found that, after 10 hours of ball milling and then heat treating at 1073 K (800 °C), MgNi4Y intermetallic was formed almost completely. The results of Sievert tests showed that as-received MgH2 did not release any significant amount of hydrogen at 623 K (350 °C). But, after ball milling for 10 hours, 0.8 wt pct hydrogen was released from MgH2 at 623 K (350 °C) in 40 minutes. Adding 10 wt pct catalyst via ball milling to MgH2 led to releasing 3.5 wt pct hydrogen in the same conditions. In addition, increasing ball milling time from 10 to 65 hours increased the amount of released hydrogen from 51 to 85 pct of theoretical hydrogen desorption value and improved kinetic of desorption process.

  14. Hydrogenation of CO-bearing species on grains: unexpected chemical desorption of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Moudens, A.; Baouche, S.; Chaabouni, H.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-05-01

    The amount of methanol in the gas phase and the CO depletion from the gas phase are still open problems in astrophysics. In this work, we investigate solid-state hydrogenation of CO-bearing species via H-exposure of carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and methanol-thin films deposited on cold surfaces, paying attention to the possibility of a return to the gas phase. The products are probed via infrared spectroscopy (reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy), and two types of mass spectroscopy protocols: temperature-programmed desorption, and during-exposure desorption techniques. In the case of the [CO+H] reactive system, we have found that chemical desorption of CO is more efficient than H-addition reactions and HCO and H2CO formation; the studies of the [H2CO +H] reactive system show a strong competition between all surface processes, chemical desorption of H2CO, H-addition (CH3OH formation) and H-abstraction (CO formation); finally, [CH3OH + H] seems to be a non-reactive system and chemical desorption of methanol is not efficient. CO-bearing species present a see-saw mechanism between CO and H2CO balanced by the competition of H-addition and H2-abstraction that enhances the CO chemical desorption. The chemical network leading to methanol has to be reconsidered. The methanol formation on the surface of interstellar dust grain is still possible through CO+H reaction; nevertheless, its consumption of adsorbed H atoms should be higher than previously expected.

  15. Measurement of hydrogen solubility and desorption rate in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Erck, R.; Park, E.T.

    1997-04-01

    Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium was measured at a hydrogen pressure of 9.09 x 10{sup {minus}4} torr at temperatures between 250 and 700{degrees}C. Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium decreased with temperature. The measured desorption rate of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process; the activation energy is 0.067 eV. Oxygen-charged V-4Cr-4Ti specimens were also investigated to determine the effect of oxygen impurity on hydrogen solubility and desorption in the alloy. Oxygen in V-4Cr-4Ti increases hydrogen solubility and desorption kinetics. To determine the effect of a calcium oxide insulator coating on V-4Cr-4Ti, hydrogen solubility in lithium-calcium alloys that contained 0-8.0 percent calcium was also measured. The distribution ratio R of hydrogen between liquid lithium or lithium-calcium and V-4Cr-4Ti increased as temperature decreased (R {approx} 10 and 100 at 700 and 250{degrees}C, respectively). However at <267{degrees}C, solubility data could not be obtained by this method because of the slow kinetics of hydrogen permeation through the vanadium alloy.

  16. The effect of stress on hydrogen uptake and desorption by A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1991-01-01

    The uptake and desorption of hydrogen by A-286 as a function of stress was studied using electrochemical methods. It was found that the apparent surface hydrogen concentration, the mean hydrogen concentration, and the hydrogen distribution uniformity all increased up to a stress level 50 percent of yield and decreased thereafter. The value of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient was relatively unaffected by stress while the percent of trapped hydrogen appeared to decrease with increasing stress.

  17. Effect of carbon on hydrogen desorption and absorption of mechanically milled MgH 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, C. X.; Guo, Z. X.

    The use of MgH 2, instead of pure Mg, in the mechanical synthesis of Mg-based hydrogen storage materials offers added benefit to powder size refinement and reduced oxygen contamination. Alloying additions can further improve the sorption kinetics at a relatively low temperature. This paper examines the effect of graphitic carbon on the desorption and absorption of MgH 2. Graphite powder of different concentrations were mechanically milled with MgH 2 particles. The milled powder was characterised by XRD, SEM and simultaneous TG and DSC techniques. The results show that graphite poses little influence on the desorption properties of MgH 2. However, it does benefit the absorption process, leading to rapid hydrogen uptake in the re-hydrogenated sample. After dehydrogenation, 5 wt.% of hydrogen was re-absorbed within 30 min at 250 °C for the ( MgH 2+10 G) mixture prior-milled for 8 h, while only 0.8 wt.% for the pure MgH 2 milled for 8 h, the effect may be attributed to the interaction between crystalline graphite with H 2 disassociation close to the MgH 2 or Mg surface. Moreover, graphite can also inhibit the formation of a new oxide layer on the surface of Mg particles.

  18. Effects of hydrogen surface processes on hydrogen retention in plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterl, Jerome; Smirnov, Roman; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen retention and recycling on metallic plasma-facing components (PFCs) are among the key-issues for future fusion devices due to both safety and operational reasons. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, parameters of hydrogen desorption from Wsurfaces, experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions, show a large discrepancy. Indeed, various complex phenomena may affect hydrogen desorption (e.g atomic islands, roughness, surface reconstruction, impurities, ect). In this work, we investigate effects of hydrogen desorption from W surfaces on hydrogen retention in W material. Two regimes of hydrogen surface desorption (readsorption-limited and recombination-limited) can be identified and may affect the kinetic order of desorption. Within these desorption regimes, it is shown that release of hydrogen from W material in fusion-related conditions may be surface-limited at low temperature and diffusion-limited at high temperature. Analyses of hydrogen release regimes for thermodesorption experiments and plasma operations in fusion reactors show that surface processes may strongly affect retention and release of hydrogen from W material. In this context, effects of W surface coverage with oxygen on hydrogen desorption are discussed since high concentrations of oxygen on PFCs surfaces are expected in future fusion devices. This work is performed under the auspices of USDOE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER54739 and the PSI Science Center Grant DE-SC0001999 at UCSD.

  19. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  20. Real-time detection of hydrogen absorption and desorption in metallic palladium using vibrating wire method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Yuji; Nishimura, Atsuki; Yokooji, Honoka; Takata, Hiroki; Kawae, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    A vibrating wire (VW) method was applied to investigate the hydrogen absorption and desorption properties of palladium. At room temperature, a considerable shift in resonance frequency was successfully observed in VW spectra under H2 gas exposure. The shift is reversible in the initial stage of the exposure and is attributed to changes in the density and Young’s modulus of the VW sensor. Irreversibility of the shift because of embrittlement is detected after a sufficient exposure time. H absorption is slowed down enormously at T = 200 K owing to suppression of the thermal activation process.

  1. Hydrogen formation in PDRs: Laboratory stuides on recombinative hydrogen desorption from graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baouche, Saoud; Hornekær, Liv; Petrunin, V. V.; Luntz, Alan C.; Zecho, T.; Baurichter, Arnd

    Recent laboratory studies have shown that hydrogen atoms with temperatures exceeding 2000K, corresponding to velocities higher than 0.6 Km/s, adsorb into the chemisorption state on graphite surfaces [Zecho (2002)], at conditions similar to those occuring near dissociation fronts in photo dissociation regions (PDRs) [Hollenbach, & Tielens (1999)]. In the same study it was found by thermal desorption spectroscopy that hydrogen desorbs recombinatively with first order kinetics at temperatures around 450 K on a laboratory time scale [Zecho (2002)]. The corresponding desorption energy is compatible with 1.3eV, a value derived from an elaborate density functional analysis [Sha, & Jackson (2002)]. We present and discuss results of laboratory investigations on the dynamics of the molecular hydrogen formation reaction. In our ultra high vacuum surface science apparatus, we first cover a highly oriented pyrolitically grown graphite (0001) surface (HOPG) at room temperature with hydrogen atoms from a thermal cracker type atom source (T(H)= 2000K). We then apply pulsed laser assisted associative desorption (LAAD)[Diekhoner (2001)] to measure time-of-flight distributions of hydrogen and deuterium molecules released from the surface. We find that the molecules are ejected with high translational energies into the gas phase. The translational energy distribution peaks at around 1.3eV and is about 1.0eV wide, indicating that in the extreme up to 1/2 of the recombination energy is going into the translational co-ordinate. Molecules desorbing from step edges desorb at higher temperatures but exhibit a lower translational energy component, compatible with a surface temperature Maxwell Boltzmann distribution. Angular resolved measurements show that the desorption is sharply peaked into the direction of the surface normal, the width of the distribution depending on the surface temperature and the nature of the 'launch site' (basal plane sites/ edge site). An isotope effect could not be

  2. Hydrogen chemisorption and thermal desorption on the diamond C(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Song, K.-J.; Wang, Y. L.; Lu, H.-L.; Chuang, T. J.; Lin, J.-C.

    1997-11-01

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) were utilized to study the interaction of atomic hydrogen with single crystal diamond C(111) surface. From isotherm and isostere analysis of TPD spectra acquired at various sample heating rates ranging from 0.6 K/s to 30 K/s, the kinetic parameters were extracted. It is found that molecular hydrogen desorption from the C(111) surface exhibits the first-order kinetics. This result is confirmed by no apparent shift in peak temperatures of TPD spectra for hydrogen coverage above 0.2 ML. At lower coverage regime, the isothermal desorption experiment also indicates the first-order desorption kinetics. A nearly coverage-independent activation energy of (3.7±0.1) eV and a prefactor of (9.5±4.0)×1013s-1 are obtained except at relatively low coverages (below ˜0.2 ML). In addition, the half-order LEED spots intensity decreases linearly with increase of the hydrogen coverage and drops to zero at ˜0.5 ML. These results are interpreted with a model that during adsorption hydrogen atoms segregate to form metastable, highly hydrogenated domains from where hydrogen atoms recombine and desorb concertedly as the substrate surface is heated up. The comparison of this work with the hydrogen adsorption and desorption on silicon surfaces is also discussed.

  3. Change in soft magnetic properties of Fe-based metallic glasses during hydrogen absorption and desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, L.; Lovas, A.; Kiss, L.F.

    2005-08-15

    The stress level can be altered in soft magnetic amorphous alloys by hydrogen absorption. The resulting changes in the soft magnetic parameters are reversible or irreversible, depending on the chemical composition. Some of these effects are demonstrated in Fe-B, Fe-W-B, and Fe-V-B glassy ribbons, in which various magnetic parameters are measured mainly during hydrogen desorption. The rate of hydrogen desorption is also monitored by measuring the pressure change in a hermetically closed bomb. The observed phenomena are interpreted on the basis of induced stresses and chemical interactions between the solute metal and hydrogen.

  4. Revisiting reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterl, Jerome; Smirnov, Roman; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2015-11-01

    Plasma-material interactions may strongly influence plasma performance and life-time of future magnetic fusion devices. Understanding the multifaceted physics of hydrogen retention in plasma-facing components (PFC) is thus crucial, but remains challenging due to the wide spectrum of retention processes on PFC surface and in PFC bulk induced by long-time exposure of PFC to high flux of energy and particles. We revisit here some aspects of reaction-diffusion models used to investigate hydrogen retention in material. We focus on analysis of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiment considering only one type of traps in material and first neglecting surface effects. We show that solute hydrogen concentration in retention region usually remains in equilibrium during TDS experiments. In this regime, analytic description of thermal desorption spectra indicates that trapping of solute hydrogen during TDS cannot be ignored. Main features of thermal desorption are then analytically described and refined interpretation of Arrhenius plots is proposed. Effects of surface processes on hydrogen outgassing during TDS experiments are then introduced and surface-limited outgassing regimes are discussed.

  5. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-05-26

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

  6. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F.

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  7. Dust as interstellar catalyst. I. Quantifying the chemical desorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F.; Cazaux, S.; Hocuk, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The presence of dust in the interstellar medium has profound consequences on the chemical composition of regions where stars are forming. Recent observations show that many species formed onto dust are populating the gas phase, especially in cold environments where UV- and cosmic-ray-induced photons do not account for such processes. Aims: The aim of this paper is to understand and quantify the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, the so-called chemical desorption process, so that an explicit formula can be derived that can be included in astrochemical models. Methods: We present a collection of experimental results of more than ten reactive systems. For each reaction, different substrates such as oxidized graphite and compact amorphous water ice were used. We derived a formula for reproducing the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process that considers the equipartition of the energy of newly formed products, followed by classical bounce on the surface. In part II of this study we extend these results to astrophysical conditions. Results: The equipartition of energy correctly describes the chemical desorption process on bare surfaces. On icy surfaces, the chemical desorption process is much less efficient, and a better description of the interaction with the surface is still needed. Conclusions: We show that the mechanism that directly transforms solid species into gas phase species is efficient for many reactions.

  8. Numerical comparison of hydrogen desorption behaviors of metal hydride beds based on uranium and on zirconium-cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoung, S.; Yoo, H.; Ju, H.

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, the hydrogen delivery capabilities of uranium (U) and zirconium-cobalt (ZrCo) are compared quantitatively in order to find the optimum getter materials for tritium storage. A three-dimensional hydrogen desorption model is applied to two identically designed cylindrical beds with the different materials, and hydrogen desorption simulations are then conducted. The simulation results show superior hydrogen delivery performance and easier thermal management capability for the U bed. This detailed analysis of the hydrogen desorption behaviors of beds with U and ZrCo will help to identify the optimal bed material, bed design, and operating conditions for the storage and delivery system in ITER. (authors)

  9. Bulk Diffusion-Controlled Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy with Examples for Hydrogen in Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchheim, Reiner

    2016-02-01

    Bulk diffusion-controlled thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is studied by solving the corresponding transport equations numerically as well as analytically with appropriate approximations. The two solutions are compared in order to validate the derived equations including the Kissinger equation. Besides the diffusion of the desorbed species through the sample, trapping of the species at special lattice sites within the sample is included in the numerical and approximate analytical solutions. Trapping energies are mono-energetic, multi-energetic, or are described by a box-type distribution. TDS-peaks were simulated for different heating rates, sample thicknesses, trap concentrations, and initial degrees of trap saturation. It is shown that for the case of mono-energetic traps, Kissinger's equation is obeyed for both numerical and analytical results. This widely used equation for reaction rate-controlled studies is derived in an explicit form for diffusion-controlled processes. Together with a newly derived relation between maximum desorption rate and temperature, TDS-spectra yield information about diffusion coefficient, trap energies, and trap concentration as well as trap saturation. This is exemplified using data of two experimental studies. Although the numerical and analytical treatment is in general applicable to all diffusion species, hydrogen in iron alloys is used as a model system because of its technological importance and the increasing number of experimental work with this material.

  10. Hydrogen Dissociation, Spillover, and Desorption from Cu-Supported Co Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Emily A; Marcinkowski, Matthew D; Murphy, Colin J; Liriano, Melissa L; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-10-01

    Co-Cu nanoparticles have recently been explored for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) as a way to combine the long chain selectivity of Co with Cu's activity for alcohol formation in order to synthesize oxygenated transportation fuels. Depending on particle size, hydrogen dissociation can be a rate-determining step in cobalt-catalyzed FTS. To understand the fundamentals of uptake and release of hydrogen from the Co/Cu bimetallic system, we prepared well-defined Co nanoparticles on Cu(111). We demonstrate that hydrogen spills over from dissociation sites on the Co nanoparticles to the Cu(111) surface via the Co-Cu interface and that desorption of H occurs at a temperature that is lower than from Co or Cu alone, which we attribute to the Co-Cu interface sites. From this data, we have constructed an energy landscape for the facile dissociation, spillover, and desorption of hydrogen on the Co-Cu bimetallic system. PMID:26278448

  11. Electron-ion dynamics in laser-assisted desorption of hydrogen atoms from H-Si(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Varga, Kalman

    2011-09-15

    In the framework of real time real space time-dependent density functional theory we have studied the electron-ion dynamics of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface H-Si(111) subjected to intense laser irradiation. Two surface fragments of different sizes have been used in the simulations. When the intensity and duration of the laser exceed certain levels (which depend on the wavelength) we observe the desorption of the hydrogen atoms, while the underlying silicon layer remains essentially undamaged. Upon further increase of the laser intensity, the chemical bonds between silicon atoms break as well. The results of the simulations suggest that with an appropriate choice of laser parameters it should be possible to remove the hydrogen layer from the H-Si(111) surface in a matter of a few tens of femtoseconds. We have also observed that at high laser field intensities (2-4 V/A in this work) the desorption occurs even when the laser frequency is smaller than the optical gap of the silicon surface fragments. Therefore, nonlinear phenomena must play an essential role in such desorption processes.

  12. Advanced Hydrogen Liquefaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Kromer, Brian; Neu, Ben; Jankowiak, Jerome; Barrett, Philip; Drnevich, Raymond

    2011-09-28

    The project identified and quantified ways to reduce the cost of hydrogen liquefaction, and reduce the cost of hydrogen distribution. The goal was to reduce the power consumption by 20% and then to reduce the capital cost. Optimizing the process, improving process equipment, and improving ortho-para conversion significantly reduced the power consumption of liquefaction, but by less than 20%. Because the efficiency improvement was less than the target, the program was stopped before the capital cost was addressed. These efficiency improvements could provide a benefit to the public to improve the design of future hydrogen liquefiers. The project increased the understanding of hydrogen liquefaction by modeling different processes and thoroughly examining ortho-para separation and conversion. The process modeling provided a benefit to the public because the project incorporated para hydrogen into the process modeling software, so liquefaction processes can be modeled more accurately than using only normal hydrogen. Adding catalyst to the first heat exchanger, a simple method to reduce liquefaction power, was identified, analyzed, and quantified. The demonstrated performance of ortho-para separation is sufficient for at least one identified process concept to show reduced power cost when compared to hydrogen liquefaction processes using conventional ortho-para conversion. The impact of improved ortho-para conversion can be significant because ortho para conversion uses about 20-25% of the total liquefaction power, but performance improvement is necessary to realize a substantial benefit. Most of the energy used in liquefaction is for gas compression. Improvements in hydrogen compression will have a significant impact on overall liquefier efficiency. Improvements to turbines, heat exchangers, and other process equipment will have less impact.

  13. Application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data at 25 deg C

    SciTech Connect

    Danford, M.D.

    1985-10-01

    The application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data (coulombs of H/sub 2/ desorbed versus time) has been studied. From these analyses, important information concerning hydrogen solubilities and the nature of the hydrogen distributions in the metal has been obtained. Two nickel base alloys, Rene' 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, are studied in this work. For the nickel base alloys, it is found that the hydrogen distributions after electrolytic charging conforms closely to those which would be predicted by diffusion theory. For Waspaloy samples charged at 5,000 psi, it is found that the hydrogen distributions are essentially the same as those obtained by electrolytic charging. The hydrogen distributions in electrolytically charged 4340 steel, on the other hand, are essentially uniform in nature, which would not be predicted by diffusion theory. A possible explanation has been proposed. Finally, it is found that the hydrogen desorption is completely explained by the nature of the hydrogen distribution in the metal, and that the fast hydrogen is not due to surface and sub-surface hydride formation, as was originally proposed.

  14. The application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data at 25 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data (coulombs of H2 desorbed versus time) has been studied. From these analyses, important information concerning hydrogen solubilities and the nature of the hydrogen distributions in the metal has been obtained. Two nickel base alloys, Rene' 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, are studied in this work. For the nickel base alloys, it is found that the hydrogen distributions after electrolytic charging conforms closely to those which would be predicted by diffusion theory. For Waspaloy samples charged at 5,000 psi, it is found that the hydrogen distributions are essentially the same as those obtained by electrolytic charging. The hydrogen distributions in electrolytically charged 4340 steel, on the other hand, are essentially uniform in nature, which would not be predicted by diffusion theory. A possible explanation has been proposed. Finally, it is found that the hydrogen desorption is completely explained by the nature of the hydrogen distribution in the metal, and that the fast hydrogen is not due to surface and sub-surface hydride formation, as was originally proposed.

  15. Hydrogen recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

  16. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared tomore » a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.« less

  17. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared to a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.

  18. The development of microstructure during hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination treatment of sintered neodymium-iron-boron-type magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, R. S.; Harris, I. R.; Walton, A.

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of the hydrogenation disproportionation desorption and recombination (HDDR) process on scrap sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) type magnets have been investigated. At each stage of the process, the microstructural changes have been studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points and then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. This process was accelerated at particle surfaces and at free surfaces produced by any cracks in the powder particles. However, the recombination reaction appeared to initiate randomly throughout the particles with no apparent preference for particle surfaces or internal cracks. During the hydrogenation of the grain boundaries and triple junctions, the disproportionation reaction was, however, affected by the much higher oxygen content of the sintered NdFeB compared with that of the as-cast NdFeB alloys. Throughout the entire HDDR reaction the oxidised triple junctions (from the sintered structure) remained unreacted and hence, remained in their original form in the fine recombined microstructure. This resulted in a very significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure and this could lend to improved consolidation in the recycled magnets.

  19. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-08-28

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  20. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaobo; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  1. Finite-Temperature Hydrogen Adsorption/Desorption Thermodynamics Driven by Soft Vibration Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Lee, Eui-Sup; Yoon, Mina; Yong-Hyun, Kim

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that room-temperature hydrogen storage on nanostructured or porous materials requires enhanced dihydrogen adsorption. In this work we reveal that room-temperature hydrogen storage is possible not only by the enhanced adsorption, but also by making use of the vibrational free energy from soft vibration modes. These modes exist for example in the case of metallo-porphyrin-incorporated graphenes (M-PIGs) with out-of-plane ( buckled ) metal centers. There, the in-plane potential surfaces are flat because of multiple-orbital-coupling between hydrogen molecules and the buckled-metal centers. This study investigates the finite-temperature adsorption/desorption thermodynamics of hydrogen molecules adsorbed on M-PIGs by employing first-principles total energy and vibrational spectrum calculations. Our results suggest that the current design strategy for room-temperature hydrogen storage materials should be modified by explicitly taking finite-temperature vibration thermodynamics into account.

  2. Absorption and desorption of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium for Zr--V--Fe getter

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, K.; Inoue, N.; Watanabe, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    1984-07-01

    Nonevaporable getters have wide applicability for developing the tritium handling techniques for thermonuclear fusion devices. From this viewpoint, mechanisms of the absorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes and the isotope effects were investigated for a Zr--V--Fe alloy (St-707) by means of the mass analyzed thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was observed that the absorption rate was proportional to the first power of the pressure, indicating that the rate limiting step is the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen isotopes on the surface. The activation energy was very small, in the order of magnitude of a few tens of calories per mole in a temperature range from -196 to 200 /sup 0/C. The desorption rate was proportional to the square of the amount of absorption, indicating that the rate limiting step is the associative desorption reaction of hydrogen atoms or ions diffused to the surface from the bulk. The rate constants for hydrogen and deuterium were determined as k/sub d/(H/sub 2/) = (5.3/sup +2.6//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.0 +- 0.7) x 10/sup 3//RT) and k/sub d/(D/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +2.7//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.6 +- 0.8) x 10/sup 3//RT) in (1/Pa 1 s), respectively, where R is in (cal/mol deg). With regard to tritium, the rate constant was evaluated as k/sub d/(T/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +20//sub -4.0/)exp(-(29.3 +- 3) x 10/sup 3//RT), however, the frequency factor will have to be corrected by knowing the relative sensitivity factor of the mass spectrometer for tritium (T/sub 2/).

  3. Preparation and thermal desorption properties of dc sputtered zirconium-hydrogen-helium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Y. C.; Shi, L. Q.; Zhang, L.; He, Z. J.; Zhang, B.; Wang, L. B.

    2008-11-15

    We developed a new approach for preparing hydrogen and helium co-containing zirconium films (Zr-H-He) to simulate aging metal tritides. We also studied the effect of hydrogen on helium behavior, in which we applied direct current magnetron sputtering in a mixture of working gases (helium, argon, and hydrogen). The amount and depth profile of helium and hydrogen trapped in the films were determined using the elastic recoil detection analysis. The microstructure and surface morphology of the Zr-H-He films were studied by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the effect of hydrogen on the thermal release behavior of helium in the Zr film, thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) was used, which revealed a similar desorption behavior to aged tritides. TDS experiments showed that the spectra were constituted by low-temperature peaks around 300 deg. C and high temperature peaks above 750 deg. C. Furthermore, the solid-phase {alpha} to {delta} transformation changed the shapes of the high-temperature peaks related to microstates of helium bubbles and caused the peak with a massive helium release shift toward lower temperature obviously.

  4. Desorption of Hydrogen from Si(111) by Resonant Excitation of the Si-H Vibrational Stretch Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiheng; Feldman, Leonard C.; Tolk, Norman; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cohen, Philip I

    2006-01-01

    Past efforts to achieve selective bond scission by vibrational excitation have been thwarted by energy thermalization. Here we report resonant photodesorption of hydrogen from a Si(111) surface using tunable infrared radiation. The wavelength dependence of the desorption yield peaks at 0.26 electron volt: the energy of the Si-H vibrational stretch mode. The desorption yield is quadratic in the infrared intensity. A strong H/D isotope effect rules out thermal desorption mechanisms, and electronic effects are not applicable in this low-energy regime. A molecular mechanism accounting for the desorption event remains elusive.

  5. Thermal desorption of hydrogen from carbon and graphite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumi, H.; Takemura, Y.; Konishi, T.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2013-07-01

    Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) has been investigated to obtain fundamental information of hydrogen behavior in graphite and CFC especially at high temperatures. Thirteen brands of graphite and CFC materials charged with deuterium gas are tested up to the temperature of 1720 K with a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. TDS spectra have at least four peaks at 600-700 K, around 900 K, 1300-1450 K and 1600-1650 K. The change of TDS spectra is measured for the samples, which are charged with deuterium at 1273 K under a different pressure in the range of 83 Pa to 79 kPa. Physical and chemical states of deuterium in graphite and mechanisms of desorption are discussed.

  6. Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2012-04-26

    The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge

  7. Gas Diffusion in Metals: Fundamental Study of Helium-Point Defect Interactions in Iron and Kinetics of Hydrogen Desorption from Zirconium Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang

    influence of pre-existing defects on helium behavior in iron is studied by applying a hybrid model, which includes the defect evolution during neutron irradiation and the subsequent He ion implantation and THDS. These modeling predictions will be assessed in future experiments. The hydrogen desorption process from zirconium hydride and zirconium in vacuum is also studied by coordinated experimental and modeling methods. The production and verification of the desired delta-zirconium hydride is discussed while thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is employed to obtain the hydrogen desorption spectra directly. In addition, a one-dimensional two-phase moving boundary model coupled with a kinetic description of hydrogen desorption from a two-phase region of delta-ZrH1.6+/-n and α-Zr is developed to compare with the TDS experimental results.

  8. Tunneling effects in the kinetics of helium and hydrogen isotopes desorption from single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Danilchenko, B. A. Yaskovets, I. I.; Uvarova, I. Y.; Dolbin, A. V.; Esel'son, V. B.; Basnukaeva, R. M.; Vinnikov, N. A.

    2014-04-28

    The kinetics of desorption both helium isotopes and molecules of hydrogen and deuterium from open-ended or γ-irradiated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles was investigated in temperature range of 10–300 K. The gases desorption rates obey the Arrhenius law at high temperatures, deviate from it with temperature reduction and become constant at low temperatures. These results indicate the quantum nature of gas outflow from carbon nanotube bundles. We had deduced the crossover temperature below which the quantum corrections to the effective activation energy of desorption become significant. This temperature follows linear dependence against the inverse mass of gas molecule and is consistent with theoretical prediction.

  9. Removal of mercury contamination on primary mass standards by hydrogen plasma and thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, P.; Marti, K.; Russi, S.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of a high mercury contamination on a Pt reference mass by thermal desorption was studied directly by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently the contamination mechanism was investigated. Samples of PtIr and AuPt exposed to vapour of mercury in air were studied using XPS and gravimetric mass determination. We find an extremely rapid mercury contamination which takes place within minutes and reaches an initial equilibrium state after 2 h to 4 h. Roughly 1 to 2 monolayers of mercury adsorbs directly on the metal surface. A natural contamination of carbon and oxygen compounds is at the top. Due to the accumulation of mercury, we find a gain in mass which corresponds to 20 µg to 26 µg for a PtIr standard. XPS data from a historical Pt standard give strong evidence for further average mercury accumulation of (1.3 ± 0.1) µg/year during a period of more than a century. This can be explained by a two-step mechanism presented in this study. The speed of contamination depends on the initial surface conditions. Polishing activates the surface and results in an enhanced accumulation of mercury. Natural contamination by C and O can delay but not prevent contamination. We further demonstrate that the mercury contamination can be removed by both hydrogen plasma and thermal desorption. The removal of mercury by hydrogen plasma can directly be attributed to the synthesis of gaseous mercury dihydrides at low pressures.

  10. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  11. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of vacuum UV photo-processed methanol ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, D. M.; Bossa, J.-B.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol in the interstellar medium mainly forms upon sequential hydrogenation of solid CO. With typical abundances of up to 15% (with respect to water) it is an important constituent of interstellar ices where it is considered as a precursor in the formation of large and complex organic molecules (COMs), e.g. upon vacuum UV (VUV) photo-processing or exposure to cosmic rays. Aims: This study aims at detecting novel complex organic molecules formed during the VUV photo-processing of methanol ice in the laboratory using a technique more sensitive than regular surface diagnostic tools. In addition, the formation kinetics of the main photo-products of methanol are unravelled for an astronomically relevant temperature (20 K) and radiation dose. Methods: The VUV photo-processing of CH3OH ice is studied by applying laser desorption post-ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDPI TOF-MS), and analysed by combining molecule-specific fragmentation and desorption features. Results: The mass spectra correspond to fragment ions originating from a number of previously recorded molecules and from new COMs, such as the series (CO)xH, with x = 3 and y < 3x-1, to which prebiotic glycerin belongs. The formation of these large COMs has not been reported in earlier photolysis studies and suggests that such complex species may form in the solid state under interstellar conditions.

  12. Enhanced hydrogen desorption properties of magnesium hydride by coupling non-metal doping and nano-confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Daliang; Wang, Yulong; Wu, Chengzhang; Li, Qian; Ding, Weizhong; Sun, Chenghua

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH2) offers excellent capacity to store hydrogen, but it suffers from the high desorption temperature (>283 °C for starting release hydrogen). In this work, we calculated the hydrogen desorption energy of Mg76H152 clusters with/without non-metal dopants by density functional theory method. Phosphorus (P), as identified as the best dopant, can reduce the reaction energy for releasing one hydrogen molecule from 0.75 eV (bulk MgH2) to 0.20 eV. Inspired by the calculation, P-doped ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) was synthesized by one-step method and employed as the scaffold for loading MgH2 nanoparticles, forming MgH2@P/CMK-3. Element analysis shows that phosphorus dopants have been incorporated into the CMK-3 scaffold and magnesium and phosphorus elements are well-distributed in carbon scaffold hosts. Tests of hydrogen desorption confirmed that P-doping can remarkably enhance the hydrogen release properties of nanoconfined MgH2 at low temperature, specifically ˜1.5 wt. % H2 released from MgH2@P/CMK-3 below 200 °C. This work, based on the combination of computational calculations and experimental studies, demonstrated that the combined approach of non-metal doping and nano-confinement is promising for enhancing the hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2, which provides a strategy to address the challenge of hydrogen desorption from MgH2 at mild operational conditions.

  13. Electronic structure of partially hydrogenated Si(100)-( 2 x 1) surfaces prepared by thermal and nonthermal desorption.

    PubMed

    Bobrov, K; Comtet, G; Dujardin, G; Hellner, L

    2001-03-19

    The electronic structure of partially hydrogenated Si(100)- (2 x 1) surfaces, prepared by controlled thermal annealing and nonthermal photon stimulated desorption of fully hydrogenated Si(100) surfaces, has been investigated by using valence band photoemission. Thermal and nonthermal desorption are found to produce very specific electronic surface structures. This led us to the discovery of two specific surface states having binding energies of 1.0 and 0.7 eV associated with the isolated Si dimers and single Si dangling bonds, respectively. PMID:11289998

  14. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni-CNT Nanocomposite Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayati, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.; Jafari, M.; Sabooni, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this research, the effects of nanocrystallization and incorporation of aluminum, titanium, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on hydrogen desorption behavior of Mg2Ni alloy were investigated. Toward this purpose, nanocrystalline Mg2Ni intermetallic compound with average grain size of 20 nm was prepared by ball milling of elemental magnesium and nickel powders. Mg2Ni powder was then ball milled with aluminum and titanium powders for 20 h to dissolve these elements into the Mg2Ni structure, leading to the formation of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni compound. The elemental x-ray mapping analysis revealed the uniform dissolution of aluminum and titanium inside the Mg2Ni structure. Mg2Ni and Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni compounds were further ball milled with 3 wt.% CNT for 5 h. The high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that CNTs have retained their tubular shape after ball-milling process. The hydrogen desorption properties of the samples were identified using a Sieverts-type apparatus at 473 K. The Mg2Ni, Mg2Ni-CNT, and Mg1.7Ti0.15Al0.15-CNT samples showed the desorbed hydrogen of 0.17, 0.25, and 0.28 wt.% after 1 h, respectively, indicating 47 and 65% increase in the hydrogen desorption capability of Mg2Ni via CNT addition and co-presence of aluminum-titanium-CNT. The direct hydrogen diffusion through CNTs and development of local atomic distortion due to substitution of magnesium atoms by aluminum and titanium appears to be responsible for enhancement of desorption behavior of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15-3 wt.% CNT.

  15. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1995-04-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials; however, this added hydrogen can lead to increased costs in the tritium purification system. The objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the interactions between hydrogen and lithium oxide surfaces so that the authors can take full advantage of the observed enhancement of tritium release caused by hydrogen addition without incurring high costs in the tritium purification plant.

  16. Angular distributions of surface produced H{sup −} ions for reflection and desorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Kasuya, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2014-02-15

    A numerical simulation code, Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target, has been run to clarify the effects due to the incident angle of hydrogen flux onto surface collision cascade in the subsurface region of a Cs covered Mo plasma grid. The code has taken into account the threshold energy for negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ions to leave the surface. This modification has caused the shift of energy distribution functions of H{sup −} from that of hydrogen atoms leaving the surface. The results have shown that large incident angle of hydrogen particle tilt the angular distribution of reflection component, while it caused a small effect onto the angular distribution of desorption component. The reflection coefficient has increased, while the desorption yield has decreased for increased angle of incidence measured from the surface normal.

  17. Principles of hydrogen radical mediated peptide/protein fragmentation during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki

    2016-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is a very easy way to obtain large sequence tags and, thereby, reliable identification of peptides and proteins. Recently discovered new matrices have enhanced the MALDI-ISD yield and opened new research avenues. The use of reducing and oxidizing matrices for MALDI-ISD of peptides and proteins favors the production of fragmentation pathways involving "hydrogen-abundant" and "hydrogen-deficient" radical precursors, respectively. Since an oxidizing matrix provides information on peptide/protein sequences complementary to that obtained with a reducing matrix, MALDI-ISD employing both reducing and oxidizing matrices is a potentially useful strategy for de novo peptide sequencing. Moreover, a pseudo-MS(3) method provides sequence information about N- and C-terminus extremities in proteins and allows N- and C-terminal side fragments to be discriminated within the complex MALDI-ISD mass spectrum. The combination of high mass resolution of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) analyzer and the software suitable for MALDI-ISD facilitates the interpretation of MALDI-ISD mass spectra. A deeper understanding of the MALDI-ISD process is necessary to fully exploit this method. Thus, this review focuses first on the mechanisms underlying MALDI-ISD processes, followed by a discussion of MALDI-ISD applications in the field of proteomics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 35:535-556, 2016. PMID:25286767

  18. Diffusion, adsorption, and desorption of molecular hydrogen on graphene and in graphite.

    PubMed

    Petucci, Justin; LeBlond, Carl; Karimi, Majid; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2013-07-28

    The diffusion of molecular hydrogen (H2) on a layer of graphene and in the interlayer space between the layers of graphite is studied using molecular dynamics computer simulations. The interatomic interactions were modeled by an Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order (AIREBO) potential. Molecular statics calculations of H2 on graphene indicate binding energies ranging from 41 meV to 54 meV and migration barriers ranging from 3 meV to 12 meV. The potential energy surface of an H2 molecule on graphene, with the full relaxations of molecular hydrogen and carbon atoms is calculated. Barriers for the formation of H2 through the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism are calculated. Molecular dynamics calculations of mean square displacements and average surface lifetimes of H2 on graphene at various temperatures indicate a diffusion barrier of 9.8 meV and a desorption barrier of 28.7 meV. Similar calculations for the diffusion of H2 in the interlayer space between the graphite sheets indicate high and low temperature regimes for the diffusion with barriers of 51.2 meV and 11.5 meV. Our results are compared with those of first principles. PMID:23902002

  19. Hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior with oxygen-contaminated boron film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, K.; Eiki, H.; Inoue, N.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Hirohata, Y.; Hino, T.

    The effect of oxygen contamination on hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior from a boron coating film has been studied. Oxygen atoms were implanted by glow discharge in an O 2/He gas mixture until near saturation, into the boron film deposited by PCVD. The depth profile measurement by AES showed that O atoms were retained up to the depth of 20 nm. Hydrogen discharges were carried out to investigate the H absorption behavior. The capability of H absorption decreased for 30-50% compared to the pure boron film without O contamination. After the discharge, the depth profile of the oxygen atoms was not changed, which means that a stable oxide layer had formed. The reduction of the H absorption capability occurs probably because the formation of the boron oxide prevents H atoms from trapping in the form of B-H bonding. Most of the retained H atoms can be released by a heating up to 500°C with the O contamination. The required temperature for H evacuation is slightly higher than that for pure boron film. In addition, a small peak was observed at around 200°C. From these results, the applicability of boronization to future long term discharges was discussed, in which the boron film saturates with O contamination.

  20. Catalytic reduction of CO with hydrogen sulfide. 4. Temperature-programmed desorption of methanethiol on anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.D.; White, J.M.; Ratcliffe, C.T.

    1986-07-03

    The interaction of methanethiol with anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile was studied by temperature-programmed desorption. Dissociative adsorption occurs on rutile but is insignificant on anatase. Decomposition products are dominated by H/sub 2/ on rutile and by CH/sub 4/ on sulfided rutile. In both cases desorption occurs between 500 and 775 K. The 5- and 4-coordinate sites on the (110) face of rutile are proposed as the active sites for decomposition. The dominance of methane on a sulfided surface is attributed to the relatively large supply of highly mobile surface hydrogen atoms.

  1. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    DOEpatents

    Hindin, Saul G.; Roberts, George W.

    1980-08-12

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  2. The Effect of Platinum-coatings on Hydrogen- and Water-absorption and Desorption Characteristics of Lithium Zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, B.; Bandow, S.; Nagata, S.; Saito, K.; Tokunaga, K.; Morita, K.

    Hydrogen (H)- and water (H2O)-storage and desorption characteristics of 25 nm thick Pt films onLi2ZrO3composite materials, exposed to normal air at room temperature, have been investigated by means of elastic recoil detection (ERD), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), weight gain measurement (WGM), and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) techniques. It was found by the ERD and TDS that H and H2O were absorbed into the Pt-coated Li2ZrO3 in air at room temperature and desorbed from it in vacuum at much low temperatures of approximately 317 and 309 K, respectively. In addition, the WGM and TDS spectra revealed that the absorption and desorption characters ofsome gases such as CH4, CO, and CO2including H as well as H2Ointo the Li2ZrO3 bulk were improved by Pt deposition.

  3. Electron-stimulated desorption study of hydrogen-exposed aluminum films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, CH.; Bujor, M.; Poppa, H.

    1984-01-01

    H2 adsorption of evaporated clean and H2-exposed aluminum films is investigated by using the electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) method. A strong H(+)ESD signal is observed on a freshly evaporated aluminum surface which is clean according to previously proposed cleanlines criteria. An increased H(+) yield on H2 exposure is also observed. However, the increasing rate of H(+) emission could be directly correlated with small increases in H2O partial pressure during H2 exposure. It is proposed that the oxidation of aluminum by water vapor and subsequent adsorption of H2 or water is the primary process of the enhanced high H(+) yield during H2 exposure.

  4. Hydrogen released from bulk ZnO single crystals investigated by time-of-flight electron-stimulated desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Yuan, Xiaoli; Ueda, Kazuyuki

    2010-11-15

    Electron beam (e-beam) irradiation effects on ZnO single crystals have been investigated by using time-of-flight electron-stimulated desorption (TOF-ESD). The samples were irradiated by using a continuous 0.5 or 1.5 keV e-beam, while the TOF-ESD spectra were taken by using a pulsed 0.5 keV e-beam. For both the O-terminated and Zn-terminated surfaces, the major desorption is H{sup +} desorption. The main trend of H{sup +} desorption intensity and evolution as a function of irradiation time is similar for both faces. The H{sup +} peak is much higher after 1.5 keV irradiation than after 0.5 keV irradiation. The intensity of the H{sup +} peak decreases exponentially as a function of irradiation time and partially recovers after the irradiation is stopped. These observations suggest that the main contribution of the H{sup +} desorption is hydrogen released from the dissociation of H-related defects and complexes in the bulk region of the ZnO by e-beam irradiation. This finding can be used to explain the reported ultraviolet degradation of ZnO single crystals under electron irradiation observed by cathodoluminescence. The surfaces play a lesser role for the H{sup +} desorption, as there are differences of the decreasing rate between the two faces and additionally the intensity of the H{sup +} peak for both the unclean O-face and Zn-facesis smaller than that for clean faces. While the H{sup +} desorption is mainly dominated by the bulk region, O{sup +} desorption is more influenced by the surfaces. There are two kinds of O{sup +} desorbed from ZnO having 13.0 {mu}s TOF and 14.2 {mu}s TOF. The O{sup +} desorption depends on the surface polarity, the surface conditions and the energy used for irradiation.

  5. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Ritter, James A.; Ebner, Armin D.; Wang, Jun; Holland, Charles E.

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  6. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  7. NaAlH4 Mixed with Carbon Nanotubes, Fullerene, and Titanium to Yield the Lowest Temperature for Hydrogen Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Jennifer; McFadden, Patrick; Kim, Sanga; Dobbins, Tabbetha

    Recent research in hydrogen storage has improved dehydrogenation methods with solid-state compounds. NaAlH4 is a complex hydrides which release hydrogen at a lower temperature making the compound a great candidate for hydrogen storage. However, a catalyst should be combined with NaAlH4 to release the lowest desorption temperature. Prior research showed that interaction of NaAlH4 with nanotube or fullerene effectively weakens the Al-H bonds causing hydrogen desorption at lower temperatures. In the present study, NaAlH4 is ball milled with three of these catalysts: titanium, carbon nanotubes and fullerene and the milling time is varied from 10 to 30 minutes to compare the dehydrogenation rates in each setup. The phase structures were identified using the X-ray diffraction. Of these catalysts, the fullerene yielded the most interesting result showing nanostructuring of the hydride during ball milling. The possibility of ``shot peening'' of the NaAlH4 by the fullerenes is explored.

