Science.gov

Sample records for hydrogen deuterium carbon

  1. Investigations of chemical erosion of carbon materials in hydrogen and deuterium low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, P.; Fantz, U.; Balden, M.

    2005-03-01

    Investigations on chemical erosion of pure and carbide-doped graphite materials were carried out in inductively coupled RF plasmas containing hydrogen, deuterium or a mixture of both in helium. For extrapolations of erosion yields to future fusion devices the relevant particle fluxes have to be known precisely. This was done by several diagnostic techniques. In particular the ion fluxes are determined by an energy mass analyzer. An isotope effect of the ion composition is measured resulting in an enhanced erosion of graphite in deuterium plasmas. Since in fusion plasmas a mixture of deuterium and tritium will interact with the surface, a mixture of hydrogen and deuterium on graphite was investigated as well. In order to reduce erosion yields doping of carbon is under discussion. Therefore, fluence dependent erosion yields of several W-, Ti-, V- and Zr-doped graphite materials are measured and compared with pure graphite.

  2. Electron emission and molecular fragmentation during hydrogen and deuterium ion impact on carbon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, A.; Schustereder, W.; Mair, C.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.; Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.

    2003-03-01

    Molecular fragmentation and electron emission during hydrogen ion impact on graphite surfaces has been investigated in the eV to keV impact energy region typical for fusion edge plasma conditions. As a target surface graphite tiles for the Tokamak experiment Tore Supra in CEA-Cadarache/France and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been used. For both surfaces studied, the experimentally observed threshold for electron emission is at about 50 eV/amu impact energy. Electron emission from the high conductivity side of the carbon tile is 15-20% less as compared to its low conductivity side, whereas results for HOPG are generally between these two cases. Deuterium and hydrogen ions are almost equally effective in liberating electrons from graphite when comparing results for the same impact velocity. Surface-induced dissociation of deuterium ions D 3+ upon impact on Tore Supra graphite tiles, in the collision energy range of 20-100 eV, produced only atomic fragment ions D +. The other possible fragment ion D 2+ could not be observed.

  3. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.; Gleason, J.D.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a ??D from -580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a ??D of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO2 is 290 to 418 ppm with S 13C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and ??18O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO2 carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, ??18C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H2O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon (??13C = -17.6 per mil). The 18O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100?? to 1300??C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  4. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 1015 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  5. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B. Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  6. Pionic hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotta, Detlev; Amaro, F. D.; Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Bühler, P.; Gorke, H.; Covita, D. S.; Fuhrmann, H.; Gruber, A.; Hennebach, M.; Hirtl, A.; Ishiwatari, T.; Indelicato, P.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Marton, J.; Nekipelov, M.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schlesser, S.; Schmid, Ph.; Simons, L. M.; Strauch, Th.; Trassinelli, M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Zmeskal, J.

    The ground-state level shifts and broadenings of the hydrogen isotopes caused by the strong interaction have been redetermined by using a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. An additional measurement of muonic hydrogen reveals properties of the de-excitation cascade of such electrically neutral exotic atoms, in particular Coulomb de-excitation, the understanding of which is essential for the analysis of the hadronic-atom data.

  7. Pionic hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotta, Detlev; Amaro, F. D.; Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Bühler, P.; Gorke, H.; Covita, D. S.; Fuhrmann, H.; Gruber, A.; Hennebach, M.; Hirtl, A.; Ishiwatari, T.; Indelicato, P.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Marton, J.; Nekipelov, M.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schlesser, S.; Schmid, Ph.; Simons, L. M.; Strauch, Th.; Trassinelli, M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-05-01

    The ground-state level shifts and broadenings of the hydrogen isotopes caused by the strong interaction have been redetermined by using a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. An additional measurement of muonic hydrogen reveals properties of the de-excitation cascade of such electrically neutral exotic atoms, in particular Coulomb de-excitation, the understanding of which is essential for the analysis of the hadronic-atom data.

  8. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 142 Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  9. Deuterium inventory in Tore Supra: Coupled carbon-deuterium balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pégourié, B.; Panayotis, S.; Languille, P.; Martin, C.; Dittmar, T.; Gauthier, E.; Hatchressian, J.-C.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Roubin, P.; Ruffe, R.; Tsitrone, E.; Vartanian, S.; Wang, H.; Beauté, A.; Bouvet, J.; Brosset, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Cabié, M.; Caprin, E.; Courtois, X.; Dachicourt, R.; Delchambre, E.; Dominici, C.; Douai, D.; Ekedahl, A.; Gunn, J. P.; Hakola, A.; Jacob, W.; Khodja, H.; Likonen, J.; Linez, F.; Litnovsky, A.; Marandet, Y.; Markelj, S.; Martinez, A.; Mayer, M.; Meyer, O.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Moreau, P.; Negrier, V.; Oddon, P.; Pardanaud, C.; Pasquet, B.; Pelicon, P.; Petersson, P.; Philipps, V.; Possnert, G.; Reiter, D.; Roth, J.; Roure, I.; Rubel, M.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Samaille, F.; Vavpetič, P.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the carbon-deuterium circulation and the resulting balance in Tore Supra over the period 2002-2007. Carbon balance combines the estimation of carbon gross erosion from spectroscopy, net erosion and deposition using confocal microscopy, lock-in thermography and SEM, and a measure of the amount of deposits collected in the vacuum chamber. Fuel retention is determined from post-mortem (PM) analyses and gas balance (GB) measurements. Special attention was paid to the deuterium outgassed during the nights and weekends of the experimental campaign (vessel under vacuum, Plasma Facing Components at 120 °C) and during vents (vessel at atmospheric pressure, PFCs at room temperature). It is shown that this outgassing is the main process reconciling the PM and GB estimations of fuel retention, closing the coupled carbon-deuterium balance. In particular, it explains why the deuterium concentration in deposits decreases with increasing depth.

  10. Hydrogen and deuterium diffusion in vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Herro, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium diffusion coefficients were measured between 473 and 230 K in alloys of vanadium containing titanium or niobium. Boltzmann-Matano techniques allowed the measurement of the hydrogen concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient. In addition, one of these techniques permitted a determination of the terminal hydrogen solid solubility which was greatly increased by alloying. Both the hydrogen and deuterium diffusion coefficients were found to decrease with hydrogen isotope concentration in all alloys at all temperatures. The effect of niobium additions was to markedly reduce the rate of hydrogen migration to a minimum in the 75 at. pct. Nb alloy. The rate of hydrogen migration decreased with titanium concentration up to 30 at. pct. Ti, the highest concentration examined in that alloy system. The diffusion coefficients exhibited an Arrhenius temperature dependence and the resulting diffusion activation energy and D/sub o/ values both increased with titanium and with niobium concentration to a maximum of 75 at. pct. Nb. Deuterium diffusion activation energies were larger than corresponding hydrogen values in all alloys. The diffusion behavior found in these alloys is not well represented by current local deep trapping models.

  11. Hydrogen and deuterium diffusion in vanadium-titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. T.; Herro, H. M.

    1987-02-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium diffusion coefficients were measured in vanadium-titanium alloys, containing up to 30 at. pct Ti, by Boltzmann-Matano techniques. Hydrogen and deuterium diffusivity decreased rapidly with titanium concentration. The diffusion coefficients showed an Arrhenius temperature dependence in each alloy between 230 and 473 K with activation energies that increased with titanium concentration. The diffusion coefficient decreased linearly with hydrogen concentration in all alloys. The terminal solid solubilities increased markedly with titanium concentration with deuterium showing a larger terminal solid solubility than hydrogen below ten percent titanium. The diffusion results do not fit a localized deep trapping of hydrogen by the titanium atoms.

  12. Deuterium and hydrogen flows in the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, E. L.; Hanson, W. B.

    1991-01-01

    Processes that affect vertical distributions and flows of deuterium and hydrogen between 100 and 500 km in the daytime thermosphere are investigated using a steady state numerical model that includes HD and H2 molecular flows, relevant chemistry, and transport by both molecular and eddy diffusion. The results of calculations indicate that the outward thermospheric fuxes and, hence, the planetary loss rates for D must be large compared to evaporative escape (as is also the case for H), confirming the suggestion of Breig et al. (1987). Results of measurements of H in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere and of H and D in the thermosphere were used to derive upward fluxes through the daytime thermosphere, showing that the upward fluxes exceeded the corresponding Jeans evaporative escape rates by factors of about 5 for H, and greater than 500 for D.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Based Deuterium Ion Source for Improved Neutron Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, R. L.; Jiang, N.; Thuesen, L.; Leung, K. N.; Antolak, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Field ionization uses high electric fields to cause the ionization and emission of ions from the surface of a sharp electrode. We are developing a novel field ionization neutron generator using carbon nanotubes (CNT) to produce the deuterium ion current. The generator consists of three major components: a deuterium ion source made of carbon nanotubes, a smooth negatively-biased target electrode, and a secondary electron suppression system. When a negative high voltage is applied on the target electrode, a high gradient electric field is formed at the tips of the carbon nanotubes. This field is sufficiently strong to create deuterium (D) ions at or near the nanotubes which are accelerated to the target causing D-D reactions to occur and the production of neutrons. A cross magnetic field is used to suppress secondary emission electrons generated on the target surface. We have demonstrated field ionization currents of 70 nA (1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}) at hydrogen gas pressure of 10 mTorr. We have found that the current scales proportionally with CNT area and also with the gas pressure in the range of 1 mTorr to 10 mTorr. We have demonstrated pulse cut-off times as short as 2 {mu}sec. Finally, we have shown the feasibility of generating neutrons using deuterium gas.

  14. Hydrogen and deuterium diffusion in vanadium-titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.T.; Herro, H.M.

    1987-02-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium diffusion coefficients were measured in vanadium-titanium alloys, containing up to 30 at. pct Ti, by Boltzmann-Matano techniques. Hydrogen and deutrium diffusivity decreased rapidly with titanium concentration. The diffusion coefficients showed an Arrhenius temperature dependence in each alloy between 230 and 473 K with activation energies that increased with titanium concentration. The diffusion coefficient decreased linearly with hydrogen concentration in all alloys. The terminal solid solubilities increased markedly with titanium concentration with deuterium showing a larger terminal solid solubility than hydrogen below ten percent titanium. The diffusion results do not fit a localized deep trapping of hydrogen by the titanium atoms.

  15. Observations of interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward Alpha Centauri A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A composite profile is presented of the Ly-alpha emission line of Alpha Cen A, obtained from 10 individual spectra with the high-resolution spectrograph aboard the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. There is excellent overall agreement with two previous Copernicus observations. Interstellar deuterium is detected, and a lower limit is set on the deuterium to hydrogen ratio of nDI/nHI greater than 8 x 10 to the -6th. In addition, the deuterium bulk velocity appears blueshifted by 8 + or - 2 km/s with respect to interstellar hydrogen, suggesting a nonuniform medium along the line of sight.

  16. Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic-Fusion Devices with Lithium-Conditioned Carbon Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, Predrag S.; Allain, J. P.; Taylor, C. N.; Dadras, J.; Morokuma, K.; Jakowski, J.; Allouche, A.; Skinner, C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has lowered hydrogenic recycling and dramatically improved plasma performance in many magnetic-fusion devices. In this Letter, we report quantum-classical atomistic simulations and laboratory experiments that elucidate the roles of lithium and oxygen in the uptake of hydrogen in amorphous carbon. Surprisingly, we show that lithium creates a high oxygen concentration on a carbon surface when bombarded by deuterium. Furthermore, surface oxygen, rather than lithium, plays the key role in trapping hydrogen.

  17. Ordered ground states of metallic hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    The physical attributes of some of the more physically distinct ordered states of metallic hydrogen and metallic deuterium at T = 0 and nearby are discussed. The likelihood of superconductivity in both is considered with respect to the usual coupling via the density fluctuations of the ions.

  18. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  19. Laser-driven polarized hydrogen and deuterium internal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    After completing comprehensive tests of the performance of the source with both hydrogen and deuterium gas, we began tests of a realistic polarized deuterium internal target. These tests involve characterizing the atomic polarization and dissociation fraction of atoms in a storage cell as a function of flow and magnetic field, and making direct measurements of the average nuclear tensor polarization of deuterium atoms in the storage cell. Transfer of polarization from the atomic electron to the nucleus as a result of D-D spin-exchange collisions was observed in deuterium, verifying calculations suggesting that high vector polarization in both hydrogen and deuterium can be obtained in a gas in spin temperature equilibrium without inducing RF transitions between the magnetic substates. In order to improve the durability of the system, the source glassware was redesigned to simplify construction and installation and eliminate stress points that led to frequent breakage. Improvements made to the nuclear polarimeter, which used the low energy {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction to analyze the tensor polarization of the deuterium, included installing acceleration lenses constructed of wire mesh to improve pumping conductance, construction of a new holding field coil, and elimination of the Wien filter from the setup. These changes substantially simplified operation of the polarimeter and should have reduced depolarization in collisions with the wall. However, when a number of tests failed to show an improvement of the nuclear polarization, it was discovered that extended operation of the system with a section of teflon as a getter for potassium caused the dissociation fraction to decline with time under realistic operating conditions, suggesting that teflon may not be a suitable material to eliminate potassium from the target. We are replacing the teflon surfaces with drifilm-coated ones and plan to continue tests of the polarized internal target in this configuration.

  20. Equations of state for hydrogen and deuterium.

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, Gerald Irwin (Kerley Technical Services, Appomattox, VA)

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the complete revision of a deuterium equation of state (EOS) model published in 1972. It uses the same general approach as the 1972 EOS, i.e., the so-called 'chemical model,' but incorporates a number of theoretical advances that have taken place during the past thirty years. Three phases are included: a molecular solid, an atomic solid, and a fluid phase consisting of both molecular and atomic species. Ionization and the insulator-metal transition are also included. The most important improvements are in the liquid perturbation theory, the treatment of molecular vibrations and rotations, and the ionization equilibrium and mixture models. In addition, new experimental data and theoretical calculations are used to calibrate certain model parameters, notably the zero-Kelvin isotherms for the molecular and atomic solids, and the quantum corrections to the liquid phase. The report gives a general overview of the model, followed by detailed discussions of the most important theoretical issues and extensive comparisons with the many experimental data that have been obtained during the last thirty years. Questions about the validity of the chemical model are also considered. Implications for modeling the 'giant planets' are also discussed.

  1. Azimuthal asymmetries in DVCS on unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Marukyan, H.

    2009-08-04

    We report the latest results of azimuthal asymmetries in the DVCS process measured at the HERMES experiment on unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets. Exploiting the ability of HERA to provide lepton beams with both charges and spin orientations, it is possible to extract simultaneously asymmetry amplitudes attributed to the pure DVCS process and to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and DVCS processes. The results are compared to the theoretical calculations.

  2. HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM NMR OF SOLIDS BY MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING

    SciTech Connect

    Eckman, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large spectral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. For example, the homonuclear dipolar broadening, HD, for hydrogen is usually several tens of kilohertz. For deuterium, HD is relatively small; however, the quadrupole interaction causes a broadening which can be hundreds of kilohertz in polycrystalline or amorphous solids. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, {beta}{sub m} = Arccos(3{sup -1/2}), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. Two approaches have been developed for each nucleus. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of {beta}. A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H{sub D} was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal

  3. Measurement of the ratio of hydrogen to deuterium at the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaigna)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jong-Gu; Wang, Son Jong; Kim, Sun Ho; Park, Jae Min; Na, Hoon Kyun

    2010-10-01

    The control of the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is one of the very important issues for ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating as well as the plasma wall interaction in the tokamak. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium during the tokamak shot was deduced from the emission spectroscopy measurements during the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign. Graphite tiles were used for the plasma facing components (PFCs) at KSTAR and its surface area exposed to the plasma was about 11 m2. The data showed that it remained as high as around 50% during the campaign period because graphite tiles were exposed to the air for about two months and the hydrogen contents at the tiles are not fully pumped out due to the lack of baking on the PFC in the 2009 campaign. The validation of the spectroscopy method was checked by using the Zeeman effects and the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is compared with results from the residual gas analysis. During the tokamak shot, the ratio is low below 10% initially and saturated after around 1 s. When there is a hydrogen injection to the vessel via ion cyclotron wall conditioning and the boronization process where the carbone is used, the ratio of the hydrogen to the deuterium is increased by up to 100% and it recovers to around 50% after one day of operation. However it does not decrease below 50% at the end of the experimental campaign. It was found that the full baking on the PFC (with a high temperature and sufficient vacuum pumping) is required for the ratio control which guarantees the efficient ICRF heating at the KSTAR 2010 experimental campaign.

  4. Measurement of the ratio of hydrogen to deuterium at the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Jong-Gu; Wang, Son Jong; Kim, Sun Ho; Park, Jae Min; Na, Hoon Kyun

    2010-10-15

    The control of the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is one of the very important issues for ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating as well as the plasma wall interaction in the tokamak. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium during the tokamak shot was deduced from the emission spectroscopy measurements during the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign. Graphite tiles were used for the plasma facing components (PFCs) at KSTAR and its surface area exposed to the plasma was about 11 m{sup 2}. The data showed that it remained as high as around 50% during the campaign period because graphite tiles were exposed to the air for about two months and the hydrogen contents at the tiles are not fully pumped out due to the lack of baking on the PFC in the 2009 campaign. The validation of the spectroscopy method was checked by using the Zeeman effects and the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is compared with results from the residual gas analysis. During the tokamak shot, the ratio is low below 10% initially and saturated after around 1 s. When there is a hydrogen injection to the vessel via ion cyclotron wall conditioning and the boronization process where the carbone is used, the ratio of the hydrogen to the deuterium is increased by up to 100% and it recovers to around 50% after one day of operation. However it does not decrease below 50% at the end of the experimental campaign. It was found that the full baking on the PFC (with a high temperature and sufficient vacuum pumping) is required for the ratio control which guarantees the efficient ICRF heating at the KSTAR 2010 experimental campaign.

  5. Muon transfer from hydrogen and deuterium atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. )

    1995-03-01

    The muon exchange reactions from the ground state of muonic protium and deuterium atoms to neon are studied. Measurements have been performed in binary gas mixtures at room temperature. The transfer rate from thermalized muonic deuterium is found to exceed by about an order of magnitude the one from muonic protium. On the other hand, an energy dependence of the rate from [mu][ital d] is revealed, while none is observed from [mu][ital p]. The intensity patterns of the muonic Lyman series of neon resulting from the muon exchange differ from one hydrogen isotope to the other, the most obvious discrepancy being the presence of the muonic Ne(7-1) line after transfer from [mu][ital d], whereas this line is absent by transfer from [mu][ital p]. This indicates that the muon is transferred to the level [ital n][sub [ital p

  6. The pion nucleon scattering lengths from pionic hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, H.-Ch.; Badertscher, A.; Goudsmit, P. F. A.; Janousch, M.; Leisi, H. J.; Matsinos, E.; Sigg, D.; Zhao, Z. G.; Chatellard, D.; Egger, J.-P.; Gabathuler, K.; Hauser, P.; Simons, L. M.; Rusi El Hassani, A. J.

    2001-07-01

    This is the final publication of the ETH Zurich Neuchâtel PSI collaboration on the pionic hydrogen and deuterium precision X-ray experiments. We describe the recent hydrogen 3 p 1 s measurement, report on the determination of the Doppler effect correction to the transition line width, analyze the deuterium shift measurement and discuss implications of the combined hydrogen and deuterium results. From the pionic hydrogen 3 p 1 s transition experiments we obtain the strong-interaction energy level shift \\varepsilon_{1s} = -7.108±0.013 (stat.)±0.034 (syst.) eV and the total decay width Γ_{1s} = 0.868±0.040 (stat.)±0.038 (syst.) eV of the 1s state. Taking into account the electromagnetic corrections we find the hadronic π N s-wave scattering amplitude a_{π-prightarrowπ-p} = 0.0883±0.0008 m_{π}^{-1} for elastic scattering and a_{π-prightarrowπ0n} = -0.128±0.006 m_{π} ^{-1} for single charge exchange, respectively. We then combine the pionic hydrogen results with the 1 s level shift measurement on pionic deuterium and test isospin symmetry of the strong interaction: our data are still compatible with isospin symmetry. The isoscalar and isovector π N scattering lengths (within the framework of isospin symmetry) are found to be b_0 = -0.0001^{+0.0009}_{-0.0021} m_{π}^{-1} and b1 = -0.0885^{+0.0010}_{-0.0021} m_{π} ^{-1}, respectively. Using the GMO sum rule, we obtain from b_1 a new value of the π N coupling constant (g_{π N} = 13.21_{-0.05}^{+0.11}) from which follows the Goldberger Treiman discrepancy Δ_{{GT}} =0.027_{-0.008}^{+0.012}. The new values of b_0 and g_{π N} imply an increase of the nucleon sigma term by at least 9 MeV.

  7. A laser-driven source of polarized hydrogen and deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Holt, R.J.; Gilman, R.A.; Kowalczyk, R.; Coulter, K.

    1989-01-01

    A novel laser-driven polarized source of hydrogen and deuterium which operates on the principle of spin-exchange optical pumping is being developed. This source is designed to operate as an internal target in an electron storage ring for fundamental studies of spin-dependent structure of nuclei. It has the potential to exceed the flux from existing conventional sources (3 /times/ 10/sup 16//s) by an order of magnitude. Currently, the source delivers hydrogen at a flux of 8 /times/ 10/sup 16/ atoms/s with an atomic polarization of 24% and deuterium at 6 /times/ 10/sup 16/ atoms/s with a polarization of 29%. Technical obstacles which have been overcome, with varying degrees of success are complete Doppler-coverage in the optical-pumping stage without the use of a buffer gas, wall-induced depolarization and radiation-trapping. Future improvements should allow achievement of the design goals of 4 /times/ 10/sup 17/ atoms/s with a polarization of 50%. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  8. New Analysis of Hydrogen and Deuterium Escape from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Thomas M.

    1999-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the time required for escape of hydrogen and deuterium to produce the present D/ H ratio in Venus water, the sizes of the original hydrogen reservoirs and their sensitivity to the magnitude of the present escape fluxes, the characteristics of exogenous and endogenous hydrogen sources, and the D/ H ratio for primordial Venus hydrogen. The procedure followed allowed the H escape flux to vary over a large range, the ratio of input to escape flux to vary from 0 to 1, and the fractionation factor, which expresses the relative efficiency of D and H escape, to vary between 0.02 and 0.5. It was found that, unless deuterium escape is very efficient, the present H escape flux (averaged over a solar cycle) cannot be larger than about 10 7 cm -2 s -1 if today's water is to be the remnant of water deposited eons ago. On the other hand if the escape flux is as large as large as 3×10 7 cm -2 s -1, today's water would be the remnant of water outgassed only about 500 million years ago. These conclusions are relatively insensitive to factors other than the magnitude of the escape flux. Since recent analysis of escape fluxes indicates that the H escape fluxes may be in the neighborhood of 3×10 7 cm -2 s -1 and the fractionation factor may be 0.14 or larger, the suggestion of Grinspoon (1993, Nature 363, 1702-1704) that the water now on Venus was created during a recent massive resurfacing event is credible. However, since it is still possible that the average escape flux is as small as 7×10 6 cm -2 s -1, the choice between 4 and 0.5 Gyr must await a resolution of this conflict by reanalysis of Pioneer Venus Lyman α data (Paxton, L., D. E. Anderson, and A. I. F. Stewart 1988, J. Geophys. Res. 93, 1766-1772).

  9. Experimental results of hydrogen distillation at the low power cryogenic column for the production of deuterium depleted hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Fedorchenko, O.; Kravtsov, P.; Vasilyev, A.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2008-07-15

    The Deuterium Removal Unit (DRU) has been designed and built at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst. (PNPI) to produce isotopically pure hydrogen with deuterium content less than 1 ppm. The cryogenic distillation column of 2.2 cm inner diameter and 155 cm packing height is the main element of the DRU. Column performances at different hydrogen distillation operating modes have been measured. The height equivalent to theoretical plate (HETP) for the column is 2.2 cm and almost constant over a wide range of vapour flow rates. Deuterium depleted hydrogen with a deuterium content of less than 0.1 ppm was produced in required quantity. (authors)

  10. Θ+ Search at HERMES with Deuterium and Hydrogen Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siguang; Schnell, Gunar

    The previous search at HERMES for narrow baryon states excited in quasi-real photo-production, decaying through the channel Θ + to pKS0 to pπ + π - , has been extended. Improved decay-particle reconstruction, more advanced particle identification, and increased event samples are employed. The structure that was observed earlier at an invariant mass of 1528 MeV shifts to 1522 MeV in the new analysis of data with a deuterium target, with a drop of statistical significance to about 2σ. The number of events above background is 68 - 31 + 98(stat) ± 13(sys). No such structure is observed in the hydrogen data set.

  11. Toward standardizing deuterium content reporting in hydrogen exchange-MS.

    PubMed

    Sheff, Joey G; Schriemer, David C

    2014-12-16

    We introduce a method to monitor dispensing ratios during labeling reactions in hydrogen exchange (HX)-MS. The method corrects for systematic and random dispensing errors and harmonizes data incorporating variable %D2O in the experiment design. A correction factor for deuterium levels is obtained by quantifying the relative signal intensities arising from nonexchanging heavy caffeine (spiked into labeling buffer) and light caffeine (spiked into sample solutions). Dispensing variability over a wide range of %D2O composition can be detected and corrected to a common value, and although random dispensing error is usually minor, we show it can be the limiting factor in high quality signal measurements. Applying a dispensing control is therefore an effective tool for monitoring measurement precision in HX-MS. PMID:25427063

  12. Pion Electroproduction form Helium 3, Deuterium, and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    S. Avery

    2002-05-01

    A series of measurements for pion electroproduction from helium-3, deuterium, and hydrogen were completed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility by the NucPi Collaboration. E91003 began taking data in February 1998 and was completed in April 1998. The longitudinal and transverse parts of the differential cross section were extracted, by means of a Rosenbluth type separation, in the direction parallel to the virtual photon, at Q 2 = 0.4 GeV 2 , for W = 1.15 and W = 1.6 GeV. The mass dependence of the longitudinal cross section should provide insight into the surprising apparent absence of any significant cross section enhancement due to excess pions in the nuclear medium.

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H](3-) and [M - 5H](5-) insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å(2) and 808 ± 2 Å(2). [M - 4H](4-) ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å(2)) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å(2)) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H](4-) and [M - 5H](5-) ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis. PMID:26620531

  14. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H]3- and [M - 5H]5- insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å2 and 808 ± 2 Å2. [M - 4H]4- ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å2) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å2) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H]4- and [M - 5H]5- ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  15. Thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium and tantalum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.

    1981-10-01

    Heats of transport have been determined for thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in pure vanadium, niobium and tantalum; in vanadium alloyed with either niobium, titanium or chromium; and in niobium-tantalum alloys. In all cases, thermotransport was toward colder regions and was significantly greater for deuterium than for hydrogen. A mass spectrometric technique was used to simultaneously measure heats of transport for hydrogen and deuterium in a single specimen containing both isotopes. This technique greatly increased the precision with which isotope effects in the heat of transport could be measured. The predominant effect of alloying was to dramatically increase thermotransport; however, thermotransport decreased as niobium was added to tantalum.

  16. Counter-Permeation of Deuterium and Hydrogen Through INCONEL 600[reg

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Tetsuaki; Iwatsuki, Jin

    2004-04-15

    Permeation of hydrogen isotopes through a high-temperature alloy used for heat exchanger and catalyst pipes is an important problem in the hydrogen production system connected to the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of the existence of hydrogen in an outside pipe on the amount of permeated deuterium through the pipe. It was found that the amount of permeated deuterium decreases by increasing the partial pressure of hydrogen in the outside pipe when the partial pressure of deuterium in the pipe is lower than 100 Pa and that of hydrogen in the outside pipe is larger than 10 kPa. The amount of permeated deuterium on counter permeation was predicted quantitatively by using an effectiveness factor for diffusivity of deuterium in metals and by taking into account the equilibrium state for hydrogen, deuterium, and HD molecules on the metal surface. From the results obtained in this study, it is supposed that the amount of tritium transferred from the primary circuit of the HTTR to the hydrogen production system will be reduced by the existence of high-pressure hydrogen in the catalyst pipe of the steam reformer.

  17. Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Meteoritic Dicarboxylic Acids During Aqueous Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, M.; Huang, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the extent of hydrogen-deuterium exchange on dicarboxylic acids during aqueous extraction. Deuterium enrichment was observed to be a function of diacid structure as well as delta-D. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Recombination-induced athermal migration of hydrogen and deuterium in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Koshka, Yaroslav; Krishnan, Bharat

    2005-02-01

    The phenomenon of recombination-induced formation of hydrogen-defect complexes in epitaxial silicon carbide (SiC) was further investigated on p-type samples treated in deuterium plasma. Qualitatively similar effects were observed for hydrogen and deuterium. The formation of hydrogen-related (deuterium-related) defects would depend on the temperature of the sample during plasma treatment, with lower process temperatures causing only incorporation of hydrogen (deuterium) near the surface without any significant formation of electrically or optically active hydrogen-related or deuterium-related defects in the epilayer. Higher process temperatures normally produced more efficient formation of new centers, including passivation of acceptors in SiC. In all cases, prolonged excitation of the hydrogenated (deuterated) samples with above-bandgap light at reduced temperatures caused recombination-induced formation of a few different defect centers. A confirmation of the long-range athermal migration of hydrogen from the surface into the bulk of the sample was obtained. It has been established that it is the recombination-induced migration of hydrogen that is responsible for the formation of hydrogen-related defect centers under optical excitation.

  19. Recombinant Nepenthesin II for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Menglin; Hoeppner, Morgan; Rey, Martial; Kadek, Alan; Man, Petr; Schriemer, David C

    2015-07-01

    The pitcher secretions of the Nepenthes genus of carnivorous plants contain a proteolytic activity that is very useful for hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS). Our efforts to reconstitute pitcher fluid activity using recombinant nepenthesin I (one of two known aspartic proteases in the fluid) revealed a partial cleavage profile and reduced enzymatic stability in certain HX-MS applications. We produced and characterized recombinant nepenthesin II to determine if it complemented nepenthesin I in HX-MS applications. Nepenthesin II shares many properties with nepenthesin I, such as fast digestion at reduced temperature and pH, and broad cleavage specificity, but in addition, it cleaves C-terminal to tryptophan. Neither enzyme reproduces the C-terminal proline cleavage we observed in the natural extract. Nepenthesin II is considerably more resistant to chemical denaturants and reducing agents than nepenthesin I, and it possesses a stability profile that is similar to that of pepsin. Higher stability combined with the slightly broader cleavage specificity makes nepenthesin II a useful alternative to pepsin and a more complete replacement for pitcher fluid in HX-MS applications. PMID:25993527

  20. Hydrogen, deuterium and tritium in palladium: An eleastic constants study

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, H. T.; Schwarz, R. B.; Tuggle, D. G.

    2004-01-01

    We have used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy to measure the three independent elastic constants of Pd-H, Pd-D, and Pd-T single crystal at 300K as a junction of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium concentration, respectively. The addition of interstitial H (D, or T) atoms, located at (0, 1/2, 0) in the fcc Pd lattice, affects all three elastic constants C, C{sub 44}, and B. In the mixed (a+{beta}) phase, and with increasing H isotope, the shear modulus C' shows an abnormal softening whereas C{sub 44} and B do not. This is explained in terms of Zener-type anelastic relaxations affecting the shape of the hydride phases in the coherent ({alpha}+{beta}) two-phase mixture In the single {beta}-phase, C' shows a strong isotope dependence whereas C{sub 44} and B show none. This behavior is explained in terms of differences in the excitation of optical phonons. In Pd-T, {sup 3}He is produced by the radioactive decay of tritium. We have measured in situ the swelling and the change in the elastic constants in Pd-T as a function of aging time. Aging ({sup 3}He formation) affects all three elastic constants. These measurements are being used to understand the early stages of {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He clusterformation in aged Pd-T crystal.

  1. Retention property of deuterium for fuel recovery in divertor by using hydrogen storage material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera, Saori; Tonegawa, Akira; Matsumura, Yoshihito; Sato, Kohnosuke; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic confinement fusion reactor by using Deuterium and Tritium of hydrogen isotope as fuels is suggested as one of the future energy source. Most fuels don't react and are exhausted out of fusion reactor. Especially, Tritium is radioisotope and rarely exists in nature, so fuels recovery is necessary. This poster presentation will explain about research new fuel recovery method by using hydrogen storage materials in divertor simulator TPD-Sheet IV. Samples are tungsten coated with titanium; tungsten of various thickness, and titanium films deposited by ion plating on tungsten substrates. The sample surface temperature is measured by radiation thermometer. Retention property of deuterium after deuterium plasma irradiation was examined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As a result, the TDS measurement shows that deuterium is retained in titanium. Therefore, Titanium as a hydrogen storage material expects to be possible to use separating and recovering fuel particles in divertor.

  2. The Dissociation Energy of Hydrogen and of Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Ashok

    The ab initio computation and experimental determination of the dissociation energy (D_0) of the hydrogen and deuterium molecules has long been an important problem in molecular spectroscopy. Kolos, Monkhorst, and Szalewicz (1986) have calculated D_0 with an accuracy of +/-0.1 cm^{-1} while including fine interactions such as relativistic effects, non-adiabatic mixing, and radiative shifts. These terms introduce corrections as small as 0.2 cm^{-1}, and experimental precision must exceed this to test the calculation in all of its aspects. In our experiment, a jet of H_2 (or D_2 ) was probed with coherent and tunable radiation at ~84 nm, near the second dissociation limit which leads to the products H(n = 2) + H(1s). Molecules in their ground state were excited into the highest vibronic levels of the electronic states B, B^' , and C, and into the dissociation continuum by tuning the radiation across the dissociation threshold. Metastable H(2s) photofragments were detected by applying a delayed electric field to mix the 2s with 2p states, thereby quenching H(2s) atoms to yield fluorescence at the Lyman- alpha wavelength. The onset of quenched fluorescence marked the second dissociation limit; from this energy, the atomic 2s-1s interval was subtracted, thus yielding D_0. We obtained the values D _0(H_2) = 36 118.11 +/- 0.08 cm^{ -1} and D_0(D _2) = 36 748.38 +/- 0.07 cm^{-1}, which are in excellent agreement with the most recent theoretical calculations. Thus, a long-standing discrepancy between experiment and theory has been resolved, and the ab initio calculation of D_0 appears to be successful. Finally, from our D_0 values, the dissociation energies of the molecular ions were deduced, and they also confirm the latest (1991) ab initio values of D_0(H_sp {2}{+}) and D_0 (D_sp{2}{+}).

  3. Breakdown in hydrogen and deuterium gases in static and radio-frequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Korolov, I. Donkó, Z.

    2015-09-15

    We report the results of a combined experimental and modeling study of the electrical breakdown of hydrogen and deuterium in static (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz) electric fields. For the simulations of the breakdown events, simplified models are used and only electrons are traced by Monte Carlo simulation. The experimental DC Paschen curve of hydrogen is used for the determination of the effective secondary electron emission coefficient. A very good agreement between the experimental and the calculated RF breakdown characteristics for hydrogen is found. For deuterium, on the other hand, presently available cross section sets do not allow a reproduction of RF breakdown characteristics.

  4. Venus was wet - A measurement of the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Watson, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The deuterium-hydrogen abundance ratio in the Venus atmosphere was measured while the inlets to the Pioneer Venus large probe mass spectrometer were coated with sulfuric acid from Venus' clouds. The ratio is 0.016 + or - 0.002. The hundredfold enrichment of deuterium means that at least 0.3 percent of a terrestrial ocean was outgassed on Venus, but is consistent with a much greater production.

  5. Comparison between the radial density buildup in the TARA plugs using hydrogen versus deuterium neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D.T.

    1983-11-01

    The WOLF code is used to compare the beam divergences from a TARA source using hydrogen and deuterium. Factors which influence the divergence which are investigated are the electron temperature, initial ion energy, electrode positions and ion beam current density. The beam divergence for 20 keV hydrogen is found to be only 20% smaller than for 25 keV deuterium for the same electrode positions. Since the optimal positioning of the electrodes is found to be independent of mesh spacing, a large parameter study is undertaken using little computer time. A time-dependent radial Fokker-Planck code is next used to examine the radial density buildup in a plug of the TARA tandem mirror. For both hydrogen and deuterium neutral beams, the influences of beam positioning, current and energy, edge neutral pressure and assumed electron temperature are studied.

  6. Fractionation of hydrogen and deuterium on Venus due to collisional ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurwell, Mark A.; Yung, Yuk L.

    1993-01-01

    The collisional ejection process for hydrogen on Venus is reanalyzed. Improved values for the efficiency of H and D escape as a function of the ionospheric temperature are reported. It is proposed that the reduction of the hydrogen flux for collisional ejection be reduced from 8 to 3.5 x 10 exp 6/sq cm/s, and a revised D/H fractional factor of 0.47 due to collisional ejection is suggested. The resulting deuterium flux is 3.1 x 10 exp 4/sq cm/s, roughly six times the flux due to charge exchange, making collisional ejection the dominant escape mechanism for deuterium on Venus.

  7. Fractionation of hydrogen and deuterium on Venus due to collisional ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwell, M. A.; Yung, Y. L.

    1993-02-01

    The collisional ejection process for hydrogen on Venus is reanalyzed. Improved values for the efficiency of H and D escape as a function of the ionospheric temperature are reported. It is proposed that the reduction of the hydrogen flux for collisional ejection be reduced from 8 to 3.5 x 10 exp 6/sq cm/s, and a revised D/H fractional factor of 0.47 due to collisional ejection is suggested. The resulting deuterium flux is 3.1 x 10 exp 4/sq cm/s, roughly six times the flux due to charge exchange, making collisional ejection the dominant escape mechanism for deuterium on Venus.

  8. Longitudinal-Transverse Separations of Structure Functions at Low $Q^2$ for Hydrogen and Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    V. Tvaskis; M. E. Christy; J. Arrington; R. Asaturyan; O. K. Baker; H. P. Blok; P. Bosted; M. Boswell; A. Bruell; A. Cochran; L. Cole; J. Crowder; J. Dunne; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; B. W. Filippone; K. Garrow; A. Gasparian; J. Gomez; H.E. Jackson; C. E. Keppel; E. Kinney; Y. Liang; W. Lorenzon; A. Lung; D. J. Mack; J. W. Martin; K. McIlhany; D. Meekins; R. G. Milner; J. H. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchyan; B. Moreland; V. Nazaryan; I. Niculescu; A. Opper; R. B. Piercey; D.H. Potterveld; B. Rose; Y. Sato; W. Seo; G. Smith; K. Spurlock; G. van der Steenhoven; S. Stepanyan; V. Tadevosian; A. Uzzle; W. F. Vulcan; S. A. Wood; B. Zihlmann; V. Ziskin

    2006-11-20

    We report on a study of the longitudinal to transverse cross section ratio, R={sigma}{sub L} {sigma}{sub T}, at low values of x and Q{sup 2}, as determined from inclusive inelastic electron-hydrogen and electron-deuterium scattering data from Jefferson Lab Hall C spanning the four-momentum transfer range 0.06 < Q{sup 2} < 2.8 GeV{sup 2}. Even at the lowest values of Q{sup 2}, R remains nearly constant and does not disappear with decreasing Q{sup 2}, as expected. We find a nearly identical behavior for hydrogen and deuterium.

  9. Longitudinal Lelectroproduction of Charged Pions on Hydrogen, Deuterium, and Helium 3

    SciTech Connect

    David Gaskell

    2001-05-01

    Conventional pictures of nuclear interactions, in which the pion mediates the long/medium range part of the nuclear force, predict an enhancement of the virtual pion cloud in nuclei relative to that in the free nucleon. Jefferson Lab Experiment E91003 measured charged pion electroproduction from Hydrogen, Deuterium, and Helium-3. The longitudinal cross section, which in the limit of pole dominance can be viewed as the quasifree knockout of a virtual pion, was extracted via a Rosenbluth separation. The longitudinal cross sections from Deuterium and Helium-3 were compared to Hydrogen to look for signatures of the nuclear pions.

  10. Computation of hyperfine energies of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakır, Bekir; Özmen, Ayhan; Yakar, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    The hyperfine energies and hyperfine constants of the ground and excited states of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium quantum dots(QDs) are calculated. Quantum genetic algorithm (QGA) and Hartree-Fock-Roothaan (HFR) methods are employed to calculate the unperturbed wave functions and energy eigenvalues. The results show that in the medium and strong confinement regions the hyperfine energy and hyperfine constant are strongly affected by dot radius, impurity charge, electron spin orientation, impurity spin and impurity magnetic moment. Besides, in all dot radii, the hyperfine splitting and hyperfine constant of the confined hydrogen and tritium atoms are approximately equivalent to each other and they are greater than the confined deuterium atom.

  11. Measurement of the nuclear polarization of hydrogen and deuterium molecules using a Lamb-shift polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Ralf Gorski, Robert; Grigoryev, Kiril; Mikirtychyants, Maxim; Rathmann, Frank; Seyfarth, Hellmut; Ströher, Hans; Weiss, Philipp; Kochenda, Leonid; Kravtsov, Peter; Trofimov, Viktor; Tschernov, Nikolay; Vasilyev, Alexander; Vznuzdaev, Marat; Schieck, Hans Paetz gen.

    2014-10-15

    Lamb-shift polarimeters are used to measure the nuclear polarization of protons and deuterons at energies of a few keV. In combination with an ionizer, the polarization of hydrogen and deuterium atoms was determined after taking into account the loss of polarization during the ionization process. The present work shows that the nuclear polarization of hydrogen or deuterium molecules can be measured as well, by ionizing the molecules and injecting the H{sub 2}{sup +} (or D{sub 2}{sup +}) ions into the Lamb-shift polarimeter.

  12. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange on aromatic rings during atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Davies, Noel W; Smith, Jason A; Molesworth, Peter P; Ross, John J

    2010-04-15

    It has been demonstrated that substituted indoles fully labelled with deuterium on the aromatic ring can undergo substantial exchange back to partial and even fully protonated forms during atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The degree of this exchange was strongly dependent on the absolute quantity of analyte, the APCI desolvation temperature, the nature of the mobile phase, the mobile phase flow rate and the instrument used. Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange on several other aromatic ring systems during APCI LC/MS was either undetectable (nitrobenzene, aniline) or extremely small (acetanilide) compared to the effect observed for substituted indoles. This observation has major implications for quantitative assays using deuterium-labelled internal standards and for the detection of deuterium-labelled products from isotopically labelled feeding experiments where there is a risk of back exchange to the protonated form during the analysis. PMID:20213724

  13. The ground state properties of spin-aligned atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The internal energy, pressure, and compressibility of ground-state, spin-aligned atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium are calculated assuming that all pair interactions occur via the atomic triplet (spin-aligned) potential. The conditions required to obtain atomic hydrogen and its isotopes in bulk are discussed; such a development would be of value in propulsion systems because of the light mass and energetic recombination of atomic hydrogen. Results show that atomic triplet hydrogen and deuterium remain gaseous at 0 K, and that tritium forms a liquid with a binding energy of approximately -0.75 K per atom at a molar volume of 130 cu cm per mole. The pair distribution function for these systems is calculated, and the predicted superfluid behavior of atomic triplet hydrogen and tritium is briefly discussed.

  14. Deuterium inventory in Tore Supra: Contribution of carbon deposits outgassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotis, S.; Pégourié, B.; Caprin, E.; Douai, D.; Hatchressian, J.-C.; Negrier, V.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Vartanian, S.; Bucalossi, J.; Monier-Garbet, P.

    2013-07-01

    In carbon dominated devices, the in vessel D inventory obtained from post-mortem analyses of plasma facing component samples is generally smaller by a factor of ˜4 than that estimated from gas balance measurements. However, for an accurate evaluation of the wall inventory, gas balance measurements must be done not only during discharges and conditioning procedures, but also in between discharges and during vents. From the analysis of the whole Tore Supra database for the 2002-2007 period, we show that long term outgassing during nights, weekends and vents is essential for evaluating the deuterium release. Taking these contributions into account reconciles the gas balance and post-mortem estimations of fuel retention.

  15. IUE observations of neutral hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Small-aperture, high-dispersion IUE spectra have been obtained of seven late-type stars that, in general, confirm previous Copernicus results concerning the distribution of hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium. In addition, the IUE Ly Alpha spectra of Altair, and of the Alpha Cen components, suggest that multiple velocity components exist in these two directions.

  16. Neutron scattering studies of Ti-Cr-V bcc alloy with the residual hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.; Iwase, K.; Sugiyama, M.; Kofu, M.; Yamamuro, O.; Onodera, Y.; Otomo, T.; Fukunaga, T.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium pressure-composition (P-C) isotherm measurements were carried out for Ti0.31Cr0.49V0.20 bcc alloy. As a result, the residual hydrogen-to-metal ratio (H/M)res was almost the same as the residual deuterium-to-metal one (D/M)res; the (H/M)res and (D/M)res were approximately 0.5. Furthermore, the neutron scattering experiments were conducted with Ti0.31Cr0.49V0.20 alloys including the residual hydrogen and/or deuterium. It was found that H atoms absorbed in the first absorption cycle up to H/M = 0.5 are hardly bound in the desorption cycle as the residual hydrogen, whereas D atoms are mainly bound in Ti0.31Cr0.49V0.20 bcc alloy as the residual deuterium when D2 gas is partially used in the H absorption reaction.

  17. Diffusion and electrotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium-titanium and vanadium-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pine, David J.; Cotts, R. M.

    1983-07-01

    The diffusion coefficient D and electrotransport effective charge number Z* of hydrogen and deuterium in V, V1-xTix, and V1-yCry were measured as a function of temperature using resistance techniques. Measurements were performed for hydrogen (deuterium) concentrations of approximately 1 at.% and alloys with x=0.03 and 0.08 and y=0.04 and 0.10. Alloying vanadium with either titanium or chromium was found to lower both D and Z* over the entire temperature range studied (310-480 K). The diffusion data obey an Arrhenius relation, the alloys having larger activation energies for diffusion than pure vanadium. No currently existing microscopic theory seems capable of explaining the dependence of D on alloy composition, nor can the data be consistently explained by a simple two-state trapping model. In every sample, Z* was observed to decrease with increasing temperature and host-metal resistivity for both hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, Z* was found to be larger for deuterium than hydrogen.

  18. Hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Research cited from the international literature adresses various aspects of hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Topics covered include flows, laser outputs, molecular relaxation, molecular rotation, energy conversion efficiency, reaction kinetics, and laser materials. Continous wave and pulsed laser are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 53 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  19. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  20. Isotope effects in dense solid hydrogen - Phase transition in deuterium at 190 + or - 20 GPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    Raman measurements of solid normal deuterium compressed in a diamond-anvil cell indicate that the material undergoes a structural phase transformation at 190 + or - 20 GPa and 77 K. Spectroscopically, the transition appears analogous to that observed in hydrogen at 145 + or - 5 GPa. The large isotope effect on the transition pressure suggests there is a significant vibrational contribution to the relative stability of the solid phases of hydrogen at very high densities.

  1. Spontaneous versus induced hydrogen and deuterium helical shaped plasmas with electron internal transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbin, M.; Franz, P.; Auriemma, F.; Lorenzini, R.; Marrelli, L.

    2015-09-01

    Electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) in high current plasmas with helical equilibria of the reversed field pinch experiment RFX-mod are analyzed and characterized in detail thanks to a high time resolution double filter diagnostic for the electron temperature spatial profile determination. The large amount of data provided by this diagnostic has required the development of dedicated algorithms and the identification of suitable parameters, reported and described in this paper, in order to perform automatic statistical studies. These numerical tools have been used to examine the effect of three dimensional (3D) magnetic fields applied by the RFX-mod 192 active coils in deuterium and hydrogen discharges with the aim to improve the sustainment and control of helical equilibria with eITBs. It is shown that 3D fields partially increase the occurring of helical states but with only a moderate effect on the eITBs duration; moreover, they have a different impact on the confinement properties in hydrogen and deuterium discharges. Numerical simulations, by the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT, investigate the effect of magnetic topology in plasmas with and without the application of 3D fields on deuterium and hydrogen test ions transport. Results from numerical studies are in agreement with estimates of the particle confinement times showing that particle transport is reduced in deuterium plasmas but not significantly affected by the application of helical boundary conditions.

  2. Hydrogen and deuterium loss from the terrestrial atmosphere - A quantitative assessment of nonthermal escape fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.; Wen, Jun-Shan; Moses, Julianne I.; Landry, Bridget M.; Allen, Mark; Hsu, Kuang-Jung

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive one-dimensional photochemical model extending from the middle atmosphere (50 km) to the exobase (432 km) has been used to study the escape of hydrogen and deuterium from the earth's atmosphere. The model incorporates recent advances in chemical kinetics as well as atmospheric observations by satellites, especially the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite. The results suggest that the escape fluxes of both H and D are limited by the upward transport of total hydrogen and total deuterium at the homopause. About one fourth of total hydrogen escape is thermal, the rest being nonthermal. It is shown that escape of D is nonthermal and that charge exchange and polar wind are important mechanisms for the nonthermal escape of H and D.

  3. Ultraviolet observations of cool stars. VII - Local interstellar hydrogen and deuterium Lyman-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, W.; Henry, R. C.; Linsky, J. L.; Moos, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    High-resolution Copernicus spectra of Epsilon Eri and Epsilon Ind containing interstellar hydrogen and deuterium L-alpha absorption lines are presented, reduced, and analyzed. Parameters of the interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward these two stars are derived independently, without any assumptions concerning the D/H ratio. Copernicus spectra of Alpha Aur and Alpha Cen A are reanalyzed, and limits on the D/H number-density ratio consistent with the data for all four stars are considered. A comparison of the present estimates for the parameters of the local interstellar medium with those obtained by other techniques shows that there is no compelling evidence for significant variations in the hydrogen density and D/H ratio in the local interstellar medium. On this basis the hypothesis of an approaching local interstellar cloud proposed by Vidal-Madjar et al. (1978) is rejected

  4. a Resistance Measurement of the Diffusion and Electrotransport of Hydrogen and Deuterium in Vanadium - Alloys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pine, David James

    The diffusion coefficient D and electrotransport effective charge Z* of hydrogen and deuterium have been measured as a function of temperature in pure vanadium and in vanadium-titanium and vanadium-chromium alloys. The diffusion coefficient was measured using a resistance technique. Diffusion is along the length of a foil which has been loaded electrolytically to a hydrogen concentration of approximately 0.5 atomic per cent. Initially the hydrogen is held at uniform concentration in essentially half the length of the foil by the effect of a DC electrotransport current of 2500 A/cm('2) in the other half. After this current is removed, the diffusion of H into the empty half is monitored by its effect on the resistivity of the foil. The sensitivity to hydrogen concentration is (+OR-)10 ppm. This resistance technique represents an improvement on existing methods for measuring D because: (1) an absolute measurement of the diffusion coefficient is made, (2) a single sample may be reused to make many measurements of D, (3) the diffusion coefficient is more accurately measured, and (4) an a.c. technique is used which avoids problems arising from the electrotransport of hydrogen. The diffusion coefficients measured for hydrogen and deuterium in pure vanadium are in excellent agreement with those measured in other studies using the Gorsky effect. Alloying vanadium with up to 10 at .% titanium or chromium was found to depress the diffusion coefficients of both hydrogen and deuterium over the entire temperature range studied (310 K to 480 K). In the 8.3 at .% titanium alloys, D was depressed by nearly a factor of ten; in the 10 at .% chromium samples, D was depressed by approximately a factor of two. The diffusion data for each sample were found to obey an Arrhenius relation. The diffusion data do not correlate with changes in the bulk characteristics of the host lattice (e.g. the Debye temperature), nor can they be explained consistently in terms of a simple two

  5. Production of bacterial cellulose with controlled deuterium-hydrogen substitution for neutron scattering studies.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Hugh; Shah, Riddhi; Evans, Barbara R; He, Junhong; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Jones, A Daniel; Langan, Paul; Davison, Brian H; Urban, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic enrichment of biomacromolecules is a widely used technique that enables the investigation of the structural and dynamic properties to provide information not accessible with natural abundance isotopic composition. This study reports an approach for deuterium incorporation into bacterial cellulose. A media formulation for growth of Acetobacter xylinus subsp. sucrofermentans and Gluconacetobacter hansenii was formulated that supports cellulose production in deuterium (D) oxide. The level of D incorporation can be varied by altering the ratio of deuterated and protiated glycerol used during cell growth in the D2O-based growth medium. Spectroscopic analysis and mass spectrometry show that the level of deuterium incorporation is high (>90%) for the perdeuterated form of bacterial cellulose. The small-angle neutron scattering profiles of the cellulose with different amounts of D incorporation are all similar indicating that there are no structural changes in the cellulose due to substitution of deuterium for hydrogen. In addition, by varying the amount of deuterated glycerol in the media it was possible to vary the scattering length density of the deuterated cellulose. The ability to control deuterium content of cellulose extends the range of experiments using techniques such as neutron scattering to reveal information about the structure and dynamics of cellulose, and its interactions with other biomacromolecules as well as synthetic polymers used for development of composite materials. PMID:26577730

  6. Interdiffusion of deuterium and hydrogen in olivine and enstatite: Initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburczy, J. A.; Du Frane, W. L.; Sharp, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    Interdiffusion rates of hydrogen and deuterium in olivine and enstatite, the most abundant minerals in the upper mantle, will improve our understanding of point defects, and defect dominated processes such as electrical conductivity. Deuterium is interdiffused into San Carlos olivine and enstatite as a traceable species of hydrogen to simulate the process of hydrogen self diffusion. Experiments were performed on oriented single crystals of olivine, and unoriented grains of olivine and enstatite. The olivine samples underwent two annealing steps before the diffusion experiment. The first anneal was at 1-bar, 1300 °C at NNO oxygen fugacity for 16+ hrs to set the point defects. Olivine samples were then saturated with 75 +/- 15 ppm-wt H2O during a hydrothermal anneal in a H2O(100wt%) bath at temperatures ranging between 750-900 °C, 2 GPa, NNO, with the inclusion of enstatite to buffer silica. Enstatite grains did not undergo a dry 1-atm anneal and were saturated with 300 +/- 100 ppm-wt H2O. Finally, deuterium is interdiffused into the hydrated olivine and enstatite; samples were recovered and brought back to the same P-T conditions as saturation in a D2O(90wt%)/H2O(10wt%) bath. We used the Cameca 6f SIMS at ASU to measure hydrogen and deuterium across samples from each of these experiments, and fit interdiffusion coefficients to the resulting deuterium and hydrogen profiles. In olivine D[100] is 2.0e-12 m^2/s at 800 °C, 2GPa. Diffusion lengths in the [010] and [001] directions were only modestly larger than the spatial resolution of our technique. Using concentration boundary conditions from the better quality data in [100] diffusion profile, we estimate diffusion coefficients for the other orientations as ~3e-13 m^2/s [001] and ~5e-14 m^2/s [010]. These values are roughly 1 ½ -2 orders of magnitude lower than chemical diffusion in San Carlos olivine (Kohlstedt & Mackwell, 1998). Activation energies estimated over the temperature range 750 - 800 °C are

  7. Speed of sound in solid molecular hydrogen-deuterium: Quantum Molecular Dynamics Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Carlo Luis; Perlado, Jose Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Uniformity of the solid layer is one of the critical points for an efficient ignition of the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) target. During the compression process this layer, perturbations grow as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Knowing the mechanical properties of this layer and its thermo-mechanical limits is necessary if we want to control or to minimize these instabilities. In this work we have used a simplified approach, replacing the DT ice system with a mixture of hydrogen-deuterium (HD) because beta decay of tritium complicates the analysis in the former case. Through simulation with ab initio methods we have calculated the elastic constants, the bulk modulus and sound velocity for hydrogen isotopes in solid molecular state. In this work we present the results for hydrogen-deuterium mixtures 50%-50%, at 15 K and with a compression which covers the range of 1 to 15 GPa. This system is interesting for study the early stages of the dynamic compression and provides conditions that are close to the manufacture of DT target in inertial confinement fusion. Discontinuities in the curve that have been observed on pure hydrogen, which are associated with phase transitions and the phase hysteresis.

