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Sample records for hydrogen deuterium carbon

  1. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    E-print Network

    Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited)a) Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 11E501 equivalence in cryogenic deuterium­tritium implosions on OMEGAa) Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); 10

  2. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 1015 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  3. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 142 Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  4. Cosmic Deuterium Or A Hydrogen Interloper ?

    E-print Network

    Gary Steigman

    1994-05-16

    Two groups have independently reported the possible detection of extragalactic deuterium in the absorption spectrum of the same high redshift, low metalicity QSO. Although the high value for the inferred deuterium abundance poses no problems for cosmology (i.e., big bang nucleosynthesis), it is in apparent conflict with solar system observations of deuterium and helium-3. This latter inconsistency is explained and made quantitative and it is shown that, unless the inferred D/H ratio is too high by a factor of three, these data challange our understanding of the stellar and galactic evolution of helium-3. This conflict is resolved if the observed absorption feature is, in fact, due to a hydrogen interloper rather than to high z, low Z deuterium.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Based Deuterium Ion Source for Improved Neutron Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, R. L.; Jiang, N.; Thuesen, L.; Leung, K. N.; Antolak, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Field ionization uses high electric fields to cause the ionization and emission of ions from the surface of a sharp electrode. We are developing a novel field ionization neutron generator using carbon nanotubes (CNT) to produce the deuterium ion current. The generator consists of three major components: a deuterium ion source made of carbon nanotubes, a smooth negatively-biased target electrode, and a secondary electron suppression system. When a negative high voltage is applied on the target electrode, a high gradient electric field is formed at the tips of the carbon nanotubes. This field is sufficiently strong to create deuterium (D) ions at or near the nanotubes which are accelerated to the target causing D-D reactions to occur and the production of neutrons. A cross magnetic field is used to suppress secondary emission electrons generated on the target surface. We have demonstrated field ionization currents of 70 nA (1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}) at hydrogen gas pressure of 10 mTorr. We have found that the current scales proportionally with CNT area and also with the gas pressure in the range of 1 mTorr to 10 mTorr. We have demonstrated pulse cut-off times as short as 2 {mu}sec. Finally, we have shown the feasibility of generating neutrons using deuterium gas.

  6. Deuterium uptake in magnetic-fusion devices with lithium-conditioned carbon walls.

    PubMed

    Krstic, P S; Allain, J P; Taylor, C N; Dadras, J; Maeda, S; Morokuma, K; Jakowski, J; Allouche, A; Skinner, C H

    2013-03-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has lowered hydrogenic recycling and dramatically improved plasma performance in many magnetic-fusion devices. In this Letter, we report quantum-classical atomistic simulations and laboratory experiments that elucidate the roles of lithium and oxygen in the uptake of hydrogen in amorphous carbon. Surprisingly, we show that lithium creates a high oxygen concentration on a carbon surface when bombarded by deuterium. Furthermore, surface oxygen, rather than lithium, plays the key role in trapping hydrogen. PMID:23521267

  7. The deuterium content of atmospheric molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerst, Steven Gregory

    2000-09-01

    A new technique for the separation of molecular hydrogen (H2) from air and the determination of its deuterium (D) content is presented. A high-pressure air sample in an aluminum cylinder is condensed at -196°C, whereby H2 contained in the air sample is enriched in the gaseous headspace above the liquefied air. The H2-enriched headspace is bled into a vacuum extraction line where the H2 is oxidized to H2O for cryogenic isolation from the air stream. The captured water is reduced back to H2 for determination of its D/H ratio via isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (?D is reported in permil (‰) vs. Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, where ?D = ((D/H)sample/(D/H) VSMOW - 1)*1000‰). Air samples for ?D analyses were collected in November-December 1998 on a transect from Seattle, WA, 48°N, to McMurdo, Antarctica, 71°S (n = 19), and over a two-year interval on the Washington Coast, 48°N (n = 11), and Point Barrow, AK, 71°N (n = 6). Results indicate that the average ?D of global atmospheric H2 is +130 +/- 4‰, with average ?D values of +123 +/- 3‰ and +138 +/- 8‰ in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Comparison of background and polluted samples in the Seattle area indicate the ?D of H2 produced by anthropogenic activities (e.g. automobiles) is -1961 +/- 10‰. Laboratory combustion studies of pine needles and pine branches indicate that the ?D of H2 emitted during biomass burning is -293 +/- 60‰. The results of field experiments (n = 6) using a large chamber to isolate a volume of air in contact with soil imply that the H2 removed during soil uptake has a ?D value 57 +/- 24‰ lower than that of atmospheric H2. The constraints that these preliminary isotopic measurements place on the global H2 budget are limited by the unmeasured isotopic composition of photochemically produced H2, ?Dh?. However, the global H2 isotope balance implies that the average global value of ?Dh? must be +130‰, and this value is demonstrated to be plausible. Therefore, it is concluded that the available isotopic measurements are not in disagreement with the global H2 budget, as had been previously suggested.