  8. Optimization and kinetic modeling of cadmium desorption from citrus peels: a process for biosorbent regeneration.

    PubMed

    Njikam, Eloh; Schiewer, Silke

    2012-04-30

    Citrus peel biosorbents are efficient in removing heavy metals from wastewater. Heavy metal recovery and sorbent regeneration are important for the financial competitiveness of biosorption with other processes. The desorbing agents HNO(3), NaNO(3), Ca(NO(3))(2), EDTA, S, S-EDDS, and Na-Citrate were studied at different concentrations to optimize cadmium elution from orange or grapefruit peels. In most cases, desorption was fast, being over 90% complete within 50 min. However sodium nitrate and 0.001 M nitric acid were less efficient. Several new models for desorption kinetics were developed. While zero-, first- and second-order kinetics are commonly applied for modeling adsorption kinetics, the present study adapts these models to describe desorption kinetics. The proposed models relate to the number of metal-filled binding sites as the rate-determining reactant concentration. A model based on first order kinetics with respect to the remaining metal bound performed best. Cd bound in subsequent adsorption after desorption was similar to the original amount bound for desorption by nitric acid, but considerably lower for calcium nitrate as the desorbent. While complexing agents were effective desorbents, their cost is higher than that of common mineral acids. Thus 0.01-0.1 M acids are the most promising desorbing agents for efficient sorbent regeneration. PMID:22342899

  9. Improvement in hydrogen desorption from β- and γ-MgH2 upon transition-metal doping.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tanveer; Maark, Tuhina Adit; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-08-24

    A thorough study of the structural, electronic, and hydrogen-desorption properties of β- and γ-MgH2 phases substituted by selected transition metals (TMs) is performed through first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The TMs considered herein include Sc, V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Y, Zr, and Nb, which substitute for Mg at a doping concentration of 3.125 % in both the hydrides. This insertion of TMs causes a variation in the cell volumes of β- and γ-MgH2 . The majority of the TM dopants decrease the lattice constants, with Ni resulting in the largest reduction. From the formation-energy calculations, it is predicted that except for Cu and Ni, the mixing of all the selected TM dopants with the MgH2 phases is exothermic. The selected TMs also influence the stability of both β- and γ-MgH2 and cause destabilization by weakening the MgH bonds. Our results show that doping with certain TMs can facilitate desorption of hydrogen from β- and γ-MgH2 at much lower temperatures than from their pure forms. The hydrogen adsorption strengths are also studied by density-of-states analysis. PMID:26079892

  10. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  11. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wade C; Lewis, Charlotte R; Openshaw, Anna P; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27380389

  12. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  13. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  14. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  15. UV photoprocessing of CO2 ice: a complete quantification of photochemistry and photon-induced desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Manzano-Santamaría, J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Cruz-Díaz, G. A.; Chen, Y.-J.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Ice mantles that formed on top of dust grains are photoprocessed by the secondary ultraviolet (UV) field in cold and dense molecular clouds. UV photons induce photochemistry and desorption of ice molecules. Experimental simulations dedicated to ice analogs under astrophysically relevant conditions are needed to understand these processes. Aims: We present UV-irradiation experiments of a pure CO2 ice analog. Calibration of the quadrupole mass spectrometer allowed us to quantify the photodesorption of molecules to the gas phase. This information was added to the data provided by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer on the solid phase to obtain a complete quantitative study of the UV photoprocessing of an ice analog. Methods: Experimental simulations were performed in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. Ice samples were deposited onto an infrared transparent window at 8K and were subsequently irradiated with a microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. After irradiation, ice samples were warmed up until complete sublimation was attained. Results: Photolysis of CO2 molecules initiates a network of photon-induced chemical reactions leading to the formation of CO, CO3, O2, and O3. During irradiation, photon-induced desorption of CO and, to a lesser extent, O2 and CO2 took place through a process called indirect desorption induced by electronic transitions, with maximum photodesorption yields (Ypd) of ~1.2 × 10-2 molecules incident photon-1, ~9.3 × 10-4 molecules incident photon-1, and ~1.1 × 10-4 molecules incident photon-1, respectively. Conclusions: Calibration of mass spectrometers allows a direct quantification of photodesorption yields instead of the indirect values that were obtained from infrared spectra in most previous works. Supplementary information provided by infrared spectroscopy leads to a complete quantification, and therefore a better understanding, of the processes taking place in UV-irradiated ice mantles. Appendix A is available in

  16. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  17. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via desorption process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple adsorption and desorption cycles are required to achieve the reliable operation of copper removal and recovery. A green sorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was evaluated in this study for its desorptive characteristics as a companion study of the corresponding adsorption process in an earlier publication. We conducted a screening of potential desorbing agents, batch desorption equilibrium and kinetic studies, and batch tests through 3 adsorption/desorption cycles. The desorbing agent screening revealed that hydrochloric acid has good potential for copper desorption. Equilibrium data fit the Freundlich isotherm, whereas kinetic data had high correlation with the Lagergren pseudo second-order model and revealed a rapid desorption reaction. Batch equilibrium data over 3 adsorption/desorption cycles showed that the coconut coir and media mixture were the most resilient, demonstrating they could be used through 3 or more adsorption/desorption cycles. FE-SEM imaging, XRD, and EDS analyses supported the batch adsorption and desorption results showing significant surface sorption of CuO species in the media mixture and coconut coir, followed by partial desorption using 0.1 M HCl as a desorbing agent. PMID:27081796

  18. Effectiveness of passivation techniques on hydrogen desorption in a tritium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodall, Steven Michael

    2009-11-01

    Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It is used as a fuel in fusion reactors, a booster material in nuclear weapons and as a light source in commercial applications. When tritium is used in fusion reactors, and especially when used in the manufacture of nuclear weapons, purity is critical. For U.S. Department of Energy use, tritium is recycled by Savannah River Site in South Carolina and is processed to a minimum purity of 99.5%. For use elsewhere in the country, it must be shipped and stored, while maintaining the highest purity possible. As an isotope of hydrogen it exchanges easily with the most common isotope of hydrogen, protium. Stainless steel bottles are used to transport and store tritium. Protium, present in air, becomes associated in and on the surface of stainless steel during and after the manufacture of the steel. When filled, the tritium within the bottle exchanges with the protium in and on the surface of the stainless steel, slowly contaminating the pure tritium with protium. The stainless steel is therefore passivated to minimize the protium outgrowth of the bottles into the pure tritium. This research is to determine how effective different passivation techniques are in minimizing the contamination of tritium with protium. Additionally, this research will attempt to determine a relationship between surface chemistry of passivated steels and protium contamination of tritium. The conclusions of this research found that passivated bottles by two companies which routinely provide passivated materials to the US Department of Energy provide low levels of protium outgrowth into pure tritium. A bottle passivated with a material to prevent excessive corrosion in a highly corrosive environment, and a clean and polished bottle provided outgrowth rates roughly twice those of the passivated bottles above. Beyond generally high levels of chromium, oxygen, iron and nickel in the passivated bottles, there did not appear to be a strong correlation

  19. Fully reversible hydrogen absorption and desorption reactions with Sc(Al{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}), x=0.0, 0.15, 0.20

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlberg, Martin; Zlotea, Claudia; Latroche, Michel; Andersson, Yvonne

    2011-01-15

    The hydrogen storage properties of Sc(Al{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}), x=0.0, 0.15, 0.20, have been studied by X-ray powder diffraction, thermal desorption spectroscopy, pressure-composition-isotherms and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Hydrogen is absorbed from the gas phase at 70 kPa and 400 {sup o}C under the formation of ScH{sub 2} and aluminium with magnesium in solid solution. The reaction is fully reversible in vacuum at 500 {sup o}C and shows the hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination (HDDR) behaviour. The activation energy of desorption was determined by the Kissinger method to 185 kJ/mol. The material is stable up to at least six absorption-desorption cycles and there is no change in particle size during cycling. -- Graphical abstract: XRD pattern of Sc(Al{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}). From the top: x=0, 0.15, 0.20. The hydrogen absorption properties were studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy, pressure-composition-isotherms and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Display Omitted

  20. Synergy on catalytic effect of Fe-Zr additives mixed in different proportions on the hydrogen desorption from MgH{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, A.; Bazzanella, N.; Checchetto, R.; Miotello, A.

    2009-05-18

    Mg films with mixed Fe and Zr metallic additives were prepared by rf magnetron sputtering keeping the total metal content constant, about 7 at. %, and changing the [Fe]/[Zr] ratio. Isothermal hydrogen desorption curves showed that the kinetics depends on [Fe]/[Zr] ratio and is fastest when the [Fe]/[Zr] ratio is {approx}1.8. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed formation of Fe nanoclusters and Mg grain refinement. The improvement of the hydrogen desorption kinetics can be explained by the presence of atomically dispersed Zr and Fe nanoclusters acting as nucleation centers, as well as Mg grain refinement.

  1. Process for thermochemically producing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of water with chromium sesquioxide and strontium oxide. The hydrogen producing reaction is combined with other reactions to produce a closed chemical cycle for the thermal decomposition of water.

  2. Ultra high vacuum high precision low background setup with temperature control for thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDA-MS) of hydrogen in metals.

    PubMed

    Merzlikin, Sergiy V; Borodin, S; Vogel, D; Rohwerder, M

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly developed UHV-based high precision low background setup for hydrogen thermal desorption analysis (TDA) of metallic samples is presented. Using an infrared heating with a low thermal capacity enables a precise control of the temperature and rapid cool down of the measurement chamber. This novel TDA-set up is superior in sensitivity to almost every standard hydrogen analyzer available commercially due to the special design of the measurement chamber, resulting in a very low hydrogen background. No effects of background drift characteristic as for carrier gas based TDA instruments were observed, ensuring linearity and reproducibility of the analysis. This setup will prove to be valuable for detailed investigations of hydrogen trapping sites in steels and other alloys. With a determined limit of detection of 5.9×10(-3)µg g(-1) hydrogen the developed instrument is able to determine extremely low hydrogen amounts even at very low hydrogen desorption rates. This work clearly demonstrates the great potential of ultra-high vacuum thermal desorption mass spectroscopy instrumentation. PMID:25702992

  3. The effect of chars and their water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) fractions on atrazine adsorption-desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoski, I.; Jablonowski, N.; Burauel, P.; Miano, T.

    2012-04-01

    Chars are carbonaceous material produced from different type of biomass by pyrolysis. They are known as highly effective adsorbents for atrazine therefore limiting its degradation and its diffusion into the aqueous phase. The aim of the present work is to study the effects of different chars and char's derived WEOC on atrazine sorption-desorption processes. The five chars been used in this study derived from: 1) fast pyrolysis from hard wood (FP1); 2) flash pyrolysis from soft wood (FP2); 3) slow pyrolysis from deciduous wood (CC); 4) gasification from deciduous wood (GC) and 5) the market, purchased as activated charcoal standard (AC). Short-term batch equilibration tests were conducted to assess the sorption-desorption behavior of 14C-labeled atrazine on the chars, with a special focus on the desorption behavior using successive dilution method with six consecutive desorption step. Chars and their WEOC were physically and chemically characterized. Results demonstrate that biomass and pyrolysis process used to produce chars affect their physical and chemical properties, and atrazine adsorption-desorption behavior. Atrazine desorption resulted from the positive and competitive interactions between WEOC and chars surfaces. WEOC pool play important role in atrazine adsorption-desorption behavior. FP1 and FP2 with higher concentration of WEOC showed higher desorption rates, whereas GC, CC and AC with insignificant WEOC concentration strongly adsorb atrazine with low desorption rates. According to our results, when high WEOC pools chars are concerned, an increase in atrazine desorption can be observed but further studies would help in confirming the present results.

  4. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  5. Trapping state of hydrogen isotopes in carbon and graphite investigated by thermal desorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, H.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) has been investigated to obtain fundamental information of tritium behavior in graphite and carbon materials especially at high temperatures. 29 brands of graphite, HOPG, glassy carbon and CFC materials charged with deuterium gas are tested up to the temperature of 1735 K with a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. TDS spectra have five peaks at 600-700 K, around 900 K, 1200 K, 1300-1450 K and 1600-1650 K. The amounts of released deuterium have been compared with crystallographic parameters derived from XRD analysis. The results can be summarized as follows. First, TDS spectra of deuterium were quite varied among the samples tested, such as existence of peaks, peak temperatures and release amounts of deuterium. Secondly, TDS spectra may consist of five peaks, which are peak 1 (600-700 K), peak 2 (around 900 K), peak 3 (around 1200 K), peak 4 (1300-1450 K) and peak 5 (1600-1650 K). Thirdly, the correlations between the estimated surface area of edge surface and the total amount of released deuterium could be observed for peaks 4 and 5. Fourthly, high energy trapping site (peak 5) may exist even at edge surface or a near surface region, not only for intercalary. And fifth, in order to obtain the lower tritium retention for graphite and CFC materials, the material should be composed of a filler grain with a smaller crystallite size or having the smaller net edge surface in its structure. It is shown that heat treatment does not reduce originally existing trapping sites but trapping sites generated by neutron irradiation for instance can be reduced in some degree.

  6. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  7. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Rathin; Randhava, Sarabjit S.; Tsai, Shih-Perng

    1997-01-01

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

  8. Nature of the sites involved in the process of cesium desorption from vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Dzene, Liva; Tertre, Emmanuel; Hubert, Fabien; Ferrage, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Three particle size fractions of sodium-saturated vermiculite (10-20, 1-2 and 0.1-0.2 μm), differing only in their ratios of external-to-total sorption sites, were used to probe the nature of the sites involved in desorption of cesium ions. The sorption was investigated for initial aqueous concentrations of cesium ranging from 5.6×10(-4) to 1.3×10(-2) mol/L, and the cesium desorption was probed by exchange with ammonium ions. The results showed that (1) the amounts of desorbed cesium were strongly dependent on the particle size for a given initial aqueous cesium concentration and (2) the amounts of desorbed cations (Na(+) and Cs(+)) strongly decreased with increasing initial cesium aqueous concentration, irrespective of the particle size investigated. Quantitative analysis of these results suggested that cesium ions sorbed on external (edge+basal) sorption sites can be desorbed by ammonium ions. As a contrast, most of cesium ions sorbed on interlayer sites remain fixed due to the collapse of the structure under aqueous conditions. This study provides important information, such as the nature of the sites involved in the exchange process, when the thermodynamic formalism is considered to describe the ion-exchange process involving cesium and high-charge swelling clay minerals in polluted soil environments. PMID:26073847

  9. Visualization and Measurement of Adsorption/Desorption Process of Ethanol in Activated Carbon Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Murata, Kenta; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yasushi

    Adsorption refrigerator is one of the efficient tools for waste heat recovery, because the system is driven by heat at relative low temperature. However, the coefficient of performance is low due to its batch operation and the heat capacity of the adsorber. In order to improve the performance, it is important to optimize the configuration to minimize the amount of driving heat, and to clarify adsorption/desorption phenomena in transient conditions. Neutron radiography was applied to visualize and measure the adsorption amount distribution in an adsorber. The visualization experiments had been performed at the neutron radiography facility of E-2 port of Kyoto University Research Reactor. Activated carbon and ethanol were used as the adsorbent and refrigerant. From the acquired radiographs, adsorption amount was quantitatively measured by applying the umbra method using a checkered neutron absorber with boron powder. Then, transient adsorption and desorption processes of a rectangular adsorber with 84 mm in width, 50 mm in height and 20 mm in depth were visualized. As the result, the effect of fins in the adsorbent layer on the adsorption amount distribution was clearly visualized.

  10. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION OF A THERMAL DESORPTION/UV PHOTOLYSIS PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING SOILS CONTAINING HERBICIDE ORANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study report presents the results of laboratory and field tests on the effectiveness of a new decontamination process for soils containing 2,4-D/2,4,5-T and traces of dioxin. The process employs three operations, thermal desorption, condensation and absorp...

  11. Hydrogen-methane separation processes and related phenomena. [112 references

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.T.; Wang, S.S.; Yang, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A thorough and up-dated literature survey has been conducted on processes for separating hydrogen and methane. This was done in conjunction with our work of developing a more energy-efficient and lower-cost process based on cyclic, fixed-bed processes using coal chars as the sorbents. Although the review has covered all hydrocarbon separation processes, the focuses were on physical adsorption phenomena and theories (for both single and mixed gases), surface and pore characteristics of coals and heat-treated coals, and the continuous or semi-continuous chromatographic separation methods. There has been a sharply increasing interest in the past 10 to 15 years in developing processes for hydrocarbon separation based on adsorption/desorption; this is particularly true since the energy costs became increasingly higher recently. The rigorous work on competitive adsorption and on the cyclic (including parametric pumping) processes has all been done in the past 13 years. On the other hand, it is disappointing to find the absence of knowledge on adsorption on coal chars and the lack of it on adsorption on raw coals as well.

  12. First-principles study of water desorption from montmorillonite surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Meng, Yingfeng; Liu, Houbin; Yang, Mingli

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge about water desorption is important to give a full picture of water diffusion in montmorillonites (MMT), which is a driving factor in MMT swelling. The desorption paths and energetics of water molecules from the surface of MMT with trapped Li(+), Na(+) or K(+) counterions were studied using periodic density functional theory calculations. Two paths--surface and vacuum desorption--were designed for water desorption starting from a stationary structure in which water bonds with both the counterion and the MMT surface. Surface desorption is energetically more favorable than vacuum desorption due to water-surface hydrogen bonds that help stabilize the intermediate structure of water released from the counterion. The energy barriers of water desorption are in the order of Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+), which can be attributed to the short ionic radius of Li(+), which favors strong binding with the water molecule. The temperature dependence of water adsorption and desorption rates were compared based on the computed activation energies. Our calculations reveal that the water desorption on the MMT surface has a different mechanism from water adsorption, which results from surface effects favoring stabilization of water conformers during the desorption process. PMID:27083565

  13. Two key processes in dust/gas chemical modelling: photoprocessing of grain mantles and explosive desorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalabiea, O. M.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1994-10-01

    Two models of the time dependent chemical evolution of stable dense and translucent clouds are presented: one for pure gas phase chemistry and the other in which solid grain chemistry is included along with the gas. Comparing the results using these two schemes for the theoretical abundances of certain key molecules shows that including the dust provides a significantly (often by orders of magnitude) better agreement with the observations than those derived by pure gas phase chemistry models. The initial atomic abundances are those given by observations and are not modified to suit the model. Moreover, the inclusion of grain chemistry appears to minimize the effects of uncertainties in some important gas phase reaction rates, which would otherwise strongly affect the results of pure gas phase models. The grain mantle composition and gas phase abundances have been investigated using a number of different physical assumptions for both dense and translucent cloud models, taking into consideration the accretion, photochemical processing and desorption mechanisms involving the dust grains. The use of triggered explosive desorption is critical to providing reasonable steady state abundances. The abundances of H_2_O, H_2_CO, CH_3_OH and NH_3_ have a particular relevance because they are more abundantly produced in dust than in the gas. The most abundant observed molecules in grain mantles are H_2_O and CO which, under irradiation by ultraviolet light, not only produce H_2_CO but the latter can in turn react with water ice producing CH_3_OH. The reversible transformation between formaldehyde and methanol in the dust affects their gas phase abundances in both translucent and dense clouds. Depth dependent calculations have been performed and it is found that the effects of solid state photochemical molecular production in the inner part of a dense cloud are much larger than in the outer part or in a translucent cloud. In addition to matching observed gas phase abundances

  14. Correlation between the processes of water desorption and tritium release from Li4SiO4 ceramic pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Guangming; Xiao, Chengjian; Chen, Xiaojun; Gong, Yu; Kang, Chunmei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-11-01

    The correlation between water desorption and tritium release from Li4SiO4 pebbles was studied by temperature programmed desorption. The released water and tritium from irradiated samples were monitored simultaneously. The main peak for tritium release from the irradiated samples that were exposed to air for more than a month, was shifted from 500 to about 250 °C, as compared to that from the unexposed samples. The peak temperatures for water desorption and tritium release overlapped very well, suggesting a strong correlation between the two processes. Accordingly, a two-step mechanism, involving isotope exchange between the tritium trapped on the grain surface and the surface hydroxyls (-OH), and subsequent desorption of tritiated water through recombination of the -OH/-OT groups, was proposed to explain the tritium release behavior for the air-exposed samples. It is believed that the formation and desorption of surface hydroxyl groups at 200-300 °C can affect the behavior of tritium release from Li4SiO4 significantly.

  15. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-21

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53–75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  16. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53-75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  17. In-situ Probing of Radiation-induced Processing of Organics in Astrophysical Ice Analogs—Novel Laser Desorption Laser Ionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectroscopic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Yang, Rui

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the evolution of organic molecules in ice grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) under cosmic rays, stellar radiation, and local electrons and ions is critical to our understanding of the connection between ISM and solar systems. Our study is aimed at reaching this goal of looking directly into radiation-induced processing in these ice grains. We developed a two-color laser-desorption laser-ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopic method (2C-MALDI-TOF), similar to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results presented here with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) probe molecules embedded in water-ice at 5 K show for the first time that hydrogenation and oxygenation are the primary chemical reactions that occur in astrophysical ice analogs when subjected to Lyα radiation. We found that hydrogenation can occur over several unsaturated bonds and the product distribution corresponds to their stabilities. Multiple hydrogenation efficiency is found to be higher at higher temperatures (100 K) compared to 5 K—close to the interstellar ice temperatures. Hydroxylation is shown to have similar efficiencies at 5 K or 100 K, indicating that addition of O atoms or OH radicals to pre-ionized PAHs is a barrierless process. These studies—the first glimpses into interstellar ice chemistry through analog studies—show that once accreted onto ice grains PAHs lose their PAH spectroscopic signatures through radiation chemistry, which could be one of the reason for the lack of PAH detection in interstellar ice grains, particularly the outer regions of cold, dense clouds or the upper molecular layers of protoplanetary disks.

  18. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-10-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U

  19. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of ultraviolet photo-processed ices

    SciTech Connect

    Paardekooper, D. M. Bossa, J.-B.; Isokoski, K.; Linnartz, H.

    2014-10-01

    A new ultra-high vacuum experiment is described that allows studying photo-induced chemical processes in interstellar ice analogues. MATRI²CES - a Mass Analytical Tool to study Reactions in Interstellar ICES applies a new concept by combining laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the ultimate goal to characterize in situ and in real time the solid state evolution of organic compounds upon UV photolysis for astronomically relevant ice mixtures and temperatures. The performance of the experimental setup is demonstrated by the kinetic analysis of the different photoproducts of pure methane (CH₄) ice at 20 K. A quantitative approach provides formation yields of several new species with up to four carbon atoms. Convincing evidence is found for the formation of even larger species. Typical mass resolutions obtained range from M/ΔM ~320 to ~400 for CH₄ and argon, respectively. Additional tests show that the typical detection limit (in monolayers) is ⩽0.02 ML, substantially more sensitive than the regular techniques used to investigate chemical processes in interstellar ices.

  20. Extension lifetime for dye-sensitized solar cells through multiple dye adsorption/desorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yi-Fang; Chen, Ruei-Tang; Shen, Po-Shen; Chen, Peter; Guo, Tzung-Fang

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we propose a novel concept of extending the lifetime of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) and reducing the costs of re-conditioning DSCs by recycling the FTO/TiO2 substrates. The photovoltaic performances of DSCs using substrates with various cycles of dye uptake and rinse off history are tested. The results show that dye adsorption and Voc are significantly increased under multiple dye adsorption/desorption process and resulted in the improvement of power conversion efficiency. Moreover, the dyeing kinetics is faster after multiple recycling processes, which is favorable for the industrial application. With surface analysis and charge transport characteristics, we also demonstrate the optimal functionality of TiO2/dye interface for the improved Voc and efficiency. The results confirm that the improved performances are due to increased dye loading and dense packing of dye molecules. Our results are beneficial for the understanding on the extension of DSCs lifetime after long-term operation in the application of DSC modules. This approach may also be applied in the replacement of newly synthesized photosensitizes to the active cells.

  1. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V.

    1995-06-01

    In the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide is reduced to carbohydrate using water as the source of electrons with simultaneous evolution of molecular oxygen: H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + light {yields} O{sub 2} + (CH{sub 2}O). It is well established that two light reactions, Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) working in series, are required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Experimental data supporting the two-light reaction model are based on the quantum requirement for complete photosynthesis, spectroscopy, and direct biochemical analysis. Some algae also have the capability to evolve molecular hydrogen in a reaction energized by the light reactions of photosynthesis. This process, now known as biophotolysis, can use water as the electron donor and lead to simultaneous evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen. In green algae, hydrogen evolution requires prior incubation under anaerobic conditions. Atmospheric oxygen inhibits hydrogen evolution and also represses the synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme. CO{sub 2} fixation competes with proton reduction for electrons relased from the photosystems. Interest in biophotolysis arises from both the questions that it raises concerning photosynthesis and its potential practical application as a process for converting solar energy to a non-carbon-based fuel. Prior data supported the requirement for both Photosystem I and Photosystem II in spanning the energy gap necessary for biophotolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen. In this paper we report the at PSII alone is capable of driving sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen in an anaerobically adapted PSI-deficient strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, mutant B4, and that CO{sub 2} competes as an electron acceptor.

  2. Process for recovery of hydrogen and

    DOEpatents

    James, Brian R.; Li-Lee, Chung; Lilga, Michael A.; Nelson, David A.

    1987-01-01

    on of sulfur Abstract A process of abstracting sulfur from H.sub.2 S and generating hydrogen is disclosed comprising dissolving Pd.sub.2 X.sub.2 (.mu.-dppm).sub.2 in a solvent and then introducing H.sub.2 S. The palladium complex abstracts sulfur, forming hydrogen and a (.mu.-S) complex. The (.mu.-S) complex is readily oxidizable to a (.mu.-SO.sub.2) adduct which spontaneously loses SO.sub.2 and regenerates the palladium complex.

  3. Implications of Using Thermal Desorption to Remediate Contaminated Agricultural Soil: Physical Characteristics and Hydraulic Processes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Peter L; DeSutter, Thomas M; Casey, Francis X M; Derby, Nathan E; Wick, Abbey F

    2016-07-01

    Given the recent increase in crude oil production in regions with predominantly agricultural economies, the determination of methods that remediate oil contamination and allow for the land to return to crop production is increasingly relevant. Ex situ thermal desorption (TD) is a technique used to remediate crude oil pollution that allows for reuse of treated soil, but the properties of that treated soil are unknown. The objectives of this research were to characterize TD-treated soil and to describe implications in using TD to remediate agricultural soil. Native, noncontaminated topsoil and subsoil adjacent to an active remediation site were separately subjected to TD treatment at 350°C. Soil physical characteristics and hydraulic processes associated with agricultural productivity were assessed in the TD-treated samples and compared with untreated samples. Soil organic carbon decreased more than 25% in both the TD-treated topsoil and the subsoil, and total aggregation decreased by 20% in the topsoil but was unaffected in the subsoil. The alteration in these physical characteristics explains a 400% increase in saturated hydraulic conductivity in treated samples as well as a decrease in water retention at both field capacity and permanent wilting point. The changes in soil properties identified in this study suggest that TD-treated soils may still be suitable for sustaining vegetation, although likely at a slightly diminished capacity when directly compared with untreated soils. PMID:27380094

  4. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd–10Rh processed by cryomilling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; Kurmanaeva, Lilia; Cappillino, Patrick; Stavila, Vitalie; Lavernia, Enrique J.; San Marchi, Chris

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less thanmore » 100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the α-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.« less

  5. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd–10Rh processed by cryomilling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; Kurmanaeva, Lilia; Cappillino, Patrick; Stavila, Vitalie; Lavernia, Enrique J.; San Marchi, Chris

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less than 100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the α-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.

  6. Optimisation of sorbent trapping and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric conditions for sampling and analysis of hydrogen cyanide in air.

    PubMed

    Juillet, Yannick; Le Moullec, Sophie; Bégos, Arlette; Bellier, Bruno

    2005-06-01

    Among the chemicals belonging to the schedules of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), sampling and analysis of highly volatile compounds such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) require special consideration. The latter is present in numerous old chemical weapons that are stockpiled awaiting destruction in Northeastern France: thus, sampling on stockpile area and subsequent verification of HCN levels is compulsory to ensure safety of workers on these areas. The ability of several commercial sorbents to trap hydrogen cyanide at various concentration levels and in various humidity conditions, was evaluated. Furthermore, thermal desorption of the corresponding samples, followed by analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was also optimised. Carbosieve S-III, a molecular sieve possessing a very high specific area, proved the most efficient sorbent for HCN sampling in all conditions tested. Conversely, the presented results show that Tenax, albeit generally considered as the reference sorbent for air monitoring and analysis of CWC-related chemicals, is not suitable for HCN trapping. PMID:15912249

  7. Process hydrogenates unwanted diolefins and acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vora, B.V. )

    1988-12-05

    Diolefins and actetylenes in C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin streams can be selectively hydrogenated to produce high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefin production. C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin sources, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), steam crackers, and dehydrogenation of C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ paraffins, all contain these undesirable polyunsaturated compounds. Hydrogenation of these compounds in alkylation unit feeds can also improve the economics of the alkylation process. Production of high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefins production requires a feedstock that is essentially free of dienes and acetylenes to minimize undesirable side reactions. Although alkylation units can tolerate some diolefins in the feed, economics dictate that these diolefins should be minimized. The selective hydrogenation process (SHP) developed by others at its Marl, West Germany, plant, has undergone additional development work since commercialization of the process in 1980. The unit was designed to feed 160,000 metric tons/year of clean C/sub 4/ raffinate from a steam cracker, with a maximum polyunsaturated content of 0.8 wt%.

  8. ADSORPTION, DESORPTION AND OXIDATION OF ARSENIC AFFECTED BY CLAY MINERALS AND AGING PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption/desorption and oxidation/reduction of arsenic at clay surfaces are very important to the natural attenuation of arsenic in the subsurface environment. Although numerous studies have concluded that iron oxides have high affinities for the adsorption of As(V), very litt...

  9. Process and apparatus for coal hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Ruether, John A.; Simpson, Theodore B.

    1991-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process an aqueous slurry of coal is prepared containing a dissolved liquefaction catalyst. A small quantity of oil is added to the slurry and then coal-oil agglomerates are prepared by agitation of the slurry at atmospheric pressure. The resulting mixture is drained of excess water and dried at atmospheric pressure leaving catalyst deposited on the agglomerates. The agglomerates then are fed to an extrusion device where they are formed into a continuous ribbon of extrudate and fed into a hydrogenation reactor at elevated pressure and temperature. The catalytic hydrogenation converts the extrudate primarily to liquid hydrocarbons in the reactor. The liquid drained in recovering the agglomerates is recycled.

  10. Assessment of biological Hydrogen production processes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafpour, G. D.; Shahavi, M. H.; Neshat, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Energy crisis created a special attention on renewable energy sources. Among these sources; hydrogen through biological processes is well-known as the most suitable and renewable energy sources. In terms of process yield, hydrogen production from various sources was evaluated. A summary of microorganisms as potential hydrogen producers discussed along with advantages and disadvantages of several bioprocesses. The pathway of photo-synthetic and dark fermentative organisms was discussed. In fact, the active enzymes involved in performance of biological processes for hydrogen generation were identified and their special functionalities were discussed. The influential factors affecting on hydrogen production were known as enzymes assisting liberation specific enzymes such as nitrogenase, hydrogenase and uptake hydrogenase. These enzymes were quite effective in reduction of proton and form active molecular hydrogen. Several types of photosynthetic systems were evaluated with intension of maximum hydrogen productivities. In addition dark fermentative and light intensities on hydrogen productions were evaluated. The hydrogen productivities of efficient hydrogen producing strains were evaluated.

  11. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  12. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  13. Process, including membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2001-01-01

    Processes for providing improved methane removal and hydrogen reuse in reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved methane removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the reactor recycle loop across membranes selective in favor of methane over hydrogen, and capable of exhibiting a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the process conditions.

  14. U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Dihu, R.J.; Patel, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Today, hydrogen is produced mainly from natural gas and petroleum fractions. Tomorrow, because reserves of natural gas and oil are declining while demand continues to increase, they cannot be considered available for long-term, large-scale production of hydrogen. Hydrogen obtained from coal is expected to be the lowest cost, large-scale source of hydrogen in the future. The U-GAS coal gasification process and its potential application to the manufacture of hydrogen is discussed. Pilot plant results, the current status of the process, and economic projections for the cost of hydrogen manufactured are presented.

  15. Superior hydrogen desorption kinetics of Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} hollow nanospheres mixed with MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Lei; Li Yaoqi; Yang Rong; Liu Yang; Li Xingguo

    2008-06-09

    Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} nanocubes were prepared by vaporized bulk magnesium in ammonia atmosphere associated with plasma metal reaction. Then the product transformed to Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} hollow nanospheres after it was reacted with NH{sub 3} based on the Kirkendall effect. The electron microscopy results suggested that the obtained hollow nanospheres were around 100 nm and the shell thickness was about 10 nm. Because of its short distance for Mg{sup 2+} diffusion and large specific surface area for interaction between Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and MgH{sub 2}, the structure dramatically enhanced the hydrogen desorption kinetics of Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2MgH{sub 2}.

  16. Novel simple process for tocopherols selective recovery from vegetable oils by adsorption and desorption with an anion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Hiromori, Kousuke; Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Nakashima, Kazunori; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2016-03-01

    A novel and simple low-temperature process was used to recover tocopherols from a deodorizer distillate, which is a by-product of edible oil refining. The process consists of three operations: the esterification of free fatty acids with a cation-exchange resin catalyst, the adsorption of tocopherols onto an anion-exchange resin, and tocopherol desorption from the resin. No degradation of tocopherols occurred during these processes. In the tocopherol-rich fraction, no impurities such as sterols or glycerides were present. These impurities are commonly found in the product of the conventional process. This novel process improves the overall recovery ratio and the mass fraction of the product (75.9% and 51.0wt%) compared with those in the conventional process (50% and 35wt%). PMID:26471519

  17. Process and apparatus for coal hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Ruether, John A.

    1988-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process an aqueous slurry of coal is prepared containing a dissolved liquefaction catalyst. A small quantity of oil is added to the slurry and then coal-oil agglomerates are prepared by agitation of the slurry at atmospheric pressure. The resulting mixture of agglomerates, excess water, dissolved catalyst, and unagglomerated solids is pumped to reaction pressure and then passed through a drainage device where all but a small amount of surface water is removed from the agglomerates. Sufficient catalyst for the reaction is contained in surface water remaining on the agglomerates. The agglomerates fall into the liquefaction reactor countercurrently to a stream of hot gas which is utilized to dry and preheat the agglomerates as well as deposit catalyst on the agglomerates before they enter the reactor where they are converted to primarily liquid products under hydrogen pressure.

  18. Analysis of the volatile components emitted from cut tobacco processing by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry thermal desorption system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Sha, Yunfei; Wu, Da; Liu, Baizhan; Chen, Chaoying; Fang, Dingye

    2012-11-15

    A sensitive and reliable method was developed for the determination of volatile components emitted from cut tobacco processing using thermal desorption (TD) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the work, to obtain the optimal sorbent, three commercial sorbents were compared in terms of adsorption efficiency. The carbotrap 349 was found to have the best performance. The desorption conditions were also studied. Validation of the TD-GC-MS method showed good sensibility, linearity and precision. Limits of detection ranges were from 0.20 to 3.6 ng. Calibration curves were obtained by plotting peak area versus concentration and the correlation coefficients relating to linearity were at least 0.9984. The analysis was reproducible, with relative standard deviation (n=8) within 6.5%. The target compound breakthrough examination showed no significant losses when about 1500 ng standards were prepared. In order to evaluate the performance of the analytical method in the volatile constituents of cut tobacco, samples were taken in industrial areas of cut tobacco processing. Recoveries ranged from 85.1% to 110% for all the compounds and good precision had been reached (RSD<13.3). The results proved that TD-GC-MS was a simple, rapid and accurate method for the analysis of volatile compounds emitted from cut tobacco drying step. PMID:23158312

  19. Process for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.; Russell, Jr., John L.; Porter, II, John T.; McCorkle, Kenneth H.; Roemer, Thomas S.; Sharp, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen is thermochemically produced from water in a cycle wherein a first reaction produces hydrogen iodide and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 by the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water under conditions which cause two distinct aqueous phases to be formed, i.e., a lighter sulfuric acid-bearing phase and a heavier hydrogen iodide-bearing phase. After separation of the two phases, the heavier phase containing most of the hydrogen iodide is treated, e.g., at a high temperature, to decompose the hydrogen iodide and recover hydrogen and iodine. The H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is pyrolyzed to recover sulfur dioxide and produce oxygen.

  20. Process for hydrogenation of hydrocarbon tars

    DOEpatents

    Dolbear, Geoffrey E.

    1978-07-18

    Hydrocarbon tars of high asphaltene content such as tars obtained from pyrolysis of coal are dissolved in a solvent formed from the hydrogenation of the coal tars, and the resultant mixture hydrogenated in the presence of a catalyst at a pressure from about 1500 to 5000 psig at a temperature from about 500.degree. F to about the critical temperature of the solvent to form a light hydrocarbon as a solvent for the tars. Hydrogen content is at least three times the amount of hydrogen consumed.

  1. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Fullerton; Ward, J.W.; Yorba, L.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  2. Hydrogen-donor coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Jr., Edward L.; Mitchell, Willard N.

    1980-01-01

    Improved liquid yields are obtained during the hydrogen-donor solvent liquefaction of coal and similar carbonaceous solids by maintaining a higher concentration of material having hydrogenation catalytic activity in the downstream section of the liquefaction reactor system than in the upstream section of the system.

  3. Hydrogenation process for solid carbonaceous materials

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Wilcox, Wayne A.

    1979-01-01

    Coal or other solid carbonaceous material is contacted with an organic solvent containing both hydrogen and a transition metal catalyst in solution to hydrogenate unsaturated bonds within the carbonaceous material. This benefaction step permits subsequent pyrolysis or hydrogenolysis of the carbonaceous fuel to form gaseous and liquid hydrocarbon products of increased yield and quality.

  4. Exploring adsorption and desorption characteristics of molecular hydrogen on neutral and charged Mg nanoclusters: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Paramita; Chandrakumar, K. R. S.; Das, G. P.

    2016-05-01

    To surmount the limitations of bulk MgH2 for the purpose of hydrogen storage, we report here, a detailed first principles density functional theory (DFT) based study on the structure and stability of neutral (Mgm) and positively charged (Mgm+) Mg nanoclusters of different sizes (m = 2, 4, 8 and 12) and their interaction with molecular hydrogen (H2). Our results demonstrate that H2 is weakly bound to the Mg nanoclusters through van der Waals interactions. Incorporation of Grimme's dispersion correction (D3) in the DFT based exchange-correlation functionals leads to improved accuracy of H2 interaction energy (IE) values that fall within an energy window (between physisorption and chemisorption) desirable for hydrogen storage. Energy decomposition analysis reveals the significance of polarization energy for these Mg-H2 binding. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation shows that complete dehydrogenation from these Mg nanoclusters occur at ∼100 °C which is a significant improvement over bulk MgH2 (∼300 °C).

  5. On plate graphite supported sample processing for simultaneous lipid and protein identification by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; van der Werf, Inez Dorothé; Sabbatini, Luigia; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous identification of lipids and proteins by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) after direct on-plate processing of micro-samples supported on colloidal graphite is demonstrated. Taking advantages of large surface area and thermal conductivity, graphite provided an ideal substrate for on-plate proteolysis and lipid extraction. Indeed proteins could be efficiently digested on-plate within 15 min, providing sequence coverages comparable to those obtained by conventional in-solution overnight digestion. Interestingly, detection of hydrophilic phosphorylated peptides could be easily achieved without any further enrichment step. Furthermore, lipids could be simultaneously extracted/identified without any additional treatment/processing step as demonstrated for model complex samples such as milk and egg. The present approach is simple, efficient, of large applicability and offers great promise for protein and lipid identification in very small samples. PMID:25770620

  6. Surface Electronic Properties and Site-Specific Laser Desorption Processes of Highly Structured Nanoporous MgO Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Henyk, Matthias; Beck, Kenneth M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Dickinson, J T.

    2005-11-20

    The surface electronic properties of metal oxides critically depends on low-coordinated sites, such as kinks, corners and steps [1]. In order to characterize experimentally those surface states as well as their role for laser desorption processes, we prepare defect enriched surfaces by growing thin MgO films using reactive ballistic deposition [2] on crystalline dielectric substrates. With samples held at room temperature, the resulting MgO films are highly textured and consist of porous columns with column lengths ranging from tens of nanometers up to six micrometers. Measurements by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are carried out in-situ for MgO films, vacuum-cleaved MgO crystals, and water vapor exposed samples. In the case of thin films, we observe O 1s spectra with a significant shoulder feature at 2.3 eV higher binding energy (HBE) than the corresponding peak at 530.0 eV representing regular lattice oxygen. We evaluate this feature in terms of non-stoichiometric oxygen and formation of an oxygen-rich layer at the topmost surface of the MgO columns. In contrast, no HBE-features are detectable from clean single crystal MgO surfaces, while the hydroxyl O 1s band peaks at 531.6 eV. Under excitation with 266-nm-laser-pulses, known to be resonant with low-coordinated surface anions [3], we observe preferential depletion of defective oxygen-states (HBE signal) and temporary restoration of ideal surface stoichiometry. Furthermore, auxiliary signals are observed on several micrometer thick films, acting like satellites to major photoelectron-peaks (O 1s, Mg 2s, and Mg 2p) but shifted by approximately 4 eV towards lower kinetic energy. These features are depleted by UV-light exposure, pointing to the occurrence of surface-charge imbalance, accompanied by photon stimulated charge-transfer reactions. These results are in line with desorption experiments of neutrals, stimulated by laser excitation at 266 nm. According to the low-coordination nature of nanoporous Mg

  7. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Bauer, Hans F.; Grimes, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  8. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.H.; Bauer, H.F.; Grimes, R.W.

    1993-03-30

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  9. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOEpatents

    Perdieu, Louisa H.

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  10. Mechanism of near-threshold stimulated desorption of protons from transition-metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C.F.; Stulen, R.H.; Noell, J.O.

    1982-05-17

    The mechanism for near threshold electron and photon stimulated desorption of protons from transition-metal surfaces has been investigated with use of configuration-interaction techniques on finite clusters. The calculations indicate that the protons arise from repulsive states involving double excitations from the metal-hydrogen bonding orbitals and suggest that the process may occur via a surface predissociation mechanism. The calculations are compared to experimental electron stimulated desorption results for Ni<111>.

  11. Process for the production of hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Maroni, Victor A.; Willit, James L.

    2010-05-25

    A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

  12. Hydrogen emission in fatigue process of hydrogen-charged austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Hisao; Endo, Masahiro

    2010-03-01

    The acceleration of hydrogen diffusion in the fatigue process of AISI type 304 and 316L meta-stable austenitic stainless steels was studied by paying attention to the relation between fatigue slip bands and hydrogen emission. Slip bands were formed in tension-compression fatigue tests of round specimens in ambient air, and then the specimens were cathodically charged with hydrogen. The location of hydrogen emission was microscopically visualized by means of the hydrogen microprint technique (HMT). Hydrogen was mainly emitted from slip bands on the surface of fatigued specimens. The depth of hydrogen diffusion into the specimens was also observed on the fatigue fracture surfaces by the HMT. The depth for a specimen hydrogen-charged before fatigue testing was about 50 μm at a maximum, whereas the depth for a specimen that was hydrogen-charged after slip bands had been formed in a preliminary fatigue test was about 300 μm. Those results suggested that slip bands act as a pathway where hydrogen will move preferentially.

  13. Hydrogen emission in fatigue process of hydrogen-charged austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Hisao; Endo, Masahiro

    2009-12-01

    The acceleration of hydrogen diffusion in the fatigue process of AISI type 304 and 316L meta-stable austenitic stainless steels was studied by paying attention to the relation between fatigue slip bands and hydrogen emission. Slip bands were formed in tension-compression fatigue tests of round specimens in ambient air, and then the specimens were cathodically charged with hydrogen. The location of hydrogen emission was microscopically visualized by means of the hydrogen microprint technique (HMT). Hydrogen was mainly emitted from slip bands on the surface of fatigued specimens. The depth of hydrogen diffusion into the specimens was also observed on the fatigue fracture surfaces by the HMT. The depth for a specimen hydrogen-charged before fatigue testing was about 50 μm at a maximum, whereas the depth for a specimen that was hydrogen-charged after slip bands had been formed in a preliminary fatigue test was about 300 μm. Those results suggested that slip bands act as a pathway where hydrogen will move preferentially.