  8. Hydrogen and deuterium NMR of solids by magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Eckman, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large specral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, ..beta../sub m/ = Arccos (3/sup -1/2/), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of ..beta... A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H/sub D/ was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal motion. In the general case of large H/sub D/, isotropic spectra were obtained by dilution of /sup 1/H with /sup 2/H combined with magic angle rotation. The resolution obtained represents the practical limit for proton NMR of solids.

  9. Measuring the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins at high spatial resolution by mass spectrometry: overcoming gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium scrambling.

    PubMed

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-10-21

    Proteins are dynamic molecules that exhibit conformational flexibility to function properly. Well-known examples of this are allosteric regulation of protein activity and ligand-induced conformational changes in protein receptors. Detailed knowledge of the conformational properties of proteins is therefore pertinent to both basic and applied research, including drug development, since the majority of drugs target protein receptors and a growing number of drugs introduced to the market are therapeutic peptides or proteins. X-ray crystallography provides a static picture at atomic resolution of the lowest-energy structure of the native ensemble. There is a growing need for sensitive analytical tools to explore all of the significant molecular structures in the conformational landscape of proteins. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently emerged as a powerful method for characterizing protein conformational dynamics. The basis of this method is the fact that backbone amides in stable hydrogen-bonded structures (e.g., α-helices and β-sheets) are protected against exchange with the aqueous solvent. All protein structures are dynamic, however, and eventually all of the protecting hydrogen bonds will transiently break as the protein--according to thermodynamic principles--cycles through partially unfolded states that correspond to excited free energy levels. As a result, all of the backbone amides will eventually become temporarily solvent-exposed and exchange-competent over time. Consequently, a folded protein in D2O will gradually incorporate deuterium into its backbone amides, and the kinetics of the process can be readily monitored by mass spectrometry. The deuterium uptake kinetics for the intact protein (global exchange kinetics) represents the sum of the exchange kinetics for the individual backbone amides. Local exchange kinetics is typically achieved by using pepsin digestion under quench conditions (i.e., under cold

  10. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications. PMID:12908227

  11. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange on plasma-exposed W and SS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Ikuji; Nomura, Shinji; Minamimoto, Toshihiro; Akiyoshi, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Taishi; Sasaki, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    The desorption cross section for hydrogen isotopes adsorbed on stainless steel (SS) and tungsten (W) has been evaluated experimentally to provide basic information on tritium exchange. One side of a sample sheet was alternately exposed to H and D plasma, and deuterium density on the surface was repeatedly observed using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) under continuous plasma exposure. From the time dependent change in the deuterium density, the desorption cross sections for SS and W were estimated to be 6.9 ± 2.3 × 10-23 m2 and 4.6 ± 1.0 × 10-23 m2, respectively. No significant differences in the cross section between H and D plasma were observed. Recombinative desorption was found to dominate the desorption process owing to the low incident energy of hydrogen atoms.

  12. Thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium-niobium, vanadium-titanium, and vanadium-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. T.; Smith, M. F.

    1983-04-01

    Thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium alloyed with either niobium, titanium, or chromium is much greater than in pure vanadium, and additions of vanadium to niobium similarly increase thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium over that observed in pure niobium. In all cases, the heat of transport was positive and was significantly greater for deuterium than for hydrogen. The results are consistent with an atomistic model in which the temperature dependence of atomic jump frequencies is the dominant factor in thermotransport with a small bias in the direction of atomic jumps. There is evidence that differences between the heats of transport for hydrogen and deuterium may be related to isotope effects in the activation energies for diffusion.

  13. IUE observations of hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Landsman, W. B.; Linsky, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    High-resolution Ly-alpha spectra of the late-type stars Epsilon Eri, Procyon, Altair, Capella, and HR 1099 taken with the short-wavelength camera on IUE are presented. The density, velocity dispersion, and bulk velocity of the interstellar H I toward each of the stars is derived from the spectra. Lower limits on the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio toward these stars are obtained.

  14. High-temperature study of superconducting hydrogen and deuterium sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durajski, A. P.; Szczȩśniak, R.; Pietronero, L.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds are extensively explored as candidates for a high-temperature superconductors. Currently, the measured critical temperature of $203$ K in hydrogen sulfide (H$_3$S) is among the highest over all-known superconductors. In present paper, using the strong-coupling Eliashberg theory of superconductivity, we compared in detail the thermodynamic properties of two samples containing different hydrogen isotopes H$_3$S and D$_3$S at $150$ GPa. Our research indicates that it is possible to reproduce the measured values of critical temperature $203$ K and $147$ K for H$_3$S and D$_3$S by using a Coulomb pseudopotential of $0.123$ and $0.131$, respectively. However, we also discuss a scenario in which the isotope effect is independent of pressure and the Coulomb pseudopotential for D$_3$S is smaller than for H$_3$S. For both scenarios, the energy gap, specific heat, thermodynamic critical field and related dimensionless ratios are calculated and compared with other conventional superconductors. We shown that the existence of the strong-coupling and retardation effects in the systems analysed result in significant differences between values obtained within the framework of the Eliashberg formalism and the prediction of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.

  15. Effects of atomic hydrogen and deuterium exposure on high polarization GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    M. Baylac; P. Adderley; J. Brittian; J. Clark; T. Day; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker; M. Stutzman; A. T. Wu; A. S. Terekhov

    2005-12-01

    Strained-layer GaAs and strained-superlattice GaAs photocathodes are used at Jefferson Laboratory to create high average current beams of highly spin-polarized electrons. High electron yield, or quantum efficiency (QE), is obtained only when the photocathode surface is atomically clean. For years, exposure to atomic hydrogen or deuterium has been the photocathode cleaning technique employed at Jefferson Laboratory. This work demonstrates that atomic hydrogen cleaning is not necessary when precautions are taken to ensure that clean photocathode material from the vendor is not inadvertently dirtied while samples are prepared for installation inside photoemission guns. Moreover, this work demonstrates that QE and beam polarization can be significantly reduced when clean high-polarization photocathode material is exposed to atomic hydrogen from an rf dissociator-style atomic hydrogen source. Surface analysis provides some insight into the mechanisms that degrade QE and polarization due to atomic hydrogen cleaning.

  16. Pion transfer from hydrogen to deuterium in H2+D2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, P.; Armstrong, D. S.; Measday, D. F.; Noble, A. J.; Stanislaus, S.; Harston, M. R.; Aniol, K. A.; Horváth, D.

    1990-01-01

    The transfer of negative pions from pionic hydrogen to deuterium has been investigated in gas mixtures of H2 and D2 as a function of the D2 concentration (C). The concentration dependence of the transfer rate was fitted using a phenomenological model with two parameters. For C-->∞ (32+/-3)% of the pions undergo transfer. The fitted parameters reflect the ratio of pion capture to pion transfer in collisions of pionic hydrogen with protons or deuterons. No pressure dependence for pion transfer was found.

  17. Ultrahigh pressures - Optical observations and Raman measurements of hydrogen and deuterium to 1.47 Mbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, H. K.; Bell, P. M.; Hemley, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium have been pressurized under static conditions to 1.47 Mbar, which is higher by a factor of 2 than the static data of Sharma et al. (1980). Measurements of the vibron indicate an initial increase and then a sharp decrease in frequency at pressures above 0.5 Mbar. At 1.14 Mbar the vibron frequency decreased to the zero-pressure value, and at 1.47 Mbar the frequency of the vibron in hydrogen is 90/cm below the value of the vibrational mode of the isolated molecule. This pronounced softening of the vibron suggests strengthened intermolecular interaction.

  18. Two-chamber hydrogen generation and application: access to pressurized deuterium gas.

    PubMed

    Modvig, Amalie; Andersen, Thomas L; Taaning, Rolf H; Lindhardt, Anders T; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2014-06-20

    Hydrogen and deuterium gas were produced and directly applied in a two-chamber system. These gaseous reagents were generated by the simple reaction of metallic zinc with HCl in water for H2 and DCl in deuterated water for D2. The setup proved efficient in classical Pd-catalyzed reductions of ketones, alkynes, alkenes, etc. in near-quantitative yields. The method was extended to the synthesis and isotope labeling of quinoline and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline derivatives. Finally, CX-546 and Olaparib underwent efficient Ir-catalyzed hydrogen isotope exchange reactions. PMID:24870212

  19. Hydrogen-deuterium substitution in solid ethanol by surface reactions at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Osaka, Kazuya; Chigai, Takeshi; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol (CH3CH2OH) is one of the most abundant complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. Despite its detection in the gas phase only, ethanol is believed to be formed by low-temperature grain-surface reactions. Methanol, the simplest alcohol, has been a target for observational, experimental, and theoretical studies in view of its deuterium enrichment in the interstellar medium; however, the deuterium chemistry of ethanol has not yet been an area of focus. Recently, deuterated dimethyl ether, a structural isomer of ethanol, was found in star-forming regions, indicating that deuterated ethanol can also be present in those environments. In this study, we performed laboratory experiments on the deuterium fractionation of solid ethanol at low temperatures through a reaction with deuterium (D) atoms at 10 K. Hydrogen (H)-D substitution, which increases the deuteration level, was found to occur on the ethyl group but not on the hydroxyl group. In addition, when deuterated ethanol (e.g. CD3CD2OD) solid was exposed to H atoms at 10 K, D-H substitution that reduced the deuteration level occurred on the ethyl group. Based on the results, it is likely that deuterated ethanol is present even under H-atom-dominant conditions in the interstellar medium.

  20. Kinetic Method for Hydrogen-Deuterium-Tritium Mixture Distillation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, A.B.; Kagramanov, Z.G.; Magomedbekov, E.P.

    2005-07-15

    Simulation of hydrogen distillation plants requires mathematical procedures suitable for multicomponent systems. In most of the present-day simulation methods a distillation column is assumed to be composed of theoretical stages, or plates. However, in the case of a multicomponent mixture theoretical plate does not exist.An alternative kinetic method of simulation is depicted in the work. According to this method a system of mass-transfer differential equations is solved numerically. Mass-transfer coefficients are estimated with using experimental results and empirical equations.Developed method allows calculating the steady state of a distillation column as well as its any non-steady state when initial conditions are given. The results for steady states are compared with ones obtained via Thiele-Geddes theoretical stage technique and the necessity of using kinetic method is demonstrated. Examples of a column startup period and periodic distillation simulations are shown as well.

  1. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Scott; Bridgewater, Jon S; Ward, John W; Allen, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH{sub 2}). The heats of solution for PuH{sub s} and PuD{sub s} are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

  2. Hydrogen-Deuterium exchange monitored by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poe, Brent; Del Vecchio, Alessandro; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the extent of isotopic exchange is a common means for the determination of self-diffusion coefficients in any type of medium (gas, liquid, amorphous solid, crystalline solid). For rapidly diffusing species such as hydrogen in condensed phases, real time methods involving vibrational spectroscopy can be used by taking advantage of the large relative mass difference between 1H and 2H, resulting in large differences in the band positions of their vibrational modes. We demonstrate rapid isotopic exchange between D2O liquid and H2O vapor using ATR (attenuated total reflectance) in a FTIR spectrometer. Over the course of a few minutes several spectra were acquired of a D2O droplet mounted on a diamond crystal. The progressive exchange reaction between the liquid phase and H2O from the atmosphere was monitored by measuring the decreasing absorbance of the D-O-D bending and O-D stretching bands and the increasing absorbance of the D-O-H and H-O-H bending and O-H stretching bands as functions of time. Our results offer some intriguing insights into the structural characteristics of water as inferred by this exchange process.

  3. Changes in protein structure monitored by use of gas‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, Helen S.; Ault, James R.; Pringle, Steven D.; Brown, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein conformation by solution‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to MS is well documented. This involves monitoring the exchange of backbone amide protons with deuterium and provides details concerning the protein's tertiary structure. However, undesired back‐exchange during post‐HDX analyses can be difficult to control. Here, gas‐phase HDX‐MS, during which labile hydrogens on amino acid side chains are exchanged in sub‐millisecond time scales, has been employed to probe changes within protein structures. Addition of the solvent 2,2,2‐trifluoroethanol to a protein in solution can affect the structure of the protein, resulting in an increase in secondary and/or tertiary structure which is detected using circular dichroism. Using a Synapt G2‐S ESI‐mass spectrometer modified to allow deuterated ammonia into the transfer ion guide (situated between the ion mobility cell and the TOF analyser), gas‐phase HDX‐MS is shown to reflect minor structural changes experienced by the proteins β‐lactoglobulin and ubiquitin, as observed by the reduction in the level of deuterium incorporation. Additionally, the use of gas‐phase HDX‐MS to distinguish between co‐populated proteins conformers within a solution is demonstrated with the disordered protein calmodulin; the gas‐phase HDX‐MS results correspond directly with complementary data obtained by use of ion mobility spectrometry‐MS. PMID:25603979

  4. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes using Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Cassell, Alan M.; Nguyen, Cattien V.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the irradiation of multi walled and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with atomic hydrogen. After irradiating the SWNT sample, a band at 2940/cm (3.4 microns) that is characteristic of the C-H stretching mode is observed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Additional confirmation of SWNT functionalization is tested by irradiating with atomic deuterium. A weak band in the region 1940/cm (5.2 micron) to 2450/cm (4.1 micron) corresponding to C-D stretching mode is also observed in the FTIR spectrum. This technique provides a clean gas phase process for the functionalization of SWNTs, which could lead to further chemical manipulation and/or the tuning of the electronic properties of SWNTs for nanodevice applications.

  5. Kinetics of hydrogen/deuterium exchanges in cometary ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Mathilde; Quirico, Eric; Faure, Alexandre; Schmitt, Bernard; Theulé, Patrice; Marboeuf, Ulysse

    2015-11-01

    The D/H composition of volatile molecules composing cometary ices brings key constraints on the origin of comets, on the extent of their presolar heritage, as well as on the origin of atmospheres and hydrospheres of terrestrial planets. Nevertheless, the D/H composition may have been modified to various extents in the nucleus when a comet approaches the Sun and experiences deep physical and chemical modifications in its subsurface. We question here the evolution of the D/H ratio of organic species by proton exchanges with water ice. We experimentally studied the kinetics of D/H exchanges on the ice mixtures H2O:CD3OD, H2O:CD3ND2 and D2O:HCN. Our results show that fast exchanges occur on the -OH and -NH2 chemical groups, which are processed through hydrogen bonds exchanges with water and by the molecular mobility triggered by structural changes, such as glass transition or crystallization. D/H exchanges kinetic is best described by a second-order kinetic law with activation energies of 4300 ± 900 K and 3300 ± 100 K for H2O:CD3OD and H2O:CD3ND2 ice mixtures, respectively. The corresponding pre-exponential factors ln(A(s-1)) are 25 ± 7 and 20 ± 1, respectively. No exchange was observed in the case of HCN trapped in D2O ice. These results strongly suggest that upon thermal heating (1) -OH and -NH2 chemical groups of any organic molecules loose their primordial D/H composition and equilibrate with water ice, (2) HCN does not experience proton transfer and keeps a primordial D/H composition and (3) C-H chemical groups are not isotopically modified.

  6. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  7. Ion-induced deuterium retention in tungsten coatings on carbon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Sugiyama, K.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Dürbeck, T.; Balden, M.

    2011-12-01

    Deuterium retention in different tungsten (W) coatings on carbon substrates was investigated for various incident ion energies ranging from 20 to 200 eV per deuterium atom and fluences ranging from 1 × 10 23 m -2 to 2 × 10 25 m -2. The targets were irradiated by deuterium ions at the IPP laboratory with a mass-separated ion beam with a flux of 10 19 D/m 2 s and with a deuterium plasma providing a flux of 10 20 D/m 2 s. Irradiation has been done at different sample temperatures ranging from 320 to 650 K. The depth profile of deuterium in the W coatings was measured up to 6 μm depth by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and the total retained amount was determined by thermal desorption spectroscopy. It is shown that deuterium retention significantly depends on the microstructure of each W coating. The deuterium retention in W coating of 7 μm thickness produced by combined magnetron-sputtering and ion implantation technique is higher compared to physical vapour deposited W coating of 4-5 μm thickness and 200 μm thickness plasma-sprayed W coating for all investigated energies and sample temperatures up to 650 K.

  8. Raman measurements of phase transitions in dense solid hydrogen and deuterium to 325 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Chang-sheng; Cohen, R. E.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy of dense hydrogen and deuterium performed to 325 GPa at 300 K reveals previously unidentified transitions. Detailed analysis of the spectra from multiple experimental runs, together with comparison with previous infrared and Raman measurements, provides information on structural modifications of hydrogen as a function of density through the I–III–IV transition sequence, beginning near 200 GPa at 300 K. The data suggest that the transition sequence at these temperatures proceeds by formation of disordered stacking of molecular and distorted layers. Weaker spectral changes are observed at 250, 285, and 300 GPa, that are characterized by discontinuities in pressure shifts of Raman frequencies, and changes in intensities and linewidths. The results indicate changes in structure and bonding, molecular orientational order, and electronic structure of dense hydrogen at these conditions. The data suggest the existence of new phases, either variations of phase IV, or altogether new structures. PMID:24639543

  9. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  10. Biogeochemistry of the Stable Isotopes of Hydrogen and Carbon in Salt Marsh Biota 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce N.; Epstein, Samuel

    1970-01-01

    Deuterium to hydrogen ratios of 14 plant species from a salt marsh and lagoon were 55‰ depleted in deuterium relative to the environmental water. Carbon tetrachloride-extractable material from these plants was another 92‰ depleted in deuterium. This gave a fractionation factor from water to CCl4 extract of 1.147. This over-all fractionation was remarkably constant for all species analyzed. Plants also discriminate against 13C, particularly in the lipid fraction. Data suggest that different mechanisms for carbon fixation result in different fractionations of the carbon isotopes. Herbivore tissues reflected the isotopic ratios of plants ingested. Apparently different metabolic processes are responsible for the different degrees of fractionation observed for hydrogen and carbon isotopes. PMID:16657539

  11. A centroid molecular dynamics study of liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium.

    PubMed

    Hone, Tyler D; Voth, Gregory A

    2004-10-01

    Centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) is applied to the study of collective and single-particle dynamics in liquid para-hydrogen at two state points and liquid ortho-deuterium at one state point. The CMD results are compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics, quantum mode coupling theory, a maximum entropy analytic continuation approach, pair-product forward- backward semiclassical dynamics, and available experimental results. The self-diffusion constants are in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements for all systems studied. Furthermore, it is shown that the method is able to adequately describe both the single-particle and collective dynamics of quantum liquids. PMID:15446940

  12. NMR-Based Detection of Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange in Liposome-Embedded Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xuejun; Dürr, Ulrich H. N.; Gattin, Zrinka; Laukat, Yvonne; Narayanan, Rhagavendran L.; Brückner, Ann-Kathrin; Meisinger, Chris; Lange, Adam; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in biology. Determination of their structure in a membrane environment, however, is highly challenging. To address this challenge, we developed an approach that couples hydrogen/deuterium exchange of membrane proteins to rapid unfolding and detection by solution-state NMR spectroscopy. We show that the method allows analysis of the solvent protection of single residues in liposome-embedded proteins such as the 349-residue Tom40, the major protein translocation pore in the outer mitochondrial membrane, which has resisted structural analysis for many years. PMID:25375235

  13. Analysis of overlapped and noisy hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Miklos; Weis, David D; Engen, John R; Lee, Kelly K

    2013-12-01

    Noisy and overlapped mass spectrometry data hinder the sequence coverage that can be obtained from hydrogen deuterium exchange analysis, and places a limit on the complexity of the samples that can be studied by this technique. Advances in instrumentation have addressed these limits, but as the complexity of the biological samples under investigation increases, these problems are re-encountered. Here we describe the use of binomial distribution fitting with asymmetric linear squares regression for calculating the accurate deuterium content for mass envelopes of low signal or that contain significant overlap. The approach is demonstrated with a test data set of HIV Env gp140 wherein inclusion of the new analysis regime resulted in obtaining exchange data for 42 additional peptides, improving the sequence coverage by 11%. At the same time, the precision of deuterium uptake measurements was improved for nearly every peptide examined. The improved processing algorithms also provide an efficient method for deconvolution of bimodal mass envelopes and EX1 kinetic signatures. All these functions and visualization tools have been implemented in the new version of the freely available software, HX-Express v2. PMID:24018862

  14. Analysis of Overlapped and Noisy Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Miklos; Weis, David D.; Engen, John R.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2013-12-01

    Noisy and overlapped mass spectrometry data hinder the sequence coverage that can be obtained from hydrogen deuterium exchange analysis, and places a limit on the complexity of the samples that can be studied by this technique. Advances in instrumentation have addressed these limits, but as the complexity of the biological samples under investigation increases, these problems are re-encountered. Here we describe the use of binomial distribution fitting with asymmetric linear squares regression for calculating the accurate deuterium content for mass envelopes of low signal or that contain significant overlap. The approach is demonstrated with a test data set of HIV Env gp140 wherein inclusion of the new analysis regime resulted in obtaining exchange data for 42 additional peptides, improving the sequence coverage by 11 %. At the same time, the precision of deuterium uptake measurements was improved for nearly every peptide examined. The improved processing algorithms also provide an efficient method for deconvolution of bimodal mass envelopes and EX1 kinetic signatures. All these functions and visualization tools have been implemented in the new version of the freely available software, HX-Express v2.

  15. Online deuterium hydrogen exchange and protein digestion coupled with ion mobility spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Arndt, James R; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-05-19

    Online deuterium hydrogen exchange (DHX) and pepsin digestion (PD) is demonstrated using drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) coupled with linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometry (MS) with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. DHX of deuterated ubiquitin, followed by subsequent quenching and digestion, is performed within ∼60 s, yielding 100% peptide sequence coverage. The high reproducibility of the IMS separation allows spectral feature matching between two-dimensional IMS-MS datasets (undeuterated and deuterated) without the need for dataset alignment. Extracted ion drift time distributions (XIDTDs) of deuterated peptic peptides are mobility-matched to corresponding XIDTDs of undeuterated peptic peptides that were identified using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Matching XIDTDs allows a straightforward identification and deuterium retention evaluation for labeled peptides. Aside from the mobility separation, the ion trapping capabilities of the LTQ, combined with ETD, are demonstrated to provide single-residue resolution. Deuterium retention for the c- series ions across residues M(1)-L(15) and N(25)-R(42) are in good agreement with the known secondary structural elements within ubiquitin. PMID:25893550

  16. Studies of negative ions by collision-induced decomposition and hydrogen-deuterium exchange techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, D F; Sethi, S K; Shabanowitz, J

    1980-01-01

    Development of two new techniques for studying the gas phase chemistry of negative ions is reported. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of (M-1)- ions has been accomplished in a newly constructed triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometer. This instrument was assembled by adding two additional Finnigan quadrupole mass filters to a Finnigan Model 3200 CI mass spectrometer. Generation of (M-1)- ions is accomplished by allowing OH- and sample to react under CI conditions in the ion source. The first quadrupole mass filter, Q1, is then employed to selectively pass the (M-1)- ion into a second quadrupole filter containing argon or neon at 10(-3) torr. On collision with the inert gas the (M-1)- ions dissociate into fragments which are then mass analyzed in the third quadrupole filter, CID spectra of (M-1)- ions from twelve carbonyl compounds are presented in this paper. Ion molecule isotope exchange reactions in the CI ion source can be used to count the number of hydrogen atoms in many different chemical environments. Collisions between sample (M-1)- ions and deuterium-labeled reagent gases (ND3, D2O, EtOD) facilitate incorporation of deuterium into the negative ion if the basicities of the sample and reagent anions are similar. Thus it is possible to selectively incorporate deuterium into many organic samples by controlling the exothermicity of the acid base, ion-molecule chemistry. PMID:7428745

  17. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System.

  18. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System. PMID:26461170

  19. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System. PMID:26461170

  20. A technique for determining the deuterium/hydrogen contrast map in neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    A difference in the neutron scattering length between hydrogen and deuterium leads to a high density contrast in neutron Fourier maps. In this study, a technique for determining the deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) contrast map in neutron macromolecular crystallography is developed and evaluated using ribonuclease A. The contrast map between the D2O-solvent and H2O-solvent crystals is calculated in real space, rather than in reciprocal space as performed in previous neutron D/H contrast crystallography. The present technique can thus utilize all of the amplitudes of the neutron structure factors for both D2O-solvent and H2O-solvent crystals. The neutron D/H contrast maps clearly demonstrate the powerful detectability of H/D exchange in proteins. In fact, alternative protonation states and alternative conformations of hydroxyl groups are observed at medium resolution (1.8 Å). Moreover, water molecules can be categorized into three types according to their tendency towards rotational disorder. These results directly indicate improvement in the neutron crystal structure analysis. This technique is suitable for incorporation into the standard structure-determination process used in neutron protein crystallography; consequently, more precise and efficient determination of the D-atom positions is possible using a combination of this D/H contrast technique and standard neutron structure-determination protocols. PMID:26894536

  1. Probing Conserved Helical Modules of Portal Complexes by Mass Spectrometry based Hydrogen/deuterium Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sebyung; Poliakov, Anton; Sexton, Jennifer; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Prevelige, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    The dsDNA bacteriophage P22 has a ring shaped dodecameric complex composed of the 84 kDa portal protein subunit which forms the central channel of the phage’s DNA packaging motor. The overall morphology of the P22 portal complex is similar to that of the portal complexes of Phi29, SPP1, T3, T7 phages and herpes simplex virus. Secondary structure prediction of P22 portal protein and its threading onto the crystal structure of the Phi29 portal complexes suggested that P22 portal protein complex shares conserved helical modules which were found in the dodecameric interfaces of the Phi29 portal complex. To identify the amino acids involved in inter-subunit contacts in the P22 portal ring complexes and validate the threading model, we performed comparative hydrogen/deuterium exchange analysis of monomeric and in vitro assembled portal proteins of P22 and the dodecameric Phi29 portal. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments provided evidence of inter-subunit interactions in the P22 portal complex similar to those in the Phi29 portal which map to the regions predicted to be conserved helical modules. PMID:18621389

  2. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies. PMID:27441240

  3. Isotopic effect study in the LHCD and LHH experiments in hydrogen/deuterium plasmas of the FT-2 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkul, S. I.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Dyachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Irzak, M. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Saveliev, A. N.; Shatalin, S. V.; Stepanov, A. Yu.

    2014-02-12

    Results of comparative experimental studies of the efficiency of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and lower hybrid heating (LHH) in the FT-2 tokamak in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas are presented. In the new comparative experimental runs in deuterium/hydrogen plasmas suppression of the LHCD and beginning of the interaction of LH waves with ions is controlled by the plasma density rise. Role of parametric instabilities in CD switch-off is considered. In order to analyze the experimentally observed effect of LHCD the GRILL3D and FRTC codes has been used.

  4. Subzero temperature chromatography for reduced back-exchange and improved dynamic range in amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Venable, John D; Okach, Linda; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Brock, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange is a commonly used technique for studying the dynamics of proteins and their interactions with other proteins or ligands. When coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, hydrogen/deuterium exchange provides several unique advantages over other structural characterization techniques including very high sensitivity, the ability to analyze proteins in complex environments, and a large mass range. A fundamental limitation of the technique arises from the loss of the deuterium label (back-exchange) during the course of the analysis. A method to limit loss of the label during the separation stage of the analysis using subzero temperature reversed-phase chromatography is presented. The approach is facilitated by the use of buffer modifiers that prevent freezing. We evaluated ethylene glycol, dimethyl formamide, formamide, and methanol for their freezing point suppression capabilities, effects on peptide retention, and their compatibilities with electrospray ionization. Ethylene glycol was used extensively because of its good electrospray ionization compatibility; however, formamide has potential to be a superior modifier if detrimental effects on ionization can be overcome. It is demonstrated using suitable buffer modifiers that separations can be performed at temperatures as low as -30 °C with negligible loss of the deuterium label, even during long chromatographic separations. The reduction in back-exchange is shown to increase the dynamic range of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry in terms of mixture complexity and the magnitude with which changes in deuteration level can be quantified. PMID:23025328

  5. Comparison of Carbon and Main Ion Radiation Profiles in Matched Helium and Deuterium Plasmas in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Lawson, K D; Porter, G D; Erents, S K; Ingesson, C; Mathews, G F; McCracken, G M; Philipps, V; Pitts, A; Stamp, M F

    2002-05-17

    This paper examines the radiation profiles and corresponding ionization source profiles of various carbon and main plasma ions in matched helium and deuterium L-mode plasmas in JET. Operation in helium should reduce chemical sputtering of carbon substantially compared with deuterium. The radiation intensities from C{sup 1+}, C{sup 2+} and C{sup 3+} in the helium plasmas showed reduction by factors of 8, 10 and 25 respectively along the inner SOL and divertor leg compared with the deuterium cases. However, the emission in the outer divertor leg was less than a factor of 2 lower in helium. Using photon efficiencies calculated by the UEDGE code for the spectrometer lines of sight, the calculated source rates of C{sup 1+} and C{sup 3+} along the inner SOL and inner divertor were reduced by a factors of 4 and 20 respectively in the helium plasmas. In the outer divertor leg the source rate of C{sup 3+} was reduced by a factor of 10 but the C{sup 1+} source rate did not change in helium. These measurements are consistent with a model that chemical sputtering of carbon dominates the source from the inner wall and inner divertor in deuterium L-mode plasmas while physical sputtering appears to dominate the source from the outer divertor.

  6. The effect of hydrogen/deuterium introduction on photoluminescence of 3C-SiC crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.K.; Steckl, A.J.; Zavada, J.M.; Wilson, R.G.

    1998-12-31

    The effect of the incorporation and annealing of deuterium in 3C-SiC on its photoluminescence is reported. A 3C-SiC crystal has been implanted with 100 kev deuterium and subsequently annealed at temperatures between 1015 C and 1220 C for 1 to 5 minutes. SIMS depth profiles indicate hydrogen is strongly trapped by defects generated through ion bombardment, but a gradual damage repairing occurs during annealing. Photoluminescence was measured with 488 nm Ar laser excitation for sample temperatures from 89 K to 400 K. The PL peak wavelength of 540 nm at room temperature has shifted to 538 nm at 89 K. The peak PL intensity decreases with measurement temperature while its full width at half maximum (FWHM) exhibits an increasing trend. PL data were taken at five annealing stages. The post-implantation peak PL intensity and its integrated area increase initially with annealing temperature and time. After the final annealing at 1218 C for 2 minute, PL intensity and its integrated area exhibit a decrease in level.

  7. Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

    2008-08-11

    This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the

  8. Method and source for producing a high concentration of positively charged molecular hydrogen or deuterium ions

    DOEpatents

    Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1988-01-01

    A high concentration of positive molecular ions of hydrogen or deuterium gas is extracted from a positive ion source having a short path length of extracted ions, relative to the mean free path of the gas molecules, to minimize the production of other ion species by collision between the positive ions and gas molecules. The ion source has arrays of permanent magnets to produce a multi-cusp magnetic field in regions remote from the plasma grid and the electron emitters, for largely confining the plasma to the space therebetween. The ion source has a chamber which is short in length, relative to its transverse dimensions, and the electron emitters are at an even shorter distance from the plasma grid, which contains one or more extraction apertures.

  9. Determination of hydrogen/deuterium ratio with neutron measurements on MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Klimek, I. Cecconello, M.; Ericsson, G.; Sharapov, S. E.; Harrison, J.

    2014-11-15

    On MAST, compressional Alfvén eigenmodes can be destabilized by the presence of a sufficiently large population of energetic particles in the plasma. This dependence was studied in a series of very similar discharges in which increasing amounts of hydrogen were puffed into a deuterium plasma. A simple method to estimate the isotopic ratio n{sub H}/n{sub D} using neutron emission measurements is here described. The inferred isotopic ratio ranged from 0.0 to 0.6 and no experimental indication of changes in radial profile of n{sub H}/n{sub D} were observed. These findings are confirmed by TRANSP/NUBEAM simulations of the neutron emission.

  10. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Applied to IL-23 Interaction Characteristics: Potential Impact for Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Krystek, Stanley R.; Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Wei, Hui; Tao, Li; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Adnectins are targeted protein therapeutics that are derived from domain III of human fibronectin, and have similar protein scaffold to antibodies. A specific adnectin (Adnectin 2) was identified to bind to IL-23 and compete with IL-23/IL-23R interaction, being a potential protein therapeutic. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) and computational methods were applied to probe the binding interactions between IL-23 and Adnectin2 and to determine the correlation between the two orthogonal methods. This review article summarizes the current structural knowledge about Il-23 and it focuses on the applicability of HDX MS to investigate the higher order structure of proteins, which plays an important role for the discovery of new and improved biotherapeutics. PMID:25711416

  11. Time-resolved pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes gaseous proteins structural kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX. PMID:25318698

  12. Time-Resolved Pulsed Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Probes Gaseous Proteins Structural Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX.

  13. Oligomerization Interface of RAGE Receptor Revealed by MS-Monitored Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Poznański, Jarosław; Kulma, Magdalena; Dadlez, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) leads to a chronic proinflammatory signal, affecting patients with a variety of diseases. Potentially beneficial modification of RAGE activity requires understanding the signal transduction mechanism at the molecular level. The ligand binding domain is structurally uncoupled from the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting receptor oligomerization is a requirement for receptor activation. In this study, we used hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to map structural differences between the monomeric and oligomeric forms of RAGE. Our results indicated the presence of a region shielded from exchange in the oligomeric form of RAGE and led to the identification of a new oligomerization interface localized at the linker region between domains C1 and C2. Based on this finding, a model of a RAGE dimer and higher oligomeric state was constructed. PMID:24098480

  14. Deuterium-Hydrogen Interdiffusion in Olivine: Implications for Point Defects and Electrical Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburczy, J. A.; Du Frane, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge about hydrogen diffusivity in mantle minerals is critical for determining mantle hydrogen distribution, and additionally for understanding point defects. Chemical diffusion of hydrogen in olivine depends on self diffusion and concentration of hydrogen and other point defects, such as small polarons and metal vacancies. In this study we measured hydrogen self diffusion in olivine, and we compare these values to those previously reported for chemical 1-H redox exchange DExch. Deuterium 2-H was interdiffused into hydrogen 1-H saturated single crystals of San Carlos olivine between 750-900 °C at 2 GPa. We measured and fit the resulting 2-H and 1-H profiles to obtain the interdiffusion coefficient DH,[100] = 10^(-5.04+/-1.43)*e(-137+/-31kJ/mol)/(RT) m^2/s. This is ~1 log unit lower than DExch,[100], with similar activation energy Ea,[100]. DH is anisotropic with DH,[001] = 10^(-12.0+/-0.2) m^2/s at 900 °C and 2 GPa; only upper bound estimates for DH,[010] could be determined from our experiments. We use DH,[100] and DExch,[100] to calculate the small polaron diffusion coefficient associated with redox exchange Dh,[100] = 10^-3.90*e(-142kJ/mol)/(RT) m^2/s. Dh,[100] is combined with reported values for DExch,[010] and DExch,[010] to calculate values for DH,[010] and DH,[001] that are consistent with our upper bound estimates. These DH values, both measured and derived, are used with the Nernst-Einstein relation to calculate the electrical conductivity σ by hydrogen in olivine σH. We calculate σH = 10^1.63*e(-126kJ/mol)/(RT) S/m, which is similar in magnitude to the lower range of reported σ measurements. This similarly suggests that hydrogen alone cannot account for high σ anomalies observed at asthenospheric depths (~10^-2 to ~10^-1 S/m). The Ea for hydrogen mobility/diffusion we calculate are higher (~40% for 100 ppmw H2O) than those derived from previous σ measurements. This work supported by NSF EAR 0739050 to J. A. Tyburczy and R. Hervig. The SIMS

  15. Dissociative adsorption of molecular deuterium and thermal stability onto hydrogenated, bare and ion beam damaged poly- and single crystalline diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelson, Sh.; Chandran, M.; Zalkind, S.; Shamir, N.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report on dissociative adsorption of deuterium (D2) on bare, hydrogenated and ion beam bombarded polycrystalline and single crystalline diamond surfaces. Polycrystalline diamond films with an average grain size of ~ 300 nm were deposited on silicon substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique from methane/hydrogen gas mixture. Deposited films were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to estimate the phase composition and microstructure. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and direct recoil spectrometry were used to study hydrogen (deuterium) bonding configuration of the upper surface region. Near surface amorphization was achieved by 1 keV Ar+ implantation at ~ 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 at room temperature (RT). As deposited and Ar+ bombarded films are annealed to 500-1000 °C in ultra-high vacuum conditions and also under D2 partial pressure of 5 × 10- 6 Torr. For comparison, key experiments were repeated on the single crystal (100) diamond. Our results clearly show the preferential dissociative adsorption of D2 on low hybridized carbon (sp/sp2) states with activation temperature as low as RT, but with a lower thermal stability compared to pure diamond Csbnd D bonds.

  16. Absorption and desorption of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium for Zr--V--Fe getter

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, K.; Inoue, N.; Watanabe, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    1984-07-01

    Nonevaporable getters have wide applicability for developing the tritium handling techniques for thermonuclear fusion devices. From this viewpoint, mechanisms of the absorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes and the isotope effects were investigated for a Zr--V--Fe alloy (St-707) by means of the mass analyzed thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was observed that the absorption rate was proportional to the first power of the pressure, indicating that the rate limiting step is the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen isotopes on the surface. The activation energy was very small, in the order of magnitude of a few tens of calories per mole in a temperature range from -196 to 200 /sup 0/C. The desorption rate was proportional to the square of the amount of absorption, indicating that the rate limiting step is the associative desorption reaction of hydrogen atoms or ions diffused to the surface from the bulk. The rate constants for hydrogen and deuterium were determined as k/sub d/(H/sub 2/) = (5.3/sup +2.6//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.0 +- 0.7) x 10/sup 3//RT) and k/sub d/(D/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +2.7//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.6 +- 0.8) x 10/sup 3//RT) in (1/Pa 1 s), respectively, where R is in (cal/mol deg). With regard to tritium, the rate constant was evaluated as k/sub d/(T/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +20//sub -4.0/)exp(-(29.3 +- 3) x 10/sup 3//RT), however, the frequency factor will have to be corrected by knowing the relative sensitivity factor of the mass spectrometer for tritium (T/sub 2/).

  17. Conformational stability of ribonuclease T1 determined by hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, L. S.; Pace, C. N.; Raushel, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    The hydrogen-deuterium exchange kinetics of 37 backbone amide residues in RNase T1 have been monitored at 25, 40, 45, and 50 degrees C at pD 5.6 and at 40 and 45 degrees C at pD 6.6. The hydrogen exchange rate constants of the hydrogen-bonded residues varied over eight orders of magnitude at 25 degrees C with 13 residues showing exchange rates consistent with exchange occurring as a result of global unfolding. These residues are located in strands 2-4 of the central beta-pleated sheet. The residues located in the alpha-helix and the remaining strands of the beta-sheet exhibited exchange behaviors consistent with exchange occurring due to local structural fluctuations. For several residues at 25 degrees C, the global free energy change calculated from the hydrogen exchange data was over 2 kcal/mol greater than the free energy of unfolding determined from urea denaturation experiments. The number of residues showing this unexpected behavior was found to increase with temperature. This apparent inconsistency can be explained quantitatively if the cis-trans isomerization of the two cis prolines, Pro-39 and Pro-55, is taken into account. The cis-trans isomerization equilibrium calculated from kinetic data indicates the free energy of the unfolded state will be 2.6 kcal/mol higher at 25 degrees C when the two prolines are cis rather than trans (Mayr LM, Odefey CO, Schutkowski M, Schmid FX. 1996. Kinetic analysis of the unfolding and refolding of ribonuclease T1 by a stopped-flow double-mixing technique. Biochemistry 35: 5550-5561). The hydrogen exchange results are consistent with the most slowly exchanging hydrogens exchanging from a globally higher free energy unfolded state in which Pro-55 and Pro-39 are still predominantly in the cis conformation. When the conformational stabilities determined by hydrogen exchange are corrected for the proline isomerization equilibrium, the results are in excellent agreement with those from an analysis of urea denaturation curves

  18. Precision measurements on kaonic hydrogen and kaonic deuterium: DEAR and SIDDHARTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, M.

    2005-06-01

    The SIDDHARTA ( SIlicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application) experiment [J. Zmeskal, SIDDHARTA Technical Note IR-2 (2003); C. Curceanu (Petrascu), SID-DHARTA Technical Note IR-3 (2003)] represents the scientific and technical development of DEAR ( DAΦNE Exotic Atom Research) [S. Bianco et al., Rivista del Nuovo Cimento 22 (11) (1999) 1], as part of the program dedicated to exotic atoms at DAΦNE [G. Vignola, Proc. of the "5th European Particle Accelerator Conference", Sitges, Eds. S. Myres et al., Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol and Philadelphia (1996) 22]. The objective consists in an eV precision measurement of the kaonic hydrogen K line shift and width induced by the strong interaction, and the first measurement of kaonic deuterium. These values will allow a precise determination of antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths and a better understanding of the chiral symmetry breaking scenario in the strangeness sector. DEAR performed the most precise measurement up to now on kaonic hydrogen, at the end of 2002. The SIDDHARTA collaboration is developing a new set of large area, triggerable X-ray Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD), which will improve by 2 orders of magnitude the background rejection, allowing to reach the proposed objectives. The results of DEAR, as well as the state of the art of the new setup are presented.

  19. FeTiMn alloy granulate in a pressure container for storage of hydrogen and deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Klatt, K.; Wenzl, H.

    1982-01-19

    Oxygen is incorporated into an FeTiMn granulate in an amount sufficient to form double oxides of titanium and manganese therein, but insufficient to form oxides containing iron. As the result, the granules are embrittled, favoring the formation of microcracks to such an extent that activation of the granules by hydrogen takes place, after initial evacuation, at room temperature, after which the granulate can be used in a pressure container for storage and discharge of hydrogen and/or deuterium over long periods of operation. The oxygen content is to be kept in an atomic ratio with reference to the manganese content of the alloy lying between 1:3 and 1:3.5 and the ratio of titanium not bound by formation of a metal oxide to the iron should be equal to or greater than 1:1 on an atomic basis, with the FeTi content of the alloy constituting 90 to 95% by weight of the alloy.

  20. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-01

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution. PMID:25553956

  1. Nepenthesin from monkey cups for hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Burns, Kyle M; Yu, Yaping; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Schriemer, David C

    2013-02-01

    Studies of protein dynamics, structure and interactions using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) have sharply increased over the past 5-10 years. The predominant technology requires fast digestion at pH 2-3 to retain deuterium label. Pepsin is used almost exclusively, but it provides relatively low efficiency under the constraints of the experiment, and a selectivity profile that renders poor coverage of intrinsically disordered regions. In this study we present nepenthesin-containing secretions of the pitcher plant Nepenthes, commonly called monkey cups, for use in HDX-MS. We show that nepenthesin is at least 1400-fold more efficient than pepsin under HDX-competent conditions, with a selectivity profile that mimics pepsin in part, but also includes efficient cleavage C-terminal to "forbidden" residues K, R, H, and P. High efficiency permits a solution-based analysis with no detectable autolysis, avoiding the complication of immobilized enzyme reactors. Relaxed selectivity promotes high coverage of disordered regions and the ability to "tune" the mass map for regions of interest. Nepenthesin-enriched secretions were applied to an analysis of protein complexes in the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair pathway. The analysis of XRCC4 binding to the BRCT domains of Ligase IV points to secondary interactions between the disordered C-terminal tail of XRCC4 and remote regions of the BRCT domains, which could only be identified with a nepenthesin-based workflow. HDX data suggest that stalk-binding to XRCC4 primes a BRCT conformation in these remote regions to support tail interaction, an event which may be phosphoregulated. We conclude that nepenthesin is an effective alternative to pepsin for all HDX-MS applications, and especially for the analysis of structural transitions among intrinsically disordered proteins and their binding partners. PMID:23197791

  2. Measurement of cross sections for the scattering of p{mu} and d{mu} atoms on hydrogen and deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.

    1995-04-01

    A brief review is given of all experiments on measurement of cross sections for the scattering of p{mu} atoms on hydrogen and for the scattering of d{mu} atoms on hydrogen or deuterium. The experimental results are analyzed and compared both with one another and with the results of calculations. In order to clarify the nature of discrepancies between the results of certain experiments and to obtain more precise information about the cross sections for the above processes, a program is proposed for further experimental investigation of the scattering of muonic atoms by hydrogen isotopes. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Decreases in deuterium pumping by St707 getter alloy caused by carbon dioxide preexposure

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    Intentional passivation of the deuterium pumping of the solid getter alloy St707 has been attempted by exposing samples of St707 to carbon dioxide at different pressures, temperatures and exposure times relevant for application to the getter modules in the ALT-I pump limiter. It was found that one of the most effective treatments examined was a 30 min, 1 Torr exposure at approximately 100 /sup 0/C. This preexposure kept the getter pumping speed less than 0.001 of its rated value for about 3 min when exposed to deuterium at 1 Torr and 30 /sup 0/C. After this ''incubation'' period, the getter speed increases to values greater than approx.1% of fully activated values. If left under high deuterium pressure, the getter eventually flakes off the substrate. Video observations of the flaking process indicate that individual particles leave the constantan getter substrate at velocities of 1 m/s. Attempts at passivating the getter using oxygen and carbon monoxide were found to be no more effective than using carbon dioxide, suggesting that there is no way to completely passivate the getter with these gases at pressures low enough for application to in situ getter arrays used in tokamaks.

  4. In situ study of erosion and deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films by exposure to a hydrogen atom beam

    SciTech Connect

    Markelj, Sabina; Pelicon, Primoz; Cadez, Iztok; Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Jacob, Wolfgang

    2012-07-15

    This paper reports on the first dual-beam experiment employing a hydrogen atom beam for sample exposure and an ion beam for analysis, enabling in situ and real-time studies of hydrogen atom interaction with materials. The erosion of an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) layer by deuterium atoms at 580 K sample temperature was studied and the uptake of deuterium during the erosion process was measured in real time. The deuterium areal density increased at the beginning to 7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} D cm{sup -2}, but then stabilized at a constant value of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} D cm{sup -2}. Formation of a polymer-like deposit on an a-C:H layer held at room temperature and subjected to the deuterium atom beam was observed and also studied in situ. For both erosion and deposition studies an a-{sup 13}C:H layer on top of an Si substrate was used as a sample, making the experiments isotopically fully specified and thereby differentiating the deposited from the original layer and the interacting D atoms from H atoms present in the layer and in the residual vacuum. From the deposition study it was shown that carbon in the deposited layer originates from carbon-carrying species in the background vacuum that interact with hydrogen atoms. The areal density of the carbon at the surface was determined from the energy shift of the Si edge in the Rutherford backscattering spectrum. The cross section for {sup 7}Li on D at 4.3 MeV Li ion energy and at a recoil angle of 30 Degree-Sign was also determined to be (236 {+-} 16) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -27} cm{sup 2}/sr. This is a factor of 3 {+-} 0.2 times higher than the Rutherford elastic cross section.

  5. First-principles study of temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients: Hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium in α-Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong; Zhang, Ping

    2013-05-01

    We report the prediction of temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients of interstitial hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium atoms in α-Ti using transition state theory. The microscopic parameters in the pre-factor and activation energy of the impurity diffusion coefficients are obtained from first-principles total energy and phonon calculations including the full coupling between the vibrational modes of the diffusing atom with the host lattice. The dual occupancy case of impurity atom in the hcp matrix is considered, and four diffusion paths are combined to obtain the final diffusion coefficients. The calculated diffusion parameters show good agreement with experiments. Our numerical results indicate that the diffusions of deuterium and tritium atoms are slower than that of the hydrogen atom at temperatures above 425 K and 390 K, respectively.

  6. Temperature and site dependence of the rate of hydrogen and deuterium abstraction by methyl radicals in methanol glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Doba, T.; Ingold, K.U.; Siebrand, W.; Wildman, T.A.

    1984-07-19

    Rate constants are reported for hydrogen and deuterium abstraction by methyl radicals in CH/sub 3/OH and CD/sub 3/OD glasses in the ranges 5-89 and 77-97 K, respectively. At each temperature, they show a distribution due to a variation of radical trapping sites. The rate constants of this distribution are analyzed theoretically to yield a quantitative relation between tunneling rate and equilibrium tunneling distance. 20 references, 2 figures.

  7. Analysis of Local Dynamics of Human Insulin and a Rapid-acting Insulin Analog by Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Shiori; Hashii, Noritaka; Hirose, Kenji; Kawasaki, Nana; Ahn, Joomi

    2013-01-01

    Human insulin, used by diabetics to regulate blood sugar, was first introduced as a recombinant therapeutic drug nearly 30 years ago. Human insulin and insulin lispro have identical primary structure, except for the transposition of two amino acids. Lispro is one of the rapid-acting insulin analogs, which has higher tendency to dissociate than human insulin. In this study, we present an analytical workflow to allow us to detect the difference in the oligomeric dynamics using Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX MS). The HDX analysis on Insulin and Lispro peptides was conducted to identify the location where different deuterium uptakes were observed between human insulin and lispro. The detected areas were illustrated in various formats to help understand their flexibility associated with rapid dissociation of insulin oligomers. Drug products, human insulin (Humulin R) and lispro (Humalog), were reduced and digested online by pepsin. Deuterium labeling, quenching, and injection to on-line pepsin digestion were prepared using a robotic sample manager. Labeling experiments in 0, 0.5, 5, 10, 60, and 180 min interval were duplicated for both samples. The peptic digests were separated on a UPLC system at 0 °C. Q-TOF MS was used to measure the deuterium incorporation of identified peptides. The amount of deuterium was determined by automated HDX data processing software, DynamX 2.0. We obtained 98% of sequence coverage for both human insulin and lispro. From peptide HDX determination, two regions were revealed distinctive different values in deuterium uptakes between human insulin and lispro; the N terminus of chain A, and a region adjacent to the C terminus of chain B. We attributed this localized behavior to the relation of hexamerization and dimerization, respectively. Furthermore, characteristic profiles that showed different deuteration margins between two insulins were determined, which was also consistent with their involvement in hexamer and dimer

  8. Pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for time-resolved membrane protein folding studies.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Anil; Pan, Yan; Brown, Leonid S; Konermann, Lars

    2012-12-01

    Kinetic folding experiments by pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) are a well-established tool for water-soluble proteins. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first that applies this approach to an integral membrane protein. The native state of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) comprises seven transmembrane helices and a covalently bound retinal cofactor. BR exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) induces partial unfolding and retinal loss. We employ a custom-built three-stage mixing device for pulsed-HDX/MS investigations of BR refolding. The reaction is triggered by mixing SDS-denatured protein with bicelles. After a variable folding time (10 ms to 24 h), the protein is exposed to excess D(2) O buffer under rapid exchange conditions. The HDX pulse is terminated by acid quenching after 24 ms. Subsequent off-line analysis is performed by size exclusion chromatography and electrospray MS. These measurements yield the number of protected backbone N-H sites as a function of folding time, reflecting the recovery of secondary structure. Our results indicate that much of the BR secondary structure is formed quite late during the reaction, on a time scale of 10 s and beyond. It is hoped that in the future it will be possible to extend the pulsed-HDX/MS approach employed here to membrane proteins other than BR. PMID:23280751

  9. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  10. Start2Fold: a database of hydrogen/deuterium exchange data on protein folding and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pancsa, Rita; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter; Vranken, Wim F.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fulfil a wide range of tasks in cells; understanding how they fold into complex three-dimensional (3D) structures and how these structures remain stable while retaining sufficient dynamics for functionality is essential for the interpretation of overall protein behaviour. Since the 1950's, solvent exchange-based methods have been the most powerful experimental means to obtain information on the folding and stability of proteins. Considerable expertise and care were required to obtain the resulting datasets, which, despite their importance and intrinsic value, have never been collected, curated and classified. Start2Fold is an openly accessible database (http://start2fold.eu) of carefully curated hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data extracted from the literature that is open for new submissions from the community. The database entries contain (i) information on the proteins investigated and the underlying experimental procedures and (ii) the classification of the residues based on their exchange protection levels, also allowing for the instant visualization of the relevant residue groups on the 3D structures of the corresponding proteins. By providing a clear hierarchical framework for the easy sharing, comparison and (re-)interpretation of HDX data, Start2Fold intends to promote a better understanding of how the protein sequence encodes folding and structure as well as the development of new computational methods predicting protein folding and stability. PMID:26582925

  11. Microscopic self-dynamics in liquid hydrogen and in its mixtures with deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Colognesi, D.; Celli, M.; Zoppi, M.; Neumann, M.