  8. Double radiative pion capture on hydrogen and deuterium and the nucleon's pion cloud

    E-print Network

    S. Tripathi; D. S. Armstrong; M. E. Christy; J. H. D. Clark; T. P. Gorringe; M. D. Hasinoff; M. A. Kovash; D. H. Wright; P. A. Zolnierczuk

    2007-01-02

    We report measurements of double radiative capture in pionic hydrogen and pionic deuterium. The measurements were performed with the RMC spectrometer at the TRIUMF cyclotron by recording photon pairs from pion stops in liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets. We obtained absolute branching ratios of $(3.02 \\pm 0.27 (stat.) \\pm 0.31 (syst.)) \\times 10^{-5}$ for hydrogen and $(1.42 \\pm ^{0.09}_{0.12} (stat.) \\pm 0.11 (syst.)) \\times 10^{-5}$ for deuterium, and relative branching ratios of double radiative capture to single radiative capture of $(7.68 \\pm 0.69(stat.) \\pm 0.79(syst.)) \\times 10^{-5}$ for hydrogen and $(5.44 \\pm^{0.34}_{0.46}(stat.) \\pm 0.42(syst.)) \\times 10^{-5}$ for deuterium. For hydrogen, the measured branching ratio and photon energy-angle distributions are in fair agreement with a reaction mechanism involving the annihilation of the incident $\\pi^-$ on the $\\pi^+$ cloud of the target proton. For deuterium, the measured branching ratio and energy-angle distributions are qualitatively consistent with simple arguments for the expected role of the spectator neutron. A comparison between our hydrogen and deuterium data and earlier beryllium and carbon data reveals substantial changes in the relative branching ratios and the energy-angle distributions and is in agreement with the expected evolution of the reaction dynamics from an annihilation process in S-state capture to a bremsstrahlung process in P-state capture. Lastly, we comment on the relevance of the double radiative process to the investigation of the charged pion polarizability and the in-medium pion field.

  9. Appendix A SIMS profiles of hydrogen and deuterium in diamond

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    127 Appendix A SIMS profiles of hydrogen and deuterium in diamond A.1 Introduction A diamond sample ion­beam doping. Impurity levels were profiled as a function of depth from the diamond surface using­type reactor, consisting of a quartz tube with diamond­coated quartz substrate holder. The substrate

  10. Joint analysis of data on pionic hydrogen and deuterium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kolybasov, V.M.; Kudryavtsev, A.E.

    1983-05-20

    Analysis of recent data on the shifts of the 1s levels of pionic hydrogen and deuterium atoms yields new values for the isosinglet and isotriplet ..pi..N scattering lengths. These new values contradict the results found from dispersion relations.

  11. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  12. The pion nucleon scattering lengths from pionic hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, H.-Ch.; Badertscher, A.; Goudsmit, P. F. A.; Janousch, M.; Leisi, H. J.; Matsinos, E.; Sigg, D.; Zhao, Z. G.; Chatellard, D.; Egger, J.-P.; Gabathuler, K.; Hauser, P.; Simons, L. M.; Rusi El Hassani, A. J.