  14. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  15. A Hydrogen Containment Process For Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A hydrogen containment process was proposed for ground testing of a nuclear thermal engine. The hydrogen exhaust from the engine is contained in two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a tubular heat exchanger. The burner burns off the majority of the hydrogen, and the remaining hydrogen is removed in the tubular heat exchanger through the species recombination mechanism. A multi-dimensional, pressure-based multiphase computational fluid dynamics methodology was used to conceptually sizing the oxygen-rich burner, while a one-dimensional thermal analysis methodology was used to conceptually sizing the heat exchanger. Subsequently, a steady-state operation of the entire hydrogen containment process, from pressure vessel, through nozzle, diffuser, burner and heat exchanger, was simulated numerically, with the afore-mentioned computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational results show that 99% of hydrogen reduction is achieved at the end of the burner, and the rest of the hydrogen is removed to a trivial level in the heat exchanger. The computed flammability at the exit of the heat exchanger is less than the lower flammability limit, confirming the hydrogen containment capability of the proposed process.

  16. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  17. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation and hydroconversion process

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, James B.; McLean, Joseph B.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    1989-01-01

    A process for two-stage catalytic hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent and fed at temperature below about 650.degree. F. into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils at conditions favoring hydrogenation reactions. The first stage reactor is maintained at 650.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-60 lb coal/hr/ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The partially hydrogenated material from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the close-coupled second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at a temperature at least about 25.degree. F. higher than for the first stage reactor and within a range of 750.degree.-875.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and thermal hydroconversion reactions. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, which results in significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of undesirable residuum and unconverted coal and hydrocarbon gases, with use of less energy to obtain the low molecular weight products, while catalyst life is substantially increased.

  18. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  19. Effect of process variables on photosynthetic algal hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Hahn, John J; Ghirardi, Maria L; Jacoby, William A

    2004-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green alga that can use the sun's energy to split water into O(2) and H(2). This is accomplished by means of a two-phase cycle, an aerobic growth phase followed by an anaerobic hydrogen production phase. The effects of process variables on hydrogen production are examined here. These variables include cell concentration, light intensity, and reactor design parameters that affect light transport and mixing. An optimum cell concentration and light intensity are identified, and two reactor designs are compared. The maximum hydrogen production observed in this study was 0.29 mL of hydrogen per milliliter of suspension. This was measured at atmospheric pressure during a 96 h production cycle. This corresponds to an average hydrogen production rate of 0.12 mmol/mL.h. PMID:15176910

  20. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  1. Water-hydrogen isotope exchange process analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchenko, O.; Alekseev, I.; Uborsky, V.

    2008-07-15

    The use of a numerical method is needed to find a solution to the equation system describing a general case of heterogeneous isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and liquid water in a column. A computer model of the column merely outputting the isotope compositions in the flows leaving the column, like the experimental column itself, is a 'black box' to a certain extent: the solution is not transparent and occasionally not fully comprehended. The approximate analytical solution was derived from the ZXY-diagram (McCabe-Thiele diagram), which illustrates the solution of the renewed computer model called 'EVIO-4.2' Several 'unusual' results and dependences have been analyzed and explained. (authors)

  2. Changes induced on the surfaces of small Pd clusters by the thermal desorption of CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doering, D. L.; Poppa, H.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The stability and adsorption/desorption properties of supported Pd crystallites less than 5 nm in size were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and repeated flash thermal desorption of CO. The Pd particles were grown epitaxially on heat-treated, UHV-cleaved mica at a substrate temperature of 300 C and a Pd impingement flux of 10 to the 13th atoms/sq cm s. Auger analysis allowed in situ measurement of relative particle dispersion and contamination, while FTD monitored the CO desorption properties. The results show that significant changes in the adsorption properties can be detected. Changes in the Pd Auger signal and the desorption spectrum during the first few thermal cycles are due to particle coalescence and facetting and the rate of this change is dependent on the temperature and duration of the desorption. Significant reductions in the amplitude of the desorptions peak occur during successive CO desorptions which are attributed to increases of surface carbon, induced by the desorption of CO. The contamination process could be reversed by heat treatment in oxygen or hydrogen

  3. Desorption kinetics of {H}/{Mo(211) }

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopinski, G. P.; Prybyla, J. A.; Estrup, P. J.

    1994-08-01

    The desorption kinetics of the {H}/{Mo(211) } chemisorption system were studied by thermal desorption and measurement of adsorption isobars. Analysis of the steady-state measurements permits the independent determination of the desorption energy ( Ed) and prefactor ( v). These quantities are found to depend strongly on coverage, with ( Ed) varying continuously from 145 {kJ}/{mol} at low coverage to 65 {kJ}/{mol} near saturation. Three regions of hydrogen adsorption are clearly indicated by the isobars as well as the thermal desorption traces. These regions can be correlated with structural changes observed previously with HREELS and LEED. The coverage dependence of the kinetic parameters is attributed to hydrogen-induced local distortions of the substrate structure. By relating the desorption energy to the isosteric heat the partial molar entropy is also extracted from the data and indicates localized adsorption as well as significant adsorbate-induced changes in the substrate degrees of freedom.

  4. Hydrogen incorporation into III-V nitrides during processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Vartuli, C.B.

    1995-10-01

    Hydrogen is readily incorporated into GaN and related alloys during wet and dry etching, chemical vapor deposition of dielectric overlayers, boiling in water and other process steps, in addition to its effects during MOCVD or MOMBE growth. The hydrogen is bound at defects or impurities and passivates their electrical activity. Reactivation occurs at 450-550{degrees}C, but evolution from the crystal requires much higher temperatures ({ge} 800{degrees}C).

  5. Process for producing cracked distillate and hydrogen from heavy oil

    SciTech Connect

    Aizawa, S.; Fujimori, K.; Satomi, Y.; Suzuka, T.

    1980-09-23

    A process is disclosed for producing a cracked distillate and hydrogen from a heavy oil which comprises cracking the heavy oil in the presence of laterite or a laterite-containing catalyst while simultaneously depositing coke on said laterite or laterite-containing catalysts, reducing the laterite or laterote-containing catalyst on which the coke is deposited, and forming a hydrogen-rich gas by contacting the reduced laterite or laterite-containing catalyst with steam.

  6. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  7. Characteristic hydrogen concentrations for various redox processes in batch study.

    PubMed

    Lu, X X; Tao, S; Bosma, T; Gerritse, J

    2001-01-01

    The dissolved hydrogen concentrations under various redox processes were investigated based on batch experiments. Chloroethenes including tetrachloroethene (PCE), cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinylchloride (VC) were respectively used as culture substrates. For each chloroethene, a series of bottles were prepared with the additions of different electron acceptors or donors such as nitrate, manganese oxide, ferrous iron, sulfate, carbondioxide and volatile fatty acids. Hydrogen concentrations as well as redox species were measured over time to ensure the achievements of characteristic hydrogen levels in various enrichment batches. The results showed that redox processes with nitrate, manganese oxide and ferric iron as the electron acceptors exhibited hydrogen threshold values close to PCE/TCE dechlorination, whereas cis-DCE and VC dechlorinations exhibited hydrogen threshold values in the range of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis, respectively. Characteristic hydrogen concentrations for various redox processes were as follows (nM): denitrification, 0.1-0.4; manganese reduction, 0.1-2.0; iron reduction, 0.1-0.4; sulfate reduction, 1.5-4.5; methanogenesis, 2.5-24; PCE/TCE dechlorination, 0.6-0.9; eis-DCE dechlorination, 0.1-2.5; and VC dechlorination, 2-24. PMID:11688686

  8. Hydrogen donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Plumlee, Karl W.

    1978-01-01

    An indigenous hydrocarbon product stream boiling within a range of from about C.sub.1 -700.degree. F., preferably C.sub.1 -400.degree. F., is treated to produce an upgraded hydrocarbon fuel component and a component which can be recycled, with a suitable donor solvent, to a coal liquefaction zone to catalyze the reaction. In accordance therewith, a liquid hydrocarbon fraction with a high end boiling point range up to about 700.degree. F., preferably up to about 400.degree. F., is separated from a coal liquefaction zone effluent, the separated fraction is contacted with an alkaline medium to provide a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous extract phase, the aqueous phase is neutralized, and contacted with a peroxygen compound to convert indigenous components of the aqueous phase of said hydrocarbon fraction into catalytic components, such that the aqueous stream is suitable for recycle to the coal liquefaction zone. Naturally occurring phenols and alkyl substituted phenols, found in the aqueous phase, are converted, by the addition of hydroxyl constituents to phenols, to dihydroxy benzenes which, as disclosed in copending Application Ser. Nos. 686,813 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,536; 686,814 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,537; 686,827 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,012 and 686,828, K. W. Plumlee et al, filed May 17, 1976, are suitable hydrogen transfer catalysts.

  9. Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, William H.

    1976-09-21

    A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

  10. Plasma processing methods for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Jasiński, Mariusz

    2016-08-01

    In the future a transfer from the fossil fuel-based economy to hydrogen-based economy is expected. Therefore the development of systems for efficient H2 production becomes important. The several conventional methods of mass-scale (or central) H2 production (methane, natural gas and higher hydrocarbons reforming, coal gasification reforming) are well developed and their costs of H2 production are acceptable. However, due to the H2 transport and storage problems the small-scale (distributed) technologies for H2 production are demanded. However, these new technologies have to meet the requirement of producing H2 at a production cost of (1-2)/kg(H2) (or 60 g(H2)/kWh) by 2020 (the U.S. Department of Energy's target). Recently several plasma methods have been proposed for the small-scale H2 production. The most promising plasmas for this purpose seems to be those generated by gliding, plasmatron and nozzle arcs, and microwave discharges. In this paper plasma methods proposed for H2 production are briefly described and critically evaluated from the view point of H2 production efficiency. The paper is aiming at answering a question if any plasma method for the small-scale H2 production approaches such challenges as the production energy yield of 60 g(H2)/kWh, high production rate, high reliability and low investment cost. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  11. A mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process in zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen uptake data for thin Zircaloy-2 specimens in steam at 300-400°C have been analysed to show that there is a decrease in the rate of uptake with respect to the rate of oxidation when the terminal solid solubility (TSS) of hydrogen in the metal is exceeded. In order for TSS to be reached during pre-transition oxidation a very thin 0.125 mm Zircaloy sheet was used. The specimens had been pickled initially removing all Zr 2(Fe/Ni) particles from the initial surfaces, yet the initial hydrogen uptake rates were still much higher than for Zircaloy-4 or a binary Zr/Fe alloy that did not contain phases that dissolve readily during pickling. Cathodic polarisation at room temperature in CuSO 4 solution showed that small cracks or pores formed the cathodic sites in pre-transition oxide films. Some were at pits resulting from the initial dissolution of the Zr 2(Fe/Ni) phase; others were not; none were at the remaining intermetallics in the original surface. These small cracks are thought to provide the ingress routes for hydrogen. A microscopic steam starvation process at the bottoms of these small cracks or pores, leading to the accumulation of hydrogen adjacent to the oxide/metal interface, and causing breakdown of the passive oxide forming at the bottom of the flaw, is thought to provide the mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process during both pre-transition and post-transition oxidation.

  12. Process modeling of hydrogen production from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    The ASPEN PLUS commercial simulation software has been used to develop a process model for a conceptual process to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen. The process consists of hydrothermal treatment of the MSW in water to create a slurry suitable as feedstock for an oxygen blown Texaco gasifier. A method of reducing the complicated MSW feed material to a manageable set of components is outlined along with a framework for modeling the stoichiometric changes associated with the hydrothermal treatment process. Model results indicate that 0.672 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from the processing of 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of raw MSW. A number of variations on the basic processing parameters are explored and indicate that there is a clear incentive to reduce the inert fraction in the processed slurry feed and that cofeeding a low value heavy oil may be economically attractive.

  13. Chill Down Process of Hydrogen Transport Pipelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James

    2006-01-01

    A pseudo-steady model has been developed to predict the chilldown history of pipe wall temperature in the horizontal transport pipeline for cryogenic fluids. A new film boiling heat transfer model is developed by incorporating the stratified flow structure for cryogenic chilldown. A modified nucleate boiling heat transfer correlation for cryogenic chilldown process inside a horizontal pipe is proposed. The efficacy of the correlations is assessed by comparing the model predictions with measured values of wall temperature in several azimuthal positions in a well controlled experiment by Chung et al. (2004). The computed pipe wall temperature histories match well with the measured results. The present model captures important features of thermal interaction between the pipe wall and the cryogenic fluid, provides a simple and robust platform for predicting pipe wall chilldown history in long horizontal pipe at relatively low computational cost, and builds a foundation to incorporate the two-phase hydrodynamic interaction in the chilldown process.

  14. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrogen. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquids. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  15. Hydrogen Transport to Mars Enables the Sabatier/Electrolysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, P. J.; Rapp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) process is an attractive approach to in situ propellant production (ISPP), and a breadboard demonstration of this process at Lockheed Martin Astronautics funded by JPL performed very well, with high conversion efficiency, and reliable diurnal operation. There is a net usage of hydrogen in the S/E process, and this has been the principal problem for this approach to ISPP.

  16. A Hydrogen Containment Process for Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a new total hydrogen containment process to enable the testing required for NTP engine development. This H2 removal process comprises of two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a shell-and-tube type of heat exchanger. This new process is demonstrated by simulation of the steady state operation of the engine firing at nominal conditions.

  17. The ferrosilicon process for the generation of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E R; Berry, W M; Bohnson, V L; Gordon, B D

    1920-01-01

    Report describes the generation of hydrogen by the reaction between ferrosilicon, sodium hydroxide, and water. This method known as the ferrosilicon method is especially adapted for use in the military field because of the relatively small size and low cost of the generator required to produce hydrogen at a rapid rate, the small operating force required, and the fact that no power is used except the small amount required to operate the stirring and pumping machinery. These advantages make it possible to quickly generate sufficient hydrogen to fill a balloon with a generator which can be transported on a motor truck. This report gives a summary of the details of the ferrosilicon process and a critical examination of the means which are necessary in order to make the process successful.

  18. Thin film hydrogen sensors: A materials processing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Raviprakash

    Hydrogen (H2) is consumed and produced in large quantities by chemical, petroleum, plastic, space and glass industries. Detection and quantitative estimation of H2 in a reliable and efficient manner is of great value in these applications, not only from a safety stand point but also economically beneficial. Hence the requirement for a simple but efficient hydrogen sensor. The simplest hydrogen sensors are based on monitoring changes in electrical properties of group VIII transition metals, especially palladium (Pd). Hydrogen adsorbs on Pd surface and diffuses into its bulk altering its electrical and optical properties. This variation is used to detect/estimate hydrogen in the ambience. However, at high hydrogen concentrations palladium undergoes a phase change. This causes an expansion of the lattice---a problem for fabricating reliable sensors using this metal. This problem was overcome by alloying palladium with nickel. Currently, sensors made from palladium alloy thin films (resistors and FET's) can detect/estimate hydrogen from ppm to 100% concentrations. However, these sensors are affected by the total gas pressure and other gases like carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO 2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S). This work, for most part deals with resistors (chemiresistors). Resistors estimate hydrogen by correlating the change in resistance to the hydrogen concentration. Magnetron sputtering enables the deposition of films of different compositions and morphology. In this work, Pd and Pd/Ni alloy thin films resistors were fabricated by sputtering. Morphology was seen to have a significant effect on the hydrogen sensing property of these films. In presence of CO the response of these sensors are extremely sluggish, however by employing SiO2 barrier layer the response was greatly improved. It was noted that despite the sluggish response, the signal from the chemiresistors did saturate to same level as seen in absence of CO from gas mixture; contrary to the earlier

  19. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Anand, M.; Carvill, B.

    1995-09-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process, the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The consequences of SER are: (1) reformation reaction at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than conventional SMR (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (2) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 99+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (3) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The early focus of the program will be on the identification of an adsorbent/chemisorbent for CO{sub 2} and on the demonstration of the SER concept for SMR in our state-of-the-art bench scale process. In the latter stages, a pilot plant will be built to scale-up the technology and to develop engineering data. The program has just been initiated and no significant results for SMR will be reported. However, results demonstrating the basic principles and process schemes of SER technology will be presented for reverse water gas shift reaction as the model reaction. If successful, this technology will be commercialized by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) and used in its existing hydrogen business. APCI is the world leader in merchant hydrogen production for a wide range of industrial applications.

  20. Hydrogen purifiers go to Savannah River Site to process tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.

    1996-12-31

    The Johnson Matthey Fabricated Equipment group has been awarded a contract to supply the United States government Savannah River Site (SRS) with six additional ultra-high purity hydrogen purifier systems specially designed to process tritium in support of national defense programs. The purifiers employ palladium membrane diffusion technology.

  1. Desorption from interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, A.; Jura, M.; Omont, A.

    1985-01-01

    Different desorption mechanisms from interstellar grains are considered to resolve the conflict between the observed presence of gaseous species in molecular clouds and their expected depletion onto grains. The physics of desorption is discussed with particular reference to the process of grain heating and the specific heat of the dust material. Impulsive heating by X-rays and cosmic rays is addressed. Spot heating of the grains by cosmic rays and how this can lead to desorption of mantles from very large grains is considered. It is concluded that CO depletion on grains will be small in regions with A(V) less than five from the cloud surface and n(H) less than 10,000, in agreement with observations and in contrast to expectations from pure thermal equilibrium. Even in very dense and obscured regions and in the absence of internal ultraviolet sources, the classical evaporation of CO or N2 and O2-rich mantles by cosmic rays is important.

  2. Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection: Process Performance Package

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Russ

    2009-06-01

    This document describes the details of implementing a Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) hydrogen production plant to deploy with the Next General Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP). Technical requirements and specifications are included, and a conceptual plant design is presented. The following areas of interest are outlined in particular as a baseline for the various technology comparisons: (1) Performance Criteria - (a) Quantity of hydrogen produced, (b) Purity of hydrogen produced, (c) Flexibility to serve various applications, (d) Waste management; (2) Economic Considerations - (a) Cost of hydrogen, (b) Development costs; and (3) Risk - (a) Technical maturity of the S-I process, (b) Development risk, (c) Scale up options.

  3. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  4. Low temperature exfoliation process in hydrogen-implanted germanium layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferain, I. P.; Byun, K. Y.; Colinge, C. A.; Brightup, S.; Goorsky, M. S.

    2010-03-01

    The feasibility of transferring hydrogen-implanted germanium to silicon with a reduced thermal budget is demonstrated. Germanium samples were implanted with a splitting dose of 5×1016 H2+ cm-2 at 180 keV and a two-step anneal was performed. Surface roughness and x-ray diffraction pattern measurements, combined with cross-sectional TEM analysis of hydrogen-implanted germanium samples were carried out in order to understand the exfoliation mechanism as a function of the thermal budget. It is shown that the first anneal performed at low temperature (≤150 °C for 22 h) enhances the nucleation of hydrogen platelets significantly. The second anneal is performed at 300 °C for 5 min and is shown to complete the exfoliation process by triggering the formation of extended platelets. Two key results are highlighted: (i) in a reduced thermal budget approach, the transfer of hydrogen-implanted germanium is found to follow a mechanism similar to the transfer of hydrogen-implanted InP and GaAs, (ii) such a low thermal budget (<300 °C) is found to be suitable for directly bonded heterogeneous substrates, such as germanium bonded to silicon, where different thermal expansion coefficients are involved.

  5. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrocarbons. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquid. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  6. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  7. Hydrogen transport through oxide metal surface under atom and ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L.; Dvoychenkova, O.; Evsin, A.; Kaplevsky, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya; Schitov, N.; Vergasov, S.; Yurkov, D.

    2014-11-01

    Both the latest and earlier achieved results on gas exchange processes on metal surfaces (including stainless steel, titanium, zirconium, tungsten with deposited aluminum oxide coating) under hydrogen atom or plasma irradiation with occasional oxygen impurity are presented in the paper. Mechanisms and regularities of these processes are discussed. It is demonstrated that surface oxide layer properties as a diffusion barrier strongly depend on external influence on the surface. In particular, it is revealed that low energy hydrogen ion irradiation could slow down hydrogen desorption from metals. Hydrogen atom or ion irradiation combined with simultaneous oxygen admixture accelerates hydrogen desorption from metals.

  8. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460 °C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51 ± 3 and 87 ± 5 kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475 °C and E{sub d} of 110 ± 5 kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585 °C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62 ± 3 and 270 ± 10 kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited

  9. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  10. A Compact, Solid-State UV (266 nm) Laser System Capable of Burst-Mode Operation for Laser Ablation Desorption Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arevalo, Ricardo, Jr.; Coyle, Barry; Paulios, Demetrios; Stysley, Paul; Feng, Steve; Getty, Stephanie; Binkerhoff, William

    2015-01-01

    Compared to wet chemistry and pyrolysis techniques, in situ laser-based methods of chemical analysis provide an ideal way to characterize precious planetary materials without requiring extensive sample processing. In particular, laser desorption and ablation techniques allow for rapid, reproducible and robust data acquisition over a wide mass range, plus: Quantitative, spatially-resolved measurements of elemental and molecular (organic and inorganic) abundances; Low analytical blanks and limits-of-detection ( ng g-1); and, the destruction of minimal quantities of sample ( g) compared to traditional solution and/or pyrolysis analyses (mg).

  11. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1981-01-06

    A process for the removal of H/sub 2/S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO/sub 2/ at temperatures between 250* and 450* F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H/sub 2/, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H/sub 2/S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO, CS/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/ and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H/sub 2/S and subsequently removing the H/sub 2/S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  12. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1982-01-19

    A process for the removal of H2S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO2 at temperatures between 250 and 450/sup 0/F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H2, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H2S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO2 and H2S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO CS2, SO3 and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H2S and subsequently removing the H2S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  13. Electron stimulated desorption of H 3O + from 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, C. R.; Outlaw, R. A.; Champion, R. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Kelly, M. A.

    2007-02-01

    Surface ions generated by electron stimulated desorption from mass spectrometer ion source grids are frequently observed, but often misidentified. For example, in the case of mass 19, the source is often assumed to be surface fluorine, but since the metal oxide on grid surfaces has been shown to form water and hydroxides, a more compelling case can be made for the formation of hydronium. Further, fluorine is strongly electronegative, so it is rarely generated as a positive ion. A commonly used metal for ion source grids is 316L stainless steel. Thermal vacuum processing by bakeout or radiation heating from the filament typically alters the surface composition to predominantly Cr 2O 3. X-ray photoelectron spectral shoulders on the O 1s and Cr 2p 3/2 peaks can be attributed to adsorbed water and hydroxides, the intensity of which can be substantially increased by hydrogen dosing. On the other hand, the sub-peak intensities are substantially reduced by heating and/or by electron bombardment. Electron bombardment diode measurements show an initial work function increase corresponding to predominant hydrogen desorption (H 2) and a subsequent work function decrease corresponding to predominant oxygen desorption (CO). The fraction of hydroxide concentration on the surface was determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and from the deconvolution of temperature desorption spectra. Electron stimulated desorption yields from the surface show unambiguous H 3O + peaks that can be significantly increased by hydrogen dosing. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry sputter yields show small signals of H 3O +, as well as its constituents (H +, O + and OH +) and a small amount of fluorine as F -, but no F + or F + complexes (HF +, etc.). An electron stimulated desorption cross-section of σ+ ˜ 1.4 × 10 -20 cm 2 was determined for H 3O + from 316L stainless steel for hydrogen residing in surface chromium hydroxide.

  14. Studies of the use of heat from high temperature nuclear sources for hydrogen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    Future uses of hydrogen and hydrogen production processes that can meet the demand for hydrogen in the coming decades were considered. To do this, a projection was made of the market for hydrogen through the year 2000. Four hydrogen production processes were selected, from among water electrolysis, fossil based and thermochemical water decomposition systems, and evaluated, using a consistent set of ground rules, in terms of relative performance, economics, resource requirements, and technology status.

  15. A process of applying polypyrrole-engineered pulp fibers prepared using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant to detoxification of Cr(VI)-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Qian, Xueren; Shen, Jing; An, Xianhui

    2013-03-01

    In this study, different from previous reports, an alternative process for detoxification of Cr(VI)-contaminated water with polypyrrole-engineered pulp fibers prepared using low cost hydrogen peroxide as oxidant was proposed. The process conditions in preparation of the engineered fibers as well as the water treatment conditions were optimized, and the behavior of Cr desorption from the engineered fibers was evaluated. The results showed that the proposed process was highly efficient in Cr(VI)-detoxification via the integration of adsorption with reduction. Compared with the previously reported polyaniline-engineered fibers prepared with hydrogen peroxide as oxidant, the engineered fibers studied in this work was much more effective. PMID:23340110

  16. Catalytic hydrogenation process and apparatus with improved vapor liquid separation

    DOEpatents

    Chervenak, Michael C.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    1980-01-01

    A continuous hydrogenation process and apparatus wherein liquids are contacted with hydrogen in an ebullated catalyst reaction zone with the liquids and gas flowing vertically upwardly through that zone into a second zone substantially free of catalyst particles and wherein the liquid and gases are directed against an upwardly inclining surface through which vertical conduits are placed having inlet ends at different levels in the liquid and having outlet ends at different levels above the inclined surface, such that vapor-rich liquid is collected and discharged through conduits terminating at a higher level above the inclined surface than the vapor-poor liquid which is collected and discharged at a level lower than the inclined surface.

  17. State resolved desorption measurements as a probe of surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Surface reactions which lead directly to gas phase products can be investigated by using state resolved techniques to measure the energy released into the newly formed molecules. This technique has been used extensively to explore oxidation of CO and the dynamics of H 2 recombinative desorption at surfaces, but so far has been applied to few other reactions. Here we review the application of final state measurements and discuss the conditions under which dynamical information can be obtained for Langmuir-Hinshelwood type surface reactions. Combining resonance enhanced multiphoton ionisation with ion time of flight detection allows translational energy distributions to be measured for a wide range of products, with full quantum state resolution. The energy release reflects scattering from a thermally populated transition state, with the recombination dynamics determining how the product state distributions depart from a thermal distribution at the surface temperature. Using the principle of detailed balance the desorption dynamics can be related to the reverse process, dissociative chemisorption. Making the link between adsorption and desorption has two benefits. Firstly, it allows us to discuss quantitatively the influence of surface temperature on the product state distributions formed by surface reactions, allowing us to avoid naive models, which treat the transition state as having a unique, well-defined energy. Secondly, the desorption results can be used to obtain relative sticking probabilities with full quantum state and translational energy resolution, providing a way to determine how internal energy influences dissociation for both hydrogen and for heavy molecules, such as nitrogen. The conditions necessary to apply detailed balance successfully are discussed and the desorption distributions expected for different types of adsorption behaviour illustrated. The recombination/dissociation dynamics of hydrogen are summarised briefly and the energy

  18. APPLICATION OF THERMAL DESORPTION TECHNOLOGIES TO HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is a separation process frequently used to remediate many Superfund sites. Thermal desorption technologies are recommended and used because of (1) the wide range of organic contaminants effectively treated, (2) availability and mobility of commercial systems, ...

  19. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  20. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -454.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent (83) and recycled as process solvent (16). The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance.

  1. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone, the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1,500 psig (105 kg/cm[sup 2]), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone at a temperature in the range of between about 455 and about 500 C to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425 C to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C[sub 5]-454 C is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent. The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance. 6 figs.

  2. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed

  3. Application of electron stimulated desorption techniques to measure the isotherm and the mean residence time of hydrogen physisorbed on a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Ichiro Shimizu, Hideyuki; Kawarabuki, Taku; Yamakawa, Koichiro; Miura, Takashi

    2015-03-15

    Electron stimulated desorption techniques were applied to probe the density of H{sub 2} physisorbed on a cold surface. The adsorption isotherm of H{sub 2} on a copper surface was measured in the equilibrium pressure range between 10{sup −9} and 10{sup −4} Pa at surface temperatures of 6.5 and 4.2 K. The mean residence times of H{sub 2} on copper were obtained from the observation of the time development of the surface density in a transitional state approaching equilibrium, and are 50–500 s for the coverage between 1 and 0.18 at 4.2 K of the substrate temperature. The adsorption energies of 1.18–1.27 kJ/mol, and the condensation coefficient of 0.074–0.018 were also deduced.

  4. Investigation of heat and mass transfer process in metal hydride hydrogen storage reactors, suitable for a solar powered water pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldea, I.; Popeneciu, G.; Lupu, D.; Misan, I.; Blanita, G.; Ardelean, O.

    2012-02-01

    The paper analyzes heat and mass transfer process in metal hydride hydrogen storage systems as key element in the development of a solar powered pump system. Hydrogen storage and compression performance of the developed reactors are investigated according to the type of metal alloys, the metal hydride bed parameters and system operating conditions. To reach the desired goal, some metal hydride from groups AB5 and AB2 were synthesized and characterized using elements substitution for tailoring their properties: reversible hydrogen absorption capacity between the hydrogen absorption and desorption pressures at equilibrium at small temperature differences. For the designed hydrogen storage reactors, a new technical solution which combines the effective increase of the thermal conductivity of MH bed and good permeability to hydrogen gas circulation, was implemented and tested. The results permitted us to develop a heat engine with metal hydride, the main element of the functional model of a heat operated metal hydride based water pumping system using solar energy. This is a free energy system able to deliver water, at a convenience flow and pressure, in remote places without conventional energy access.

  5. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-01

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  6. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Scherwitzl, Boris Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-14

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  7. NEST-GENERATION TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L; Henry Sessions, H; Anita Poore, A; William Jacobs, W; Christopher Williams, C

    2007-08-07

    A thermal cycling absorption process (TCAP) for hydrogen isotope separation has been in operation at Savannah River Site since 1994. The process uses a hot/cold nitrogen system to cycle the temperature of the separation column. The hot/cold nitrogen system requires the use of large compressors, heat exchanges, valves and piping that is bulky and maintenance intensive. A new compact thermal cycling (CTC) design has recently been developed. This new design uses liquid nitrogen tubes and electric heaters to heat and cool the column directly so that the bulky hot/cold nitrogen system can be eliminated. This CTC design is simple and is easy to implement, and will be the next generation TCAP system at SRS. A twelve-meter column has been fabricated and installed in the laboratory to demonstrate its performance. The design of the system and its test results to date is discussed.

  8. Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption study of isopropanol and tert-butanol on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Kim, Kwansoo; Yong, Kijung

    2002-09-01

    Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption of isopropanol (IPA) and tert-butanol on Si(100) were studied using temperature programed desorption. Adsorbed alcohols studied were decomposed into atomic hydrogen and alkoxy on the surface. During heating the sample up to 1000 K, acetone, propylene, and hydrogen were desorbed as decomposition products of IPA on Si(100). Desorption pathways of IPA on Si(100) were largely consistent with those on metal surfaces: beta-hydride elimination reaction to acetone and C-O scission to propylene. For tert-butanol, which has no beta-hydrogen, isobutene and hydrogen were observed as main desorption products. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  9. OTEC gas desorption studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. C.; Golshani, A.

    1982-02-01

    Experiments on deaeration in packed columns and barometric intake systems, and with hydraulic air compression for open-cycle OTEC systems are reported. A gas desorption test loop consisting of water storage tanks, a vacuum system, a liquid recirculating system, an air supply, a column test section, and two barometric leg test sections was used to perform the tests. The aerated water was directed through columns filled with either ceramic Raschig rings or plastic pall rings, and the system vacuum pressure, which drives the deaeration process, was found to be dependent on water velocity and intake pipe height. The addition of a barometric intake pipe increased the deaeration effect 10%, and further tests were run with lengths of PVC pipe as potential means for noncondensibles disposal through hydraulic air compression. Using the kinetic energy from the effluent flow to condense steam in the noncondensible stream improved the system efficiency.

  10. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for the production of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.; Gaffney, T.; Nataraj, S.; Rao, M.; Sircar, S.

    1998-08-01

    The novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process has the potential to decrease the cost of hydrogen production by steam methane reforming. Current effort for development of this technology has focused on adsorbent development, experimental process concept testing, and process development and design. A preferred CO{sub 2} adsorbent, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted hydrotalcite, satisfies all of the performance targets and it has been scaled up for process testing. A separate class of adsorbents has been identified which could potentially improve the performance of the H{sub 2}-SER process. Although this material exhibits improved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the HTC adsorbent, its hydrothermal stability must be improved. Single-step process experiments (not cyclic) indicate that the H{sub 2}-SER reactor performance during the reaction step improves with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature and steam to methane ratio in the feed. Methane conversion in the H{sub 2}-SER reactor is higher than for a conventional catalyst-only reactor operated at similar temperature and pressure. The reactor effluent gas consists of 90+% H{sub 2}, balance CH{sub 4}, with only trace levels (< 50 ppm) of carbon oxides. A best-case process design (2.5 MMSCFD of 99.9+% H{sub 2}) based on the HTC adsorbent properties and a revised SER process cycle has been generated. Economic analysis of this design indicates the process has the potential to reduce the H{sub 2} product cost by 25--31% compared to conventional steam methane reforming.

  11. Processing Raman Spectra of High-Pressure Hydrogen Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The Raman Code automates the analysis of laser-Raman-spectroscopy data for diagnosis of combustion at high pressure. On the basis of the theory of molecular spectroscopy, the software calculates the rovibrational and pure rotational Raman spectra of H2, O2, N2, and H2O in hydrogen/air flames at given temperatures and pressures. Given a set of Raman spectral data from measurements on a given flame and results from the aforementioned calculations, the software calculates the thermodynamic temperature and number densities of the aforementioned species. The software accounts for collisional spectral-line-broadening effects at pressures up to 60 bar (6 MPa). The line-broadening effects increase with pressure and thereby complicate the analysis. The software also corrects for spectral interference ("cross-talk") among the various chemical species. In the absence of such correction, the cross-talk is a significant source of error in temperatures and number densities. This is the first known comprehensive computer code that, when used in conjunction with a spectral calibration database, can process Raman-scattering spectral data from high-pressure hydrogen/air flames to obtain temperatures accurate to within 10 K and chemical-species number densities accurate to within 2 percent.

  12. Laser-desorption mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and the mechanism of desorption ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zakett, D.; Schoen, A.E.; Cooks, R.G.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1981-03-11

    This paper reports sucrose mass spectra obtained by combining laser desorption with mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Remarkable similarities in fragmentation behavior with secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) provide evidence for mechanistic similarities between SIMS and laser desorption (LD). Attachment of alkali metals to organic molecules (cationization) is a common feature of desorption ionization. This process also occurs during laser desorption of involatile compounds which further indicates the existence of underlying similarities between LD and SIMS. Steady ion currents (several thousand ions per laser pulse) of cationized sucrose are obtained for relatively long periods (minutes).

  13. THERMAL DESORPTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is an ex situ means to physically separate volatile and some semivolatile contaminants from soil, sediments, sludges, and filter cakes. or wastes containing up to 10% organics or less, thermal desorption can be used alone for site remediation. t also may find a...

  14. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  15. Process conditions for the mineralization of a biorefractory polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in soils using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, P.C.; Watts, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and soluble iron or mineral catalysts) was investigated as a basis for mineralizing benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a hydrophobic and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, in two soils of varied complexity. The process is based on Fenton`s reagent, which can be implemented in soils to generate hydroxyl radicals. This short-lived species reacts with most organic contaminants at near diffusion-controlled rates, providing a mechanism for potential rapid soil remediation. Benzo[a]pyrene labeled with {sup 14}C was added to silica sand and a silt loam loess soil; mineralization processes were then optimized using central composite rotatable experimental designs. Variables investigated during the optimization included H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, slurry volume, iron (II) amendment, and pH. Experimental data were evaluated by linear regression to develop empirical relationships and interactions between the variables. The equations were then used to develop three-dimensional response surfaces to describe BaP mineralization. The results from the response surfaces showed that 74% and 78% BaP mineralization was achieved in the silica sand and loess soils, respectively. The balance of the contaminant carbon remained with the soil fraction and was probably irreversibly sorbed. Desorption measurements over 5 d confirmed negligible desorption; however, oxidation reactions, which were complete within 24 h, documented >78% BaP mineralization, suggesting that the contaminant was oxidized, at least in part, in the sorbed phase. The results show that catalyzed H{sub 2}O{sub 2} has the ability to rapidly mineralize BaP that is not irreversibly sorbed.

  16. Process for recovering evolved hydrogen enriched with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope

    DOEpatents

    Tanaka, John; Reilly, Jr., James J.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a separation means and method for enriching a hydrogen atmosphere with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope by using a solid titaniun alloy hydride. To this end, the titanium alloy hydride containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of vanadium, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, iron, cobalt and nickel is contacted with a circulating gaseous flow of hydrogen containing at least one heavy hydrogen isotope at a temperature in the range of -20.degree. to +40.degree. C and at a pressure above the dissociation pressure of the hydrided alloy selectively to concentrate at least one of the isotopes of hydrogen in the hydrided metal alloy. The contacting is continued until equilibrium is reached, and then the gaseous flow is isolated while the temperature and pressure of the enriched hydride remain undisturbed selectively to isolate the hydride. Thereafter, the enriched hydrogen is selectively recovered in accordance with the separation factor (S.F.) of the alloy hydride employed.

  17. Reaction kinetics for the oxygen hydrogenation process on Pt(111) derived from temperature-programmed XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näslund, Lars-Åke

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen hydrogenation under ultra high vacuum conditions at the platinum surface was explored using temperature-programmed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Through modeling of the oxygen consumption, information on the reaction kinetics was obtained indicating that the reaction rate of the oxygen hydrogenation process depends on the hydrogen diffusion and on the lifetime of hydroxyl intermediates. The reaction rate is, however, enhanced when an autocatalytic process stabilizes the hydroxyl intermediates through hydrogen bonding to neighboring water molecules. The overall activation energy for the hydrogenation of atomic oxygen to form water was determined to be 0.20 eV with a frequency factor of only 103 s- 1.

  18. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation: Processes and equipment. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning methods, processes, and apparatus for coal liquefaction and hydrogenation. Included are patents for catalytic two-stage, catalytic single-step, fixed-bed, hydrogen-donor, internal heat transfer, and multi-phase processes. Topics also include catalyst production, catalyst recovery, desulfurization, pretreatment of coals, energy recovery processes, solvent product separation, hydrogenating gases, and pollution control. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Silica membranes for hydrogen separation in coal gas processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gavalas, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The general objective of this project was to synthesize permselective membranes suitable for hydrogen separation from coal gas. The specific objectives were: (i) to synthesize membranes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of SiO[sub 2] or other oxides on porous support tubes, (ii) characterize the membranes by permeation measurements of various gases and by electron microscopy, and (iii) obtain information about the mechanism and kinetics Of SiO[sub 2] deposition, and model the process of membrane formation. Silica glass and certain other glasses, in dense (nonporous) form, are highly selective to hydrogen permeation. Since this high selectivity is accompanied by low permeability, however, a practical membrane must have a composite structure consisting of a thin layer of the active oxide supported on a porous tube or plate providing mechanical support. In this project the membranes were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of SiO[sub 2], TiO[sub 2], Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and B[sub 2]O[sub 3] layers inside the walls of porous Vycor tubes (5 mm ID, 7 mm OD, 40 [Angstrom] mean pore diameter). Deposition of the oxide layer was carried out using the reaction of SiCl[sub 4] (or TiCl[sub 4], AlCl[sub 3], BCl[sub 3]) and water vapor at elevated temperatures. The porous support tube was inserted concentrically into a larger quartz tube and fitted with flow lines and pressure gauges. The flow of the two reactant streams was regulated by mass flow controllers, while the temperature was controlled by placing the reactor into a split-tube electric furnace.

  20. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  1. Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2001-01-01

    An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

  2. Development of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Knight, J.; Quigley, M.; Forsberg, G.; Ganapathi, G.; Yarbrough, C.; Koukol, R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will present test data and discussion on the work we are conducting at JPL to address the following issues: 1) efficacy of sterilization process; 2) diffusion of hydrogen peroxide under sterilization process conditions into hard to reach places; 3) materials and components compatibility with the sterilization process and 4) development of methodology to protect sensitive components from hydrogen peroxide vapor.

  3. Removing hydrogen sulfide from geothermal gases: hypochlorite process reduces hydrogen sulfide emissions to acceptable levels. NTIS tech note

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This citation summarizes a one-page announcement of technology available for utilization. A hypochlorite process has been proposed as an alternative to other methods for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the exhaust gases of geothermal powerplants. An electrolytically-generated sodium hypochlorite solution converts the hydrogen sulfide to water, salt, and sulfur. The hypochlorite process appears to be less expensive than competing processes for most of the cases studied. ...FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Detailed information about the technology described may be obtained by ordering the NTIS report, order number: DOE/ER/1092-T7, price code: PC A03.

  4. Molecular processes in astrophysics: Calculations of hydrogen + hydrogen gas excitation, de-excitation, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Matthew Thomas

    The implications of H+H2 cooling in astrophysics is important to several applications. One of the most significant and pure applications is its role in cooling in the early universe. Other applications would include molecular dynamics in nebulae and their collapse into stars and astrophysical shocks. Shortly after the big bang, the universe was a hot primordial gas of photons, electrons, and nuclei among other ingredients. By far the most dominant nuclei in the early universe was hydrogen. In fact, in the early universe the matter density was 90 percent hydrogen and only 10 percent helium with small amounts of lithium and deuterium. In order for structure to form in the universe, this primordial gas must form atoms and cool. One of the significant cooling mechanisms is the collision of neutral atomic hydrogen with a neutral diatomic hydrogen molecule. This work performs calculations to determine collisional cooling rates of hydrogen using two potential surfaces.

  5. Theoretical study of stimulated desorption of protons from transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C.F.; Noell, J.O.; Stulen, R.H.

    1982-03-01

    The mechanism for near-threshold photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) is examined theoretically using finite cluster, quantum chemical techniques to model the interaction of a hydrogen atom with a metal surface. Configuration interaction calculations on clusters modeling both the <100> and <111> faces of an fcc crystal yield a consistent picture of the process. A band of strongly repulsive states which asymptotically dissociate to ions is found to lie approx.25 eV above the ground state. This excitation energy is consistent with the threshold observed in ESD and PSD experiments on the <100> surfaces of Ni and Pd. The states of this band all involve double excitations from the metal--hydrogen bonding orbitals.

  6. Nanoscale Insights into the Hydrogenation Process of Layered α-MoO3.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiguang; Su, Mingze; Zheng, Zebo; Wang, Yu; Gong, Li; Xie, Fangyan; Zhang, Weihong; Luo, Zhi; Luo, Jianyi; Liu, Pengyi; Xu, Ningsheng; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Huanjun; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-26

    The hydrogenation process of the layered α-MoO3 crystal was investigated on a nanoscale. At low hydrogen concentration, the hydrogenation can lead to formation of HxMoO3 without breaking the MoO3 atomic flat surface. For hydrogenation with high hydrogen concentration, hydrogen atoms accumulated along the <101> direction on the MoO3, which induced the formation of oxygen vacancy line defects. The injected hydrogen atoms acted as electron donors to increase electrical conductivity of the MoO3. Near-field optical measurements indicated that both of the HxMoO3 and oxygen vacancies were responsible for the coloration of the hydrogenated MoO3, with the latter contributing dominantly. On the other hand, diffusion of hydrogen atoms from the surface into the body of the MoO3 will encounter a surface diffusion energy barrier, which was for the first time measured to be around 80 meV. The energy barrier also sets an upper limit for the amount of hydrogen atoms that can be bound locally inside the MoO3 via hydrogenation. We believe that our findings has provided a clear picture of the hydrogenation mechanisms in layered transition-metal oxides, which will be helpful for control of their optoelectronic properties via hydrogenation. PMID:26689113

  7. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2

    PubMed Central

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2015-01-01

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer des orption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. PMID:24832297

  8. Variable-temperature diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of amine desorption from a siliceous surface

    SciTech Connect

    Leyden, D.E.; Proctor, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    Variable-temperature diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy was used in conjunction with pyridine desorption studies to assess the acidity of a siliceous surface. An amorphous, porous silica substrate was investigated. The results contribute to an understanding of the acidic strength and the distribution of acidic sites on this material. A hydrogen-bonding interaction was observed between pyridine and the surface. Isothermal rate constants and an activation energy for the desorption process are reported and can be used as direct measures of surface site acidity. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Process for forming hydrogen and other fuels utilizing magma

    DOEpatents

    Galt, John K.; Gerlach, Terrence M.; Modreski, Peter J.; Northrup, Jr., Clyde J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a method for extracting hydrogen from magma and water by injecting water from above the earth's surface into a pocket of magma and extracting hydrogen produced by the water-magma reaction from the vicinity of the magma.