    2004-12-01

    We have measured the dynamic structure factor of liquid parahydrogen, pure and mixed with deuterium, in various thermodynamic conditions using incoherent inelastic neutron scattering. The experiments were carried out on TOSCA-II, a new time-of-flight, inverse-geometry, crystal-analyzer spectrometer. After an accurate data reduction, the high-energy parts of the neutron spectra recorded in backward scattering were studied through the modified Young and Koppel model, from which the mean kinetic energy values for a hydrogen molecule were estimated. In addition the low-energy parts of the neutron spectra recorded in forward scattering were analyzed in the framework of the Gaussian approximation and fitted through a Levesque-Verlet model for the velocity autocorrelation function. Thus various physical quantities are determined and compared with accurate path integral Monte Carlo simulations. Despite the excellent quality of these fits, the velocity autocorrelation functions derived from the forward-scattering data appear totally unable to properly describe the backward-scattering ones. These findings prove an unquestionable breakdown of the Gaussian approximation in semiquantum liquids. The present results appear of great interest and suggest further investigation on the limits of the widely used Gaussian approximation.

  12. Combining size-exclusion chromatography with differential hydrogen-deuterium exchange to study protein conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Alexey A; Helmy, Roy

    2016-01-29

    Methods for protein characterization are being actively developed based on the growing importance of protein therapies and applications. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the use of size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) in combination with differential hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) to compare protein global conformational changes at different solution conditions. Using chaotropic mobile phase additive, differential HDX was used to detect a number of solvent accessible labile protons of protein on-column at pH and temperature conditions which provided unrestricted intrinsic H/D exchange (all-or-nothing approach). Varying SEC on-column conditions allowed for protein conformational changes to be observed. Temperature and pressure were independently studied with regards to their effect on the proteins' (insulin, cytochrome C, ubiquitin, and myoglobin) conformational changes in the solution. The obtained ΔHDX profiles revealed protein conformational changes in solution under varied conditions manifested as the difference in the number of protons exchanged to deuterons, or vice-versa. The approach described in this manuscript could prove useful for protein batch-to-batch comparisons, for optimization of chemical reactions with enzyme as catalyst or for protein chemical modification reactions. PMID:26763301

  13. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  14. Automated Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Electron Transfer Dissociation High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Measured at Single-Amide Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a well established method for the measurement of solution-phase deuterium incorporation into proteins, which can provide insight into protein conformational mobility. However, most HDX measurements are constrained to regions of the protein where pepsin proteolysis allows detection at peptide resolution. Recently, single-amide resolution deuterium incorporation has been achieved by limiting gas-phase scrambling in the mass spectrometer. This was accomplished by employing a combination of soft ionization and desolvation conditions coupled with the radical-driven fragmentation technique electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Here, a hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap XL is systematically evaluated for its utility in providing single-amide deuterium incorporation for differential HDX analysis of a nuclear receptor upon binding small molecule ligands. We are able to show that instrumental parameters can be optimized to minimize scrambling and can be incorporated into an established and fully automated HDX platform making differential single-amide HDX possible for bottom-up analysis of complex systems. We have applied this system to determine differential single amide resolution HDX data for the peroxizome proliferator activated receptor bound with two ligands of interest.

  15. Carbon-13 and deuterium isotope effects on the reaction catalyzed by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Canellas, P.F.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-09-10

    Carbon-13 and deuterium isotope effects have been measured on the reaction catalyzed by rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in an effort to locate the rate-limiting steps. With D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as substrate, hydride transfer is a major, but not the only, slow step prior to release of the first product, and the intrinsic primary deuterium and {sup 13}C isotope effects on this step are 5-5.5 and 1.034-1.040, and the sum of the commitments to catalysis is {approximately} 3. The {sup 13}C isotope effects on thiohemiacetal formation and thioester phosphorolysis are 1.005 or less. With D-glyceraldehyde as substrate, the isotope effects are similar, but the sum of commitments is {approximately} 1.5, so that hydride transfer is more, but still not solely, rate limiting for this slow substrate. The observed {sup 13}C and deuterium equilibrium isotope effects on the overall reaction from the hydrated aldehyde are 0.995 and 1.145, while the {sup 13}C equilibrium isotope effect for conversion of a thiohemiacetal to a thioester is 0.994, and that for conversion of a thioester to an acyl phosphate is 0.997. Somewhat uncertain values for the {sup 13}C equilibrium isotope effects on aldehyde dehydration and formation of a thiohemiacetal are 1.003 and 1.004.

  16. A resistance measurement of the diffusion and electrotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pine, D. J.

    The diffusion coefficient D and electrotransport effective charge Z of hydrogen and deuterium were measured as a function of temperature in pure vanadium and in vanadium-titanium and vanadium-chromium alloys. The diffusion coefficient was measured using a resistance technique. Diffusion is along the length of a foil which was loaded electrolytically to a hydrogen concentration of approximately 0.5 atomic per cent. Initially the hydrogen is held at uniform concentration in essentially half the length of the foil by the effect of a DC electrotransport current of 2500 A/sq cm in the other half. After this current is removed, the diffusion of H into the empty half is monitored by its effect on the resistivity of the foil. The sensitivity to hydrogen concentration is + or - 10 ppm.

  17. A potent IκB kinase-β inhibitor labeled with carbon-14 and deuterium.

    PubMed

    Latli, Bachir; Eriksson, Magnus; Hrapchak, Matt; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2016-06-30

    3-Amino-4-(1,1-difluoro-propyl)-6-(4-methanesulfonyl-piperidin-1-yl)-thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxylic acid amide (1) is a potent IκB Kinase-β (IKK-β) inhibitor. The efficient preparations of this compound labeled with carbon-14 and deuterium are described. The carbon-14 synthesis was accomplished in six radiochemical steps in 25% overall yield. The key transformations were the modified Guareschi-Thorpe condensation of 2-cyano-(14) C-acetamide and a keto-ester followed by chlorination to 2,6-dichloropyridine derivative in one pot. The isolated dichloropyridine was then converted in three steps in one pot to [(14) C]-(1). The carbon-14 labeled (1) was isolated with a specific activity of 54.3 mCi/mmol and radiochemical purity of 99.8%. The deuterium labeled (1) was obtained in eight steps and in 57% overall chemical yield using 4-hydroxypiperidine-2,2,3,3,4,5,5,6,6-(2) H9 . The final three steps of this synthesis were run in one pot. PMID:27073120

  18. 2D IR Cross Peaks Reveal Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange with Single Residue Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Woys, Ann Marie; Zanni, Martin T.

    2013-01-01

    A form of chemical exchange, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), has long been used as a method for studying the secondary and tertiary structure of peptides and proteins using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using 2D IR (two dimensional infrared) spectroscopy, we resolve cross peaks between the amide II band and a 13C18O isotope labeled amide I band, which we show measures HDX with site-specific resolution. By rapidly scanning 2D IR spectra using mid-IR pulse shaping, we monitor the kinetics of HDX exchange on-the-fly. For the antimicrobial peptide, ovispirin, bound to membrane bilayers, we find that the amide II peak decays with a biexponential with rate constants of 0.54 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 min−1, which is a measure of the overall HDX in the peptide. The cross peaks between Ile-10 labeled ovispirin and the amide II mode, which specifically monitor HDX kinetics at Ile-10, decay with a single rate constant of 0.36 ± 0.1 min−1. Comparing this exchange rate to theoretically determined exchange rates of Ile-10 for ovispirin in a solution random coil configuration, the exchange rate at Ile-10 is at least 100 times slower, consistent with the known α-helix structure of ovispirin in bilayers. Because backbone isotope labels produce only a very small shift of the amide II band, site-specific HDX cannot be measured with FTIR spectroscopy, which is why 2D IR spectroscopy is needed for these measurements. PMID:23659731

  19. Gas phase recombination of hydrogen and deuterium atoms. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, D. W.; Ham, D. O.; Kaufman, F.

    1973-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction H + H + M - H2 + M, with M = H2, He, and Ar were measured over the temperature range 77 to 298 K. Hydrogen atoms were produced by thermal dissociation and absolute atom concentrations were measured through use of self-balancing, isothermal catalytic probe detector. The specific rate constants were 8.1 + or - 0.4 x 10 to the minus 33rd power, 7.0 + or - 0.4 x 10 to the minus 33rd power, and 9.2 + or - 0.6 x at 298 K for M = H2, He, and Ar respectively; these values rising to 18.5 + or - 2.2 x 10 to the minus 33rd power, 12.0 + or - 1.5 x 10 to the minus 33rd power, and 27.4 + or - 4.6 x 10 to the minus 33rd power cm to the 6th power/molecules sq/sec at 77 K. for the equivalent deuterium atom process with D2 as the third body, the rate constants are 6.1 + or - 0.3 x 10 to the minus 33rd power cm to the 6th power/molecules sq/sec at 298 K and 15.1 + or - 1.0 x 10 to the minus 33rd power cm to the 6th power/molecules sq/sec at 77 K. These values are compared with previous experimental measurements and with recent theoretical calculations.

  20. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies of the rat thyroid transcription factor 1 homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Esposito, G; Fogolari, F; Damante, G; Formisano, S; Tell, G; Leonardi, A; Di Lauro, R; Viglino, P

    1997-06-01

    The 1H NMR solution structure of the rat thyroid transcription factor 1 homeodomain (TTF-1 HD) showed that the molecule folds like classical homeodomains. The C-terminal extension of helix III (fragment 51-59) appeared to adopt a helical geometry, albeit not as rigid as the preceding portion, but the hydrogen-deuterium exchange of backbone amides and the NOE data provided evidence of a discontinuity between the two moieties of helix III at the highly conserved fragment Asn51-His52-Arg53. Analysis of quantitative measurements of isotope exchange rates allows one to recognize the general occurrence, in that region of HD motifs, of opposite effects to helix III stability. Asparagine, histidine and arginine residues occur most frequently at the beginning and end of protein helices. In TTF-1 HD a local fluctuation is observed in the fragment 51-53 which either kinks or tightens the alpha-helix. A search through the protein structure database reveals that the three most common variants of HD fragments 51-53 are often involved in helices and, frequently, in helix initiation or termination. For homeodomains in general, the nature of the fragment 51-53 may be related to the conformational dynamics of their DNA-recognition helix (helix III). Besides the specific results on fragment 51-53, the complete isotope exchange analysis of TTF-1 HD data shows that the partially solvent-exposed recognition helix is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, like most of the structured regions of the molecule. Hydrophobic stabilization of the contacting regions meets the requirements of a DNA-interaction mechanism which, as shown with other DNA-protein complexes, should entail negative heat capacity variations due to changes in solvent exposure of the nonpolar protein surface. PMID:9255944

  1. Theoretical modeling of infrared spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bond in aspirin crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalla, Houcine; Rekik, Najeh; Michta, Anna; Oujia, Brahim; Flakus, Henryk T.

    2010-01-01

    An extended quantum theoretical approach of the ν IR lineshape of cyclic dimers of weakly H-bonded species is proposed. We have extended a previous approach [M.E.-A. Benmalti, P. Blaise, H.T. Flakus, O. Henri-Rousseau, Chem. Phys. 320 (2006) 267] by accounting for the anharmonicity of the slow mode which is described by a "Morse" potential in order to reproduce the polarized infrared spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bond in acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) crystals. From comparison of polarized IR spectra of isotopically neat and isotopically diluted aspirin crystals it resulted that centrosymmetric aspirin dimer was the bearer of the crystal main spectral properties. In this approach, the adiabatic approximation is performed for each separate H-bond bridge of the dimer and a strong non-adiabatic correction is introduced into the model via the resonant exchange between the fast mode excited states of the two moieties. Within the strong anharmonic coupling theory, according to which the X-H→⋯Y high-frequency mode is anharmonically coupled to the H-bond bridge, this model incorporated the Davydov coupling between the excited states of the two moieties, the quantum direct and indirect dampings and the anharmonicity for the H-bond bridge. The spectral density is obtained within the linear response theory by Fourier transform of the damped autocorrelation functions. The evaluated spectra are in fairly good agreement with the experimental ones by using a minimum number of independent parameters. The effect of deuteration has been well reproduced by reducing simply the angular frequency of the fast mode and the anharmonic coupling parameter.

  2. Methods for the Analysis of High Precision Differential Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Data

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Michael J.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Willis, Scooter; Zhang, Jun; Iturria, Stephen J.; Dodge, Jeffery A.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry has been widely applied to the characterization of protein dynamics. More recently, differential HDX has been shown to be effective for the characterization of ligand binding. Previously we have described a fully automated HDX system for use as a ligand screening platform. Here we describe and validate the required data analysis workflow to facilitate the use of HDX as a robust approach for ligand screening. Following acquisition of HDX data at a single on-exchange time point (n ≥ 3), one way analysis of variance in conjunction with the Tukey multiple comparison procedure is used to establish the significance of any measured difference. Analysis results are graphed with respect to a single peptide, ligand or group of ligands, or displayed as an overview within a heat map. For the heat map display, only Δ%D values with a Tukey-adjusted P value less than 0.05 are colored. Hierarchical clustering is used to bin compounds with highly similar HDX signatures. The workflow is evaluated with a small data set showing the ligand binding domain (LDB) of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) screened against 10 functionally selective ligands. More significantly, data for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in complex with 87 ligands are presented. To highlight the robustness and precision of our automated HDX platform we analyzed the data from 4191 replicate HDX measurements acquired over an eight month timeframe. Ninety six percent of these measurements were within 10 percent of the mean value. Work has begun to integrate these analysis and graphing components within our HDX software suite. PMID:21528013

  3. Operation of a cw rf driven ion source with hydrogen and deuterium gas{sup a}

    SciTech Connect

    Melnychuk, S.T.; Debiak, T.W.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1996-04-01

    We will describe the operation of a cw rf driven multicusp ion source designed for extraction of high current hydrogen and deuterium beams. The source is driven at 2 MHz by a 2.5 turn induction antenna immersed in the plasma. Bare stainless-steel and porcelain-coated Cu antennas have been used. The plasma load is matched to the rf generator by a variable tap {ital N}:1 transformer isolated to 46 kV, and an LC network on the secondary. With H{sub 2} gas the source can be operated at pressures between 5 and 60 mT with power reflection coefficients {lt}0.01. The extracted ion current density with a porcelain-coated antenna is approximately given by 35 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW with an 80 G dipole filter field for input powers from 3.5 to 6.6 kW. The current density remained constant for operation with a 6 and an 8 mm aperture. The source has been operated for 260 h at 3.6 kW with a single-porcelain-coated antenna. Mass spectrometer measurements of the extracted beam at this power show a species mix for H{sup +}:H{sup +}{sub 2}:H{sup +}{sub 3}:OH{sup +} of 0.49: 0.04: 0.42: 0.04. The calculated beam divergence using the IGUN code is compared with the measured divergence from an electrostatic sweep emittance scanner designed for high-power cw beam diagnostics. Phase space measurements at 40 kV and 23 mA beam current result in a normalized rms emittance of 0.09 {pi}mmmrad. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange (DMS-HDX) as a Probe of Protein Conformation in Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaolong; Campbell, J Larry; Chernushevich, Igor; Le Blanc, J C Yves; Wilson, Derek J

    2016-06-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is an ion mobility technique that has been adopted chiefly as a pre-filter for small- to medium-sized analytes (<1 000 Da). With the exception of a handful of studies that employ an analogue of DMS-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS)-the application of DMS to intact biomacromolecules remains largely unexplored. In this work, we employ DMS combined with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (DMS-HDX) to probe the gas-phase conformations generated from proteins that were initially folded, partially-folded, and unfolded in solution. Our findings indicate that proteins with distinct structural features in solution exhibit unique deuterium uptake profiles as function of their optimal transmission through the DMS. Ultimately we propose that DMS-HDX can, if properly implemented, provide rapid measurements of liquid-phase protein structural stability that could be of use in biopharmaceuticals development. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26965162

  5. Screen-printed digital microfluidics combined with surface acoustic wave nebulization for hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Monkkonen, Lucas; Edgar, J Scott; Winters, Daniel; Heron, Scott R; Mackay, C Logan; Masselon, Christophe D; Stokes, Adam A; Langridge-Smith, Patrick R R; Goodlett, David R

    2016-03-25

    An inexpensive digital microfluidic (DMF) chip was fabricated by screen-printing electrodes on a sheet of polyimide. This device was manually integrated with surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) MS to conduct hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) of peptides. The HDX experiment was performed by DMF mixing of one aqueous droplet of angiotensin II with a second containing various concentrations of D2O. Subsequently, the degree of HDX was measured immediately by SAWN-MS. As expected for a small peptide, the isotopically resolved mass spectrum for angiotensin revealed that maximum deuterium exchange was achieved using 50% D2O. Additionally, using SAWN-MS alone, the global HDX kinetics of ubiquitin were found to be similar to published NMR data and back exchange rates for the uncooled apparatus using high inlet capillary temperatures was less than 6%. PMID:26826755

  6. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange (DMS-HDX) as a Probe of Protein Conformation in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaolong; Campbell, J. Larry; Chernushevich, Igor; Le Blanc, J. C. Yves; Wilson, Derek J.

    2016-06-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is an ion mobility technique that has been adopted chiefly as a pre-filter for small- to medium-sized analytes (<1 000 Da). With the exception of a handful of studies that employ an analogue of DMS—field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS)—the application of DMS to intact biomacromolecules remains largely unexplored. In this work, we employ DMS combined with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (DMS-HDX) to probe the gas-phase conformations generated from proteins that were initially folded, partially-folded, and unfolded in solution. Our findings indicate that proteins with distinct structural features in solution exhibit unique deuterium uptake profiles as function of their optimal transmission through the DMS. Ultimately we propose that DMS-HDX can, if properly implemented, provide rapid measurements of liquid-phase protein structural stability that could be of use in biopharmaceuticals development.

  7. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange (DMS-HDX) as a Probe of Protein Conformation in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaolong; Campbell, J. Larry; Chernushevich, Igor; Le Blanc, J. C. Yves; Wilson, Derek J.

    2016-03-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is an ion mobility technique that has been adopted chiefly as a pre-filter for small- to medium-sized analytes (<1 000 Da). With the exception of a handful of studies that employ an analogue of DMS—field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS)—the application of DMS to intact biomacromolecules remains largely unexplored. In this work, we employ DMS combined with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (DMS-HDX) to probe the gas-phase conformations generated from proteins that were initially folded, partially-folded, and unfolded in solution. Our findings indicate that proteins with distinct structural features in solution exhibit unique deuterium uptake profiles as function of their optimal transmission through the DMS. Ultimately we propose that DMS-HDX can, if properly implemented, provide rapid measurements of liquid-phase protein structural stability that could be of use in biopharmaceuticals development.

  8. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of aromatic amines and amides using deuterated trifluoroacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Richard; Lee, Amy; Jung, Erica; Kang, Aaron; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    The H-D exchange of aromatic amines and amides, including pharmaceutically relevant compounds such as acetaminophen and diclofenac, was investigated using CF3COOD as both the sole reaction solvent and source of deuterium label. The described method is amenable to efficient deuterium incorporation for a wide variety of substrates possessing both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents. Best results were seen with less basic anilines and highly activated acetanilides, reflecting the likelihood of different mechanistic pathways. PMID:25641994

  9. Impact of temperature during He+ implantation on deuterium retention in tungsten, tungsten with carbon deposit and tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Sato, Misaki; Li, Xiaochun; Yuyama, Kenta; Fujita, Hiroe; Sakurada, Shodai; Uemura, Yuki; Hatano, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoaki; Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio; Chikada, Takumi

    2016-02-01

    Temperature dependence on deuterium (D) retention for He+ implanted tungsten (W) was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) to evaluate the tritium retention behavior in W. The activation energies were evaluated using Hydrogen Isotope Diffusion and Trapping (HIDT) simulation code and found to be 0.55 eV, 0.65 eV, 0.80 eV and 1.00 eV. The heating scenarios clearly control the D retention behavior and, dense and large He bubbles could work as a D diffusion barrier toward the bulk, leading to D retention enhancement at lower temperature of less than 430 K, even if the damage was introduced by He+ implantation. By comparing the D retention for W, W with carbon deposit and tungsten carbide (WC), the dense carbon layer on the surface enhances the dynamic re-emission of D as hydrocarbons, and induces the reduction of D retention. However, by He+ implantation, the D retention was increased for all the samples.

  10. Deuterium dynamics in the icosahedral and amorphous phases of the Ti40Zr40Ni20 hydrogen-absorbing alloy studied by 2H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradišek, A.; Kocjan, A.; McGuiness, P. J.; Apih, T.; Kim, Hae Jin; Dolinšek, J.

    2008-11-01

    The Ti40Zr40Ni20 hydrogen-absorbing alloy was prepared in the icosahedral and amorphous phases by controlling the rotation speed of the melt-spinning method of sample preparation, and the deuterium dynamics was investigated by 2H NMR dynamic lineshape and spin-lattice relaxation. The results were analysed by the lineshape and relaxation models that assume deuterium thermally activated hopping within a manifold of different chemical environments. The observed 8% larger activation energy for the deuterium hopping over the interstitial sites and the 10% larger static spectrum width of the amorphous phase, as compared to the icosahedral phase, can be accounted for by the larger deuterium content of the investigated amorphous sample. From the deuterium dynamics point of view, the icosahedral phase is not special with respect to the amorphous modification of the same material.

  11. Disiloxane Synthesis Based on Silicon-Hydrogen Bond Activation using Gold and Platinum on Carbon in Water or Heavy Water.

    PubMed

    Sawama, Yoshinari; Masuda, Masahiro; Yasukawa, Naoki; Nakatani, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Shumma; Shibata, Kyoshiro; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Monguchi, Yasunari; Suzuka, Hiroyasu; Takagi, Yukio; Sajiki, Hironao

    2016-05-20

    Disiloxanes possessing a silicon-oxygen linkage are important as frameworks for functional materials and coupling partners for Hiyama-type cross coupling. We found that disiloxanes were effectively constructed of hydrosilanes catalyzed by gold on carbon in water as the solvent and oxidant in association with the emission of hydrogen gas at room temperature. The present oxidation could proceed via various reaction pathways, such as the hydration of hydrosilane into silanol, dehydrogenative coupling of hydrosilane into disilane, and the subsequent corresponding reactions to disiloxane. Additionally, the platinum on carbon catalyzed hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction of arylhydrosilanes as substrates in heavy water proceeded on the aromatic nuclei at 80 °C with high deuterium efficiency and high regioselectivity at the only meta and para positions of the aromatic-silicon bond to give the deuterium-labeled disiloxanes. PMID:27129497

  12. Variability of Deuterium Fractionation Associated With Soil Uptake of Atmospheric Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, T.; Randerson, J. T.; Eiler, J.

    2005-12-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is the second most abundant reduced gas in the atmosphere (after methane) with a globally averaged mixing ratio of ~530 nmol/mol. Its largest sources are photochemical oxidation of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons with other recognized sources that include biomass burning, fossil fuel burning, nitrogen fixation, and ocean degassing. These sources are balanced by reaction of H2 with hydroxyl radicals (~25%) in the atmosphere and by deposition at the terrestrial soil surface (~75%). As with other atmospheric trace gases, the stable isotopic content of H2 has the potential to help quantify the various aspects of its production and destruction. The average deuterium content of H2 is dDH2 = ~130 ‰ relative to Standard Mean Ocean Water. While recent studies have begun to elucidate the deuterium content of the individual sources of H2 and the fractionation associated with hydroxyl oxidation has been well established in the laboratory, there are still few data documenting the fractionation associated with soil uptake. We measured the fractionation associated with soil uptake in May, June and August of 2002 in three upland ecosystems that were part of an Alaskan fire chronosequence. Fire occurred at these sites in 1999, 1987, and ~1920. Grasses and herbaceous vegetation establish initially after fire and are gradually replaced by deciduous trees and finally by evergreen trees and moss. All three sites were in interior Alaska near the town of Delta Junction (63° 54'N, 145° 40'W). Fluxes were measured with a Plexiglas flux chamber (8 liter volume) with a manifold of four ~400 ml double-valved glass flasks in parallel and a diaphragm pump for circulation (5 SLPM). Flasks were continuously flushed by the circulating system and isolated sequentially; they were then returned to the laboratory at Caltech for subsequent analysis. In the field, the chamber was seated on Plexiglas collars that were installed prior to initiating the study and left in

  13. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of bacterial methane in a shallow freshwater lake

    SciTech Connect

    Woltemate, I.; Whiticar, M.J.; Schoell, M.

    1984-09-01

    Anoxic sediments from freshwater environments such as bogs, swamps, and lakes undergoing early diagenesis are frequently characterized by the formation of biogenic methane. Freshwater biogenic methanes exhibit carbon and hydrogen isotopic values strongly depleted in C-13 and deuterium relative to the respective values for carbon dioxide and formation water. The percentages of methane generated by fermentation and carbon dioxide reduction can be estimated by comparison of hydrogen isotopes in the formation water and methane. On the basis of these hydrogen isotope data, about 75% of the methane formation in Wurmsee comes from acetate reduction. Fermentation is thus the dominant although not exclusive process. Carbon dioxide reduction contributed the balance of the bacterial methane generated. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  14. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. PMID:16852056

  15. Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry to Study Conformational Changes in Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor upon PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hui; Ahn, Joomi; Yu, Ying Qing; Tymiak, Adrienne; Engen, John R.; Chen, Guodong

    2012-01-01

    PEGylation is the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol to proteins, and it can be used to alter immunogenicity, circulating half life and other properties of therapeutic proteins. To determine the impact of PEGylation on protein conformation, we applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) to analyze Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) upon PEGylation as a model system. The combined use of HDX automation technology and data analysis software allowed reproducible and robust measurements of the deuterium incorporation levels for peptic peptides of both PEGylated and non-PEGylated G-CSF. The results indicated that significant differences in deuterium incorporation were induced by PEGylation of G-CSF, although the overall changes observed were quite small. PEGylation did not result in gross conformational rearrangement of G-CSF. The data complexity often encountered in HDX MS measurements was greatly reduced though a data processing and presentation format designed to facilitate the comparison process. This study demonstrates the practical utility of HDX MS for comparability studies, process monitoring and protein therapeutic characterization in the biopharmaceutical industry. PMID:22227798

  16. Exclusive Photoproduction of Charged Pions in Hydrogen and Deuterium from 1 to 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lingyan Zhu

    2004-02-28

    The study of the transition region in the description of exclusive processes and hadron structure, from the nucleon-meson degrees of freedom in meson-exchange models at low energy to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom in pQCD at high energy, is essential for us to understand the strong interaction. The differential cross section measurements for exclusive reactions at fixed center-of-mass angles enable us to investigate the constituent counting rule, which explicitly connects the quark-gluon degrees of freedom to the energy dependence of differential cross sections. JLab Experiment E94-104 was carried out in Hall A with two high resolution spectrometers. It included the coincidence cross section measurement for the [gamma]n --> pi{sup -}[p] process with a deuterium target and the singles measurement for the [gamma]p --> pi{sup +}[n] process with a hydrogen target. The untagged real photons were generated by the electron beam impinging on a copper radiator. The photon energies ranged from 1.1 to 5.5 GeV, corresponding to the center-of-mass energies from 1.7 to 3.4 GeV. The pion center-of-mass angles were fixed at 50 deg, 70 deg, 90 deg, and also 100 deg, 110 deg at a few energies. The JLab E94-104 data presented in this thesis contain four interesting features. The data exhibit a global scaling behavior for both [pi]{sup -} and [pi]{sup +} photoproduction at high energies and high transverse momenta, consistent with the constituent counting rule and the existing [pi]{sup +} photoproduction data. This implies that the quark-gluon degrees of freedom start to play a role at this energy scale. The data suggests possible substructure of the scaling behavior, which might be oscillations around the scaling value. There are several possible mechanisms that can cause oscillations, for example the one associated with the generalized constituent counting rule involving quark orbital angular momentum. The data show an enhancement in the scaled cross section at center

  17. Hydrogen attack - Influence of hydrogen sulfide. [on carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliezer, D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted on 12.5-mm-thick SAE 1020 steel (plain carbon steel) plate to assess hydrogen attack at room temperature after specimen exposure at 525 C to hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m for exposure times up to 240 hr. The results are discussed in terms of tensile properties, fissure formation, and surface scales. It is shown that hydrogen attack from a high-purity hydrogen environment is severe, with the formation of numerous methane fissures and bubbles along with a significant reduction in the room-temperature tensile yield and ultimate strengths. However, no hydrogen attack is observed in the hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide blend environment, i.e. no fissure or bubble formation occurred and the room-temperature tensile properties remained unchanged. It is suggested that the observed porous discontinuous scale of FeS acts as a barrier to hydrogen entry, thus reducing its effective equilibrium solubility in the iron lattice. Therefore, hydrogen attack should not occur in pressure-vessel steels used in many coal gasification processes.

  18. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F.

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  19. Investigation of the gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of aromatic dicarboxylic acids in a quadrupole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2007-11-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions of four deprotonated aromatic dicarboxylic acids (phthalic acid, isophthalic acid, terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid) with D2O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Experimental results showed significant differences in the rate and extent of exchange when the relative position of the carboxylic acid groups varied. Spontaneous and near complete exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom occurred when the carboxylic acid groups were in the meta-position, whereas no additional exchange was observed for either the ortho- or para-isomers or for the structurally similar naphthalic acid. Computational investigations support the participation of several possible exchange mechanisms with the contribution of each relying heavily on the relative orientation of the acid moieties. A relay mechanism that bridges the deprotonation site and the labile hydrogen site appears to be responsible for the H/D exchange of not only the labile hydrogen atom of isophthalic acid, but also for the formation of a stable carbanion and corresponding subsequent exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom. The impact of hydrogen bonding on the relay mechanism is demonstrated by the reaction of phthalic acid as the extent and rate of reaction are greatly retarded by the favorable interaction of the two carboxylic acid groups. Finally, a flip-flop mechanism is likely responsible for the exchange of both terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid where the reactive sites are too remote for exchange via relay.

  20. Some implications of a new value for the primordial solar deuterium-hydrogen ratio.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Some astrophysical implications of a primordial solar D/H ratio of 0.000015 are investigated. Perhaps the most interesting aspects of the D/H ratio concern galactic evolution and cosmology. It is shown that the initial galactic abundance of deuterium exceeds by at least a factor of 30 the abundance expected from known galactic production mechanisms. If a Friedmann cosmology is a correct description of the universe, it must be an open one unless some as yet unknown mechanism is invo ked to produce deuterium and He-3.

  1. Desorption of hydrogen trapped in carbon and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumi, H.; Takemura, Y.; Miyabe, T.; Konishi, T.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2013-11-01

    Thermal desorption behavior of deuterium (D2) from isotropic graphites and a carbon fiber carbon composite (CFC) charged with D2 gas has been investigated to obtain information concerning hydrogen recycling and tritium inventory in fusion experimental devices as well as a futuristic fusion reactor. After thermal desorption experiments were conducted at temperatures up to 1740 K, a desorption peak at approximately 1600 K (peak 4) was discovered. This is in addition to the previously known peak at approximately 1300 K (peak 3). Peak 3 can be attributed to the release of deuterium controlled by the diffusion process in a graphite filler grain and peak 4 can be attributed to the detrapping of deuterium released from an interstitial cluster loop edge site. Activation energies of peaks 3 and 4 are estimated to be 3.48 and 6.93 eV, respectively. TDS spectra of D2 from graphite and CFCs had previously not been thoroughly investigated. A desorption peak at approximately 1600 K was discovered in the TDS spectra for all samples heated with a linear ramp rate of 0.1 K/s. For an isotropic graphite, ISO-880U, four desorption peaks were recognized in the TDS spectra at approximately 660 K, 900 K, 1300 K, and 1600 K. These peaks were named as peaks 1, 2, 3, and 4 in order of increasing temperature. Major desorption peaks (i.e., peaks 3 and 4) were analyzed and discussed in detail. The temperature of peak 3 was dependent on the size of a graphite filler grain. The desorption process is suggested to be controlled by deuterium diffusion within the filler grain with a strong influence of trapping sites, where the migration takes place as a sequence of detrapping and retrapping. The desorption for peak 4 can be ascribed to the detrapping reaction from an interstitial cluster loop edge site. Activation energies were estimated from the peak shift by varying the heating rate of TDS to be 3.48 and 6.93 eV for peaks 3 and 4, respectively. Theoretical desorption curves for peaks 3 and 4 with

  2. Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-02

    An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

  3. Nanoengineered Carbon Scaffolds for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, A. D.; Hudson, J. L.; Fan, H.; Booker, R.; Simpson, L. J.; O'Neill, K. J.; Parilla, P. A.; Heben, M. J.; Pasquali, M.; Kittrell, C.; Tour, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) fibers were engineered to become a scaffold for the storage of hydrogen. Carbon nanotube fibers were swollen in oleum (fuming sulfuric acid), and organic spacer groups were covalently linked between the nanotubes using diazonium functionalization chemistry to provide 3-dimensional (3-D) frameworks for the adsorption of hydrogen molecules. These 3-D nanoengineered fibers physisorb twice as much hydrogen per unit surface area as do typical macroporous carbon materials. These fiber-based systems can have high density, and combined with the outstanding thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes, this points a way toward solving the volumetric and heat-transfer constraints that limit some other hydrogen-storage supports.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of compounds containing both hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespi, H. L.; Harkness, L.; Katz, J. J.; Norman, G.; Saur, W.

    1969-01-01

    Method allows qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of partially deuterated compounds. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy determines location and amount of deuterium in organic compounds but not fully deuterated compounds. Mass spectroscopy can detect fully deuterated species but not the location.

  5. Irradiated interplanetary dust particles as a possible solution for the deuterium/hydrogen paradox of Earth's oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Kasting, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    Determining the source of Earth's oceans is a longstanding problem in planetary science. Possible sources of water include water ice or water of hydration of silicate minerals in the original material from which the bulk Earth accreted and water brought in by late-arriving planetesimals during the heavy bombardment period (4.5-3.8 Gyr ago) [Chyba, 1989, 1991]. Comets are an attractive source of water because their origin in the outer solar system is consistent with the long timescale for heavy bombardment. However, the high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio of the three comets that have been studied, Halley, Hyakutake, and Hale-Bopp, indicates that Earth must have had a source with a low-D/H ratio as well. Here we suggest that solar wind-implanted hydrogen on interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) provided the necessary low-D/H component of Earth's water inventory.

  6. Glass-type hydrogen and deuterium absorption cells developed for D/H ratio measurements in the Martian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, T D; Okano, S; Abe, T; Fukunishi, H; Ito, K

    1997-04-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium absorption cells of a new glass type have been developed for the D/H ratio measurements on the Japanese Mars mission PLANET-B. The H/D cells work as narrow-band rejection filters for the H/D Lyman-alpha line, respectively, when the H or D atoms are produced at a heated filament inside the cells. The absorption profiles of the cells were successfully measured with a high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer with a wavelength resolution of 6.6 x 10(-4) nm. The derived optical thickness was found to be ~7 and ~14 for the hydrogen and deuterium cells, respectively. It was also found that the derived temperature of atomic gas ranges between the temperature of the cell wall and that of the heated filament, and it increases with increasing filament temperature. The measured profiles showed that the absorption efficiencies of the developed absorption cells are sufficient to observe the D/H ratios of the Martian atmosphere. PMID:18253198

  7. Synthesis of carbon-14 and deuterium labeled N-nitroso-2 (3',7'-dimethyl-2',6'-octadienyl) aminoethanols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Idelson, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of preparation of carbon-14 and deuterium labeled N-nitroso-2(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl) aminoethanols are described. The primary synthetic method involved alkylation of ethanolamine or ethylglycine with suitable chlorides and subsequent mild nitrosation. Isomeric 14C-nitrosamines were also prepared by selective -cleavage of the di-substituted ethanolamine with nitrous acid.

  8. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  9. Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

  10. The effect of isotopic substitution of deuterium for hydrogen on the morphology of products precipitated from synthetic Bayer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, J. S. C.; Watling, H. R.; Parkinson, G. M.

    2002-04-01

    In the production of alumina (Al 2O 3), the precipitation of gibbsite (Al(OH) 3) is the slowest step in the Bayer process. Gibbsite growth rates are generally in the vicinity of microns per hour. Thus, research is focussed on increasing productivity (gibbsite precipitation rates) without compromising product quality. Fundamental to this is an improved understanding of gibbsite growth mechanisms. Isotopic substitution of deuterium for hydrogen in synthetic Bayer (sodium aluminate) solutions was used primarily to investigate deprotonation and reprotonation of the surface hydroxyl groups. Gibbsite precipitates in a highly alkaline solution. The hydroxyl groups situated on the surfaces of the growing crystals are likely to be deprotonated because the pH of the Bayer liquor is >14 and the pK a for the surface protons is in the range of 9-10. The rate of gibbsite growth may therefore depend on the deprotonation and reprotonation of the hydroxyl groups, as the gibbsite crystal lattice consists of hydrogen bonded layers of Al(OH) 3. However, the gibbsite precipitation rates from equivalent sodium aluminate solutions (NaAl(OH) 3 and NaAl(OD) 3) were very similar, indicating that the deprotonation and reprotonation of the hydroxyl groups are not rate-limiting. Nonetheless, the isotopic substitution of deuterium for hydrogen in synthetic Bayer solutions did have effects on the gibbsite solubility, crystallization growth process, product phase and morphology. This paper focuses on the changes in product morphology. Isotopic substitution resulted in changes in the orientation of nuclei formed on seed surfaces as well as the nuclei morphology. This is the first time that isotopic substitution has been used to investigate gibbsite precipitation in synthetic Bayer solutions.

  11. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Scott; Bridgewater, Jon S; Ward, John W; Allen, Thomas H

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen is exothermically absorbed in many transition metals, all rare earths and the actinides. The hydrogen gas adsorbs, dissociates and diffuses into these metals as atomic hydrogen. Absorbed hydrogen is generally detrimental to Pu, altering its properties and greatly enhancing corrosion. Measuring the heat of solution of hydrogen in Pu and its alloys provides significant insight into the thermodynamics driving these changes. Hydrogen is present in all Pu metal unless great care is taken to avoid it. Heats of solution and formation are provided along with evidence for spinodal decomposition.

  12. Gas chromatography flow rates for determining deuterium/hydrogen ratios of natural gas by gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wanglu; Peng, Ping'an; Liu, Jinzhong

    2008-08-01

    The effects of the gas chromatography flow rate on the determination of the deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios of natural gas utilising gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/TC/IRMS) have been evaluated. In general, the measured deltaD values of methane, ethane and propane decrease with increase in column flow rate. When the column flow rate is 1 mL/min or higher, which is commonly used for the determination of D/H ratios of natural gas, the organic H in gas compounds may not be completely converted into hydrogen gas. Based on the results of experiments conducted on a GC column with an i.d. of 0.32 mm, a GC flow rate of 0.6 mL/min is proposed for determining the D/H ratios of natural gas by GC/TC/IRMS. Although this value may be dependent on the instrument conditions used in this work, we believe that correct deltaD values of organic compounds with a few carbon atoms are obtained only when relatively low GC flow rates are used for D/H analysis by GC/TC/IRMS. Moreover, as the presence of trace water could significantly affect the determination of D/H ratios, a newly designed inlet liner was used to remove trace water contained in some gas samples. PMID:18636428

  13. Peptide-Column Interactions and Their Influence on Back Exchange Rates in Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheff, Joey G.; Rey, Martial; Schriemer, David C.

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) methods generate useful information on protein structure and dynamics, ideally at the individual residue level. Most MS-based HDX methods involve a rapid proteolytic digestion followed by LC/MS analysis, with exchange kinetics monitored at the peptide level. Localizing specific sites of HDX is usually restricted to a resolution the size of the host peptide because gas-phase processes can scramble deuterium throughout the peptide. Subtractive methods may improve resolution, where deuterium levels of overlapping and nested peptides are used in a subtractive manner to localize exchange to smaller segments. In this study, we explore the underlying assumption of the subtractive method, namely, that the measured back exchange kinetics of a given residue is independent of its host peptide. Using a series of deuterated peptides, we show that secondary structure can be partially retained under quenched conditions, and that interactions between peptides and reversed-phase LC columns may both accelerate and decelerate residue HDX, depending upon peptide sequence and length. Secondary structure is induced through column interactions in peptides with a solution-phase propensity for structure, which has the effect of slowing HDX rates relative to predicted random coil values. Conversely, column interactions can orient random-coil peptide conformers to accelerate HDX, the degree to which correlates with peptide charge in solution, and which can be reversed by using stronger ion pairing reagents. The dependency of these effects on sequence and length suggest that subtractive methods for improving structural resolution in HDX-MS will not offer a straightforward solution for increasing exchange site resolution.

  14. Hydrogenation vs. H-D isotope scrambling during the conversion of ethylene with hydrogen/deuterium catalyzed by platinum under single-collision conditions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yujung; Ebrahimi, Maryam; Tillekaratne, Aashani; Simonovis, Juan Pablo; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-07-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of olefins promoted by transition metals, represented here by the conversion of ethylene with platinum, was studied under a unique regime representing pressures in the mTorr range and single-collision conditions. Isotope labeling was used to follow the concurrent H-D exchange steps that occur during this conversion. Multiple isotope substitutions were observed in the resulting ethane products, reflecting the operability of the reversible stepwise mechanism proposed a long time ago by Horiuti and Polanyi. In fact, the ethane isotopologue distributions obtained in these experiments reflect a much higher probability for the dehydrogenation of ethyl intermediates back to the olefin, relative to the hydrogenation to ethane, than typically seen in this catalysis. In addition, a second mechanistic pathway was clearly identified, responsible for most of the dideuteroethane produced. Based on the dependence of the rates of formation of each isotopologue on the fluxes of deuterium and ethylene, it is argued that this second route may be a "reverse" Eley-Rideal step between gas-phase ethylene and two deuterium atoms adsorbed on adjacent sites of the platinum surface. The clear identification of this second pathway is new, and was possible thanks to our ability to explore a new single-collision intermediate pressure regime. PMID:27373226

  15. Incorporation of hydrogen atoms from deuterated water and stereospecifically deuterium-labeled nicotin amide nucleotides into fatty acids with the Escherichia coli fatty acid synthetase system.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Kawaguchi, A; Okuda, S; Seyama, Y; Yamakawa, T

    1980-05-28

    The mechanism of hydrogen incorporation into fatty acids was investigated with intact Escherichia coli cells, a crude enzyme preparation and purified reductases of fatty acid synthetase system. The distributions of deuterium atoms incorporated into fatty acids from 2H2O and stereospecifically deuterium-labeled NADPH or NADH were determined by mass spectrometry. When E. coli was grown in 2H2O, almost every hydrogen atom of cellular fatty acids was incorporated from the medium. When fatty acids were synthesized from acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and NADPH in the presence of a crude enzyme preparation of either E. coli or Bacillus subtilis, almost every hydrogen atom was also incorporated from the medium. In contrast to these results, purified beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier reductase directly transferred the HB hydrogen of NADPH to beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein, and purified enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase also transferred the HB hydrogen of NADPH and NADH directly to enoyl acyl carrier protein. In the crude enzyme preparation of E. coli, we found high activities which exchanged the HB hydrogen of NADPH with the deuterium of 2h2o. the conflicting results of the origin of hydrogen atoms of fatty acids mentioned above are explained by the presence of enzymes, which catalyzed the rapid exchange of NADPH with the deterium of 2H2O prior to the reaction of fatty acid synthetase. PMID:6990992

  16. Supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with in-source atmospheric pressure ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for compound speciation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yunju; Choi, Man-Ho; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-04-29

    An experimental setup for the speciation of compounds by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) with atmospheric pressure ionization while performing chromatographic separation is presented. The proposed experimental setup combines the high performance supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) system that can be readily used as an inlet for mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) HDX. This combination overcomes the limitation of an approach using conventional liquid chromatography (LC) by minimizing the amount of deuterium solvents used for separation. In the SFC separation, supercritical CO2 was used as a major component of the mobile phase, and methanol was used as a minor co-solvent. By using deuterated methanol (CH3OD), AP HDX was achieved during SFC separation. To prove the concept, thirty one nitrogen- and/or oxygen-containing standard compounds were analyzed by SFC-AP HDX MS. The compounds were successfully speciated from the obtained SFC-MS spectra. The exchange ions were observed with as low as 1% of CH3OD in the mobile phase, and separation could be performed within approximately 20min using approximately 0.24 mL of CH3OD. The results showed that SFC separation and APPI/APCI HDX could be successfully performed using the suggested method. PMID:27020885

  17. Probing the dynamic regulation of peripheral membrane proteins using hydrogen deuterium exchange-MS (HDX-MS).

    PubMed

    Vadas, Oscar; Burke, John E

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular signalling events are controlled by the selective recruitment of protein complexes to membranes. Determining the molecular basis for how lipid signalling complexes are recruited, assembled and regulated on specific membrane compartments has remained challenging due to the difficulty of working in conditions mimicking native biological membrane environments. Enzyme recruitment to membranes is controlled by a variety of regulatory mechanisms, including binding to specific lipid species, protein-protein interactions, membrane curvature, as well as post-translational modifications. A powerful tool to study the regulation of membrane signalling enzymes and complexes is hydrogen deuterium exchange-MS (HDX-MS), a technique that allows for the interrogation of protein dynamics upon membrane binding and recruitment. This review will highlight the theory and development of HDX-MS and its application to examine the molecular basis of lipid signalling enzymes, specifically the regulation and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks). PMID:26517882

  18. Water on Mars: Clues from Deuterium/Hydrogen and Water Contents of Hydrous Phases in SNC Meteorites.

    PubMed

    Watson, L L; Hutcheon, I D; Epstein, S; Stolper, E M

    1994-07-01

    Ion microprobe studies of hydrous amphibole, biotite, and apatite in shergottite-nakhlite-chassignite (SNC) meteorites, probable igneous rocks from Mars, indicate high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios relative to terrestrial values. The amphiboles contain roughly one-tentn as much water as expected, suggesting that SNC magmas were less hydrous than previously proposed. The high but variable D/H values of these minerals are best explained by postcrystallization D enrichment of initially D-poor phases by martian crustal fluids with near atmospheric D/H (about five times the terrestrial value). These igneous phases do not directly reflect the D/H ratios of martian "magmatic" water but provide evidence for a D-enriched martian crustal water reservoir. PMID:17774694

  19. Rapid Annealing Of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine effects of rapid annealing on films of amorphous hydrogenated carbon. Study represents first efforts to provide information for applications of a-C:H films where rapid thermal processing required. Major finding, annealing causes abrupt increase in absorption and concomitant decrease in optical band gap. Most of change occurs during first 20 s, continues during longer annealing times. Extend of change increases with annealing temperature. Researchers hypothesize abrupt initial change caused by loss of hydrogen, while gradual subsequent change due to polymerization of remaining carbon into crystallites or sheets of graphite. Optical band gaps of unannealed specimens on silicon substrates lower than those of specimens on quartz substrates.

  20. Method for direct production of carbon disulfide and hydrogen from hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Frank Q.; Erekson, Erek James

    1998-12-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to carbon disulfide and hydrogen is provided comprising contacting the hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to a bi-functional catalyst residing in a controlled atmosphere for a time and at a temperature sufficient to produce carbon disulfide and hydrogen. Also provided is a catalyst for converting carbon sulfides and hydrogen sulfides to gasoline range hydrocarbons comprising a mixture containing a zeolite catalyst and a hydrogenating catalyst.

  1. Atmospheric Physics and Earth Observations: Observations of Lyman-agr Emissions of Hydrogen and Deuterium.

    PubMed

    Bertaux, J L; Goutail, F; Kockarts, G

    1984-07-13

    A spectrophotometer was flown on Spacelab 1 to study various mechanisms of Lyman-alpha emission in the upper atmosphere. The use of absorption cells filled with H(2) and D(2) gases allowed us to discriminate a number of weak Lyman-alpha emissions heretofore masked by the strong H geocoronal emission due to resonance scattering of solar photons. Preliminary results are presented on three topics: the first optical detection of the deuterium Lyman-alpha emission at 110 kilometers, with an intensity of 330 rayleighs indicating an eddy diffusion coefficient of 1.3 x 10(6) square centimeters per second; auroral proton precipitations seen on both the night and the day side; and an emission located above 250 kilometers of altitude, interpreted as the result of charge exchange of magnetospheric protons with geocoronal atoms. PMID:17837930

  2. Simultaneous profiling of hydrogen and deuterium by 2.6 MeV He4e ERDA using a ΔE - E telescope detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielunski, M.; Mayer, M.; Behrisch, R.; Roth, J.; Scherzer, B. M. U.

    1997-01-01

    For depth profiling of hydrogen isotopes by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) with 2.6 MeV He4e ions a special ΔE - E telescope type detector system was tested. It allows the separation of hydrogen and deuterium recoils as well as backscattered helium particles. For particle identification from the energy loss Δ E a thin 3.7 μm silicon transmission detector was used while the residual energy was measured with a standard 100 μm PIPS silicon surface barrier detector. The depth profiles of deuterium and hydrogen were measured at plasma deposited a-C:H:D layers as well as at samples exposed to plasma discharges in the tokamak experiment ASDEX-Upgrade.

  3. Deuterium Magnetic Resonance of Residual Hydrogen in Crystalline N-Type Silicon After Long-Term Out-Diffusion.(Supported in part by NSF 93-05344.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzi, R.; Leopold, D.; Fedders, P.; Norberg, R.; Boyce, J.; Johnson, N.

    1997-03-01

    Interstitial hydrogen in single-crystal P-doped silicon can introduce planar platelet-structured defects aligned along 111 planes. Deuteron magnetic resonance has been used to examine incorporated deuterium in single crystal P-doped silicon which was exposed(J. B. Boyce, N. M. Johnson, S. E. Ready, and J. Walker, Phys. Rev. B 46), 4308 (1992). to a deuterium plasma six years ago. The residual deuterium population is greatly reduced from the original loading, but shows a quadrupolar-split doublet from SiD arrays along < 111> and a larger central line which arises, at least in part, from trapped molecular D_2. The central feature shows two components which relax differently and reflect different site occupancy and local mobility.

  4. Hydrogen and deuterium in myoglobin as seen by a neutron structure determination at 1.5 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Andreas; Tanaka, Ichiro; Engler, Niklas; Niimura, Nobuo; Parak, Fritz G

    2002-03-28

    From the first days of protein neutron structure determination sperm whale myoglobin was an object under investigation [Nature 224 (1969) 143, J. Mol. Biol. 220 (1991) 381]. Nevertheless myoglobin is still of interest [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97 (2000) 3872]. The feasibility of the monochromatic neutron diffractometer BIX-3 at the JRR-3M reactor at the JAERI [J. Phys. Chem. Solids 60 (1999) 1623], to collect high-resolution diffraction data in a relatively short time stimulated us to repeat the structural determination of myoglobin. The structure of metmyoglobin has been determined up to a resolution of 1.5 A. The hydrogen atoms were replaced in part, by deuterium soaking the crystals for more than 10 years in D(2)O. A refinement of all atoms has been performed including the refinement of individual mean square displacements and occupancies of the exchangeable protons in backbone hydrogen bonds. A method is described to show clear negative scattering densities of the H atoms. Water molecules within the protein and on the molecule surface are shown. The exchangeability of H atoms is correlated with structural distribution and flexibility. PMID:12062378

  5. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for investigation of backbone dynamics of oxidized and reduced cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Molnar, Kathleen S; Coales, Stephen J; OuYang, Bo; Simorellis, Alana K; Pochapsky, Thomas C

    2008-02-01

    Backbone dynamics of the camphor monoxygenase cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP101) as a function of oxidation/ligation state of the heme iron were investigated via hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange) as monitored by mass spectrometry. Main chain amide NH hydrogens can exchange readily with solvent and the rate of this exchange depends upon, among other things, dynamic fluctuations in local structural elements. A fluxional region of the polypeptide will exchange more quickly with solvent than one that is more constrained. In most regions of the enzyme, exchange rates were similar between oxidized high-spin camphor-bound and reduced camphor- and CO-bound CYP101 (CYP-S and CYP-S-CO, respectively). However, in regions of the protein that have previously been implicated in substrate access by structural and molecular dynamics investigations, the reduced enzyme shows significantly slower exchange rates than the oxidized CYP-S. This observation corresponds to increased flexibility of the oxidized enzyme relative to the reduced form. Structural features previously found to be perturbed in CYP-S-CO upon binding of the biologically relevant effector and reductant putidaredoxin (Pdx) as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance are also more protected from exchange in the reduced state. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental investigation of backbone dynamics within the P450 family using this methodology. PMID:18023482

  6. Hexicon 2: automated processing of hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry data with improved deuteration distribution estimation.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Lou, Xinghua; Reinstein, Jochen; Shoeman, Robert L; Hamprecht, Fred A; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) provide information about the dynamics and the solvent accessibility of protein backbone amide hydrogen atoms. Continuous improvement of MS instrumentation has contributed to the increasing popularity of this method; however, comprehensive automated data analysis is only beginning to mature. We present Hexicon 2, an automated pipeline for data analysis and visualization based on the previously published program Hexicon (Lou et al. 2010). Hexicon 2 employs the sensitive NITPICK peak detection algorithm of its predecessor in a divide-and-conquer strategy and adds new features, such as chromatogram alignment and improved peptide sequence assignment. The unique feature of deuteration distribution estimation was retained in Hexicon 2 and improved using an iterative deconvolution algorithm that is robust even to noisy data. In addition, Hexicon 2 provides a data browser that facilitates quality control and provides convenient access to common data visualization tasks. Analysis of a benchmark dataset demonstrates superior performance of Hexicon 2 compared with its predecessor in terms of deuteration centroid recovery and deuteration distribution estimation. Hexicon 2 greatly reduces data analysis time compared with manual analysis, whereas the increased number of peptides provides redundant coverage of the entire protein sequence. Hexicon 2 is a standalone application available free of charge under http://hx2.mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de. PMID:24676893

  7. Hexicon 2: Automated Processing of Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Data with Improved Deuteration Distribution Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Robert; Lou, Xinghua; Reinstein, Jochen; Shoeman, Robert L.; Hamprecht, Fred A.; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) provide information about the dynamics and the solvent accessibility of protein backbone amide hydrogen atoms. Continuous improvement of MS instrumentation has contributed to the increasing popularity of this method; however, comprehensive automated data analysis is only beginning to mature. We present Hexicon 2, an automated pipeline for data analysis and visualization based on the previously published program Hexicon (Lou et al. 2010). Hexicon 2 employs the sensitive NITPICK peak detection algorithm of its predecessor in a divide-and-conquer strategy and adds new features, such as chromatogram alignment and improved peptide sequence assignment. The unique feature of deuteration distribution estimation was retained in Hexicon 2 and improved using an iterative deconvolution algorithm that is robust even to noisy data. In addition, Hexicon 2 provides a data browser that facilitates quality control and provides convenient access to common data visualization tasks. Analysis of a benchmark dataset demonstrates superior performance of Hexicon 2 compared with its predecessor in terms of deuteration centroid recovery and deuteration distribution estimation. Hexicon 2 greatly reduces data analysis time compared with manual analysis, whereas the increased number of peptides provides redundant coverage of the entire protein sequence. Hexicon 2 is a standalone application available free of charge under http://hx2.mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de.