    2001-07-01

    This is the final publication of the ETH Zurich Neuchâtel PSI collaboration on the pionic hydrogen and deuterium precision X-ray experiments. We describe the recent hydrogen 3 p 1 s measurement, report on the determination of the Doppler effect correction to the transition line width, analyze the deuterium shift measurement and discuss implications of the combined hydrogen and deuterium results. From the pionic hydrogen 3 p 1 s transition experiments we obtain the strong-interaction energy level shift \\varepsilon_{1s} = -7.108±0.013 (stat.)±0.034 (syst.) eV and the total decay width ?_{1s} = 0.868±0.040 (stat.)±0.038 (syst.) eV of the 1s state. Taking into account the electromagnetic corrections we find the hadronic ? N s-wave scattering amplitude a_{?-prightarrow?-p} = 0.0883±0.0008 m_{?}^{-1} for elastic scattering and a_{?-prightarrow?0n} = -0.128±0.006 m_{?} ^{-1} for single charge exchange, respectively. We then combine the pionic hydrogen results with the 1 s level shift measurement on pionic deuterium and test isospin symmetry of the strong interaction: our data are still compatible with isospin symmetry. The isoscalar and isovector ? N scattering lengths (within the framework of isospin symmetry) are found to be b_0 = -0.0001^{+0.0009}_{-0.0021} m_{?}^{-1} and b1 = -0.0885^{+0.0010}_{-0.0021} m_{?} ^{-1}, respectively. Using the GMO sum rule, we obtain from b_1 a new value of the ? N coupling constant (g_{? N} = 13.21_{-0.05}^{+0.11}) from which follows the Goldberger Treiman discrepancy ?_{{GT}} =0.027_{-0.008}^{+0.012}. The new values of b_0 and g_{? N} imply an increase of the nucleon sigma term by at least 9 MeV.

  13. Equations of state for hydrogen and deuterium.

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, Gerald Irwin

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the complete revision of a deuterium equation of state (EOS) model published in 1972. It uses the same general approach as the 1972 EOS, i.e., the so-called 'chemical model,' but incorporates a number of theoretical advances that have taken place during the past thirty years. Three phases are included: a molecular solid, an atomic solid, and a fluid phase consisting of both molecular and atomic species. Ionization and the insulator-metal transition are also included. The most important improvements are in the liquid perturbation theory, the treatment of molecular vibrations and rotations, and the ionization equilibrium and mixture models. In addition, new experimental data and theoretical calculations are used to calibrate certain model parameters, notably the zero-Kelvin isotherms for the molecular and atomic solids, and the quantum corrections to the liquid phase. The report gives a general overview of the model, followed by detailed discussions of the most important theoretical issues and extensive comparisons with the many experimental data that have been obtained during the last thirty years. Questions about the validity of the chemical model are also considered. Implications for modeling the 'giant planets' are also discussed.

  14. Measurement of the ratio of hydrogen to deuterium at the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Jong-Gu; Wang, Son Jong; Kim, Sun Ho; Park, Jae Min; Na, Hoon Kyun

    2010-10-15

    The control of the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is one of the very important issues for ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating as well as the plasma wall interaction in the tokamak. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium during the tokamak shot was deduced from the emission spectroscopy measurements during the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign. Graphite tiles were used for the plasma facing components (PFCs) at KSTAR and its surface area exposed to the plasma was about 11 m{sup 2}. The data showed that it remained as high as around 50% during the campaign period because graphite tiles were exposed to the air for about two months and the hydrogen contents at the tiles are not fully pumped out due to the lack of baking on the PFC in the 2009 campaign. The validation of the spectroscopy method was checked by using the Zeeman effects and the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is compared with results from the residual gas analysis. During the tokamak shot, the ratio is low below 10% initially and saturated after around 1 s. When there is a hydrogen injection to the vessel via ion cyclotron wall conditioning and the boronization process where the carbone is used, the ratio of the hydrogen to the deuterium is increased by up to 100% and it recovers to around 50% after one day of operation. However it does not decrease below 50% at the end of the experimental campaign. It was found that the full baking on the PFC (with a high temperature and sufficient vacuum pumping) is required for the ratio control which guarantees the efficient ICRF heating at the KSTAR 2010 experimental campaign.