  10. Process and reactor design for biophotolytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Tamburic, Bojan; Dechatiwongse, Pongsathorn; Zemichael, Fessehaye W; Maitland, Geoffrey C; Hellgardt, Klaus

    2013-07-14

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has the ability to produce molecular hydrogen (H2), a clean and renewable fuel, through the biophotolysis of water under sulphur-deprived anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to advance the development of a practical and scalable biophotolytic H2 production process. Experiments were carried out using a purpose-built flat-plate photobioreactor, designed to facilitate green algal H2 production at the laboratory scale and equipped with a membrane-inlet mass spectrometry system to accurately measure H2 production rates in real time. The nutrient control method of sulphur deprivation was used to achieve spontaneous H2 production following algal growth. Sulphur dilution and sulphur feed techniques were used to extend algal lifetime in order to increase the duration of H2 production. The sulphur dilution technique proved effective at encouraging cyclic H2 production, resulting in alternating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii recovery and H2 production stages. The sulphur feed technique enabled photobioreactor operation in chemostat mode, resulting in a small improvement in H2 production duration. A conceptual design for a large-scale photobioreactor was proposed based on these experimental results. This photobioreactor has the capacity to enable continuous and economical H2 and biomass production using green algae. The success of these complementary approaches demonstrate that engineering advances can lead to improvements in the scalability and affordability of biophotolytic H2 production, giving increased confidence that H2 can fulfil its potential as a sustainable fuel of the future. PMID:23689756

  11. Deuterium desorption temperature of Mg-Ti composites prepared by the method of atom-by-atom component mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, O. M.; Kulish, V. G.; Zhurba, V. I.; Neklyudov, I. M.; Progolaieva, V. O.; Kuprin, A. S.; Lomino, N. S.; Ovcharenko, V. D.; Kolodiy, I. V.; Galitskiy, O. G.

    2013-12-01

    The plasma evaporation-sputtering method has been applied to obtain composite materials of the Mg-Ti system. Variations in the temperature of the ion-implanted deuterium desorption as a function of the component concentration are studied. It has been established, that introduction of titanium into magnesium leads to the significant decrease of deuterium desorption temperature, namely, to 400-450 K as compared to ~800 K in the case of deuterium release (desorption) from magnesium. The step-like shape of the deuterium desorption temperature curve evidences on the existence of two different structural states of the Mg-Ti composite depending on the ratio of components. The deuterium temperature drop can be caused by filamentary inclusions composed of titanium atoms in magnesium (insoluble component in magnesium) produced in the process of composite formation and providing the deuterium release from the sample at lower temperature (channels for deuterium diffusion and desorption through the surface barrier). The deuterium desorption data obtained on the example of Mg-Ti composites provide a support for further research into hydrogen storage materials containing not readily soluble chemical elements in the alloy components.

  12. Sorption enhanced reaction process for production of hydrogen. Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayorga, S.G.; Hufton, J.R.; Sircar, S.; Gaffney, T.R.

    1997-07-01

    Hydrogen is one of the most suitable energy sources from both technological and environmental perspectives for the next century, especially in the context of a sustainable global energy economy. The most common industrial process to produce high-purity (99.99+ mol%) hydrogen is to reform natural gas by a catalytic reaction with steam at a high temperature. Conventional steam-methane reforming (SMR) contributed to approximately 2.4 billion standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of hydrogen production in the US. By 1998, the growth of SMR-produced hydrogen in the US is expected to reach 3.4 billion SCFD, with the increased demand attributed to hydrogen`s use in reformulated gasolines required by the Clean Air Act. The goal of this work is to develop an even more efficient process for reforming steam and methane to hydrogen product than the conventional SMR process. The application of Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) technology to SMR has the potential to markedly reduce the cost of hydrogen through lower capital and energy requirements. The development of a more cost-effective route to hydrogen production based on natural gas as the primary energy source will accelerate the transition to a more hydrogen-based economy in the future. The paper describes the process, which includes a sorbent for CO{sub 2} removal, and the various tasks involved in its development.

  13. Investigation of the processes for reversible hydrogen storage in the Li-Mg-N-H system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janot, Raphaël; Eymery, Jean-Bruno; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    The hydrogen storage performances of the Li-Mg-N-H system are investigated starting either from 1:2 Mg(NH 2) 2-LiH or 1:2 MgH 2-LiNH 2 ball-milled mixtures. It is shown that, for 1:2 MgH 2-LiNH 2, an ammonia release occurs if the first heating is conducted under a dynamic vacuum, leading to a fast degradation of the material. The positive role of LiH, if initially present in the mixture, is therefore emphasized as LiH rapidly reacts with ammonia and avoids the contamination of the hydrogen desorbing flow. The desorption kinetics of the ball-milled 1:2 Mg(NH 2) 2-LiH mixture are fast: a total amount of 5.0 wt.% of hydrogen is desorbed in 25 min at 220 °C. This material exhibits a nice reversibility at 200 °C with an experimental capacity around 4.8 wt.%. Preliminary results are given on the structure of Li 2Mg(NH) 2, formed upon desorption: this phase crystallizes in a cubic unit cell with a lattice parameter of 10.06(1) Å. In addition, by plotting an absorption isotherm of the Li 2Mg(NH) 2 phase at 200 °C, two pressure plateaus are observed revealing the existence of an intermediary phase between Li 2Mg(NH) 2 and the rehydrided material, which is the 1:2 Mg(NH 2) 2-LiH mixture.

  14. Applications of light-induced electron-transfer and hydrogen-abstraction processes: photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen from reducing radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, K.; Whitten, D.G.

    1980-07-16

    A study of several photoprocesses which generate reducing radicals in similar photoelectrochemical cells was reported. Coupling of a light-induced reaction to produce a photocurrent concurrent with hydrogen generation in a second compartment can occur for a number of electron transfers and hydrogen abstractions in what appears to be a fairly general process. Irradiation of the RuL/sub 3//sup +2//Et/sub 3/N: photoanode compartment leads to production of a photocurrent together with generation of hydrogen at the cathode. A rather different type of reaction that also results in formation of two reducing radicals as primary photoproducts if the photoreduction of ketones and H-heteroaromatics by alcohols and other hydrogen atom donors. Irradiation of benzophenone/2-propanol/MV/sup +2/ solutions in the photoanode compartment (intensity 1.4 x 10/sup -8/ einstein/s) leads to a buildup of moderate levels of MV/sup +/ and to a steady photocurrent of 320 ..mu..A. The MV/sup +/ is oxidized at the anode of the photolyzed compartment with concomitant reduction of H/sup +/ in the cathode compartment. There was no decrease in benzophenone concentration over moderate periods of irradiation, and a steady production of hydrogen in the cathode compartment was observed. The photocurrent produced was linear with the square of absorbed light intensity. The quantum efficiency at the above-indicated intensity is 22%; quantitative analysis of the hydrogen produced gives good agreement with this value. 1 figure, 1 table. (DP)

  15. Modular Advanced Oxidation Process Enabled by Cathodic Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO•) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d–1. The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO• scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m–3, with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  16. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  17. Chemisorption kinetics of hydrogen on evaporated iron films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the kinetics of isothermal adsorption-desorption processes involving molecular hydrogen which is chemisorbed onto thin (20 to 50 A) polycrystalline Fe films at temperatures near 300 K. The results of the investigation indicate that chemisorption in the H2-Fe system occurs via a precursor state of molecularly adsorbed hydrogen. Contamination of the surface from unknown impurities in the gas phase is found to affect the number of available adsorption sites and to modify the prefactor for the absolute desorption rate constant for the precursor state.

  18. Comparative study of thermochemical processes for hydrogen production from biomass fuels.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Enrico; Masoni, Lorenzo; Tognotti, Leonardo

    2010-08-01

    Different thermochemical configurations (gasification, combustion, electrolysis and syngas separation) are studied for producing hydrogen from biomass fuels. The aim is to provide data for the production unit and the following optimization of the "hydrogen chain" (from energy source selection to hydrogen utilization) in the frame of the Italian project "Filiera Idrogeno". The project focuses on a regional scale (Tuscany, Italy), renewable energies and automotive hydrogen. Decentred and small production plants are required to solve the logistic problems of biomass supply and meet the limited hydrogen infrastructures. Different options (gasification with air, oxygen or steam/oxygen mixtures, combustion, electrolysis) and conditions (varying the ratios of biomass and gas input) are studied by developing process models with uniform hypothesis to compare the results. Results obtained in this work concern the operating parameters, process efficiencies, material and energetic needs and are fundamental to optimize the entire hydrogen chain. PMID:20362431

  19. Silicon homojunction solar cells via a hydrogen plasma etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, S. Q.; Xu, S.; Zhou, H. P.; Wei, D. Y.; Huang, S. Y.; Xu, L. X.; Sern, C. C.; Guo, Y. N.; Khan, S.; Xu, Y.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the one-step formation of an efficient Si homojunction solar cell produced by a simple exposure of p-type Si wafers to low-temperature inductively coupled hydrogen plasma. The formation of oxygen thermal donors during hydrogen plasma treatment is responsible for the conductivity type conversion and the final formation of Si homojunction. The hydrogen plasma etching with suppressed heavy ion bombardment results in a relatively flat surface, which is favourable for deposition of passivation layers such as silicon nitride. The integrated Si homojunction solar cell consisting of Al/p-c-Si/n-c-Si/SiN/Al-grid has demonstrated a maximum photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6%.

  20. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  1. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Wiesmann, Harold

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  2. TDPAC Study of the Hydrogen Uptake Process in HfNi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaar, I.; Cohen, D.; Halevy, I.; Kahane, S.; Ettedgui, H.; Aslanov, R.; Berant, Z.

    2004-12-01

    The electronic properties of the HfNi-hydrogen system has been investigated, as a function of the hydrogen composition ratio ( x), using combined Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation (TDPAC) technique and standard full-potential Linearized-Augmented-Plane-Wave method. The experimental TDPAC data confirm the presence of a two-step hydrogenation process in this system, with the octahedral holes filled first. The major part of the electric field gradient at the hafnium site is from p p contribution, shifted down in energy by hydrogen s-states contribution.

  3. The use of non-fossil derived hydrogen in coal conversion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, J. S.; Merrick, D.; Smith, M.; Rasmussen, G.

    The National Coal Board, UK, carried out a technical and economic study of the use of non-fossil derived (NFD) hydrogen on three coal conversion processes: methanol synthesis, solid phase hydrogenation (hydrogasification) for substitute natural gas production, and liquid phase hydrogenation (liquifaction) for the manufacture of liquid fuels. Use of NFD hydrogen generally resulted in an increase in the conversion efficiency and carbon utilization, and a reduction in the number of component stages of the process. It was also shown that market conditions could exist in which the use of NFD hydrogen in coal conversion would be preferable to both conventional coal conversion and the direct use of hydrogen, irrespective of the coal price. Substitute natural gas production from synthesis gas (methanation) and the production of liquid fuels from synthesis gas by a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis route were also evaluated and showed similar technical and economic results. Preliminary results of the overall costs of using NFD hydrogen from a nuclear power/electrolysis plant showed that at present fuel prices, coal conversion processes using NFD hydrogen are not competitive with conventional processes, but would be if the price of coal were to double.

  4. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  5. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  6. The dual-bed hydrogen production process as being developed by the Florida Solar Energy Center. Process study

    SciTech Connect

    DiPietro, J.P.; Skolnik, E.G.

    1997-06-01

    Clovis Linkous of the Florida Solar Energy Center is developing a dual-bed hydrogen production process. The idea is to break the water splitting process into two separate chemical reactions, each with roughly {1/2} the electrochemical potential of direct water dissociation. This enables the dual-bed process to utilize a much broader range of sunlight photons than conventional photoelectrochemical (PEC) systems. However, it requires twice as many photons per unit of hydrogen produced. The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate and quantify the trade-offs presented by the dual bed process and determine if it holds economic potential as a hydrogen production technology. The capital cost of a /solar-based water dissociation system is roughly proportional to the solar collection surface area. Thus, the economics rely on how much hydrogen can be produced per unit of solar insolation.

  7. Techno-economic evaluation of a two-step biological process for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, Mattias; Zacchi, Guido

    2010-01-01

    An integrated biological process for the production of hydrogen based on thermophilic and photo-heterotrophic fermentation was evaluated from a technical and economic standpoint. Besides the two fermentation steps the process also includes pretreatment of the raw material (potato steam peels) and purification of hydrogen using amine absorption. The study aimed neither at determining the absolute cost of biohydrogen nor at an economic optimization of the production process, but rather at studying the effects of different parameters on the production costs of biohydrogen as a guideline for future improvements. The effect of the key parameters, hydrogen productivity and yield and substrate concentration in the two fermentations on the cost of the hydrogen produced was studied. The selection of the process conditions was based mainly on laboratory data. The process was simulated by use of the software Aspen Plus and the capital costs were estimated using the program Aspen Icarus Process Evaluator. The study shows that the photo-fermentation is the main contributor to the hydrogen production cost mainly because of the cost of plastic tubing, for the photo-fermentors, which represents 40.5% of the hydrogen production cost. The costs of the capital investment and chemicals were also notable contributors to the hydrogen production cost. Major economic improvements could be achieved by increasing the productivity of the two fermentation steps on a medium-term to long-term scale. PMID:20039381

  8. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Alex J.; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbe, Niki; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2015-06-30

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.

  9. Process for synthesis of ammonia borane for bulk hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, S Thomas; Heldebrant, David J; Linehan, John C; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J; Zheng, Feng

    2011-03-01

    The present invention discloses new methods for synthesizing ammonia borane (NH.sub.3BH.sub.3, or AB). Ammonium borohydride (NH.sub.4BH.sub.4) is formed from the reaction of borohydride salts and ammonium salts in liquid ammonia. Ammonium borohydride is decomposed in an ether-based solvent that yields AB at a near quantitative yield. The AB product shows promise as a chemical hydrogen storage material for fuel cell powered applications.

  10. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Muradov, Nazim Z.

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  11. Certification of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schubert, W.; Koukol, R.; Foster, T. L.; Stabekis, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process and research activities JPL is planning to conduct for certification of hydrogen peroxide as a NASA approved technique for sterilization of various spacecraft parts/components and entire modern spacecraft.

  12. Hydrogen storage development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.

    1998-08-01

    A summary of the hydride development efforts for the current program year (FY98) are presented here. The Mg-Al-Zn alloy system was studied at low Zn levels (2--4 wt%) and midrange Al contents (40--60 wt%). Higher plateau pressures were found with Al and Zn alloying in Mg and, furthermore, it was found that the hydrogen desorption kinetics were significantly improved with small additions of Zn. Results are also shown here for a detailed study of the low temperature properties of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, and a comparison made between conventional melt cast alloy and the vapor process material.

  13. A new method of measuring hydrogen diffusivity by hydrogen permeation technique . 1: Theoretical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.Y.; Zheng, Y.P.

    1998-12-31

    A new model on hydrogen permeation is proposed, considering absorption and desorption processes on the sample surfaces. Analytical solution, satisfying the flux continuity rather than the concentration boundary conditions, is derived from the model. Drift velocity through surface and drift velocity in bulk are introduced and their ratio determines the validity of the time-lag model. When the ratio of drift velocity through surface over that in bulk approaches infinity, the proposed model is reduced to the time-lag one. The diffusivity and the drift velocity through surface can be evaluated by fitting the entire normalized permeation curve. The obtained results can predict the effects of temperature, sample thickness and energy barriers of absorption and desorption on the permeation process. The thickness effect occurred in using the time-lag model is well explained by the effects of absorption and desorption on the permeation process.

  14. Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Soft Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberg, Brendan; Nuebler, Johannes; Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Adsorption-desorption processes are ubiquitous in physics, chemistry, and biology. Models usually assume hard particles, but within the realm of soft matter physics the adsorbing particles are compressible. A minimal 1D model reveals that softness fundamentally changes the kinetics: Below the desorption time scale, a logarithmic increase of the particle density replaces the usual Rényi jamming plateau, and the subsequent relaxation to equilibrium can be nonmonotonic and much faster than for hard particles. These effects will impact the kinetics of self-assembly and reaction-diffusion processes.

  15. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange on plasma-exposed W and SS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Ikuji; Nomura, Shinji; Minamimoto, Toshihiro; Akiyoshi, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Taishi; Sasaki, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    The desorption cross section for hydrogen isotopes adsorbed on stainless steel (SS) and tungsten (W) has been evaluated experimentally to provide basic information on tritium exchange. One side of a sample sheet was alternately exposed to H and D plasma, and deuterium density on the surface was repeatedly observed using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) under continuous plasma exposure. From the time dependent change in the deuterium density, the desorption cross sections for SS and W were estimated to be 6.9 ± 2.3 × 10-23 m2 and 4.6 ± 1.0 × 10-23 m2, respectively. No significant differences in the cross section between H and D plasma were observed. Recombinative desorption was found to dominate the desorption process owing to the low incident energy of hydrogen atoms.

  16. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  17. Polymer-induced surface modifications of Pd-based thin films leading to improved kinetics in hydrogen sensing and energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Ngene, Peter; Westerwaal, Ruud J; Sachdeva, Sumit; Haije, Wim; de Smet, Louis C P M; Dam, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    The catalytic properties of Pd alloy thin films are enhanced by a thin sputtered PTFE coating, resulting in profound improvements in hydrogen adsorption and desorption in Pd-based and Pd-catalyzed hydrogen sensors and hydrogen storage materials. The remarkably enhanced catalytic performance is attributed to chemical modifications of the catalyst surface by the sputtered PTFE leading to a possible change in the binding strength of the intermediate species involved in the hydrogen sorption process. PMID:25244324

  18. Field desorption of Na and Cs from graphene on iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    Field electron and desorption microscopy has been used to study specific features of the field desorption of sodium and cesium ions adsorbed on the surface of iridium with graphene. It was found that adsorbed sodium atoms most strongly reduce the work function on graphene islands situated over densely packed faces of iridium. A strong electric field qualitatively similarly affects the sodium and cesium desorption processes from a field emitter to give two desorption phases and has no noticeable effect on the disintegration of the graphene layer.

  19. Electrochemical synthesis of hydrogen with depolarization of the anodic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulskiy, Gennadiy; Tulskaya, Alena; Skatkov, Leonid; Gomozov, Valeriy; Deribo, Svetlana

    2016-05-01

    A new active composite coating for graphite gas diffusion electrode for hybrid sulfur cycle was proposed. The kinetics of oxidation of SO2 were studied on porous graphite anodes with different catalytic coatings. It was shown that the most efficient composite coating is based on activated carbon and platinum supported on graphite gas diffusion substrate. The voltage drop in the laboratory electrochemical cell was 1.3 V at a current density of 1000 A·m-2. This corresponds to a specific consumption of 3.1 kWh electric energy per 1 m3 of hydrogen.

  20. Maximizing light emission from silicon nanocrystals - The role of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, A. R.; Elliman, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements are undertaken to determine the passivation kinetics of luminescence-quenching defects during isothermal and isochronal annealing in molecular and atomic hydrogen. The latter employs an alneal process in which atomic hydrogen is generated by reactions between a deposited Al layer and H2O or -OH radicals in the SiO2. Passivation and desorption kinetics are shown to be consistent with the existence of two classes of non-radiative defects: one that reacts with either atomic or molecular hydrogen, and the other that reacts only with atomic hydrogen.

  1. Thermodynamics of the hybrid interaction of hydrogen with palladium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Griessen, Ronald; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Giessen, Harald

    2016-03-01

    Palladium-hydrogen is a prototypical metal-hydrogen system. It is therefore not at all surprising that a lot of attention has been devoted to the absorption and desorption of hydrogen in nanosized palladium particles. Several seminal articles on the interaction of H with Pd nanocubes and nanoparticles have recently been published. Although each article provides for the first time detailed data on specific aspects of hydrogen in nanoparticles, they individually do not contain enough information to draw firm conclusions about the involved mechanisms. Here, we show that the large body of data available so far in literature exhibits general patterns that lead to unambiguous conclusions about the processes involved in H absorption and desorption in Pd nanoparticles. On the basis of a remarkably robust scaling law for the hysteresis in absorption-desorption isotherms, we show that hydrogen absorption in palladium nanoparticles is consistent with a coherent interface model and is thus clearly different from bulk Pd behaviour. However, H desorption occurs fully coherently only for small nanoparticles (typically smaller than 50 nm) at temperatures sufficiently close to the critical temperature. For larger particles it is partially incoherent, as in bulk, where dilute α-PdHx and high concentration β-PdHx phases coexist. PMID:26569476

  2. Thermodynamics of the hybrid interaction of hydrogen with palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessen, Ronald; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Giessen, Harald

    2016-03-01

    Palladium-hydrogen is a prototypical metal-hydrogen system. It is therefore not at all surprising that a lot of attention has been devoted to the absorption and desorption of hydrogen in nanosized palladium particles. Several seminal articles on the interaction of H with Pd nanocubes and nanoparticles have recently been published. Although each article provides for the first time detailed data on specific aspects of hydrogen in nanoparticles, they individually do not contain enough information to draw firm conclusions about the involved mechanisms. Here, we show that the large body of data available so far in literature exhibits general patterns that lead to unambiguous conclusions about the processes involved in H absorption and desorption in Pd nanoparticles. On the basis of a remarkably robust scaling law for the hysteresis in absorption-desorption isotherms, we show that hydrogen absorption in palladium nanoparticles is consistent with a coherent interface model and is thus clearly different from bulk Pd behaviour. However, H desorption occurs fully coherently only for small nanoparticles (typically smaller than 50 nm) at temperatures sufficiently close to the critical temperature. For larger particles it is partially incoherent, as in bulk, where dilute α-PdHx and high concentration β-PdHx phases coexist.

  3. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization. PMID:22750091

  4. Role of deuterium desorption kinetics on the thermionic emission properties of polycrystalline diamond films with respect to kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, W. F. Howell, M.; Kang, W. P.; Davidson, J. L.; Brooks, M. M.; Tolk, N.

    2014-06-21

    The desorption kinetics of deuterium from polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited diamond films were characterized by monitoring the isothermal thermionic emission current behavior. The reaction was observed to follow a first-order trend as evidenced by the decay rate of the thermionic emission current over time which is in agreement with previously reported studies. However, an Arrhenius plot of the reaction rates at each tested temperature did not exhibit the typical linear behavior which appears to contradict past observations of the hydrogen (or deuterium) desorption reaction from diamond. This observed deviation from linearity, specifically at lower temperatures, has been attributed to non-classical processes. Though no known previous studies reported similar deviations, a reanalysis of the data obtained in the present study was performed to account for tunneling which appeared to add merit to this hypothesis. Additional investigations were performed by reevaluating previously reported data involving the desorption of hydrogen (as opposed to deuterium) from diamond which further indicated this reaction to be dominated by tunneling at the temperatures tested in this study (<775 °C). An activation energy of 3.19 eV and a pre-exponential constant of 2.3 × 10{sup 12} s{sup −1} were determined for the desorption reaction of deuterium from diamond which is in agreement with previously reported studies.

  5. Solubility of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti and lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, G.; Erck, R.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium was determined at 400-675{degrees}C and a hydrogen pressure of 1.76x10{sup -4} torr (2.35 x 10{sup -2}Pa). Hydrogen concentration in both materials decreased as temperature increased, and the ratio of the hydrogen concentration in liquid lithium and V-4Cr-4Ti (hydrogen distribution ratio R) increased with temperature, e.g., R was {approx} 17 at 400{degrees}C and {approx} 80 at 700{degrees}C. Desorption of hydrogen from V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process and the activation energy of the desorption rate is 0.405 eV.

  6. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  7. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  8. Syngas redox (SGR) process to produce hydrogen from coal derived syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Puneet Gupta; Luis G. Velazquez-Vargas; Liang-Shih Fan

    2007-09-15

    The syngas redox (SGR) process to produce hydrogen from coal derived syngas is described. The process involves reduction of a metal oxide to metallic form with syngas and subsequent regeneration with steam to generate hydrogen in a cyclic operation. Metal oxides of Ni, Cu, Cd, Co, Mn, Sn, and Fe were evaluated for this process based upon thermodynamic equilibrium limitations. It was found that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} provided the best conversion of syngas to combustion products CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O along with a high conversion of steam to hydrogen. Other oxides provide high conversion of syngas but were found lacking in producing hydrogen from steam. Composite particles with Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the key ingredient were developed that undergo multiple redox cycles without loss of activity. Analysis of process economics with respect to particle recyclability showed that the particles should undergo at least a 100 redox cycles without diminishing its activity. Process modifications to address carbon formation on reaction of syngas with iron oxide are discussed. Detailed process simulation showed that the SGR process is capable of converting 74% of the coal energy into hydrogen energy (higher heating value (HHV) basis) while delivering a pure CO{sub 2} stream without the need for costly separation technology. 38 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, James B.; Comolli, Alfred G.; McLean, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    A process for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600.degree.-750.degree. F. to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650.degree. F. and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft.sup.3 catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760.degree.-860.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600.degree.-750.degree. F..sup.+ fraction containing 0-20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials.

  10. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

    1989-10-17

    A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

  11. New insights into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hydrogen production processes by combined microarray/RNA-seq transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Toepel, Jörg; Illmer-Kephalides, Maike; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Straube, Jasmin; May, Patrick; Goesmann, Alexander; Kruse, Olaf

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii induced by sulphur starvation is a multiphase process while the cell internal metabolism is completely remodelled. The first cellular response is characterized by induction of genes with regulatory functions, followed by a total remodelling of the metabolism to provide reduction equivalents for cellular processes. We were able to characterize all major processes that provide energy and reduction equivalents during hydrogen production. Furthermore, C. reinhardtii showed a strong transcript increase for gene models responsible for stress response and detoxification of oxygen radicals. Finally, we were able to determine potential bottlenecks and target genes for manipulation to increase hydrogen production or to prolong the hydrogen production phase. The investigation of transcriptomic changes during the time course of hydrogen production in C. reinhardtii with microarrays and RNA-seq revealed new insights into the regulation and remodelling of the cell internal metabolism. Both methods showed a good correlation. The microarray platform can be used as a reliable standard tool for routine gene expression analysis. RNA-seq additionally allowed a detailed time-dependent study of gene expression and determination of new genes involved in the hydrogen production process. PMID:23551401

  12. THERMAL DESORPTION...NOW YOU'RE COOKIN'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption includes a number of ex situ processes that use either direct or indirect heat exchange to heat a waste material to volatilize organic materials. hermal desorption systems typically operate at soil treatment temperatures in the range of 400 to 600 degrees F to ...

  13. Prospects for hydrogen storage in graphene.

    PubMed

    Tozzini, Valentina; Pellegrini, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-based fuel cells are promising solutions for the efficient and clean delivery of electricity. Since hydrogen is an energy carrier, a key step for the development of a reliable hydrogen-based technology requires solving the issue of storage and transport of hydrogen. Several proposals based on the design of advanced materials such as metal hydrides and carbon structures have been made to overcome the limitations of the conventional solution of compressing or liquefying hydrogen in tanks. Nevertheless none of these systems are currently offering the required performances in terms of hydrogen storage capacity and control of adsorption/desorption processes. Therefore the problem of hydrogen storage remains so far unsolved and it continues to represent a significant bottleneck to the advancement and proliferation of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Recently, however, several studies on graphene, the one-atom-thick membrane of carbon atoms packed in a honeycomb lattice, have highlighted the potentialities of this material for hydrogen storage and raise new hopes for the development of an efficient solid-state hydrogen storage device. Here we review on-going efforts and studies on functionalized and nanostructured graphene for hydrogen storage and suggest possible developments for efficient storage/release of hydrogen under ambient conditions. PMID:23165421

  14. Radiolytic hydrogen production from process vessels in HB line - production rates compared to evolution rates and discussion of LASL reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.

    1992-11-12

    Hydrogen production from radiolysis of aqueous solutions can create a safety hazard since hydrogen is flammable. At times this production can be significant, especially in HB line where nitric acid solutions containing high concentrations of Pu-238, an intense alpha emitter, are processed. The hydrogen production rates from these solutions are necessary for safety analyses of these process systems. The methods and conclusions of hydrogen production rate tests are provided in this report.

  15. Thermochemical production of hydrogen via multistage water splitting processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents and reviews the fundamental thermodynamic principles underlying thermochemical water splitting processes. The overall system is considered first and the temperature limitation in process thermal efficiency is developed. The relationship to an ideal water electrolysis cell is described and the nature of efficient multistage reaction processes is discussed. The importance of the reaction entropy change and the relation of the reaction free energy change to the work of separation is described. A procedure for analyzing thermochemical water splitting processes is presented and its use to calculate individual stage efficiency is demonstrated. A number of processes are used to illustrate the concepts and procedures.

  16. Study of tritium desorption by energetic ion bombardment from tungsten material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shuichi; Ito, Atsushi M.; Takayama, Arimichi; Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problem of tritium retention in a nuclear fusion reactor, the removal of hydrogen isotopes retained in a tungsten material by exposure to the other hydrogen isotope plasma was investigated. We proposed the balance equation between the absorption and desorption of the hydrogen isotope atoms in the tungsten material. Absorption ratio and desorption yield were calculated by binary collision approximation simulation. Simulation results showed that desorption yield was proportional to the concentration of the retained hydrogen isotope. Therefore, the decrease in the retained hydrogen isotope atoms by hydrogen plasma irradiation can be regarded as approximately exponential decay. The decay rate in the case that retained deuterium atoms are removed by light hydrogen irradiation was two thirds of the decay rate in the case that retained tritium atoms are removed by deuterium irradiation.

  17. A Micro-fabricated Hydrogen Storage Module with Sub-atmospheric Activation and Durability in Air Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogen storage module for onboard electrical power sources suitable for use in micro power systems and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Important design aspects were (a) ready activation at sub-atmospheric hydrogen pressure and room temperature and (b) durability, i.e. capable of hundreds of absorption/desorption cycles and resistance to deactivation on exposure to air. Inks with palladium-treated intermetallic hydrogen storage alloys were developed and are shown here to be compatible with a thin-film micro-fabrication process. These hydrogen storage modules absorb hydrogen readily at atmospheric pressure, and the absorption/desorption rates remained fast even after the ink was exposed to air for 47 weeks. PMID:20967132

  18. A Micro-fabricated Hydrogen Storage Module with Sub-atmospheric Activation and Durability in Air Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H.; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogen storage module for onboard electrical power sources suitable for use in micro power systems and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Important design aspects were (a) ready activation at sub-atmospheric hydrogen pressure and room temperature and (b) durability, i.e. capable of hundreds of absorption/desorption cycles and resistance to deactivation on exposure to air. Inks with palladium-treated intermetallic hydrogen storage alloys were developed and are shown here to be compatible with a thin-film micro-fabrication process. These hydrogen storage modules absorb hydrogen readily at atmospheric pressure, and the absorption/desorption rates remained fast even after the ink was exposed to air for 47 weeks. PMID:20967132

  19. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  20. Chemisorption kinetics of hydrogen on evaporated iron films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the isothermal adsorption-desorption kinetics for H2 chemisorbed onto Fe films. The chemisorption process is observed to proceed via a precursor state of adsorbed molecular hydrogen similar to the H2-Ni system. The first measurements of the activation energy for desorption, and estimates of the values of the fast kinetic rates between the precursor and chemisorbed states are reported. Adsorption into the precursor state does not appear to be activated, but the process connecting the precursor state with the chemisorbed state will, under certain circumstances, be a rate limiting step for adsorption. The effects of contamination of the surface are evidenced in the measurements.

  1. Desorption of intrinsic cesium from smectite: inhibitive effects of clay particle organization on cesium desorption.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Sakai, Haruka; Itono, Taeko; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2014-09-16

    Fine clay particles have functioned as transport media for radiocesium in terrestrial environments after nuclear accidents. Because radiocesium is expected to be retained in clay minerals by a cation-exchange reaction, ascertaining trace cesium desorption behavior in response to changing solution conditions is crucially important. This study systematically investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs (13 nmol/g) in well-characterized Na-montmorillonite in electrolyte solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) under widely differing cation concentrations (0.2 mM to 0.2 M). Batch desorption experiments demonstrated that Cs(+) desorption was inhibited significantly in the presence of the environmental relevant concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (>0.5 mM) and high concentrations of K(+). The order of ability for Cs desorption was Na(+) = K(+) > Ca(2+) = Mg(2+) at the highest cation concentration (0.2 M), which is opposite to the theoretical prediction based on the cation-exchange selectivity. Laser diffraction grain-size analyses revealed that the inhibition of Cs(+) desorption coincided with the increase of the clay tactoid size. Results suggest that radiocesium in the dispersed fine clay particles adheres on the solid phase when the organization of swelling clay particles occurs because of changes in solution conditions caused by both natural processes and artificial treatments. PMID:25144123

  2. A Process Model for the Production of Hydrogen Using High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Mc Kellar; E. A. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy

    2006-07-01

    High temperature electrolysis (HTE) involves the splitting of stream into hydrogen and oxygen at high temperatures. The primary advantage of HTE over conventional low temperature electrolysis is that considerably higher hydrogen production efficiencies can be achieved. Performing the electrolysis process at high temperatures results in more favorable thermodynamics for electrolysis, more efficient production of electricity, and allows direct use of process heat to generate steam. This paper presents the results of process analyses performed to evaluate the hydrogen production efficiencies of an HTE plant coupled to a 600 MWt Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) that supplies both the electricity and process heat needed to drive the process. The MHR operates with a coolant outlet temperature of 950 C. Approximately 87% of the high-temperature heat is used to generate electricity at high efficiency using a direct, Brayton-cycle power conversion system. The remaining high-temperature heat is used to generate a superheated steam / hydrogen mixture that is supplied to the electrolyzers. The analyses were performed using the HYSYS process modeling software. The model used to perform the analyses consisted of three loops; a primary high temperature helium loop, a secondary helium loop and the HTE process loop. The detailed model included realistic representations of all major components in the system, including pumps, compressors, heat exchange equipment, and the electrolysis stack. The design of the hydrogen production process loop also included a steam-sweep gas system to remove oxygen from the electrolysis stack so that it can be recovered and used for other applications. Results of the process analyses showed that hydrogen production efficiencies in the range of 45% to 50% are achievable with this system.

  3. Computer simulation of the water and hydrogen distillation and CECE process and its experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Trenin, V.D.; Uborski, V.V.

    1995-10-01

    Mathematical simulation procedures have been developed for three processes of hydrogen isotopes separation: (1) a non steady-state water distillation; (2) a cryogenic distillation; and (3) a combined electrolysis and multistage water/hydrogen catalytic exchange (CECE) process. The simulation procedures possess some special features. Thus, the comparatively large step of integration and as a result of this high fast-acting is the peculiarity of the model for the dynamic behaviour of water distillation column operating at total reflux. The simulation procedure for CECE process considers six components and three phases (liquid water, water vapour, and hydrogen gas) and allows one to carry out computations for any mole fraction stock. This procedure, as the one for cryogenic distillation process, is not based on the Newton-Raphson method, and, in spite of this, convergence is reached by a small number of iterations (4 - 11). 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. A study of the processes in the RF hydrogen gas dissociator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the RF gas dissociator in the hydrogen maser is examined. Based on collisional and plasma transport processes, the performance of the source is investigated. It is found that while the complexity of the collisional processes in the RF dissociator prohibits an easily obtained quantitative expression for the performance of the source, it is nevertheless possible to make general inferences concerning the qualitative performance based on collisional effects. An analytical expression for the efficiency of the source in atom production is obtained based on plasma transport processes. On the basis of this study some recommendations are made for the development of more efficient RF hydrogen gas dissociators for use in masers.

  5. Physics and Chemistry of the Hydrogen Fluoride Production Process from Fluorine Containing Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. N.; Kraydenko, R. I.; Lesnikova, M. S.; Malyutin, L. N.; Petlin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the aluminum industry wastes on the environment is established. The resource efficient method of aluminum industry fluorine-containing wastes processing, which includes wastes oxidizing roasting to remove carbon component and the interaction of fluorine- containing particles with sulfuric acid in order to produce hydrogen fluoride, is considered. The economic and environmental effect of the proposed processing method is substantiated.

  6. Analysis of hypochlorite process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal gases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Sodium hypochlorite reacts readily with hydrogen sulfide to convert the sulfide ion into free sulfur in a neutral or acid solution and to the sulfate ion in an alkaline solution. Sodium hypochlorite can be generated on site by processing geothermal brine in electrolytic cells. An investigation to determine if this reaction could be economically used to remove hydrogen sulfide from geothermal noncondensible gases is reported. Two processes, the LO-CAT Process and the Stretford Process, were selected for comparison with the hypochlorite process. Three geothermal reservoirs were considered for evaluation: Niland KGRA, Baca KGRA, and The Geysers KGRA. Because of the wide variation in the amount of hydrogen sulfide present at The Geysers, two different gas analyses were considered for treatment. Plants were designed to process the effluent noncondensible gases from a 10 MW/sub e/ geothermal power plant. The effluent gas from each plant was to contain a maximum hydrogen sulfide concentration of 35 ppb. Capital costs were estimated for each of the processes at each of the four sites selected. Operating costs were also calculated for each of the processes at each of the sites. The results of these studies are shown.

  7. Topotactixity of the hydrogen reduction process in fused iron catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Caceres, P.G.; Habib, K.

    1995-12-01

    Microstructural characterization of highly porous fused iron catalyst in the reduced and partially reduced states has been performed using electron microscopy techniques. The microstructure consists of 30--50 nm iron crystallites in a network of highly defected iron, forming an interconnected porous structure. The size of the pores ranges from 10 to 20 nm and they are aligned along a specific crystallographic direction of magnetite and/or iron. The authors found that the {l_brace}111{r_brace}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the {l_brace}011{r_brace}Fe planes are preferentially reduced and preferentially exposed, respectively, during reduction. The magnetite-{alpha}-iron-pore channel crystallographic orientation relationship can be expressed as ({bar 1}11)Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}{parallel}({bar 1}10)Fe{parallel} pore channel and (0{bar 2}2)Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}{parallel}(002)Fe{perpendicular} pore channel. The former is known as the Nishiyama-Wassermann orientation relationship between face-centered and body-centered cubic materials. It is suggested that the high activity of this catalyst is due to the presence of alkali atoms on top of every other closely packed iron atom. Alpha-iron produced from magnetite, doped with small amounts of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}O, CaO, SiO{sub 2}, etc., has been used for many years as a catalyst in the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and in ammonia synthesis from dinitrogen and dihydrogen molecules.

  8. Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, Vincent; Hill, Scott; Akbari, Amin; McDonell, Vincent

    2011-09-30

    As simulation capability improves exponentially with increasingly more cost effective CPUs and hardware, it can be used ?routinely? for engineering applications. Many commercial products are available and they are marketed as increasingly powerful and easy to use. The question remains as to the overall accuracy of results obtained. To support the validation of the CFD, a hierarchical experiment was established in which the type of fuel injection (radial, axial) as well as level of swirl (non-swirling, swirling) could be systematically varied. The effort was limited to time efficient approaches (i.e., generally RANS approaches) although limited assessment of time resolved methods (i.e., unsteady RANS and LES) were considered. Careful measurements of the flowfield velocity and fuel concentration were made using both intrusive and non-intrusive methods. This database was then used as the basis for the assessment of the CFD approach. The numerical studies were carried out with a statistically based matrix. As a result, the effect of turbulence model, fuel type, axial plane, turbulent Schmidt number, and injection type could be studied using analysis of variance. The results for the non-swirling cases could be analyzed as planned, and demonstrate that turbulence model selection, turbulence Schmidt number, and the type of injection will strongly influence the agreement with measured values. Interestingly, the type of fuel used (either hydrogen or methane) has no influence on the accuracy of the simulations. For axial injection, the selection of proper turbulence Schmidt number is important, whereas for radial injection, the results are relatively insensitive to this parameter. In general, it was found that the nature of the flowfield influences the performance of the predictions. This result implies that it is difficult to establish a priori the ?best? simulation approach to use. However, the insights from the relative orientation of the jet and flow do offer some

  9. Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Russ

    2009-05-01

    This report summarizes the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process for the purpose of supporting the process for evaluating and recommending a hydrogen production technology to deploy with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). This package provides the baseline process description as well as a comparison with the process as it was implemented in the Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment conducted at General Atomics from 2006-2009.

  10. An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhicheng Wang

    2007-03-15

    The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

  11. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  12. Electrocatalytic process for the hydrogenation of edible and non-edible oils and fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pintauro, P.N.

    1993-07-06

    A two phase electrocatalytic process is described for hydrogenating an unsaturated fatty acid, a triglyceride or mixtures thereof as an oil and/or a fat, which comprises the steps of: (a) placing a dispersion consisting essentially of (i) the unsaturated fatty acid, the triglyceride, or the mixtures thereof as the oil and/or the fat, (ii) water, or a water-alcohol mixture and (iii) a supporting electrolyte salt in a reactor containing an anode and a high surface area, low hydrogen overvoltage catalytic cathode consisting essentially of a granular or a powdered Raney metal or an alloy thereof: (b) passing current through the catalytic cathode; and (c) generating atomic hydrogen on the catalytic cathode surface in amounts sufficient to hydrogenate some or all of the double bonds in the unsaturated fatty acid and/or triglyceride.

  13. MVC: A user-based on-line optimal control system for small gas processing and treating plants. Development and results for lean oil absorption/desorption modules. Topical report, January-November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, P.N.; Papadopoulos, M.N.; Klein, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The two phase project involved the development and field validation of an optimal process control system for lean oil absorption/desorption gas processing plants. Phase 1 consisted of a field survey and software module development activity for the control modules. Phase 2 consisted of the field validation of the total package. The software package (called MVC) is a modular, on-line, advanced control system designed for gas processing and treating facilities. MVC is 386/486 PC-based and relatively inexpensive. Software modules (standarized self-contained process software packages for specific process units) were developed for Refrigerated Lean Oil Absorption and Lean Oil Recovery (Desorption) and were installed for field performance validation at ARCO's Denver City, Texas gas processing plant. Each module consists of process simulations, feedforward control equations, feedback trim equations and adaptive control features including re-linearization (for simulation equation coefficients) and drift factor equations (to correct for the normal drifting of on-line analyzers). The process optimization uses an economic module containing prices and operating costs which forms the basis of the profit maximization. The project duration was 10 1/2 months and was completed in December, 1991. Current process control optimization is expensive and generally infeasible for small and mid-sized gas plants. MVC is designed to gain more than 90% of the benefits of optimized advanced control while running for over 90% of the available service time. MVC utilizes standardized software algorithms with coefficients tailored to specific process units. MVC will give producers the economic incentive to process more gas and thus increase the availability to consumers of both natural gas and natural gas liquids at lower prices.

  14. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  15. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  16. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  17. The contribution of dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines in hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of molecular dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines is considered for a steady-state hydrogen plasma. If the contribution of dissociative processes is dominant, a substantial simplification in plasma diagnostics can be achieved. Numerical calculations have been performed for the production of Balmer alpha, beta, and gamma lines in hydrogen plasmas with medium and large degrees of ionization (x greater than about 0.0001) and for electron temperatures of 5000-45,000 K and electron densities of 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 16th/cu cm.

  18. FLOSHEET: microcomputerized flowsheeting/simulation program for simulating hydrogen isotope separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.; Sepa, T.R.; Sood, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has developed a comprehensive computer program, FLOSHEET, to simulate various hydrogen isotope separation processes, including water distillation and cryogenic distillation of elemental hydrogen isotopes. FLOSHEET was developed to assist in the operation and optimization of a Tritium Removal Facility Ontario Hydro is building at the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station. However, FLOSHEET is a general purpose simulator and allows the specification and simulation of complete process plants with various interconnected units. This paper discusses the development and features of FLOSHEET, as well as various simulation results which have emerged from the use of the program.