  8. Optimization and Application of APCI Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX MS) for the Speciation of Nitrogen Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acter, Thamina; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sungji; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-09-01

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the utility of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (APCI HDX MS) to identify the structures of nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds. First, experiments were performed to determine the optimized experimental conditions, with dichloromethane and CH3OD found to be good cosolvents for APCI HDX. In addition, a positive correlation between the heated capillary temperature and the observed HDX signal was observed, and it was suggested that the HDX reaction occurred when molecules were contained in the solvent cluster. Second, 20 standard nitrogen-containing compounds were analyzed to investigate whether speciation could be determined based on the different types of ions produced from nitrogen-containing compounds with various functional groups. The number of exchanges occurring within the compounds correlated well with the number of active hydrogen atoms attached to nitrogen, and it was confirmed that APCI HDX MS could be used to determine speciation. The results obtained by APCI HDX MS were combined with the subsequent investigation of the double bond equivalence distribution and indicated that resins of shale oil extract contained mostly pyridine type nitrogen compounds. This study confirmed that APCI HDX MS can be added to previously reported chemical ionization, electrospray ionization, and atmospheric pressure photo ionization-based HDX methods, which can be used for structural elucidation by mass spectrometry.

  9. Optimization and Application of APCI Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX MS) for the Speciation of Nitrogen Compounds.

    PubMed

    Acter, Thamina; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sungji; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-09-01

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the utility of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (APCI HDX MS) to identify the structures of nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds. First, experiments were performed to determine the optimized experimental conditions, with dichloromethane and CH(3)OD found to be good cosolvents for APCI HDX. In addition, a positive correlation between the heated capillary temperature and the observed HDX signal was observed, and it was suggested that the HDX reaction occurred when molecules were contained in the solvent cluster. Second, 20 standard nitrogen-containing compounds were analyzed to investigate whether speciation could be determined based on the different types of ions produced from nitrogen-containing compounds with various functional groups. The number of exchanges occurring within the compounds correlated well with the number of active hydrogen atoms attached to nitrogen, and it was confirmed that APCI HDX MS could be used to determine speciation. The results obtained by APCI HDX MS were combined with the subsequent investigation of the double bond equivalence distribution and indicated that resins of shale oil extract contained mostly pyridine type nitrogen compounds. This study confirmed that APCI HDX MS can be added to previously reported chemical ionization, electrospray ionization, and atmospheric pressure photo ionization-based HDX methods, which can be used for structural elucidation by mass spectrometry. PMID:26115964

  10. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  11. Effective application of bicelles for conformational analysis of G protein-coupled receptors by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS. PMID:25740347

  12. Characterization of IgG1 Conformation and Conformational Dynamics by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Damian; Arndt, Joseph; Domeier, Wayne; Berkowitz, Steven; Engen, John R.

    2009-04-22

    Protein function is dictated by protein conformation. For the protein biopharmaceutical industry, therefore, it is important to have analytical tools that can detect changes in protein conformation rapidly, accurately, and with high sensitivity. In this paper we show that hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) can play an important role in fulfilling this need within the industry. H/DX-MS was used to assess both global and local conformational behavior of a recombinant monoclonal IgG1 antibody, a major class of biopharmaceuticals. Analysis of exchange into the intact, glycosylated IgG1 (and the Fab and Fc regions thereof) showed that the molecule was folded, highly stable, and highly amenable to analysis by this method using less than a nanomole of material. With improved chromatographic methods, peptide identification algorithms and data-processing steps, the analysis of deuterium levels in peptic peptides produced after labeling was accomplished in 1--2 days. On the basis of peptic peptide data, exchange was localized to specific regions of the antibody. Changes to IgG1 conformation as a result of deglycosylation were determined by comparing exchange into the glycosylated and deglycosylated forms of the antibody. Two regions of the IgG1 (residues 236-253 and 292-308) were found to have altered exchange properties upon deglycosylation. These results are consistent with previous findings concerning the role of glycosylation in the interaction of IgG1 with Fc receptors. Moreover, the data clearly illustrate how H/DX-MS can provide important characterization information on the higher order structure of antibodies and conformational changes that these molecules may experience upon modification.

  13. Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela; Narayanan, Deepa

    2011-03-08

    A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

  14. Refinement of the experimental dynamic structure factor for liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium using semi-classical quantum simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kyle K. G. Rossky, Peter J.; Poulsen, Jens Aage; Cunsolo, A.

    2014-01-21

    The dynamic structure factor of liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium in corresponding thermodynamic states (T = 20.0 K, n = 21.24 nm{sup −3}) and (T = 23.0 K, n = 24.61 nm{sup −3}), respectively, has been computed by both the Feynman-Kleinert linearized path-integral (FK-LPI) and Ring-Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) methods and compared with Inelastic X Ray Scattering spectra. The combined use of computational and experimental methods enabled us to reduce experimental uncertainties in the determination of the true sample spectrum. Furthermore, the refined experimental spectrum of para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium is consistently reproduced by both FK-LPI and RPMD results at momentum transfers lower than 12.8 nm{sup −1}. At larger momentum transfers the FK-LPI results agree with experiment much better for ortho-deuterium than for para-hydrogen. More specifically we found that for k ∼ 20.0 nm{sup −1} para-hydrogen provides a test case for improved approximations to quantum dynamics.

  15. Determination of diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium in Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube material using hot vacuum extraction-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Komal Chandra; Kulkarni, A. S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P. S.; Sunil, Saurav; Saxena, M. K.; Singh, R. N.; Tomar, B. S.; Ramakumar, K. L.

    2015-06-01

    The diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy were measured in the temperature range 523 to 673 K, employing hot vacuum extraction-quadrupole mass spectrometry (HVE-QMS). One end of the Zr-2.5%Nb alloy specimens was charged electrolytically with the desired hydrogen isotope. After annealing at different temperatures for a predetermined time, the specimens were cut into thin slices, which were analyzed for their H2/D2 content using the HVE-QMS technique. The depth profile data were fitted into the equation representing the solution of Fick's second law of diffusion. The activation energy of hydrogen/deuterium diffusion was obtained from the Arrhenius relation between the diffusion coefficient and temperature. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient can be represented as DH = 1.41 × 10-7 exp(-36,000/RT) and DD = 6.16 × 10-8 exp(-35,262/RT) for hydrogen and deuterium, respectively.

  16. IUE observations of interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward Alpha Centauri B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A high dispersion profile is presented of the Lyman-alpha emission toward Alpha Cen B as recorded in two images taken with the IUE spacecraft. The spectra were examined with a three-parameter Gaussian or five-parameter solar-type profile to derive the intrinsic background stellar emission. Voight absorption profiles were calculated for the intervening H I and D I gas. A uniform, thermally broadened medium was assumed, with the calculations being based on the free stellar parameters of density, velocity dispersion and the bulk velocity of H I, and the density of D I. The use of a small aperture is shown to have been effective in eliminating geocoronal and interplanetary diffuse Ly-alpha contamination. The H I absorption profile toward Alpha Cen B is found to be equivalent to that toward Alpha Cen A, indicating that the H I profiles derived are essentially independent of stellar emission. Less success, however, was attained in obtaining any definitive D I profile, although an asymmetry in the blue and red wings of the Lyman-alpha emissions did show the presence of absorption by interstellar deuterium and allow setting a lower limit of 0.00001 for the D I/H I ratio.

  17. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  18. Liquid-solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H2 and D2 in an ˜85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid-solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ˜4 K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H2 and D2 confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H2 and D2 are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  19. Liquid–solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-28

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} in an ∼85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid–solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ∼4 K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  20. SISGR - Hydrogen Caged in Carbon-Exploration of Novel Carbon-Hydrogen Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lueking, Angela; Badding, John; Crespi, Vinent

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen trapped in a carbon cage, captured through repulsive interactions, is a novel concept in hydrogen storage. Trapping hydrogen via repulsive interactions borrows an idea from macroscale hydrogen storage (i.e. compressed gas storage tanks) and reapplies these concepts on the nanoscale in specially designed molecular containers. Under extreme conditions of pressure, hydrogen solubility in carbon materials is expected to increase and carbon is expected to restructure to minimize volume via a mixed sp2/sp3 hydrogenated state. Thermodynamics dictate that pre-formed C-H structures will rearrange with increased pressure, yet the final carbon-hydrogen interactions may be dependent upon the mechanism by which hydrogen is introduced. Gas “trapping” is meant to denote gas present in a solid in a high density, adsorbed-like state, when the external pressure is much less than that necessary to provide a comparable fluid density. Trapping thus denotes a kinetically metastable state rather than thermodynamic equilibrium. This project probed mechanochemical means to polymerize select hydrocarbons in the presence of gases, in an attempt to form localized carbon cages that trap gases via repulsive interactions. Aromatic, polyaromatic, and hydroaromatic molecules expected to undergo cyclo-addition reactions were polymerized at high (~GPa) pressures to form extended hydrogenated amorphous carbon networks. Notably, aromatics with a pre-existing internal free volume (such as Triptycene) appeared to retain an internal porosity upon application of pressure. However, a high photoluminescence background after polymerization precluded in situ identification of trapped gases. No spectroscopic evidence was found after depressurization that would be indicative of pockets of trapped gases in a localized high-pressure environment. Control studies suggested this measurement may be insensitive to gases at low pressure. Similarly, no spectral fingerprint was found for gas-imbued spherical

  1. Spherical cauliflower-like carbon dust formed by interaction between deuterium plasma and graphite target and its internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, N.; Yoshimi, M.; Tokitani, M.; Takamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.

    2009-06-01

    Simulated experiments to produce carbon dust particles with cauliflower structure have been performed in a liner plasma device, NAGDIS-II by exposing high density deuterium plasma to a graphite sample (IG-430U). Formation of carbon dust depends on the surface temperature and the incident ion energy. At a surface temperature 600-700 K, a lot of isolated spherical dust particles are observed on the graphite target. The internal structure of an isolated dust particle was observed with Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) in detail. FIB analysis clearly shows there exist honey-combed cell structure with thin carbon walls in the dust particle and the dust particle grows from the graphite surface. TEM image also shows that the dust particle is made of amorphous carbon with crystallized grains with diameters of 10-50 nm.

  2. Study of a polarized hydrogen ion source with deuterium plasma ionizer

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Derevyankin, G.E.; Dudnikov, V.G.; Klenov, V.S.; Nechaeva, L.P.; Plohinsky, Y.V.; Vasil`ev, G.A.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1995-07-15

    A description of the atomic beam polarized hydrogen ion source developed at the INR in Moscow is given. It is capable of producing polarized 100 {mu}sec long H{sup +} beams with currents up to 6 {mu}A. The beam is 85% polarized and has a normal emittance of 2{pi} mm mrad. Additionally polarized H{sup {minus}} beams have currents up to 200 {mu}A and normalized emittance 2.2 {pi} mm mrad. (AIP)

  3. Hydrogen-bond-dynamics-based switching of conductivity and magnetism: a phase transition caused by deuterium and electron transfer in a hydrogen-bonded purely organic conductor crystal.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Akira; Yamada, Shota; Isono, Takayuki; Kamo, Hiromichi; Nakao, Akiko; Kumai, Reiji; Nakao, Hironori; Murakami, Youichi; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Nishio, Yutaka; Mori, Hatsumi

    2014-08-27

    A hydrogen bond (H-bond) is one of the most fundamental and important noncovalent interactions in chemistry, biology, physics, and all other molecular sciences. Especially, the dynamics of a proton or a hydrogen atom in the H-bond has attracted increasing attention, because it plays a crucial role in (bio)chemical reactions and some physical properties, such as dielectricity and proton conductivity. Here we report unprecedented H-bond-dynamics-based switching of electrical conductivity and magnetism in a H-bonded purely organic conductor crystal, κ-D3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-D). This novel crystal κ-D, a deuterated analogue of κ-H3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-H), is composed only of a H-bonded molecular unit, in which two crystallographically equivalent catechol-fused ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (Cat-EDT-TTF) skeletons with a +0.5 charge are linked by a symmetric anionic [O···D···O](-1)-type strong H-bond. Although the deuterated and parent hydrogen systems, κ-D and κ-H, are isostructural paramagnetic semiconductors with a dimer-Mott-type electronic structure at room temperature (space group: C2/c), only κ-D undergoes a phase transition at 185 K, to change to a nonmagnetic insulator with a charge-ordered electronic structure (space group: P1). The X-ray crystal structure analysis demonstrates that this dramatic switching of the electronic structure and physical properties originates from deuterium transfer or displacement within the H-bond accompanied by electron transfer between the Cat-EDT-TTF π-systems, proving that the H-bonded deuterium dynamics and the conducting TTF π-electron are cooperatively coupled. Furthermore, the reason why this unique phase transition occurs only in κ-D is qualitatively discussed in terms of the H/D isotope effect on the H-bond geometry and potential energy curve. PMID:25127315

  4. Hydrogen storage in engineered carbon nanospaces.

    PubMed

    Burress, Jacob; Kraus, Michael; Beckner, Matt; Cepel, Raina; Suppes, Galen; Wexler, Carlos; Pfeifer, Peter

    2009-05-20

    It is shown how appropriately engineered nanoporous carbons provide materials for reversible hydrogen storage, based on physisorption, with exceptional storage capacities (approximately 80 g H2/kg carbon, approximately 50 g H2/liter carbon, at 50 bar and 77 K). Nanopores generate high storage capacities (a) by having high surface area to volume ratios, and (b) by hosting deep potential wells through overlapping substrate potentials from opposite pore walls, giving rise to a binding energy nearly twice the binding energy in wide pores. Experimental case studies are presented with surface areas as high as 3100 m(2) g(-1), in which 40% of all surface sites reside in pores of width approximately 0.7 nm and binding energy approximately 9 kJ mol(-1), and 60% of sites in pores of width>1.0 nm and binding energy approximately 5 kJ mol(-1). The findings, including the prevalence of just two distinct binding energies, are in excellent agreement with results from molecular dynamics simulations. It is also shown, from statistical mechanical models, that one can experimentally distinguish between the situation in which molecules do (mobile adsorption) and do not (localized adsorption) move parallel to the surface, how such lateral dynamics affects the hydrogen storage capacity, and how the two situations are controlled by the vibrational frequencies of adsorbed hydrogen molecules parallel and perpendicular to the surface: in the samples presented, adsorption is mobile at 293 K, and localized at 77 K. These findings make a strong case for it being possible to significantly increase hydrogen storage capacities in nanoporous carbons by suitable engineering of the nanopore space. PMID:19420674

  5. Conformational Analysis of Proteins in Highly Concentrated Solutions by Dialysis-Coupled Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Houde, Damian; Nazari, Zeinab E; Bou-Assaf, George M; Weiskopf, Andrew S; Rand, Kasper D

    2016-04-01

    When highly concentrated, an antibody solution can exhibit unusual behaviors, which can lead to unwanted properties, such as increased levels of protein aggregation and unusually high viscosity. Molecular modeling, along with many indirect biophysical measurements, has suggested that the cause for these phenomena can be due to short range electrostatic and/or hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for investigating protein conformation, dynamics, and interactions. However, "traditional" continuous dilution labeling HDX-MS experiments have limited utility for the direct analysis of solutions with high concentrations of protein. Here, we present a dialysis-based HDX-MS (di-HDX-MS) method as an alternative HDX-MS labeling format, which takes advantage of passive dialysis rather than the classic dilution workflow. We applied this approach to a highly concentrated antibody solution without dilution or significant sample manipulation, prior to analysis. Such a method could pave the way for a deeper understanding of the unusual behavior of proteins at high concentrations, which is highly relevant for development of biopharmaceuticals in industry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26860088

  6. Simultaneous reduction and digestion of proteins with disulfide bonds for hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Min; McLoughlin, Shaun M; Frausto, Stephen D; Tang, Hengli; Emmett, Mark R; Marshall, Alan G

    2010-02-15

    Proteolyzed peptides provide the basis for mass-analyzed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) for mapping solvent access to various segments of solution-phase proteins. Aspergillus saitoi protease type XIII and porcine pepsin can generate peptides of overlapping sequences and high sequence coverage. However, if disulfide bonds are present, proteolysis can be severely limited, particularly in the vicinity of the disulfide linkage(s). Disulfide bonds cannot be reduced before or during the H/D exchange reaction without affecting the protein higher-order structure. Here, we demonstrate simultaneous quench/digestion/reduction following H/D exchange, for subsequent mass analysis. Proteolysis is conducted in the presence of tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP.HCl) and urea, and all other steps of the H/D exchange and analysis are maintained. This method yields dramatically increased sequence coverage and localization of solvent-exposed segments for mass-analyzed solution-phase H/D exchange of proteins containing disulfide bonds. PMID:20099838

  7. Applications of hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) for the characterization of conformational dynamics in light-activated photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Robert; Heintz, Udo; Winkler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of optogenetic tools is inherently linked to the understanding of photoreceptor function. Structural analysis of elements involved in signal integration in individual sensor domains provides an initial idea of their mode of operation, but understanding how local structural rearrangements eventually affect signal transmission to output domains requires inclusion of the effector regions in the characterization. However, the dynamic nature of these assemblies renders their structural analysis challenging and therefore a combination of high- and low-resolution techniques is required to appreciate functional aspects of photoreceptors. This review focuses on the potential of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) for complementing the structural characterization of photoreceptors. In this respect, the ability of HDX-MS to provide information on conformational dynamics and the possibility to address multiple functionally relevant states in solution render this methodology ideally suitable. We highlight recent examples demonstrating the potential of HDX-MS and discuss how these results can help to improve existing optogenetic systems or guide the design of novel optogenetic tools. PMID:26157802

  8. Characterization of Stress-Exposed Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Using ELISA and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Katsuyoshi; Akashi, Satoko

    2014-10-01

    Information on the higher-order structure is important in the development of biopharmaceutical drugs. Recently, hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate protein conformation, and unique automated systems for HDX-MS are now commercially available. To investigate the potential of this technique for the prediction of the activity of biopharmaceuticals, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which had been subjected to three different stress types, was analyzed using HDX-MS and through comparison with receptor-binding activity. It was found that HDX-MS, in combination with ion mobility separation, was able to identify conformational changes in G-CSF induced by stress, and a good correlation with the receptor-binding activity was demonstrated, which cannot be completely determined by conventional peptide mapping alone. The direct evaluation of biological activity using bioassay is absolutely imperative in biopharmaceutical development, but HDX-MS can provide the alternative information in a short time on the extent and location of the structural damage caused by stresses. Furthermore, the present study suggests the possibility of this system being a versatile evaluation method for the preservation stability of biopharmaceuticals.

  9. Application of a New Ensemble Conserving Quantum Dynamics Simulation Algorithm to Liquid para-Hydrogen and ortho-Deuterium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Kyle K.G.; Poulsen, Jens Aage; Nyman, Gunnar; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Rossky, Peter J.

    2015-06-30

    Here, we apply the Feynman-Kleinert Quasi-Classical Wigner (FK-QCW) method developed in our previous work [Smith et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244112 (2015)] for the determination of the dynamic structure factor of liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium at state points of (T = 20.0 K, n = 21.24 nm-3) and (T = 23.0 K, n = 24.61 nm-3), respectively. When applied to this challenging system, it is shown that this new FK-QCW method consistently reproduces the experimental dynamic structure factor reported by Smith et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034501 (2014)] for all momentum transfers considered. Moreover, this shows that FK-QCWmore » provides a substantial improvement over the Feynman-Kleinert linearized path-integral method, in which purely classical dynamics are used. Furthermore, for small momentum transfers, it is shown that FK-QCW provides nearly the same results as ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), thus suggesting that FK-QCW provides a potentially more appealing algorithm than RPMD since it is not formally limited to correlation functions involving linear operators.« less

  10. Recombinant immobilized rhizopuspepsin as a new tool for protein digestion in hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rey, Martial; Man, Petr; Brandolin, Gérard; Forest, Eric; Pelosi, Ludovic

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange coupled to mass spectrometry is nowadays routinely used to probe protein interactions or conformational changes. The method has many advantages, e.g. very low sample consumption, but offers limited spatial resolution. One way to higher resolution leads through the use of different proteases or their combinations. In the present work we describe recombinant production, purification and use of aspartic protease zymogen from Rhizopus chimensis, protease type XVIII (EC 3.4.23.6), commonly referred to as rhizopuspepsinogen (Rpg). The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli, refolded and purified to homogeneity. A typical yield was approximately 100 mg of pure enzyme per 1 L of original bacterial culture. The kinetics of protease activation, i.e. removal of the propeptide achieved by autolysis in an acidic environment, was followed by mass spectrometry. The digestion efficiency was tested for the protease in solution as well as for the immobilized enzyme. Apomyoglobin was successfully digested under all conditions tested and the protease displayed very low or no autodigestion. The results outperformed those obtained with commercial protease where the digestion of apomyoglobin was incomplete and accompanied by many contaminating peptides. Taken together, the recombinant protease type XVIII can be considered as a new and highly efficient tool for H/D exchange followed by mass spectrometry. PMID:19827048

  11. Study of the conformational change of adsorbed proteins on biomaterial surfaces using hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinku

    2016-05-01

    There is no doubt that protein adsorption plays a crucial role in determining biocompatibility of biomaterials. Despite the information of the identity and composition of blood plasma/serum proteins adsorbed on surfaces of biomaterials to understand which proteins are involved in blood/biomaterial interactions, it still does not provide information about the conformations and orientations of adsorbed protein, which are very important in determining biological responses to biomaterials. Therefore, our laboratory has developed an experimental technology to probe protein conformations on materials that is applicable to mixtures of proteins. Herein, the new application of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange combined with mass spectrometry was applied to determine conformational changes of adsorbed proteins at biomaterial surfaces. The results suggest that there may be a significant conformational change in adsorbed proteins at 'low' bulk concentrations that leads to a large change in the kinetics of H/D exchange as compared to 'high' bulk concentrations. This technique may eventually be useful for the study of the kinetics of protein conformational changes. PMID:26896658

  12. NMR-Based Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Measurements for Complex Membrane Proteins: Development and Critical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerski, Lech; Vinogradova, Olga; Sanders, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for measuring site-specific amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates for membrane proteins in bilayers is reported and evaluated. This method represents an adaptation and extension of the approach of Dempsey and co-workers (Biophys. J. 70, 1777-1788 (1996)) and is based on reconstituting 15N-labeled membrane proteins into phospholipid bilayers, followed by lyophilization and rehydration with D2O or H2O (control). Following incubation for a time t under hydrated conditions, samples are again lyophilized and then solubilized in an organic solvent system, where 1H-15N HSQC spectra are recorded. Comparison of spectra from D2O-exposed samples to spectra from control samples yields the extent of the H-D exchange which occurred in the bilayers during time t. Measurements are site specific if specific 15N labeling is used. The first part of this paper deals with the search for a suitable solvent system in which to solubilize complex membrane proteins in an amide "exchange-trapped" form for NMR quantitation of amide peak intensities. The second portion of the paper documents application of the overall procedure to measuring site-specific amide exchange rates in diacylglycerol kinase, a representative integral membrane protein. Both the potential usefulness and the significant limitations of the new method are documented.

  13. Conformational Analysis of Proteins in Highly Concentrated Solutions by Dialysis-Coupled Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houde, Damian; Nazari, Zeinab E.; Bou-Assaf, George M.; Weiskopf, Andrew S.; Rand, Kasper D.

    2016-04-01

    When highly concentrated, an antibody solution can exhibit unusual behaviors, which can lead to unwanted properties, such as increased levels of protein aggregation and unusually high viscosity. Molecular modeling, along with many indirect biophysical measurements, has suggested that the cause for these phenomena can be due to short range electrostatic and/or hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for investigating protein conformation, dynamics, and interactions. However, "traditional" continuous dilution labeling HDX-MS experiments have limited utility for the direct analysis of solutions with high concentrations of protein. Here, we present a dialysis-based HDX-MS (di-HDX-MS) method as an alternative HDX-MS labeling format, which takes advantage of passive dialysis rather than the classic dilution workflow. We applied this approach to a highly concentrated antibody solution without dilution or significant sample manipulation, prior to analysis. Such a method could pave the way for a deeper understanding of the unusual behavior of proteins at high concentrations, which is highly relevant for development of biopharmaceuticals in industry.

  14. Application of a new ensemble conserving quantum dynamics simulation algorithm to liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kyle K. G.; Poulsen, Jens Aage Nyman, Gunnar; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Rossky, Peter J.

    2015-06-28

    We apply the Feynman-Kleinert Quasi-Classical Wigner (FK-QCW) method developed in our previous work [Smith et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244112 (2015)] for the determination of the dynamic structure factor of liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium at state points of (T = 20.0 K, n = 21.24 nm{sup −3}) and (T = 23.0 K, n = 24.61 nm{sup −3}), respectively. When applied to this challenging system, it is shown that this new FK-QCW method consistently reproduces the experimental dynamic structure factor reported by Smith et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034501 (2014)] for all momentum transfers considered. This shows that FK-QCW provides a substantial improvement over the Feynman-Kleinert linearized path-integral method, in which purely classical dynamics are used. Furthermore, for small momentum transfers, it is shown that FK-QCW provides nearly the same results as ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), thus suggesting that FK-QCW provides a potentially more appealing algorithm than RPMD since it is not formally limited to correlation functions involving linear operators.

  15. Application of a New Ensemble Conserving Quantum Dynamics Simulation Algorithm to Liquid para-Hydrogen and ortho-Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kyle K.G.; Poulsen, Jens Aage; Nyman, Gunnar; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Rossky, Peter J.

    2015-06-30

    Here, we apply the Feynman-Kleinert Quasi-Classical Wigner (FK-QCW) method developed in our previous work [Smith et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244112 (2015)] for the determination of the dynamic structure factor of liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium at state points of (T = 20.0 K, n = 21.24 nm-3) and (T = 23.0 K, n = 24.61 nm-3), respectively. When applied to this challenging system, it is shown that this new FK-QCW method consistently reproduces the experimental dynamic structure factor reported by Smith et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034501 (2014)] for all momentum transfers considered. Moreover, this shows that FK-QCW provides a substantial improvement over the Feynman-Kleinert linearized path-integral method, in which purely classical dynamics are used. Furthermore, for small momentum transfers, it is shown that FK-QCW provides nearly the same results as ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), thus suggesting that FK-QCW provides a potentially more appealing algorithm than RPMD since it is not formally limited to correlation functions involving linear operators.

  16. Imidazole C-2 Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Reaction at Histidine for Probing Protein Structure and Function with MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Naoka; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nakajima, Chihiro; Kawahara, Kazuki; Miyagi, Masaru; Nishimura, Osamu; Matsuo, Hisayuki; Nakazawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We present a mass spectrometric method for analyzing protein structure and function, based on the imidazole C-2 or histidine Cε1 hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reaction, which is intrinsically second order with respect to the concentrations of the imidazolium cation and OD− in D2O. The second-order rate constant (k2) of this reaction was calculated from the pH-dependency of the pseudo-first-order rate constant (kφ) obtained from the change of average mass ΔMr (0 ≤ ΔMr < 1) of a peptide fragment containing a defined histidine residue at incubation time (t) such that kφ = − [ln(1−ΔMr)]/t. We preferred using k2 rather than kφ because k2max (maximal value of k2) was empirically related to pKa as illustrated with a Brønsted plot: logk2max=-0.7pKa+α (α is an arbitrary constant), so that we could analyze the effect of structure on the H/D-exchange rate in terms of log(k2max/k2) representing the deviation of k2 from k2max. In the catalytic site of bovine ribonuclease A, His12 showed much larger change in log(k2max/k2) compared with His119 upon binding with cytidine 3′-monophosphate, as anticipated from the X-ray structures and the possible change in solvent accessibility. However, there is a need of considering the hydrogen bonds of the imidazole group with non-dissociable groups to interpret an extremely slow H/D exchange rate of His48 in partially solvent-exposed situation. PMID:24606199

  17. Analysis of distinct molecular assembly complexes of keratin K8 and K18 by hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    PubMed

    Premchandar, Aiswarya; Kupniewska, Anna; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Mücke, Norbert; Mauermann, Monika; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Edelman, Aleksander; Herrmann, Harald; Dadlez, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Keratins are intermediate filament (IF) proteins that form complex filament systems in epithelial cells, thus serving as scaffolding elements and mechanical stress absorbers. The building blocks of keratin IFs are parallel coiled-coil dimers of two distinct sequence-related proteins distinguished as type I and type II keratins. To gain more insight into their structural dynamics, we resorted to hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of keratins K8 and K18, which are characteristic for simple epithelial cells. Using this powerful technique not employed with IFs before, we mapped patterns of protected versus unprotected regions in keratin complexes at various assembly levels. In particular, we localized protein segments exhibiting different hydrogen exchange patterns in tetramers versus filaments. We observed a general pattern of precisely positioned regions of stability intertwining with flexible regions, mostly represented by the non-α-helical segments. Notably, some regions within the coiled-coil domains are significantly more dynamic than others, while the IF-consensus motifs at the end domains of the central α-helical "rod" segment, which mediate the "head-to-tail" dimer-dimer interaction in the filament elongation process, become distinctly more protected upon formation of filaments. Moreover, to gain more insight into the dynamics of the individual keratins, we investigated the properties of homomeric preparations of K8 and K18. The physiological importance of keratins without a partner is encountered in both pathological and experimental situations when one of the two species is present in robust excess or completely absent, such as in gene-targeted mice. PMID:26434626

  18. Damages of Carbon-Tungsten Samples under Influence of Deuterium Ions and Dense Plasma Streams within Plasma-Focus Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gribkov, V. A.; Grebenschikova, Ye. S.; Dubrovsky, A. V.; Makeev, O. N.; Rogozhkin, S. V.; Zaluzhnij, A. G.; Demina, Ye. V.; Kovtun, A. V.; Maslayev, S. A.; Pimenov, V. N.; Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.; Sadowski, M. J.

    2008-03-19

    The paper reports on experimental studies of processes of the interaction of pulsed streams of fast deuterium ions (E{sub i}{approx}100 keV) and dense deuterium plasma (v{sub pl}>10{sup 7} cm/s) with samples made of carbon and tungsten. Experiments were performed in the large PF-1000 plasma-focus facility with the charging energy of 481 kJ and with the pure deuterium filling. Power flux density of plasma/ions streams was q = 10{sup 7}-10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} and the pulse length was from 10{sup -7} s to 10{sup -6} s, whereas the duration of heat pulses (due to a secondary plasma at the target's surface) was 10{sup -4} s. The stainless steel, tungsten and carbon-tungsten samples were placed in the zone of their strong melting and evaporation or in the zone without their melting. Each sample was exposed to 1 through 10 discharges, and the irradiated samples were investigated with optical-, electron- and atomic-force-microscopes. The interaction of intense plasma-ion pulses with the carbon-tungsten samples caused the formation of a wave-like relief on sample surfaces, the evident erosion of the sample material, and the creation of numerous micro-cracks. It was also found that about 200-nm-thick layer of the irradiated tungsten sample contained many melted fragments of nm-dimensions. The results might be useful for estimations of tungsten behavior in extreme situations (e.g. disruptions) expected in fusion reactors with magnetic plasma confinement.

  19. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J.

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  20. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); England, Christopher (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Mixing of carbon in the form of high sulfur coal with sulfuric acid reduces the temperature of sulfuric acid decomposition from 830.degree. C. to between 300.degree. C. and 400.degree. C. The low temperature sulfuric acid decomposition is particularly useful in thermal chemical cycles for splitting water to produce hydrogen. Carbon dioxide is produced as a commercially desirable byproduct. Lowering of the temperature for the sulfuric acid decomposition or oxygen release step simplifies equipment requirements, lowers thermal energy input and reduces corrosion problems presented by sulfuric acid at conventional cracking temperatures. Use of high sulfur coal as the source of carbon for the sulfuric acid decomposition provides an environmentally safe and energy efficient utilization of this normally polluting fuel.

  1. Functionalized carbon nanostructures for hydrogen catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lung-Hao

    Sodium borohydride, NaBH4, is widely used as a source of pure hydrogen. Hydrogen is of interest because it is a source of clean energy. It can be converted directly into electrical energy by means of fuel cells. One of the objectives of this thesis was to develop a new catalytic process to (i) enhance the rate of hydrogen generation, and (ii) to achieve hydrogen generation equal to 100% of the theoretically expected value. The catalyst investigated in this research is constructed by starting from single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). This material has a very high specific surface area and good conductivity. The SWNT were formed into a paper by a special filtration process. Polysilazane, a polymeric precursor (Ceraset(TM)-SN from KiON Corp., Wiesbaden, Germany) was diluted by acetone and then layered onto SWNT paper. The Ceraset coated SWNT was then pyrolyzed at 1100°C for three hours to form a silicon carbonitride (SiCN), polymer derived ceramic (PDC), layer on the surface of SWNT filtered paper. This functionalized SiCN carbon nanotube paper (SiCN/CNT) was used as the substrate for catalyst dispersions. The catalyst consisted of transition metals, Pt/Pd/Ru. Suspension solutions of Pt, Pd and Ru were impregnated onto the SiCN/CNT paper with the expectation of creating a monolayer of these transition metals on surface of the SiCN/CNT substrate. It is likely that an interaction could occur between the transition metals and the silicon atoms present in the SiCN layer on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. It is known that transition metals and silicon react to form silicides, suggesting the formation of a strong Si-transition metal bond. Therefore, it is possible that this bond could provide good wetting of metal atoms on SiCN functionalized carbon nanotube substrate. In the limit a monolayer of the transition metals may be achieved, which would correspond to a near zero dihedral angle between the substrate and the cluster of transition metals. In such a scenario a

  2. Nonthermal escape of hydrogen and deuterium from Venus and implications for loss of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, S.; Hunten, D. M.; Pollack, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    As the dominant nonthermal mechanism for the escape of hydrogen in past Venus atmospheres, the charge exchange of H(+) with H would have provided an escape flux close to the diffusion-limiting value for H-mixing ratios up to 0.002 at the homopause, which also marks the onset of hydrodynamic flow. Charge exchange therefore represents a viable mechanism through which Venus could have lost up to an earth-equivalent ocean of water from its atmosphere over geologic time. Present Venus atmosphere estimates are based on in situ Pioneer Venus mission measurements, and assumptions in the course of extrapolation to past atmospheres have been with respect to the nature of the bulge, circulation pattern, and ion temperature.

  3. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  4. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Aaron J; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance (1)H-(2)H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance (2)H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the (2)H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of (1)H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques. PMID:26363582

  5. Photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberoglu, Halil

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an alternative to thermochemical and electrolytic technologies with the advantage of carbon dioxide sequestration. However, it suffers from low solar to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency due to limited light transfer, mass transfer, and nutrient medium composition. The present study aims at addressing these limitations and can be divided in three parts: (1) experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of hydrogen producing and carbon dioxide consuming microorganisms, (2) solar radiation transfer modeling and simulation in photobioreactors, and (3) parametric experiments of photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration. First, solar radiation transfer in photobioreactors containing microorganisms and bubbles was modeled using the radiative transport equation (RTE) and solved using the modified method of characteristics. The study concluded that Beer-Lambert's law gives inaccurate results and anisotropic scattering must be accounted for to predict the local irradiance inside a photobioreactor. The need for accurate measurement of the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms was established. Then, experimental setup and analysis methods for measuring the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms have been developed and successfully validated experimentally. A database of the radiation characteristics of representative microorganisms have been created including the cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis, the purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii along with its three genetically engineered strains. This enabled, for the first time, quantitative assessment of the effect of genetic engineering on the radiation characteristics of microorganisms. In addition, a parametric experimental study has been performed to model the growth, CO2 consumption, and H 2 production of Anabaena variabilis as functions of

  6. Deuterium retention in codeposited layers and carbon materials exposed to high flux D-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, I. I.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Zalavutdinov, R. Kh; Zakharov, A. P.; Burtseva, T. A.; Mazul, I. V.; Khripunov, B. I.; Shapkin, V. V.; Petrov, V. B.

    A ceramic BCN target with samples of dense RG-Ti-91 without boron, RG-Ti-B with boron (0.1 at.%) and porous POCO AXF-5Q graphites was exposed in a stationary D-plasma of the `Lenta' device with an ion energy of 200 eV and an ion flux of (3 - 6) × 10 17 D/cm 2s at 1040 and 1400 K to a fluence of ˜1 × 10 22 D/cm 2. Codeposited layers were obtained for comparison on the target surface. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) showed that the amount of deuterium in RG-Ti after exposure at 1040 K was more than an order of magnitude higher than in POCO (9 × 10 17 and 7 × 10 16 D/cm 2, respectively). The retention took place preferentially in a surface layer about 100 μm thick. The bulk deuterium concentration in both RG-Ti and POCO was lower than 1 appm. The irradiated RG-Ti surface was subjected to strong erosion and consisted of `columnar' grains covered with TiC at their tips. The deuterium in RG-Ti irradiated at 1400 K was located in the surface layer (1.5 × 10 16 D/cm 2). The value of the bulk concentration did not exceed 0.1 appm while in POCO it was equal to about 20 appm. TDS for deuterium in RG-Ti demonstrated a spectrum similar to that for codeposited layers on a target surface. The differences in deuterium retention in the graphites are explained on the basis of structural differences. Considering tritium inventory assessment for ITER, dense graphites like RG-Ti are preferred for working divertor plates at high temperatures.

  7. Tunneling effects in the kinetics of helium and hydrogen isotopes desorption from single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Danilchenko, B. A. Yaskovets, I. I.; Uvarova, I. Y.; Dolbin, A. V.; Esel'son, V. B.; Basnukaeva, R. M.; Vinnikov, N. A.

    2014-04-28

    The kinetics of desorption both helium isotopes and molecules of hydrogen and deuterium from open-ended or γ-irradiated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles was investigated in temperature range of 10–300 K. The gases desorption rates obey the Arrhenius law at high temperatures, deviate from it with temperature reduction and become constant at low temperatures. These results indicate the quantum nature of gas outflow from carbon nanotube bundles. We had deduced the crossover temperature below which the quantum corrections to the effective activation energy of desorption become significant. This temperature follows linear dependence against the inverse mass of gas molecule and is consistent with theoretical prediction.

  8. Differential isotopic enrichment to facilitate characterization of asymmetric multimeric proteins using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Bruce D.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool for analyzing the conformational dynamics of protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Recent advances in instrumentation and methodology have expanded the utility of HDX for the analysis of large and complex proteins; however, asymmetric dimers with shared amino acid sequence present a unique challenge for HDX because assignment of peptides with identical sequence to their subunit of origin remains ambiguous. Here we report the use of differential isotopic labeling to facilitate HDX analysis of multimers using HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) as a model. RT is an asymmetric heterodimer of 51 kDa (p51) and 66 kDa (p66) subunits. The first 440 residues of p51 and p66 are identical. In this study differentially labeled RT was reconstituted from isotopically enriched (15N-labeled) p51 and unlabeled p66. In order to enable detection of 15N-deuterated RT peptides, the software HDX Workbench was modified to follow a 100% 15N model. Our results demonstrated that 15N enrichment of p51 did not affect its conformational dynamics compared to unlabeled p51, but 15N-labeled p51 did show different conformational dynamics than p66 in the RT heterodimer. Differential HDX-MS of isotopically labeled RT in the presence of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) efavirenz (EFV) showed subunit-specific perturbation in the rate of HDX consistent with previously published results and the RT-EFV co-crystal structure. PMID:25763479

  9. Operation of a cw rf driven ion source with hydrogen and deuterium gas (abstract){sup a}

    SciTech Connect

    Melnychuk, S.T.; Debiak, T.W.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1996-03-01

    We will describe the operation of a cw rf driven multicusp ion source designed for extraction of high current hydrogen and deuterium beams. The source is driven at 2 MHz by a 2.5 turn induction antenna immersed in the plasma. Bare stainless-steel and porcelain-coated Cu antennas have been used. The plasma load is matched to the rf generator by a variable tap {ital N}:1 transformer isolated to 46 kV, and an LC network on the secondary. With H{sub 2} gas the source can be operated at pressures between 5 and 60 mT with power reflection coefficients {lt}0.01. The extracted ion current density with a porcelain-coated antenna is approximately given by 35 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW with an 80 G dipole filter field for input powers from 3.5 to 6.6 kW. The current density remained constant for operation with a 6 and an 8 mm aperture. The source has been operated for 260 h at 3.6 kW with a single-porcelain-coated antenna. Mass spectrometer measurements of the extracted beam at this power show a species mix for H{sup +}:H{sup +}{sub 2}:H{sup +}{sub 3}:OH{sup +} of 0.49: 0.04: 0.42: 0.04. The calculated beam divergence using the IGUN code is compared with the measured divergence from an electrostatic sweep emittance scanner designed for high-power cw beam diagnostics. Phase space measurements at 40 kV and 23 mA beam current result in a normalized rms emittance of 0.09 {pi}mmmrad. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Conformational difference in human IgG2 disulfide isoforms revealed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aming; Fang, Jing; Chou, Robert Y-T; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Zhang, Zhongqi

    2015-03-17

    Both recombinant and natural human IgG2 antibodies have several different disulfide bond isoforms, which possess different global structures, thermal stabilities, and biological activities. A detailed mapping of the structural difference among IgG2 disulfide isoforms, however, has not been established. In this work, we employed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to study the conformation of three major IgG2 disulfide isoforms known as IgG2-B, IgG2-A1, and IgG2-A2 in two recombinant human IgG2 monoclonal antibodies. By comparing the protection factors between amino acid residues in isoforms B and A1 (the classical form), we successfully identified several local regions in which the IgG2-B isoform showed more solvent protection than the IgG2-A1 isoform. On the basis of three-dimensional structural models of IgG2, these identified regions were located on the Fab domains, close to the hinge, centered on the side where the two Fab arms faced each other in spatial proximity. We speculated that in the more solvent-protected B isoform, the two Fab arms were brought into contact by the nonclassical disulfide bonds, resulting in a more compact global structure. Loss of Fab domain flexibility in IgG2-B could limit its ability to access cell-surface epitopes, leading to reduced antigen binding potency. The A2 isoform was previously found to have disulfide linkages similar to those of the classical A1 isoform, but with different biophysical behaviors. Our data indicated that, compared to IgG2-A1, IgG2-A2 had less solvent protection in some heavy-chain Fab regions close the hinge, suggesting that the A2 isoform had more flexible Fab domains. PMID:25730439

  11. Sticking coefficient of hydrogen and deuterium on silicates under interstellar conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaabouni, H.; Bergeron, H.; Baouche, S.; Dulieu, F.; Matar, E.; Congiu, E.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Sticking of H and D atoms on interstellar dust grains is the first step in molecular hydrogen formation, which is a key reaction in the interstellar medium. Isotopic properties of the sticking can have an incidence on the observed HD molecule. Aims: After studying the sticking coefficients of H2 and D2 molecules on amorphous silicate surfaces experimentally and theoretically, we extrapolate the results to the sticking coefficient of atoms and propose a formulae that gives the sticking coefficients of H and D on both silicates and icy dust grains. Methods: In our experiments, we used the King and Wells method for measuring the sticking coefficients of H2 and D2 molecules on a silicate surface held at 10 K. It consists of measuring with a QMS (quadrupole mass spectrometer) the signals of H2 and D2 molecules reflected by the surface during the exposure of the sample to the molecular beam at a temperature ranging from 20 K to 340 K. We tested the efficiency of a physical model, developed previously for sticking on water-ice surfaces. We applied this model to our experimental results for the sticking coefficients of H2 and D2 molecules on a silicate surface and estimated the sticking coefficient of atoms by a single measurement of atomic recombination and propose an extrapolation. Results: Sticking of H, D, HD, H2, and D2 on silicates grains behaves the same as on icy dust grains. The sticking decreases with the gas temperature, and is dependent on the mass of the impactor. The sticking coefficient for both surfaces and impactors can be modeled by an analytical formulae S(T) = S0(1 + βT/T0)/(1 + T/T0)β, which describes both the experiments and the thermal distribution expected in an astrophysical context. The parameters S0 and T0 are summarized in a table. Conclusions: Previous estimates for the sticking coefficient of H atoms are close to the new estimation; however, we find that, when isotopic effects are taken into account, the sticking coefficient

  12. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Lassila, David H.; Bonner, Brian P.

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  13. In situ deuterium observation in deuterium-implanted tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, Yoshinori; Takagi, Ikuji; Kawamura, Shotaro; Yamamichi, Kazuyoshi; Akiyoshi, Masafumi; Sasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Taishi

    2013-11-01

    In order to evaluate the tritium inventory in plasma-facing tungsten components of a fusion reactor, deuterium depth profiles in tungsten were observed in situ using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) under continuous implantation of 3 keV D ions. Measurements were conducted at temperatures of 384, 473, 573 and 673 K. Recombination coefficients and rate constants for the surface recombination process were estimated from the observed deuterium concentration. It is indicated that the measured surface recombination rate constant is applied in a case wherein tungsten is exposed to hydrogen particles of various energies from a fusion plasma. The measured recombination coefficient was identical to that found by a different technique in a previous work. Deuterium in trap sites was found to contribute to deuterium retention in the samples as well as to deuterium in solution sites. The deuterium retention was low in the 384 K sample, in which trap sites had not appeared. Deuterium retention was very low in the 673 K sample, where most deuterium atoms were detrapped and desorbed. At an intermediate temperature of 473 K, the retention showed a maximum value due to a large occupancy of deuterium over many trap sites. The dependence of the retention on deuterium fluence was explained assuming that trap sites were produced by implantation.

  14. Optimum extracted H{sup {minus}} and D{sup {minus}} current densities from gas-pressure-limited high-power hydrogen/deuterium tandem ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1993-07-14

    The tandem hydrogen/deuterium ion source is modelled for the purpose of identifying the maximum current densities that can be extracted subject to the gas-pressure constraints proposed for contemporary beam-line systems. Optimum useful extracted current densities are found to be in the range of approximately 7 to 10 mA cm{sup {minus}2}. The sensitivity of these current densities is examined subject to uncertainties in the underlying atomic/molecular rate processes; A principal uncertainty remains the quantification of the molecular vibrational distribution following H{sub 3{sup +}} wall collisions.

  15. Difference in fibril core stability between two tau four-repeat domain proteins: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayathri; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2013-12-10

    One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies is fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The purpose of this study was to compare the high-resolution structure of fibrils formed by two different tau four-repeat domain constructs, tau4RD and tauK18, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry as a tool. While the two fibrils are found to be constructed on similar structural principles, the tauK18 fibril has a slightly more stable core. This difference in fibril core stability appears to be reflective of the mechanistic differences in the aggregation pathways of the two proteins. PMID:24256615

  16. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons . I. Interstellar H2 and CH4 formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alata, I.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Dartois, E.

    2014-09-01

    Context. The interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbons (HAC or a-C:H) observed in the diffuse medium are expected to disappear in a few million years, according to the destruction time scale from laboratory measurements. The existence of a-C:H results from the equilibrium between photodesorption, radiolysis, hydrogenation and resilience of the carbonaceous network. During this processing, many species are therefore injected into the gas phase, in particular H2, but also small organic molecules, radicals or fragments. Aims: We perform experiments on interstellar a-C:H analogs to quantify the release of these species in the interstellar medium. Methods: The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbon analogs was performed at low (10 K) to ambient temperature, coupled to mass-spectrometry detection and temperature-programed desorption. Using deuterium isotopic substitution, the species produced were unambiguously separated from background contributions. Results: The VUV photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons leads to the efficient production of H2 molecules, but also to small hydrocarbons. Conclusions: These species are formed predominantly in the bulk of the a-C:H analog carbonaceous network, in addition to the surface formation. Compared with species made by the recombination of H atoms and physisorbed on surfaces, they diffuse out at higher temperatures. In addition to the efficient production rate, it provides a significant formation route in environments where the short residence time scale for H atoms inhibits H2 formation on the surface, such as PDRs. The photolytic bulk production of H2 with carbonaceous hydrogenated amorphous carbon dust grains can provide a very large portion of the contribution to the H2 molecule formation. These dust grains also release small hydrocarbons (such as CH4) into the diffuse interstellar medium, which contribute to the formation of small carbonaceous radicals after being dissociated

  17. Carbonate thermochemical cycle for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L [Knoxville, TN; Dole, Leslie R [Knoxville, TN; Ferrada, Juan J [Knoxville, TN; Forsberg, Charles W [Oak Ridge, TN; Haire, Marvin J [Oak Ridge, TN; Hunt, Rodney D [Oak Ridge, TN; Lewis, Jr, Benjamin E [Knoxville, TN; Wymer, Raymond G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  18. Carbonate Thermochemical Cycle for the Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, Juan J; Collins, Jack Lee; Dole, Leslie Robert; Forsberg, Charles W; Haire, Marvin Jonathan; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Lewis Jr, Benjamin E; Wymer, Raymond; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and hydrogen storage studies on porous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ruz, Priyanka Banerjee, Seemita; Sudarsan, V.; Pandey, M.

    2015-06-24

    Porous carbon sample has been prepared, using zeolite-Y as template followed by annealing at 800°C, with view to estimate the extent of hydrogen storage by the sample. Based on XRD, {sup 13}C MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopic studies it is confirmed that the porous Carbon sample contains only sp{sup 2} hybridized carbon. The hydrogen sorption isotherms have been recorded for the sample at 273, 223K and 123K and the maximum hydrogen absorption capacity is found to be 1.47wt% at 123K. The interaction energy of hydrogen with the carbon framework was determined to be ∼ 10 kJ mol{sup −1}at lower hydrogen uptake and gradually decreases with increase in hydrogen loading.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Lueking, Angela D.; Li, Qixiu; Badding, John V.; Fonseca, Dania; Gutierrez, Humerto; Sakti, Apurba; Adu, Kofi; Schimmel, Michael

    2010-03-31

    Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

  1. XPS study of. beta. -carbon hydrogenation on Nickel(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Dost, A.A.; Dhanak, V.R.; Buckingham, S.

    1984-09-01

    The methanation reaction has been studied extensively using conventional catalysis and modern surface science techniques. It is now well established that the mechanism of this reaction involves the dissociative adsorption of carbon monoxide to produce highly reactive carbidic carbon (..cap alpha..-carbon) which is subsequently hydrogenated to produce methane. Under conditions of low hydrogen concentration, and high temperature, however, the reactive ..cap alpha..-C can be transformed into relatively less-reactive graphitic carbon (..beta..-carbon). The nature of ..beta..-carbon has been suggested to be graphitic as characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed surface reaction (TPSR) in hydrogen. Using XPS, it is demonstrated directly that conversion of ..beta..-carbon to ..cap alpha..-carbon does occur at ..beta..-carbon hydrogenation temperature and that the rate-determining step in the hydrogenation of ..beta..-carbon may be the detachment of carbon atoms from ..beta..-carbon islands. 19 references, 6 figures.

  2. Detection of Hydrogen Spillover in Palladium-Modified Activated Carbon Fibers During Hydrogen Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Brown, Craig; Liu, Yun; Bhat, Vinay V; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) are being evaluated for adsorptive hydrogen storage at near-ambient conditions because of their enhanced hydrogen uptake in comparison to Pd-free activated carbon fibers (ACF). The net uptake enhancement (at room temperature and 20 bar) is in excess of the amount corresponding to formation of Pd hydride, and is usually attributed to hydrogen spillover. In this paper, inelastic neutron scattering was used to demonstrate the formation of new C-H bonds in Pd-containing activated carbon fibers after exposure to hydrogen at 20 oC and 1.6 MPa, at the expense of physisorbed H2. This finding is a post-factum proof of the atomic nature of H species formed in presence of a Pd catalyst, and of their subsequent spillover and binding to the carbon support. Chemisorption of hydrogen may explain the reduction in hydrogen uptake from first to second adsorption cycle.

  3. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange reactions of cis- and trans-cyclopropane derivatives with D(2)O and CD(3)OD in the gas phase

    PubMed

    Li; Liu

    2000-01-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions involving four isomeric cyclopropane derivatives were investigated under chemical ionization (CI) conditions, using D(2)O and CD(3)OD as reagent gases. There are abundant ions at [M + 1](+), [M + 2](+) and [M + 3](+) in the D(2)O and CD(3)OD positive-ion CI mass spectra of the two isomer pairs 1, 2 and 3, 4. Their CI mass spectra are identical with each pair, and so are the collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of ions [M + 1](+), [M + 2](+) and [M + 3](+) of each of the two isomer pairs. The CID spectra of [M + 1](+) ions indicate that they have common D/H exchange reactions within each pair, which take place between molecular ions and deuterium-labeling reagents to form the [M - H + D](+) ions. Those of their [M + 2](+) ions show that they have common D/H exchange reactions within each pair, which form the [M(d1) + H](+) ions. Those of their [M + 3](+) ions show that they have common D/H exchange reactions within each pair, which take place between the [M(d1)] and deuterium-labeling reagents to produce [M(d2) + H](+) for the isomer pair 1, 2 and [M(d1) + D](+) for the isomer pair 3, 4. The number and position, and active order of the active hydrogen atoms of the isomer pairs 1, 2 and 3, 4 were determined. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10637425

  4. Carbon and hydrogen isotope effects in the open-system Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. Implications for abiogenic hydrocarbons in the Earth Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to clarify the isotope effects in the open-system Fischer-Tropsh type (FTT) synthesis with application to the problem of 'abiogenic' hydrocarbons. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions were measured for products of catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 on cobalt and iron catalysts at 245° C and 350° C and 10 MPa in a flow-through reactor. No carbon isotope fractionation between methane and longer hydrocarbons was observed, independently on the CO2 conversion. The hydrogen isotope fractionation appeared to be similar to that found in natural ('thermogenic' and 'biogenic') gases with the enrichment in deuterium of longer hydrocarbon chains and the higher effects for the Co-catalyst. It can be suggested that other than FTT reactions or a simple mixing are responsible for the occurrence of 'inverse' isotopic trends in both carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition found in light hydrocarbons in some specific terrestrial environments and meteorites.