  15. Isentropes and Hugoniot curves for dense hydrogen and deuterium.

    PubMed

    Beule, D; Ebeling, W; Förster, A; Juranek, H; Redmer, R; Röpke, G

    2001-06-01

    Multiple-shock experiments with fluid hydrogen have shown that a transition from semiconducting behavior to metal-like conductivity occurs at pressures (p) of about 140 GPa and temperatures (T) near 3000 K. We model the p-T pathway by Hugoniot curves (initial shock) and isentropes (subsequent shocks). For the calculation of these curves we apply an expression for the free energy developed recently for dense hydrogen and deuterium plasma in the regions of partial dissociation and partial ionization. Furthermore, we discuss the relations between Hugoniot curves, isentropes and the coexistence line of the plasma phase transition. PMID:11415059

  16. HYDROGEN DISTILLATION AT THE DEUTERIUM REMOVAL UNIT OF MuCap EXPERIMENT

    E-print Network

    Titov, Anatoly

    321 HYDROGEN DISTILLATION AT THE DEUTERIUM REMOVAL UNIT OF MuCap EXPERIMENT I.A. Alekseev, E for manufacturing of ultra pure protium from hydrogen [2]. A principle of hydrogen cryogenic distillation was used

  17. Simulation of the CLAS12 dual hydrogen-deuterium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musalo, Christopher; Gilfoyle, Gerard

    2011-10-01

    The primary mission of Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is to reveal the quark and gluon structure of nucleons and nuclei and to deepen our understanding of matter and quark confinement. This mission will be done using a 12-GeV electron beam incident on nuclear targets. One approved experiment E12-07-104 will measure the elastic scattering of electrons from deuterium to extract the neutron magnetic form factor (GMn) using the CLAS12 detector. Calibrations will be done with a dual, co-linear target consisting of liquid hydrogen(LH2) and liquid deuterium (LD2) cells. The hydrogen target is used for calibration, and the deuterium one provides the data for the physics analysis. A CLAS12 simulation has been developed called gemc, where Geant4 is used to simulate the components of CLAS12. We have added the dual LH2 - LD2 target to the gemc simulation. The targets parameters are stored in a mysql database and then read into the simulation at run time. Simulated particles start at a random point in the target volume and are propagated through the CLAS12 detector. We will present initial results showing the effect of target size and position on the distribution of hits in CLAS12.

  18. Diffusion of hydrogen and deuterium in Zr-Al

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1982-10-01

    Optimization of getter performance necessitates a detailed understanding of the getter operation for a variety of experimental parameters, including pressure, temperature, getter mass, and getter thickness. For pumping at low pressures or during slow desorption, the getter operation will be dependent primarily on surface kinetics, which have been described previously. During pumping at higher pressures or during rapid desorption, bulk diffusion may play an important role. In this paper we present the first measurements of the diffusivities of hydrogen (D/sub H/) and deuterium (D/sub D/) in Zr-Al as determined from detailed analysis of desorption.

  19. Experimental results of hydrogen distillation at the low power cryogenic column for the production of deuterium depleted hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Fedorchenko, O.; Kravtsov, P.; Vasilyev, A.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2008-07-15

    The Deuterium Removal Unit (DRU) has been designed and built at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst. (PNPI) to produce isotopically pure hydrogen with deuterium content less than 1 ppm. The cryogenic distillation column of 2.2 cm inner diameter and 155 cm packing height is the main element of the DRU. Column performances at different hydrogen distillation operating modes have been measured. The height equivalent to theoretical plate (HETP) for the column is 2.2 cm and almost constant over a wide range of vapour flow rates. Deuterium depleted hydrogen with a deuterium content of less than 0.1 ppm was produced in required quantity. (authors)

  20. Diffusion of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium in niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Matusiewicz, Gerald Robert

    1981-01-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in niobium was investigated over the temperature range 148 to 500 degrees Kelvin, using measurements of the elastic after effect caused by long range diffusion (the Gorsky Effect). Relaxation curves for pure annealed niobium were generally not of the single exponential form expected from the Gorsky Effect theory, but were described well by a sum of two exponential curves with different amplitudes and relaxation times. The effects of oxygen and nitrogen interstitials on the diffusion were studied and were not in agreement with conventional trapping models. Deuterium and tritium diffusion in niobium were also studied, and a non-classical isotope effect was observed. Hydrogen diffusion coefficients in several Nb-Ta alloys were measured, and the diffusivity in all these alloys exhibited a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. Experimental results were compared to several models for diffusion and trapping. A model is presented which can account for the form of the relaxation curves observed in pure, annealed niobium.

  1. A laser-driven source of polarized hydrogen and deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Holt, R.J.; Gilman, R.A.; Kowalczyk, R.; Coulter, K.