  19. Hydrogen isotope analysis of amino acids and whole cells reflects biosynthetic processing of nutrient- and water-derived hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, P.; Newsome, S.; Steele, A.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen (H) isotopes serve as sensitive tracers of biochemical processes that can be exploited to answer critical questions in biogeochemistry, ecology, and microbiology. Despite this apparent utility, relatively little is known about the specific mechanisms of H isotope fractionation involved in biosynthesis. In order to understand how organisms incorporate hydrogen from their chemical milieu into biomass, we have cultured the model bacterium E. coli MG1655 in a variety of media composed of deuterium-labeled nutrients and waters. Isotopic analysis of bulk cell mass reveals that the H fractionation between media water and cell material varies as a function of the nutrient source, with commonly used organic food sources (glucose and tryptone) leading to far smaller fractionation signals than non-standard ones (such as formamide, adenine, and urea). In addition, we have completed compound specific isotope analysis of amino acids using combined GC-IRMS. Amino acids harvested from E. coli cultured on glucose in water of varied D/H composition posses an extraordinary range of isotopic compositions (400-600 %). Furthermore, these amino acids follow a systematic distribution of D/H where proline is always heaviest and glycine is always lightest. However, when the short-chain peptide tryptone is used in place of glucose, only the non-essential amino acids reflect media water D/H values, suggesting the direct incorporation of some media-borne amino acids into cellular protein. These observations provide a foundation for understanding the cellular routing of hydrogen obtained from food and water sources and indicate that D/H analysis can serve as a powerful probe of biological function.

  20. Aqueous process for recovering sulfur from hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Arunabha

    2015-05-05

    A process for recovering sulfur from a hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas utilizes an aqueous reaction medium, a temperature of about 110-150.degree. C., and a high enough pressure to maintain the aqueous reaction medium in a liquid state. The process reduces material and equipment costs and addresses the environmental disadvantages associated with known processes that rely on high boiling point organic solvents.

  1. Compound specific carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses of volatile organic compounds in various emissions of combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Christiane D; Grice, Kliti; Ioppolo-Armanios, Marisa; Kelly, David; Gibberd, Mark

    2012-11-01

    This study presents carbon (δ(13)C) and hydrogen (δD) isotope values of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in various emission sources using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TD-GC-irMS). The investigated VOCs ranged from C6 to C10. Samples were taken from (i) car exhaust emissions as well as from plant combustion experiments of (ii) various C3 and (iii) various C4 plants. We found significant differences in δ values of analysed VOCs between these sources, e.g. δ(13)C of benzene ranged between (i) -21.7 ± 0.2 ‰, (ii) -27.6 ± 1.6 ‰ and (iii) -16.3 ± 2.2 ‰, respectively and δD of benzene ranged between (i) -73 ± 13 ‰, (ii) -111 ± 10 ‰ and (iii) -70 ± 24 ‰, respectively. Results of VOCs present in investigated emission sources were compared to values from the literature (aluminium refinery emission). All source groups could be clearly distinguished using the dual approach of δ(13)C and δD analysis. The results of this study indicate that the correlation of compound specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis provides the potential for future research to trace the fate and to determine the origin of VOCs in the atmosphere using thermal desorption compound specific isotope analysis. PMID:22921436

  2. Aasgard B process selection of hydrogen sulfide removal and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Son, K.J. van; Chludzinski, G.; Charles, P.R.

    1999-07-01

    The Aasgard offshore project consists of a 2-stage development to produce the oil and gas reserves from three fields in the Norwegian Sea. The three fields Midgard, Smoerbukk and Smoerbukk Soer have reserves of approximately 220 Gia standard cubic meters (Gsm{sup 3}, 8 Tcf) and 120 (Mm{sup 3}, 750 MMbbls) of crude oil and condensate. The Aasgard unit will be jointly developed by Statoil and Saga, and operated by Statoil. Other partners are Neste Petroleum, Mobil, Total, Agip and Norsk Hydro. This paper will focus on the process selection and preliminary design of the gas treating system.

  3. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David C.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Baich, Mark A.

    2005-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is in the process of investigating factors suspected of impacting catalytic hydrogen generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, Chemical Process Cell, CPC. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation in simulation work constrains the allowable acid addition operating window in DWPF. This constraint potentially impacts washing strategies during sludge batch preparation. It can also influence decisions related to the addition of secondary waste streams to a sludge batch. Catalytic hydrogen generation data from 2002-2005 were reviewed. The data came from process simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, and Slurry Mix Evaporator, SME. Most of the data was from the development work for the Sludge Batch 3 process flowsheet. This included simulant and radioactive waste testing. Preliminary Sludge Batch 4 data were also reviewed. A statistical analysis of SB3 simulant hydrogen generation data was performed. One factor considered in the statistical analysis was excess acid. Excess acid was determined experimentally as the acid added beyond that required to achieve satisfactory nitrite destruction.

  4. The kinetics of catalytic hydrogenation of pyrene-implications for direct coal liquefaction processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, H.P.; Chapman, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Although recycling heavy solvents has recently re-emerged as a key to cutting the cost of direct coal liquefaction, little data for the hydrogenation of heavy solvent donors have been reported. This study addresses the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of catalytic hydrogenation of pyrene, a donor solvent precursor thought to play an important role in coal liquefaction processes that use heavy recycle solvents. In the presence of a catalyst, pyrene (Py) is hydrogenated to di- (H/sub 2/Py), tetra- (H/sub 4/Py), hexa- (H/sub 6/Py), deca- (H/sub 10/Py) and perhydro- (H/sub 16/Py) species via a complex mechanism involving a network of reversible parallel and series reactions. Though several studies have dealt with aspects of pyrene hydrogenation, including hydrocracking reactions, reaction product distributions and thermodynamic properties, the kinetics of hydrogenation have not been previously reported. Ultimate application of kinetic and thermodynamic data to direct coal liquefaction must take into consideration the conditions imposed by the particular process used. However, two generalizations may be made regarding hydrogen supplied by the dihydropyrene component of donor solvents: (1) Increasing hydrogen partial pressure increases both the rate at which H/sub 2/Py is formed and the equilibrium concentration of H/sub 2/Py. Therefore, pyrene rehydrogenation should be done at as high a pressure as is cost effective. Although an increase in temperature favors the rate of attainment of equilibrium between Py and H/sub 2/Py, the position of the equilibrium is shifted toward pyrene. Temperature must therefore be adjusted to achieve an optimum trade-off between rate of formation and maximum possible concentration of H/sub 2/Py.

  5. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via an integrated pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J; Ren, S; Ye, X; Kim, P; Labbe, N; Borole, A P

    2015-11-01

    A new approach to hydrogen production using an integrated pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L anode-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50±3.2% to 76±0.5% while anode Coulombic efficiency ranged from 54±6.5% to 96±0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass. PMID:26210530

  6. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lewis, Alex J.; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbe, Niki; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2015-06-30

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%,more » respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.« less

  7. Thermochemical processes for hydrogen production by water decomposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, D.D.

    1980-08-01

    The principal contributions of the research are in the area of gas-solid reactions, ranging from models and data interpretation for fundamental kinetics and mixing of solids to simulations of engineering scale reactors. Models were derived for simulating the heat and mass transfer processes inside the reactor and tested by experiments. The effects of surface renewal of solids on the mass transfer phenomena were studied and related to the solid mixing. Catalysis by selected additives were studied experimentally. The separate results were combined in a simulation study of industrial-scale rotary reactor performance. A study was made of the controlled decompositions of a series of inorganic sulfates and their common hydrates, carried out in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA), a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), and a Differential Thermal Analyzer (DTA). Various sample sizes, heating rates, and ambient atmospheres were used to demonstrate their influence on the results. The purposes of this study were to: (i) reveal intermediate compounds, (ii) determine the stable temperature range of each compound, and (iii) measure reaction kinetics. In addition, several solid additives: carbon, metal oxides, and sodium chloride, were demonstrated to have catalytic effects to varying degrees for the different salts.

  8. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  9. Anion effects to deliver enhanced iridium catalysts for hydrogen isotope exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan R; Kerr, William J; Moir, Rory; Reid, Marc

    2014-10-28

    Synthesis of a series of iridium(I) complexes of the type [(COD)Ir(IMes)(PPh3)]X (X = BF4, OTf, and BArF) has been established. Application of these species in mild hydrogen isotope exchange processes revealed more efficient catalysis and, further, a wider solvent scope when employing larger, more weakly coordinating counterions. PMID:25208265

  10. Thermochemical process for the production of hydrogen using chromium and barium compound

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1977-01-25

    Hydrogen is produced by a closed cyclic process involving the reduction and oxidation of chromium compounds by barium hydroxide and the hydrolytic disproportionation of Ba.sub.2 CrO.sub.4 and Ba.sub.3 (CrO.sub.4).sub.2.

  11. Ambient pressure laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption ion mobility spectrometry detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Sven; Walte, Andreas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-11-19

    The development of fast, mobile, and sensitive detection systems for security-relevant substances is of enormous importance. Because of the low vapor pressures of explosives and improvised explosive devices, adequate sampling procedures are crucial. Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) are fast and sensitive instruments that are used as detection systems for explosives. Ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD) and ambient pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption (AP-LIAD) are new tools suitable to evaporate explosives in order to detect them in the vapor phase. Indeed, the most important advantage of APLD or AP-LIAD is the capability to sample directly from the surface of interest without any transfer of the analyte to other surfaces such as wipe pads. A much more gentle desorption, compared to classical thermal-based desorption, is possible with laser-based desorption using very short laser pulses. With this approach the analyte molecules are evaporated in a very fast process, comparable to a shock wave. The thermal intake is reduced considerably. The functionality of APLD and AP-LIAD techniques combined with a hand-held IMS system is shown for a wide range of common explosives such as EGDN (ethylene glycol dinitrate), urea nitrate, PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine), RDX (hexogen), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), and TNT (trinitrotoluene). Detection limits down to the low nanogram range are obtained. The successful combination of IMS detection and APLD/AP-LIAD sampling is shown. PMID:24116702

  12. CATALYTIC INTERACTIONS OF RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM, AND MERCURY DURING SIMULATED DWPF CPC PROCESSING WITH HYDROGEN GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-10-09

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels were performed as part of the ongoing investigation into catalytic hydrogen generation. Rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury have been identified as the principal elemental factors affecting the peak hydrogen generation rate in the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) for a given acid addition. The primary goal of this study is to identify any significant interactions between the three factors. Noble metal concentrations were similar to recent sludge batches. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%. An experimental matrix was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), two duplicate midpoint runs, and two additional replicate runs to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing can identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. Six Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed to supplement the SME hydrogen generation database. Some of the preliminary findings from this study include: (1) Rh was linked to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the first two hours after acid addition in preliminary statistical modeling. (2) Ru was linked conclusively to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the last four hours of reflux in preliminary statistical modeling. (3) Increasing the ratio of Hg/Rh shifted the noble metal controlling the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate from

  13. Investigation of processes in system {open_quotes}uranium-water-oxygen-hydrogen{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, V.N.; Laptev, N.N.; Akhlyustin, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    The solutions of some kinetic equations of Uranium corrosion in Hydrogen, Oxygen and Water media are obtained. Corrosion processes on a surface of components made of uranium and its alloys depend not only by the surface state (degree of mechanical purity, chemical state, presence and nature of technological or hygienic covers, etc.) but also by presence and parameters of gaseous medium. A lot of interdependent reactions proceed in the system {open_quotes}uranium - hydrogen - water - oxygen{close_quotes}, and their depth and direction depend on initial gaseous medium, temperature, pressure, etc.

  14. Hydrogen and electricity production from a food processing wastewater using fermentation and microbial fuel cell technologies.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Eun; Logan, Bruce E

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from fermentation of sugars in wastewaters, but much of the organic matter remains in solution. We demonstrate here that hydrogen production from a food processing wastewater high in sugar can be linked to electricity generation using a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to achieve more effective wastewater treatment. Grab samples were taken from: plant effluent at two different times during the day (Effluents 1 and 2; 735+/-15 and 3250+/-90 mg-COD/L), an equalization tank (Lagoon; 1670+/-50mg-COD/L), and waste stream containing a high concentration of organic matter (Cereal; 8920+/-150 mg-COD/L). Hydrogen production from the Lagoon and effluent samples was low, with 64+/-16 mL of hydrogen per liter of wastewater (mL/L) for Effluent 1, 21+/-18 mL/L for Effluent 2, and 16+/-2 mL/L for the Lagoon sample. There was substantially greater hydrogen production using the Cereal wastewater (210+/-56 mL/L). Assuming a theoretical maximum yield of 4 mol of hydrogen per mol of glucose, hydrogen yields were 0.61-0.79 mol/mol for the Cereal wastewater, and ranged from 1 to 2.52 mol/mol for the other samples. This suggests a strategy for hydrogen recovery from wastewater based on targeting high-COD and high-sugar wastewaters, recognizing that sugar content alone is an insufficient predictor of hydrogen yields. Preliminary tests with the Cereal wastewater (diluted to 595 mg-COD/L) in a two-chambered MFC demonstrated a maximum of 81+/-7 mW/m(2) (normalized to the anode surface area), or 25+/-2 mA per liter of wastewater, and a final COD of <30 mg/L (95% removal). Using a one-chambered MFC and pre-fermented wastewater, the maximum power density was 371+/-10 mW/m(2) (53.5+/-1.4 mA per liter of wastewater). These results suggest that it is feasible to link biological hydrogen production and electricity producing using MFCs in order to achieve both wastewater treatment and bioenergy production. PMID:16289673

  15. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface. PMID:22433948

  16. Temperature of hydrogen radio frequency plasma under dechlorination process of polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Y. Abe, K.; Kumada, A.; Hidaka, K.; Amano, K.; Itoh, K.; Oono, T.

    2014-10-27

    It has been reported that RF (radio frequency) hydrogen plasmas promote the dechlorination process of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) under irradiation of MW (microwave). A relative emission intensity spectroscope system was used for single-shot imaging of two-dimensional temperature distributions of RF hydrogen plasmas generated in chemical solutions with several mixing ratios of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and insulation oil under MW irradiation. Our experimental results showed that the plasma generation frequencies for the oil-contaminating solutions were higher than that for the pure IPA solution. In addition, the plasma temperature in the compound liquids including both oil and IPA was higher than that in the pure IPA and oil solutions. A combination of the plasma temperature measurements and plasma composition analysis indicated that the hydrogen radicals generated in a chemical solution containing the equal volumes of IPA and oil were almost the same amounts of H and H{sup +}, while those produced in the other solutions were mainly H.

  17. Perlite as a potential support for nickel catalyst in the process of sunflower oil hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjić, V.; Krstić, J.; Lončarević, D.; Jovanović, D.; Vukelić, N.; Stanković, M.; Nikolova, D.; Gabrovska, M.

    2015-12-01

    Investigation was conducted in order to elucidate the possibility of using perlite as support for preparation of nickel based precursor catalyst, potentially applicable in vegetable oil hydrogenation process. On three differently prepared expanded perlite, nickel catalyst precursors with identical Ni/SiO2 = 1.1 and Ni/Mg = 10/1 ratios were synthesized by precipitation-deposition method. Different techniques, SEM micrography, He-pycnometry, calcimetry, Hg-porosimetry, N2-physisorption, H2-chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction, were used for characterization of obtained samples. Determining the precursor texture, morphology and reducibility shows a successfully deposited nickel phase on perlite support with promising properties for vegetable oil hydrogenation. Chosen precursor was reduced and passivated in paraffin oil and the obtained catalyst showed significant catalytic activity in the test of sunflower oil hydrogenation.

  18. Use of plasma arc welding process to combat hydrogen metallic disbonding of austenitic stainless steel claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, O.A. ); Steklov, O.I.; Alexeev, A.V. )

    1993-11-01

    A separation type crack, metallic disbonding, occurred between austenitic stainless steel weld metal cladding and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo base metal in the hydrodesulfurizing reactor of an oil refining plant. For stainless steel cladding, the submerged arc welding (SAW) process with a strip electrode is usually applied, but the authors experimented with the plasma arc welding (PAW) process with hot wire electrode for the cladding. The metallic disbonding is considered to be attributed to hydrogen accumulation at the transition zone and has been generally studied on a laboratory scale using an autoclave. The authors used a electrolytic hydrogen charging technique for the sake of experimental simplicity and made a comparison with the results for gaseous hydrogen charging. The main conclusions obtained were follows: The PAW stainless steel weld metal cladding is more resistant to metallic disbonding with the PAW process is explained by the desirable microstructure and properties of the first layer of weld metal at the transition zone. Electrolytic hydrogen charging pretty well reproduces the results of autoclave gas phase charging.

  19. Quantum mechanical investigation on bimolecular hydrogen abstractions in butyl acrylate-based free radical polymerization processes.

    PubMed

    Mavroudakis, Evangelos; Cuccato, Danilo; Moscatelli, Davide

    2014-03-13

    The present computational study focuses on the investigation of bimolecular hydrogen abstractions that can occur during free radical polymerization (FRP) processes. In particular, several hydrogen abstractions from four monomers (butyl acrylate, BA; styrene, ST; butyl methacrylate, BMA; vinyl acetate, VA) and three different backbone chains (poly-BA, poly-BA-co-VA, and poly-BA-co-ST) have been studied. The aim is to provide an overview of the kinetics for all possible intermolecular hydrogen abstraction reactions from all chemical species present in a bulk FRP as well as to support the understanding of the influence of chemical environment on hydrogen abstractions. All simulations were performed using density functional theory (DFT) with quantum tunneling factors estimated using the Eckart model. This study provides proof that the presence of an electron donating group in the chemical environment of the abstracted hydrogen atoms can lead to lower activation energies and higher rate coefficients for abstraction whereas the presence of an electron withdrawing group leads to opposite effects. PMID:24555565

  20. An exergetic/energetic/economic analysis of three hydrogen production processes - Electrolysis, hybrid, and thermochemical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, J. E.; Eisermann, W.

    This paper presents the results of a combined first and second law analysis, along with capital and operating costs, for hydrogen production from water by means of electrolytic, hybrid, and thermochemical processes. The processes are SPE and Lurgi electrolysis with light water reactor power generation and sulfur cycle hybrid, thermochemical and SPE electrolysis with a very high temperature reactor primary energy source. Energy and Exergy (2nd law) flow diagrams for the process are shown along with the location and magnitude of the process irreversibilities. The overall process thermal (1st law) efficiencies vary from 25 to 51% and the exergetic (2nd law) efficiencies, referred to the fuel for the primary energy source, vary from 22 to 45%. Capital and operating costs, escalated to 1979 dollars, are shown for each process for both the primary energy source and the hydrogen production plant. All costs were taken from information available in the open literature and are for a plant capacity of 100 x 10 to the 6th SCF/day. Production costs vary from 10 to 18 $/GJ, based on the higher heating value of hydrogen, and are based on a 90% plant operating factor with a 21% annual charge on total capital costs.

  1. Effect of organic matter and calcium carbonate on behaviors of cadmium adsorption-desorption on/from purple paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiulan; Jiang, Tao; Du, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Batch experiments and sequential extraction analysis were employed to investigate the effects of soil organic matter and CaCO3 on the adsorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd(2+)) onto and from two purple paddy soils, an acidic purple paddy soil (APPS) and a calcareous purple paddy soil (CPPS). The Cd(2+) adsorption isotherms on both soils could be well-described by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. CPPS had a higher capacity and a stronger affinity for Cd(2+) adsorption compared with APPS. The adsorption process of Cd(2+) on APPS was dominated by electrostatic attractions, whereas the adsorption mechanism varied depending on the Cd(2+) concentrations in equilibrium solutions on CPPS. At low equilibrium concentrations, the adsorption process was primarily specific adsorption, but nonspecific adsorption dominated at high equilibrium concentrations. Removal of organic matter decreased the amount of Cd(2+) adsorption on both of the soils, slightly affected the Cd(2+) desorption rate and exchangeable Cd (EXC-Cd) in APPS and increased the desorption rate and EXC-Cd in CPPS, suggesting that the effect of organic matter on Cd(2+) adsorption-desorption depends on the soils. CPPS and APPS containing CaCO3 exhibited higher adsorption amounts but lower desorption rates and lower proportions of EXC-Cd than those of their corresponding soils without CaCO3, demonstrating that CaCO3 played an important role in Cd(2+) specific adsorption on soil. The changes in the thermodynamic parameters, including free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)) and entropy (ΔS(0)), as evaluated by the Van't Hoff equations, indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process with the primary interaction forces of dipole interactions and hydrogen bonds on APPS, whereas both physical and chemical interactions dominated the adsorption on CPPS. PMID:24289979

  2. Innovative site remediation technology: Thermal desorption. Volume 6

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.C.

    1993-11-01

    The monograph on thermal desorption is one of a series of eight on innovative site and waste remediation technologies that are the culmination of a multiorganization effort involving more than 100 experts over a two-year period. The thermal desorption processes addressed in this monograph use heat, either direct or indirect, ex situ, as the principal means to physically separate and transfer contaminants from soils, sediments, sludges, filter cakes, or other media. Thermal desorption is part of a treatment train; some pre- and postprocessing is necessary.

  3. Process for the production of 1:4 butanediol from maleic anhydride via ester hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Towers, R.G.; Harris, N.; McKee, D.

    1986-01-01

    A process has been developed for the production of 1:4 butanediol (1:4 BDO from maleic anhydride (MA). The three process steps are:- a) Esterifiction of MA to produce a dialkyl maleate ester based on a modification of commercially proven esterification technology; b) Hydrogenation of the ester, at moderate temperatures and pressures, to 1:4 BD using novel low pressure ester hydrogenation technology. Gamma-Butyrolactone (gamma-BL) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) are produced as co-products. The 1:4 BD/Gamma-BL product ratio can be adjusted to respond to market requirements by recycle of the less desirable product, and THF productivity controlled over wide limits by variation of process parameters; c) Product separation by distillation.

  4. RECENT ADVANCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-07-22

    Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In the HyS Process, sulfur dioxide is oxidized in the presence of water at the electrolyzer anode to produce sulfuric acid and protons. The protons are transported through a cation-exchange membrane electrolyte to the cathode and are reduced to form hydrogen. In the second stage of the process, the sulfuric acid by-product from the electrolyzer is thermally decomposed at high temperature to produce sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The two gases are separated and the sulfur dioxide recycled to the electrolyzer for oxidation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been exploring a fuel-cell design concept for the SDE using an anolyte feed comprised of concentrated sulfuric acid saturated with sulfur dioxide. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small footprint compared to a parallel-plate electrolyzer design. This paper will provide a summary of recent advances in the development of the SDE for the HyS process.

  5. Colouration process of colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles in the presence of hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi Garavand, N.; Ranjbar, M.; Mahdavi, S. M.; Iraji zad, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this study, tungsten oxide nanoparticles were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of tungsten target using the first harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) in deionized water. After ablation, a 0.2 g/lit PdCl2 solution was added to activate the solution against the hydrogen gas. Dynamic light scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to measure the average size and the surface chemical composition of the synthesized nanoparticles, respectively. The aim is to investigate the influence of hydrogen exposure time on colouration process of colloidal nanoparticles. According to optical measurements, hydrogen bubbling into the produced colloidal Pd-WO3 led to formation of several absorption peaks at ∼1.26, ∼1.6 and ∼1.97 eV. We observed the appearance and growth of a peak at 1.6 eV at the initial stages of hydrogen exposure. However, two other peaks became dominant at long exposure times. The coloration process is reversible in the presence of oxygen gas.

  6. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  7. Photon- and electron-stimulated desorption from laboratory models of interstellar ice grains

    SciTech Connect

    Thrower, J. D.; Abdulgalil, A. G. M.; Collings, M. P.; McCoustra, M. R. S.; Burke, D. J.; Brown, W. A.; Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. J.; Kendall, P.; Mason, N. J.; Jamme, F.; Fraser, H. J.; Rutten, F. J. M.

    2010-07-15

    The nonthermal desorption of water from ice films induced by photon and low energy electron irradiation has been studied under conditions mimicking those found in dense interstellar clouds. Water desorption following photon irradiation at 250 nm relies on the presence of an absorbing species within the H{sub 2}O ice, in this case benzene. Desorption cross sections are obtained and used to derive first order rate coefficients for the desorption processes. Kinetic modeling has been used to compare the efficiencies of these desorption mechanisms with others known to be in operation in dense clouds.

  8. Use of once-through treat gas to remove the heat of reaction in solvent hydrogenation processes

    DOEpatents

    Nizamoff, Alan J.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein feed coal is contacted with molecular hydrogen and a hydrogen-donor solvent in a liquefaction zone to form coal liquids and vapors and coal liquids in the solvent boiling range are thereafter hydrogenated to produce recycle solvent and liquid products, the improvement which comprises separating the effluent from the liquefaction zone into a hot vapor stream and a liquid stream; cooling the entire hot vapor stream sufficiently to condense vaporized liquid hydrocarbons; separating condensed liquid hydrocarbons from the cooled vapor; fractionating the liquid stream to produce coal liquids in the solvent boiling range; dividing the cooled vapor into at least two streams; passing the cooling vapors from one of the streams, the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range, and makeup hydrogen to a solvent hydrogenation zone, catalytically hydrogenating the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range and quenching the hydrogenation zone with cooled vapors from the other cooled vapor stream.

  9. Equilibrium structure and Ti-catalyzed H2 desorption in NaAlH4 nanoparticles from density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Vegge, Tejs

    2006-11-14

    Improving the hydrogen ab- and desorption kinetics in complex hydrides is essential if these materials are to be used as reversible hydrogen storage media in the transport sector. Although reductions in particle size and the addition of titanium based compounds have been found to improve the kinetics significantly, the physical understanding remains elusive. Density functional theory is used to calculate the energy of the potential low energy surfaces of NaAlH(4) to establish the equilibrium particle shape, and furthermore to determine the deposition energy of Ti/TiH(2) and the substitutional energy for Ti@Al and Ti@Na-sites on the exposed facets. The substitutional processes are energetically preferred and the Na-vacancy formation energy is found to be strongly reduced in the presence of Ti. The barrier for H(2) desorption is found to depend significantly on surface morphology and in particular on the presence of Ti, where the activation energy for H(2) desorption on NaAlH(4){001} surfaces can drop to 0.98 eV--in good agreement with the experimentally observed activation energy for dehydrogenation. PMID:17066174

  10. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 2: Microscopic hydrogen cracking processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Based on a fractographic analysis of fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 stressed in a variety of inert and embrittling environments, microscopic crack paths are identified and correlated with intrinsic da/dN-delta K kinetics. FCP rates in 2090 are accelerated by hydrogen producing environments (pure water vapor, moist air, and aqueous NaCl), as defined in Part 1. For these cases, subgrain boundary fatigue cracking (SGC) dominates for delta K values where the crack tip process zone, a significant fraction of the cyclic plastic zone, is sufficiently large to envelop 5 micron subgrains in the unrecrystallized microstructure. SGC may be due to strong hydrogen trapping at T1 precipitates concentrated at sub-boundaries. At low delta K, the plastic zone diameter is smaller than the subgrain size and FCP progresses along (100) planes due to either local lattice decohesion or aluminum-lithium hydride cracking. For inert environments (vacuum, helium, and oxygen), or at high delta K where the hydrogen effect on da/dN is small, FCP is along (111) slip planes; this mode does not transition with increasing delta K and plastic zone size. The SGC and (100) crystallographic cracking modes, and the governing influence of the crack tip process zone volume (delta K), support hydrogen embrittlement rather than a surface film rupture and anodic dissolution mechanism for environmental FCP. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by changes in process zone hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and not by purely micromechanical-microstructure interactions, in contradiction to microstructural distance-based fatigue models.

  11. Suitability of different construction materials for use in aseptic processing environments decontaminated with gaseous hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Unger, Beatriz; Rauschnabel, Uta; Düthorn, Berthold; Kottke, Volker; Hertel, Christian; Rauschnabel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the behavior of different materials towards the microbial inactivation kinetic of gaseous hydrogen peroxide. Samples of 49 materials potentially used in aseptic processing environments were inoculated with 106 spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC #12980 and exposed to defined periods using a reproducible hydrogen peroxide bio-decontamination cycle. The inactivation characteristic of each material was investigated by means of repeated D-value calculations. The results demonstrate that different materials show highly variable performance regarding the inactivation pattern of spores on each particular surface. Not only the chemical composition of the material but also differences in manufacturing processes and surface treatments were found to have an effect on the resistance of the test organisms. From the data obtained it is concluded that some correlation exists between the calculated D-values and roughness as well as wettability of the materials. Best- and worst-case materials were identified, and the dependence of specific decontamination characteristics on material properties was investigated. It is suggested to integrate studies regarding the inactivation characteristics of incorporated materials into the construction process of new aseptic processing systems bio-decontaminated with hydrogen peroxide. PMID:17933208

  12. A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.

    1996-03-01

    Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

  13. Quantitative determination of hydrogen in solids by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Addach, H; Berçot, P; Wery, M; Rezrazi, M

    2004-11-19

    Processes such as electroplating or acid cleaning are notorious causes of post-processing failure through hydrogen embrittlement. So, the determination of amounts of hydrogen in metals is of great importance. An analysis method for investigation of H content in solids has been established based on hot extraction and gas chromatography system. Hot extraction in inert gas enables complete and/or partial removal of the hydrogen from the samples. A gas chromatography system is used to determine quantitatively the amount of thermally desorbed hydrogen. An investigation of the baking operating conditions is made of the hydrogen desorption rate of zinc-plated steel parts. Then, an analysis of the polarisation conditions upon chromium electroplating is given. PMID:15584242

  14. Process for forming a nickel foil with controlled and predetermined permeability to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Engelhaupt, Darell E.

    1981-09-22

    The present invention provides a novel process for forming a nickel foil having a controlled and predetermined hydrogen permeability. This process includes the steps of passing a nickel plating bath through a suitable cation exchange resin to provide a purified nickel plating bath free of copper and gold cations, immersing a nickel anode and a suitable cathode in the purified nickel plating bath containing a selected concentration of an organic sulfonic acid such as a napthalene-trisulfonic acid, electrodepositing a nickel layer having the thickness of a foil onto the cathode, and separating the nickel layer from the cathode to provide a nickel foil. The anode is a readily-corrodible nickel anode. The present invention also provides a novel nickel foil having a greater hydrogen permeability than palladium at room temperature.

  15. In-source decay during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization combined with the collisional process in an FTICR mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Calligaris, David; Zimmerman, Tyler A; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-08-20

    The type of ions detected after in-source decay (ISD) in a MALDI source differs according to the ion source pressure and on the mass analyzer used. We present the mechanism leading to the final ISD ions for a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR MS). The MALDI ion source was operated at intermediate pressure to cool the resulting ions and increase their lifetime during the long residence times in the FTICR ion optics. This condition produces not only c', z', and w fragments, but also a, y', and d fragments. In particular, d ions help to identify isobaric amino acid residues present near the N-terminal amino acid. Desorbed ions collide with background gas during desorption, leading to proton mobilization from Arg residues to a less favored protonation site. As a result, in the case of ISD with MALDI FTICR, the influence of the Arg residue in ISD fragmentation is less straightforward than for TOF MS and the sequence coverage is thus improved. MALDI-ISD combined with FTICR MS appears to be a useful method for sequencing of peptides and proteins including discrimination of isobaric amino acid residues and site determination of phosphorylation. Additionally we also used new software for in silico elimination of MALDI matrix peaks from MALDI-ISD FTICR mass spectra. The combination of high resolving power of an FTICR analyzer and matrix subtraction software helps to interpret the low m/z region of MALDI-ISD spectra. Finally, several of these developed methods are applied in unison toward a MALDI ISD FTICR imaging experiment on mouse brain to achieve better results. PMID:23879863

  16. Fast hydrogen sorption from MgH2-VO2(B) composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, Sanja; Kurko, Sandra; Pasquini, Luca; Matović, Ljiljana; Vujasin, Radojka; Novaković, Nikola; Novaković, Jasmina Grbović

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH2‒VO2(B) composites synthesised by mechanical milling have been studied. The microstructural properties of composites were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Particle size analysis (PSD), while sorption behaviour was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Sievert measurements. Results have shown that although desorption temperature reduction is moderate; there is a substantial improvement in hydrogen sorption kinetics. The complete desorption of pure MgH2 at elevated temperature takes place in more than 30 min while the composite fully desorbs in less than 2 min even at lower temperatures. It has been shown that the metastable γ-MgH2 phase and the point defects have a decisive role in desorption process only in the first sorption cycle, while the second and the subsequent sorption cycles are affected by microstructural and morphological characteristics of the composite.

  17. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2004-01-01

    ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of

  18. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2003-10-01

    ITN Energy Systems, along with its team members, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Nexant Consulting, Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair, propose to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The ITN team is taking a novel approach to hydrogen separation membrane technology where fundamental engineering material development is fully integrated into fabrication designs; combining functionally graded materials, monolithic module concept and plasma spray manufacturing techniques. The technology is based on the use of Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes (ICCM) for the selective transport of hydrogen. The membranes are comprised of composites consisting of a proton conducting ceramic and a second metallic phase to promote electrical conductivity. Functional grading of the membrane components allows the fabrication of individual membrane layers of different materials, microstructures and functions directly into a monolithic module. Plasma spray techniques, common in industrial manufacturing, are well suited for fabricating ICCM hydrogen separation modules inexpensively, yielding compact membrane modules that are amenable to large scale, continuous manufacturing with low costs. This program will develop and evaluate composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules will be fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed ICCM approach, including system integration issues, will also be assessed. This will result in a complete evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of ICCM hydrogen separation for implementation within the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The ICCM hydrogen separation technology is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of

  19. An analysis of hydrogen production via closed-cycle schemes. [thermochemical processings from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis and state-of-the-art review of three basic schemes for production of hydrogen from water: electrolysis, thermal water-splitting, and multi-step thermochemical closed cycles is presented. Criteria for work-saving thermochemical closed-cycle processes are established, and several schemes are reviewed in light of such criteria. An economic analysis is also presented in the context of energy costs.

  20. PEPTIDE FORMATION MEDIATED BY HYDROGEN CYANIDE TETRAMER: A POSSIBLE PREBIOTIC PROCESS

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sherwood; Flores, Jose; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1969-01-01

    Chemical evolution on the primitive earth must have involved condensation of α-amino acids to peptides. Under aqueous conditions consistent with current conceptions of primordial waters, heating glycerine with the hydrogen cyanide tetramer, diaminomaleonitrile, yields dipeptide. If nitrogen was cycled through primordial waters as cyanide, peptide synthesis by stepwise tetramer-mediated condensation of α-amino acids would have been a plausible process. PMID:5264133

  1. Catalytic process for control of NO.sub.x emissions using hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2010-05-18

    A selective catalytic reduction process with a palladium catalyst for reducing NOx in a gas, using hydrogen as a reducing agent. A zirconium sulfate (ZrO.sub.2)SO.sub.4 catalyst support material with about 0.01-2.0 wt. % Pd is applied to a catalytic bed positioned in a flow of exhaust gas at about 70-200.degree. C. The support material may be (ZrO.sub.2--SiO.sub.2)SO.sub.4. H.sub.2O and hydrogen may be injected into the exhaust gas upstream of the catalyst to a concentration of about 15-23 vol. % H.sub.2O and a molar ratio for H.sub.2/NO.sub.x in the range of 10-100. A hydrogen-containing fuel may be synthesized in an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power plant for combustion in a gas turbine to produce the exhaust gas flow. A portion of the fuel may be diverted for the hydrogen injection.

  2. Hydrogen as the solar energy translator. [in photochemical and photovoltaic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Many concepts are being investigated to convert sunlight to workable energy forms with emphasis on electricity and thermal energy. The electrical alternatives include direct conversion of photons to electricity via photovoltaic solar cells and solar/thermal production of electricity via heat-energy cycles. Solar cells, when commercialized, are expected to have efficiencies of about 12 to 14 percent. The cells would be active about eight hours per day. However, solar-operated water-splitting process research, initiated through JPL, shows promise for direct production of hydrogen from sunlight with efficiencies of up to 35 to 40 percent. The hydrogen, a valuable commodity in itself, can also serve as a storable energy form, easily and efficiently converted to electricity by fuel cells and other advanced-technology devices on a 24-hour basis or on demand with an overall efficiency of 25 to 30 percent. Thus, hydrogen serves as the fundamental translator of energy from its solar form to electrical form more effectively, and possibly more efficiently, than direct conversion. Hydrogen also can produce other chemical energy forms using solar energy.

  3. Calcium lignosulfonate adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Reid B; Bai, Baojun

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes adsorption and desorption studies carried out with calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) on Berea sandstone. Circulation experiments were performed to determine CLS adsorption isotherms and the effects of CLS concentration, temperature, salinity, brine hardness, and injection rate on adsorption density. Flow-through experiments were performed to assess the reversibility of CLS adsorption and the influence of postflush rate, brine concentration, brine hardness, brine pH, and temperature on the desorption process. Results indicate that CLS adsorption isotherms on Berea sandstone follow the Freundlich isotherm law. The results presented in this paper on the effects of CLS adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone show that: (1) increasing CLS concentration and salinity increases CLS adsorption density; (2) increasing temperature will decrease adsorption density; (3) increasing injection rate of CLS solution will slightly decrease CLS adsorption density; (4) postflush rate and salinity of brine have a large impact on the CLS desorption process; (5) the adsorption and desorption process are not completely reversible; and (5) temperature and pH of the postflush brine have little effect on desorption. PMID:15380409

  4. Combined production and purification of hydrogen from methanol using steam iron process in fixed bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, R.; Durán, P.; Plou, J.; Herguido, J.; Peña, J. A.

    2013-11-01

    A research work is being conducted to study the combined production and purification of hydrogen by means of redox processes departing from biomass fast pyrolysis oils (bio-oils). To achieve that goal, methanol has been used as featured material because it is the most representative compound of the alcoholic fraction of bio-oils. The study has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor where methanol decomposes in H2 and CO when gets in contact with a reactive solid based in an iron oxide at temperatures above 600 °C. During the first stage of the “steam-iron” process, reactive gases reduce the iron oxide to metallic iron. Afterward, in a following step, the previously reduced iron is reoxidized by steam producing a high purity hydrogen stream. Although coke deposition does exist during the reducing stage, this behaves as inert during the reoxidation process. Coke inert role has been corroborated by GC, SEM and TEM techniques, showing that carbon deposits were constituted by ordered structures (carbon nanotubes). The determination of the hydrogen production along successive cycles allowed the evaluation of the effect of temperature and alternating reactive atmospheres on the stability of the solid, as well as the optimum conditions for such purpose.

  5. NEW MATERIAL NEEDS FOR HYDROCARBON FUEL PROCESSING: Generating Hydrogen for the PEM Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrauto, R.; Hwang, S.; Shore, L.; Ruettinger, W.; Lampert, J.; Giroux, T.; Liu, Y.; Ilinich, O.

    2003-08-01

    The hydrogen economy is fast approaching as petroleum reserves are rapidly consumed. The fuel cell promises to deliver clean and efficient power by combining hydrogen and oxygen in a simple electrochemical device that directly converts chemical energy to electrical energy. Hydrogen, the most plentiful element available, can be extracted from water by electrolysis. One can imagine capturing energy from the sun and wind and/or from the depths of the earth to provide the necessary power for electrolysis. Alternative energy sources such as these are the promise for the future, but for now they are not feasible for power needs across the globe. A transitional solution is required to convert certain hydrocarbon fuels to hydrogen. These fuels must be available through existing infrastructures such as the natural gas pipeline. The present review discusses the catalyst and adsorbent technologies under development for the extraction of hydrogen from natural gas to meet the requirements for the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The primary market is for residential applications, where pipeline natural gas will be the source of H2 used to power the home. Other applications including the reforming of methanol for portable power applications such as laptop computers, cellular phones, and personnel digital equipment are also discussed. Processing natural gas containing sulfur requires many materials, for example, adsorbents for desulfurization, and heterogeneous catalysts for reforming (either autothermal or steam reforming) water gas shift, preferential oxidation of CO, and anode tail gas combustion. All these technologies are discussed for natural gas and to a limited extent for reforming methanol.

  6. Process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein nitrogen is separated from hydrogen via ammonia synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Stetka, Steven S.; Nazario, Francisco N.

    1982-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein bottoms residues are upgraded with a process wherein air is employed, the improvement wherein nitrogen buildup in the system is avoided by ammonia synthesis. In a preferred embodiment hydrogen from other portions of the liquefaction process will be combined with hydrogen produced as a result of the bottoms upgrading to increase the H.sub.2 :N.sub.2 ratio in the ammonia reactor.

  7. One-step bleaching process for cotton fabrics using activated hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, E S; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2013-02-15

    Cotton fabric was bleached in a simple and economic process using a bleaching system composed of hydrogen peroxide activated with thiourea. Different bleaching trials were carried out with varying hydrogen peroxide and thiourea concentrations, as well as the bleaching medium temperature. The obtained results reveal that bleached cotton fabric with satisfactory whiteness index and reasonable tensile strength can be obtained by treating the fabric at 90 °C in a bleaching bath containing 6 g/l hydrogen peroxide, 1.5 g/l thiourea and 1 g/l non-ionic wetting agent using a material to liquor ratio of 1:20. These optimum conditions lead to completion of the bleaching process in a reasonable duration of 1h. Lower concentrations of the activator thiourea were found to prolong the bleaching duration without getting satisfactory whiteness index. Higher concentrations of the activator were found to cause early termination of the oxidizing species leading to bad whiteness index. PMID:23399227

  8. Light-induced atomic desorption: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, E.; Atutov, S. N.; Biancalana, Valerio; Bocci, S.; Burchianti, A.; Marinelli, C.; Nasyrov, K. A.; Pieragnoli, B.; Moi, L.

    2001-04-01

    Light induced atomic desorption (LIAD) is an impressive manifestation of a new class of phenomena involving alkali atoms, dielectric films and light. LIAD consists of a huge emission of alkali atoms (experimentally proved for sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) from siloxane films when illuminated by laser or ordinary light. Most of the experiments have been performed in glass cells suitably coated by a thin film (of the order of 10 micrometer) either of poly - (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a polymer, or of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OCT), a crown molecule. LIAD is a combination of two processes: direct photo-desorption from the surface and diffusion within the siloxane layer. The photo-desorbed atoms are replaced by fresh atoms diffusing to the surface. Moreover, from the experimental data it comes out that the desorbing light increases atomic diffusion and hence the diffusion coefficient. To our knowledge this is the first time that such an effect is clearly observed, measured and discussed: LIAD represents a new class of photo-effects characterized by two simultaneous phenomena due to the light: surface desorption and fastened bulk diffusion.