  5. Deuterium-tritium pulse propulsion with hydrogen as propellant and the entire space-craft as a gigavolt capacitor for ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2013-08-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ∼105 K. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  6. Investigation of the role of the micro-porous layer in polymer electrolyte fuel cells with hydrogen deuterium contrast neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu Taek; Mench, Matthew M

    2012-03-28

    In this study, the high resolution hydrogen-deuterium contrast radiography method was applied to elucidate the impact of the micro-porous layer (MPL) on water distribution in the porous fuel cell media. At the steady state, deuterium replaced hydrogen in the anode stream, and the large difference in neutron attenuation of the D(2)O produced at the cathode was used to track the produced water. It was found that the water content peaked in the cathode-side diffusion media (DM) for the cell without MPL, but with an MPL on the anode and cathode DM, the peak water amount was pushed toward the anode, resulting in a relatively flattened water profile through components and demonstrating a liquid barrier effect. Additionally, the dynamic water behavior in diffusion media was analyzed to understand the effect of a MPL and operating conditions. The water content in the DM changed with applied current, although there is a significant amount of residual liquid content that does not appear to be part of capillary channels. The effect of the MPL on irreducible saturation in DM and cell performance was also investigated. PMID:22337210

  7. EPR and FTIR Spectroscopy of CARBON(4), CARBON(3) Hydrogen and Oxygen CARBON(3) Hydrogen in Solid Neon and Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qian

    The electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectrum of C_4 in a neon matrix at {~}4 K formed by the vacuum-ultraviolet photolysis of 1,3-butadiene has been investigated to seek evidence for the bending of the molecule, which had previously been indicated by the results of EPR and FTIR measurements made on C_4 trapped in argon at 10 K. The observed spectra, which include ^ {13}C hyperfine splitting and zero-field splitting data, confirm the splitting of the perpendicular xy_1 and xy_2 lines of triplet C_4 into separate x and y components, which is indicative of the unequivalent axes of a bent molecule. A Fourier transform infrared isotopic study has been made of the deuterium and carbon-13 substituted C _3H radical produced by trapping in solid Ar the products of the vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of CH_3CHCH_2 (propylene) or a mixture of methane and acetylene. The 1824.7 and 1159.8 cm^{-1} absorptions, which in earlier work using only deuterium isotosopic data could be assigned to either the cyclic or linear isomer, can now be definitely identified on the basis of extensive ^{13}C isotopic measurements as the nu_2(sigma^+) and nu_3(sigma^+) fundamentals of linear C_3H. The frequencies of the fundamentals and D and ^ {13}C isotopic shifts are in good agreement with the predictions of preliminary ab initio calculations for the linear isomer. The identification of a fundamental vibration of the HCCCO radical has been made, for the first time, in a FTIR study involving extensive isotopic measurements. An absorption at 2308.6 cm^{-1} has been assigned to the nu_2, antisymmetric CCCO stretching mode of HCCCO which was produced by trapping in Ar the products of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of a mixture of acetylene and carbon monoxide. The assignment is confirmed by measurements for a variety of D, ^{18}O, and ^{13}C substituted isotopomers.

  8. Effect of hydrogenation on interaction force among carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Ahmadreza; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogenation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was achieved with flowing hydrogen gas and heating CNTs up to 800 °C. Electron microcopy images show the etching effect of the hydrogen as well as the appearance of defects after hydrogenation. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CHx groups on the sidewalls of the functionalized CNTs. Raman spectra of the pristine and hydrogenated samples revealed a transition from graphitic to a disordered and defected structure by increasing the hydrogenation time. We measured the interaction force among CNTs in the pristine and hydrogenated samples. Results showed that the interaction force is reduced sharply upon hydrogenation. After examination of the relation between different experimentally obtained results and the interaction force trend, we discuss how hydrogenation affects the interaction force among CNTs by increasing roughness and formation of repulsive dipoles on the CNT surface.

  9. Are aromatic carbon donor hydrogen bonds linear in proteins?

    PubMed

    Nanda, Vikas; Schmiedekamp, Ann

    2008-02-01

    Proteins fold and maintain structure through the collective contributions of a large number of weak, noncovalent interactions. The hydrogen bond is one important category of forces that acts on very short distances. As our knowledge of protein structure continues to expand, we are beginning to appreciate the role that weak carbon-donor hydrogen bonds play in structure and function. One property that differentiates hydrogen bonds from other packing forces is propensity for forming a linear donor-hydrogen-acceptor orientation. To ascertain if carbon-donor hydrogen bonds are able to direct acceptor linearity, we surveyed the geometry of interactions specifically involving aromatic sidechain ring carbons in a data set of high resolution protein structures. We found that while donor-acceptor distances for most carbon donor hydrogen bonds were tighter than expected for van der Waals packing, only the carbons of histidine showed a significant bias for linear geometry. By categorizing histidines in the data set into charged and neutral sidechains, we found only the charged subset of histidines participated in linear interactions. B3LYP/6-31G**++ level optimizations of imidazole and indole-water interactions at various fixed angles demonstrates a clear orientation dependence of hydrogen bonding capacity for both charged and neutral sidechains. We suggest that while all aromatic carbons can participate in hydrogen bonding, only charged histidines are able to overcome protein packing forces and enforce linear interactions. The implications for protein modeling and design are discussed. PMID:17705268

  10. On the role of atomic metastability in the production of Balmer line radiation from ‘cold’ atomic hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogenic ion impurities in fusion edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2012-03-01

    Published arguments, which assign an important role to atomic metastability in the production of ‘narrow’ Zeeman component radiation from the boundary region of fusion plasmas, are examined critically in relation to l-redistribution by proton and electron collisions, and mixing of unperturbed atomic states by the ion microfield and microfield gradient. It is concluded that these important processes indeed severely constrain the contribution from ‘metastable’ states to the generation of the hydrogen Balmer spectra, for electron concentrations above 1012 cm-3, as pointed out before by the present author (Hey et al 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3555). The analysis of collision-induced l-redistribution represents an extension of that used previously (Hey et al 1996 Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36 583), applicable up to higher electron densities. For comparison purposes, we also consider the question of metastability of ionized helium in a low-temperature plasma, and that of some common hydrogenic impurities (C5+ and Ne9+) in a hydrogen (deuterium) fusion plasma. While for low nuclear charge Z the metastability of 2s1/2 levels is quenched by the plasma environment, it is much reduced in high-Z ions owing to the rapid increase with Z of the two-photon electric dipole (2E1) and magnetic dipole (M1) spontaneous transition rates to the ground state, whereas the role of the plasma in these cases is less important. The main new principle elaborated in this work is the sensitivity of atomic line strengths, and hence collision strengths, to perturbation by the plasma environment for transitions between fine-structure sublevels of the same principal quantum number. As the plasma microfield strength grows, ‘allowed’ transitions diminish in strength, while ‘forbidden’ transitions grow. However, owing to violation of the parity selection rule, there is an overall loss of collision strength available to transitions, resulting from the appearance of significant

  11. [Determination of deuterium concentration in foods and influence of water with modified isotopic composition on oxidation parameters and heavy hydrogen isotopes content in experimental animals].

    PubMed

    Basov, A A; Bykov, I M; Baryshev, M G; Dzhimak, S S; Bykov, M I

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of the study of the deuterium (D) content in food products as well as the influence of deuterium depleted water (DDW) on the concentration of heavy hydrogen isotopes in the blood and lyophilized tissues of rats. The most significant difference in the content of D was found between potato and pork fat, which indexes the standard delta notation (δ) D in promille, related to the international standard SMOW (Standard Mean Ocean of Water) amounted to -83,2 per thousand and -250,7 per thousand, respectively (p<0,05). Among the investigated samples of water deuterium concentration ranged from -75,5 per thousand (Narzan) to +72,1 per thousand (Kubai), that indicates the ability of some food products to increase the concentration of heavy hydrogen atoms in the body. The data obtained in the experimental modeling of the diet of male Wistar rats in the age of 5-6 mo (weight 235 ± 16 g) using DDW (δD = -743,2 per thousand) instead of drinking water (δD = -37,0 per thousand) with identical mineral composition showed that after 2 weeks significant (p <0,05) formation of isotopic (deuterium-protium, D/H) gradient in the body is possible. Changing the direction of isotopic D/H gradient in laboratory animals in comparison with its physiological indicators (72-127 per thousand, "plasma>tissue") is due to different rates ofisotopic exchange reactions in plasma and tissues (liver, kidney, heart), which can be explained by entering into the composition of a modified diet of organic substrates with more than DDW concentration D, which are involved in the construction of cellular structures and eventually lead to a redistribution of D and change direction of D/H gradient "plasma

  12. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of dissolved organic groundwater pollutants by equilibrium sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhener, Patrick; Yu, Xianjing

    2012-03-01

    Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) were established which relate equilibrium vapor-liquid isotope effects to stable carbon and hydrogen isotope enrichment factors for equilibrium sorption to geosorbents. The LFERs were established for normal, cyclic or branched alkanes, monoaromatic hydrocarbons, and chloroethenes. These LFERs predict that isotopic light compounds sorb more strongly than their heavy counterparts. Defining fractionation as in classical literature by "heavy divided by light", carbon enrichment factors for equilibrium sorption were derived which ranged from - 0.13 ± 0.04‰ (benzene) to - 0.52 ± 0.19‰ (trichloroethene at 5-15 °C). Hydrogen enrichment factors for sorption of 14 different compounds were between - 2.4 and - 9.2‰. For perdeuterated hydrocarbons the predicted enrichment factors ranged from - 19 ± 5.4‰ (benzene) to - 64 ± 30‰ (cyclohexane). Equilibrium sorption experiments with a soil and activated carbon as sorbents were performed in the laboratory for perdeuterocyclohexane and perdeuterotoluene. The measured D/H enrichments agreed with the LFER prediction for both compounds and both sorbents within the uncertainty estimate of the prediction. The results of this work suggest that equilibrium sorption does create only very small isotope shifts for 13C in groundwater pollutants in aquifers. It is also suggested that deuterium shifts are expected to be higher, especially for strongly sorbing pollutants.

  13. Polar Aprotic Modifiers for Chromatographic Separation and Back-Exchange Reduction for Protein Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Monitored by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeja, Santosh G.; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry is an important non-perturbing tool to study protein structure and protein-protein interactions. However, water in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography mobile phase leads to back-exchange of D for H during chromatographic separation of proteolytic peptides following H/D exchange, resulting in incorrect identification of fast-exchanging hydrogens as unexchanged hydrogens. Previously, fast high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography have been shown to decrease back-exchange. Here, we show that replacement of up to 40% of the water in the LC mobile phase by the modifiers, dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) (i.e., polar organic modifiers that lack rapid exchanging hydrogens), significantly reduces back-exchange. On-line LC micro-ESI FT-ICR MS resolves overlapped proteolytic peptide isotopic distributions, allowing for quantitative determination of the extent of back-exchange. The DMF modified solvent composition also improves chromatographic separation while reducing back-exchange relative to conventional solvent.

  14. Deuterium-free water (1H2O) in complex life-support systems of long-term space missions.

    PubMed

    Sinyak, Y; Grigoriev, A; Gaydadimov, V; Gurieva, T; Levinskih, M; Pokrovskii, B

    2003-04-01

    Heavy water containing deuterium displays toxic property. It is stated that any quantity of a heavy isotope of hydrogen--deuterium--is undesirable to animals and plants. It was earlier shown by us that physical-chemical life support systems on board the "MIR" station fractionate (change) isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon. Therefore, the problem of regenerative systems in habitable space objects should include removal, from water, of a heavy stable isotope of hydrogen--deuterium. In this article we consider one method of obtaining deuterium-free water--decomposition of distillate water in an electrolyser to hydrogen and oxygen with subsequent synthesis in a catalytic or high-temperature reactor. The influence of deuterium-free water on the growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana and Japanese quail is investigated. It is shown that with the help of the electrolysis method it is possible to fabricate water containing 80% less deuterium in comparison with SMOW. Experimentally, it is proved on a culture of Arabidopsis thaliana and Japanese quail that water with reduced contents of deuterium (80%) displays positive biological activity. PMID:12575722

  15. Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotube with vacant defects

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Gang; Shen, Huaze; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei; Tangpanitanon, Jirawat; Wen, Bo; Xue, Jianming

    2014-05-28

    Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is important for its engineering applications and hydrogen energy storage. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the physisorption of molecular hydrogen on a SWCNT with a vacant defect, focusing on the effect of the vacant defect size and external parameters such as temperature and pressure. We find that hydrogen can be physisorbed inside a SWCNT through a vacant defect when the defect size is above a threshold. By controlling the size of the defects, we are able to extract hydrogen molecules from a gas mixture and store them inside the SWCNT. We also find that external parameters, such as low temperature and high pressure, enhance the physisorption of hydrogen molecules inside the SWCNT. In addition, the storage efficiency can be improved by introducing more defects, i.e., reducing the number of carbon atoms on the SWCNT.

  16. Hydrogen storage in carbon materials—preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörissen, Ludwig; Klos, Holger; Lamp, Peter; Reichenauer, Gudrun; Trapp, Victor

    1998-08-01

    Recent developments aiming at the accelerated commercialization of fuel cells for automotive applications have triggered an intensive research on fuel storage concepts for fuel cell cars. The fuel cell technology currently lacks technically and economically viable hydrogen storage technologies. On-board reforming of gasoline or methanol into hydrogen can only be regarded as an intermediate solution due to the inherently poor energy efficiency of such processes. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanofibers may lead to an efficient solution to the above described problems.

  17. Hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic compounds in plants reflect the plant's carbon metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. A.; Kahmen, A.; Werner, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The main factors controlling δ2H of plant organic compounds are generally assumed to be the plant's source water and the evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water. Hydrogen isotope analyses of plant compounds from sediments or tree rings are therefore mainly applied to assess hydrological conditions at different spatial and temporal scales. However, the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of plant organic compounds (ɛbio) also accounts for a large part of the variability observed in the δ2H values. Nevertheless, only few studies have directly addressed the physiological basis of this variability and even fewer studies have thus explored possible applications of hydrogen isotope variability in plant organic compounds for plant physiological research. Here we show two datasets indicating that the plant's carbon metabolism can have a substantial influence on δ2H values of n-alkanes and cellulose. First, we performed a controlled experiment where we forced plants into heterotrophic and autotrophic C-metabolism by growing them under four different light treatments. Second, we assessed the δ2H values of different parasitic heterotrophic plants and their autotrophic host plants. Our two datasets show a systematic shift in ɛbio of up to 80 ‰ depending on the plant's carbon metabolism (heterotrophic or autotrophic). Differences in n-alkane and cellulose δ2H values in plants with autotrophic vs. heterotrophic metabolisms can be explained by different NADPH pools that are used by the plants to build their compounds either with assimilates that originate directly from photosynthesis or from stored carbohydrates. Our results have significant implications for the calibration and interpretation of geological records. More importantly, as the δ2H values reflect the plant's carbon metabolism involved during the tissue formation, our findings highlight the potential of δ2H values as new tool for studying plant and ecosystem carbon

  18. Probing the Conformational and Functional Consequences of Disulfide Bond Engineering in Growth Hormone by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Coupled to Electron Transfer Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Seger, Signe T; Breinholt, Jens; Faber, Johan H; Andersen, Mette D; Wiberg, Charlotte; Schjødt, Christine B; Rand, Kasper D

    2015-06-16

    Human growth hormone (hGH), and its receptor interaction, is essential for cell growth. To stabilize a flexible loop between helices 3 and 4, while retaining affinity for the hGH receptor, we have engineered a new hGH variant (Q84C/Y143C). Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to map the impact of the new disulfide bond on the conformational dynamics of this new hGH variant. Compared to wild type hGH, the variant exhibits reduced loop dynamics, indicating a stabilizing effect of the introduced disulfide bond. Furthermore, the disulfide bond exhibits longer ranging effects, stabilizing a short α-helix quite distant from the mutation sites, but also rendering a part of the α-helical hGH core slightly more dynamic. In the regions where the hGH variant exhibits a different deuterium uptake than the wild type protein, electron transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation has been used to pinpoint the residues responsible for the observed differences (HDX-ETD). Finally, by use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements, we show that the new disulfide bond does not compromise receptor affinity. Our work highlight the analytical potential of HDX-ETD combined with functional assays to guide protein engineering. PMID:25978680

  19. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry reveals the interaction of Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein and chlorosome CsmA protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Richard Y-C.; Wen, Jianzhong; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    In green-sulfur bacterial photosynthesis, excitation energy absorbed by a peripheral antenna structure known as the chlorosome is sequentially transferred through a baseplate protein to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) antenna protein and into the reaction center, which is embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane. The molecular details of the optimized photosystem architecture required for efficient energy transfer are only partially understood. We address here the question of how the baseplate interacts with the FMO protein by applying hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with enzymatic digestion and mass spectrometry analysis to reveal the binding interface of the FMO antenna protein and the CsmA baseplate protein. Several regions on the FMO protein, represented by peptides consisting of 123-129, 140-149, 150-162, 191-208 and 224-232, show significant decreases of deuterium uptake after CsmA binding. The results indicate that the CsmA protein interacts with the Bchl a #1 side of the FMO protein. A global picture including peptide-level details for the architecture of the photosystem from green sulfur bacteria can now be drawn. PMID:22142245

  20. Conformational dynamics of human FXR-LBD ligand interactions studied by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry: insights into the antagonism of the hypolipidemic agent Z-guggulsterone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liping; Broderick, David; Jiang, Yuan; Hsu, Victor; Maier, Claudia S

    2014-09-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors that plays a key role in the regulation of bile acids, lipid and glucose metabolisms. The regulative function of FXR is governed by conformational changes of the ligand binding domain (LBD) upon ligand binding. Although FXR is a highly researched potential therapeutic target, only a limited number of FXR-agonist complexes have been successfully crystallized and subsequently yielded high resolution structures. There is currently no structural information of any FXR-antagonist complexes publically available. We therefore explored the use of amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled with mass spectrometry for characterizing conformational changes in the FXR-LBD upon ligand binding. Ligand-specific deuterium incorporation profiles were obtained for three FXR ligand chemotypes: GW4064, a synthetic non-steroidal high affinity agonist; the bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), the endogenous low affinity agonist of FXR; and Z-guggulsterone (GG), an in vitro antagonist of the steroid chemotype. A comparison of the HDX profiles of their ligand-bound FXR-LBD complexes revealed a unique mode of interaction for GG. The conformational features of the FXR-LBD-antagonist interaction are discussed. PMID:24953769

  1. Different conformational dynamics of PDZ1 and PDZ2 in full-length EBP50 analyzed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Duc, Nguyen Minh; Kim, Dong Kyun; Lee, Su Youn; Li, Sheng; Seo, Min-Duk; Woods, Virgil L; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-08-01

    Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding protein 50 (EBP50) is a scaffolding protein expressed in polarized epithelial cells in various organs, including the liver, kidney, and small intestine, in which it regulates the trafficking and targeting cellular proteins. EBP50 contains two postsynaptic density-95/disk-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domains (e.g., PDZ1 and PDZ2) and an ezrin/radixin/moesin-binding (EB) domain. PDZ domains are one of the major scaffolding domains regulating protein-protein interactions with critical biological roles in cell polarity, migration, proliferation, recognition, and cell-cell interaction. PDZ1 and PDZ2 in EBP50 have different ligand selectivity, although several high-resolution structural studies of isolated PDZ1 and PDZ2 showed similar structures. We studied the conformations of full-length EBP50 and isolated PDZ1 and PDZ2 using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). The deuterium uptake profiles of isolated PDZ1 and PDZ2 were similar to those of full-length EBP50. Interestingly, PDZ1 was more dynamic than PDZ2, and these PDZ domains underwent different conformational changes upon ligand binding. These results might explain the differences in ligand-selectivity between PDZ1 and PDZ2. PMID:25789870

  2. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

    2011-07-31

    Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

  3. Investigation of Kp- and Kd-atom formation and their collisional processes with hydrogen and deuterium targets by the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Raeisi, G. M.; Kalantari, S. Z.

    2010-10-15

    The classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method has been used to study the capture of negative kaons by hydrogen and deuterium atoms; subsequently, the elastic scattering, Stark mixing, and Coulomb deexcitation cross sections of Kp and Kd atoms have been determined. The results for kaonic atom formation confirm the initial conditions that have been parametrically applied by most atomic cascade models. Our results show that Coulomb deexcitation in Kp and Kd atoms with {Delta}n>1 is important in addition to n=1. We have shown that the contribution of molecular structure effects to the cross sections of the collisional processes is larger than the isotopic effects of the targets. We have also compared our results with the semiclassical approaches.

  4. Kaon Electroproduction on Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    David Abbott; Abdellah Ahmidouch, Pawel Ambrozewicz; Chris Armstrong; John Arrington; K. Assamagan; Kevin Bailey; Oliver K. Baker; Shelton Beedoe; Elizabeth Beise; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Jinseok Cha; G. Collins; C. Cothran; W.J. Cummings; Samuel Danagoulian; Fraser Duncan; Jim Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Tom Eden; Rolf Ent; Lars Ewell; H.T. Fortune; Haiyan Gao; Donald Geesaman; Kenneth Gustafsson; Paul Gueye; Jens-Ole Hansen; Wendy Hinton; Hal Jackson; Cynthia Keppel; Andi Klein; D. Koltenok; David Mack; Richard Madey; Pete Markowitz; C.J. Martoff; David Meekins; Joseph Mitchell; R. Mohring; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; S.K. Mtingwa; Tom O'Neill; Gabriel Niculescu; Ioana Niculescu; Dave Potterveld; John Price; Philip Roos; Brian Raue; J.J. Reidy; Juerg Reinhold; G. Savage; Reyad Sawafta; J.P. Schiffer; Ralph Segel; Stepan Stepanyan; V. Tadevosian; Liguang Tang; B. Terburg; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Ben Zeidman; Beni Zihlmann

    1998-08-01

    Kaon electroproduction on deuterium and hydrogen targets has been measured at beam energies of 3.245 and 2.445GeV and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}=0.38 and O.5(GeV/c ){sup 2} Associated production off a proton in the deuteron exhibits a quasifree production mechanism. The electroproduction of a Sigma - off the neutron could be extracted for the first time with reasonable errors.

  5. Hydrogen-deficient atmospheres for cool carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Bower, C. D.; Lemke, D. A.; Luttermoser, D. G.; Petrakis, J. P.; Reinhart, M. D.; Welch, K. A.; Alexander, D. R.; Goebel, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Motivated by recent work which hints at a possible deficiency of hydrogen in non-Mira N-type carbon stars and to further explore the parameter space of chemical composition, computations have been made of a series of hydrogen-deficient models for carbon stars. For these models Teff = 3000 K, and log g = 0.0. Solar abundances are used for all elements except for carbon (which is enhanced to give C/O = 1.05), hydrogen, and helium. As the fractional abundance of hydrogen is decreased, being replaced by helium, the temperature-optical depth relation is affected only slightly, but the temperature-pressure relation is changed. The most striking change in the emergent flux is the decrease of the H(-) peak at 1.65 micron compared with the blackbody peak at 1.00 micron.

  6. Controlled carbon nitride growth on surfaces for hydrogen evolution electrodes.

    PubMed

    Shalom, Menny; Gimenez, Sixto; Schipper, Florian; Herraiz-Cardona, Isaac; Bisquert, Juan; Antonietti, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Efficient and low-cost electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction are highly desired for future renewable energy systems. Described herein is the reduction of water to hydrogen using a metal-free carbon nitride electrocatalyst which operates in neutral and alkaline environments. An efficient, easy, and general method for growing ordered carbon nitride on different electrodes was developed. The metal-free catalyst demonstrates low overpotential values, which are comparable to those of non-noble metals, with reasonable current densities. The facile deposition method enables the fabrication of many electronic and photoelectronic devices based on carbon nitride for renewable energy applications. PMID:24574144

  7. TENSILE TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A; Thad Adams, T; Ps Lam, P

    2007-05-02

    An infrastructure of new and existing pipelines and systems will be required to carry and to deliver hydrogen as an alternative energy source under the hydrogen economy. Carbon and low alloy steels of moderate strength are currently used in hydrogen delivery systems as well as in the existing natural gas systems. It is critical to understand the material response of these standard pipeline materials when they are subjected to pressurized hydrogen environments. The methods and results from a testing program to quantify hydrogen effects on mechanical properties of carbon steel pipeline and pipeline weld materials are provided. Tensile properties of one type of steel (A106 Grade B) in base metal, welded and heat affected zone conditions were tested at room temperature in air and high pressure (10.34 MPa or 1500 psig) hydrogen. A general reduction in the materials ability to plastically deform was noted in this material when specimens were tested in hydrogen. Furthermore, the primary mode of fracture was changed from ductile rupture in air to cleavage with secondary tearing in hydrogen. The mechanical test results will be applied in future analyses to evaluate service life of the pipelines. The results are also envisioned to be part of the bases for construction codes and structural integrity demonstrations for hydrogen service pipeline and vessels.

  8. Hydrogen sensing characteristics from carbon nanotube field emissions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Changkun; Luo, Haijun; Cai, Jianqiu; Wang, Fuquan; Zhao, Yangyang; Li, Detian

    2016-03-14

    An innovative hydrogen sensing concept is demonstrated based on the field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, where the low emission currents rise in proportion to hydrogen partial pressures above 10(-9) Torr. Experimental and first principles studies reveal that the sensing mechanism is attributed to the effective work function reduction from dissociative hydrogen chemisorption. The embedded Ni catalyst would assist both the hydrogen dissociation and work function reduction. This technique is promising to build miniature low cost hydrogen sensors for multiple applications. This work is valuable for studies of nanocarbon-gas reaction mechanisms and the work function properties in adsorption related applications, including field emission, hydrogen storage, energy cells, and gas sensing. PMID:26890686

  9. Hydrogen sensing characteristics from carbon nanotube field emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Changkun; Luo, Haijun; Cai, Jianqiu; Wang, Fuquan; Zhao, Yangyang; Li, Detian

    2016-03-01

    An innovative hydrogen sensing concept is demonstrated based on the field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, where the low emission currents rise in proportion to hydrogen partial pressures above 10-9 Torr. Experimental and first principles studies reveal that the sensing mechanism is attributed to the effective work function reduction from dissociative hydrogen chemisorption. The embedded Ni catalyst would assist both the hydrogen dissociation and work function reduction. This technique is promising to build miniature low cost hydrogen sensors for multiple applications. This work is valuable for studies of nanocarbon-gas reaction mechanisms and the work function properties in adsorption related applications, including field emission, hydrogen storage, energy cells, and gas sensing.

  10. [Microbial synthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment by facultative methylotrophic bacterium Brevibacterium methylicum with RMP assimilation of carbon].

    PubMed

    Mosin, O V; Shvets, V I; Skladnev, D A; Ignatov, I

    2014-01-01

    The preparative microbial synthesis of amino acids labelled with stable isotopes, including deuterium ( 2 H), suitable for biomedical applications by methylotrophic bacteria was studied using L-phenylalanine as example. This amino acid is secreted by Gram-negative aerobic facultative methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, assimilating methanol via ribulose-5-monophosphate (RMP) cycle of assimilation of carbon, The data on adaptation of L-phenylalanine secreted by methylotrophic bacterium В. methylicum to the maximal concentration of deuterium in the growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O and 2% [ 2 Н]methanol, and biosynthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine With different levels of enrichment are presented. The strain was adapted by means of plating initial cells on firm (2% agarose) minimal growth media with an increasing gradient of 2 Н 2 O concentration from 0; 24.5; 49.0; 73.5 up to 98% 2 Н 2 O followed by subsequent selection of separate colonies stable to the action of 2 Н 2 O. These colonies were capable to produce L-phenylalanine. L-phenylalanine was extracted from growth medium by extraction with isopropanol with the subsequent crystallization in ethanol (output 0.65 g/l). The developed method of microbial synthesis allows to obtain deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment, depending on concentration of 2 Н 2 O in growth media, from 17% (on growth medium with 24,5% 2 Н 2 O) up to 75% (on growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O) of deuterium in the molecule that is confirmed with the data of the electron impact (EI) mass- spectrometry analysis of methyl ethers of N-dimethylamino(naphthalene)-5-sulfochloride (dansyl) phenylalanine in these experimental conditions. PMID:25249528

  11. Hydrogen storage on high-surface-area carbon monoliths for Adsorb hydrogen Gas Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Pfeifer, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase hydrogen volumetric storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed hydrogen gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize hydrogen storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis atmosphere. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis atmosphere have influences on gravimetric excess adsorption. Compaction temperature has large influences on gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high hydrogen storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument.

  12. MECHANICAL TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A

    2006-05-11

    The methods and interim results from a testing program to quantify hydrogen effects on mechanical properties of carbon steel pipeline and pipeline weld materials are provided. The scope is carbon steels commonly used for natural gas pipelines in the United States that are candidates for hydrogen service in the hydrogen economy. The mechanical test results will be applied in future analyses to evaluate service life of the pipelines. The results are also envisioned to be part of the bases for construction codes and structural integrity demonstrations for hydrogen service pipeline and vessels. Tensile properties of one type of steel (A106 Grade B) in base metal, welded and heat affected zone conditions were tested at room temperature in air and high pressure (1500 psig) hydrogen. A general reduction in the materials ability to plastically deform was noted in this material when specimens were tested in 1500 psig hydrogen. Furthermore, the primary mode of fracture was changed from ductile rupture in air to cleavage with secondary tearing in hydrogen. The mechanical test program will continue with tests to quantify the fracture behavior in terms of J-R curves for these materials at air and hydrogen pressure conditions.

  13. Automated data reduction for hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments, enabled by high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kazazic, Sasa; Zhang, Hui-Min; Schaub, Tanner M; Emmett, Mark R; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Blakney, Gregory T; Marshall, Alan G

    2010-04-01

    Mass analysis of proteolytic fragment peptides following hydrogen/deuterium exchange offers a general measure of solvent accessibility/hydrogen bonding (and thus conformation) of solution-phase proteins and their complexes. The primary problem in such mass analyses is reliable and rapid assignment of mass spectral peaks to the correct charge state and degree of deuteration of each fragment peptide, in the presence of substantial overlap between isotopic distributions of target peptides, autolysis products, and other interferant species. Here, we show that at sufficiently high mass resolving power (m/Delta m(50%) > or = 100,000), it becomes possible to resolve enough of those overlaps so that automated data reduction becomes possible, based on the actual elemental composition of each peptide without the need to deconvolve isotopic distributions. We demonstrate automated, rapid, reliable assignment of peptide masses from H/D exchange experiments, based on electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectra from H/D exchange of solution-phase myoglobin. Combined with previously demonstrated automated data acquisition for such experiments, the present data reduction algorithm enhances automation (and thus expands generality and applicability) for high-resolution mass spectrometry-based analysis of H/D exchange of solution-phase proteins. PMID:20116280

  14. A novel five-lipoxygenase activity protein inhibitor labeled with carbon-14 and deuterium.

    PubMed

    Latli, Bachir; Hrapchak, Matt; Gao, Joe J; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2015-07-01

    2-[4-(3-{(1R)-1-[4-(2-Aminopyrimidin-5-yl)phenyl]-1-cyclopropylethyl}-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]-N,N-dimethylacetamide (1), is a novel and selective five-lipoxygenase activity protein (FLAP) inhibitor with excellent pharmacokinetics properties. The availability of a key chiral intermediate allowed the synthesis of [(14) C]-(1) in six radiochemical steps and in 47% overall radiochemical yield with a specific activity of 51 mCi/mmol using carbon-14 zinc cyanide. 2-Chloro-N,N-dimethyl-(2)H6-acetamide was prepared and condensed with a penultimate intermediate to give [(2)H6]-(1) in very high yield and in more than 99% isotopic enrichment. PMID:26190342

  15. Hydrogen Confinement in Carbon Nanopores: Extreme Densification at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; He, Lilin; Saha, Dipendu; Contescu, Cristian I; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2011-01-01

    In-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of hydrogen confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) at room-temperature provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H2 at pressures up to 200 bar. The data was used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure, and approaches the liquid hydrogen density in narrow nanopores at 200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of hydrogen within the pores create internal pressures which exceed by a factor of up to ~ 60 the external gas pressures, confirming the benefits of adsorptive over compressive storage. These results can be utilized to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum hydrogen storage capacities at near ambient temperatures.

  16. Hydrogen Storage in the Carbon Dioxide - Formic Acid Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cornel; Montandon-Clerc, Mickael; Laurenczy, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    This year Mankind will release about 39 Gt carbon dioxide into the earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important, as the CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere has reached 400 ppm. One approach to contribute to the decrease of this hazardous emission is to recycle CO(2), for example reducing it to formic acid. The hydrogenation of CO(2) can be achieved with a series of catalysts under basic and acidic conditions, in wide variety of solvents. To realize a hydrogen-based charge-discharge device ('hydrogen battery'), one also needs efficient catalysts for the reverse reaction, the dehydrogenation of formic acid. Despite of the fact that the overwhelming majority of these reactions are carried out using precious metals-based catalysts (mainly Ru), we review here developments for catalytic hydrogen evolution from formic acid with iron-based complexes. PMID:26842324

  17. A Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Study on Nickel-based Binary-Ternary Amorphous and Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibhatla, Anasuya

    Hydrogen is a major role player in current global sustainable energy scenario. Research around the world is carried out to harness hydrogen from all possible sources. One of these sources is water gas shift reaction after the coal gasification process. Sustainable infrastructure can be viable in countries like USA and Australia, making this process viable. Various methods are used to harness this hydrogen from the water gas. One of these methods is the use of inorganic membranes based on Pd, Ag, Ni, Zr and other transition metals. Pd addition to the membranes makes the membranes more expensive for commercial use. Various bulk properties like hydrogen permeation and absorption are studied on Pd and Pd-based alloys. Alternate alloys based on Ni, V, Ta etc are being studied to substitute the use of Pd making this technology more cost efficient. A current balance in research in this area is fund to exist by coating the non-precious metal membranes with Pd to improve the surface interaction with hydrogen. The nature of membranes used for hydrogen separation is important aspect for the overall performance. Crystalline materials provide better bulk properties, however, are not durable under high temperature and hydrogen pressure. In this research, non-Pd coated Ni-based amorphous membranes were made by melt spin technique, which have been studied for their surface properties. Gas phase H2-D2 exchange reaction has been carried out on the membrane surface. This provides a measure of catalytic activity of the above mentioned membranes. More studies included the crystallographic phase change determination, bulk hydrogen solubility measurements, surface conduction measurements and surface morphological studies. During this research, it has been observed that crystalline materials provide more surface activity for hydrogen than their amorphous counterparts. Ni64Zr36 alloy has been shown to exhibit similar kinetic rates as metallic Ni. Also, microkinetic analysis was performed

  18. Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

  19. Injection of deuterium pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.; Andersen, P.; Andersen, S.A.; Andersen, V.; Nordskov-Nielsen, A.; Sass, B.; Weisberg, K.V.

    1984-09-01

    A discussion is given of the work done at Riso National Laboratory on the design and construction of deuterium pellet injectors. A pellet injection system made for the TFR tokamak at Fontenay-aux-Roses, Paris is described. 0.12-mg pellets are injected with velocities of around 600-700 m/s through a 5-m long guide tube. Next some of the details of a new light gas gun are given; with this gun, hydrogen pellets are accelerated to velocities above 1400 m/s, deuterium pellets to velocities above 1300 m/s and neon pellets to velocities above 550 m/s. Finally, a new acceleration method where a pellet should be accelerated by means of a magnetically stabilised electrical discharge is discussed, and a set up for measuring of the pellet size by means of a microwave cavity is outlined.

  20. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Mosqueda, Rosalba; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Kuc, Agnieszka B.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Heine, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory. Our simulation model includes a Pt4 cluster for the catalyst nanoparticle and curved and planar circumcoronene for two exemplary single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT), the (10,10) CNT and one of large diameter, respectively. Our results show that the H2 molecule dissociates spontaneously on the Pt4 cluster. However, the dissociated H atoms have to overcome a barrier of more than 2 eV to migrate from the catalyst to the CNT, even if the Pt4 cluster is at full saturation with six adsorbed and dissociated hydrogen molecules. Previous investigations have shown that the mobility of hydrogen atoms on the CNT surface is hindered by a barrier. We find that instead the Pt4 catalyst may move along the outer surface of the CNT with activation energy of only 0.16 eV, and that this effect offers the possibility of full hydrogenation of the CNT. Thus, although we have not found a low-energy pathway to spillover onto the CNT, we suggest, based on our calculations and calculated data reported in the literature, that in the hydrogen-spillover process the observed saturation of the CNT at hydrogen background pressure occurs through mobile Pt nanoclusters, which move on the substrate more easily than the substrate-chemisorbed hydrogens, and deposit or reattach hydrogens in the process. Initial hydrogenation of the carbon substrate, however, is thermodynamically unfavoured, suggesting that defects should play a significant role. PMID:25699250

  1. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrogen. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquids. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  2. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation during Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Silvia A.; Ulrich, Ania C.; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sleep, Brent; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has the potential to distinguish physical from biological attenuation processes in the subsurface. In this study, carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation effects during biodegradation of benzene under anaerobic conditions with different terminal-electron-accepting processes are reported for the first time. Different enrichment factors (ɛ) for carbon (range of −1.9 to −3.6‰) and hydrogen (range of −29 to −79‰) fractionation were observed during biodegradation of benzene under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. These differences are not related to differences in initial biomass or in rates of biodegradation. Carbon isotopic enrichment factors for anaerobic benzene biodegradation in this study are comparable to those previously published for aerobic benzene biodegradation. In contrast, hydrogen enrichment factors determined for anaerobic benzene biodegradation are significantly larger than those previously published for benzene biodegradation under aerobic conditions. A fundamental difference in the previously proposed initial step of aerobic versus proposed anaerobic biodegradation pathways may account for these differences in hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Potentially, C-H bond breakage in the initial step of the anaerobic benzene biodegradation pathway may account for the large fractionation observed compared to that in aerobic benzene biodegradation. Despite some differences in reported enrichment factors between cultures with different terminal-electron-accepting processes, carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis has the potential to provide direct evidence of anaerobic biodegradation of benzene in the field. PMID:12513995

  3. Nanopores of carbon nanotubes as practical hydrogen storage media

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sang Soo; Kim, Hyun Seok; Han, Kyu Sung; Lee, Jai Young; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Kang, Jeung Ku; Woo, Seong Ihl; Duin, Adri C.T. van; Goddard, William A. III

    2005-11-21

    We report on hydrogen desorption mechanisms in the nanopores of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The as-grown MWCNTs show continuous walls that do not provide sites for hydrogen storage under ambient conditions. However, after treating the nanotubes with oxygen plasma to create nanopores in the MWCNTs, we observed the appearance of a new hydrogen desorption peak in the 300-350 K range. Furthermore, the calculations of density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that this peak could be attributed to the hydrogen that is physically adsorbed inside nanopores whose diameter is approximately 1 nm. Thus, we demonstrated that 1 nm nanopores in MWCNTs offer a promising route to hydrogen storage media for onboard practical applications.

  4. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  5. Palladium-doped Nanoporous Carbon Fibers for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Bhat, Vinay V; van Benthem, Klaus; Tekinalp, Halil; Edie, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Pd-free and Pd-containing activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) were synthesized from isotropic pitch as a carbon precursor. The source of Pd was a palladium salt that was premixed with pitch before carbonization. Hydrogen adsorption was measured at near-ambient temperatures (5 to 80 oC) and moderate pressures (up to 20 bar). It was found that adsorption on Pd-ACF is always higher than that on corresponding ACF, and in excess of what it would be expected based solely on formation of Pd hydride. This fact can be explained based on the mechanism of hydrogen spillover. It was also found that temperature and pressure have opposite effects on physisorption and spillover. It was hypothesized that a narrow temperature range exists, where the kinetic advantage of H2 spillover in Pd-ACF overlaps synergistically with the thermodynamic advantage of physisorption, thus contributing to enhanced uptakes compared with the Pd-free carbons.

  6. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  7. Molecular simulation of hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes and idealized carbon slit pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinyu; Johnson, J. Karl

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen gas into single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and idealized carbon slit pores is studied by computer simulation. Hydrogen-hydrogen interactions are modeled with the Silvera-Goldman potential. The Crowell-Brown potential is used to model the hydrogen-carbon interactions. Calculations include adsorption inside the tubes, in the interstitial regions of tube arrays, and on the outside surface of isolated tubes. Quantum effects are included through implementation of the path integral formalism. Comparison with classical simulations gives an indication of the importance of quantum effects for hydrogen adsorption. Quantum effects are important even at 298 K for adsorption in tube interstices. We compare our simulations with experimental data for SWNTs, graphitic nanofibers, and activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms from simulations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data for activated carbon, but do not confirm the large uptake reported for SWNTs and nanofibers. Although the adsorption potential for hydrogen in SWNTs is enhanced relative to slit pores of the same size, our calculations show that the storage capacity of an array of tubes is less than that for idealized slit pore geometries, except at very low pressures. Ambient temperature isotherms indicate that an array of nanotubes is not a suitable sorbent material for achieving DOE targets for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  8. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrocarbons. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquid. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  9. Mean excitation energy for molecules of hydrogen and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Kamaratos, E.

    1981-01-01

    The Gordon-Kim electron gas model of molecular bonding is used to calculate correction factors for the Bragg rule for molecules of hydrogen and carbon. General rules for molecular mean excitation energies are obtained that agree to about 4% with experimental values.

  10. Storage of Hydrogen in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A. C.; Jones, K. M.; Bekkedahl, T. A.; Kiang, C. H.; Bethune, D. S.; Heben, M. J.

    1997-03-27

    Pores of molecular dimensions can adsorb large quantities of gases owing to the enhanced density of the adsorbed material inside the pores, a consequence of the attractive potential of the pore walls. Pederson and Broughton have suggested that carbon nanotubes, which have diameters of typically a few nanometres, should be able to draw up liquids by capillarity, and this effect has been seen for low-surface-tension liquids in large-diameter, multi-walled nanotubes. Here we show that a gas can condense to high density inside narrow, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). Temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy shows that hydrogen will condense inside SWNTs under conditions that do not induce adsorption within a standard mesoporous activated carbon. The very high hydrogen uptake in these materials suggests that they might be effective as a hydrogen-storage material for fuel-cell electric vehicles.

  11. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  12. External reflection FTIR of peptide monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface: experimental design, spectra-structure correlations, and effects of hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Flach, C R; Brauner, J W; Taylor, J W; Baldwin, R C; Mendelsohn, R

    1994-01-01

    A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer has been interfaced with a surface balance and a new external reflection infrared sampling accessory, which permits the acquisition of spectra from protein monolayers in situ at the air/water interface. The accessory, a sample shuttle that permits the collection of spectra in alternating fashion from sample and background troughs, reduces interference from water vapor rotation-vibration bands in the amide I and amide II regions of protein spectra (1520-1690 cm-1) by nearly an order of magnitude. Residual interference from water vapor absorbance ranges from 50 to 200 microabsorbance units. The performance of the device is demonstrated through spectra of synthetic peptides designed to adopt alpha-helical, antiparallel beta-sheet, mixed beta-sheet/beta-turn, and unordered conformations at the air/water interface. The extent of exchange on the surface can be monitored from the relative intensities of the amide II and amide I modes. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange may lower the amide I frequency by as much as 11-12 cm-1 for helical secondary structures. This shifts the vibrational mode into a region normally associated with unordered structures and leads to uncertainties in the application of algorithms commonly used for determination of secondary structure from amide I contours of proteins in D2O solution. PMID:7919013

  13. Goddard high-resolution spectrograph observations of the local interstellar medium and the deuterium/hydrogen ratio along the line of sight toward Capella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Brown, Alexander; Gayley, Ken; Diplas, Athanassios; Savage, Blair D.; Ayres, Thomas R.; Landsman, Wayne; Shore, Steven N.; Heap, Sara R.

    1993-01-01

    HST Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph observations of the 1216, 2600, and 2800 A spectral regions are analyzed for the spectroscopic binary system Capella, obtained at orbital phase 0.26 with 3.27-3.57 km/s resolution and high SNR. The column densities of H I, D I, Mg II, and Fe II for the local interstellar medium along this 12.5 pc line of sight, together with estimates of the temperature and turbulent velocity are inferred. It is inferred that the atomic deuterium/hydrogen ratio by number is 1.65(+0.07, -0.18) x 10 exp -5 for this line of sight. Galactic evolution calculations indicate that the primordial D/H ratio probably lies in the range of (1.5-3) x (D/H)LISM. If H0 = 80 km/s Mpc, as recent evidence suggests, then the baryonic density in units of the Einstein-de Sitter closure density is 0.023-0.031. Thus the universe is argued to expand forever, unless nonbaryonic matter greatly exceeds the amount of baryonic matter.

  14. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Kinetics Demonstrate Long Range Allosteric Effects of Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Deredge, Daniel; Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A; Wintrode, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    New nonnucleoside analogs are being developed as part of a multi-drug regimen to treat hepatitis C viral infections. Particularly promising are inhibitors that bind to the surface of the thumb domain of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B). Numerous crystal structures have been solved showing small molecule non-nucleoside inhibitors bound to the hepatitis C viral polymerase, but these structures alone do not define the mechanism of inhibition. Our prior kinetic analysis showed that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) do not block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from the initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex. Here we have mapped the effect of three NNI2 inhibitors on the conformational dynamics of the enzyme using hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. All three inhibitors rigidify an extensive allosteric network extending >40 Å from the binding site, thus providing a structural rationale for the observed disruption of the transition from distributive initiation to processive elongation. The two more potent inhibitors also suppress slow cooperative unfolding in the fingers extension-thumb interface and primer grip, which may contribute their stronger inhibition. These results establish that NNI2 inhibitors act through long range allosteric effects, reveal important conformational changes underlying normal polymerase function, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:27006396

  15. Load-dependent destabilization of the γ-rotor shaft in FOF1 ATP synthase revealed by hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Vahidi, Siavash; Bi, Yumin; Dunn, Stanley D.; Konermann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    FoF1 is a membrane-bound molecular motor that uses proton-motive force (PMF) to drive the synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. Reverse operation generates PMF via ATP hydrolysis. Catalysis in either direction involves rotation of the γε shaft that connects the α3β3 head and the membrane-anchored cn ring. X-ray crystallography and other techniques have provided insights into the structure and function of FoF1 subcomplexes. However, interrogating the conformational dynamics of intact membrane-bound FoF1 during rotational catalysis has proven to be difficult. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to probe the inner workings of FoF1 in its natural membrane-bound state. A pronounced destabilization of the γ C-terminal helix during hydrolysis-driven rotation was observed. This behavior is attributed to torsional stress in γ, arising from γ⋅⋅⋅α3β3 interactions that cause resistance during γ rotation within the apical bearing. Intriguingly, we find that destabilization of γ occurs only when FoF1 operates against a PMF-induced torque; the effect disappears when PMF is eliminated by an uncoupler. This behavior resembles the properties of automotive engines, where bearings inflict greater forces on the crankshaft when operated under load than during idling. PMID:26884184

  16. Load-dependent destabilization of the γ-rotor shaft in FOF1 ATP synthase revealed by hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Siavash; Bi, Yumin; Dunn, Stanley D; Konermann, Lars

    2016-03-01

    FoF1 is a membrane-bound molecular motor that uses proton-motive force (PMF) to drive the synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. Reverse operation generates PMF via ATP hydrolysis. Catalysis in either direction involves rotation of the γε shaft that connects the α3β3 head and the membrane-anchored cn ring. X-ray crystallography and other techniques have provided insights into the structure and function of FoF1 subcomplexes. However, interrogating the conformational dynamics of intact membrane-bound FoF1 during rotational catalysis has proven to be difficult. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to probe the inner workings of FoF1 in its natural membrane-bound state. A pronounced destabilization of the γ C-terminal helix during hydrolysis-driven rotation was observed. This behavior is attributed to torsional stress in γ, arising from γ⋅⋅⋅α3β3 interactions that cause resistance during γ rotation within the apical bearing. Intriguingly, we find that destabilization of γ occurs only when FoF1 operates against a PMF-induced torque; the effect disappears when PMF is eliminated by an uncoupler. This behavior resembles the properties of automotive engines, where bearings inflict greater forces on the crankshaft when operated under load than during idling. PMID:26884184

  17. Sites Involved in Intra- and Interdomain Allostery Associated with the Activation of Factor VIIa Pinpointed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange and Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongjian; Olsen, Ole H.; Persson, Egon; Rand, Kasper D.

    2014-01-01

    Factor VIIa (FVIIa) is a trypsin-like protease that plays an important role in initiating blood coagulation. Very limited structural information is available for the free, inactive form of FVIIa that circulates in the blood prior to vascular injury and the molecular details of its activity enhancement remain elusive. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation to pinpoint individual residues in the heavy chain of FVIIa whose conformation and/or local interaction pattern changes when the enzyme transitions to the active form, as induced either by its cofactor tissue factor or a covalent active site inhibitor. Identified regulatory residues are situated at key sites across one continuous surface of the protease domain spanning the TF-binding helix across the activation pocket to the calcium binding site and are embedded in elements of secondary structure and at the base of flexible loops. Thus these residues are optimally positioned to mediate crosstalk between functional sites in FVIIa, particularly the cofactor binding site and the active site. Our results unambiguously show that the conformational allosteric activation signal extends to the EGF1 domain in the light chain of FVIIa, underscoring a remarkable intra- and interdomain allosteric regulation of this trypsin-like protease. PMID:25344622

  18. Identification of pharmacological chaperones for Gaucher disease and characterization of their effects on beta-glucocerebrosidase by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tropak, Michael B; Kornhaber, Gregory J; Rigat, Brigitte A; Maegawa, Gustavo H; Buttner, Justin D; Blanchard, Jan E; Murphy, Cecilia; Tuske, Steven J; Coales, Stephen J; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Brown, Eric D; Mahuran, Don J

    2008-11-01

    Point mutations in beta-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) can result in a deficiency of both GCase activity and protein in lysosomes thereby causing Gaucher Disease (GD). Enzyme inhibitors such as isofagomine, acting as pharmacological chaperones (PCs), increase these levels by binding and stabilizing the native form of the enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and allow increased lysosomal transport of the enzyme. A high-throughput screen of the 50,000-compound Maybridge library identified two, non-carbohydrate-based inhibitory molecules, a 2,4-diamino-5-substituted quinazoline (IC(50) 5 microM) and a 5-substituted pyridinyl-2-furamide (IC(50) 8 microM). They raised the levels of functional GCase 1.5-2.5-fold in N370S or F213I GD fibroblasts. Immunofluorescence confirmed that treated GD fibroblasts had decreased levels of GCase in their ER and increased levels in lysosomes. Changes in protein dynamics, monitored by hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry, identified a domain III active-site loop (residues 243-249) as being significantly stabilized upon binding of isofagomine or either of these two new compounds; this suggests a common mechanism for PC enhancement of intracellular transport. PMID:18972510

  19. Identification of Pharmacological Chaperones for Gaucher Disease and Characterization of Their Effects on β-Glucocerebrosidase by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tropak, Michael B.; Kornhaber, Gregory J.; Rigat, Brigitte A.; Maegawa, Gustavo H.; Buttner, Justin D.; Blanchard, Jan E.; Murphy, Cecilia; Tuske, Steven J.; Coales, Stephen J.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Brown, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    Point mutations in β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) can result in a deficiency of both GCase activity and protein in lysosomes thereby causing Gaucher Disease (GD). Enzyme inhibitors such as isofagomine, acting as pharmacological chaperones (PCs), increase these levels by binding and stabilizing the native form of the enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and allow increased lysosomal transport of the enzyme. A high-throughput screen of the 50 000-compound Maybridge library identified two, non-carbohydrate-based inhibitory molecules, a 2,4-diamino-5-substituted quinazoline (IC50 5 μM) and a 5-substituted pyridinyl-2-furamide (IC50 8 μM). They raised the levels of functional GCase 1.5–2.5-fold in N370S or F213I GD fibroblasts. Immunofluorescence confirmed that treated GD fibroblasts had decreased levels of GCase in their ER and increased levels in lysosomes. Changes in protein dynamics, monitored by hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry, identified a domain III active-site loop (residues 243–249) as being significantly stabilized upon binding of isofagomine or either of these two new compounds; this suggests a common mechanism for PC enhancement of intracellular transport. PMID:18972510

  20. Using hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to engineer optimized constructs for crystallization of protein complexes: Case study of PI4KIIIβ with Rab11

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Melissa L.; McPhail, Jacob A.; Jenkins, Meredith L.; Masson, Glenn R.; Rutaganira, Florentine U.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Williams, Roger L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ability of proteins to bind and interact with protein partners plays fundamental roles in many cellular contexts. X‐ray crystallography has been a powerful approach to understand protein‐protein interactions; however, a challenge in the crystallization of proteins and their complexes is the presence of intrinsically disordered regions. In this article, we describe an application of hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX‐MS) to identify dynamic regions within type III phosphatidylinositol 4 kinase beta (PI4KIIIβ) in complex with the GTPase Rab11. This information was then used to design deletions that allowed for the production of diffraction quality crystals. Importantly, we also used HDX‐MS to verify that the new construct was properly folded, consistent with it being catalytically and functionally active. Structures of PI4KIIIβ in an Apo state and bound to the potent inhibitor BQR695 in complex with both GTPγS and GDP loaded Rab11 were determined. This hybrid HDX‐MS/crystallographic strategy revealed novel aspects of the PI4KIIIβ‐Rab11 complex, as well as the molecular mechanism of potency of a PI4K specific inhibitor (BQR695). This approach is widely applicable to protein‐protein complexes, and is an excellent strategy to optimize constructs for high‐resolution structural approaches. PMID:26756197

  1. Optimization and application of atmospheric pressure chemical and photoionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for speciation of oxygen-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Acter, Thamina; Kim, Donghwi; Ahmed, Arif; Jin, Jang Mi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the feasibility of optimized positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) for structural assignment of diverse oxygen-containing compounds. The important parameters for optimization of HDX MS were characterized. The optimized techniques employed in the positive and negative modes showed satisfactory HDX product ions for the model compounds when dichloromethane and toluene were employed as a co-solvent in APCI- and APPI-HDX, respectively. The evaluation of the mass spectra obtained from 38 oxygen-containing compounds demonstrated that the extent of the HDX of the ions was structure-dependent. The combination of information provided by different ionization techniques could be used for better speciation of oxygen-containing compounds. For example, (+) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with alcohol, ketone, or aldehyde substituents, while (-) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with carboxylic functional groups. In addition, the compounds with alcohol can be distinguished from other compounds by the presence of exchanged peaks. The combined information was applied to study chemical compositions of degraded oils. The HDX pattern, double bond equivalent (DBE) distribution, and previously reported oxidation products were combined to predict structures of the compounds produced from oxidation of oil. Overall, this study shows that APCI- and APPI-HDX MS are useful experimental techniques that can be applied for the structural analysis of oxygen-containing compounds. PMID:26898203

  2. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  3. Was Venus wet? Deuterium reconsidered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinspoon, David H.