    1989-01-01

    A novel laser-driven polarized source of hydrogen and deuterium which operates on the principle of spin-exchange optical pumping is being developed. This source is designed to operate as an internal target in an electron storage ring for fundamental studies of spin-dependent structure of nuclei. It has the potential to exceed the flux from existing conventional sources (3 /times/ 10/sup 16//s) by an order of magnitude. Currently, the source delivers hydrogen at a flux of 8 /times/ 10/sup 16/ atoms/s with an atomic polarization of 24% and deuterium at 6 /times/ 10/sup 16/ atoms/s with a polarization of 29%. Technical obstacles which have been overcome, with varying degrees of success are complete Doppler-coverage in the optical-pumping stage without the use of a buffer gas, wall-induced depolarization and radiation-trapping. Future improvements should allow achievement of the design goals of 4 /times/ 10/sup 17/ atoms/s with a polarization of 50%. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Measuring Deuterium Enrichment of Glucose Hydrogen Atoms by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    We developed a simple and accurate method for determining deuterium enrichment of glucose hydrogen atoms by electron impact gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). First, we prepared 18 derivatives of glucose and ...

  3. Recombinant Nepenthesin II for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Menglin; Hoeppner, Morgan; Rey, Martial; Kadek, Alan; Man, Petr; Schriemer, David C

    2015-07-01

    The pitcher secretions of the Nepenthes genus of carnivorous plants contain a proteolytic activity that is very useful for hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS). Our efforts to reconstitute pitcher fluid activity using recombinant nepenthesin I (one of two known aspartic proteases in the fluid) revealed a partial cleavage profile and reduced enzymatic stability in certain HX-MS applications. We produced and characterized recombinant nepenthesin II to determine if it complemented nepenthesin I in HX-MS applications. Nepenthesin II shares many properties with nepenthesin I, such as fast digestion at reduced temperature and pH, and broad cleavage specificity, but in addition, it cleaves C-terminal to tryptophan. Neither enzyme reproduces the C-terminal proline cleavage we observed in the natural extract. Nepenthesin II is considerably more resistant to chemical denaturants and reducing agents than nepenthesin I, and it possesses a stability profile that is similar to that of pepsin. Higher stability combined with the slightly broader cleavage specificity makes nepenthesin II a useful alternative to pepsin and a more complete replacement for pitcher fluid in HX-MS applications. PMID:25993527

  4. Breakdown in hydrogen and deuterium gases in static and radio-frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolov, I.; Donkó, Z.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a combined experimental and modeling study of the electrical breakdown of hydrogen and deuterium in static (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz) electric fields. For the simulations of the breakdown events, simplified models are used and only electrons are traced by Monte Carlo simulation. The experimental DC Paschen curve of hydrogen is used for the determination of the effective secondary electron emission coefficient. A very good agreement between the experimental and the calculated RF breakdown characteristics for hydrogen is found. For deuterium, on the other hand, presently available cross section sets do not allow a reproduction of RF breakdown characteristics.

  5. Longitudinal-Transverse Separations of Structure Functions at Low $Q^2$ for Hydrogen and Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    V. Tvaskis; M. E. Christy; J. Arrington; R. Asaturyan; O. K. Baker; H. P. Blok; P. Bosted; M. Boswell; A. Bruell; A. Cochran; L. Cole; J. Crowder; J. Dunne; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; B. W. Filippone; K. Garrow; A. Gasparian; J. Gomez; H.E. Jackson; C. E. Keppel; E. Kinney; Y. Liang; W. Lorenzon; A. Lung; D. J. Mack; J. W. Martin; K. McIlhany; D. Meekins; R. G. Milner; J. H. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchyan; B. Moreland; V. Nazaryan; I. Niculescu; A. Opper; R. B. Piercey; D.H. Potterveld; B. Rose; Y. Sato; W. Seo; G. Smith; K. Spurlock; G. van der Steenhoven; S. Stepanyan; V. Tadevosian; A. Uzzle; W. F. Vulcan; S. A. Wood; B. Zihlmann; V. Ziskin

    2006-11-20

    We report on a study of the longitudinal to transverse cross section ratio, R={sigma}{sub L} {sigma}{sub T}, at low values of x and Q{sup 2}, as determined from inclusive inelastic electron-hydrogen and electron-deuterium scattering data from Jefferson Lab Hall C spanning the four-momentum transfer range 0.06 < Q{sup 2} < 2.8 GeV{sup 2}. Even at the lowest values of Q{sup 2}, R remains nearly constant and does not disappear with decreasing Q{sup 2}, as expected. We find a nearly identical behavior for hydrogen and deuterium.