  9. Lead sorption-desorption from organic residues.

    PubMed

    Duarte Zaragoza, Victor M; Carrillo, Rogelio; Gutierrez Castorena, Carmen M

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption are mechanisms involved in the reduction of metal mobility and bioavailability in organic materials. Metal release from substrates is controlled by desorption. The capacity of coffee husk and pulp residues, vermicompost and cow manure to adsorb Pb2+ was evaluated. The mechanisms involved in the sorption process were also studied. Organic materials retained high concentrations of lead (up to 36,000 mg L(-1)); however, the mechanisms of sorption varied according to the characteristics of each material: degree of decomposition, pH, cation exchange capacity and percentage of organic matter. Vermicompost and manure removed 98% of the Pb from solution. Lead precipitated in manure and vermicompost, forming lead oxide (PbO) and lead ferrite (PbFe4O7). Adsorption isotherms did not fit to the typical Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Not only specific and non-specific adsorption was observed, but also precipitation and coprecipitation. Lead desorption from vermicompost and cow manure was less than 2%. For remediation of Pb-polluted sites, the application of vermicompost and manure is recommended in places with alkaline soils because Pb precipitation can be induced, whereas coffee pulp residue is recommended for acidic soils where Pb is adsorbed. PMID:21780703

  10. High-sensitivity detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed onto soot particles using laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry: An approach to studying the soot inception process in low-pressure flames

    SciTech Connect

    Faccinetto, Alessandro; Desgroux, Pascale; Therssen, Eric; Ziskind, Michael; Focsa, Cristian

    2011-02-15

    Species adsorbed at the surfaces of soot particles sampled at different locations in a low-pressure methane flame have been analyzed. The analysis method is laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD/LI/TOF-MS) applied to soot particles deposited on a filter after probe extraction in the flame. In order to fully characterize the experimental apparatus, a strategy of systematic investigations has been adopted, beginning with the study of less complex systems constituted by model soot (standard polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, adsorbed on black carbon), and then natural soot sampled from a literature reference ethylene flame. This characterization allowed a good understanding of the analytical response of PAHs to the desorption and ionization processes and the definition of the optimal experimental conditions. The soot PAH content was then investigated on a low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen premixed flat flame ({phi} = 2.32) as a function of the sampling height above the burner (HAB). The obtained mass spectra are reproducible, fragment-free, well resolved in the analyzed m/z range and they are characterized by an excellent signal-to-noise ratio. They all feature regular peak sequences, where each signal peak has been assigned to the most stable high-temperature-formed PAHs. The structure of the mass spectra depends on the sampling HAB into the flame, i.e., on the reaction time. An original contribution to the data interpretation comes from the development of a new sampling method that makes it possible to infer hypotheses about the PAH partition between the gas phase and the soot particles. This method highlights the presence of high-mass PAHs in the soot nucleation zone, and it suggests the importance of heterogeneous reactions occurring between flame PAHs and soot particles. (author)

  11. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-08

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H{sup −} ions. The influence is particularly large for H{sup −} ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H{sup −} ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H{sup −} ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  12. Process and apparatus for the production of hydrogen by steam reforming of hydrocarbon

    DOEpatents

    Sircar, Shivaji; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Nataraj, Shankar

    2000-01-01

    In the steam reforming of hydrocarbon, particularly methane, under elevated temperature and pressure to produce hydrogen, a feed of steam and hydrocarbon is fed into a first reaction volume containing essentially only reforming catalyst to partially reform the feed. The balance of the feed and the reaction products of carbon dioxide and hydrogen are then fed into a second reaction volume containing a mixture of catalyst and adsorbent which removes the carbon dioxide from the reaction zone as it is formed. The process is conducted in a cycle which includes these reactions followed by countercurrent depressurization and purge of the adsorbent to regenerate it and repressurization of the reaction volumes preparatory to repeating the reaction-sorption phase of the cycle.

  13. Developing an energy efficient steam reforming process to produce hydrogen from sulfur-containing fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simson, Amanda

    Hydrogen powered fuel cells have the potential to produce electricity with higher efficiency and lower emissions than conventional combustion technology. In order to realize the benefits of a hydrogen fuel cell an efficient method to produce hydrogen is needed. Currently, over 90% of hydrogen is produced from the steam reforming of natural gas. However, for many applications including fuel cell vehicles, the use of a liquid fuel rather than natural gas is desirable. This work investigates the feasibility of producing hydrogen efficiently by steam reforming E85 (85% ethanol/15% gasoline), a commercially available sulfur-containing transportation fuel. A Rh-Pt/SiO2-ZrO2 catalyst has demonstrated good activity for the E85 steam reforming reaction. An industrial steam reforming process is often run less efficiently, with more water and at higher temperatures, in order to prevent catalyst deactivation. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a process that can operate without catalyst deactivation at more energy efficient conditions. In this study, the steam reforming of a sulfur-containing fuel (E85) was studied at near stoichiometric steam/carbon ratios and at 650C, conditions at which catalyst deactivation is normally measured. At these conditions the catalyst was found to be stable steam reforming a sulfur-free E85. However, the addition of low concentrations of sulfur significantly deactivated the catalyst. The presence of sulfur in the fuel caused catalyst deactivation by promoting ethylene which generates surface carbon species (coke) that mask catalytic sites. The amount of coke increased during time on stream and became increasingly graphitic. However, the deactivation due to both sulfur adsorption and coke formation was reversible with air treatment at 650°C. However, regenerations were found to reduce the catalyst life. Air regenerations produce exotherms on the catalyst surface that cause structural changes to the catalyst. During regenerations the

  14. Energy efficacy used to score organic refuse pretreatment processes for hydrogen anaerobic production.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Bernardo; Luongo Malave, Andrea C; Bernardi, Milena; Fino, Debora

    2013-11-01

    The production of hydrogen through Anaerobic Digestion (AD) has been investigated to verify the efficacy of several pretreatment processes. Three types of waste with different carbon structures have been tested to obtain an extensive representation of the behavior of the materials present in Organic Waste (OW). The following types of waste were selected: Sweet Product Residue (SPR), i.e., confectionary residue removed from the market after the expiration date, Organic Waste Market (OWM) refuse from a local fruit and vegetable market, and Coffee Seed Skin (CSS) waste from a coffee production plant. Several pretreatment processes have been applied, including physical, chemical, thermal, and ultrasonic processes and a combination of these processes. Two methods have been used for the SPR to remove the packaging, manual (SPR) and mechanical (SPRex). A pilot plant that is able to extrude the refuse to 200atm was utilized. Two parameters have been used to score the different pretreatment processes: efficiency (ξ), which takes into account the amount of energy produced in the form of hydrogen compared with the available energy embedded in the refuse, and efficacy (η), which compares the efficiency obtained using the pretreated refuse with that obtained using the untreated refuse. The best result obtained for the SPR was the basic pretreatment, with η=6.4, whereas the thermal basic pretreatment gave the highest value, η=17.0 for SPRex. The best result for the OWM was obtained through a combination of basic/thermal pretreatments with η=9.9; lastly, the CSS residue with ultrasonic pretreatment produced the highest quantity of hydrogen, η=5.2. PMID:23891078

  15. A regenerative process for carbon dioxide removal and hydrogen production in IGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh Khayyat, Armin

    Advanced power generation technologies, such as Integrated Gasification-Combined Cycles (IGCC) processes, are among the leading contenders for power generation conversion because of their significantly higher efficiencies and potential environmental advantages, compared to conventional coal combustion processes. Although the increased in efficiency in the IGCC processes will reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide per unit of power generated, further reduction in CO2 emissions is crucial due to enforcement of green house gases (GHG) regulations. In IGCC processes to avoid efficiency losses, it is desirable to remove CO2 in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C, which makes regenerable MgO-based sorbents ideal for such operations. In this temperature range, CO2 removal results in the shifting of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction towards significant reduction in carbon monoxide (CO), and enhancement in hydrogen production. However, regenerable, reactive and attrition resistant sorbents are required for such application. In this work, a highly reactive and attrition resistant regenerable MgO-based sorbent is prepared through dolomite modification, which can simultaneously remove carbon dioxide and enhance hydrogen production in a single reactor. The results of the experimental tests conducted in High-Pressure Thermogravimetric Analyzer (HP-TGA) and high-pressure packed-bed units indicate that in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C at 20 atm more than 95 molar percent of CO2 can be removed from the simulated coal gas, and the hydrogen concentration can be increased to above 70 percent. However, a declining trend is observed in the capacity of the sorbent exposed to long-term durability analysis, which appears to level off after about 20 cycles. Based on the physical and chemical analysis of the sorbent, a two-zone expanding grain model was applied to obtain an excellent fit to the carbonation reaction rate data at various operating conditions. The modeling

  16. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Kevin C.; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Christopher, Aardahl L.

    2008-05-12

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen storage targets.

  17. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this project is to develop and apply computational materials science tools to determine and predict critical properties of hydrogen storage materials. By better understanding the absorption/desorption mechanisms and characterizing their physical properties it is possible to explore and evaluate new directions for hydrogen storage materials. Particular emphasis is on the determination of the structure and thermodynamics of hydrogen storage materials, the investigation of microscopic mechanisms of hydrogen uptake and release in various materials and the role of catalysts in this process. As a team we have decided to focus on a single material, NaAlH{sub 4}, in order to fully be able to study the many aspects of hydrogen storage. We have focused on phase stability, mass transport and size-dependent reaction mechanisms in this material.

  18. A metal-free strategy to release chemisorbed H2 from hydrogenated boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Lisa; Bhunya, Sourav; Paul, Ankan

    2014-11-10

    Chemisorbed hydrogen on boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) can only be released thermally at very high temperatures above 350 °C. However, no catalyst has been identified that could liberate H2 from hydrogenated BN nanotubes under moderate conditions. Using different density functional methods we predict that the desorption of chemisorbed hydrogen from hydrogenated BN nanotubes can be facilitated catalytically by triflic acid at low free-energy activation barriers and appreciable rates under metal free conditions and mildly elevated temperatures (40-50 °C). Our proposed mechanism shows that the acid is regenerated in the process and can further facilitate similar catalytic release of H2 , thus suggesting all the chemisorbed hydrogen on the surface of the hydrogenated nanotube can be released in the form of H2 . These findings essentially raise hope for the development of a sustainable chemical hydrogen storage strategy in BN nanomaterials. PMID:25132421

  19. Characterization of Electron Beam Pumped Hydrogen Disc Plasmas and Process Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Tienyu

    A wide area windowless plasma disc excited by a soft vacuum electron beam provides a wide area uniform source of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons as well as atomic radicals. Hydrogen and helium when excited by the soft vacuum electron beam, emit strong atomic resonance radiation at 121.6, and 121.5 nm, respectively; in fact up to 10% of the total applied discharge power is emitted as VUV photons. The spatial uniformity of the atomic VUV resonance radiation approaches 6% across a disc 20 cm in diameter. The experiment employs the disc plasma in a windowless configuration to achieve lower temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD) than conventional thermal CVD. The VUV photon flux as well as the radical and excited atomic gas species emitted from the lamp can assist dissociation of feedstock reactant gases as well as assist heterogeneous surface reactions and increase surface mobility of absorbed species allowing for lower temperature CVD. Decomposition mechanisms of feedstock gases like trimethylgallium (TMGa) and trimethylarsenic (TMAs) by VUV and excited atomic species have been studied extensively. Thin films of aluminum nitride (AlN) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been deposited at temperatures between 100-400 ^circC. In-situ generation of arsine (AsH_3) and unsaturated arsenic hydrides (AsH_{rm x}, x <= 2) has also been achieved by placing elemental arsenic in an environment rich in atomic hydrogen created from the disc plasma source. Arsenic hydride species are synthesized in-situ and only produced when the atomic hydrogen reacts with and gasifies the solid surface of arsenic. Such a system may allow one to produce the toxic gases such as AsH_3 only while the processing system is running properly and more importantly terminate the hydrogenation immediately if required for safety reasons. Near afterglow hydrogen plasma assisted organometallic vapor phase homoepitaxy of GaAs has also been demonstrated using feedstock gases of TMGa and in

  20. Site technology capsule: Clean Berkshires, Inc. thermal desorption system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The thermal desorption process devised by Clean Berkshires Inc. (CBI) uses standard rotary kiln technology to remove organic contaminants from excavated solid wastes. The process works by vaporizing and isolating the constituents in a gas stream and then destroying them in a high-efficiency afterburner. The processed solids are either reused or disposed of as nonhazardous, depending on applicable regulations.

  1. Kinetics of desorption of organic compounds from dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Ramus, Ksenia; Poerschmann, Juergen; Georgi, Anett

    2011-12-01

    This study presents a new experimental technique for measuring rates of desorption of organic compounds from dissolved organic matter (DOM) such as humic substances. The method is based on a fast solid-phase extraction of the freely dissolved fraction of a solute when the solution is flushed through a polymer-coated capillary. The extraction interferes with the solute-DOM sorption equilibrium and drives the desorption process. Solutes which remain sorbed to DOM pass through the extraction capillary and can be analyzed afterward. This technique allows a time resolution for the desorption kinetics from subseconds up to minutes. It is applicable to the study of interaction kinetics between a wide variety of hydrophobic solutes and polyelectrolytes. Due to its simplicity it is accessible for many environmental laboratories. The time-resolved in-tube solid-phase microextraction (TR-IT-SPME) was applied to two humic acids and a surfactant as sorbents together with pyrene, phenanthrene and 1,2-dimethylcyclohexane as solutes. The results give evidence for a two-phase desorption kinetics: a fast desorption step with a half-life of less than 1 s and a slow desorption step with a half-life of more than 1 min. For aliphatic solutes, the fast-desorbing fraction largely dominates, whereas for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as pyrene, the slowly desorbing, stronger-bound fraction is also important. PMID:22035249

  2. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION IN GASIFICATION PROCESSES IN VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schwartz

    2004-12-01

    This report describes the work performed, accomplishments and conclusion obtained from the project entitled ''Novel Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation in Gasification Processes in Vision 21 Energy Plants'' under the United States Department of Energy Contract DE-FC26-01NT40973. ITN Energy Systems was the prime contractor. Team members included: the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory; Nexant Consulting; Argonne National Laboratory and Praxair. The objective of the program was to develop a novel composite membrane structure for hydrogen separation as a key technology module within the future ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plants. The separation technology module is targeted for use within the gasification module of the ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant. The high performance and low-cost manufacturing of the proposed technology will benefit the deployment of ''Vision 21'' fossil fuel plant processes by improving the energy efficiency, flexibility and environmental performance of these plants. Of particular importance is that this technology will also produce a stream of pure carbon dioxide. This allows facile sequestration or other use of this greenhouse gas. These features will benefit the U.S. in allowing for the continued use of domestic fossil fuels in a more energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The program developed and evaluated composite membranes and catalysts for hydrogen separation. Components of the monolithic modules were fabricated by plasma spray processing. The engineering and economic characteristics of the proposed Ion Conducting Ceramic Membrane (ICCM) approach, including system integration issues, were also assessed. This resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of integration schemes of ICCM hydrogen separation technology within Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Several results and conclusion were obtained during this program. In the area of materials synthesis, novel

  3. Characterization of the surface changes during the activation process of erbium/erbium oxide for hydrogen storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Snow, Clark Sheldon; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2010-10-01

    Erbium is known to effectively load with hydrogen when held at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. To make the storage of hydrogen kinetically feasible, a thermal activation step is required. Activation is a routine practice, but very little is known about the physical, chemical, and/or electronic processes that occur during Activation. This work presents in situ characterization of erbium Activation using variable energy photoelectron spectroscopy at various stages of the Activation process. Modification of the passive surface oxide plays a significant role in Activation. The chemical and electronic changes observed from core-level and valence band spectra will be discussed along with corroborating ion scattering spectroscopy measurements.

  4. EFFECT OF MINOR ADDITIONS OF HYDROGEN TO ARGON SHIELDING GAS WHEN WELDING AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH THE GTAW PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2004-12-15

    This paper provides the technical basis to conclude that the use of hydrogen containing shielding gases during welding of austenitic stainless steels will not lead to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) of the weld or weld heat affected zone. Argon-hydrogen gas mixtures, with hydrogen additions up to 35% [1], have been successfully used as the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of austenitic stainless steels. The addition of hydrogen improves weld pool wettability, bead shape control, surface cleanliness and heat input. The GTAW process is used extensively for welding various grades of stainless steel and is preferred when a very high weld quality is desired, such as that required for closure welding of nuclear materials packages. The use of argon-hydrogen gas mixtures for high-quality welding is occasionally questioned, primarily because of concern over the potential for HIC. This paper was written specifically to provide a technical basis for using an argon-hydrogen shielding gas in conjunction with the development, at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), of an ''optimized'' closure welding process for the DOE standardized spent nuclear fuel canister [2]. However, the basis developed here can be applied to other applications in which the use of an argon-hydrogen shielding gas for GTAW welding of austenitic stainless steels is desired.

  5. Influence of the postplasma process conditions on the surface conductivity of hydrogenated diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snidero, E.; Tromson, D.; Mer, C.; Bergonzo, P.; Foord, John S.; Nebel, C.; Williams, Oliver A.; Jackman, Richard B.

    2003-03-01

    It is a common observation that diamond surface conductivity rises after exposure to hydrogen plasmas. Hydrogenation treatments are known to induce a p-type conductive layer, which is not present on non-hydrogenated samples. However, the particular mechanisms predominant in the plasma treatment process are still controversial, and several antagonist conditions have been reported to be of importance, such as sample temperature (500 °C to 800 °C), duration (a few seconds to 1 h), and microwave (MW) power density, etc. Further, the post-plasma step is also crucial, especially since the surface conductivity has been reported to be affected by the presence of an adsorbate layer on the diamond surface. By setting up the arrangement to enable the in situ measurement of the surface conductivity after treatment, we have been able to control all parameters that could affect the surface conductivity, in order to determine those of importance. Among the parameters studied, we were able to analyze the influence of the surface temperature, the gas phase exposure (dry air, wet air, neutral gas, CH4, O2, and H2), the MW plasma conditions (O2,H2) as well as the exposure to UV (Hg and deuterium) and the importance of the sequence and duration of each of these treatments. We found that hydrogenated surfaces are strongly influenced by the combination of wet air exposure and UV light. We noticed that the effect of UV light is persistent and cannot be related to direct photoconduction and has to be attributed to a modification of the trapped defect population. This can, therefore, be compared with the modification of filled defect density as observed in persistent photoconduction.

  6. Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2013-01-22

    Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the

  7. Hydrogen Reduction Kinetics of Hematite Concentrate Particles Relevant to a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Mohassab, Yousef; Jiang, Tao; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2015-04-01

    As an integral part of developing a novel ironmaking process, the hydrogen reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles (average particle size 21 µm) were measured in the temperature range from 1423 K to 1623 K (1150 °C to 1350 °C). The novel ironmaking process aims at producing iron from iron oxide concentrates in a flash reactor using gaseous fuels and reductants, which will help reduce energy consumption and minimize greenhouse gas emissions. More than 90 pct reduction of hematite concentrate particles could be obtained by hydrogen at a temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C) and 3 seconds of residence time, indicating that hematite concentrate is suitable for the flash reduction process under development largely aimed at the use of magnetite concentrates. The nucleation and growth rate equation with the Avrami parameter, n, of 1.0 well described the kinetics of hematite reduction. The reduction rate has a 1st-order dependence on the partial pressure of hydrogen. The activation energy of the reaction was 214 kJ/mol, indicating strong temperature dependence. The following complete rate equation was developed that can satisfactorily predict the kinetics of hematite concentrate particles and is suitable for the design of a flash reactor: {{{d}}X}/{{{d}t}} = 4.41 × 107 × {{e}}^{{ - 214{,}000/RT}} × ( {p{{H}}2 - {p{{H}}2 {{O}}}/K} ) × (1 - X), where X is fractional reduction degree, R is 8.314 J/mol K, T is in K, p is in atm, and t is in seconds.

  8. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy; Part II: Microscopic hydrogen cracking processes

    SciTech Connect

    Piascik, R.S.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1993-12-01

    Microscopic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) paths in peak-aged unrecrystallized alloy 2090 are identified as functions of intrinsic da/dN-{Delta}K kinetics and environment. The FCP rates in longitudinal-transverse (LT)-oriented 2090 are accelerated by hydrogen-producing environments (pure water vapor, moist air, and aqueous NaCl), as defined in Part 1. Subgrain boundary cracking (SGC) dominates for {Delta}K values where the cyclic plastic zone is sufficient to envelop subgrains. At low {Delta}K, when this crack tip process zone is smaller than the subgrain size, environmental FCP progresses on or near [100] or [110] planes, based on etch-pit shape. For inert environments (vacuum and He) and pure O{sub 2} with crack surface oxidation, FCP produces large facets along [111] oriented slip bands. This mode does not change with {Delta}K, and T{sub 1} decorated subgrain boundaries do not effect an expected da/dN-{Delta}K transition for the inert environments. Rather, the complex dependence of da/dN on {Delta}K is controlled by the environmental contribution to process zone microstructure-plastic strain interactions. A hydrogen embrittlement mechanism for FCP in 2090 is supported by similar brittle crack paths for low pressure water vapor and the electrolyte, the SGC and [100]/[110] crystallographic cracking modes, the influence of cyclic plastic zone volume ({Delta}K), and the benignancy of O{sub 2}. The SGC may be due to hydrogen production and trapping at T{sub 1} bearing sub-boundaries after process zone dislocation transport, while crystallographic cracking may be due to lattice decohesion or hydride cracking.

  9. Solar thermal hydrogen production process: Final report, January 1978-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Under sponsorship by the United States Department of Energy, Westinghouse Advanced Energy-Systems Division has investigated the potential for using solar thermal energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. A hybrid thermochemical/electrochemical process, known as the Sulfur Cycle, has been the focus of these investigations. Process studies have indicated that, with adequate and ongoing research and development, the Sulfur Cycle can be effectively driven with solar heat. Also, economic analyses have indicated that the cycle has the potential to produce hydrogen in economic competitiveness with conventional methods (e.g. methane/steam reforming) by the turn of the century. A first generation developmental system has been defined along with its critical components, i.e. those components that need substantial engineering development. Designs for those high temperature components that concentrate, vaporize and decompose the process circulating fluid, sulfuric acid, have been prepared. Extensive experimental investigations have been conducted with regard to the selection of construction materials for these components. From these experiments, which included materials endurance tests for corrosion resistance for periods up to 6000 hours, promising materials and catalysts have been identified.

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L; Henry Sessions, H; Steve Xiao, S; Heather Mentzer, H

    2009-01-09

    The first generation of TCAP hydrogen isotope separation process has been in service for tritium separation at the Savannah River Site since 1994. To prepare for replacement, a next-generation TCAP process has been developed. This new process simplifies the column design and reduces the equipment requirements of the thermal cycling system. An experimental twelve-meter column was fabricated and installed in the laboratory to demonstrate its performance. This new design and its initial test results were presented at the 8th International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology and published in the proceedings. We have since completed the startup and demonstration the separation of protium and deuterium in the experimental unit. The unit has been operated for more than 200 cycles. A feed of 25% deuterium in protium was separated into two streams each better than 99.7% purity.

  11. Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils

    DOEpatents

    Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

    2014-06-03

    Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

  12. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, A.; Fontaine, J.; Martin, J.-M.; Mogne, T. L.; Nevshupa, R.

    2008-03-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H2 and CH4. During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it was

  13. One-pot process combining transesterification and selective hydrogenation for biodiesel production from starting material of high degree of unsaturation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ru; Su, Mengxing; Li, Min; Zhang, Jianchun; Hao, Xinmin; Zhang, Hua

    2010-08-01

    A one-pot process combining transesterification and selective hydrogenation was established to produce biodiesel from hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) seed oil which is eliminated as a potential feedstock by a specification of iodine value (IV; 120 g I(2)/100g maximum) contained in EN 14214. A series of alkaline earth metal oxides and alkaline earth metal supported copper oxide were prepared and tested as catalysts. SrO supported 10 wt.% CuO showed the superior catalytic activity for transesterification with a biodiesel yield of 96% and hydrogenation with a reduced iodine value of 113 and also exhibited a promising selectivity for eliminating methyl linolenate and increasing methyl oleate without rising methyl stearate in the selective hydrogenation. The fuel properties of the selective hydrogenated methyl esters are within biodiesel specifications. Furthermore, cetane numbers and iodine values were well correlated with the compositions of the hydrogenated methyl esters according to degrees of unsaturation. PMID:20231090

  14. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: THERMAL DESORPTION TREATMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is an EX SITU means to physically separate volatile and some semivolatile contaminants from soil, sediments, sludge, and filter cakes by heating them at temperatures high enough to volatilize the organic contaminants. For wastes containing up to 10 percent orga...

  15. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: THERMAL DESORPTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is an EX SITU means to physically separate volatile and some semivolatile contaminants from soil, sediments, sludge, and filter cakes by heating them at temperatures high enough to volatilize the organic contaminants. or wastes containing up to 10 percent organ...

  16. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  17. The production of hydrogen by dark fermentation of municipal solid wastes and slaughterhouse waste: A two-phase process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, X.; Morán, A.; Cuetos, M. J.; Sánchez, M. E.

    A two-phase fermentation process for the treatment of waste, intended for the recovery of hydrogen for energy use, was investigated in its initial fermentation phase. Hydrogen production was obtained from a mixed culture based on an active mesophilic inoculum without any selective treatment being applied. The liquid stream generated by the hydrogen fermentation process was stabilized in the following, methanogenic, phase for the recovery of methane and further breaking down of the waste stream. The whole process was carried out at a temperature in the mesophilic range (34 °C). The substrate used was an unsterilized mixture of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) and slaughterhouse waste from a poultry-processing plant. The hydrogen-producing phase was capable of stable performance under the hydraulic retention times (HRTs) evaluated (3 and 5 days). No methane was detected in the first phase at any point during the whole period of the experiment and the hydrogen yield showed no symptoms of declining as time elapsed. The amount of hydrogen obtained from the fermentation process was in the range of 52.5-71.3 N L kg -1 VS rem.

  18. Demonstration of a micro-fabricated hydrogen storage module for micro-power systems.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate a micro-fabricated hydrogen storage module for micro-power systems. Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Performance and durability of storage modules were evaluated. Further, applications were demonstrated for a nickel-hydrogen battery and a micro-fabricated hydrogen-air PEM fuel cell. The ink making process, in which polymer binders and solvents were added to the palladium-treated alloys, slightly decreased the storage capacities, but had little effect on the activation properties of the treated alloys. After 5000 absorption/desorption cycles under hydrogen, the hydrogen storage capacities of the thin-film inks remained high. Absorption/desorption behavior of the ink was tested in the environment of a new type nickel-hydrogen battery, in which it would in contact with 26wt% KOH solution, and the ink showed no apparent degradation. Storage modules were used as the successfully as hydrogen source for PEM fuel cell. PMID:20953345

  19. Demonstration of a micro-fabricated hydrogen storage module for micro-power systems

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate a micro-fabricated hydrogen storage module for micro-power systems. Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Performance and durability of storage modules were evaluated. Further, applications were demonstrated for a nickel-hydrogen battery and a micro-fabricated hydrogen-air PEM fuel cell. The ink making process, in which polymer binders and solvents were added to the palladium-treated alloys, slightly decreased the storage capacities, but had little effect on the activation properties of the treated alloys. After 5000 absorption/desorption cycles under hydrogen, the hydrogen storage capacities of the thin-film inks remained high. Absorption/desorption behavior of the ink was tested in the environment of a new type nickel-hydrogen battery, in which it would in contact with 26wt% KOH solution, and the ink showed no apparent degradation. Storage modules were used as the successfully as hydrogen source for PEM fuel cell. PMID:20953345

  20. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  1. General Thermal Texturization Process of MoS2 for Efficient Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kiriya, Daisuke; Lobaccaro, Peter; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Taheri, Peyman; Hettick, Mark; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Zhao, Peida; Gao, Wei; Maboudian, Roya; Ager, Joel W; Javey, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been widely examined as a catalyst containing no precious metals for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER); however, these examinations have utilized synthesized MoS2 because the pristine MoS2 mineral is known to be a poor catalyst. The fundamental challenge with pristine MoS2 is the inert HER activity of the predominant (0001) basal surface plane. In order to achieve high HER performance with pristine MoS2, it is essential to activate the basal plane. Here, we report a general thermal process in which the basal plane is texturized to increase the density of HER-active edge sites. This texturization is achieved through a simple thermal annealing procedure in a hydrogen environment, removing sulfur from the MoS2 surface to form edge sites. As a result, the process generates high HER catalytic performance in pristine MoS2 across various morphologies such as the bulk mineral, films composed of micron-scale flakes, and even films of a commercially available spray of nanoflake MoS2. The lowest overpotential (η) observed for these samples was η = 170 mV to obtain 10 mA/cm(2) of HER current density. PMID:27322506

  2. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: CLEAN BERKSHIRES, INC. THERMAL DESORPTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thermal desorption process devised by Clean Berkshires, Inc., works by vaporizing the organic contaminants from the soil with heat, isolating the contaminant! in a gas stream, and then destroying them in a high efficiency afterburner. The processed solids are either replaced ...

  3. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: CLEAN BERKSHIRES, INC. - THERMAL DESORPTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thermal desorption process devised by Clean Berkshires, Inc., works by vaporizing the organic contaminants from the soil with heat, isolating the contaminant! in a gas stream, and then destroying them in a high efficiency afterburner. he processed solids are either replaced f...

  4. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation: Processes and equipment. September 1971-November 1989 (A Bibliography from the US Patent data base). Report for September 1971-November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning coal liquefaction and hydrogenation. Coal-liquefaction and -hydrogenation processes, catalysts and catalyst recovery, desulfurization, pretreatment of coals, energy recovery processes, solvent-product separation, and process variables are among the topics discussed. Liquefaction and hydrogenation processes include those employing catalysts such as manganese compounds, iron compounds, or chromium compounds; metal/iodine systems using different feedstocks such as coal solvent slurries, coke, extracted coals, distilled coals, or other pretreated coals; and systems using different hydrogenating gases such as methane or hydrogen. (Contains 253 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  5. Application of hydrogenation to low-temperature cleaning of the Si(001) surface in the processes of molecular-beam epitaxy: Investigation by scanning tunneling microscopy, reflected high-energy electron diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arapkina, L. V.; Krylova, L. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Uvarov, O. V.; Yuryev, V. A.

    2012-07-01

    Structural properties of the clean Si(001) surface obtained as a result of low-temperature (470-650 Degree-Sign C) pre-growth annealings of silicon wafers in a molecular-beam epitaxy chamber have been investigated. To decrease the cleaning temperature, a silicon surface was hydrogenated in the process of a preliminary chemical treatment in HF and NH{sub 4}F aqueous solutions. It has been shown that smooth surfaces composed of wide terraces separated by monoatomic steps can be obtained by dehydrogenation at the temperatures Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 600 Degree-Sign C, whereas clean surfaces obtained at the temperatures <600 Degree-Sign C are rough. It has been found that there exists a dependence of structural properties of clean surfaces on the temperature of hydrogen thermal desorption and the process of the preliminary chemical treatment. The frequency of detachment/attachment of Si dimers from/to the steps and effect of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on ad-dimer migration across steps have been found to be the most probable factors determining a degree of the resultant surface roughness.

  6. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  7. Monitoring surface processes during heterogeneous asymmetric hydrogenation of ketones on a chirally modified platinum catalyst by operando spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Meemken, Fabian; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Baiker, Alfons

    2014-08-11

    Surface processes occurring at the catalytic chiral surface of a cinchona-modified Pt catalyst during the asymmetric hydrogenation of activated ketones have been monitored for the first time using operando ATR-IR spectroscopy. Fundamental information about this catalytic system could be gained, including the chiral modification process of the catalyst, the surface interaction of reactant ketone with preadsorbed chiral modifier, the role of hydrogen as well as the influence of the product enantiomers in the catalytic cycle. The formation of a diastereomeric transient surface complex between ketone and chiral modifier was found to be related to the ketone consumption. Among the studied activated ketones, a correlation between stereoselection and the strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bond was identified. Dissociated hydrogen from the catalytic surface is found to play a crucial role in the formation of the diastereomeric surface complex. PMID:24777839

  8. Hydrogen production from sugar beet juice using an integrated biohydrogen process of dark fermentation and microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-12-01

    An integrated dark fermentation and microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) process was evaluated for hydrogen production from sugar beet juice. Different substrate to inoculum (S/X) ratios were tested for dark fermentation, and the maximum hydrogen yield was 13% of initial COD at the S/X ratio of 2 and 4 for dark fermentation. Hydrogen yield was 12% of initial COD in the MEC using fermentation liquid end products as substrate, and butyrate only accumulated in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production from the integrated biohydrogen process was 25% of initial COD (equivalent to 6 mol H2/mol hexoseadded), and the energy recovery from sugar beet juice was 57% using the combined biohydrogen. PMID:26398665

  9. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes

    PubMed Central

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S.; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a paradigm—“hydricity”—that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40–46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a “turbine”-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65–70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses. PMID:26668380

  10. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  11. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes.

    PubMed

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-12-29

    We introduce a paradigm-"hydricity"-that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40-46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a "turbine"-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65-70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses. PMID:26668380

  12. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Characterization of coal-derived materials by field desorption mass spectrometry, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, supercritical fluid extraction, and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL`s contract.

  13. Application of single-particle laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot particles originating from an industrial combustion process.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, R; Ferge, T; Gälli, M; Karlsson, R

    2003-01-01

    Combustion-related soot particles were sampled in situ from the stoker system of a 0.5 MW incineration pilot plant (feeding material was wood) at two different heights over the feed bed in the third air supply zone. The collected particles were re-aerosolized by a powder-dispersing unit and analyzed by a single-particle laser desorption/ionization (LDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer (aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry, ATOFMS). The ATOFMS instrument characterizes particles according to their aerodynamic size (laser velocimetry) and chemical composition (LDI mass spectrometry). Chemical species from the particles are laser desorbed/ionized by 266 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses. ATOFMS results on individual 'real world' particles in general give information on the bulk inorganic composition. Organic compounds, which are of much lower concentrations, commonly are not detectable. However, recent off-line laser microprobe mass spectrometric (LMMS) experiments on bulk soot aerosol samples have emphasized that organic compounds can be desorbed and ionized without fragmentation in LDI experiments from black carbonaceous matrices. This paper reports the successful transfer of the off-line results to on-line analysis of airborne soot particles by ATOFMS. The detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot particles is addressed in detail. The results are interpreted in the context of the recent LMMS results. Furthermore, their relevance with respect to possible applications in on-line monitoring of combustion processes is discussed. PMID:12672141

  14. Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

  15. Activation of erbium films for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Snow, Clark S.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2011-06-01

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  16. Activatino of Erbium Films for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    M Brumbach; j Ohlhausen; K Zavadil; C Snow; J Woicik

    2011-12-31

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  17. Plasma transfer process in hydrogen negative ions source based on reflective discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Goretsky, V.P.; Ryabtsev, A.V.; Soloshenko, I.A.; Tarasenko, A.F.; Schedrin, A.I.

    1996-07-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of stationary volume source of hydrogen negative ions based on reflective discharge are presented in the report. Measurements of plasma parameters and emission characteristics are accomplished, and the optimization of ion source geometry is provided. The best parameters of ion beam extracted from the source across a magnetic field are the following: current 40 mA, current density 80 mA/cm{sup 2}, emittance along a magnetic field 3{center_dot}10{sup {minus}5} cm{center_dot}rad, emittance across a magnetic field 1{center_dot}10{sup {minus}5} cm{center_dot}rad. The calculation of beam basic properties is performed by numeric solving of Boltzman equation for electrons, balance equations for more than 300 elementary processes in gas discharge plasma, and equations of ions and electrons motion. Calculated dependencies of hydrogen negative ions current density in a plane of emission slit on the gas pressure and the discharge current are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Catalytic lignin valorization process for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zakzeski, Joseph; Jongerius, Anna L; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2012-08-01

    With dwindling reserves of fossil feedstock as a resource for chemicals production, the fraction of chemicals and energy supplied by alternative, renewable resources, such as lignin, can be expected to increase in the foreseeable future. Here, we demonstrate a catalytic process to valorize lignin (exemplified with kraft, organosolv, and sugarcane bagasse lignin) using a mixture of cheap, bio-renewable ethanol and water as solvent. Ethanol/water mixtures readily solubilize lignin under moderate temperatures and pressures with little residual solids. The molecular weight of the dissolved lignins was shown to be reduced by gel permeation chromatography and quantitative HSQC NMR methods. The use of liquid-phase reforming of the solubilized lignin over a Pt/Al(2)O(3) catalyst at 498 K and 58 bar is introduced to yield up to 17 % combined yield of monomeric aromatic oxygenates such as guaiacol and substituted guaiacols generating hydrogen as a useful by-product. Reduction of the lignin dissolved in ethanol/water using a supported transition metal catalyst at 473 K and 30 bar hydrogen yields up to 6 % of cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics. PMID:22740175

  19. How to control hydrogen level in (super) duplex stainless steel weldments using the GTAW or GMAW process

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, V.V.D.; Meelker, H.; Schelde, R.V.D.

    1999-01-01

    In this investigation, an attempt is made to further the understanding of factors influencing the hydrogen content in duplex stainless steel gas tungsten arc (GTA) and gas metal arc (GMA) welds as well as to what extent it affects hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility. The results indicated that susceptibility to hydrogen cracking using the GTA or GMA process appears to be limited. In practice, maintaining a moisture level below 10 ppm in the shielding gas is of less importance than the choice of welding parameters. Even a moisture level of 1000 ppm in the shielding gas, in combination with the correct welding parameters, will result in a sufficient low hydrogen content in the weld. Similarly, a moisture level in the shielding gas below 10 ppm does not necessarily result in low hydrogen content in the weld metal. Although very high ferrite levels were combined with high restrain and high hydrogen content, none of the GMA and GTA welds cracked. Susceptibility to hydrogen cracking is concluded to be limited.

  20. Dispersion of Natural Arsenic in the Malcantone Watershed, Southern Switzerland: Field Evidence for Repeated Sorption-Desorption and Oxidation-Reduction Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer,H.; Gueye-Girardet, A.; Reymond, D.; Schlegel, C.; Temgoua, E.; Hesterberg, D.; Chou, J.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, elevated arsenic concentrations have been found in waters and soils of many countries, often resulting in a health threat for the local population. Switzerland is not an exception and this paper deals with the release and subsequent fate of arsenic in a 200-km{sup 2} mountainous watershed, characterized by crystalline silicate rocks (gneisses, schists, amphibolites) that contain abundant As-bearing sulfide ore deposits, some of which have been mined for iron and gold in the past. Using analytical methods common for mineralogical, ground water and soil studies (XRD, XRF, XAS-XANES and -EXAFS, electron microprobe, extraction, ICP, AAS with hydride generator, ion chromatography), seven different field situations and related dispersion processes of natural arsenic have been studied: (1) release by rock weathering; (2) transport and deposition by water and ice; (3) release of As to the ground and surface water due to increasing pH; (4) accumulation in humic soil horizons; (5) remobilization by reduction in water-saturated soils and stagnant ground waters; (6) remobilization by using P-rich fertilizers or dung and (7) oxidation, precipitation and dilution in surface waters. Comparison of the results with experimental adsorption studies and speciation diagrams from the literature allows us to reconstruct and identify the typical behavior of arsenic in a natural environment under temperate climatic conditions. The main parameters identified are: (a) once liberated from the primary minerals, sorption processes on Fe-oxy-hydroxides dominate over Al-phases, such as Al-hydroxides or clay minerals and limit the As concentrations in the spring and well waters between 20 and 300 {mu}g/l. (b) Precipitation as secondary minerals is limited to the weathering domain, where the As concentrations are still high and not yet too diluted by rain and soils waters. (c) Although neutral and alkaline pH conditions clearly increase the mobility of As, the main factor to

  1. Thermal desorption of CO and H2 from degassed 304 and 347 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaie-Serej, S.; Outlaw, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), along with Auger electron spectroscopy, was used to study the desorption of H2 and CO from baked 304 and 347 stainless-steel samples exposed only to residual gases. Both 347 and 304 samples gave identical TDS spectra. The spectra for CO contained a sharp leading peak centered in the temperature range 410-440C and an exponentially increasing part for temperatures higher than 500C, with a small peak around 600C appearing as a shoulder. The leading peak followed a second-order desorption behavior with an activation energy of 28+/-2 kcal/mol, suggesting that the rate-limiting step for this peak is most likely a surface reaction that produces the CO molecules in the surface layer. The amount of desorbed CO corresponding to this peak was approximately 0.5X10(exp 14) molecules/cm(exp 2) . The exponentially rising part of the CO spectrum appeared to originate from a bulk diffusion process. The TDS spectrum for H2 consisted of a main peak centered also in the temperature range 410-440C, with two small peaks appearing as shoulders at approximately 500 and 650C. The main peak in this case also displayed a second-order behavior with an activation energy of 14+/-2 kcal/mol. The amount of desorbed H2, approximately 1.9X 10(exp 15) molecules/cm(exp 2) , appeared to be independent of the concentration of hydrogen in the bulk, indicating that the majority of the desorbed H2 originated from the surface layer.

  2. Thermal desorption of CO and H2 from degassed 304 and 347 stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezaie-Serej, S.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), along with Auger electron spectroscopy, was used to study the desorption of H2 and CO from baked 304 and 347 stainless-steel samples exposed only to residual gases. Both 347 and 304 samples gave identical TDS spectra. The spectra for CO contained a sharp leading peak centered in the temperature range 410-440C and an exponentially increasing part for temperatures higher than 500C, with a small peak around 600C appearing as a shoulder. The leading peak followed a second-order desorption behavior with an activation energy of 28+/-2 kcal/mol, suggesting that the rate-limiting step for this peak is most likely a surface reaction that produces the CO molecules in the surface layer. The amount of desorbed CO corresponding to this peak was approximately 0.5X10(exp 14) molecules/cm(exp 2) . The exponentially rising part of the CO spectrum appeared to originate from a bulk diffusion process. The TDS spectrum for H2 consisted of a main peak centered also in the temperature range 410-440C, with two small peaks appearing as shoulders at approximately 500 and 650C. The main peak in this case also displayed a second-order behavior with an activation energy of 14+/-2 kcal/mol. The amount of desorbed H2, approximately 1.9X 10(exp 15) molecules/cm(exp 2) , appeared to be independent of the concentration of hydrogen in the bulk, indicating that the majority of the desorbed H2 originated from the surface layer.

  3. Electron stimulated desorption of negative ions: A time-of-flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeden, C.; Dollinger, G.

    2002-08-01

    We present a setup for stimulated desorption experiments of negative ions using low energy incident electrons and time-of-flight identification of the desorbed ions. It consists of a pulsed electron gun, an electrostatic focusing system, and a channel plate detector setup. Electron beams down to sub-eV energies can be used due to electrostatic shielding and the compensation of the earth's magnetic field by a set of Helmholtz coils. The main advantage is the large acceptance for ions of all masses, energies, and desorption angles at the same time, which keeps measuring time reasonably short and allows us to gain information before degeneration of the irradiated sample occurs, even if weak desorption channels are investigated. We demonstrate the power of our setup with first results from a boron doped, (100)-oriented diamond sample, which is partly oxidized and partly hydrogenated with some water contaminations on it. Different binding states of oxygen are disclosed clearly by different desorption thresholds. The C-O binding on oxidized diamond forms a carbonyl group. The 1b2 orbital of water can be seen in a O desorption threshold. The yield of negative hydrogen desorption shows a linear increase for incident electron energies higher than 13 eV. It results from a dipolar dissociation as has been published previously.