    1987-01-01

    The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen on Venus has been accepted as proof of a wetter, more earth-like part on that planet. However, the present-day water abundance and the nonthermal hydrogen escape flux on Venus imply that hydrogen is in a steady state and that a hydrogen source, most likely cometary infall, is present. An alternative interpretation of the D/H ratio is offered, in which the measured value is consistent with a steady-state evolution over the age of the solar system. No past water excess is required to explain the isotopic data.

  4. In Situ Electrical Study on Primary Hydrogen Spillover from Nanocatalysts to Amorphous Carbon Support

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.; Yang, Z.; Xu, T.; Zhao, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Primary hydrogen spillover has been studied using a unique electrical method. We observed that at ambient temperature, when a discontinuous nanogranular Pd film is on the top of an amorphous carbon film, the electrical conductance of the carbon film decreases in pressurized hydrogen. In comparison, in the absence of this Pd layer, the conductance of the carbon film remains unchanged in pressurized hydrogen. The observed decrease in the current in the Pd/carbon structure is ascribed to the hydrogenation of the dangling carbon bonds and sp{sup 2}-sp{sup 3} transition in the amorphous carbon by the primary spillover hydrogen atoms from Pd nanoclusters.

  5. Deuterium separation by infrared-induced addition reaction

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1977-01-01

    A method for deuterium enrichment by the infrared-induced addition reaction of a deuterium halide with an unsaturated aliphatic compound. A gaseous mixture of a hydrogen halide feedstock and an unsaturated aliphatic compound, particularly an olefin, is irradiated to selectively vibrationally excite the deuterium halide contained therein. The excited deuterium halide preferentially reacts with the unsaturated aliphatic compound to produce a deuterated addition product which is removed from the reaction mixture.

  6. Hydrogen softening and optical transparency in Si-incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, G. A.; Papakonstantinou, P.; McLaughlin, J. A.; Weijers-Dall, T. D. M.; Elliman, R. G.; Filik, J.

    2005-11-01

    High-resolution x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and heavy-ion elastic recoil detection were employed to study the role of hydrogen on the softening behavior observed in Si-incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Si-a-C:H) films synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition using tetramethylsilane (TMS) precursor in C2H2/Ar plasma. An enhancement of the optical band gap and a massive reduction in the density of the films prepared at high TMS flow rate were revealed, respectively, by spectroscopic ellipsometry and XRR analysis with the development of a double critical angle. A hydrogenation process was responsible for a rise in the density of voids and an associated reduction in the connectivity of the carbon network and the release of its residual stress.

  7. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  8. Carbon Nanotube/Magnesium Composite as a Hydrogen Source.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min Kyu; Se, Kwon Oh; Kim, Min Joong; Hwang, Jae Won; Yoon, Byoung Young; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen produced using the steam reforming process contains sulfur and carbon monoxide that are harmful to the Pt catalyst in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, CO-free hydrogen can be generated from the hydrolysis of either Al in strongly alkaline water or Mg in neutral water with chlorides such as sea water. The hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of Mg is extremely slow and linearly proportional to the corrosion rate of Mg in chloride water. In this work, we fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)--reinforced Mg--matrix composite by Spark Plasma Sintering as a fast hydrogen generation source for a PEMFC. The CNTs distributed in the Mg matrix act as numerous local cathodes, and hence cause severe galvanic corrosion between the Mg-matrix anode and CNT-cathode in NaCl solution. It was found that the hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of the 5 vol.% CNT/Mg composite is 3300 times faster than that of the Mg without CNTs due primarily to the galvanic corrosion effect. PMID:26726603

  9. Atomistic Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Ropes and Hydrogen Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ju; Yip, Sidney; Fujiwara, Joshua

    2001-06-01

    Atomistic Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Ropes and Hydrogen Absorption Ju Li, Sidney Yip, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Cambridge, MA 02139; Joshua Fujiwara, Honda R&D Co., Ltd., Wako Research Center, JAPAN. Using Brenner type Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) interatomic potentials, we perform atomistic simulations to calculate the optimized structures, tensile and bending strengths, and thermal conductivities of both straight and twisted single-walled nanotube ropes (bundles) where results from direct simulation are checked against those from the Green-Kubo linear response theory. Preliminary calculations are performed to study hydrogen absorption by SWNTs at room temperature and 77K.

  10. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Meteorite Sulfonic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Chang, Sherwood

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  11. Thermal desorption of hydrogen from carbon and graphite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumi, H.; Takemura, Y.; Konishi, T.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2013-07-01

    Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) has been investigated to obtain fundamental information of hydrogen behavior in graphite and CFC especially at high temperatures. Thirteen brands of graphite and CFC materials charged with deuterium gas are tested up to the temperature of 1720 K with a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. TDS spectra have at least four peaks at 600-700 K, around 900 K, 1300-1450 K and 1600-1650 K. The change of TDS spectra is measured for the samples, which are charged with deuterium at 1273 K under a different pressure in the range of 83 Pa to 79 kPa. Physical and chemical states of deuterium in graphite and mechanisms of desorption are discussed.

  12. Mechanism of enhanced hydrogen adsorption on palladium-doped nanoporous carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Wu, Xianxian; Tekinalp, Halil; Edie, Dan; Thies, Mark C; Baker, Frederick S

    2007-01-01

    Recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was directed towards adsorptive storage of hydrogen in nanoporous carbon fibers in which palladium was incorporated prior to spinning and carbonization/activation of the fibers. Palladium doped carbon fibers exhibited enhanced hydrogen uptake compared to the corresponding palladium-free nanoporous carbon fibers (at room temperature and 2 MPa pressure). However, the mechanism responsible for the enhanced hydrogen uptake is not fully understood. New findings are presented in this paper in support of a mechanism that encompasses both hydrogen spillover on palladium metal sites and hydrogen physisorption on nanostructured carbon sites.

  13. Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Hydrogen Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Jie; Jaffe, Richard L.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We examined the electronic and mechanical properties of hydrogen functionalized carbon nanotubes. The functionalization pattern covers two extreme groups. One group has randomly selected functionalization sites including one to twenty percent of the carbon atoms. The other group has regularly patterned functional sites parallel to the tube axis. Metallic, small-gap semiconducting and large-gap semiconducting carbon nanotubes are studied. The results reveal that the electronic properties of the tubes are very sensitive to the degree of functionalization, with even one percent functionalization being enough to render metallic tubes semiconducting. On the other hand, the mechanical properties, like tensile modulus, are much less sensitive to functionalization. For carbon nanotubes functionalized with specific patterns, the electric properties depends strongly on the nature of the functionalization pattern.

  14. Carbon-Oxygen Hydrogen Bonding in Biological Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Scott; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen (CH···O) hydrogen bonding represents an unusual category of molecular interactions first documented in biological structures over 4 decades ago. Although CH···O hydrogen bonding has remained generally underappreciated in the biochemical literature, studies over the last 15 years have begun to yield direct evidence of these interactions in biological systems. In this minireview, we provide a historical context of biological CH···O hydrogen bonding and summarize some major advancements from experimental studies over the past several years that have elucidated the importance, prevalence, and functions of these interactions. In particular, we examine the impact of CH···O bonds on protein and nucleic acid structure, molecular recognition, and enzyme catalysis and conclude by exploring overarching themes and unresolved questions regarding unconventional interactions in biomolecular structure. PMID:23048026

  15. Hydrogenated 5-carbon compound and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, D.C.; Frye, J.G.

    1999-03-16

    The present invention is based upon the surprising discovery that a 5-carbon compound selected from the group of 4-oxopentanoic acid, at least one lactone of 4-oxopentanoic acid, and combinations thereof, may be hydrogenated with a bimetallic catalyst of a noble metal in combination with a second metal and preserve the pendant methyl group. It was further unexpectedly discovered that the same conditions of bimetallic catalyst in the presence of hydrogen are useful for catalyzing the different intermediate reactions, for example, angelicalactone to gamma-valerolactone and gamma-valerolactone to 1,4-pentanediol. Finally, it was surprising that levulinic acid could be converted to 2-methyltetrahydrofuran with heating in the presence of the bimetallic catalyst and hydrogen in a single process vessel. The method of the present invention unexpectedly produced a fuel or fuel component having 2-methyltetrahydrofuran either in a yield greater than 4.5 mol % or in combination with alcohols. 8 figs.

  16. Hydrogenated 5-carbon compound and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Frye, John G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is based upon the surprising discovery that a 5-carbon compound selected from the group of 4-oxopentanoic acid, at least one lactone of 4-oxopentanoic acid, and combinations thereof, may be hydrogenated with a bimetallic catalyst of a noble metal in combination with a second metal and preserve the pendant methyl group. It was further unexpectedly discovered that the same conditions of bimetallic catalyst in the presence of hydrogen are useful for catalyzing the different intermediate reactions for example angelicalactone to gamma-valerolactone and gamma-valerolactone to 1,4-pentanediol. Finally, it was surprising that levulinic acid could be converted to 2-methyltetrahydrofuran with heating in the presence of the bimetallic catalyst and hydrogen in a single process vessel. The method of the present invention unexpectedly produced a fuel or fuel component having 2-methyltetrahydrofuran either in a yield greater than 4.5 mol % or in combination with alcohols.

  17. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  18. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T.; Huang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8 kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500 Nm3 H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry. PMID:24067754

  19. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T; Huang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8 kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500 Nm(3) H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry. PMID:24067754

  20. Optimization of Nano-Carbon Materials for Hydrogen Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yakobson, Boris I

    2013-08-02

    Research undertaken has added to the understanding of several critical areas, by providing both negative answers (and therefore eliminating expensive further studies of unfeasible paths) and positive feasible options for storage. Theoretical evaluation of the early hypothesis of storage on pure carbon single wall nanotubes (SWNT) has been scrutinized with the use of comprehensive computational methods (and experimental tests by the Center partners), and demonstrated that the fundamentally weak binding energy of hydrogen is not sufficiently enhanced by the SWNT curvature or even defects, which renders carbon nanotubes not practical media. More promising direction taken was towards 3-dimensional architectures of high porosity where concurrent attraction of H2 molecule to surrounding walls of nano-scale cavities can double or even triple the binding energy and therefore make hydrogen storage feasible even at ambient or somewhat lower temperatures. An efficient computational tool has been developed for the rapid capacity assessment combining (i) carbon-foam structure generation, (ii) accurate empirical force fields, with quantum corrections for the lightweight H2, and (iii) grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. This made it possible to suggest optimal designs for carbon nanofoams, obtainable via welding techniques from SWNT or by growth on template-zeolites. As a precursor for 3D-foams, we have investigated experimentally the synthesis of VANTA (Vertically Aligned NanoTube Arrays). This can be used for producing nano-foams. On the other hand, fluorination of VANTA did not show promising increase of hydrogen sorption in several tests and may require further investigation and improvements. Another significant result of this project was in developing a fundamental understanding of the elements of hydrogen spillover mechanisms. The benefit of developed models is the ability to foresee possible directions for further improvement of the spillover mechanism.

  1. DNA Interactions Probed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange (HDX) Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry Confirm External Binding Sites on the Minichromosomal Maintenance (MCM) Helicase.

    PubMed

    Graham, Brian W; Tao, Yeqing; Dodge, Katie L; Thaxton, Carly T; Olaso, Danae; Young, Nicolas L; Marshall, Alan G; Trakselis, Michael A

    2016-06-10

    The archaeal minichromosomal maintenance (MCM) helicase from Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsoMCM) is a model for understanding structural and mechanistic aspects of DNA unwinding. Although interactions of the encircled DNA strand within the central channel provide an accepted mode for translocation, interactions with the excluded strand on the exterior surface have mostly been ignored with regard to DNA unwinding. We have previously proposed an extension of the traditional steric exclusion model of unwinding to also include significant contributions with the excluded strand during unwinding, termed steric exclusion and wrapping (SEW). The SEW model hypothesizes that the displaced single strand tracks along paths on the exterior surface of hexameric helicases to protect single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and stabilize the complex in a forward unwinding mode. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS, we have probed the binding sites for ssDNA, using multiple substrates targeting both the encircled and excluded strand interactions. In each experiment, we have obtained >98.7% sequence coverage of SsoMCM from >650 peptides (5-30 residues in length) and are able to identify interacting residues on both the interior and exterior of SsoMCM. Based on identified contacts, positively charged residues within the external waist region were mutated and shown to generally lower DNA unwinding without negatively affecting the ATP hydrolysis. The combined data globally identify binding sites for ssDNA during SsoMCM unwinding as well as validating the importance of the SEW model for hexameric helicase unwinding. PMID:27044751

  2. Two-Site Evaluation of the Repeatability and Precision of an Automated Dual-Column Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Platform.

    PubMed

    Cummins, David J; Espada, Alfonso; Novick, Scott J; Molina-Martin, Manuel; Stites, Ryan E; Espinosa, Juan Felix; Broughton, Howard; Goswami, Devrishi; Pascal, Bruce D; Dodge, Jeffrey A; Chalmers, Michael J; Griffin, Patrick R

    2016-06-21

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is an information-rich biophysical method for the characterization of protein dynamics. Successful applications of differential HDX-MS include the characterization of protein-ligand binding. A single differential HDX-MS data set (protein ± ligand) is often comprised of more than 40 individual HDX-MS experiments. To eliminate laborious manual processing of samples, and to minimize random and gross errors, automated systems for HDX-MS analysis have become routine in many laboratories. However, an automated system, while less prone to random errors introduced by human operators, may have systematic errors that go unnoticed without proper detection. Although the application of automated (and manual) HDX-MS has become common, there are only a handful of studies reporting the systematic evaluation of the performance of HDX-MS experiments, and no reports have been published describing a cross-site comparison of HDX-MS experiments. Here, we describe an automated HDX-MS platform that operates with a parallel, two-trap, two-column configuration that has been installed in two remote laboratories. To understand the performance of the system both within and between laboratories, we have designed and completed a test-retest repeatability study for differential HDX-MS experiments implemented at each of two laboratories, one in Florida and the other in Spain. This study provided sufficient data to do both within and between laboratory variability assessments. Initial results revealed a systematic run-order effect within one of the two systems. Therefore, the study was repeated, and this time the conclusion was that the experimental conditions were successfully replicated with minimal systematic error. PMID:27224086

  3. Structural basis of specific interactions of Lp-PLA2 with HDL revealed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry[S

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian; Hsu, Yuan-Hao; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), specifically Group VIIA PLA2, is a member of the phospholipase A2 superfamily and is found mainly associated with LDL and HDL in human plasma. Lp-PLA2 is considered as a risk factor, a potential biomarker, a target for therapy in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, and evidence suggests that the level of Lp-PLA2 in plasma is associated with the risk of future cardiovascular and stroke events. The differential location of the enzyme in LDL/HDL lipoproteins has been suggested to affect Lp-PLA2 function and/or its physiological role and an abnormal distribution of the enzyme may correlate with diseases. Although a mutagenesis study suggested that a surface helix (residues 362–369) mediates the association between Lp-PLA2 and HDL, the molecular details and mechanism of association has remained unknown. We have now employed hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to characterize the interaction between recombinant human Lp-PLA2 and human HDL. We have found that specific residues 113–120, 192–204, and 360–368 likely mediate HDL binding. In a previous study, we showed that residues 113–120 are important for Lp-PLA2-liposome interactions. We now find that residues 192–204 show a decreased deuteration level when Lp-PLA2 is exposed to apoA-I, but not apoA-II, the most abundant apoproteins in HDL, and additionally, residues 360–368 are only affected by HDL.The results suggest that apoA-I and phospholipid membranes play crucial roles in Lp-PLA2 localization to HDL. PMID:23089916

  4. Dimerization of the type IV pilin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 results in increased helix stability as measured by time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Lento, Cristina; Wilson, Derek J.; Audette, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Truncated pilin monomers from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 (ΔK122) have been shown to enter a monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution prior to oligomerization into protein nanotubes. Here, we examine the structural changes occurring between the monomeric and dimeric states of ΔK122 using time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Based on levels of deuterium uptake, the N-terminal α-helix and the loop connecting the second and third strands of the anti-parallel β-sheet contribute significantly to pilin dimerization. Conversely, the antiparallel β-sheet and αβ loop region exhibit increased flexibility, while the receptor binding domain retains a rigid conformation in the equilibrium state. PMID:26798830

  5. Dimerization of the type IV pilin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 results in increased helix stability as measured by time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    PubMed

    Lento, Cristina; Wilson, Derek J; Audette, Gerald F

    2016-01-01

    Truncated pilin monomers from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 (ΔK122) have been shown to enter a monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution prior to oligomerization into protein nanotubes. Here, we examine the structural changes occurring between the monomeric and dimeric states of ΔK122 using time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Based on levels of deuterium uptake, the N-terminal α-helix and the loop connecting the second and third strands of the anti-parallel β-sheet contribute significantly to pilin dimerization. Conversely, the antiparallel β-sheet and αβ loop region exhibit increased flexibility, while the receptor binding domain retains a rigid conformation in the equilibrium state. PMID:26798830

  6. Characterization of the International Humic Substances Society standard and reference fulvic and humic acids by solution state carbon-13 (13C) and hydrogen-1 (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Folan, Daniel W.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Standard and reference samples of the International Humic Substances Society have been characterized by solution state carbon-13 and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Samples included the Suwannee River, soil, and peat standard fulvic and humic acids, the Leonardite standard humic acid, the Nordic aquatic reference fulvic and humic acids, and the Summit Hill soil reference humic acid. Aqueous-solution carbon-13 NMR analyses included the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times, measurement of nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors, measurement of quantitative carbon distributions, recording of attached proton test spectra, and recording of spectra under nonquantitative conditions. Distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer carbon-13 NMR spectra also were recorded on the Suwannee River fulvic acid in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide. Hydrogen-1 NMR spectra were recorded on sodium salts of the samples in deuterium oxide. The carbon aromaticities of the samples ranged from 0.24 for the Suwannee River fulvic acid to 0.58 for the Leonardite humic acid.

  7. Hydrogen storage reactions on titanium decorated carbon nanocones theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalabi, A. S.; Taha, H. O.; Soliman, K. A.; Abeld Aal, S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen storage reactions on Ti decorated carbon nanocones (CNC) are investigated by using the state of the art density functional theory calculations. The single Ti atom prefers to bind at the bridge site between two hexagonal rings, and can bind up to 6 hydrogen molecules with average adsorption energies of -1.73, -0.74, -0.57, -0.45, -0.42, and -0.35 eV per hydrogen molecule. No evidence for metal clustering in the ideal circumstances, and the hydrogen storage capacity is expected to be as large as 14.34 wt%. Two types of interactions are recognized. While the interaction of 2H2 with Ti-CNC is irreversible at 532 K, the interaction of 3H2 with Ti-CNC is reversible at 392 K. Further characterizations of the former two reactions are considered in terms of projected densities of states, simulated infrared and proton magnetic resonance spectra, electrophilicity, and statistical thermodynamic stability. The free energy of the highest hydrogen storage capacity reaction between 6H2 and Ti-CNC meets the ultimate targets of department of energy at (233.15 K) and (11.843 atm) with surface coverage (0.941) and (direct/inverse) rate constants ratio (1.35).

  8. Infrared emission from hydrogenated amorphous carbon and amorphous carbon grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duley, W. W.; Jones, A. P.; Taylor, S. D.; Williams, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The correlations deduced by Boulanger et al. (1990) from IRAS maps of the Chamaeleon, Taurus and Ursa Major molecular cloud complexes are interpreted in terms of the evolutionary hydrogenated amorphous carbon model of interstellar dust. In particular, regions of relatively strong 12-micron emission may be regions where recently accreted carbon is being converted by ambient UV to small PAHs in situ. Regions of weak 12-micron emission are probably quiescent regions where carbon has been annealed to amorphous carbon. Observational consequences of these inferences are briefly described.

  9. Noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 with hydrogen accumulated in a hybrid carbon nanostructure in nanosized membrane reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    Studies on the creation of nanosized membrane reactors (NMRs) of a new generation with accumulated hydrogen and a regulated volume of reaction zone were continued at the next stage. Hydrogenation was performed in the pores of ceramic membranes with hydrogen preliminarily adsorbed in mono- and multilayered orientated carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs)—a new hybrid carbon nanostructure formed on the inner pore surface. Quantitative determination of hydrogen adsorption in OCNTGs was performed using TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with D av = 50 and 90 nm and showed that hydrogen adsorption was up to ˜1.5% of the mass of OCNTG. The instrumentation and procedure for noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 at 250-350°C using hydrogen accumulated and stored in OCNTG were developed. The conversion of decene-1 into decane was ˜0.2-1.8% at hydrogenation temperatures of 250 and 350°C, respectively. The rate constants and activation energy of hydrogenation were determined. The latter was found to be 94.5 kJ/mol, which is much smaller than the values typical for noncatalytic hydrogenations and very close to the values characteristic for catalytic reactions. The quantitative distribution of the reacting compounds in each pore regarded as a nanosized membrane reactor was determined. The activity of hydrogen adsorbed in a 2D carbon nanostructure was evaluated. Possible mechanisms of noncatalytic hydrogenation were discussed.

  10. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling δ2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (ɛbio), accounting also for a large part in the δ2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of ɛbio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic ɛbio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the δ2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of δ2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  11. Deuterium trapping in deep traps of differently oriented pyrolytic graphite exposed to D 2 gas at 1473 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikov, V. N.; Wampler, W. R.; Zakharov, A. P.; Gorodetsky, A. E.

    1999-01-01

    Due to their importance for tritium inventories in future DT fueled fusion machines, experimental data on H isotope diffusion, absorption and retention in deep traps ( Eb ≅ 4.3 eV) of graphites exposed to hydrogen at elevated temperatures have been reviewed. Deuterium retention was studied in edge- and basal-oriented pyrolytic graphite (PG) and polycrystalline RG-Ti-91 damaged by irradiation with 200 keV carbon ions. Deuterium loading was done by soaking in D 2 gas at 1473 K, and the resulting D retention was measured by nuclear reaction analysis. The microstructure was studied by cross-sectional TEM, SEM and microprofilometry. The concentration of strong traps created by irradiation and estimated by the amount of accumulated deuterium was shown to saturate with the damage above ≈1 dpa at about 1000 appm. In non-damaged and damaged graphites deuterium diffuses via porous grain boundaries and along basal planes within crystallites, while its migration through the graphite lattice along the c direction was found to be negligible. Radiation modifications of PG retard deuterium diffusion and decrease the rate of its chemical erosion by a factor of five. The amount of deuterium accumulated in strong traps in graphites is mainly influenced by their macro- and microstructure, while the degree of graphitization seems to be less important. Derivations are made of the susceptibility of damaged graphites, in particular, CFCs to the retention of hydrogen isotopes in deep traps.

  12. Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials Studied by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Anderson, Robert; Mao, Shenghua

    2007-03-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in carbon-based materials such as boron-doped graphite and boron-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). ^1H NMR is shown to be a sensitive and quantitative probe for detecting adsorbed gas molecules such as H2, methane, and ethane. NMR measurements were carried out in-situ under given H2 pressure up to a pressure of over 100 atm. From such ^1H NMR measurement, the amount of adsorbed H2 molecules was determined versus pressure. This gives an alternative method for measuring the adsorption isotherms where the H2 signature is identified based on spin properties rather than weight or volume as in gravimetric and volumetric measurements. The measurement shows that boron doping has a favorable effect on increasing the adsorption enthalpy of H2 in carbon-based systems. This work was done in collaboration with NREL and Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, within the DOE Center of Excellence on Carbon-based Hydrogen Storage Materials and is supported by DOE.

  13. High electric field deuterium ion sources for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk

    Active interrogation systems for highly enriched uranium require improved fieldable neutron sources. The target technology for deuterium-tritium neutron generators is well understood and the most significant improvement can be achieved by improving the deuterium ion source through increased output and, in some cases, lifetime of the ion source. We are developing a new approach to a deuterium ion sources based upon the field desorption/evaporation of deuterium from the surfaces of metal tips. Electrostatic field desorption (EFD) desorbs previously adsorbed deuterium as ions under the influence of high electric fields (several V/A), without removing tip material. Single etched wire tip experiments have been performed and have shown that this is difficult but can be achieved with molybdenum and tungsten tips. Electrostatic field evaporation (EFE) evaporates ultra thin deuterated titanium films as ions. It has been shown that several 10s of atomic layers can be removed within a few nanoseconds from etched tungsten tips. In the course of these studies titanium deposition and deuteration methods were studied and new detection methods developed. Space charge effects resulting from the large ion currents were identified to be the most likely cause of some unusual ion emission characteristics. In addition, on W < 110 > oriented substrates a surprising body-centered cubic crystal structure of the titanium film was found and studied. The ion currents required for neutron generator applications can be achieved by microfabrication of metal tip arrays. Field desorption studies of microfabricated field emitter tip arrays have been conducted for the first time. Maximum fields of 3 V/A have been applied to the array tip surfaces to date, although fields of ˜ 2 V/A to ˜ 2.5 V/A are more typical. Desorption of atomic deuterium ions has been observed at fields of roughly 2 V/A at room temperature. The desorption of common surface adsorbates, such as hydrogen, carbon, water, and

  14. Water electrolysis with a conducting carbon cloth: subthreshold hydrogen generation and superthreshold carbon quantum dot formation.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Mandakini; Deshpande, Aparna; Kelkar, Sarika; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-03-01

    A conducting carbon cloth, which has an interesting turbostratic microstructure and functional groups that are distinctly different from other ordered forms of carbon, such as graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes, was synthesized by a simple one-step pyrolysis of cellulose fabric. This turbostratic disorder and surface chemical functionalities had interesting consequences for water splitting and hydrogen generation when such a cloth was used as an electrode in the alkaline electrolysis process. Importantly, this work also gives a new twist to carbon-assisted electrolysis. During electrolysis, the active sites in the carbon cloth allow slow oxidation of its surface to transform the surface groups from COH to COOH and so forth at a voltage as low as 0.2 V in a two-electrode system, along with platinum as the cathode, instead of 1.23 V (plus overpotential), which is required for platinum, steel, or even graphite anodes. The quantity of subthreshold hydrogen evolved was 24 mL cm(-2)  h(-1) at 1 V. Interestingly, at a superthreshold potential (>1.23 V+overpotential), another remarkable phenomenon was found. At such voltages, along with the high rate and quantity of hydrogen evolution, rapid exfoliation of the tiny nanoscale (5-7 nm) units of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are found in copious amounts due to an enhanced oxidation rate. These CQDs show bright-blue fluorescence under UV light. PMID:24492961

  15. Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing a deuterium enriched material by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the working material a gas phase photolytically dissociable organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom which is adjacent to a carbonyl group and consisting of molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as deuterium and molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as another isotope of hydrogen. The organic carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of the deuterium containing species to yield a deuterium enriched stable molecular product. Undissociated carbonyl compound, depleted in deuterium, is preferably redeuterated for reuse.

  16. Comparative hydrogen-deuterium exchange for a mesophilic vs thermophilic dihydrofolate reductase at 25 °C: identification of a single active site region with enhanced flexibility in the mesophilic protein.

    PubMed

    Oyeyemi, Olayinka A; Sours, Kevin M; Lee, Thomas; Kohen, Amnon; Resing, Katheryn A; Ahn, Natalie G; Klinman, Judith P

    2011-09-27

    The technique of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been applied to a mesophilic (E. coli) dihydrofolate reductase under conditions that allow direct comparison to a thermophilic (B. stearothermophilus) ortholog, Ec-DHFR and Bs-DHFR, respectively. The analysis of hydrogen-deuterium exchange patterns within proteolytically derived peptides allows spatial resolution, while requiring a series of controls to compare orthologous proteins with only ca. 40% sequence identity. These controls include the determination of primary structure effects on intrinsic rate constants for HDX as well as the use of existing 3-dimensional structures to evaluate the distance of each backbone amide hydrogen to the protein surface. Only a single peptide from the Ec-DHFR is found to be substantially more flexible than the Bs-DHFR at 25 °C in a region located within the protein interior at the intersection of the cofactor and substrate-binding sites. The surrounding regions of the enzyme are either unchanged or more flexible in the thermophilic DHFR from B. stearothermophilus. The region with increased flexibility in Ec-DHFR corresponds to one of two regions previously proposed to control the enthalpic barrier for hydride transfer in Bs-DHFR [Oyeyemi et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 10074]. PMID:21859100

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and modeling of hydrogen storage in carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Calef, D.F.

    1995-04-01

    Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with an ultrafine cell/pore size (<50 nm), high surface area (600-800 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. These materials are usually synthesized from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde or phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical extraction of the solvent and pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. The resultant aerogel has a nanocrystalline structure with micropores (<2 nm diameter) located within the solid matrix. Carbon aerogel monoliths can be prepared at densities ranging from 0.05-1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, leading to volumetric surface areas (> 500 m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}) that are much larger than commercially available materials. This research program is directed at optimization of the aerogel structure for maximum hydrogen adsorption over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. Computer modeling of hydrogen adsorption at carbon surfaces was also examined.

  18. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  19. The Case for Hydrogen in a Carbon Constrained World

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G D; Aceves, S M

    2005-02-18

    Unlike other fuels, hydrogen (H{sub 2}) can be generated and consumed without generating carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This creates both significant engineering challenges and unsurpassed ecological advantages for H{sub 2} as a fuel, while enabling an inexhaustible (closed) global fuel cycle based on the cleanest, most abundant, natural, and elementary substances: H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O. If generated using light, heat, and/or electrical energy from solar, wind, fission, or (future) fusion power sources, H{sub 2} becomes a versatile, storable, and universal carbonless energy carrier, a necessary element for future global energy system(s) aimed at being free of air and water pollution, CO{sub 2}, and other greenhouse gases. The case for hydrogen rests fundamentally on the need to eliminate pollution and stabilize Earth's atmosphere and climate system.

  20. Pionic deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Th.; Amaro, F. D.; Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Bühler, P.; Covita, D. S.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Indelicato, P.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Marton, J.; Nekipelov, M.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schmid, Ph.; Schlesser, S.; Simons, L. M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2009-09-01

    Data taking of the PIONIC HYDROGEN project has been completed with a high statistics study of the strong-interaction effects in πD by measuring the Kβ X-radiation for three different target densities with a high resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer. The πD hadronic shift will provide a constraint for the πN isospin scattering lengths extracted from the πH measurement. The hadronic width is directly related to pion production at threshold.

  1. Different conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 analyzed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Youngjoo; Kim, Dong Kyun; Seo, Min-Duk; Kim, Kyeong-Man; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • The conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 or β-arrestin2 were analyzed by HDX-MS. • β-Strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • The middle loop was less dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • Upon pre-activation by the R169E mutation, β-arrestins became more dynamic. • Pre-activation affected a wider region of β-arrestin1 compared to β-arrestin2. - Abstract: Arrestins have important roles in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling including desensitization of GPCRs and G protein-independent signaling. There have been four arrestins identified: arrestin1, arrestin2 (e.g. β-arrestin1), arrestin3 (e.g. β-arrestin2), and arrestin4. β-Arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 are ubiquitously expressed and regulate a broad range of GPCRs, while arrestin1 and arrestin4 are expressed in the visual system. Although the functions of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 widely overlap, β-arrestin2 has broader receptor selectivity, and a few studies have suggested that β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 have distinct cellular functions. Here, we compared the conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). We also used the R169E mutant as a pre-activation model system. HDX-MS data revealed that β-strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 in the basal state, while the middle loop was more dynamic in β-arrestin1. With pre-activation, both β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 became more flexible, but broader regions of β-arrestin1 became flexible compared to β-arrestin2. The conformational differences between β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 in both the basal and pre-activated states might determine their different receptor selectivities and different cellular functions.

  2. Chemical shift and electric field gradient tensors for the amide and carboxyl hydrogens in the model peptide N-acetyl-D,L-valine. Single-crystal deuterium NMR study.

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, R. E., II; Bernhard, T.; Haeberlen, U.; Rendell, J.; Opella, S.; Chemical Engineering

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is well established as a method for describing molecular structure with resolution on the atomic scale. Many of the NMR observables result from anisotropic interactions between the nuclear spin and its environment. These observables can be described by second-rank tensors. For example, the eigenvalues of the traceless symmetric part of the hydrogen chemical shift (CS) tensor provide information about the strength of inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding. On the other hand, the eigenvectors of the deuterium electric field gradient (EFG) tensor give deuteron/proton bond directions with an accuracy rivalled only by neutron diffraction. In this paper the authors report structural information of this type for the amide and carboxyl hydrogen sites in a single crystal of the model peptide N-acetyl-D,L-valine (NAV). They use deuterium NMR to infer both the EFG and CS tensors at the amide and carboxyl hydrogen sites in NAV. Advantages of this technique over multiple-pulse proton NMR are that it works in the presence of {sup 14}N spins which are very hard to decouple from protons and that additional information in form of the EFG tensors can be derived. The change in the CS and EFG tensors upon exchange of a deuteron for a proton (the isotope effect) is anticipated to be very small; the effect on the CS tensors is certainly smaller than the experimental errors. NAV has served as a model peptide before in a variety of NMR studies, including those concerned with developing solid-state NMR spectroscopy as a method for determining the structure of proteins. NMR experiments on peptide or protein samples which are oriented in at least one dimension can provide important information about the three-dimensional structure of the peptide or the protein. In order to interpret the NMR data in terms of the structure of the polypeptide, the relationship of the CS and EFG tensors to the local symmetry elements of an amino acide, e.g., the peptide plane, is

  3. Single Membrane Reactor Configuration for Separation of Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Micheal Roberts; Robert Zabransky; Shain Doong; Jerry Lin

    2008-05-31

    The objective of the project was to develop a novel complementary membrane reactor process that can consolidate two or more downstream unit operations of a coal gasification system into a single module for production of a pure stream of hydrogen and a pure stream of carbon dioxide. The overall goals were to achieve higher hydrogen production efficiencies, lower capital costs and a smaller overall footprint than what could be achieved by utilizing separate components for each required unit process/operation in conventional coal-to-hydrogen systems. Specifically, this project was to develop a novel membrane reactor process that combines hydrogen sulfide removal, hydrogen separation, carbon dioxide separation and water-gas shift reaction into a single membrane configuration. The carbon monoxide conversion of the water-gas-shift reaction from the coal-derived syngas stream is enhanced by the complementary use of two membranes within a single reactor to separate hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Consequently, hydrogen production efficiency is increased. The single membrane reactor configuration produces a pure H{sub 2} product and a pure CO{sub 2} permeate stream that is ready for sequestration. This project focused on developing a new class of CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for this new process concept. Several approaches to make CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for high-temperature applications have been tested. Membrane disks using the technique of powder pressing and high temperature sintering were successfully fabricated. The powders were either metal oxide or metal carbonate materials. Experiments on CO{sub 2} permeation testing were also performed in the temperature range of 790 to 940 C for the metal carbonate membrane disks. However, no CO{sub 2} permeation rate could be measured, probably due to very slow CO{sub 2} diffusion in the solid state carbonates. To improve the permeation of CO{sub 2}, one approach is to make membranes containing liquid or molten carbonates

  4. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over nanostructured systems: A mechanochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulas, Gabriele; Campesi, Renato; Garroni, Sebastiano; Delogu, Francesco; Milanese, Chiara

    2011-07-01

    In this study we investigated the mechanochemical hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over nanostructured FeCo- and Mg 2Ni-based catalysts. To this aim powdered materials, prepared by mechanical alloying, were subjected to mechanical treatment under CO + H 2 atmosphere. A methodology to evaluate the activity of the solid catalysts on an absolute basis was developed. Conversion data were, indeed, expressed as turnover frequency, TOF, and related to the occurrence of ball to powder collision events through the mechanochemical turnover frequency parameter, MTOF. Differences in the catalytic activity and selectivity were observed for the two FeCo-based studied systems, the solid solution Fe 50Co 50 and its dispersion on TiO 2 support. As for the Mg 2Ni system, we explored the possibility to estimate the specific role of hydrogen pre-activation step. The catalytic properties of the mechanically alloyed Mg 2Ni system were compared with the conversion data shown by the same system pre-hydrogenated and subsequently milled under CO atmosphere.

  5. Membrane-based systems for carbon capture and hydrogen purification

    SciTech Connect

    Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2010-11-24

    This presentation describes the activities being conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop carbon capture technologies for power systems. This work is aimed at continued development and demonstration of a membrane based pre- and post-combustion carbon capture technology and separation schemes. Our primary work entails the development and demonstration of an innovative membrane technology for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide that operates over a broad range of conditions relevant to the power industry while meeting the US DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program goals of 90% CO{sub 2} capture at less than a 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Separating and capturing carbon dioxide from mixed gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic temperatures and pressures as well as be compatible with large gas volumes. Our project team is developing polymer membranes based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) chemistries that can purify hydrogen and capture CO{sub 2} at industrially relevant temperatures. Our primary objectives are to develop and demonstrate polymer-based membrane chemistries, structures, deployment platforms, and sealing technologies that achieve the critical combination of high selectivity, high permeability, chemical stability, and mechanical stability all at elevated temperatures (> 150 C) and packaged in a scalable, economically viable, high area density system amenable to incorporation into an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) plant for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. Stability requirements are focused on tolerance to the primary synthesis gas components and impurities at various locations in the IGCC process. Since the process stream compositions and conditions (temperature and pressure) vary throughout the IGCC process, the project is focused on the

  6. Combustion characteristics of hydrogen. Carbon monoxide based gaseous fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notardonato, J. J.; White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.; Lecren, R. T.

    1981-10-01

    An experimental rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating the combuston performance of a family of fuel gases based on a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These gases, in addition to being members of a family, were also representative of those secondary fuels that could be produced from coal by various gasification schemes. In particular, simulated Winkler, Lurgi, and Blue-water low and medium energy content gases were used as fuels in the experimental combustor rig. The combustor used was originally designed as a low NOx rich-lean system for burning liquid fuels with high bound nitrogen levels. When used with the above gaseous fuels this combustor was operated in a lean-lean mode with ultra long residence times. The Blue-water gas was also operated in a rich-lean mode. The results of these tests indicate the possibility of the existence of an 'optimum' gas turbine hydrogen - carbon monoxide based secondary fuel. Such a fuel would exhibit NOx and high efficiency over the entire engine operating range. It would also have sufficient stability range to allow normal light-off and engine acceleration. Solar Turbines Incorporated would like to emphasize that the results presented here have been obtained with experimental rig combustors. The technologies generated could, however, be utilized in future commercial gas turbines.

  7. Combustion characteristics of hydrogen. Carbon monoxide based gaseous fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, J. J.; White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.; Lecren, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating the combuston performance of a family of fuel gases based on a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These gases, in addition to being members of a family, were also representative of those secondary fuels that could be produced from coal by various gasification schemes. In particular, simulated Winkler, Lurgi, and Blue-water low and medium energy content gases were used as fuels in the experimental combustor rig. The combustor used was originally designed as a low NOx rich-lean system for burning liquid fuels with high bound nitrogen levels. When used with the above gaseous fuels this combustor was operated in a lean-lean mode with ultra long residence times. The Blue-water gas was also operated in a rich-lean mode. The results of these tests indicate the possibility of the existence of an 'optimum' gas turbine hydrogen - carbon monoxide based secondary fuel. Such a fuel would exhibit NOx and high efficiency over the entire engine operating range. It would also have sufficient stability range to allow normal light-off and engine acceleration. Solar Turbines Incorporated would like to emphasize that the results presented here have been obtained with experimental rig combustors. The technologies generated could, however, be utilized in future commercial gas turbines.

  8. Deep inelastic structure functions from electron scattering on hydrogen, deuterium, and iron at 0. 6 GeV sup 2 le Q sup 2 le 30. 0 GeV sup 2

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlow, L.W.

    1990-03-01

    We report the final results from experiment E140, a recent deep inelastic electron-deuterium and electron-iron scattering experiment at SLAC. In addition, we present the results of a combined global analysis of all SLAC deep inelastic electron-hydrogen and electron-deuterium cross section measurements between 1970 and 1983. Data from seven earlier experiments are re-radiatively corrected and normalized to experiment E140. We report extractions of R(x,Q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) for hydrogen and deuterium over the entire SLAC kinematic range: .06{le} x {le}.90 and 0.6{le} Q{sup 2} {le}30.0 (GeV{sup 2}). We fine that R{sup p} = R{sup d}, as expected by QCD. Extracted values of R(x,Q{sup 2}) are significantly larger than predictions based on QCD and on QCD with the inclusion of kinematic target mass terms. This difference indicates that dynamical higher twist effects may be important in the SLAC kinematic range. A best fit empirical model of R(x,Q{sup 2}) is used to extract F{sub 2} from each cross section measurement. These F{sub 2} extractions are compared with F{sub 2} data from EMC and BCDMS. Agreement is observed with EMC when the EMC data are multiplied by 1.07. Agreement is observed with BCDMS over a limited range in x. The ratios of F{sub 2}{sup d}/F{sub 2}{sup p} are examined for Q{sup 2} dependence. We observe a significant negative slope for x {le} .6, and a significant positive slope above x > .7, in excellent agreement with predictions based on QCD with the inclusion of kinematic target mass terms. 111 refs., 40 figs., 34 tabs.

  9. Isotopic exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, Alex L.; Sylva, Sean P.; Summons, Roger E.; Hayes, John M.

    2004-04-01

    The increasing popularity of compound-specific hydrogen isotope (D/H) analyses for investigating sedimentary organic matter raises numerous questions about the exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales. Important questions include the rates of isotopic exchange, methods for diagnosing exchange in ancient samples, and the isotopic consequences of that exchange. This article provides a review of relevant literature data along with new data from several pilot studies to investigate such issues. Published experimental estimates of exchange rates between organic hydrogen and water indicate that at warm temperatures (50-100°C) exchange likely occurs on timescales of 10 4 to 10 8 yr. Incubation experiments using organic compounds and D-enriched water, combined with compound-specific D/H analyses, provide a new and highly sensitive method for measuring exchange at low temperatures. Comparison of δD values for isoprenoid and n-alkyl carbon skeletons in sedimentary organic matter provides no evidence for exchange in young (<1 Ma), cool sediments, but strong evidence for exchange in ancient (>350 Ma) rocks. Specific rates of exchange are probably influenced by the nature and abundance of organic matter, pore-water chemistry, the presence of catalytic mineral surfaces, and perhaps even enzymatic activity. Estimates of equilibrium fractionation factors between organic H and water indicate that typical lipids will be depleted in D relative to water by ˜75 to 140‰ at equilibrium (30°C). Thus large differences in δD between organic molecules and water cannot be unambiguously interpreted as evidence against hydrogen exchange. A better approach may be to use changes in stereochemistry as a proxy for hydrogen exchange. For example, estimated rates of H exchange in pristane are similar to predicted rates for stereochemical inversion in steranes and hopanes. The isotopic consequences of this exchange remain in question. Incubations of cholestene with D 2O

  10. Cometary Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Roland; Owen, Tobias C.

    1999-10-01

    Deuterium fractionations in cometary ices provide important clues to the origin and evolution of comets. Mass spectrometers aboard spaceprobe Giotto revealed the first accurate D/H ratios in the water of Comet 1P/Halley. Ground-based observations of HDO in Comets C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), the detection of DCN in Comet Hale-Bopp, and upper limits for several other D-bearing molecules complement our limited sample of D/H measurements. On the basis of this data set all Oort cloud comets seem to exhibit a similar ( {{{D} {{D {H}}} H}} )_{H}_{2} {O}} ratio in H2O, enriched by about a factor of two relative to terrestrial water and approximately one order of magnitude relative to the protosolar value. Oort cloud comets, and by inference also classical short-period comets derived from the Kuiper Belt cannot be the only source for the Earth's oceans. The cometary O/C ratio and dynamical reasons make it difficult to defend an early influx of icy planetesimals from the Jupiter zone to the early Earth. D/H measurements of OH groups in phyllosilicate rich meteorites suggest a mixture of cometary water and water adsorbed from the nebula by the rocky grains that formed the bulk of the Earth may be responsible for the terrestrial D/H. The D/H ratio in cometary HCN is 7 times higher than the value in cometary H2O. Species-dependent D-fractionations occur at low temperatures and low gas densities via ion-molecule or grain-surface reactions and cannot be explained by a pure solar nebula chemistry. It is plausible that cometary volatiles preserved the interstellar D fractionation. The observed D abundances set a lower limit to the formation temperature of (30 ± 10) K. Similar numbers can be derived from the ortho-to-para ratio in cometary water, from the absence of neon in cometary ices and the presence of S2. Noble gases on Earth and Mars, and the relative abundance of cometary hydrocarbons place the comet formation temperature near 50 K. So far all cometary

  11. Cometary deuterium.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Owen, T C

    1999-01-01

    Deuterium fractionations in cometary ices provide important clues to the origin and evolution of comets. Mass spectrometers aboard spaceprobe Giotto revealed the first accurate D/H ratios in the water of Comet 1P/Halley. Ground-based observations of HDO in Comets C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), the detection of DCN in Comet Hale-Bopp, and upper limits for several other D-bearing molecules complement our limited sample of D/H measurements. On the basis of this data set all Oort cloud comets seem to exhibit a similar (D/H)H2O ratio in H2O, enriched by about a factor of two relative to terrestrial water and approximately one order of magnitude relative to the protosolar value. Oort cloud comets, and by inference also classical short-period comets derived from the Kuiper Belt cannot be the only source for the Earth's oceans. The cometary O/C ratio and dynamical reasons make it difficult to defend an early influx of icy planetesimals from the Jupiter zone to the early Earth. D/H measurements of OH groups in phyllosilicate rich meteorites suggest a mixture of cometary water and water adsorbed from the nebula by the rocky grains that formed the bulk of the Earth may be responsible for the terrestrial D/H. The D/H ratio in cometary HCN is 7 times higher than the value in cometary H2O. Species-dependent D-fractionations occur at low temperatures and low gas densities via ion-molecule or grain-surface reactions and cannot be explained by a pure solar nebula chemistry. It is plausible that cometary volatiles preserved the interstellar D fractionation. The observed D abundances set a lower limit to the formation temperature of (30 +/- 10) K. Similar numbers can he derived from the ortho-to-para ratio in cometary water, from the absence of neon in cometary ices and the presence of S2. Noble gases on Earth and Mars, and the relative abundance of cometary hydrocarbons place the comet formation temperature near 50 K. So far all cometary D/H measurements refer to

  12. An investigation of the effect of carbon support on ruthenium/carbon catalysts for lactic acid and butanone hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel R; Iqbal, Sarwat; Kondrat, Simon A; Lari, Giacomo M; Miedziak, Peter J; Morgan, David J; Parker, Stewart F; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-06-29

    A series of ruthenium catalysts supported on two different carbons were tested for the hydrogenation of lactic acid to 1,2-propanediol and butanone to 2-butanol. The properties of the carbon supports were investigated by inelastic neutron scattering and correlated with the properties of the ruthenium deposited onto the carbons by wet impregnation or sol-immobilisation. It was noted that the rate of butanone hydrogenation was highly dependent on the carbon support, while no noticeable difference in rates was observed between different catalysts for the hydrogenation of lactic acid. PMID:27079275

  13. Acceleration of Hydrogen Ions up to 30 MeV and Generation of 3 × 1012 Neutrons in Megaampere Deuterium Gas-Puff Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Cikhardt, J.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A.; Cherdizov, R.; Fursov, F.; Kokshenev, V.; Kovalchuk, B.; Kurmaev, N.; Labetsky, A.; Ratakhin, N.; Orcikova, H.; Turek, K.

    2013-10-01

    Fusion neutrons were produced with a deuterium gas-puff z-pinch on the GIT-12 generator at the Institute of High Current Electronics in Tomsk. The peak neutron yield from DD reactions reached Yn = (2 . 9 +/- 0 . 3) ×1012 at 100 μg/cm linear mass density of deuterium, 700 ns implosion time and 2.7 MA current. Such a neutron yield means that the scaling law of deuterium z-pinches Yn ~I4 was extended to 3 MA currents. The further increase of neutron yields up to (3 . 7 +/- 0 . 4) ×1012 was achieved by placing a deuterated polyethylene catcher onto the axis. Maximum neutron energies of 15 and 22 MeV were observed by radial and axial nToF detectors, respectively. A stack of CR-39 track detectors showed up to 40 MeV deuterons (or 30 MeV protons) on the z-pinch axis. Since the energy input into plasmas was 70 kJ, the number of DD neutrons per one joule of stored plasma energy exceeded the value of 5 ×107 . This value implies that deuterium gas-puff z-pinches belong to the most efficient plasma-based sources of DD neutrons. This work was partially supported by the GACR grant No. P205/12/0454 and by the RFBR research project No. 13-08-00479-a.

  14. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  15. Trapping state of hydrogen isotopes in carbon and graphite investigated by thermal desorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, H.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) has been investigated to obtain fundamental information of tritium behavior in graphite and carbon materials especially at high temperatures. 29 brands of graphite, HOPG, glassy carbon and CFC materials charged with deuterium gas are tested up to the temperature of 1735 K with a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. TDS spectra have five peaks at 600-700 K, around 900 K, 1200 K, 1300-1450 K and 1600-1650 K. The amounts of released deuterium have been compared with crystallographic parameters derived from XRD analysis. The results can be summarized as follows. First, TDS spectra of deuterium were quite varied among the samples tested, such as existence of peaks, peak temperatures and release amounts of deuterium. Secondly, TDS spectra may consist of five peaks, which are peak 1 (600-700 K), peak 2 (around 900 K), peak 3 (around 1200 K), peak 4 (1300-1450 K) and peak 5 (1600-1650 K). Thirdly, the correlations between the estimated surface area of edge surface and the total amount of released deuterium could be observed for peaks 4 and 5. Fourthly, high energy trapping site (peak 5) may exist even at edge surface or a near surface region, not only for intercalary. And fifth, in order to obtain the lower tritium retention for graphite and CFC materials, the material should be composed of a filler grain with a smaller crystallite size or having the smaller net edge surface in its structure. It is shown that heat treatment does not reduce originally existing trapping sites but trapping sites generated by neutron irradiation for instance can be reduced in some degree.

  16. Interaction between adsorbed hydrogen and potassium on a carbon nanocone containing material as studied by photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Raaen, Steinar

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen adsorption on a potassium doped carbon nanocone containing material was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and work function measurement. The valence band spectra indicate that there is charge transfer from potassium to carbon. Upon deposition on carbon potassium is in its ionic state for lower doping and shows both ionic and metallic behavior at higher doping. Adsorption of hydrogen facilitates diffusion of potassium on the carbon material as seen by changes in the K{sub 2p} core level spectrum. Variations in the measured sample work function indicate that hydrogen initially adsorb on the K dopants and subsequently adsorb on the carbon cone containing material.

  17. Deuterium in the daytime thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, E. L.; Sanatani, S.; Hanson, W. B.

    1987-01-01

    Ion concentration measurements for H(+) and D(+) from the magnetic ion mass spectrometer on the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite are used, in conjunction with other atmospheric data, to determine the concentrations of H and D in the nonpolar daytime thermosphere. The ratio of the observed D(+) to H(+) concentrations has essentially the same height dependence in the 300 to 800-km region as expected for their neutral counterparts, even in the presence of ion temperature gradients and probable large vertical ion fluxes. Rapid charge exchange with atomic oxygen ensures that D/H is about equal to D(+)/H(+) at the lower altitudes where the derived D to H concentration ratio is a factor of about 6 larger than its sea level value, for an exospheric temperature of 930 K. This relative enhancement of deuterium arises from the fact that hydrogen more readily escapes the earth, and a large vertical gradient in the H concentration relative to its diffusive equilibrium value is necessary to drive this upward flux through the lower thermosphere. If these planetary losses of hydrogen are much greater than those associated with evaporative escape, as is the current view, then correspondingly larger deuterium loss rates are also likely in order that the thermospheric D/H ratio not increase well above the observed value. The absolute winter daytime concentration of deuterium at 300 km is found to be 210 + or - 50 atoms/cu cm.

  18. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sanip, S. M.; Saidin, M. A. R.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-03-11

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetric differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydrogen adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will be helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using the fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type method. The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range, R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume. The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operating pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of +-0.01 bar. High purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is between 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of the adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and other non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate the hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbon with a surface area of 644.87 m{sup 2}/g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m{sup 2}/g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the

  19. Poisoning effect on solubility of hydrogen isotopes in getter materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Sato, Yuichi; Ogawa, Hidenori; Shirasu, Yoshirou; Miyake, Masanobu

    1991-03-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys with various compositions have been measured at pressures below 100 Pa. All of the solubility data were found to follow Sieverts' law. The presence of carbon in Ti increased the solubilities of hydrogen isotopes and reduced the enthalpies of solution. The solubility increased and the enthalpy of solution decreased with addition of nitrogen into Zr. The hydrogen solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was larger than the deuterium solubility. Partial thermodynamic functions of hydrogen and deuterium in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys were obtained by a dilute solution model and compared with those in Ti-(O, N) and Zr-O alloys. The isotope effect of hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in the Ti-(O, N, C) and Zr-(O, N) alloys was discussed, and the tritium solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was evaluated from hydrogen and deuterium data.

  20. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Muradov, Nazim Z.

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  1. Selective Breaking of Hydrogen Bonds of Layered Carbon Nitride for Visible Light Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuyang; Yang, Yongqiang; Yin, Li-Chang; Kang, Xiangdong; Wang, Lianzhou; Liu, Gang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Selective breaking of the hydrogen bonds of graphitic carbon nitride can introduce favorable features, including increased band tails close to the band edges and the creation of abundant pores. These features can simultaneously improve the three basic processes of photocatalysis. As a consequence, the photocatalytic hydrogen-generation activity of carbon nitride under visible light is drastically increased by tens of times. PMID:27167996

  2. Development of Affordable, Low-Carbon Hydrogen Supplies at an Industrial Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roddy, Dermot J.

    2008-01-01

    An existing industrial hydrogen generation and distribution infrastructure is described, and a number of large-scale investment projects are outlined. All of these projects have the potential to generate significant volumes of low-cost, low-carbon hydrogen. The technologies concerned range from gasification of coal with carbon capture and storage…

  3. A STUDY TO EVALUATE CARBON MONOXIDE AND HYDROGEN SULFIDE CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORS AT AN OIL REFINERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An eleven month field evaluation was done on five hydrogen sulfide and four carbon monoxide monitors located at an oil refinery. The hydrogen sulfide monitors sampled a fuel gas feed line and the carbon monoxide monitors sampled the emissions from a fluid cat cracker (FCC). Two o...

  4. Laser spectroscopy of muonic deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Fernandes, Luis M. P.; Amaro, Fernando D.; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M. R.; Covita, Daniel S.; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L.; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A. M.; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M. B.; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; dos Santos, Joaquim M. F.; Schaller, Lukas A.; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F. C. A.; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    The deuteron is the simplest compound nucleus, composed of one proton and one neutron. Deuteron properties such as the root-mean-square charge radius rd and the polarizability serve as important benchmarks for understanding the nuclear forces and structure. Muonic deuterium μd is the exotic atom formed by a deuteron and a negative muon μ–. We measured three 2S-2P transitions in μd and obtain rd = 2.12562(78) fm, which is 2.7 times more accurate but 7.5σ smaller than the CODATA-2010 value rd = 2.1424(21) fm. The μd value is also 3.5σ smaller than the rd value from electronic deuterium spectroscopy. The smaller rd, when combined with the electronic isotope shift, yields a “small” proton radius rp, similar to the one from muonic hydrogen, amplifying the proton radius puzzle.

  5. Laser spectroscopy of muonic deuterium.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Fernandes, Luis M P; Amaro, Fernando D; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; dos Santos, Joaquim M F; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-08-12

    The deuteron is the simplest compound nucleus, composed of one proton and one neutron. Deuteron properties such as the root-mean-square charge radius rd and the polarizability serve as important benchmarks for understanding the nuclear forces and structure. Muonic deuterium μd is the exotic atom formed by a deuteron and a negative muon μ(-). We measured three 2S-2P transitions in μd and obtain r(d) = 2.12562(78) fm, which is 2.7 times more accurate but 7.5σ smaller than the CODATA-2010 value r(d) = 2.1424(21) fm. The μd value is also 3.5σ smaller than the r(d) value from electronic deuterium spectroscopy. The smaller r(d), when combined with the electronic isotope shift, yields a "small" proton radius r(p), similar to the one from muonic hydrogen, amplifying the proton radius puzzle. PMID:27516595

  6. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Farris, Thomas Stephen

    2008-11-18

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  7. Sustainable production of green feed from carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Landau, Miron V; Vidruk, Roxana; Herskowitz, Moti

    2014-03-01

    Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form hydrocarbons was conducted on two iron-based catalysts, prepared according to procedures described in the literature, and on a new iron spinel catalyst. The CO2 conversion measured in a packed-bed reactor was limited to about 60% because of excessive amounts of water produced in this process. Switching to a system of three packed-bed reactors in series with interim removal of water and condensed hydrocarbons increased CO2 conversion to as much as 89%. The pure spinel catalyst displayed a significantly higher activity and selectivity than those of the other iron catalysts. This process produces a product called green feed, which is similar in composition to the product of a high-temperature, iron-based Fischer–Tropsch process from syngas. The green feed can be readily converted into renewable fuels by well-established technologies. PMID:24678062

  8. Kinetic modelling of molecular hydrogen transport in microporous carbon materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hankel, M.; Zhang, H.; Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K.; Gray, S. K.; Smith, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The proposal of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes is explored by employing statistical rate theory methods to describe the kinetics of molecular hydrogen transport in model microporous carbon structures. A Lennard-Jones atom-atom interaction potential is utilized for the description of the interactions between H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} and the carbon framework, while the requisite partition functions describing the thermal flux of molecules through the transition state are calculated quantum mechanically in view of the low temperatures involved in the proposed kinetic molecular sieving application. Predicted kinetic isotope effects for initial passage from the gas phase into the first pore mouth are consistent with expectations from previous modeling studies, namely, that at sufficiently low temperatures and for sufficiently narrow pore mouths D{sub 2} transport is dramatically favored over H{sub 2}. However, in contrast to expectations from previous modeling, the absence of any potential barrier along the minimum energy pathway from the gas phase into the first pore mouth yields a negative temperature dependence in the predicted absolute rate coefficients - implying a negative activation energy. In pursuit of the effective activation barrier, we find that the minimum potential in the cavity is significantly higher than in the pore mouth for nanotube-shaped models, throwing into question the common assumption that passage through the pore mouths should be the rate-determining step. Our results suggest a new mechanism that, depending on the size and shape of the cavity, the thermal activation barrier may lie in the cavity rather than at the pore mouth. As a consequence, design strategies for achieving quantum-mediated kinetic molecular sieving of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} in a microporous membrane will need, at the very least, to take careful account of cavity shape and size in addition to pore-mouth size in order to ensure that the selective step, namely passage

  9. Hydrogen induced redox mechanism in amorphous carbon resistive random access memory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of the resistive random access memory (RRAM) device with amorphous carbon layer. Applying a forming voltage, the amorphous carbon layer was carbonized to form a conjugation double bond conductive filament. We proposed a hydrogen redox model to clarify the resistive switch mechanism of high/low resistance states (HRS/LRS) in carbon RRAM. The electrical conduction mechanism of LRS is attributed to conductive sp2 carbon filament with conjugation double bonds by dehydrogenation, while the electrical conduction of HRS resulted from the formation of insulating sp3-type carbon filament through hydrogenation process. PMID:24475979

  10. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of Glycerol Steam Reforming for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogen and carbon dioxide separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Joel M.; Soria, M. A.; Madeira, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic study of Glycerol Steam Reforming (GSR) for hydrogen production with in situ carbon dioxide and hydrogen (reaction products) simultaneous removal was performed. The sorption-enhanced membrane reactor (SEMR) was divided into multiple sub-Gibbs reactors and the Gibbs free energy minimization method was employed. The effects of temperature (600-800 K), molar water-to-glycerol feed ratio (WGFR) (3-9), pressure (1-5 atm) and fraction of hydrogen and carbon dioxide removal (f, 0-0.99) on the GSR process were target of investigation. A hydrogen yield (total moles of hydrogen produced/mole of reacted glycerol) very close to the stoichiometric value of 7 was obtained at 700 K, WGFR of 9, 1 atm and for fCO2 = 0.99 and fH2 = 0.80. This corresponds to an enhancement of 217%, 47% and 22% in terms of hydrogen yield comparatively to the traditional reactor (TR), sorption-enhanced reactor (SER) with carbon dioxide capture (fCO2 = 0.99) and membrane reactor (MR) with hydrogen separation (fH2 = 0.80) , respectively. In terms of coke, its formation was only observed under WGFRs below the stoichiometric value of 3.

  12. Apparatus for hydrogen and carbon production via carbon aerosol-catalyzed dissociation of hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor); Smith, Franklyn (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A novel process and apparatus is disclosed for sustainable, continuous production of hydrogen and carbon by catalytic dissociation or decomposition of hydrocarbons at elevated temperatures using in-situ generated carbon particles. Carbon particles are produced by decomposition of carbonaceous materials in response to an energy input. The energy input can be provided by at least one of a non-oxidative and oxidative means. The non-oxidative means of the energy input includes a high temperature source, or different types of plasma, such as, thermal, non-thermal, microwave, corona discharge, glow discharge, dielectric barrier discharge, or radiation sources, such as, electron beam, gamma, ultraviolet (UV). The oxidative means of the energy input includes oxygen, air, ozone, nitrous oxide (NO.sub.2) and other oxidizing agents. The method, apparatus and process of the present invention is applicable to any gaseous or liquid hydrocarbon fuel and it produces no or significantly less CO.sub.2 emissions compared to conventional processes.

  13. Hydrogen in carbon foils made by DC glow discharge in ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, P.; Armour, D. G.; England, J. B. A.; Tait, N. R. S.; Tolfree, D. W. L.

    1983-08-01

    Thermal desorption has been studied from thin films of carbon prepared by dc glow discharge in ethylene. The only gases released in significant quantities are hydrogen and methane. Both releases can be characterised by a continuum of activation energies but the methane release peaks at a lower temperature than that from hydrogen. The estimated total hydrogen release is compared with the hydrogen content determined by nuclear scattering experiments. Infra red studies suggest that the majority of CH 2 and CH 3 bonds can be ruptured by annealing at 300°C, a temperature well below the hydrogen and methane release rate maxima. Possible hydrogen bonding modes and desorption mechanisms are discussed.

  14. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  15. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  16. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  17. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  18. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  19. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel-carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm(-2) and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis. PMID:26861684

  20. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel-carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm-2 and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis.

  1. Two different carbon-hydrogen complexes in silicon with closely spaced energy levels

    SciTech Connect

    Stübner, R. E-mail: kolkov@ifpan.edu.pl; Kolkovsky, Vl. E-mail: kolkov@ifpan.edu.pl; Weber, J.

    2015-08-07

    An acceptor and a single donor state of carbon-hydrogen defects (CH{sub A} and CH{sub B}) are observed by Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy at 90 K. CH{sub A} appears directly after hydrogenation by wet chemical etching or hydrogen plasma treatment, whereas CH{sub B} can be observed only after a successive annealing under reverse bias at about 320 K. The activation enthalpies of these states are 0.16 eV for CH{sub A} and 0.14 eV for CH{sub B}. Our results reconcile previous controversial experimental results. We attribute CH{sub A} to the configuration where substitutional carbon binds a hydrogen atom on a bond centered position between carbon and the neighboring silicon and CH{sub B} to another carbon-hydrogen defect.

  2. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel–carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm−2 and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis. PMID:26861684

  3. Deuterium in Iceland waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Sigurgeirsson, T.; Gardarsson, O.

    1963-01-01

    From the deuterium analysis of 159 samples of water collected in Iceland from hot-water boreholes, cold and hot springs, rivers and rain, the geographical distribution of deuterium in surface waters is plotted. On the basis of the deuterium analysis, the water from boreholes near Reykjavik does not originate from local precipitation. The variation of deuterium content of these water wells with time suggests that these data can be used to determine the time of travel of recharge water to the various boreholes, as well as the surface recharge area. ?? 1963.

  4. Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Nitrogen-Rich Carbon Nanofibers: Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution without Cocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing; Wang, Bing; Gao, Jian; Qu, Liangti

    2016-08-26

    An interconnected framework of mesoporous graphitic-C3 N4 nanofibers merged with in situ incorporated nitrogen-rich carbon has been prepared. The unique composition and structure of the nanofibers as well as strong coupling between the components endow them with efficient light-harvesting properties, improved charged separation, and a multidimensional electron transport path that enhance the performance of hydrogen production. The as-obtained catalyst exhibits an extremely high hydrogen-evolution rate of 16885 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) , and a remarkable apparent quantum efficiency of 14.3 % at 420 nm without any cocatalysts, which is much higher than most reported g-C3 N4 -based photocatalysts even in the presence of Pt-based cocatalysts. PMID:27467255

  5. Conformational changes of the glucocorticoid receptor ligand binding domain induced by ligand and cofactor binding, and the location of cofactor binding sites determined by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Frego, Lee; Davidson, Walter

    2006-01-01

    HXMS (hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry) of the glucocorticoid receptor ligand-binding domain (GR LBD) complexed with the agonist dexamethasone and the antagonist RU-486 is described. Variations in the rates of exchange were observed in regions consistent with the published crystal structures of GR LBD complexed with RU-486 when compared with the GR dexamethasone complex. We also report the HXMS results for agonist-bound GR LBD with the coactivator transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (TIF2) and anatagonist-bound GR LBD with nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). Alterations in exchange rates observed for agonist-bound GR LBD with TIF2 present were consistent with the published crystal structural contacts for the complex. Alterations in exchange rates observed for antagonist-bound GR LBD with NCoR were a subset of those observed with TIF2 binding, suggesting a common or overlapping binding site for coactivator and corepressor. PMID:16600964

  6. Maximising biohydrogen yields via continuous electrochemical hydrogen removal and carbon dioxide scrubbing.

    PubMed

    Massanet-Nicolau, Jaime; Jones, Rhys Jon; Guwy, Alan; Dinsdale, Richard; Premier, Giuliano; Mulder, Martijn J J

    2016-10-01

    The use of electrochemical hydrogen removal (EHR) together with carbon dioxide removal (CDR) was demonstrated for the first time using a continuous hydrogen producing fermenter. CDR alone was found to increase hydrogen yields from 0.07molH2molhexose to 0.72molH2molhexose. When CDR was combined with EHR, hydrogen yields increased further to 1.79molH2molhexose. The pattern of carbohydrate utilisation and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production are consistent with the hypothesis that increased yields are the result of relieving end product inhibition and inhibition of microbial hydrogen consumption. In situ removal of hydrogen and carbon dioxide as demonstrated here not only increase hydrogen yield but also produces a relatively pure product gas and unlike other approaches can be used to enhance conventional, mesophilic, CSTR type fermentation of low grade/high solids biomass. PMID:27394998

  7. Temperature dependence of deuterium retention in tungsten deposits by deuterium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, K.; Uehara, K.; Date, H.; Fukada, S.; Watanabe, H.

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten (W) deposits were formed by hydrogen plasma sputtering and blisters were observed on the surface. The W deposits and W foils were exposed to deuterium ions with 2 keV-D2+ to doses of 1.0 × 1021 D2+/m2 at 294 and 773 K in addition to 573 K in the present authors' previous work. Hydrogen isotopes release behaviors from the W deposits and W foils were observed by the thermal desorption spectroscopy method. The amount of deuterium released from the W deposit was considerably larger than that from W foil. The obtained deuterium retention in D/m2 was in the range of deuterium retention in polycrystalline tungsten. Not only implanted deuterium but also hydrogen, which was incorporated during the sputtering-deposition process, were released from the W deposits. A hydrogen release peak at around 1100 K was observed for the W deposits. This is considered to be due to the rupture of the blisters.

  8. Effect of γ-ray irradiation on the sorption of hydrogen by nanoporous carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbin, A. V.; Manzhelii, V. G.; Esel'son, V. B.; Gavrilko, V. G.; Vinnikov, N. A.; Basnukaeva, R. M.; Khlistyuck, M. V.; Maletskii, V. P.; Nikolaev, V. G.; Kudriachenko, E. V.; Uvarova, I. Yu.; Tripachko, N. A.; Koda, V. Yu.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of radiation exposure in a hydrogen atmosphere on hydrogen sorption by a synthetic porous carbon nanosorbent, SCN (spherical carbonite saturated). The exposure was created by γ-rays from cobalt-60 (photon energy 1.2 MeV, irradiation dose 4.8 × 107 rad) in a normal hydrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 1 atm and a temperature of 300 K. The processes of hydrogen sorption-desorption by SCN samples before and after irradiation were studied in a temperature interval of 15-1173 K. It was found that the irradiation of SCN in a hydrogen atmosphere significantly increased the amount hydrogen sorbed in the sample. We conducted a comparison with the results of earlier studies investigating the influence of irradiation on the sorption of hydrogen by single-walled carbon nanotubes. The amount of physically sorbed hydrogen in the synthetic SCN sorbent that was irradiated in the hydrogen atmosphere, is four times greater than the amount of hydrogen that was physically sorbed by the single-walled carbon nanotubes that were irradiated under similar conditions. At a temperature below 25 K, the hydrogen diffusion in the SCN was almost temperature independent for the porous subsystem with the highest diffusion coefficients, which is typical for cases when the tunnel diffusion mechanism dominates the thermodynamic mechanism.

  9. Deuterium permeation through copper with trapping impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. J.; Harris, J. M.; Patrick, R. C.; Boespflug, E. P.; Beavis, L. C.

    1982-02-01

    The time dependence of the deuterium permeation rate through impurity-doped copper membranes was measured in the temperature range 300-700 °C. Copper membranes that were doped with Er, Zr, and Ti all exhibited permeabilities that were nearly equal to pure copper, but the apparent diffusivities were smaller than those for pure copper by factors of 10-100 over the experimental temperature range. The permeation characteristics of these alloys appear to be altered from those for pure copper due to trapping of deuterium at sites that are associated with the impurity atoms. It is shown that the deuterium permeation rate through the copper alloys can be expressed in an analytical form that is analogous to that for pure copper, except that the apparent diffusivity takes on a value which depends on the trap concentration and binding energy for deuterium. The binding energies that are calculated for the alloys are used to determine the lag time which is required for deuterium or hydrogen to permeate through initially evacuated membranes. The lag times for copper alloys containing about 1% Er, Zr, or Ti are many orders of magnitude longer than for pure copper at room temperature. Copper alloys containing Cr do not appear to exhibit deuterium trapping. Nuclear reaction and backscattering analyses were used to help determine the effect or surface oxides on the permeation measurements.

  10. Method of producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen by gasification of solid carbonaceous material involving microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, J.L. Jr.

    1984-03-06

    A process is claimed for the gasification of carbon of solid carbonaceous material to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting the material with superheated steam and irradiating the product of said contacting with an amount of microwave energy sufficient to gasify said carbon, and apparatus therefor.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation study of successive hydrogenation reactions of carbon monoxide producing methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Thi Nu; Ono, Shota; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    Doing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate a possibility of hydrogenation of carbon monoxide producing methanol step by step. At first, the hydrogen atom reacts with the carbon monoxide molecule at the excited state forming the formyl radical. Formaldehyde was formed after adding one more hydrogen atom to the system. Finally, absorption of two hydrogen atoms to formaldehyde produces methanol molecule. This study is performed by using the all-electron mixed basis approach based on the time dependent density functional theory within the adiabatic local density approximation for an electronic ground-state configuration and the one-shot GW approximation for an electronic excited state configuration.

  12. Structure and hydrogen adsorption properties in low density nanoporous carbons from simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, L.; Morris, James R

    2012-01-01

    We systematically model the hydrogen adsorption in nanoporous carbons over a wide range of carbon bulk densities (0.6 - 2.4 g/cm3) by using tight binding molecular dynamics simulations for the carbon structures and thermodynamics calculations of the hydrogen adsorption. The resulting structures are in good agreement with the experimental data of ultra-microporous carbon (UMC), a wood-based activated carbon, as indicated by comparisons of the microstructure at atomic level, pair distribution function, and pore size distribution. The hydrogen adsorption calculations in carbon structures demonstrate both a promising hydrogen storage capacity (excess uptake of 1.33 wt% at 298K and 5 MPa, for carbon structures at the lower range of densities) and a reasonable heat of adsorption (12-22 kJ/mol). This work demonstrates that increasing the heat of adsorption does not necessarily increase the hydrogen uptake. In fact, the available adsorption volume is as important as the isosteric heat of adsorption for hydrogen storage in nanoporous carbons.

  13. Chemical Behaviors of Energetic Deuterium Implanted into Boron Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, H.; Morimoto, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Oyaidu, M.; Oya, Y.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Okuno, K.

    2003-09-15

    To study chemical behaviors of energetic deuterium implanted into boron coating deposited by boronization in fusion devices, two types of boron coating film deposited on silicon and IG-430U were prepared by Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (PCVD) technique. Boron polycrystal was used as the reference sample. The chemical behavior of deuterium was investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and TDS (Thermal adsorption spectroscopy).The 1.0 keV D{sub 2}{sup +} ions were implanted into the samples and the deuterium desorption behavior was studied by TDS. The TDS spectra showed that there were two deuterium release peaks at around 550 and 750 K, which were attributed to the release from deuterium trapped by boron and carbon, respectively. It was also found that most of implanted deuterium was trapped in carbon trapping site compared with boron one.In XPS measurements, the chemical shift of B-1s towards positive side was observed in the film on IG-430U after D{sub 2}{sup +} ion implantation. However, no chemical shifts were found in the film on silicon and boron polycrystal. In highly concentrated boron materials, even if deuterium was implanted into the boron materials, the amount of B-D bond was too low to be measured by XPS. This suggests that deuterium implanted into highly pure boron materials wasn't almost trapped, so that the retention of deuterium in the boron materials would be reduced, compared that in carbon materials.

  14. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  15. In situ measurement of the deuterium (hydrogen) charging of a palladium electrode during electrolysis by energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felici, R.; Bertalot, L.; DeNinno, A.; LaBarbera, A.; Violante, V.

    1995-05-01

    A method to determine the concentration of deuterium inside a palladium cathode during the electrolysis of LiOD-heavy water solution is described. This method is based on the measurement of the host metal lattice parameter which is linearly related to the concentration in a wide range. A hard-x-ray beam which is able to cross two glass walls and few centimeters of water solutions without suffering a strong attenuation has been used. The measurement of the lattice parameter is performed in situ, during the electrolysis, by using energy dispersive x-ray diffraction. The sample volume illuminated by the x-ray beam is limited to a small region close to the surface and depends on the incident photon energy. In principle, this allows one to study the dynamics of the charging process and to determine the concentration profile in the range from few up to tens of micrometers. The deuterium concentration, determined by this method, was then checked by degassing the cathode in a known volume and was always found in a very good agreement, showing that the charging was uniform for the whole sample.

  16. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles. PMID:26763714

  17. Deuterium-incorporated gate oxide of MOS devices fabricated by using deuterium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Sung; Lear, Kevin L.

    2012-04-01

    In the aspect of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device reliability, deuterium-incorporated gate oxide could be utilized to suppress the wear-out that is combined with oxide trap generation. An alternative deuterium process for the passivation of oxide traps or defects in the gate oxide of MOS devices has been suggested in this study. The deuterium ion is delivered to the location where the gate oxide resides by using an implantation process and subsequent N2 annealing process at the back-end of metallization process. A conventional MOS field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with a 3-nm-thick gate oxide and poly-to-ploy capacitor sandwiched with 20-nm-thick SiO2 were fabricated in order to demonstrate the deuterium effect in our process. An optimum condition of ion implantation was necessary to account for the topography of the overlaying layers in the device structure and to minimize the physical damage due to the energy of the implanted ion. Device parameter variations, the gate leakage current, and the dielectric breakdown phenomenon were investigated in the deuterium-ion-implanted devices. We found the isotope effect between hydrogen- and deuterium-implanted devices and an improved electrical reliability in the deuterated gate oxide. This implies that deuterium bonds are generated effectively at the Si/SiO2 interface and in the SiO2 bulk.

  18. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER. PMID:26686184

  19. Quantum fluctuations increase the self-diffusive motion of para-hydrogen in narrow carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Gauden, Piotr A; Terzyk, Artur P; Furmaniak, Sylwester

    2011-05-28

    Quantum fluctuations significantly increase the self-diffusive motion of para-hydrogen adsorbed in narrow carbon nanotubes at 30 K comparing to its classical counterpart. Rigorous Feynman's path integral calculations reveal that self-diffusive motion of para-hydrogen in a narrow (6,6) carbon nanotube at 30 K and pore densities below ∼29 mmol cm(-3) is one order of magnitude faster than the classical counterpart. We find that the zero-point energy and tunneling significantly smoothed out the free energy landscape of para-hydrogen molecules adsorbed in a narrow (6,6) carbon nanotube. This promotes a delocalization of the confined para-hydrogen at 30 K (i.e., population of unclassical paths due to quantum effects). Contrary the self-diffusive motion of classical para-hydrogen molecules in a narrow (6,6) carbon nanotube at 30 K is very slow. This is because classical para-hydrogen molecules undergo highly correlated movement when their collision diameter approached the carbon nanotube size (i.e., anomalous diffusion in quasi-one dimensional pores). On the basis of current results we predict that narrow single-walled carbon nanotubes are promising nanoporous molecular sieves being able to separate para-hydrogen molecules from mixtures of classical particles at cryogenic temperatures. PMID:21503294

  20. Enzymatic Functionalization of Carbon-Hydrogen Bonds1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jared C.; Coelho, Pedro S.

    2010-01-01

    The development of new catalytic methods to functionalize carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds continues to progress at a rapid pace due to the significant economic and environmental benefits of these transformations over traditional synthetic methods. In nature, enzymes catalyze regio- and stereoselective C-H bond functionalization using transformations ranging from hydroxylation to hydroalkylation under ambient reaction conditions. The efficiency of these enzymes relative to analogous chemical processes has led to their increased use as biocatalysts in preparative and industrial applications. Furthermore, unlike small molecule catalysts, enzymes can be systematically optimized via directed evolution for a particular application and can be expressed in vivo to augment the biosynthetic capability of living organisms. While a variety of technical challenges must still be overcome for practical application of many enzymes for C-H bond functionalization, continued research on natural enzymes and on novel artificial metalloenzymes will lead to improved synthetic processes for efficient synthesis of complex molecules. In this critical review, we discuss the most prevalent mechanistic strategies used by enzymes to functionalize non-acidic C-H bonds, the application and evolution of these enzymes for chemical synthesis, and a number of potential biosynthetic capabilities uniquely enabled by these powerful catalysts. PMID:21079862

  1. Electronic structures of hydrogen functionalized carbon nanotube: Density functional theory (DFT) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Iyama, Tetsuji; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structures and formation mechanism of hydrogen functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) have been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) method. The mechanism of hydrogen addition reaction to the CNT surface was also investigated. Pure and boron-nitrogen (BN) substituted CNT (denoted by CNT and BN-CNT, respectively) were examined as the carbon nanotubes. It was found that the additions of hydrogen atom to B (boron atom) and C (carbon atom) sites of BN-CNT proceed without activation barrier, whereas the hydrogenation of N (nitrogen atom) site needs the activation energy. The electronic states of hydrogen functionalized CNT and BN-CNT were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  2. Analysis of diffential absorption lidar technique for measurements of anhydrous hydrogen chloride from solid rocket motors using a deuterium fluoride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, C. H.; Allario, F.

    1977-01-01

    An active optical technique (differential absorption lidar (DIAL)) for detecting, ranging, and quantifying the concentration of anhydrous HCl contained in the ground cloud emitted by solid rocket motors (SRM) is evaluated. Results are presented of an experiment in which absorption coefficients of HCl were measured for several deuterium fluoride (DF) laser transitions demonstrating for the first time that a close overlap exists between the 2-1 P(3) vibrational transition of the DF laser and the 1-0 P(6) absorption line of HCl, with an absorption coefficient of 5.64 (atm-cm) to the -1 power. These measurements show that the DF laser can be an appropriate radiation source for detecting HCl in a DIAL technique. Development of a mathematical computer model to predict the sensitivity of DIAL for detecting anhydrous HCl in the ground cloud is outlined, and results that assume a commercially available DF laser as the radiation source are presented.

  3. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  4. Measuring the primordial deuterium abundance during the cosmic dark ages.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, Kris; Furlanetto, Steven R

    2006-09-01

    We discuss how measurements of fluctuations in the absorption of cosmic microwave background photons by neutral gas at redshifts z approximately 7-200 could reveal the primordial deuterium abundance of the Universe. The strength of the cross-correlation of brightness-temperature fluctuations in the redshifted 21-cm line of hydrogen with those in the redshifted 92-cm line of deuterium is proportional to the value of the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio [D/H] fixed during big bang nucleosynthesis. Although challenging, this measurement would provide the cleanest possible determination of [D/H], free from contamination by structure formation processes at lower redshifts. We additionally report our result for the thermal spin-change cross section in deuterium-hydrogen scattering. PMID:17026353

  5. Regular chemisorption of hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, D. A.; Bulyarskii, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Regular chemisorption of hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated with the use of AM1 quantum-chemical semiempirical method. It has been found that regular hydrogen chemisorption deforms nanotubes, in some cases leading to stable prismatic modifications. The dependence of the adsorption energy on the density of hydrogen coverage has been found. A procedure for determining the adsorption energy by the spectra of thermally stimulated desorption has been proposed.

  6. Tribological studies of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films in a vacuum, spacelike environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the adhesion and friction properties of plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated carbon films and their dependence on preparation conditions are reviewed. The results of the study indicate that plasma deposition enables one to deposit a variety of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) exhibiting diamondlike friction behavior. The plasma-deposited a-C:H films can be effectively used as hard lubricating films on ceramic materials such as silicon nitride in vacuum.

  7. Wafer Mapping Using Deuterium Enhanced Defect Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, K.; Holland, O. W.; Hellmer, R.; Vanmil, B.; Bubulac, L. O.; Golding, T. D.

    2010-07-01

    Deuterium (as well as other hydrogen isotopes) binds with a wide range of morphological defects in semiconductors and, as such, becomes distributed similarly to those defects. Thus, the deuterium profile within the sample serves as the basis of a technique for defect mapping known as amethyst wafer mapping (AWM). The efficiency of this technique has been demonstrated by evaluation of ion-induced damage in implanted Si, as well as as-grown defects in HgCdTe (MCT) epilayers. The defect tagging or decoration capability of deuterium is largely material independent and applicable to a wide range of defect morphologies. A number of analytical techniques including ion channeling and etch pit density measurements were used to evaluate the AWM results.

  8. Biofiltration for control of carbon disulfide and hydrogen sulfide vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Fucich, W.J.; Yang, Y.; Togna, A.P.; Alibeckoff, D.

    1997-12-31

    A full-scale biofiltration system has been installed to control carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) vapor emissions at Nylonge Corporation (Nylonge), a cellulose sponge manufacturing facility in Elyria, Ohio. Both CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are toxic and odorous. In addition, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has classified CS{sub 2} as one of the 189 hazardous air pollutants listed under Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Nylonge evaluated several technologies to control CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S vapor emissions. After careful consideration of both removal efficiency requirements and cost, Nylonge selected biological treatment as the best overall technology for their application. A biological based technology has been developed to effectively degrade CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S vapors. Biofiltration is a process that aerobically converts particular vapor phase compounds into CO{sub 2}, biomass, and water vapor. In this process, microorganisms, in the form of a moistened biofilm layer, immobilized on an organic packing material, such as compost, peat, wood chips, etc., are used to catalyze beneficial chemical reactions. As a contaminated vapor stream passes through the biofilter bed, the contaminants are transferred to the biofilm and are degraded by the microorganisms. This paper describes the CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S biofiltration process and the full-scale biofilter system installed at Nylonge`s facility. The system was started in October of 1995, and is designed to treat a 30,000 CFM exhaust stream contaminated with CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S vapors.

  9. Structure, hydrogen bonding and thermal expansion of ammonium carbonate monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Fortes, A Dominic; Wood, Ian G; Alfè, Dario; Hernández, Eduardo R; Gutmann, Matthias J; Sparkes, Hazel A

    2014-12-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of ammonium carbonate monohydrate, (NH4)2CO3·H2O, using Laue single-crystal diffraction methods with pulsed neutron radiation. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group Pnma (Z = 4), with unit-cell dimensions a = 12.047 (3), b = 4.453 (1), c = 11.023 (3) Å and V = 591.3 (3) Å(3) [ρcalc = 1281.8 (7) kg m(-3)] at 10 K. The single-crystal data collected at 10 and 100 K are complemented by X-ray powder diffraction data measured from 245 to 273 K, Raman spectra measured from 80 to 263 K and an athermal zero-pressure calculation of the electronic structure and phonon spectrum carried out using density functional theory (DFT). We find no evidence of a phase transition between 10 and 273 K; above 273 K, however, the title compound transforms first to ammonium sesquicarbonate monohydrate and subsequently to ammonium bicarbonate. The crystallographic and spectroscopic data and the calculations reveal a quite strongly hydrogen-bonded structure (EHB ≃ 30-40 kJ mol(-1)), on the basis of H...O bond lengths and the topology of the electron density at the bond critical points, in which there is no free rotation of the ammonium cation at any temperature. The barrier to free rotation of the ammonium ions is estimated from the observed librational frequency to be ∼ 36 kJ mol(-1). The c-axis exhibits negative thermal expansion, but the thermal expansion behaviour of the a and b axes is ormal. PMID:25449618

  10. Structure, hydrogen bonding and thermal expansion of ammonium carbonate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, A. Dominic; Wood, Ian G.; Alfè, Dario; Hernández, Eduardo R.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Sparkes, Hazel A.

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of ammonium carbonate monohydrate, (NH4)2CO3·H2O, using Laue single-crystal diffraction methods with pulsed neutron radiation. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group Pnma (Z = 4), with unit-cell dimensions a = 12.047 (3), b = 4.453 (1), c = 11.023 (3) Å and V = 591.3 (3) Å3 [ρcalc = 1281.8 (7) kg m−3] at 10 K. The single-crystal data collected at 10 and 100 K are complemented by X-ray powder diffraction data measured from 245 to 273 K, Raman spectra measured from 80 to 263 K and an athermal zero-pressure calculation of the electronic structure and phonon spectrum carried out using density functional theory (DFT). We find no evidence of a phase transition between 10 and 273 K; above 273 K, however, the title compound transforms first to ammonium sesquicarbonate monohydrate and subsequently to ammonium bicarbonate. The crystallographic and spectroscopic data and the calculations reveal a quite strongly hydrogen-bonded structure (E HB ≃ 30–40 kJ mol−1), on the basis of H⋯O bond lengths and the topology of the electron density at the bond critical points, in which there is no free rotation of the ammonium cation at any temperature. The barrier to free rotation of the ammonium ions is estimated from the observed librational frequency to be ∼ 36 kJ mol−1. The c-axis exhibits negative thermal expansion, but the thermal expansion behaviour of the a and b axes is ormal. PMID:25449618

  11. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    PubMed

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane). PMID:26233751

  12. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  13. Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  14. Merging allylic carbon-hydrogen and selective carbon-carbon bond activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Didier, Dorian; Zabrodski, Tamar; Schinkel, Marvin; Ackermann, Lutz; Marek, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century, many synthetic organic chemists have focused on developing new strategies to regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectively build carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in a predictable and efficient manner. Ideal syntheses should use the least number of synthetic steps, with few or no functional group transformations and by-products, and maximum atom efficiency. One potentially attractive method for the synthesis of molecular skeletons that are difficult to prepare would be through the selective activation of C-H and C-C bonds, instead of the conventional construction of new C-C bonds. Here we present an approach that exploits the multifold reactivity of easily accessible substrates with a single organometallic species to furnish complex molecular scaffolds through the merging of otherwise difficult transformations: allylic C-H and selective C-C bond activations. The resulting bifunctional nucleophilic species, all of which have an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centre, can then be selectively derivatized by the addition of two different electrophiles to obtain more complex molecular architecture from these easily available starting materials.

  15. Provocative Questions for the Deuterium Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2009-05-01

    Analyses of spectra obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectrograph Explorer (FUSE) satellite, together with spectra from the Copernicus, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Interstellar Medium Absorption Profile Spectrograph (IMAPS) instruments reveal a very wide range in the observed deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios for interstellar gas in the Galactic disk beyond the Local Bubble. For gas located beyond the Local Bubble but within several hundred parsecs, the observed D/H ratios differ by a factor of 4-5. A critically important question is what value or values of D/H in the local region of our Galaxy should be compared with chemical evolution models of the Galaxy and with the primordial deuterium abundance. Linsky et al. [Astrophys. J. 647, 1106 (2006)] argued that spatial variations in the depletion of deuterium onto dust grains can explain these local variations in the observed gas-phase D/H ratios. In this provacative introduction to the deuterium session, I ask six questions concerning analysis techniques and proposed results from the FUSE D/H program in the hope that the speakers and participants in this conference will give serious thought to the robustness of our present understanding of this important topic. In particular, is the deuterium depletion model valid? Is it only part of the explanation?

  16. Prototype reflectivity analyses of hydrogen storage levels in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nick E; Lambrakos, S G; Moore, P G; Ashraf Imam, M; Dulcey, C S

    2004-06-01

    A prototype case study is presented that examines the level of hydrogen content in H-SWNTs using the Surface Plasmon Resonance technique. The damping effect and the angular shift in the resonance minimum of an SWNT-gold interface due to the presence of hydrogen is analyzed using a parametric model, which is based on the concept of an effective permittivity. The new approach provides for a non-invasive analysis of the level of hydrogen content in H-SWNTs and is potentially extendable to other carbon-based hydrogen storage materials. PMID:15268050

  17. Hydrogenation of single-wall carbon nanotubes using polyamine reagents: combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Glen P; Kintigh, Jeremy; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F; Berber, Savas; Tomanek, David

    2008-02-20

    We combine experimental observations with ab initio calculations to study the reversible hydrogenation of single-wall carbon nanotubes using high boiling polyamines as hydrogenation reagents. Our calculations characterize the nature of the adsorption bond and identify preferential adsorption geometries at different coverages. We find the barrier for sigmatropic rearrangement of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms to be approximately 1 eV, thus facilitating surface diffusion and formation of energetically favored, axially aligned adsorbate chains. Chemisorbed hydrogen modifies the structure and stability of nanotubes significantly and increases the inter-tube distance, thus explaining the improved dispersability in solvents like methanol, ethanol, chloroform, and benzene. PMID:18220395

  18. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X S

    2013-11-21

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in D-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. PMID:24072134

  19. Direct and reversible hydrogenation of CO2 to formate by a bacterial carbon dioxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, K; Müller, V

    2013-12-13

    Storage and transportation of hydrogen is a major obstacle for its use as a fuel. An increasingly considered alternative for the direct handling of hydrogen is to use carbon dioxide (CO2) as an intermediate storage material. However, CO2 is thermodynamically stable, and developed chemical catalysts often require high temperatures, pressures, and/or additives for high catalytic rates. Here, we present the discovery of a bacterial hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase from Acetobacterium woodii directly catalyzing the hydrogenation of CO2. We also demonstrate a whole-cell system able to produce formate as the sole end product from dihydrogen (H2) and CO2 as well as syngas. This discovery opens biotechnological alternatives for efficient CO2 hydrogenation either by using the isolated enzyme or by employing whole-cell catalysis. PMID:24337298

  20. Deuterium labeling for neutron structure-function-dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Meilleur, Flora; Weiss, Kevin L; Myles, Dean A A

    2009-01-01

    Neutron scattering and diffraction provide detailed information on the structure and dynamics of biological materials across time and length scales that range from picoseconds to nanoseconds and from 1 to 10,000 A, respectively. The particular sensitivity of neutrons to the isotopes of hydrogen makes selective deuterium labeling of biological systems an essential tool for maximizing the return from neutron scattering experiments. In neutron protein crystallography, the use of fully deuterated protein crystals improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the data by an order of magnitude and enhances the visibi-lity of the molecular structure (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:3872-3877, 2000; Acta Crystallogr D Biol Crystallogr 61:1413-1417, 2005; Acta Crystallogr D Biol Crystallogr 61:539-544, 2005). In solution and surface scattering experiments, the incorporation of deuterium-labeled subunits or components into complex assemblies or structures makes it possible to deconvolute the scattering of the labeled and unlabeled subunits and to determine their relative dispositions within the complex (J Mol Biol 93:255-265, 1975). With multiple labeling patterns, it is also possible to reconstruct the locations of multiple subunits in ternary and higher-order complexes (Science 238:1403-1406, 1987; J Mol Biol 271:588-601, 1997; J Biol Chem 275:14432-14439, 2000; Biochemistry 42:7790-7800, 2003). In inelastic neutron scattering experiments, which probe hydrogen dynamics in biological materials, the application of site, residue, or region-specific hydrogen-deuterium-labeling patterns can be used to distinguish and highlight the specific dynamics within a system (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:4970-4975, 1998).Partial, selective, or fully deuterated proteins can be readily produced by endogenous expression of recombinant proteins in bacterial systems that are adapted to growth in D(2)O solution and using selectively deuterated carbon sources. Adaptation can be achieved either by gradual

  1. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X. S.

    2013-10-01

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal.Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03813k

  2. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis IX. Photosynthesis, Photoreduction, and the Hydrogen-Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Dark Reaction

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Badin, E. J.; Calvin, M.

    1950-02-01

    A comparison of the rates of fixation of Carbon 14 dioxide in algae for the processes of photosynthesis, photoreduction and the hydrogen-oxygen-carbon dioxide dark reaction has been made. For the same series of experiments, rates of incorporation of tracer carbon into the separate soluble components using the radiogram method have been determined. The mechanism of carbon dioxide uptake has been shown to occur via two distinct paths. In all cases studied, essentially the same compounds appear radioactive. The distribution with time, however, differs markedly.

  3. Deuterium trapping by impurities in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.J.

    1982-04-01

    The addition of Er, Zr, or Ti to copper provides trapping sites for hydrogen isotopes, which causes the apparent diffusivity of hydrogen to take on values that are smaller than its normal diffusivity in pure copper. This apparent diffusivity can be described in terms of the dopant concentration and the binding energy of the hydrogen isotope to the traps. Criteria are met that enable the results of permeation breakthrough measurements, which were made between 300/sup 0/ and 700 /sup 0/C, to be extrapolated to room temperature. The resultant lag-time for deuterium breakthrough for a 0.25-mm-thick membrane of Cu containing 0.88 at.% Er, for example, exceeds 1000 years at 25 /sup 0/C. Therefore, this alloy is suitable for use in vacuum enclosures where it is necessary to restrict hydrogen permeation for long periods of time. Thermodesorption measurements for samples that were exposed to deuterium reveal that there are two types of traps in these alloys, and demonstrate that deuterium-to-dopant atomic ratios approaching two can be obtained.

  4. A trimodal porous carbon as an effective catalyst for hydrogen production by methane decomposition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Lua, Aik Chong

    2016-01-15

    A new type of porous carbon with an interconnected trimodal pore system is synthesized by a nanocasting method using nanoparticulated bimodal micro-mesoporous silica particles as the template. The synthesized template and carbon material are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission electron scanning microscopy (FESEM) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption test. The synthesized carbon material has an extremely high surface area, a large pore volume and an interconnected pore structure, which could provide abundant active sites and space for chemical reactions and minimize the diffusion resistance of the reactants. The resulting carbon is used as the catalyst for hydrogen production by the thermal decomposition of methane. The catalytic results show that the as-synthesized carbon in this study produces much higher methane conversion and hydrogen yield than the commercial carbon materials. PMID:26433477

  5. Hydrogen adsorption in the series of carbon nanostructures: Graphenes-graphene nanotubes-nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. P.; Kirichenko, A. N.; Tat'yanin, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    A comparative analysis of hydrogen absorption capability is performed for the first time for three types of carbon nanostructures: graphenes, oriented carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs), and pyrocarbon nanocrystallites (PCNs) synthesized in the pores of TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with mean diameters ( D m) of 50 and 90 nm, using methane as the pyrolized gas. The morphology of the carbon nanostructures is studied by means of powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen adsorption is investigated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in combination with mass-spectrometry. It is shown that only OCNTGs can adsorb and store hydrogen, the desorption of which under atmospheric pressure occurs at a temperature of around 175°C. Hydrogen adsorption by OCNTGs is quantitatively determined and found to be about 1.5% of their mass. Applying certain assumptions, the relationship between the mass of carbon required for the formation of single-wall OCNTGs in membrane pores and the surface area of pores is established. Numerical factor Ψ = m dep/ m calc, where m dep is the actual mass of carbon deposited upon the formation of OCNTGs and mcalc is the calculated mass of carbon necessary for the formation of OCNTGs is introduced. It is found that the dependence of specific hydrogen adsorption on the magnitude of the factor has a maximum at Ψ = 1.2, and OCNTGs can adsorb and store hydrogen in the interval 0.4 to 0.6 < Ψ < 1.5 to 1.7. Possible mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption and its relationship to the structure of carbon nanoformations are examined.

  6. Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-01-07

    On-board hydrogen storage is a key requirement for fuel cell-powered cars and trucks. Porous carbon-based materials can in principle adsorb more hydrogen per unit weight at room temperature than liquid hydrogen at -176 oC. Achieving this goal requires interconnected pores with very high internal surface area, and binding energies between hydrogen and carbon significantly enhanced relative to H2 on graphite. In this project a systematic study of carbide-derived carbons, a novel form of porous carbon, was carried out to discover a high-performance hydrogen sorption material to meet the goal. In the event we were unable to improve on the state of the art in terms of stored hydrogen per unit weight, having encountered the same fundamental limit of all porous carbons: the very weak interaction between H2 and the carbon surface. On the other hand we did discover several strategies to improve storage capacity on a volume basis, which should be applicable to other forms of porous carbon. Further discoveries with potentially broader impacts include • Proof that storage performance is not directly related to pore surface area, as had been previously claimed. Small pores (< 1.5 nm) are much more effective in storing hydrogen than larger ones, such that many materials with large total surface areas are sub-par performers. • Established that the distribution of pore sizes can be controlled during CDC synthesis, which opens the possibility of developing high performance materials within a common family while targeting widely disparate applications. Examples being actively pursued with other funding sources include methane storage, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

  7. Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Intermediary Photosynthetic Modes 1

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O'Reilly; Deniro, Michael J.; Ting, Irwin P.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from species of greenhouse plants having different photosynthetic modes were determined. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, four clusters of points are discernible, each representing different photosynthetic modes: C3 plants, C4 plants, CAM plants, and C3 plants that can shift to CAM or show the phenomenon referred to as CAM-cycling. The combination of oxygen and carbon isotope ratios does not distinguish among the different photosynthetic modes. Analysis of the carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate should prove useful for screening different photosynthetic modes in field specimens that grew near one another. This method will be particularly useful for detection of plants which show CAM-cycling. PMID:16663360

  8. Suppressed thermal conductivity of ultrathin carbon nanotube(2, 1) upon hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tingting; Zhu, Liyan Chen, Guibin

    2015-09-21

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamic simulations reveal that the thermal conductivity of ultrathin carbon nanotube (CNT)(2, 1) is significantly suppressed upon hydrogenation. The addition of hydrogen atoms to two-coordinated carbon atoms lowers the participation ratios of phonon modes, thus indicating that the spatial distribution of phonons becomes localized. Furthermore, the phonon lifetimes are remarkably shortened in hydrogenated CNT(2, 1) (HCNT(2, 1)) compared with those of bare CNT(2, 1). The lowered participation ratios and lifetimes of phonon modes are responsible for the significant reduction of thermal conductivity in HCNT(2, 1). Our study is also helpful for understanding the weakened thermal transport abilities in carbon polymers, namely, the cross links formed between individual polymer chains will hinder the thermal conduction along polymers, even though the single straight carbon polymer has a high and divergent thermal conductivity.

  9. Nanoconfinement in activated mesoporous carbon of calcium borohydride for improved reversible hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Comănescu, Cezar; Capurso, Giovanni; Maddalena, Amedeo

    2012-09-28

    Mesoporous carbon frameworks were synthesized using the soft-template method. Ca(BH(4))(2) was incorporated into activated mesoporous carbon by the incipient wetness method. The activation of mesoporous carbon was necessary to optimize the surface area and pore size. Thermal programmed absorption measurements showed that the confinement of this borohydride into carbon nanoscaffolds improved its reversible capacity (relative to the reactive portion) and performance of hydrogen storage compared to unsupported borohydride. Hydrogen release from the supported hydride started at a temperature as low as 100 °C and the dehydrogenation rate was fast compared to the bulk borohydride. In addition, the hydrogen pressure necessary to regenerate the borohydride from the dehydrogenation products was reduced. PMID:22948563

  10. Continuous monitoring of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at Stromboli volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, Roberto M. R.; Camarda, Marco; Gurrieri, Sergio; Valenza, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    Geochemical monitoring of fumarole and soil gases is a powerful tool for volcano surveillance, for investigating the subsurface magma dynamics, and for hazard assessment in volcanic areas. The monitoring of both carbon dioxide (CO2) flux, and hydrogen (H2) concentration in active volcanic areas helps to improve the understanding of the processes linking the surface gas emissions, the chemistry of the magmatic gases, and the volcanic activity. The CO2 flux measurement is a routine technique for volcano monitoring purposes, because of CO2 is the second-abundant component of the gas phase in silicate magmas, attaining saturation at the mantle to deep crustal level. The H2 concentration has provided indications concerning the oxygen fugacity of magmatic gases, a parameter that changes over a wide range of low values (10-16 - 10-8 bar), and affects the redox state of multivalent elements. This study reports on the use a tailor-made automatic system developed for continuous monitoring purposes of H2 concentration and CO2 flux in the summit area of Stromboli volcano (Aeolian islands). The automatic device consists of an H2-selective electrochemical sensor, and two IR-spectrophotometers for measuring the CO2 flux in agreement with the dynamic concentration method. The data collected by the automatic system deployed at Stromboli from 19 May 2009 to 15 December 2010 are presented herein. The data processing provides a better understanding of the relationships between the evolution of the low temperature fumarolic emissions, and the volcanic activity. The results of the data analysis indicates that the high frequency variations exhibited by CO2 flux and H2 concentration are positively correlated with the eruptive activity of Stromboli, typically changing on time scale of hours or days. Furthermore, the investigation of the relationships between CO2 flux and H2 concentration provides an evaluation of the depth of the degassing source, by which the gas mixture containing H2 and

  11. Transition metal activation and functionalization of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.D.

    1992-06-01

    We are investigating the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic factors that influence carbon-hydrogen bond activation at homogeneous transition metal centers and the conversion of hydrocarbons into functionalized products of potential use to the chemical industry. Advances have been made in both understanding the interactions of hydrocarbons with metals and in the functionalization of hydrocarbons. We have found that RhCl(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(CNR) complexes can catalyze the insertion of isonitriles into the C-H bonds or arenes upon photolysis. The mechanism of these reactions was found to proceed by way of initial phosphine dissociation, followed by C-H activation and isonitrile insertion. We have also examined reactions of a series of arenes with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})PhH and begun to map out the kinetic and thermodynamic preferences for arene coordination. The effects of resonance, specifically the differences in the Hueckel energies of the bound vs free ligand, are now believed to fully control the C-H activation/{eta}{sup 2}-coordination equilibria. We have begun to examine the reactions of rhodium isonitrile pyrazolylborates for alkane and arene C-H bond activation. A new, labile, carbodiimide precursor has been developed for these studies. We have completed studies of the reactions of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})H{sub 2} with D{sub 2} and PMe{sub 3} that indicate that both {eta}{sup 5} {yields} {eta}{sup 3} ring slippage and metal to ring hydride migration occur more facilely than thermal reductive elimination of H{sub 2}. We have examined the reactions of heterocycles with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})PhH and found that pyrrole and furan undergo C-H or N-H activation. Thiophene, however, undergoes C-S bond oxidative addition, and the mechanism of activation has been shown to proceed through sulfur coordination prior to C-S insertion.

  12. Contrasting H-mode behaviour with deuterium fuelling and nitrogen seeding in the all-carbon and metallic versions of JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddison, G. P.; Giroud, C.; Alper, B.; Arnoux, G.; Balboa, I.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Boboc, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Coffey, I.; da Silva Aresta Belo, P. C.; Devaux, S.; Devynck, P.; Eich, T.; Felton, R. C.; Flanagan, J.; Frassinetti, L.; Garzotti, L.; Groth, M.; Jachmich, S.; Järvinen, A.; Joffrin, E.; Kempenaars, M. A. H.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K. D.; Lehnen, M.; Leyland, M. J.; Liu, Y.; Lomas, P. J.; Lowry, C. G.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G. F.; McCormick, G. K.; Meigs, A. G.; Morris, A. W.; Neu, R.; Nunes, I. M.; Oberkofler, M.; Rimini, F. G.; Saarelma, S.; Sieglin, B.; Sips, A. C. C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.; Ward, D. J.; Wischmeier, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-07-01

    The former all-carbon wall on JET has been replaced with beryllium in the main torus and tungsten in the divertor to mimic the surface materials envisaged for ITER. Comparisons are presented between type I H-mode characteristics in each design by examining respective scans over deuterium fuelling and impurity seeding, required to ameliorate exhaust loads both in JET at full capability and in ITER. Attention is focused upon a common high-triangularity, single-null divertor configuration at 2.5 MA, q95 ≈ 3.5 yielding the most robust all-C performance. Contrasting results between the alternative linings are found firstly in unseeded plasmas, for which purity is improved and intrinsic radiation reduced in the ITER-like wall (ILW) but normalized energy confinement is ≈30% lower than in all-C counterparts, owing to a commensurately lower (electron) pedestal temperature. Divertor recycling is also radically altered, with slower, inboard-outboard asymmetric transients at ELMs and spontaneous oscillations in between them. Secondly, nitrogen seeding elicits opposite responses in the ILW to all-C experience, tending to raise plasma density, reduce ELM frequency, and above all to recover (electron) pedestal pressure, hence global confinement, almost back to previous levels. A hitherto unrecognized role of light impurities in pedestal stability and dynamics is consequently suggested. Thirdly, while heat loads on the divertor outboard target between ELMs are successfully reduced in proportion to the radiative cooling and ELM frequency effects of N in both wall environments, more surprisingly, average power ejected by ELMs also declines in the same proportion for the ILW. Detachment between transients is simultaneously promoted. Finally, inter-ELM W sources in the ILW divertor tend to fall with N input, although core accumulation possibly due to increased particle confinement still leads to significantly less steady conditions than in all-C plasmas. This limitation of ILW H

  13. An international multi-laboratory investigation of carbon-based hydrogen sorbent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Katherine E.; Parilla, Philip A.; O'Neill, Kevin J.; Gennett, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    New materials are needed to achieve the hydrogen storage targets set out by the US Department of Energy for fuel cell vehicular applications. In order to enable the pathway toward this discovery, precise and accurate characterization of the hydrogen storage performance of these materials is needed. Determining the precise and accurate hydrogen storage capacity of materials requires rigorous attention to detailed experimental parameters and methodology. Slight errors in even small experimental details can result in a large deviation in the determination of the material's true characteristics. Here, we compare measurements of the gravimetric excess hydrogen uptake capacities for two different carbon sorbent materials measured by different laboratories at ambient and liquid N2 temperatures. The participants for this study consist of research laboratories led by experienced scientists in the hydrogen storage field. This collaborative evaluation of standard sorbents illustrated considerable reproducibility over a broad range of materials' hydrogen sorption gravimetric capacities.