  4. Surface-enhanced laser desorption-ionization retentate chromatography mass spectrometry (SELDI-RC-MS): a new method for rapid development of process chromatography conditions.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, S R; Boschetti, E; Santambien, P; Brenac, V

    2002-12-25

    Protein biochip arrays carrying functional groups typical of those employed for chromatographic sorbents have been developed. When components of a protein mixture are deposited upon an array's functionalized surface, an interaction occurs between the array's surface and solubilized proteins, resulting in adsorption of certain species. The application of gradient wash conditions to the surface of these arrays produces a step-wise elution of retained compounds akin to that accomplished while utilizing columns for liquid chromatography (LC) separations. In retentate chromatography-mass spectrometry (RC-MS), the "retentate" components that remain following a wash are desorbed and ionized when a nitrogen laser is fired at discrete spots on the array after treatment with a laser energy-absorbing matrix solution. Ionized components are analyzed using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF MS). The present study demonstrates that protein biochips can be used to identify conditions of pH and ionic strength that support selective retention-elution of target proteins and impurity components from ion-exchange surfaces. Such conditions give corresponding behavior when using process-compatible chromatographic sorbents under elution chromatography conditions. The RC-MS principle was applied to the separation of an Fab antibody fragment expressed in Escherichia coli as well as to the separation of recombinant endostatin as expressed in supernatant of Pichia pastoris cultures. Determined optimal array binding and elution conditions in terms of ionic strength and pH were directly applied to regular chromatographic columns in step-wise elution mode. Analysis of collected LC fractions showed favorable correlation to results predicted by the RC-MS method. PMID:12458014

  5. Infrared Laser Desorption: Mechanisms and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, Claude Ricketts

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L^2MS), a combination of infrared (IR) laser desorption with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, to investigate (1) the mechanism of IR laser desorption, (2) the composition of aromatic molecules in extraterrestrial samples, and (3) the measurement of compound-specific carbon isotope ratios. First, a description of the mechanism of IR laser desorption of monolayer and submonolayer coverages of molecules adsorbed to an insulator surface is presented. The vibrational and translational energy distributions of aniline-d7 molecules desorbed from single-crystal sapphire (Al_2 O_3) are recorded using L ^2MS. The energy distributions are found to be in equilibrium with each other and with the temperature of the surface at the time of desorption. The translational and angular distributions of monolayer coverages are altered by the collisions of desorbing molecules with each other. Second, spatial and chemical analyses of the carbonaceous components in chondritic meteorites are presented. A microprobe L^2MS instrument (mu L^2MS) capable of analyzing samples with a spatial resolution of 40 mu m and zeptomole (10^{-21} mole) sensitivity is described and used to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in small particles and heterogeneous samples. PAH distributions are used to distinguish between samples from different meteorite classes, and the effects of thermal processing within a given meteorite class are observed. Sliced wafers of meteorite are found to contain an inhomogeneous distribution of PAHs. muL^2MS studies of meteorite samples are coordinated with scanning electron microscopy studies, and the abundances of aromatic compounds across the surface of a sample are consistent with gross structural features but not with elemental or mineralogical features. Third, a description of a method for performing compound-specific carbon isotope

  6. Hydrogen transport through stainless steel under plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of gas exchange through stainless steel surface of the plasma chamber under irradiation with hydrogen atoms in oxygen atmosphere or oxygen contaminated hydrogen plasma. Dependence of this process on various irradiation parameters, such as the metal temperature, energy of irradiating ions, gas composition of plasma are studied. It is shown, that desorption from stainless steel is activated with the increase of the plasma chamber walls temperature and energy of irradiating ions. Hydrogen release occurs also under irradiation of the walls by helium and argon plasmas added with oxygen, however the amount of released hydrogen is several times lower than in the case of irradiation with oxygen contaminated deuterium plasma.

  7. Treatment of coking wastewater by an advanced Fenton oxidation process using iron powder and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong; Dong, Jing; Liu, Haiyang; Sun, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    In this study the treatment of coking wastewater was investigated by an advanced Fenton oxidation process using iron powder and hydrogen peroxide. Particular attention was paid to the effect of initial pH, dosage of H(2)O(2) and to improvement in biodegradation. The results showed that higher COD and total phenol removal rates were achieved with a decrease in initial pH and an increase in H(2)O(2) dosage. At an initial pH of less than 6.5 and H(2)O(2) concentration of 0.3 M, COD removal reached 44-50% and approximately 95% of total phenol removal was achieved at a reaction time of 1 h. The oxygen uptake rate of the effluent measured at a reaction time of 1h increased by approximately 65% compared to that of the raw coking wastewater. This indicated that biodegradation of the coking wastewater was significantly improved. Several organic compounds, including bifuran, quinoline, resorcinol and benzofuranol were removed completely as determined by GC-MS analysis. The advanced Fenton oxidation process is an effective pretreatment method for the removal of organic pollutants from coking wastewater. This process increases biodegradation, and may be combined with a classical biological process to achieve effluent of high quality. PMID:22014660

  8. Configuring the thermochemical hydrogen sulfuric acid process step for the Tandem Mirror Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.

    1981-05-01

    This paper identifies the sulfuric acid step as the critical part of the thermochemical cycle in dictating the thermal demands and temperature requirements of the heat source. The General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle is coupled to a Tandem Mirror. The sulfuric acid decomposition process step is focused on specifically since this step can use the high efficiency electrical power of the direct converter together with the other thermal-produced electricity to Joule-heat a non-catalytic SO/sub 3/ decomposer to approximately 1250/sup 0/K. This approach uses concepts originally suggested by Dick Werner and Oscar Krikorian. The blanket temperature can be lowered to about 900/sup 0/K, greatly alleviating materials problems, the level of technology required, safety problems, and costs. A moderate degree of heat has been integrated to keep the cycle efficiency around 48%, but the number of heat exchangers has been limited in order to keep hydrogen production costs within reasonable bounds.

  9. Recent advances in SRS on hydrogen isotope separation using thermal cycling absorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Kit Heung, L.; Sessions, H.T.

    2015-03-15

    TCAP (Thermal Cycling Absorption Process) is a gas chromatograph in principle using palladium in the column packing, but it is unique in the fact that the carrier gas, hydrogen, is being isotopically separated and the system is operated in a semi-continuous manner. TCAP units are used to purify tritium. The recent TCAP advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10 of the current production system's footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects.

  10. Catalytic enantioselective OFF ↔ ON activation processes initiated by hydrogen transfer: concepts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Quintard, Adrien; Rodriguez, Jean

    2016-08-18

    Hydrogen transfer initiated processes are eco-compatible transformations allowing the reversible OFF ↔ ON activation of otherwise unreactive substrates. The minimization of stoichiometric waste as well as the unique activation modes provided by these transformations make them key players for a greener future for organic synthesis. Long limited to catalytic reactions that form racemic products, considerable progress on the development of strategies for controlling diastereo- and enantioselectivity has been made in the last decade. The aim of this review is to present the different strategies that enable enantioselective transformations of this type and to highlight how they can be used to construct key synthetic building blocks in fewer operations with less waste generation. PMID:27381644

  11. The production of pure pressurised hydrogen by the reformer-steam iron process in a fixed bed reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestl, Stephan; Voitic, Gernot; Lammer, Michael; Marius, Bernhard; Wagner, Julian; Hacker, Viktor

    2015-04-01

    In this paper a fixed bed chemical looping process for the decentralised production of pure pressurised hydrogen for fuel cell applications is described. CH4 is converted to a syngas using conventional steam reforming. The syngas is directly used for the reduction of an iron based oxygen carrier. A consecutive oxidation step using steam leads to the formation of pure pressurised hydrogen. A thermodynamic analysis was performed in order to investigate feasible conditions for the syngas generation and reduction step. Experiments using pure hydrogen as well as an artificial syngas mixture showed the feasibility of the process for the production of pressurised hydrogen. A stable hydrogen production at a pressure of 8-11 bar(g) was achieved and only minor impurities of 700 ppm of carbon dioxide but no signs of carbon monoxide were detected in the produced hydrogen. Although the active surface decreased from 7.5 m2 g-1 to 0.9 m2 g-1 only moderate losses of reactivity were measured in the fixed bed reactor. Thermogravimetric analysis showed a loss of 9% of reactive material over nine cycles, presumably due to sintering effects.

  12. The effect of hydrogen peroxide solution on SO2 removal in the semidry flue gas desulfurization process.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuegui; Zhu, Xian; Peng, Jun; Liu, Yaobin; Zhang, Dingwang; Zhang, Mingchuan

    2009-10-15

    The present study attempts to use hydrogen peroxide solution to humidify Ca(OH)(2) particles to enhance the absorption of SO(2) to achieve higher removal efficiency and to solve the valuable reuse of the reaction product in the semidry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. Experiments were carried out to examine the effect of various operating parameters including hydrogen peroxide solution concentration, Ca/S molar ratio and approach to adiabatic saturation temperature on SO(2) removal efficiency in a laboratory scale spray reactor. The product samples were analyzed to obtain semi-quantitative measures of mineralogical composition by X-ray diffraction (XRD) with reference intensity ratio (RIR) method and the morphology of the samples was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Compared with spraying water to humidify Ca(OH)(2), SO(2) removal efficiency was improved significantly by spraying hydrogen peroxide solution of 1-3 wt.% to humidify Ca(OH)(2) because hydrogen peroxide solution enhanced the dissolution and absorption rate of SO(2). Moreover, XRD and SEM analyses show that the desulfurization products contain less amount of unreacted Ca(OH)(2) and more amount of stable calcium sulfate with increasing hydrogen peroxide solution concentration. Thus, the process mechanism of the enhanced absorption of SO(2) by spraying hydrogen peroxide solution to humidify Ca(OH)(2) was elucidated on the basis of the experimental results. PMID:19464108

  13. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  14. Thermophilic bio-hydrogen production from corn-bran residue pretreated by calcined-lime mud from papermaking process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jishi; Zhang, Junjie; Zang, Lihua

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the use of calcined-lime mud from papermaking process (CLMP) pretreatment to improve fermentative hydrogen yields from corn-bran residue (CBR). CBR samples were pretreated with different concentrations (0-15 g/L) of CLMP at 55°C for 48 h, prior to the thermophilic fermentation with heat-treated anaerobic sludge inoculum. The maximum hydrogen yield (MHY) of 338.91 ml/g-VS was produced from the CBR pretreated with 10 g/L CLMP, with the corresponding lag-phase time of 8.24h. Hydrogen yield increments increased from 27.76% to 48.07%, compared to the control. The CLMP hydrolyzed more cellulose, which provided adequate substrates for hydrogen production. PMID:26433153

  15. Reactivity of coal in direct hydrogenation processes: Technical progress report, September-November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.M.; Miller, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Research focused on two facets of the reactivity studies. First, a series of experimental runs aimed at investigation of the role of hydrogen in direct liquefaction were completed. A model compound system consisting of dibenzyl in aromatic (non-donor) or hydroaromatic (hydrogen donor) vehicles was hydrogenated to determine the effect of molecular hydrogen and hydrogen from donor molecules in the radical quenching and bond scission reactions. Special attention was paid to the role of hydrogen as an active bond cleavage agent. These data show the relative participation of hydrogen from both sources at conditions relevant to the reactivity data and provide support for the role of hydrogen acting directly to promote bond cleavage. Maintenance of a ''pool'' of hydrogen atoms was found to be of great importance in terms of promoting hydrogenolysis and hydrocracking reactions of dibenzyl. Five bituminous coals from the Argonne premium coal collection were liquefied at conditions similar to those employed in the model compound study. The general findings relative to the activity of molecular hydrogen determined from the model compound experiments were evidenced in the coal liquefaction data. Additionally, the presence of aliphatic hydrodgen in the coal itself was found to be a highly significant factor in determining the sensitivity of coal conversion to the presence of gas phase molecular hydrogen. 8 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Sorption and desorption of sulfentrazone in Brazilian soils.

    PubMed

    Passos, Ana Beatriz R J; Freitas, Marco Antonio M; Torres, Lívia G; Silva, Antonio A; Queiroz, Maria Eliana L R; Lima, Cláudio F

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to obtain information about the behavior of sulfentrazone in soil by evaluating the sorption and desorption of the herbicide in different Brazilian soils. Batch equilibrium method was used and the samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Based on the results obtained from the values of Freundlich constants (Kf), we determined the order of sorption (Haplic Planosol < Red-Yellow Latosol < Red Argisol < Humic Cambisol < Regolitic Neosol) and desorption (Regolitic Neosol < Red Argisol < Humic Cambisol < Haplic Planosol < Red-Yellow Latosol) of sulfentrazone in the soils. The process of pesticide sorption in soils was dependent on the levels of organic matter and clay, while desorption was influenced by the organic matter content and soil pH. Thus, the use of sulfentrazone in soils with low clay content and organic matter (low sorption) increases the probability of contaminating future crops. PMID:23638891

  17. INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMODYNAMICS GOVERNING METAL HYDRIDE SYNTHESIS IN THE MOLTEN STATE PROCESS.

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, A; Polly Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Donald Anton, D

    2007-08-23

    Complex metal hydrides have been synthesized for hydrogen storage through a new synthetic technique utilizing high hydrogen overpressure at elevated temperatures (molten state processing). This synthesis technique holds the potential of fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with enhanced hydrogen storage properties. Formation of these compounds is driven by thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. We report on investigations of the thermodynamics. Novel synthetic complexes were formed, structurally characterized, and their hydrogen desorption properties investigated. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with mechanicosynthetic ball milling.

  18. Development Program of IS Process Pilot Test Plant for Hydrogen Production With High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Iwatsuki; Atsuhiko Terada; Hiroyuki Noguchi; Yoshiyuki Imai; Masanori Ijichi; Akihiro Kanagawa; Hiroyuki Ota; Shinji Kubo; Kaoru Onuki; Ryutaro Hino

    2006-07-01

    At the present time, we are alarmed by depletion of fossil energy and effects on global environment such as acid rain and global warming, because our lives depend still heavily on fossil energy. So, it is universally recognized that hydrogen is one of the best energy media and its demand will be increased greatly in the near future. In Japan, the Basic Plan for Energy Supply and Demand based on the Basic Law on Energy Policy Making was decided upon by the Cabinet on 6 October, 2003. In the plan, efforts for hydrogen energy utilization were expressed as follows; hydrogen is a clean energy carrier without carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission, and commercialization of hydrogen production system using nuclear, solar and biomass, not fossil fuels, is desired. However, it is necessary to develop suitable technology to produce hydrogen without CO{sub 2} emission from a view point of global environmental protection, since little hydrogen exists naturally. Hydrogen production from water using nuclear energy, especially the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is one of the most attractive solutions for the environmental issue, because HTGR hydrogen production by water splitting methods such as a thermochemical iodine-sulfur (IS) process has a high possibility to produce hydrogen effectively and economically. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been conducting the HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) project from the view to establishing technology base on HTGR and also on the IS process. In the IS process, raw material, water, is to be reacted with iodine (I{sub 2}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) to produce hydrogen iodide (HI) and sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), the so-called Bunsen reaction, which are then decomposed endo-thermically to produce hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}), respectively. Iodine and sulfur dioxide produced in the decomposition reactions can be used again as the reactants in the Bunsen reaction. In JAEA, continuous

  19. Phonon-mediated desorption of image-bound electrons from dielectric surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, R. L.; Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2010-04-15

    A complete kinetic modeling of an ionized gas in contact with a surface requires the knowledge of the electron desorption time and the electron sticking coefficient. We calculate the desorption time for phonon-mediated desorption of an image-bound electron as it occurs, for instance, on dielectric surfaces where desorption channels involving internal electronic degrees of freedom are closed. Because of the large depth of the polarization-induced surface potential with respect to the Debye energy, multiphonon processes are important. To obtain the desorption time, we use a quantum-kinetic rate equation for the occupancies of the bound-electron surface states, taking two-phonon processes into account in cases where one-phonon processes yield a vanishing transition probability as it is sufficient, for instance, for graphite. For an electron desorbing from a graphite surface at 360 K, we find a desorption time of 2x10{sup -5} s. We also demonstrate that depending on the potential depth and bound-state level spacing, the desorption scenario changes. In particular, we show that desorption via cascades over bound states dominates unless direct one-phonon transitions from the lowest bound state to the continuum are possible.

  20. DESORPTION OF PYRETHROIDS FROM SUSPENDED SOLIDS

    PubMed Central

    Fojut, Tessa L.; Young, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been widely detected in sediments at concentrations that can cause toxicity to aquatic organisms. Desorption rates play an important role in determining the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds, such as pyrethroids, because these compounds are more likely to be sorbed to solids in the environment and times to reach sorptive equilibrium can be long. In this study, sequential Tenax desorption experiments were performed with three sorbents, three aging times, and four pyrethroids. A biphasic rate model was fit to the desorption data with r2 > 0.99 and the rapid and slow compartment desorption rate constants and compartment fractions are reported. Suspended solids from irrigation runoff water collected from a field that had been sprayed with permethrin one day prior were used in the experiments to compare desorption rates for field-applied pyrethroids to those for laboratory-spiked materials. Suspended solids were used in desorption experiments because suspended solids can be a key source of hydrophobic compounds to surface waters. The rapid desorption rate parameters of field-applied permethrin were not statistically different than those of laboratory spiked permethrin, indicating that the desorption of the spiked pyrethroids is comparable to those added and aged in the field. Sorbent characteristics had the greatest effect on desorption rate parameters; as organic carbon content of the solids increased, the rapid desorption fractions and rapid desorption rate constants both decreased. The desorption rate constant of the slow compartment for sediment containing permethrin aged for 28 d was significantly different from those aged 1 d and 7 d, while desorption in the rapid and slow compartments did not differ between these treatments. PMID:21538493

  1. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-09-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single-stage methanogenic process (HRT 15 d) under organic loading rate (OLR) 3 gVS/(L d). The two-stage process was still stable when the OLR was increased to 4.5 gVS/(Ld), while the single-stage process failed. The study further revealed that by changing the HRT(hydrogen):HRT(methane) ratio of the two-stage process from 3:12 to 1:14, 6.7%, more energy could be obtained. Microbial community analysis indicated that the dominant bacterial species were different in the hydrogen reactors (Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum-like species) and methane reactors (Clostridium thermocellum-like species). The changes of substrates and HRT did not change the dominant species. The archaeal community structures in methane reactors were similar both in single- and two- stage reactors, with acetoclastic methanogens Methanosarcina acetivorans-like organisms as the dominant species. PMID:21353538

  2. On the role of defects and surface chemistry for surface-assisted laser desorption ionization from silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimpiev, S.; Grechnikov, A.; Sunner, J.; Karavanskii, V.; Simanovsky, Ya.; Zhabin, S.; Nikiforov, S.

    2008-01-01

    The generation of ions from silicon substrates in surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) has been studied using silicon substrates prepared and etched by a variety of different methods. The different substrates were compared with respect to their ability to generate peptide mass spectra using standard liquid sample deposition. The desorption/ionization processes were studied using gas-phase analyte deposition. Mass spectra were obtained from compounds with gas-phase basicities above 850kJ/mol and with molecular weights up to 370Da. UV, VIS, and IR lasers were used for desorption. Ionization efficiencies were measured as a function of laser fluence and accumulated laser irradiance dose. Solvent vapors were added to the ion source and shown to result in fundamental laser-induced chemical and physical changes to the substrate surfaces. It is demonstrated that both the chemical properties of the substrate surface and the presence of a highly disordered structure with a high concentration of "dangling bonds" or deep gap states are required for efficient ion generation. In particular, amorphous silicon is shown to be an excellent SALDI substrate with ionization efficiencies as high as 1%, while hydrogen-passivated amorphous silicon is SALDI inactive. Based on the results, a novel model for SALDI ion generation is proposed with the following reaction steps: (1) the adsorption of neutral analyte molecules on the SALDI surface with formation of a hydrogen bond to surface Si-OH groups, (2) the electronic excitation of the substrate to form free electron/hole pairs (their relaxation results in trapped positive charges in near-surface deep gap states, causing an increase in the acidity of the Si-OH groups and proton transfer to the analyte molecules), and (3) the thermally activated dissociation of the analyte ions from the surface via a "loose" transition state.

  3. Silica membranes for hydrogen separation in coal gas processing. Final report, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gavalas, G.R.

    1993-03-01

    The general objective of this project was to synthesize permselective membranes suitable for hydrogen separation from coal gas. The specific objectives were: (i) to synthesize membranes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of SiO{sub 2} or other oxides on porous support tubes, (ii) characterize the membranes by permeation measurements of various gases and by electron microscopy, and (iii) obtain information about the mechanism and kinetics Of SiO{sub 2} deposition, and model the process of membrane formation. Silica glass and certain other glasses, in dense (nonporous) form, are highly selective to hydrogen permeation. Since this high selectivity is accompanied by low permeability, however, a practical membrane must have a composite structure consisting of a thin layer of the active oxide supported on a porous tube or plate providing mechanical support. In this project the membranes were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers inside the walls of porous Vycor tubes (5 mm ID, 7 mm OD, 40 {Angstrom} mean pore diameter). Deposition of the oxide layer was carried out using the reaction of SiCl{sub 4} (or TiCl{sub 4}, AlCl{sub 3}, BCl{sub 3}) and water vapor at elevated temperatures. The porous support tube was inserted concentrically into a larger quartz tube and fitted with flow lines and pressure gauges. The flow of the two reactant streams was regulated by mass flow controllers, while the temperature was controlled by placing the reactor into a split-tube electric furnace.

  4. New horizons in chemical propulsion. [processes using free radicals, atomic hydrogen, excited species, etc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, W.

    1973-01-01

    After a review of the work of the late-Fifties on free radicals for propulsion, it is concluded that atomic hydrogen would provide a potentially large increase in specific impulse. Work conducted to find an approach for isolating atomic hydrogen is considered. Other possibilities for obtaining propellants of greatly increased capability might be connected with the technology for the generation of activated states of gases, metallic hydrogen, fuels obtained from other planets, and laser transfer of energy.

  5. TEM investigation of hydrogen implanted and laser annealed silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, P.; Saint-Jacques, R.G.; Terreault, B.; Veilleux, G.

    1995-09-01

    In order to explain the relatively easy laser-induced desorption of hydrogen implanted in silicon, and particularly the lower temperature needed for desorption at higher implantation energy, the microstructural modifications produced by laser pulses were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy. The structural damage, such as defect clusters and hydrogen gas bubbles was observed. In the case of low dose implantation (H/SI {le} 15%), most of the bubbles were produced during laser annealing rather than during implantation. This bubble formation in the course of desorption explains the higher temperature needed. When blisters are already present on the as-implanted surface, desorption starts at a lower temperature.

  6. Low-voltage-exposure-enabled hydrogen silsesquioxane bilayer-like process for three-dimensional nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Quan; Chen, Yiqin; Wang, Yasi; Zheng, Mengjie; Li, Zhiqin; Peng, Wei; Zhou, Yanming; Feng, Bo; Chen, Yifang; Duan, Huigao

    2016-06-01

    We report a bilayer-like electron-beam lithographic process to obtain three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures by using only a single hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist layer. The process utilizes the short penetration depth of low-energy (1.5 keV) electron irradiation to first obtain a partially cross-linked HSQ top layer and then uses a high-voltage electron beam (30 keV) to obtain self-aligned undercut (e.g. mushroom-shaped) and freestanding HSQ nanostructures. Based on the well-defined 3D resist patterns, 3D metallic nanostructures were directly fabricated with high fidelity by just depositing a metallic layer. As an example, Ag-coated mushroom-shaped nanostructures were fabricated, which showed lower plasmon resonance damping compared to their planar counterparts. In addition, the undercut 3D nanostructures also enable more reliable lift-off in comparison with the planar nanostructures, with which high-quality silver nanohole arrays were fabricated which show distinct and extraordinary optical transmission in the visible range.

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Protein Oxidation During Storage and Lyophilization Process.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiqiang; Zheng, Xiaoyang; Yang, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Although the impact of hydrogen peroxide (HP) on proteins in liquid solutions has been studied extensively, the impact during lyophilization has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of HP on lyophilized proteins and HP removal by lyophilization. A protein formulation at 5 mg/mL and its placebo were spiked with HP up to 5.0 ppm and then lyophilized. HP concentration, protein oxidation, and aggregation were monitored before and after lyophilization, as well as during storage at 25°C. The lyophilization process removed on average 94.1% of HP from protein formulation, but only 72.5% from the placebo. There were also significant increases in protein oxidization and aggregation. The oxidation increment correlated with the decrease of HP concentration in both the protein formulation and placebo at all temperatures. Protein oxidation at different freezing temperatures was also studied in follow-up studies. Data from these studies suggest that (1) HP has a significant impact on oxidation and aggregation of protein during lyophilization; (2) significant oxidation can occur even when the protein formulation is frozen; (3) the oxidized protein is more prone to aggregation during lyophilization process. PMID:27238482

  8. Low-voltage-exposure-enabled hydrogen silsesquioxane bilayer-like process for three-dimensional nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Quan; Chen, Yiqin; Wang, Yasi; Zheng, Mengjie; Li, Zhiqin; Peng, Wei; Zhou, Yanming; Feng, Bo; Chen, Yifang; Duan, Huigao

    2016-06-24

    We report a bilayer-like electron-beam lithographic process to obtain three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures by using only a single hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist layer. The process utilizes the short penetration depth of low-energy (1.5 keV) electron irradiation to first obtain a partially cross-linked HSQ top layer and then uses a high-voltage electron beam (30 keV) to obtain self-aligned undercut (e.g. mushroom-shaped) and freestanding HSQ nanostructures. Based on the well-defined 3D resist patterns, 3D metallic nanostructures were directly fabricated with high fidelity by just depositing a metallic layer. As an example, Ag-coated mushroom-shaped nanostructures were fabricated, which showed lower plasmon resonance damping compared to their planar counterparts. In addition, the undercut 3D nanostructures also enable more reliable lift-off in comparison with the planar nanostructures, with which high-quality silver nanohole arrays were fabricated which show distinct and extraordinary optical transmission in the visible range. PMID:27175929

  9. Modeling the Hydrogen-Proton Charge-Exchange Process in Global Heliospheric Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, A.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2015-12-01

    The environment surrounding our Solar System has a vast and dynamic structure. As the Sun rounds the Milky Way galaxy, interstellar dust and gas interact with the Sun's outflow of solar wind. A bubble of hot plasma forms around the Sun due to this interaction, called the heliosphere. In order to understand the structure of the heliosphere, observations and simulations must work in tandem. Within the past decade or so, 3D models of the heliosphere have been developed exhibiting non- symmmetric as well as predicting structures such as the hydrogen wall and the IBEX ribbon. In this poster we explore new ways to compute charge-exchange source terms. The charge-exchange process is the coupling mechanism between the MHD and kinetic theories. The understanding of this process is crucial in order to make valuable predictions. Energy dependant cross section terms will aid in settling non-linear affects coupling the intestellar and solar particles. Through these new ways of computing source terms, resolving fine structures in the plasma in the heliopause may be possible. In addition, other non-trivial situations, such as charge-exchange mediated shocks, may be addressed.

  10. {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} hydrogen sulfide abatement process - application analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    A new hydrogen sulfide abatement process, known as {open_quotes}BIOX,{close_quotes} has been specifically developed for the geothermal industry. {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} (biocide induced oxidation) successfully controls both primary and secondary emissions from cooling towers in pilot, demonstration, and commercial operations by air-wet oxidation. Independent laboratory tests recently controverted the efficacy of {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} to catalytically oxidize sulfides to sulfate. Studies conducted in our laboratory with a simulated cooling tower indicate that the experimental conditions employed by Nardini, et al, are unrealistic for geothermal cooling towers. Furthermore, our investigations demonstrate that the {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} process performs optimally at near neutral pH, a condition common to most geothermal cooling tower circulating water systems. A {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} agent, trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA), proved to mitigate sulfide emissions much more efficiently than air, sodium hypochlorite or chlorine dioxide. {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} is a proven, cost-effective H{sub 2}S abatement technology.

  11. A viable process for producing hydrogen synfuel using nuclear fusion heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, T. R.; Brown, L. C.

    Analytical and costing analyses of a thermochemical water splitting plant powered by a tandem mirror fusion reactor are presented. Design criteria indicated directing high quality steam to the chemical plant, where no liquid metal coolants would be used. Minimal pumping distances for high pressure He, multiple barriers between the neutron-activated blanket and the hydrogen product, and modular construction where possible are necessary. A He-Brayton topping cycle, coupled to a steam-Rankine bottoming cycle are selected. Slightly over 1111 MWt and about 720 MWe could be produced by the plant if all low grade waste heat is directed to the Rankine cycle. SO3 is used with water for the splitting process, then recombined. H2 is siphoned off as a fuel and O2 is delivered to a coal reforming plant. A 30 yr plant life is projected, operating at a 70% thermal efficiency for the splitting process and producing H2 at $10-12/GJ. The plant is expected to become economically viable in the year 2030 if debt financing is available at 12.25% per year.

  12. Leaf water absorption and desorption functions for three turfgrasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xi; Su, Derong; Yin, Shuxia; Wang, Zhi

    2009-09-01

    SummaryPlant leaf can absorb water when the leaf is in contact with water. This happens when the rainfall is intercepted by plant leaves, where the intercepted part of rain remains on the leaf surface. When the intercepted water is either absorbed or subsequently evaporated into the atmosphere, the plant leaves can dissipate water through the desorption process until the plant is dry or rewatered. In this paper, two symptomatic models in the form of exponential functions for leaf water absorption and leaf water desorption were derived and validated by experimental data using leaves of three turfgrasses (Tall fescue, Perennial ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass). Both the models and measured data showed that the rate of leaf water absorption was high at the low initial leaf water content and then gradually leveled off toward the saturated leaf water content. The rate of leaf water desorption was high at the high initial leaf water content then decreased drastically over time toward zero. The different plant leaves showed different exponents and other parameters of the functions which indicate the difference of plant species. Both the absorption and desorption rates were relatively higher for the Kentucky bluegrass and lower for the Tall fescue and Perennial ryegrass. The concept of specific leaf area ( SLA) was used to understand the saturated leaf water content ( C s) of the three turfgrasses. Linear relationships were found between C s and SLA. The leaf water absorption and desorption functions are useful for deriving physiological parameters of the plant such as permanent wilting leaf water content, naturally irreducible leaf water content, exponential leaf water absorption coefficient, and exponential leaf desorption coefficient, as well as for evaluating the effects of rainfall interception on plant growth and water use efficiency.

  13. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  14. The Influence of Hydrogen on the Microstructure and Dynamic Strength of Lean Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Ravit; Glam, Benny; Eliezer, Dan; Moreno, Daniel; Eliezer, Shalom

    2015-06-01

    In this research the dynamic strength of lean duplex stainless steel (LDS) with and without hydrogen was investigated. The LDS was chosen since it has a mixed structure of ferrite (BCC) and austenite (FCC) which allows an attractive combination of high strength and plasticity. Data collection was performed by VISAR and metallurgical analysis by post mortem observation. In addition, a thermal desorption process (TDS) was carried out in order to observe the influence of hydrogen charging on LDS crystal structure and to determine the hydrogen trapping mechanism before and after the plate impact experiments. Several assessments can be made based on the results of this study. TDS analysis revealed that even after hydrogen desorption, some hydrogen remained trapped in the austenitic phase causing a small lattice expansion. After impact, a brittle spall mechanism was seen, which occurred through crack progression along both phases grain boundaries. It was found that even small hydrogen content affects the dynamic strength of LDS. The relation between the microstructure and the dynamic strength of the LDS in the presence of hydrogen will be discussed. This work was supported by the Pazi foundation.

  15. Carbon dioxide-selective membranes and their applications in hydrogen processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jian

    Fuel cells, which are regarded as a promising energy conversion approach in the 21st century, are now receiving increasing attention worldwide. In most cases, hydrogen is the preferred fuel for fuel cells, especially for proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). One key issue in the development of PEMFC is how to generate hydrogen from the available hydrocarbon fuels. Most feasible strategies consist of a reforming step followed by the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. The resulting synthesis gas (syngas) still consists of 0.5--1.0% CO, which needs to be reduced to less than 10 ppm to meet the requirement of PEMFCs. Therefore, a further CO clean-up step is usually used to decrease CO concentration. In the present work, new CO2-selective membranes were synthesized and their applications for fuel cell fuel processing and synthesis gas purification were investigated. In order to enhance CO2 transport across membranes, the synthesized membranes contained both mobile and fixed site carriers in crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol). The effects of crosslinking, membrane composition, feed pressure, water content, and temperature on transport properties were investigated. The membranes have shown a high permeability and a good CO 2/H2 selectivity and maintained their separation performance up to 170°C. One type of these membranes showed a permeability of 8000 Barrers (1 Barrer = 10-10 cm3 (STP).cm/(cm 2.s.cm.Hg)) and a CO2/H2 selectivity of 290 at 110°C. This membrane had a permeability of 1200 Barrers and a CO 2/H2 selectivity of 33 even at 170°C. The applications of the synthesized membranes were demonstrated in a CO2-removal experiment, in which the CO2 concentration in retentate was decreased from 17% to less than 10 ppm. With such membranes, there are several options to reduce the CO concentration of syngas. One option is to develop a WGS membrane reactor, in which both the low temperature WGS reaction and the CO2-removal take place. Another option is to use a proposed

  16. Water Vapor Desorption Characteristics of Honeycomb Type Sorption Element Composed of Organic Sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Kida, Takahisa; Horibe, Akihiko; Kaneda, Makoto; Okamoto, Tamio; Seo, Jeong-Kyun

    This paper describes the water vapor desorption characteristics of honeycomb shape type sorbent element containing new organic sorbent of the bridged complex of sodium polyacrylate. The transient experiments in which the dry air was passed into the honeycomb type sorbent element sorbed water vapor were carried out under various conditions of air velocity, temperature, relative humidity and honeycomb length. The obtained data for desorption process were compared with those for sorption process. Finally, Sherwood number of mass transfer of the organic sorbent for desorption process was derived in terms of Reynolds number, modified Stefan number and non-dimensional honeycomb length.

  17. On a new ironmaking process to produce hydrogen and reduce energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbari, Rodrigo

    The primary purpose of the present work is to compute the volume and composition of the products of a theoretical charring unit for high volatile coals. In particular, the compositions of volatile gas and char and the hydrogen yield of the process. The volume of oxygen necessary to supply the energy for the process was also calculated. The model consists of materials and energy balance equations and local thermodynamic equilibrium. The model was combined with experimental results relating the effect of temperature on the extent of devolatilization and chemistry evolution of coal. Results of the model indicated that temperature plays a major role defining the quantities and composition of charring products. The H2 concentration of the volatile gas increased from about 16vol% at 700°C to 47vol% at 900°C, leveling off at approximately 52vol% at 1100°C. The hydrogen yield of the process increased from 7 to 60 percent at 700°C and 1100°C respectively. For a typical high volatile coal considered, the volume of gas generated varied from about 210 to 780 liters/kg-coal(STP) according to temperature and fraction of solids combusted. The char becomes enriched in carbon and depleted in hydrogen as temperature is increased. As much as 97 percent of the hydrogen in coal is removed at 1100°C. In the second part of this study, the kinetics of reduction of iron oxide fines with simulated smelter gas was experimentally studied by thermogravimetry. An equimolar CO/CO2 mixture was selected to simulate the off-gas of a smelter operating with char at 50 percent post combustion. Reduction temperatures ranged from 590°C to 1000°C. Under these conditions, reduction was limited to wustite. Results indicated that the reduction kinetics and dominating reaction mechanism varied with temperature, extent of reduction and type of iron oxide employed. Reduction from hematite to wustite proceeded in two consecutive reaction steps with magnetite as an intermediate oxide. The first reduction

  18. Desorption kinetics of cesium from Fukushima soils.

    PubMed

    Murota, Kento; Saito, Takumi; Tanaka, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the behaviors of Cs(+) in soils is crucial for evaluation of the impacts of disposal of soils contaminated by radiocesium, (137)Cs. The desorption rate of Cs(+) evaluated in relatively short periods of time may not be adequate for such a purpose. In this study, we investigated long-term desorption kinetics of (137)Cs and (133)Cs from soils collected in Fukushima Prefecture by batch desorption experiments in the presence of cation exchange resin as a sorbent. The sorbent can keep the concentration of Cs(+) in the aqueous phase low and prevent re-sorption of desorbed Cs(+). Up to 60% of (137)Cs was desorbed after 139 d in dilute KCl media, which was larger than the desorption by conventional short-term extraction with 1 M ammonium acetate. Desorption of (137)Cs continued even after this period. It was also found that high concentration of K(+) prevented desorption of Cs(+) in the initial stage of desorption, but the effect was alleviated with time. The desorbed fraction of stable Cs was smaller than that of (137)Cs. This indicated that (137)Cs may gradually move to more stable states in soils. The half-life of (137)Cs desorption from the slowest sorption site was estimated to be at least two years by a three-site desorption model. PMID:26773507

  19. Isothermal-desorption-rate measurements in the vicinity of the Curie temperature for H2 chemisorbed on nickel films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the isothermal desorption rate of H2 chemisorbed onto polycrystalline nickel films made for temperatures spanning the Curie temperature of the nickel film are presented. Desorption kinetics were followed by measuring the decay of the change in resistance of the nickel film brought about by hydrogen chemisorption after gas-phase H2 had been rapidly evacuated. The desorption rate is found to undergo an anomalous decrease in the vicinity of the Curie temperature, accompanied by an increase in the desorption activation energy and the equilibrium constant for the chemisorbed hydrogen. The results are interpreted in terms of anomalous variations in rate constants for the formation of the precursor molecular adsorbed state and the chemisorbed atomic state due to the phase transition in the nickel. The changes in rate constants are also considered to be in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions based on a spin coupling between the adatom and the magnetic substrate.

  20. Fluorescence and picosecond laser photolysis studies on the deactivation processes of excited hydrogen bonding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Noriaka; Okada, Tadashi; Mataga, Noboru

    1980-01-01

    The fluorescence quenching reaction of 2-naphthylamine and 1-pyrenol due to hydrogen bonding interaction with pyndine has been investigated Absorption spectra due to the state formed by charge transfer from excited naphthylamine to hydrogen bonded pyridine have been observed by means of picosecond laser photolysis.

  1. Atomistic simulation of the hydrogen-induced fracture process in an iron-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, N.R.; Foiles, S.M.; Baskes, M.I.; Angelo, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Austenitic superalloys exhibit dramatic reductions in ductility and crack growth resistance when high fugacity hydrogen and hydrogen-producing environments trigger a change in fracture mode from microvoid coalescence to slip band and intergranular fracture. Of particular importance is the change to intergranular fracture. We have therefore combined the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) with Monte Carlo simulations and molecular dynamics calculations to help define the effects of hydrogen on segregation and fracture at the atomic level. Nickel was used to simulate the face-centered-cubic austenite lattice while symmetric and asymmetric {sigma}9 tilt boundaries were used to simulate grain boundaries. These simulations show that grain boundaries are strong trap sites for hydrogen. They further show that hydrogen dramatically reduces the bond strength between atoms at grain boundary sites while inhibiting dislocation generation.

  2. Theoretical Design of Thermosyphon for Process Heat Transfer from NGNP to Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to ~ 1300K) and industrial scale power transport (=50 MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization / condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e. without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) or vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  3. YMgGa as a hydrogen storage compound

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlberg, Martin; Zlotea, Claudia; Moretto, Pietro; Andersson, Yvonne

    2009-07-15

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption properties of the recently found ternary phase YMgGa have been studied. This compound absorbs 2.2 wt% hydrogen during the first cycle, but only 1.1 wt% can be stored reversibly for the following cycles under the applied pressure and temperature conditions. Hydrogen absorption and desorption properties were investigated by measuring the thermal desorption spectra and the pressure-composition isotherms while the crystal structure was determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The compound absorbs hydrogen at pressures above 0.2 MPa and 250 deg. C by decomposing into YH{sub 3} and MgGa. This reaction is reversed when heating the hydride in a He atmosphere; hydrogen is released and the YMgGa phase is partially recovered together with YGa{sub 2} and YH{sub 2}. The reformation of YMgGa occurs at temperatures below 450 deg. C on the expenses of hydrogen desorption from YH{sub 2}. This is not expected under these temperature conditions as YH{sub 2} normally does not desorb hydrogen below 800 deg. C. - Graphical abstract: Hydrogen absorption in YMgGa studied by in situ powder X-ray diffraction. The hydrogen absorption and desorption properties were investigated by thermal desorption spectra and pressure-composition isotherms.

  4. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

  5. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes.

  6. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1990-08-28

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the producer gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figs.

  7. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1991-10-15

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figures.

  8. Characterizing the role of desorption in gas production from Devonian shales

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, H.S.; Watson, A.T. ); Lancaster, D.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Previous investigators suggest that more than one half of the gas stored in the Devonian Shales may exist in an adsorbed state. However, adsorption is considered to be an unconventional mode of gas storage and is not often accounted for in conventional reservoir engineering analysis. This article examines the role that desorption may play in gas production from Devonian Shale reservoirs. The results suggest that accounting from gas desorption can have a significant effect on production forecasts and estimates of gas reserves. A methodology is presented for detecting the presence of gas desorption and for estimating the parameters that describe the desorption process from Devonian Shale production data. The accuracy of these parameter estimates and the effects of stimulating the desorption mechanisms are also examined.

  9. Light-induced atomic desorption for loading a sodium magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Telles, Gustavo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Gibbs, Matthew; Raman, Chandra

    2010-03-15

    We report studies of photon-stimulated desorption, also known as light-induced atomic desorption, of sodium atoms from a vacuum-cell glass surface used for loading a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Fluorescence detection was used to record the trapped atom number and the desorption rate. We observed a steep wavelength dependence of the desorption process above 2.6 eV photon energy, a result significant for estimations of sodium vapor density in the lunar atmosphere. Our data fit well to a simple model for the loading of the MOT dependent only on the sodium desorption rate and residual gas density. Up to 3.7x10{sup 7} Na atoms were confined under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions, creating promising loading conditions for a vapor-cell-based atomic Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium.

  10. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I.

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defect interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.

  11. Novel Magnetically Fluidized Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Renwei; Hahn, David; Klausner, James; Petrasch, Jorg; Mehdizadeh, Ayyoub; Allen, Kyle; Rahmatian, Nima; Stehle, Richard; Bobek, Mike; Al-Raqom, Fotouh; Greek, Ben; Li, Like; Chen, Chen; Singh, Abhishek; Takagi, Midori; Barde, Amey; Nili, Saman

    2013-09-30

    The coal to hydrogen project utilizes the iron/iron oxide looping process to produce high purity hydrogen. The input energy for the process is provided by syngas coming from gasification process of coal. The reaction pathways for this process have been studied and favorable conditions for energy efficient operation have been identified. The Magnetically Stabilized Porous Structure (MSPS) is invented. It is fabricated from iron and silica particles and its repeatable high performance has been demonstrated through many experiments under various conditions in thermogravimetric analyzer, a lab-scale reactor, and a large scale reactor. The chemical reaction kinetics for both oxidation and reduction steps has been investigated thoroughly inside MSPS as well as on the surface of very smooth iron rod. Hydrogen, CO, and syngas have been tested individually as the reducing agent in reduction step and their performance is compared. Syngas is found to be the most pragmatic reducing agent for the two-step water splitting process. The transport properties of MSPS including porosity, permeability, and effective thermal conductivity are determined based on high resolution 3D CT x-ray images obtained at Argonne National Laboratory and pore-level simulations using a lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE)-based mesoscopic model developed during this investigation. The results of those measurements and simulations provide necessary inputs to the development of a reliable volume-averaging-based continuum model that is used to simulate the dynamics of the redox process in MSPS. Extensive efforts have been devoted to simulate the redox process in MSPS by developing a continuum model consist of various modules for conductive and radiative heat transfer, fluid flow, species transport, and reaction kinetics. Both the Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches for species transport of chemically reacting flow in porous media have been investigated and verified numerically. Both approaches lead to correct

  12. Process for producing hydrogen from water using cobalt and barium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, deceased, Donald M.

    1979-01-01

    A thermochemical process for producing hydrogen comprises the step of reacting CoO with BaO or Ba(OH).sub.2 in the presence of steam to produce H.sub.2 and novel double oxides of Ba and Co having the empirical formulas BaCoO.sub.2.33 and Ba.sub.2 CoO.sub.3.33. The double oxide can be reacted with H.sub.2 O to form Co.sub.3 O.sub.4 and Ba(OH).sub.2 which can be recycled to the original reaction. The Co.sub.3 O.sub.4 is converted to CoO by either of two procedures. In one embodiment Co.sub.3 O.sub.4 is heated, preferably in steam, to form CoO. In another embodiment Co.sub.3 O.sub.4 is reacted with aqueous HCl solution to produce CoCl.sub.2 and Cl.sub.2. The CoCl.sub.2 is reacted with H.sub.2 O to form CoO and HCl and the CoO is recycled to the initial reaction step. The Cl.sub.2 can be reacted with H.sub.2 O to produce HCl. HCl can be recycled for reaction with Co.sub.3 O.sub.4.