  14. Preparation and characterization of ordered porous carbons for increasing hydrogen storage behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seul-Yi; Park, Soo-Jin

    2011-10-15

    We prepared ordered porous carbons (PCs) by using a replication method that had well-organized mesoporous silica as a template with various carbonization temperatures in order to investigate the possibility of energy storage materials. The microstructure and morphologies of the samples are characterized by XRD, TEM, and FT-Raman spectroscopy. N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms are analyzed by the t-plot method, as well as the BET and the H-K method in order to characterize the specific surface area, pore volume, and pore size distribution of the samples, respectively. The capacity of the hydrogen adsorption of the samples is evaluated by BEL-HP at 77 K and 1 bar. From the results, we are able to confirm that the synthesis of the samples can be accurately governed by the carbonization temperature, which is one of the effective parameters for developing the textural properties of the carbon materials, which affects the behaviors of the hydrogen storage. - Graphical abstract: It is described that the considerable long-range ordering and the presence of mono-dimensional aligned channels between the two aligned nanorods of the porous framework from the SBA-15 was retained in the T-950 sample during the carbonization process. Highlights: > Ordered porous carbons (PCs) are synthesized with various carbonization temperatures by using a replication method. > Carbonization temperature plays an important role in shrinking the micropores during the carbonization process of PCs. > The textural and structural properties of the PCs are good parameters for enhancing the hydrogen storage capacity.

  15. Compound-specific carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids in CM and CR chondrites and their use in evaluating potential formation pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-09-01

    Stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (δD, δ13C, and δ15N) of organic compounds can reveal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may indicate the most likely of these pathways. We have applied gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H stable isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites: CM1/2 Allan Hills (ALH) 83100, CM2 Murchison, CM2 Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, CM2 Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101, CR2 Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, CR2 Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. We compare the isotopic compositions of amino acids in these meteorites with predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways. We observe trends of decreasing δ13C and increasing δD with increasing carbon number in the α-H, α-NH2 amino acids that correspond to predictions made for formation via Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis. We also observe light δ13C signatures for β-alanine, which may indicate either formation via Michael addition or via a pathway that forms primarily small, straight-chain, amine-terminal amino acids (n-ω-amino acids). Higher deuterium enrichments are observed in α-methyl amino acids, indicating formation of these amino acids or their precursors in cold interstellar or nebular environments. Finally, individual amino acids are more enriched in deuterium in CR chondrites than in CM chondrites, reflecting different parent-body chemistry.

  16. Compound-Specific Carbon, Nitrogen, and Hydrogen Isotopic Ratios for Amino Acids in CM and CR Chondrites and their use in Evaluating Potential Formation Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (oD, 013C, and olSN) of organic compounds can revcal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may indicate the most likely of these pathways. We have applied gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H stable isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites: CM1I2 Allan Hills (ALH) 83100, CM2 Murchison, CM2 Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, CM2 Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101, CRZ Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, CRZ Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. We compare the isotopic compositions of amino acids in these meteorites with predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways. We observe trends of decreasing ODC and increasing oD with increasing carbon number in the aH, (l-NH2 amino acids that correspond to predictions made for formation via Streckercyanohydrin synthesis. We also observe light ODC signatures for -alanine, which may indicate either formation via Michael addition or via a pathway that forms primarily small, straight-chain, amine-terminal amino acids (n-ro-amino acids). Higher deuterium enrichments are observed in amethyl amino acids, indicating formation of these amino acids or their precursors in cold interstellar or nebular environments. Finally, individual amino acids are more enriched in deuterium in CR chondrites than CM chondrites, reflecting different parent-body chemistry.

  17. Oxygen, carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen in crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, J.C.; Pearton, S.J.; Corbett, J.W.; Pennycook, S.J

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on interstitial material in silicon. Topics include: hydrogen in crystalline silicon, low energy hydrogen ion bombarded silicon, oxygen in silicon, oxygen thermal donor formation, thermal donor generation and annihilation effects on oxygen precipitation oxygen effects on plastic flow during growth of dendrixic web silicon, nitrogen in silicon, off-center nitrogen and oxygen in silicon, and thermal donor hierarchies in silicon and germanium.

  18. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water in Hot, Hydrogen-dominated Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Kevin; Lyons, James R.

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres in hot, hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. We construct novel analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the mixing ratio of methane. By examining the abundances of these molecules across a broad range of temperatures (spanning equilibrium temperatures from 600 to 2500 K), pressures (via temperature-pressure profiles that explore albedo and opacity variations) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios, we conclude that carbon dioxide is subdominant compared to carbon monoxide and water. Atmospheric mixing does not alter this conclusion if carbon dioxide is subdominant everywhere in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may attain comparable abundances if the metallicity is greatly enhanced, but this property is negated by temperatures above 1000 K. For hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, our generic result has the implication that retrieval studies may wish to set the subdominance of carbon dioxide as a prior of the calculation and not let its abundance completely roam free as a fitting parameter, because it directly affects the inferred value of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio and may produce unphysical conclusions. We discuss the relevance of these implications for the hot Jupiter WASP-12b and suggest that some of the previous results are chemically impossible. The relative abundance of carbon dioxide to acetylene is potentially a sensitive diagnostic of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio.

  19. Hydrogen venting characteristics of commercial carbon-composite filters and applications to TRU waste

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, E.L.; Marshall, R.S.; Cappis, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    The generation of hydrogen (by radiolysis) and of other potentially flammable gases in radioactive wastes which are in contact with hydrogenous materials is a source of concern, both from transportation and on-site storage considerations. Because very little experimental data on the generation and accumulation of hydrogen was available in actual waste materials, work was initiated to experimentally determine factors affecting the concentration of hydrogen in the waste containers, such as the hydrogen generation rate, (G-values) and the rate of loss of hydrogen through packaging and commercial filter-vents, including a new design suitable for plastic bags. This report deals only with the venting aspect of the problem. Hydrogen venting characteristics of two types of commercial carbon-composite filter-vents, and two types of PVC bag closures (heat-sealed and twist-and-tape) were measured. Techniques and equipment were developed to permit measurement of the hydrogen concentration in various layers of actual transuranic (TRU) waste packages, both with and without filter-vents. A test barrel was assembled containing known configuration and amounts of TRU wastes. Measurements of the hydrogen in the headspace verified a hydrogen release model developed by Benchmark Environmental Corporation. These data were used to calculate revised wattage Emits for TRU waste packages incorporating the new bag filter-vent.

  20. Hydrogenation of PAH molecules through interaction with hydrogenated carbonaceous grains.

    PubMed

    Thrower, John D; Friis, Emil E; Skov, Anders L; Jørgensen, Bjarke; Hornekær, Liv

    2014-02-28

    Carbonaceous materials contribute to a significant proportion of the interstellar dust inventory. Reactions on such grain surfaces are thought to play important roles in interstellar chemical networks. Of particular importance are reactions involving hydrogen atoms, and pathways to the formation of the most abundant molecular species, H2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an additional carbon reservoir, accounting for around 10% of the galactic carbon budget. Using thermal desorption and mass spectrometric techniques, we have investigated the interaction between PAH molecules and carbonaceous grain surfaces. We demonstrate that deuterium atoms adsorbed on graphite can react with adsorbed PAH molecules, forming superhydrogenated PAH species. Furthermore, by considering the number of D-atoms remaining bound to the graphite surface and the additional D-atoms in the observed superhydrogenated species, we see evidence for a significant release of deuterium from the graphite surface. We suggest that further reactive processes may be responsible for part of this deuterium loss, indicating that PAHs adsorbed on hydrogenated carbonaceous grains in warm interstellar environments may serve as a route to release H2 as well as forming superhydrogenated PAH species. PMID:24270708

  1. Suppression of hydrogenated carbon film deposition and hydrogen isotope retention by nitrogen addition into cold remote H/D and CH4 mixture plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, K.; Notani, M.; Uesugi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ishijima, T.

    2015-08-01

    Control of tritium retention and its removal from the first wall of future fusion devices are one of the most crucial issues for safety and effective use for fuel. Nitrogen addition into remote edge plasmas has been considered and tested as an effective method for suppression of carbon film deposition and reduction of hydrogen isotope absorption in the deposited films. In this paper we have investigated the scavenger effects of nitrogen injected into low temperature D2/CH4 plasmas on hydrogenated carbon film growth using a small helical device. The result of the deposition shows that the key reactive particles with CN and ND(H) bonds to suppression of hydrogenated carbon film growth and hydrogen isotope absorption are much slowly generated compared with hydrocarbon particles such as CD(H)x and C2D(H)x. This may be due to the slow atomic nitrogen diffusion into hydrogenated carbon layer and the chemical equilibrium between nitrogen absorption.

  2. Effects of Microstructure of Carbon Nanofibers for Amperometric Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhizhou; Cui, Xiaoli; Zheng, Junsheng; Wang, Qingfei; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-08-10

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with different microstructures, including platelet-carbon nanofibers (PCNFs), fish-bone-carbon nanofibers (FCNFs), and tube-carbon nanofibers (TCNFs), were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for electrochemical sensing of hydrogen peroxide. The CNFs studied here can show several microstructures in which various stacked morphologies and their sizes and graphite-layer ordering can be well controlled. Glassy carbon (GC) electrodes modified by CNFs were fabricated and compared for amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide. Sensors of PCNFs/GC, FCNFs/GC, and TCNFs/GC were used in the amperometric detection of H2O2 in a solution of 0.05 M phosphate buffered saline solution (pH 7.4).

  3. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide on Activated Carbons Impregnated with Sodium Hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Viviane; Baskova, Svetlana; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    Two activated carbons of different origin were impregnated with the solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) of various concentrations up to 10 wt %, and the effect of impregnation on the catalytic performance of the carbons was evaluated. The catalytic activity was analyzed in terms of the capacity of carbons for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) conversion and removal from hydrogen-rich fuel streams and the emission times of H2S and the products of its oxidation [e.g., sulfur dioxide (SO2) and carbonyl sulfide (COS)]. The results of impregnation showed a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of both carbons proportional to the amount of NaOH introduced. NaOH introduces hydroxyl groups (OH-) on the surface of the activated carbon that increase its surface reactivity and its interaction with sulfur-containing compounds.

  4. Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; van Benthem, Klaus; Li, Sa; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Pennycook, Stephen J; Jena, Puru; Gallego, Nidia C

    2011-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) were synthesized by meltspinning, carbonization and activation of an isotropic pitch carbon precursor premixed with an organometallic Pd compound. The hydrogen uptake at 25 oC and 20 bar on Pd- ACF exceeded the expected capacity based solely on Pd hydride formation and hydrogen physisorption on the microporous carbon support. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub- ngstrom spatial resolution provided unambiguous identification of isolated Pd atoms occurring in the carbon matrix that coexist with larger Pd particles. First principles calculations revealed that each single Pd atom can form Kubas-type complexes by binding up to three H2 molecules in the pressure range of adsorption measurements. Based on Pd atom concentration determined from STEM images, the contribution of various mechanisms to the excess hydrogen uptake measured experimentally was evaluated. With consideration of Kubas binding as a viable mechanism (along with hydride formation and physisorption to carbon support) the role of hydrogen spillover in this system may be smaller than previously thought.

  5. Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

  6. Enhancement of hydrogen physisorption on graphene and carbon nanotubes by Li doping.

    PubMed

    Cabria, I; López, M J; Alonso, J A

    2005-11-22

    Density-functional calculations of the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on a planar graphene layer and on the external surface of a (4,4) carbon nanotube, undoped and doped with lithium, have been carried out. Hydrogen molecules are physisorbed on pure graphene and on the nanotube with binding energies about 80-90 meV/molecule. However, the binding energies increase to 160-180 meV/molecule for many adsorption configurations of the molecule near a Li atom in the doped systems. A charge-density analysis shows that the origin of the increase in binding energy is the electronic charge transfer from the Li atom to graphene and the nanotube. The results support and explain qualitatively the enhancement of the hydrogen storage capacity observed in some experiments of hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes doped with alkali atoms. PMID:16351307

  7. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorinated hydrogen-bond acidic groups are directly attached to the backbone of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without the introduction of intermediate electron donating surface groups. Hexafluoroalcohol functional groups are exceptionally strong hydrogen bond acids, and are added to the nanotube surface using the aryl diazonium approach to create hydrogen-bond acidic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. These groups can promote strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with matrix materials in composites or with molecular species to be concentrated and sensed. In the latter case, this newly developed material is expected to find useful application in chemical sensors and in CNT-based preconcentrator devices for the detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents and explosives.

  8. Spot-free catalysis using gold carbon nanotube & gold graphene composites for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Siddhardha, R. S.; Lakshminarayanan, V.; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen has been proposed as the green fuel of the future in the wake of depleting fossil fuels. Recently, carbon paste electrodes (CPE) modified with nanomaterials as electrocatalysts have drawn wide attention for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acid medium. The CPEs are advantageous owing to their chemical stability and ease of fabrication. Their applications for HER without any modification, however, are hampered on account of large hydrogen overpotential associated with carbon surface. In the present study, CPE has been modified with novel gold composites as electro-catalysts for HER in acid medium. The nanocomposites have shown ∼100 fold increased current density than unmodified CPE at -0.3 V. Most strikingly for the first time, this study has quantitatively brought out the difference in catalysis between surfactant capped and pristine gold nanoparticles in terms of their application as spot-free catalysts towards hydrogen gas production by electrochemical route.

  9. Measurements of the nucleon structure function in the range 0.002 < x < 0.17 and 00.2 < Q2 < 8 GeV2 in deuterium, carbon and calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    European Muon Collaboration; Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I. G.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; de Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S. C.; Brück, H.; Calén, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Coughlan, J.; d'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Edwards, M.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Geddes, N.; Grafström, P.; Gustafsson, L.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Jaffre, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Krüger, A.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Peschel, H.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Poensgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Sandacz, A.; Scheer, M.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schouten, M.; Schröder, T.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thenard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; de la Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.

    1990-03-01

    Small angle scattering of 280 GeV positive muons by deuterium, carbon and calcium has been measured at scattering angles down to 2 mrad. The nucleon structure function F2 extracted from deuterium does not show a significant x dependence in the measured range of Q2 and its Q2 dependence is linear in logQ2. For calcium, a depletion of F2 is observed at low x by 30% as compared with the values at x = 0.1 where F2(Ca) and F2 (D) are not significantly different. This depletion is attributed to shadowing. The carbon structure function exhibits a similar, but less pronounced, x dependence. Such behaviour is observed to be independent of Q2. The data are consistent with those obtained from other charged lepton experiments both at similar and higher values of x and Q2 and considerably extend the range of the measurements down to the low values of x to be measured in forthcoming experiments at HERA.

  10. Titanium-capped carbon chains as promising new hydrogen storage media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Zeng, Zhi

    The capacity of Ti-capped sp carbon atomic chains for use as hydrogen storage media is studied using first-principles density functional theory. The Ti atom is strongly attached at one end of the carbon chains via d-p hybridization, forming stable TiCn complexes. We demonstrate that the number of adsorbed H2 on Ti through Kubas interaction depends upon the chain types. For polyyne (n even) or cumulene (n odd) structures, each Ti atom can hold up to five or six H2 molecules, respectively. Furthermore, the TiC5 chain effectively terminated on a C20 fullerene can store hydrogen with optimal binding of 0.52 eV/H2. Our results reveal a possible way to explore high-capacity hydrogen storage materials in truly one-dimensional carbon structures.

  11. Titanium-capped carbon chains as promising new hydrogen storage media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Zeng, Zhi

    2011-02-14

    The capacity of Ti-capped sp carbon atomic chains for use as hydrogen storage media is studied using first-principles density functional theory. The Ti atom is strongly attached at one end of the carbon chains via d-p hybridization, forming stable TiC(n) complexes. We demonstrate that the number of adsorbed H(2) molecules on Ti through Kubas interactions depends upon the chain types. For polyyne (n even) or cumulene (n odd) structures, each Ti atom can hold up to five or six H(2) molecules, respectively. Furthermore, the TiC(5) chain effectively terminated on a C(20) fullerene can store hydrogen with an optimal binding energy of 0.52 eV per H(2) molecule. Our results reveal a possible way to explore high-capacity hydrogen storage materials in truly one-dimensional carbon structures. PMID:21135955

  12. Principles and mechanism of combustion in the zirconium-carbon-hydrogen system

    SciTech Connect

    Martirosyan, N.A.; Dolvkhanyan, S.K.; Merzhanov, A.G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors examine the principles and mechanism of combustion in the Zr-C-H/sub 2/ system in order to clarify the generality of the effects observed previously. The experiments were performed in a constant-pressure vessel with type M-41 powdered zirconium, carbon black, and gaseous hydrogen. Chemical analysis was performed for the total and free contents of carbon, zirconium and hydrogen, and x-ray studies were performed using a DRON-0.5 analyzer. In the Zr-C-H/sub 2/ system the general tendency inherent in Me-C-H/sub 2/ systems toward completion of the hydrogenation and carbonization reactions is maintained. In this mixture, as in Ti-C-H/sub 2/, the steady-state combustion regimes are not the same when ignition sources of different temperatures are used.

  13. Dissociation of CH4 by electron impact: Production of metastable hydrogen and carbon fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, T. G.; Carnahan, B. L.; Zipf, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Metastable fragments produced by electron impact excitation of CH4 have been investigated for incident electron energies from threshold to 300 eV. Only metastable hydrogen and carbon atoms were observed. Onset energies for the production of metastable hydrogen atoms were observed at electron impact energies of 22.0 + or - .5 eV, 25.5 + or - .6 eV, 36.7 + or - .6 eV and 66 + or - 3 eV, and at 26.6 + or - .6 eV for the production of metastable carbon atoms. Most of the fragments appear to have been formed in high-lying Rydberg states. The total metastable hydrogen cross section reaches a maximum value of approximately 1 X 10 to the minus 18th power sq cm at 100 eV. At the same energy, the metastable carbon cross section is 2 x 10 to the minus 19th power sq cm.

  14. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  15. Relation of Hydrogen and Methane to Carbon Monoxide in Exhaust Gases from Internal-Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Tessmann, Arthur M

    1935-01-01

    The relation of hydrogen and methane to carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases from internal-combustion engines operating on standard-grade aviation gasoline, fighting-grade aviation gasoline, hydrogenated safety fuel, laboratory diesel fuel, and auto diesel fuel was determined by analysis of the exhaust gases. Two liquid-cooled single-cylinder spark-ignition, one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled spark-ignition, and two liquid-cooled single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were used.

  16. Hydrogenolysis Of 5-Carbon Sugars, Sugar Alcohols And Compositions For Reactions Involving Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Werpy, Todd A.; Frye, Jr., John G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Miller, Dennis J.

    2004-01-13

    Methods and compositions for reactions of hydrogen over a Re-containing catalyst with compositions containing a 5-carbon sugar, sugar alcohol, or lactic acid are described. It has been surprisingly discovered that reaction with hydrogen over a Re-containing multimetallic catalyst resulted in superior conversion and selectivity to desired products such as propylene glycol. A process for the synthesis of PG from lactate or lactic acid is also described.

  17. Hydrogenolysis of 5-carbon sugars, sugar alcohols, and other methods and compositions for reactions involving hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Werpy, Todd A; Zacher, Alan H

    2002-11-12

    Methods and compositions for reactions of hydrogen over a Re-containing catalyst with compositions containing a 5-carbon sugar, sugar alcohol, or lactic acid are described. It has been surprisingly discovered that reaction with hydrogen over a Re-containing multimetallic catalyst resulted in superior conversion and selectivity to desired products such as propylene glycol. A process for the synthesis of PG from lactate or lactic acid is also described.

  18. Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.; Jung, J.; Gilligan, J.

    1984-04-01

    A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the /sup 3/He from the D(D,n)/sup 3/He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general).

  19. Single walled carbon nanotube-metal oxide nanocomposites for reversible and reproducible storage of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Silambarasan, D; Surya, V J; Vasu, V; Iyakutti, K

    2013-11-13

    Composite material consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and metal oxide nanoparticles has been prepared and their hydrogen storage performance is evaluated. Metal oxides such as tin oxide (SnO2), tungsten trioxide (WO3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are chosen as the composite constituents. The composites have been prepared by means of ultrasonication. Then, the composite samples are deposited on alumina substrates and at 100 °C in a Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. Characterization techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), CHN elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric (TG) measurements are used to analyze the samples at various stages of experiments. Hydrogen storage capacity of the composites namely, SWCNT-SnO2, SWCNT-WO3, and SWCNT-TiO2 are found to be 1.1, 0.9, and 1.3 wt %, respectively. Hydrogenated composite samples are stable at room temperature and desorption of hydrogen is found to be 100% reversible. Desorption temperature ranges and binding energy ranges of hydrogen have been measured from the desorption studies. The hydrogenation, dehydrogenation temperature, and binding energy of hydrogen fall in the recommended range of a suitable hydrogen storage medium applicable for fuel cell applications. Reproducibility and deterioration level of the composite samples have also been examined. PMID:24117025

  20. Carbon hybridized halloysite nanotubes for high-performance hydrogen storage capacities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiao; Fu, Liangjie; Yang, Huaming; Ouyang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid nanotubes of carbon and halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with different carbon:HNTs ratio were hydrothermally synthesized from natural halloysite and sucrose. The samples display uniformly cylindrical hollow tubular structure with different morphologies. These hybrid nanotubes were concluded to be promising medium for physisorption-based hydrogen storage. The hydrogen adsorption capacity of pristine HNTs was 0.35% at 2.65 MPa and 298 K, while that of carbon coated HNTs with the pre-set carbon:HNTs ratio of 3:1 (3C-HNTs) was 0.48% under the same condition. This carbon coated method could offer a new pattern for increasing the hydrogen adsorption capacity. It was also possible to enhance the hydrogen adsorption capacity through the spillover mechanism by incorporating palladium (Pd) in the samples of HNTs (Pd-HNTs) and 3C-HNTs (Pd-3C-HNTs and 3C-Pd-HNTs are the samples with different location of Pd nanoparticles). The hydrogen adsorption capacity of the Pd-HNTs was 0.50% at 2.65 MPa and 298 K, while those of Pd-3C-HNTs and 3C-Pd-HNTs were 0.58% and 0.63%, respectively. In particular, for this spillover mechanism of Pd-carbon-HNTs ternary system, the bidirectional transmission of atomic and molecular hydrogen (3C-Pd-HNTs) was concluded to be more effective than the unidirectional transmission (Pd-3C-HNTs) in this work for the first time. PMID:26201827

  1. Synthesis of superlow friction carbon films from highly hydrogenated methane plasmas.

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Nilufer, I. B.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-10-13

    In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of diamondlike carbon films (DLC) derived from increasingly hydrogenated methane plasmas. The films were deposited on steel substrates by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature and the tribological tests were performed in dry nitrogen. Tests results revealed a close correlation between the hydrogen in source gas plasma and the friction and wear coefficients of the DLC films. Specifically, films grown in plasmas with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios had much lower friction coefficients and wear rates than did films derived from source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.003) was achieved with a film derived from 25% methane--75% hydrogen, while a coefficient of 0.015 was found for films derived from pure methane. Similar correlations were observed for wear rates. Films derived from hydrogen-rich plasmas had the least wear, while films derived from pure methane suffered the highest wear. We used a combination of surface analytical methods to characterize the structure and chemistry of the DLC films and worn surfaces.

  2. State of hydrogen in idealized carbon slitlike nanopores at 77 K.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Hołyst, Robert; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A

    2006-02-28

    The purpose of this letter is to clarify recent findings and answer to the question: "What is the state of hydrogen in carbon slitlike pores at 77 K?" For this purpose, we determined the volumetric density of hydrogen in idealized carbon pores of molecular dimension at 77 K and pressure up to 1 MPa. We used quantum corrected grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. We recognized the highest volumetric density of confined hydrogen (around 71% of hydrogen liquid at boiling point) for effective pore width 5.6 angstroms (H* = 3.04) in the considered pressure range. Our computational results are in agreement with the calculations performed by Wang and Johnson and Rzepka et al. In contrast, we did not observe the high volumetric density of hydrogen in slitlike carbon pores exceeding the density of hydrogen liquid at the boiling point as was reported by Jagiello and Thommes. Moreover, we obtained qualitative agreement between the simulation results and some experimental findings reported by Nijkamp. PMID:16489776

  3. Electrodeposition and characterization of Pd nanoparticles doped amorphous hydrogenated carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuanlie; Zhang, Junyan

    2009-11-01

    Palladium (0) nanoparticles incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Pd/a-C:H) films were synthesized on single crystal silicon (100) substrates by electrochemical deposition route using methanol and camphor as carbon source, and Pd nanoparticles as dopant. The characterization results indicate that Pd nanocrystalline particles with diameter in the range of 1-5 nm dispersed in the amorphous carbon matrix. Compared with pure a-C:H films, the introduction of Pd nanoparticles didn't change the structure of carbon films. At the end, the growth mechanism of the Pd/a-C:H composite films was discussed.

  4. Mechanistic deductions from multiple kinetic and solvent deuterium isotope effects and pH studies of pyridoxal phosphate dependent carbon-carbon lyases: escherichia coli tryptophan indole-lyase

    SciTech Connect

    Kiick, D.M.; Phillips, R.S.

    1988-09-20

    Analysis of the pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and competitive inhibitor Ki values for tryptophan indole-lyase suggests two enzymic groups must be unprotonated in order to facilitate binding and catalysis of tryptophan. The V/K for tryptophan and the pKi for oxindolyl-L-alanine, a putative transition state analogue and competitive inhibitor, decrease below two pK values of 7.6 and 6.0, while the Ki for L-alanine, also a competitive inhibitor, is 3300-fold larger (20 mM) than that for oxindolyl-L-alanine and increases below a single pK of 7.6. A single pK of 7.6 is also observed in the V/K profile for the alternate substrate, S-methyl-L-cysteine. Therefore, the enzymic group with a pK of 7.6 is responsible for proton abstraction at the 2-position of tryptophan, while the enzymic group with a pK of 6.0 interacts with the indole portion of tryptophan and probably catalyzes formation of the indolenine tautomer of tryptophan (in concert with proton transfer to C-3 of indole from the group with pK 7.6) to facilitate carbon-carbon bond cleavage and elimination of indole. The pH variation of the primary deuterium isotope effects for proton abstraction at the 2-position of tryptophan (DV = 2.5 and D(V/Ktrp) = 2.8) are pH independent, while the Vmax for tryptophan or S-methyl-L-cysteine is the same and also pH independent. Thus, substrates bind only to the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. Further, tryptophan is not sticky, and the pK values observed in both V/K profiles are the correct ones.

  5. Dynamic response of a carbon nanotube-based rotary nano device with different carbon-hydrogen bonding layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hang; Cai, Kun; Wan, Jing; Gao, Zhaoliang; Chen, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    In a nano rotational transmission system (RTS) which consists of a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as the motor and a coaxially arranged double walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) as a bearing, the interaction between the motor and the rotor in bearing, which has great effects on the response of the RTS, is determined by their adjacent edges. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the interaction is analyzed when the adjacent edges have different carbon-hydrogen (Csbnd H) bonding layouts. In the computational models, the rotor in bearing and the motor with a specific input rotational speed are made from the same armchair SWCNT. Simulation results demonstrate that a perfect rotational transmission could happen when the motor and rotor have the same Csbnd H bonding layout on their adjacent ends. If only half or less of the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends are bonded with hydrogen atoms, the strong attraction between the lower speed (100 GHz) motor and rotor leads to a synchronous rotational transmission. If only the motor or the rotor has Csbnd H bonds on their adjacent ends, no rotational transmission happens due to weak interaction between the bonded hydrogen atoms on one end with the sp1 bonded carbon atoms on the other end.

  6. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  7. Efficient and durable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst based on nonmetallic nitrogen doped hexagonal carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanming; Yu, Hongtao; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Yaobin

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility of renewable energy technology, hydrogen production by water electrolysis, depends on the design of efficient and durable electrocatalyst composed of earth-abundant elements. Herein, a highly active and stable nonmetallic electrocatalyst, nitrogen doped hexagonal carbon (NHC), was developed for hydrogen production. It exhibited high activity for hydrogen evolution with a low overpotential of only 65 mV, an apparent exchange current density of 5.7 × 10-2 mA cm-2 and a high hydrogen production rate of 20.8 mL cm-2 h-1 at -0.35 V. The superior hydrogen evolution activity of NHC stemmed from the intrinsic electrocatalytic property of hexagonal nanodiamond, the rapid charge transfer and abundance of electrocatalytic sites after nitrogen doping. Moreover, NHC was stable in a corrosive acidic solution during electrolysis under high current density.

  8. Efficient and durable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst based on nonmetallic nitrogen doped hexagonal carbon

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanming; Yu, Hongtao; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Yaobin

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of renewable energy technology, hydrogen production by water electrolysis, depends on the design of efficient and durable electrocatalyst composed of earth-abundant elements. Herein, a highly active and stable nonmetallic electrocatalyst, nitrogen doped hexagonal carbon (NHC), was developed for hydrogen production. It exhibited high activity for hydrogen evolution with a low overpotential of only 65 mV, an apparent exchange current density of 5.7 × 10−2 mA cm−2 and a high hydrogen production rate of 20.8 mL cm−2 h−1 at −0.35 V. The superior hydrogen evolution activity of NHC stemmed from the intrinsic electrocatalytic property of hexagonal nanodiamond, the rapid charge transfer and abundance of electrocatalytic sites after nitrogen doping. Moreover, NHC was stable in a corrosive acidic solution during electrolysis under high current density. PMID:25354806

  9. Blending materials composed of boron, nitrogen and carbon to transform approaches to liquid hydrogen stores.

    PubMed

    Whittemore, Sean M; Bowden, Mark; Karkamkar, Abhijeet; Parab, Kshitij; Neiner, Doinita; Autrey, Tom; Ishibashi, Jacob S A; Chen, Gang; Liu, Shih-Yuan; Dixon, David A

    2016-04-14

    Mixtures of hydrogen storage materials containing the elements of boron, nitrogen, carbon, i.e., isomers of BN cyclopentanes are examined to find a 'fuel blend' that remains a liquid phase throughout hydrogen release, maximizes hydrogen storage density, minimizes impurities and remains thermally stable at ambient temperatures. We find that the mixture of ammonia borane dissolved in 3-methyl-1,2-dihydro-1,2-azaborolidine (compound B) provide a balance of these properties and provides ca. 5.6 wt% hydrogen. The two hydrogen storage materials decompose at a faster rate than either individually and products formed are a mixture of molecular trimers. Digestion of the product mixture formed from the decomposition of the AB + B fuel blend with methanol leads to the two corresponding methanol adducts of the starting material and not a complex mixture of adducts. The work shows the utility of using blends of materials to reduce volatile impurities and preserve liquid phase. PMID:26629961

  10. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Andrew Duncan, A; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2009-04-27

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  11. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2007-04-18

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  12. The effect of hydrogen on the parameters of plastic deformation localization in low carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lunev, Aleksey G. E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Nadezhkin, Mikhail V. E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Shlyakhova, Galina V.; Barannikova, Svetlana A.; Zuev, Lev B.

    2014-11-14

    In the present study, the effect of interstitial hydrogen atoms on the mechanical properties and plastic strain localization patterns in tensile tested polycrystals of low-carbon steel Fe-0.07%C has been studied using double exposure speckle photography technique. The main parameters of plastic flow localization at various stages of deformation hardening have been determined in polycrystals of steel electrolytically saturated with hydrogen in a three-electrode electrochemical cell at a controlled constant cathode potential. Also, the effect of hydrogen on changing of microstructure by using optical microscopy has been demonstrated.

  13. Initial hydrogen attack kinetics in a carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKimpson, Marvin; Shewmon, Paul G.

    1981-05-01

    The kinetics of the initial stages of hydrogen attack in a commercial 0.3 pct C steel (grade A516) were investigated using an in situ dilatometer. The time, temperature and hydrogen pressure dependences of the rate of sample expansion were measured at hydrogen pressures from 1 to 20 MPa, and temperatures from 350 to 475 °C for sample strains of 10-6 to 10-3. Sample expansion began shortly after hydrogen exposure and proceeded at a nearly constant rate throughout the “incubation period” preceding rapid attack. At high temperatures and low pressures, this rate was proportional to PH 2 1.9±0.2 and had an apparent activation energy of 115 ± 9 kJ. At high pressures and low temperatures, the rate was proportional to PPH 2 1.0.62±0.07 and showed an apparent activation energy of 210 ± 13 kJ. This suggests that bubble growth during the incubation period occurs predominantly by grain boundary diffusion and is driven by near-equilibrium internal methane pressures. Sample expansion in the subsequent stages of accelerating growth probably is controlled by creep and methane generation.

  14. Percolative metal-organic framework/carbon composites for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuqian; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Sun, Xiang; Shi, Shangzhao; Zhang, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhai, Yuchun

    2014-05-01

    Percolative Metal-organic framework/Carbon (MOFAC) composites are synthesized by IRMOF8 (isoreticular metal-organic frameworks) directly depositing on activated carbon via heterogeneous nucleation. Carbon content is calculated by TGA (Thermogravimetric analysis) tests. XRD (X-ray diffraction) and FESEM (Field emission-scanning electron microscope) are carried out to characterize the structures of the samples. BET surface areas and the pore size distribution are measured. The dielectric constant is measured with impedance analyzer and a specially designed sample holder. The dielectric constants of the MOFAC composites rise with increasing the carbon content, and the composites possess the insulator-conductor transition as the carbon content increases from 17.77 wt% to 22.2 wt%. The composites are further tested for hydrogen storage capability under assist of the PMN-PT (single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate) generated electric field. With help from the PMN-PT, the hydrogen uptake capability is increased about 31.5% over the MOFAC3 (MOF-Carbon composite with 22.2 wt% of carbon) without PMN-PT, which is elucidated by the charge distribution mechanisms. The improved storage is due to a stronger electrostatic interaction between IRMOF8 and hydrogen molecule caused by field polarization. Meanwhile, rapid adsorption/desorption kinetics and total reversibility on the samples are observed in the present or absence of external electric field.

  15. Improvement of Electron Field Emission in Patterned Carbon Nanotubes by High Temperature Hydrogen Plasma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sigen; Sellin, Paul. J.; Lian, Jun; Özsan, Ersin; Chang, Sha

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a significant improvement of electron field emission property in patterned carbon nanotubes films by using a high temperature (650 °C) hydrogen plasma treatment. This treatment was found to greatly increase the emission current, emission uniformity and stability. The mechanism study showed that these enhanced properties are attributed to the lowering of the potential barrier and the creation of geometrical features through the removal of amorphous carbon, catalyst particles and the saturation of dangling bonds after such a hydrogen plasma treatment. PMID:19946566

  16. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of extractable hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.; Pizzarello, S.; Cronin, J. R.; Yuen, G. U.

    1991-01-01

    A fairly fool-proof method to ensure that the compounds isolated from meteorites are truly part of the meteorites and not an artifact introduced by exposure to the terrestrial environment, storage, or handling is presented. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios in several of the chemical compounds extracted from the Murchison meteorite were measured. The results obtained by studying the amino acids in this meteorite gave very unusual hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios. The technique was extended to the different classes of hydrocarbons and the hydrocarbons were isolated using a variety of separation techniques. The results and methods used in this investigation are described in this two page paper.

  17. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  18. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  19. Renewable Hydrogen Carrier Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The hydrogen economy presents an appealing energy future but its implementation must solve numerous problems ranging from low-cost sustainable production, high-density storage, costly infrastructure, to eliminating safety concern. The use of renewable carbohydrate as a high-density hydrogen carrier and energy source for hydrogen production is possible due to emerging cell-free synthetic biology technology called cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB). Assembly of numerous enzymes and co-enzymes in vitro can create complicated set of biological reactions or pathways that microorganisms cannot complete, for example, C6H10O5 (aq) + 7 H2O (l) 12 H2 (g) + 6 CO2 (g) (PLoS One 2007, 2:e456). Thanks to 100% selectivity of enzymes, modest reaction conditions, and high-purity of generated hydrogen, carbohydrate is a promising hydrogen carrier for end users. Gravimetric density of carbohydrate is 14.8 H2 mass% if water can be recycled from PEM fuel cells or 8.33% H2 mass% without water recycling. Renewable carbohydrate can be isolated from plant biomass or would be produced from a combination of solar electricity/hydrogen and carbon dioxide fixation mediated by high-efficiency artificial photosynthesis mediated by SyPaB. The construction of this carbon-neutral carbohydrate economy would address numerous sustainability challenges, such as electricity and hydrogen storage, CO2 fixation and long-term storage, water conservation, transportation fuel production, plus feed and food production.

  20. Hydrogen Generation During the Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    WIERSMA, BRUCEJ.

    2004-08-01

    A literature review of the corrosion mechanism for carbon steel in oxalic acid was performed to determine the ratio of moles of iron corroded to moles of hydrogen evolved during the corrosion of iron in oxalic acid. The theory of corrosion of carbon steel in oxalic acid and experimental work were reviewed. It was concluded that the maximum ratio of moles of hydrogen evolved to moles of iron corroded is 1:1. This ratio would be observed in a de-aerated environment. If oxygen or other oxidizing species are present, the ratio could be much less than 1:1. Testing would be necessary to determine how much less than 1:1 the ratio might be. Although the ratio of hydrogen evolution to iron corroded will not exceed 1:1, the total amount of hydrogen evolved can be influenced by such things as a decrease in the exposed surface area, suppression of hydrogen generation by gamma radiation, the presence of corrosion products on steel surface, etc. These and other variables present during chemical cleaning operations of the waste tank have not been examined by the tests reported in the literature i.e., the tests have focused on clean corrosion coupons in oxalic acid solutions. It is expected that most of these variables would reduce the total amount of hydrogen evolved. Further testing would need to be performed to quantify the reduction in hydrogen generation rate associated with these variables.

  1. New Pathways and Metrics for Enhanced, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Boron-Doped Carbon Nanospaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Peter; Wexler, Carlos; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Lee, Mark W.; Jalistegi, Satish S.

    2014-08-14

    This project, since its start in 2007—entitled “Networks of boron-doped carbon nanopores for low-pressure reversible hydrogen storage” (2007-10) and “New pathways and metrics for enhanced, reversible hydrogen storage in boron-doped carbon nanospaces” (2010-13)—is in support of the DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, as part of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program’s comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for the successful commercialization and market acceptance of hydrogen powered vehicles. Storing sufficient hydrogen on board a wide range of vehicle platforms, at energy densities comparable to gasoline, without compromising passenger or cargo space, remains an outstanding technical challenge. Of the main three thrust areas in 2007—metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, and sorption-based hydrogen storage—sorption-based storage, i.e., storage of molecular hydrogen by adsorption on high-surface-area materials (carbons, metal-organic frameworks, and other porous organic networks), has emerged as the most promising path toward achieving the 2017 DOE storage targets of 0.055 kg H2/kg system (“5.5 wt%”) and 0.040 kg H2/liter system. The objective of the project is to develop high-surface-area carbon materials that are boron-doped by incorporation of boron into the carbon lattice at the outset, i.e., during the synthesis of the material. The rationale for boron-doping is the prediction that boron atoms in carbon will raise the binding energy of hydro- gen from 4-5 kJ/mol on the undoped surface to 10-14 kJ/mol on a doped surface, and accordingly the hydro- gen storage capacity of the material. The mechanism for the increase in binding energy is electron donation from H2 to electron-deficient B atoms, in the form of sp2 boron-carbon bonds. Our team is proud to have

  2. Preparation, microstructure and hydrogen sorption properties of nanoporous carbon aerogels under ambient drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. Y.; Buckley, C. E.; Mulè, S.; Paskevicius, M.; Dhal, B. B.

    2008-11-01

    Organic aerogels are prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with furfural. These aerogels are further carbonized in nitrogen in order to obtain their corresponding carbon aerogels (CA); a sample which was carbonized at 900 °C was also activated in a carbon dioxide atmosphere at 900 °C. The chemical reaction mechanism and optimum synthesis conditions are investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermoanalyses (thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses) with a focus on the sol-gel process. The carbon aerogels were investigated with respect to their microstructures, using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption measurements at 77 K. SAXS studies showed that micropores with a radius of gyration of <0.35 ± 0.07 to 0.55 ± 0.05 nm were present, and TEM measurements and nitrogen adsorption showed that larger mesopores were also present. Hydrogen storage properties of the CA were also investigated. An activated sample with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1539 ± 20 m2 g-1 displayed a reasonably high hydrogen uptake at 77 K with a maximum hydrogen sorption of 3.6 wt% at 2.5 MPa. These results suggest that CA are promising candidate hydrogen storage materials.

  3. Unmodified versus caustics-impregnated carbons for control of hydrogen sulfide emissions from sewage treatment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bandosz, T.J.; Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Turk, A.

    2000-03-15

    Unmodified and caustic-impregnated carbons were compared as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide in the North River Water Pollution Control Plant in New York City over a period of 2 years. The carbons were characterized using accelerated H{sub 2}S breakthrough capacity tests, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, and thermal analysis. The accelerated laboratory tests indicate that the initial capacity of caustic-impregnated carbons exceeds that of unmodified carbon, but the nature of real-life challenge streams, particularly their lower H{sub 2}S concentrations, nullifies this advantage. As the caustic content of the impregnated carbon is consumed, the situation reverses, and the unmodified carbon becomes more effective. When the concentration of H{sub 2}S is low, the developed surface area and pore volume along with the affinity to retain water create a favorable environment for dissociative adsorption of hydrogen sulfide and its oxidation to elemental sulfur, S{sup 4+}, and S{sup 6+}. In the case of the caustic carbon, the catalytic impact of the carbon surface is limited, and its good performance lasts only while active base is present. The results also show the significant differences in performance of unmodified carbons due to combined effects of their porosity and surface chemistry.

  4. The Deuterium Chemistry of the Early Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, P.C.; Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.

    1998-12-01

    The chemistry of deuterium, as well as that of hydrogen and helium, in the postrecombination era of the expanding early universe is presented. A thorough survey of all potentially important gas-phase reactions involving the primordial elements produced in the Big Bang, with a particular emphasis on deuterium, is given. The reaction set, consisting of 144 processes, is used in a nonequilibrium chemistry model to follow the production of primordial molecules in the postrecombination era. It is found that significant deuterium fractionation occurs for HD{sup +}, HD, and H{sub 2}D{sup +}, while the abundance of D{sup +} is reduced compared to the proton abundance. Even with the enhanced fractionation of H{sub 2}D{sup +}, its abundance is predicted to be too small to cause any interesting cosmological consequences, such as possible attenuation of spatial anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation field, detections of the epochs of reionization and reheating, or constraints on the primordial deuterium abundance. HD, being the second most abundant primordial molecule after H{sub 2}, may play a role in subsequent structure formation because of its cooling radiation. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  5. The primordial abundance of deuterium: ionization correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ryan; Pettini, Max

    2016-01-01

    We determine the relative ionization of deuterium and hydrogen in low metallicity damped Lyman α (DLA) and sub-DLA systems using a detailed suite of photoionization simulations. We model metal-poor DLAs as clouds of gas in pressure equilibrium with a host dark matter halo, exposed to the Haardt & Madau background radiation of galaxies and quasars at redshift z ≃ 3. Our results indicate that the deuterium ionization correction correlates with the H I column density and the ratio of successive ion stages of the most commonly observed metals. The N(N II)/N(N I) column density ratio provides the most reliable correction factor, being essentially independent of the gas geometry, H I column density, and the radiation field. We provide a series of convenient fitting formulae to calculate the deuterium ionization correction based on observable quantities. The ionization correction typically does not exceed 0.1 per cent for metal-poor DLAs, which is comfortably below the current measurement precision (2 per cent). However, the deuterium ionization correction may need to be applied when a larger sample of D/H measurements becomes available.

  6. N-doped carbon networks: alternative materials tracing new routes for activating molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Remedios; Ferrante, Francesco; Roggan, Stefan; Duca, Dario

    2015-02-23

    The fragmentation of molecular hydrogen on N-doped carbon networks was investigated by using molecular (polyaromatic macrocycles) as well as truncated and periodic (carbon nanotubes) models. The computational study was focused on the ergonicity analysis of the reaction and on the properties of the transition states involved when constellations of three or four pyridinic nitrogen atom defects are present in the carbon network. Calculations show that whenever N-defects are embedded in species characterized by large conjugated π-systems, either in polyaromatic macrocycles or carbon nanotubes, the corresponding H2 bond cleavage is largely exergonic. The fragmentation Gibbs free energy is affected by the final arrangement of the hydrogen atoms on the defect and by the extension of the π-electron cloud, but it is not influenced by the curvature of the system. PMID:25614208

  7. HYDROGENATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC COMPOUNDS USING NI SUPPORT ON H-BETA ZEOLITE IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary rationale for use of supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent in hydrogenation is the elimination of mass transfer limitations, through enhancement of the solubility of hydrogen at the reaction locus. Hydrogenation of anthracene was performed using NiHB-zeolite catal...

  8. Carbon nanofiber mesoporous films: efficient platforms for bio-hydrogen oxidation in biofuel cells.

    PubMed

    de Poulpiquet, Anne; Marques-Knopf, Helena; Wernert, Véronique; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie Thérèse; Gadiou, Roger; Lojou, Elisabeth

    2014-01-28

    The discovery of oxygen and carbon monoxide tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenases was the first necessary step toward the definition of a novel generation of hydrogen fed biofuel cells. The next important milestone is now to identify and overcome bottlenecks limiting the current densities, hence the power densities. In the present work we report for the first time a comprehensive study of herringbone carbon nanofiber mesoporous films as platforms for enhanced biooxidation of hydrogen. The 3D network allows mediatorless hydrogen oxidation by the membrane-bound hydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. We investigate the key physico-chemical parameters that enhance the catalytic efficiency, including surface chemistry and hierarchical porosity of the biohybrid film. We also emphasize that the catalytic current is limited by mass transport inside the mesoporous carbon nanofiber film. Provided hydrogen is supplied inside the carbon film, the combination of the hierarchical porosity of the carbon nanofiber film with the hydrophobicity of the treated carbon material results in very high efficiency of the bioelectrode. By optimization of the whole procedure, current densities as high as 4.5 mA cm(-2) are reached with a turnover frequency of 48 s(-1). This current density is almost 100 times higher than when hydrogenase is simply adsorbed at a bare graphite electrode, and more than 5 times higher than the average of the previous reported current densities at carbon nanotube modified electrodes, suggesting that carbon nanofibers can be efficiently used in future sustainable H2/O2 biofuel cells. PMID:24296569

  9. System and method for controlling hydrogen elimination during carbon nanotube synthesis from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2010-03-23

    A system and method for producing carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition includes a catalyst support having first and second surfaces. The catalyst support is capable of hydrogen transport from the first to the second surface. A catalyst is provided on the first surface of the catalyst support. The catalyst is selected to catalyze the chemical vapor deposition formation of carbon nanotubes. A fuel source is provided for supplying fuel to the catalyst.

  10. Hydrogen Storage in Novel Carbon-Based Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, E. S.; Curtis, C. J.; Engtrakul, C.; Davis, M. F.; Su, T.; Parilla, P. A.; Simpson, L. J.; Blackburn, J. L.; Zhao, Y.; Kim, Y.-H.; Zhang, S. B.; Heben, M. J.; Dillon, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental wet chemical approaches to complex an iron atom with two C60 fullerenes, representing a new molecule, dubbed a 'bucky dumbbell', have been demonstrated. The structure of this molecule has been determined by 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Furthermore, this structure has been shown to have unique binding sites for dihydrogen molecules with the technique of temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The new adsorption sites have binding energies that are stronger than that observed for hydrogen physisorbed on planar graphite, but significantly weaker than a chemical C-H bond. Further development of these molecules could make them ideal candidates for onboard vehicular hydrogen storage.

  11. Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong; Cao, Juexian

    2012-12-15

    The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

  12. Design and reversible hydrogen storage capacity determination of unique nanoarrays of titanium dioxide and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Amrita

    In this project hydrogen storage studies were carried out on TiO 2 nanotubular arrays of different diameters prepared by electrochemical anodization, combined with template-grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The growth of the CNTs on the nanotubular TiO2 arrays was accomplished by chemical vapor deposition. The hydrogen storage capacity was determined for the nanotubular TiO2 and the combined TiO2-CNT arrays, by charging and discharging hydrogen with a Sievert's apparatus. It was found that the presence of carbon nanotubes on nano-porous titanium oxide can enhance storage of hydrogen as determined by volumetric means. The hydrogen uptake in as-anodized TiO2 nanotubes was found to be 2 wt% at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and 0.94 wt% at room temperature. Desorption results for TiO2 at 393 K and 300 K were 1.5 wt% and 0.7 wt%, respectively. The CNT-TiO2 composites showed a hydrogen uptake capacity of 1.94 wt% at room temperature and 2.5 wt% at 77 K. The desorption results were 1.8 wt% at 393 K and 0.68 wt% at room temperature. It was seen that the hydrogen uptake was higher at lower temperatures and discharge was increased significantly at higher temperatures for both TiO2 and CNT/TiO2 samples. The utilization of this novel hydrogen storage method can be recognized as a break-through in the hydrogen economy as applied to on-board vehicular applications.

  13. High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

    2002-01-02

    Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power

  14. Carboxylic Group Embedded Carbon Balls as a New Supported Catalyst for Hydrogen Economic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, Ankur

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic group functionalized carbon balls have been successfully synthesized by using a facile synthesis method and well characterized with different characterization techniques such as XPS, MAS NMR, SEM, ICP and N2 physi-sorption analysis. The synthesized material has been effectively utilized as novel support to immobilized ruthenium catalyst for hydrogen economic reactions. PMID:27455763

  15. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF ANHYDRIDES TO LACTONES UNDER SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective Hydrogenation of Anhydrides to Lactones Under Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Medium

    Endalkachew Sahle-Demessie Unnikrishnan R Pillai
    U.S. EPA , 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45268 Phone: 513-569-7739
    Fax: 513-569-7677
    Abstract:
    Hydrogenat...

  16. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  17. The role of hydrogen in small amorphous carbon grains: the IR spectrum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennella, V.; Colangeli, L.; Pestellini, C. C.; Palomba, E.; Palumbo, P.; Rotundi, A.; Bussoletti, E.

    1996-10-01

    Preliminary results on the evolution of the IR spectrum of hydrogenated carbon grains as a function of heat tretment are presented. The transformation of C-H and C-C bonding configurations is considered and the correlation with other properties of grains, such as their microstructure, is analyzed.

  18. The deuterium content of water in some volcanic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Smith, R.L.

    1958-01-01

    The deuterium-hydrogen composition (relative to Lake Michigan water = 0.0) of water extractsd from coexisting perlite and obsidian from eleven different localities was determined. The water content of the obsidians is generally from 0.09 to 0.29 per cent by weight, though two samples from near Olancha, California, contain about 0.92 per cent. The relative deuterium concentration is from -4.6 to -12.3 per cent. The coexisting perlite contains from 2.0 to 3.8 per cent of water with a relative deuterium concentration of -3.1 to -16.6 per cent. The deuterium concentration in the perlites is not related to that in the enclosed obsidian. The deuterium concentration in the perlite water is related to the deuterium concentration of the modern meteoric water and the perlite water contains approximately 4 per cent less deuterium than does the groundwater of the area in which the perlites occur. The above relations hold true for perlites from northern New Mexico, east slope of the Sierra Nevada. California Coast Range, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and New Zealand. As the water in the obsidian is unrelated to meteoric water, but the enclosing perlite water is related, we believe that this is evidence for the secondary hydration of obsidian to form high water content perlitic glass. ?? 1958.

  19. Research Progress on the Indirect Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol.

    PubMed

    Du, Xian-Long; Jiang, Zheng; Su, Dang Sheng; Wang, Jian-Qiang

    2016-02-19

    Methanol is a sustainable source of liquid fuels and one of the most useful organic chemicals. To date, most of the work in this area has focused on the direct hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. However, this process requires high operating temperatures (200-250 °C), which limits the theoretical yield of methanol. Thus, it is desirable to find a new strategy for the efficient conversion of CO2 to methanol at relatively low reaction temperatures. This Minireview seeks to outline the recent advances on the indirect hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. Much emphasis is placed on discussing specific systems, including hydrogenation of CO2 derivatives (organic carbonates, carbamates, formates, cyclic carbonates, etc.) and cascade reactions, with the aim of critically highlighting both the achievements and remaining challenges associated with this field. PMID:26692565

  20. Generating hydrogen gas from methane with carbon captured as pure spheroidal nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Andrew; Zhang, Weike; Gao, Lizhen; Varsani, Rahi R; Saunders, Martin; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Raston, Colin L; Chua, Hui Tong

    2011-08-01

    Energy production by using hydrogen gas as a feedstock is considered to be one of the keys to creating clean energy, with the proviso that the gas is generated in a sustainable way with no emissions. A simple, self-sustaining process generating hydrogen gas from methane using inexpensive stainless steel wire-mesh catalysts at elevated temperatures (800 °C) is reported. A theoretical analysis of the production of electricity by this process revealed peak chain energy efficiencies up to 21% (emission free) when using a percentage of the produced hydrogen (approximately 40% of purified yield) as the heat source. In addition, a practical method has been developed to purify the carbon byproduct, affording essentially pure highly graphitic spheroidal carbon for advanced materials applications. PMID:21732440