  13. In situ gasification process for producing product gas enriched in carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Capp, John P.; Bissett, Larry A.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an in situ coal gasification process wherein the combustion zone within the underground coal bed is fed with air at increasing pressure to increase pressure and temperature in the combustion zone for forcing product gases and water naturally present in the coal bed into the coal bed surrounding the combustion zone. No outflow of combustion products occurs during the build-up of pressure and temperature in the combustion zone. After the coal bed reaches a temperature of about 2000.degree. F and a pressure in the range of about 100-200 psi above pore pressure the airflow is terminated and the outflow of the combustion products from the combustion zone is initiated. The CO.sub.2 containing gaseous products and the water bleed back into the combustion zone to react endothermically with the hot carbon of the combustion zone to produce a burnable gas with a relatively high hydrogen and carbon monoxide content. About 11 to 29 percent of the gas recovered from the combustion zone is carbon monoxide which is considerably better than the 4 to 10 percent carbon monoxide obtained by employing previously known coal gasification techniques.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide and glucose biosensor based on silver nanowires synthesized by polyol process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuejuan; Bai, Jing; Wang, Yinhu; Jiang, Xiue; He, Xiaoying

    2012-09-21

    Silver nanowires synthesized through a polyol process using polyvinylpyrrolidone as protection (PVP-AgNWs) were used as a new electrode material for constructing a sensor. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and glucose were used as analytes to demonstrate the sensor performance of the PVP-AgNWs. It is found that the PVP-AgNWs-modified glassy carbon electrode (PVP-AgNWs/GCE) exhibits remarkable catalytic performance toward H(2)O(2) reduction. This sensor has a fast amperometric response time of less than 2 s and the catalytic current is linear over the concentration of H(2)O(2) ranging from 20 μM to 3.62 mM (R = 0.998) with a detection limit of 2.3 μM estimated on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. A glucose biosensor was constructed by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD) onto the surface of the PVP-AgNWs/GCE. The resultant glucose biosensor can be used for glucose detection in human blood serum with a sensitivity of 15.86 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and good selectivity and stability. PMID:22858619

  15. Dynamics of the fully stripped ion-hydrogen atom charge exchange process in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Wan, Jiang-feng; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on charge exchange processes of a fully stripped ion colliding with a hydrogen atom are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The inter-particle interactions are described by the exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that in weak screening conditions, cross sections increase with the increase of the ionic charge Z. However, in strong screening conditions, the dependence of cross sections on the ionic charge is related to the incident particle energy. At high energies, cross sections show a linear increase with the increase of Z, whereas at low energies, cross sections for Z≥4 become approximately the same. The He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} impacting charge exchange cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are also compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. The interactions are described by the static screened Coulomb potential. It is found that for both He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+}, the oscillatory screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are almost negligible in weak screening conditions. However, in strong screening conditions, the oscillatory screening effects enhance the screening effects of dense quantum plasmas, and the enhancement becomes more and more significant with the increase of the screening parameter and the ionic charge.

  16. Development of a hydrogen-based annealing process for desulfurization of single crystalline, nickel-based superalloy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Mickle, T.H.; Frazier, W.E.; Waldman, J.

    1994-11-05

    The presence of minor amounts of sulfur (1-10 ppm) in nickel-based superalloys has been associated with reduced oxidation resistance and premature spallation of protective coatings. A hydrogen annealing process has been developed by NAWCADWAR which effectively reduces the sulfur content of superalloys. The conditions which allow effective desulfurization are delineated. Diffusion of sulfur through the superalloy is found to be the rate controlling step for the process.

  17. Nanostructured Palladium-Rhodium for Hydrogen Absorption: Processing, Structure, and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Joshua Keng

    Impetus to identify and implement alternatives to fossil fuels has driven research on several different energy sources. Use of hydrogen as a fuel has been of particular interest, due to its relative abundance and cleanliness as a fuel, amongst other desirable characteristics. However, one of the current challenges to using hydrogen is finding an effective and safe method to store it for later use. Metal hydrides have been proposed as possibilities for safe solid state storage of hydrogen. In the present thesis, cryomilled Pd-10%Rh was investigated as potential solid state storage material of hydrogen. Pd-10%Rh was first atomized, and then subsequently cryomilled. The cryomilled Pd-10%Rh was then examined using microstructural characterization techniques including optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Pd-10%Rh particles were significantly flattened, increasing the apparent surface area. Microstructural refinement was observed in the cryomilled Pd-10%Rh, generating grains at the nanometric scale through dislocation based activity. Hydrogen sorption properties were also characterized, generating both capacity as well as kinetics measurements. It was found that the microstructural refinement due to cryomilling did not play a significant role on hydrogen sorption properties until the smallest grain size (on the order of ~25 nm) was achieved. Additionally, the increased surface area and other changes in particle morphology were associated with cryomilling changed the kinetics of hydrogen absorption.

  18. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijie; Sun, Dan; Cao, Guangli; Wang, Haoyu; Ren, Nanqi; Wu, Wei-Min; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs (each 25 mL) connected in series to an MEC (72 mL) produced a maximum of 0.43 V using fermentation effluent as a feed, achieving a hydrogen production rate from the MEC of 0.48 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d (based on the MEC volume), and a yield of 33.2 mmol H(2)/g COD removed in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production for the integrated system (fermentation, MFC and MEC) was increased by 41% compared with fermentation alone to 14.3 mmol H(2)/g cellulose, with a total hydrogen production rate of 0.24 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d and an overall energy recovery efficiency of 23% (based on cellulose removed) without the need for any external electrical energy input. PMID:21216594

  19. Degradation of metallic surfaces under space conditions, with particular emphasis on Hydrogen recombination processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznajder, Maciej; Geppert, Ulrich; Dudek, Mirosław

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of metallic structures in space technology brings risk of degradation which occurs under space conditions. New types of materials dedicated for space applications, that have been developed in the last decade, are in majority not well tested for different space mission scenarios. Very little is known how material degradation may affect the stability and functionality of space vehicles and devices during long term space missions. Our aim is to predict how the solar wind and electromagnetic radiation degrade metallic structures. Therefore both experimental and theoretical studies of material degradation under space conditions have been performed. The studies are accomplished at German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Bremen (Germany) and University of Zielona Góra (Poland). The paper presents the results of the theoretical part of those studies. It is proposed that metal bubbles filled with Hydrogen molecular gas, resulting from recombination of the metal free electrons and the solar protons, are formed on the irradiated surfaces. A thermodynamic model of bubble formation has been developed. We study the creation process of H2 -bubbles as function of, inter alia, the metal temperature, proton dose and energy. Our model has been verified by irradiation experiments completed at the DLR facility in Bremen. Consequences of the bubble formation are changes of the physical and thermo-optical properties of such degraded metals. We show that a high surface density of bubbles (up to 108cm-2) with a typical bubble diameter of ∼ 0.4 μm will cause a significant increase of the metallic surface roughness. This may have serious consequences to any space mission. Changes in the thermo-optical properties of metallic foils are especially important for the solar sail propulsion technology because its efficiency depends on the effective momentum transfer from the solar photons onto the sail structure. This transfer is proportional to the reflectivity of a sail. Therefore

  20. Effect of γ-ray irradiation on the sorption of hydrogen by nanoporous carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbin, A. V.; Manzhelii, V. G.; Esel'son, V. B.; Gavrilko, V. G.; Vinnikov, N. A.; Basnukaeva, R. M.; Khlistyuck, M. V.; Maletskii, V. P.; Nikolaev, V. G.; Kudriachenko, E. V.; Uvarova, I. Yu.; Tripachko, N. A.; Koda, V. Yu.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of radiation exposure in a hydrogen atmosphere on hydrogen sorption by a synthetic porous carbon nanosorbent, SCN (spherical carbonite saturated). The exposure was created by γ-rays from cobalt-60 (photon energy 1.2 MeV, irradiation dose 4.8 × 107 rad) in a normal hydrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 1 atm and a temperature of 300 K. The processes of hydrogen sorption-desorption by SCN samples before and after irradiation were studied in a temperature interval of 15-1173 K. It was found that the irradiation of SCN in a hydrogen atmosphere significantly increased the amount hydrogen sorbed in the sample. We conducted a comparison with the results of earlier studies investigating the influence of irradiation on the sorption of hydrogen by single-walled carbon nanotubes. The amount of physically sorbed hydrogen in the synthetic SCN sorbent that was irradiated in the hydrogen atmosphere, is four times greater than the amount of hydrogen that was physically sorbed by the single-walled carbon nanotubes that were irradiated under similar conditions. At a temperature below 25 K, the hydrogen diffusion in the SCN was almost temperature independent for the porous subsystem with the highest diffusion coefficients, which is typical for cases when the tunnel diffusion mechanism dominates the thermodynamic mechanism.

  1. DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence: Synthesis and Processing of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Hydrogen Storage and Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Geohegan; Hui Hu; Mina Yoon; Alex A. Puretzky; Christopher M. Rouleau; Norbert Thonnard; Gerd Duscher; Karren More

    2011-05-24

    The objective of the project was to exploit the unique morphology, tunable porosity and excellent metal supportability of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) to optimize hydrogen uptake and binding energy through an understanding of metal-carbon interactions and nanoscale confinement. SWNHs provided a unique material to understand these effects because they are carbon nanomaterials which are synthesized from the 'bottom-up' with well-defined, sub-nm pores and consist of single-layer graphene, rolled up into closed, conical, horn-shaped units which form ball-shaped aggregates of {approx}100-nm diameter. SWNHs were synthesized without metal catalysts by the high-temperature vaporization of solid carbon, so they can be used to explore metal-free hydrogen storage. However, SWNHs can also be decorated with metal nanoparticles or coatings in post-processing treatments to understand how metals augment hydrogen storage. The project first explored how the synthesis and processing of SWNHs could be modified to tailor pore sizes to optimal size ranges. Nanohorns were rapidly synthesized at 20g/hr rates by high-power laser vaporization enabling studies such as neutron scattering with gram quantities. Diagnostics of the synthesis process including high-speed videography, fast pyrometry of the graphite target, and differential mobility analysis monitoring of particle size distributions were applied in this project to provide in situ process control of SWNH morphology, and to understand the conditions for different pore sizes. We conclude that the high-temperature carbon-vaporization process to synthesize SWNHs is scalable, and can be performed by electric arc or other similar techniques as economically as carbon can be vaporized. However, the laser vaporization approach was utilized in this project to permit the precise tuning of the synthesis process through adjustment of the laser pulse width and repetition rate. A result of this processing control in the project was to

  2. Low-damage processing of CdTe(110) surfaces using atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Slater, D. A.; Osgood, R. M., Jr.

    1995-07-01

    We present the results of an AES, XPS, and LEED study of the reaction of oxide and contaminant overlayers on the CdTe(110) surface with atomic hydrogen. Exposure of an oxidized surface to a flux of atomic hydrogen produced by ``cracking'' ambient molecular hydrogen on a hot tungsten filament results in a rapid, quantitative removal of the oxide overlayer with substrate temperatures as low as 300 K to produce a stoichiometric surface free of contaminants which has sufficient surface order to produce a sharp (1×1) LEED pattern.

  3. Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Glikman, E.; Kelson, I. ); Doan, N.V. )

    1991-09-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption are carried out for a palladium crystal containing radioactive palladium atoms. The total desorption probability from various sites are computed, as well as the angular distribution of the desorbing atoms. The implications of the results to different experimental scenarios are discussed.

  4. Spiral Surface Growth without Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain; Plapp, Mathis

    1998-11-01

    Spiral surface growth is well understood in the limit where the step motion is controlled by the local supersaturation of adatoms near the spiral ridge. In epitaxial thin-film growth, however, spirals can form in a step-flow regime where desorption of adatoms is negligible and the ridge dynamics is governed by the nonlocal diffusion field of adatoms on the whole surface. We investigate this limit numerically using a phase-field formulation of the Burton-Cabrera-Frank model, as well as analytically. Quantitative predictions, which differ strikingly from those of the local limit, are made for the selected step spacing as a function of the deposition flux, as well as for the dependence of the relaxation time to steady-state growth on the screw dislocation density.

  5. Thermal Programmed Desorption of C32 H 66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisternas, M.; Del Campo, V.; Cabrera, A. L.; Volkmann, U. G.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.

    2011-03-01

    Alkanes are of interest as prototypes for more complex molecules and membranes. In this work we study the desorption kinetics of dotriacontane C32 adsorbed on Si O2 /Si substrate. We combine in our instrument High Resolution Ellipsometry (HRE) and Thermal Programmed Desorption (TPD). C32 monolayers were deposited in high vacuum from a Knudsen cell on the substrate, monitorizing sample thickness in situ with HRE. Film thickness was in the range of up to 100 AA, forming a parallel bilayer and perpendicular C32 layer. The Mass Spectrometer (RGA) of the TPD section was detecting the shift of the desorption peaks at different heating rates applied to the sample. The mass registered with the RGA was AMU 57 for parallel and perpendicular layers, due to the abundance of this mass value in the disintegration process of C32 in the mass spectrometers ionizer. Moreover, the AMU 57 signal does not interfere with other signals coming from residual gases in the vacuum chamber. The desorption energies obtained were ΔEdes = 11,9 kJ/mol for the perpendicular bilayer and ΔEdes = 23 ,5 kJ/mol for the parallel bilayer.

  6. Ni-Si Alloys for the S-I Reactor-Hydrogen Production Process Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph W. Newkirk; Richard K. Brow

    2010-01-21

    The overall goal of this project was to develop Ni-Si alloys for use in vessels to contain hot, pressurized sulfuric acid. The application was to be in the decomposition loop of the thermochemical cycle for production of hydrogen.

  7. Nucleation and growth mechanisms of nano magnesium hydride from the hydrogen sorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mooij, Lennard; Dam, Bernard

    2013-07-21

    We use a combination of hydrogenography and Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) analyses to identify (1) the driving force dependence of the nucleation and growth mechanism of MgH2 in thin film multilayers of Mg (10 nm) and (2) the nucleation and growth mechanism of Mg in the earlier formed MgH2, i.e. the hydrogen desorption process. We conclude that JMAK may be successfully applied to obtain the nucleation and growth mechanism of hydrogen absorption. The desorption mechanism, however, is not simply the reverse of the absorption mechanism. We find evidence that the barrier for nucleation of Mg is small. The dehydrogenation probably involves the formation of voids, which is energetically more favorable than elastic and plastic deformation of the multilayer. PMID:23749082

  8. NH{sub 3} adsorption and decomposition on Ir(110): A combined temperature programmed desorption and high resolution fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Weststrate, C.J.; Bakker, J.W.; Rienks, E.D.L.; Lizzit, S.; Petaccia, L.; Baraldi, A.; Vinod, C.P.; Nieuwenhuys, B.E.

    2005-05-08

    The adsorption and decomposition of NH{sub 3} on Ir(110) has been studied in the temperature range from 80 K to 700 K. By using high-energy resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy it is possible to distinguish chemically different surface species. At low temperature a NH{sub 3} multilayer, which desorbs at {approx}110 K, was observed. The second layer of NH{sub 3} molecules desorbs around 140 K, in a separate desorption peak. Chemisorbed NH{sub 3} desorbs in steps from the surface and several desorption peaks are observed between 200 and 400 K. A part of the NH{sub 3ad} decomposes into NH{sub ad} between 225 and 300 K. NH{sub ad} decomposes into N{sub ad} between 400 K and 500 K and the hydrogen released in this process immediately desorbs. N{sub 2} desorption takes place between 500 and 700 K via N{sub ad} combination. The steady state decomposition reaction of NH{sub 3} starts at 500 K. The maximum reaction rate is observed between 540 K and 610 K. A model is presented to explain the occurrence of a maximum in the reaction rate. Hydrogenation of N{sub ad} below 400 K results in NH{sub ad}. No NH{sub 2ad} or NH{sub 3ad}/NH{sub 3} were observed. The hydrogenation of NH{sub ad} only takes place above 400 K. On the basis of the experimental findings an energy scheme is presented to account for the observations.

  9. A soil-column gas chromatography (SCGC) approach to explore the thermal desorption behavior of hydrocarbons from soils.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Liu, Liang; Shao, Ziying; Ju, Tianyu; Sun, Bing; Benadda, Belkacem

    2016-01-01

    A soil-column gas chromatography approach was developed to simulate the mass transfer process of hydrocarbons between gas and soil during thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction (T-SVE). Four kinds of hydrocarbons-methylbenzene, n-hexane, n-decane, and n-tetradecane-were flowed by nitrogen gas. The retention factor k' and the tailing factor T f were calculated to reflect the desorption velocities of fast and slow desorption fractions, respectively. The results clearly indicated two different mechanisms on the thermal desorption behaviors of fast and slow desorption fractions. The desorption velocity of fast desorption fraction was an exponential function of the reciprocal of soil absolute temperature and inversely correlated with hydrocarbon's boiling point, whereas the desorption velocity of slow desorption fraction was an inverse proportional function of soil absolute temperature, and inversely proportional to the log K OW value of the hydrocarbons. The higher activation energy of adsorption was found on loamy soil with higher organic content. The increase of carrier gas flow rate led to a reduction in the apparent activation energy of adsorption of slow desorption fraction, and thus desorption efficiency was significantly enhanced. The obtained results are of practical interest for the design of high-efficiency T-SVE system and may be used to predict the remediation time. PMID:26335523

  10. Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Process Interface Including the HyPEP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-05-01

    The Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Plant interface is the intermediate heat transport loop that will connect a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) to a thermochemical, high-temperature electrolysis, or hybrid hydrogen production plant. A prototype plant called the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 2018-2021 timeframe, and will involve a VHTR, a high-temperature interface, and a hydrogen production plant. The interface is responsible for transporting high-temperature thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant while protecting the nuclear plant from operational disturbances at the hydrogen plant. Development of the interface is occurring under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) and involves the study, design, and development of high-temperature heat exchangers, heat transport systems, materials, safety, and integrated system models. Research and development work on the system interface began in 2004 and is expected to continue at least until the start of construction of an engineering-scale demonstration plant.

  11. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1987-09-15

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N/sub n/H/sub (n+m)/ wherein: n = 1--4 and m = 2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200--1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si/endash/N/endash/H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid-state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics

  12. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, Eloise A.; Morgan, Peter E. D.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N.sub.n H.sub.(n+m) wherein: n=1-4 and m=2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200.degree.-1700.degree. C. for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si-N-H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics.

  13. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Another spinoff from spacecraft fuel cell technology is the portable hydrogen generator shown. Developed by General Electric Company, it is an aid to safer operation of systems that use hydrogen-for example, gas chromatographs, used in laboratory analysis of gases. or flame ionization detectors used as $ollution monitors. The generator eliminates the need for high-pressure hydrogen storage bottles, which can be a safety hazard, in laboratories, hospitals and industrial plants. The unit supplies high-purity hydrogen by means of an electrochemical process which separates the hydrogen and oxygen in distilled water. The oxygen is vented away and the hydrogen gas is stored within the unit for use as needed. GE's Aircraft Equipment Division is producing about 1,000 of the generators annually.

  14. Hydrogen role in stress corrosion cracking process of iron aluminide Fe{sub 3}Al in NaCl solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.; Qiao, L.; Mao, X.

    1995-09-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of Fe3AI based intermetallic alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution was studied. The role of hydrogen in the cracking process was also defined. The susceptibility of the alloy to hydrogen embrittlement was first investigated by performing tensile tests in air environment and mineral oil. It was found that ductility increased with increasing strain rate when tested in air, but stayed at a high value when tested in mineral oil. This behavior indicates that the alloy is sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement in air. In 3.5% NaCl solution, the environmental effect was studied by slow strain rate tests that were done at electrochemical potentials ranging from {minus}1,000 mV to 0 mV vs SCE. When tested at anodic potentials, from {minus}500 mV to 0 mV vs SCE, ductility reduced from 8.7% to 3.9%. When tested in cathodic region, from {minus}500 mV to {minus}1,000 mV, the ductility was between 7.3% to 9.1%. Results of tests done on pre-immersed specimens and notched tensile specimens confirmed this material degradation to be caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). To identify the mechanism, an electrochemical permeation technique was employed. By measuring the diffusible hydrogen concentration, sensitivity to hydrogen embrittlement has been assessed at different potentials. Anodic dissolution is believed to be the controlling mechanism of the SCC as the alloy is less sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement at anodic potentials. Fracture surfaces were examined under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Fracture mode was found to be mainly transgranular quasi-cleavage, except the ones tested at anodic potentials on which intergranular fracture area was found near the edge. This intergranular fracture, which increases with increasing anodic potential, is believed to be the stress corrosion cracking area. Pits which corroded intergranularly are the crack initiation sites.

  15. Evaluation of Helium Purge & Vent Process to Reduce Hydrogen Concentrations in the Large Diameter Container & Cask Void Volumes at T Plant

    SciTech Connect

    PACKER, M.J.

    2002-10-15

    The purpose of this document is to provide calculations for two primary activities: (1) Model a Helium Purge/Vent Cycle Process to reduce hydrogen gas concentration (i.e., H{sub 2} mole fraction) to a required limit in the Cask and Large Diameter Container (LDC) void volumes prior to T-Plant Operations activities. (2) Predict a hydrogen generation rate within each sludge-contained LDC, after the T-Plant helium purge/vent process (aka Post Purge/Vent Cycle Duration) to determine the transient hydrogen concentration. The calculations will evaluate a helium purge process to reduce the hydrogen concentration in the void spaces of the LDC after receipt at T-Plant. During transport from K-Basins to T-Plant, the hydrogen concentration will increase but the low or absent oxygen concentration from the K-Basin helium purge/vent process will ensure a non-flammable event. Upon receipt at T-Plant, the increased hydrogen concentration will require a process reduction (i.e., helium purge/vent cycling) prior to removing the Cask lid, otherwise, the removed lid permits air ingress and associated oxygen with the assumed high hydrogen concentration. In addition, once the Cask lid is removed at T-Plant, and the LDC is moved to the process cell, two threaded caps must be removed from the LDC to allow the escape of hydrogen during long-term storage. It is essential that the T-Plant helium purge/vent system reduces the hydrogen in both the Cask and LDC void volumes below the required limit. The calculations will also aide in predicting actual hydrogen generation rates and concentrations in each of the void volumes after the helium purge/vent cycle process is completed. Transient hydrogen plots or figures will be provided to help achieve this objective.

  16. Signatures of Quantum-Tunneling Diffusion of Hydrogen Atoms on Water Ice at 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, K.; Hama, T.; Kouchi, A.; Watanabe, N.

    2015-09-01

    Reported here is the first observation of the tunneling surface diffusion of a hydrogen (H) atom on water ice. Photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods were used to determine the diffusion rates at 10 K on amorphous solid water and polycrystalline ice. H-atom diffusion on polycrystalline ice was 2 orders of magnitude faster than that of deuterium atoms, indicating the occurrence of tunneling diffusion. Whether diffusion is by tunneling or thermal hopping also depends on the diffusion length of the atoms and the morphology of the surface. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of elementary physicochemical processes of hydrogen on cosmic ice dust.

  17. Signatures of Quantum-Tunneling Diffusion of Hydrogen Atoms on Water Ice at 10 K.

    PubMed

    Kuwahata, K; Hama, T; Kouchi, A; Watanabe, N

    2015-09-25

    Reported here is the first observation of the tunneling surface diffusion of a hydrogen (H) atom on water ice. Photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods were used to determine the diffusion rates at 10 K on amorphous solid water and polycrystalline ice. H-atom diffusion on polycrystalline ice was 2 orders of magnitude faster than that of deuterium atoms, indicating the occurrence of tunneling diffusion. Whether diffusion is by tunneling or thermal hopping also depends on the diffusion length of the atoms and the morphology of the surface. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of elementary physicochemical processes of hydrogen on cosmic ice dust. PMID:26451552

  18. Adsorption and Thermal Processing of Glycolaldehyde, Methyl Formate, and Acetic Acid on Graphite at 20 K.

    PubMed

    Burke, Daren J; Puletti, Fabrizio; Woods, Paul M; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben; Brown, Wendy A

    2015-07-01

    We present the first detailed comparative study of the adsorption and thermal processing of the three astrophysically important C2O2H4 isomers glycolaldehyde, methyl formate, and acetic acid adsorbed on a graphitic grain analogue at 20 K. The ability of the individual molecule to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds is extremely important, dictating the growth modes of the ice on the surface and the measured desorption energies. Methyl formate forms only weak intermolecular bonds and hence wets the graphite surface, forming monolayer, bilayer, and multilayer ices, with the multilayer having a desorption energy of 35 kJ mol(-1). In contrast, glycolaldehyde and acetic acid dewet the surface, forming clusters even at the very lowest coverages. The strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding for glycolaldehyde and acetic acid is reflected in their desorption energies (46.8 and 55 kJ mol(-1), respectively), which are comparable to those measured for other hydrogen-bonded species such as water. Infrared spectra show that all three isomers undergo structural changes as a result of thermal processing. In the case of acetic acid and glycolaldehyde, this can be assigned to the formation of well-ordered, crystalline, structures where the molecules form chains of hydrogen-bonded moieties. The data reported here are of relevance to astrochemical studies of hot cores and star-forming regions and can be used to model desorption from interstellar ices during the warm up phase with particular importance for complex organic molecules. PMID:26057183

  19. Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Storage Technology: Fundamental Research for Optimization of Hydrogen Storage and Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Nadavalath, Balakrishnan; Cornelius, Andrew; Hatchett, David; Bae, Chusung; Pang, Tao; Kim, Eunja; Hemmers, Oliver

    2011-03-28

    Design and development of improved low-cost hydrogen fuel cell catalytic materials and high-capacity hydrogenn storage media are paramount to enabling the hydrogen economy. Presently, effective and durable catalysts are mostly precious metals in pure or alloyed form and their high cost inhibits fuel cell applications. Similarly, materials that meet on-board hydrogen storage targets within total mass and volumetric constraints are yet to be found. Both hydrogen storage performance and cost-effective fuel cell designs are intimately linked to the electronic structure, morphology and cost of the chosen materials. The FCAST Project combined theoretical and experimental studies of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and hydrogen adsorption/desorption characteristics of a number of different nanomaterials and metal clusters to develop better fundamental understanding of hydrogen storage in solid state matrices. Additional experimental studies quantified the hydrogen storage properties of synthesized polyaniline(PANI)/Pd composites. Such conducting polymers are especially interesting because of their high intrinsic electron density and the ability to dope the materials with protons, anions, and metal species. Earlier work produced contradictory results: one study reported 7% to 8% hydrogen uptake while a second study reported zero hydrogen uptake. Cost and durability of fuel cell systems are crucial factors in their affordability. Limits on operating temperature, loss of catalytic reactivity and degradation of proton exchange membranes are factors that affect system durability and contribute to operational costs. More cost effective fuel cell components were sought through studies of the physical and chemical nature of catalyst performance, characterization of oxidation and reduction processes on system surfaces. Additional development effort resulted in a new hydrocarbon-based high-performance sulfonated proton exchange membrane (PEM) that can be manufactured at low

  20. Numerical simulation of impurity desorption induced by nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Yinsheng; Lin Xiaohui; Chen Minhua; Chen Yunfei

    2006-08-01

    A model based on a stochastic process was developed to study the impurity molecule desorption from a substrate induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers. The dynamics of adsorbed molecules irradiated by the laser pulses can be considered to be a Brownian motion in the bath of excited energy carriers. A two-step model was used to describe the nonequilibrium heating process induced by the femtosecond laser pulses. The difference between the desorption processes induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers was discussed based on the numerical results for the desorption of CO molecules from a Ru surface. Results indicate that the femtosecond laser is a much better tool for desorption than the nanosecond laser.

  1. The Validation of Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide Microbial Reduction for Planetary Protection and a Proposed Vacuum Process Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack; Kern, Roger; Koukol, Robert; Cash, Howard

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected the vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal is to include this technique, with an appropriate specification, in NPR 8020.12C as a low temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process.To meet microbial reduction requirements for all Mars in-situ life detection and sample return missions, various planetary spacecraft subsystems will have to be exposed to a qualified sterilization process. This process could be the elevated temperature dry heat sterilization process (115 C for 40 hours) which was used to sterilize the Viking lander spacecraft. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements.The VHP process is widely used by the medical industry to sterilize surgical instruments and biomedical devices, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material properties. Our goal for this study was to determine the minimum VHP process conditions to achieve microbial reduction levels acceptable for planetary protection.

  2. Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

  3. Hydrogen passivation of defects and rapid thermal processing for high-efficiency silicon ribbon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Weon

    2002-01-01

    The use of photovoltaic (PV) system offers a unique opportunity to solve the energy and the environmental problems simultaneously because solar energy is free and can be directly converted into electrical energy by solar cells without any undesirable impact on the environment. In spite of the many advantages, PV still accounts for less than 0.05% of the current U.S. energy portfolio. This is mainly because PV is 2-4 times more expensive than traditional energy sources. PV modules should cost about $1/W to produce electricity at a rate of 6¢/kWh and to compete with fossil fuels. Since Si material accounts for ˜40% of the cost of current Si PV modules, the use of low-cost Si substrate is critical for cost reduction. Edge-defined film-fed grown (EFG) Si ribbon is the focus as substrate materials for this research because it is one of the most promising for low-cost PV. However, as-grown EFG Si has a lot of impurities and crystal defects resulted from the Si feedstock and its growth system, which reduce the bulk lifetime of less than 3 ms. In this research, first, the requirements for achieving 16% efficiency have been established using computer model simulations. To improve the bulk lifetime, manufacturable P and Al gettering techniques are developed to remove the lifetime-killing impurities from the active to inactive device regions. PECVD SiN-induced hydrogen defect passivation is investigated and maximized through the fundamental understanding of the role of Al, the impact of RTP firing, and the difference between two PECVD SiN films. For low-cost contact formation, a novel RTP firing process is developed for high-quality screen-printed contacts and Al-BSF. Finally, a complete process sequence that involves the optimal conditions for defect passivation and contacts is developed to produce ˜16% efficiency on screen-printed EFG Si solar cells, which is the highest efficiency for any screen-printed Si ribbon solar cells to date.

  4. A New Approach to Simulate the Kinetics of Metal Desorption from Mineral Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Powell, B. A.; Kersting, A. B.; Zavarin, M.

    2010-12-01

    The relevance of colloid-facilitated metal transport is largely dependent on metal sorption/desorption kinetics and the degree of reversibility of metal surface binding. Thus, transport predictions need to incorporate modeling concepts that can simulate time- and history-dependent surface processes on the microscale. In this study, we characterized the sorption and desorption kinetics of neptunium(V) reactions on goethite in a flow-cell experiment. Modeling was used to evaluate differences between sorption and desorption kinetics in terms of aging, hysteresis, and ‘irreversible’ sorption. First, aging represents a series of surface-chemical processes on the microscale that lead to changes in contaminant surface speciation over time. Second, hysteresis effects indicate fundamental, chemical differences in the microscopic pathways of reactions for net sorption and desorption processes. Both phenomena may result in a sorbed contaminant fraction that is not readily available for exchange with the solution phase (apparent irreversible sorption). Most currently available kinetic sorption/desorption models incorporate fundamental changes in adsorption and desorption behavior indirectly, e.g., by postulating surface sites with different kinetic rates or ‘irreversible’ sorption behavior. We propose a new approach that allows for the specific incorporation of changes in overall reaction pathways for (ad)sorption and desorption processes. Based on experimental results, observed rates for Np(V) desorption from goethite are substantially slower than for (ad)sorption processes. Differences in metal sorption and desorption kinetics can be simulated with a minimum number of fitting parameters by combining isotherm-based sorption rate laws with a modeling concept related to transition state theory (TST). This concept is based on the assumption that changes in reaction pathways for (ad)sorption and desorption processes lead to differences in overall driving forces and

  5. Autowave process of the localized plastic deformation of high-chromium steel saturated with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkareva, A. V.; Barannikova, S. A.; Li, Yu V.; Lunev, A. G.; Zuev, L. B.

    2016-06-01

    The deformation behavior of high-chromium stainless steel of sorbitic structure upon high-temperature tempering and of electrically saturated with hydrogen in the electrochemical cell during 12 hours is investigated. The stress-strain curves for each state were obtained. From the stress-strain curves, one can conclude that hydrogen markedly reduces the elongation to the fracture of specimen. Using double-exposed speckle photography method it was found that the plastic flow of the material is of a localized character. The pattern distribution of localized plastic flow domains at the linear hardening stage was investigated. Comparative study of autowave parameters was carried out for the tempered steel as well as the electrically saturated with hydrogen steel.

  6. Hydrogen Reduction Kinetics of Magnetite Concentrate Particles Relevant to a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Sohn, H. Y.

    2013-02-01

    A novel ironmaking technology is under development at the University of Utah. The purpose of this research was to determine comprehensive kinetics of the flash reduction reaction of magnetite concentrate particles by hydrogen. Experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 1423 K to 1673 K (1150 °C to 1400 °C) with the other experimental variables being hydrogen partial pressure and particle size. The nucleation and growth kinetics expression was found to describe the reduction rate of fine concentrate particles and the reduction kinetics had a 1/2-order dependence on hydrogen partial pressure and an activation energy of 463 kJ/mol. Unexpectedly, large concentrate particles reacted faster at 1423 K and 1473 K (1150 °C and 1200 °C), but the effect of particle size was negligible when the reduction temperature was above 1573 K (1300 °C). A complete reaction rate expression incorporating all these factors was formulated.

  7. Catalyst for concentrating hydrogen isotopes and process for producing a support therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Isomura, S.; Kamijo, E.; Nakane, R.; Nishimoto, T.; Okita, K.

    1981-03-31

    A catalyst is claimed for concentrating hydrogen isotopes for use in performing hydrogen isotopes exchange between gaseous hydrogen and liquid water. The catalyst comprises a support of porous polytetrafluoroethylene having a total specific surface area of 2 to 80 m/sub 2//g as a result of mixing therewith 0.5 to 15% by weight of fluorocarbon or a porous styrene polymer or styrene/divinylbenzene copolymer having a specific surface area of at least 150 m/sub 2//g, and deposited on the support particles of at least one element selected from group VIII of the periodic table. A method for producing a support of porous polytetrafluoroethylene for such catalyst is also disclosed.

  8. First-principles calculations of helium and neon desorption from cavities in silicon.

    PubMed

    Eddin, A Charaf; Pizzagalli, L

    2012-05-01

    Combining density functional theory, the nudged elastic band technique, and the ultradense fluid model, we investigated the desorption process of He and Ne in silicon. Our results show that the internal surfaces of gas-filled bubbles are not a limiting factor during desorption experiments, since the surface reconstruction opens diffusion paths easier than in the bulk. We show that the vibrational contribution to the energy of helium in the bulk has to be considered in order to determine realistic pressures in the bubbles, when comparing experiments and simulations. At the maximum of desorption, an average pressure of 1-2 GPa is computed. PMID:22481168

  9. Field desorption microscopy of graphene on iridium in intercalation with alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    Field-desorption and field-emission electron microscopy methods have been used to study the effect of a strong electric field on the processes of potassium and cesium desorption from the graphene surface on an iridium field emitter. It was found that two phases of field desorption may exist for these alkali metals. In the low-field phase, alkali metal atoms adsorbed on the surface are desorbed. The existence of the high-field phase is attributed to the egress from under the graphene film and ionization of intercalated alkali metal atoms under the action of the electric field.

  10. Hydrogen and methoxy coadsorption in the computation of the catalytic conversion of methanol on the ceria (111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beste, Ariana; Overbury, Steven H.

    2016-06-01

    Methanol decomposition to formaldehyde catalyzed by the ceria (111) surface was investigated using the DFT + U method. Our results rationalize experimental temperature programmed desorption experiments on the fully oxidized surface. Particular attention was paid to the effect of coadsorption of methoxy and hydrogen on various aspects of the conversion process. This issue had been raised by the experimental observation of water desorption at low temperature removing hydrogen from the system. Within this context, we also investigated hydrogen diffusion on the ceria surface. The hydrogen/methoxy interaction on ceria was shown to be ionic regardless of separation distance. The barrier for dehydrogenation of methoxy using the ionic model system, where hydrogen is coadsorbed, is above 1 eV. This barrier becomes negligible if an incorrect neutral model without coadsorbed hydrogen is employed. While water formation from isolated surface hydrogen is unlikely at low temperature, the presence of coadsorbed methoxy reduces the reaction energy for water formation considerably. For the dehydrated surface, we observed that the preference of the electron to locate at the methoxy oxygen instead of the cerium atom results in a surface that does not contain Ce3 + ions, despite the existence of a vacancy.

  11. Evaluation of aeration pretreatment to prepare an inoculum for the two-stage hydrogen and methane production process.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Andrea; Sarli, Valentina; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Spagni, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the effect of aeration pretreatment to prepare an inoculum for H₂ and CH₄ production in a two-stage process. Moreover, the biochemical hydrogen potential and biochemical methane potential of waste from the food industry in a two-stage process was assessed. The results confirmed the possibility of using an aerobic stress for selecting a hydrogen-producing inoculum. The inoculum was fairly stable since no hydrogenotrophic-methanogenic activity was observed in 25 days. The yields measured using glucose as substrate were of approximately 160 and 280 N mL(H₂) g(COD⁻¹) of glucose for hydrogen and methane, respectively, which are in agreement with other studies using heat-shock for the pretreatment of the inoculum. When waste of the food industry (wheat milling) was used as substrate, a lower H₂ yield was achieved by the aerobically-pretreated inoculum if compared to heat-shock; however, when combined with methane production in a two-stage process, much higher CH₄ yield was achieved. PMID:24908606

  12. [Desorption isotherms in amaranth flours].

    PubMed

    Alvarado, J D; Toaza, E; Coloma, G

    1990-09-01

    In milled seeds amaranth (Amaranthus hybridus) samples locally known as "ataco or sangoracha" and harvested in two consecutive years, the vapor pressure at four temperatures (15 degrees, 20 degrees, 25 degrees, 30 degrees C) was determined in samples obtained for drying in oven at different times, within a range between 60 g water/100 g dry matter for fresh seeds to 10 g water/100 g dry matter or below, as measured in a Brabender equipment. Vapor pressure of distilled water was also determined for water activity calculation. The isotherms for each temperature are presented. Application of the G.A.B. model (Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer) allowed to establish the water content of greater stability within a range of 9.9 to 7.6 g/100 g. The third degree polynomial equations presented, adjust satisfactorily with the experimental data, and can be used to calculate equilibrium moisture content from 0.15 to 0.95 water activity values. Water desorption isotherms of foods are important to determine the equilibrium relationship between the moisture content of foods and the water activity, information which permits to establish likely physical, chemical or biological changes. It is considered that the results obtained are useful in drying, milling or storing amaranth flour. PMID:2134142

  13. Enhanced thermal desorption -- Facile removal of PCBs from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Krabbenhoft, H.O.; Webb, J.L.; Gascoyne, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The use of certain organic and inorganic materials, when admixed with soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), greatly facilitates the removal of the PCBs by means of an ex situ thermal desorption process. Thus, for example, heating a soil (with an initial PCB concentration of {approximately}700 ppm A-1260) from 25 C to 300 C over a 30-minute period provided remediated soil with a residual PCB level of 53 ppm (92.4% PCB removal). When the experiment was repeated using a sweep of steam (corresponding to a water delivery rate of 1.0 mL/min), the residual PCB level was 10 ppm (98.6% PCB removal). And when steam was passed through the soil admixed with 5% sodium formate, the residual PCB level was only 0.9 ppm (99.9% PCB removal). Several other additives (such as sodium acetate, ammonium carbamate, formic acid) have been shown to be efficacious for enhanced PCB removal via thermal desorption. A design of experiments study was carried out to optimize the process parameters of temperature, time, additive level, and steam flow. A logarithmic transformation of the data afforded a mathematical model (correlation coefficient 0.96) that allows one to employ the enhanced thermal desorption process in a cost-effective manner to remediate contaminated soil (with an initial PCB level of {approximately}8,000 ppm A-1260) such that residual PCB levels of {<=}2 ppm (99.98% PCB removal) are routinely achieved.

  14. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE DECAY IN WATERS WITH SUSPENDED SOILS: EVIDENCE FOR BIOLOGICALLY MEDIATED PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen peroxide decay studies have been conducted in suspensions of several well-characterized soils and in natural water samples. inetic and product studies indicated that the decay was biologically mediated and could be described by psuedo first-order rate expressions. t an i...

  15. Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

  16. Process of converting wind energy to elemental hydrogen and apparatus therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, R.E.

    1982-06-15

    A system is described for the conversion of the energy in the wind over oceanic regions into hydrogen which can be used as a supplement to or replacement for fossil fuels. The system is based on the use of modified sailing vessels which serve as water electrolysis plants. In operation, the wind propels the vessel through the water in the manner common to all sailing vessels except that the vessel in this system does not carry a mast and does not need the ballasting characteristic of conventional sailcraft. The propulsion of the vessel causes an immersed screw propeller to power an electromagnetic generator, the electric current from which electrolytically decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen is stored on board the vessel by allowing it to combine with suitable metal alloys such as the Fe-Ti alloys to form a hydride. The metal alloy hydride is stored in cannisters which are allowed to desorb their hydrogen at sea for use as a fuel source, or alternatively may be discharged ashore through pipelines at suitable intervals.

  17. Hydrogen generation during melter feed preparation of Tank 42 sludge and salt washed loaded CST in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W.E.

    1999-12-08

    The main objective of these scoping tests was to measure the rate of hydrogen generation in a series of experiments designed to duplicate the expected SRAT and SME processing conditions in laboratory scale vessels. This document details the testing performed to determine the maximum hydrogen generation expected with a coupled flowsheet of sludge, loaded CST [crystalline silicotitanate], and frit.

  18. Ultralow field emission from thinned, open-ended, and defected carbon nanotubes by using microwave hydrogen plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian-Hua; Cheng, Lin; Wang, Fan-Jie; Yu, Bin; Li, Guo-Zheng; Li, De-Jun; Cheng, Guo-An

    2015-01-01

    Ultralow field emission is achieved from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by using microwave hydrogen plasma processing. After the processing, typical capped CNT tips are removed, with thinned, open-ended, and defected CNTs left. Structural analyses indicate that the processed CNTs have more SP3-hybridized defects as compared to the pristine ones. The morphology of CNTs can be readily controlled by adjusting microwave powers, which change the shape of CNTs by means of hydrogen plasma etching. Processed CNTs with optimal morphology are found to have an ultralow turn-on field of 0.566 V/μm and threshold field of 0.896 V/μm, much better than 0.948 and 1.559 V/μm of the as-grown CNTs, respectively. This improved FE performance is ascribed to the structural changes of CNTs after the processing. The thinned and open-ended shape of CNTs can facilitate electron tunneling through barriers and additionally, the increased defects at tube walls can serve as new active emission sites. Furthermore, our plasma processed CNTs exhibit excellent field emission stability at a large emission current density of 10.36 mA/cm2 after being perfectly aged, showing promising prospects in applications as high-performance vacuum electron sources.

  19. Laser desorption and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of 29-kDa Au:SR cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Schaaff, T Gregory

    2004-11-01

    Positive and negative ions generated by laser-based ionization methods from three gold:thiolate cluster compounds are mass analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The three compounds have similar inorganic core masses ( approximately 29 kDa, approximately 145 Au atoms) but different n-alkanethiolate ligands associated with each cluster compound (Au:SR, R = butane, hexane, dodecane). Irradiation of neat films (laser desorption/ionization) and films generated by dilution of the cluster compounds in an organic acid matrix (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization) with a nitrogen laser (337 nm) produced distinct ion abundances that are relevant to different structural aspects of the cluster compound. Laser desorption/ionization of neat Au:SR compound films produces ions consistent with the inorganic core mass (i.e., devoid of original hydrocarbon content). Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization produces either ions with m/z values consistent with the core mass of the cluster compounds or ions with m/z values consistent with the approximate molecular weight of the cluster compounds, depending on ionization conditions. The ion abundances, and ionization conditions under which they are detected, provide insight into desorption/ionization processes for these unique cluster compounds as well as other analytes typically studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization. PMID:15516109

  20. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)