  6. Measurement of the nuclear polarization of hydrogen and deuterium molecules using a Lamb-shift polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Ralf Gorski, Robert; Grigoryev, Kiril; Mikirtychyants, Maxim; Rathmann, Frank; Seyfarth, Hellmut; Ströher, Hans; Weiss, Philipp; Kochenda, Leonid; Kravtsov, Peter; Trofimov, Viktor; Tschernov, Nikolay; Vasilyev, Alexander; Vznuzdaev, Marat; Schieck, Hans Paetz gen.

    2014-10-15

    Lamb-shift polarimeters are used to measure the nuclear polarization of protons and deuterons at energies of a few keV. In combination with an ionizer, the polarization of hydrogen and deuterium atoms was determined after taking into account the loss of polarization during the ionization process. The present work shows that the nuclear polarization of hydrogen or deuterium molecules can be measured as well, by ionizing the molecules and injecting the H{sub 2}{sup +} (or D{sub 2}{sup +}) ions into the Lamb-shift polarimeter.

  7. Computation of hyperfine energies of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çak?r, Bekir; Özmen, Ayhan; Yakar, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    The hyperfine energies and hyperfine constants of the ground and excited states of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium quantum dots(QDs) are calculated. Quantum genetic algorithm (QGA) and Hartree-Fock-Roothaan (HFR) methods are employed to calculate the unperturbed wave functions and energy eigenvalues. The results show that in the medium and strong confinement regions the hyperfine energy and hyperfine constant are strongly affected by dot radius, impurity charge, electron spin orientation, impurity spin and impurity magnetic moment. Besides, in all dot radii, the hyperfine splitting and hyperfine constant of the confined hydrogen and tritium atoms are approximately equivalent to each other and they are greater than the confined deuterium atom.

  8. Phonon localization by mass disorder in dense hydrogen-deuterium binary alloy.

    PubMed

    Howie, Ross T; Magd?u, Ioan B; Goncharov, Alexander F; Ackland, Graeme J; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2014-10-24

    Using a combination of the Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations on dense hydrogen-deuterium mixtures of various concentrations, we demonstrate that, at 300 K and above 200 GPa, they transform into phase IV, forming a disordered binary alloy with six highly localized intramolecular vibrational (vibrons) and four delocalized low-frequency (<1200??cm(-1)) modes. Hydrogen-deuterium mixtures are unique in showing a purely mass-induced localization effect in the quantum solid: chemical bonding is isotope-independent while the mass varies by a factor of 2. PMID:25379921

  9. Helium-3 Generation from the Interaction of Deuterium Plasma inside a Hydrogenated Lattice: Red Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Leal-Escalante, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Helium-3 has been created in a nuclear fusion reaction by fusing deuterium ions from deuterium plasma with hydrogen ions in a “RED” (the Spanish word for net) or crystal lattice, a method we called red fusion ("Fusion en la red cristalina"), because is a new method to make nuclear fusion reaction. In this paper, it will be show the experimental results where the helium-3 has been generated for the first time in this kind of new method to confine deuterium and hydrogen inside the RED or lattice of the hydrogenated crystal and that confinement inside the RED facilitated overcoming the Coulomb barrier between them and helium-3 and phonons are produced in this fusion reaction. The results of a long time research in which helium-3, has been created in a fusion reaction inside the lattice or RED of the crystal that contained hydrogen after adequate interaction of deuterium plasma at appropriate high temperature and magnetic confinement of the Mirror/Cusp Plasma Machine at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, designed by the authors. Several mass spectra and visible light spectrum where the presence of helium-3 was detected are shown. The experiment was repeated more than 200 times showing always the generation of helium-3. In this experiment no gamma rays were detected. For this experiment several diagnostic instruments were used. The data collection with these control instrumentation are shown. Thus, it is an important new way to generate Helium-3. reserved.

  10. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  11. Hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Research cited from the international literature adresses various aspects of hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Topics covered include flows, laser outputs, molecular relaxation, molecular rotation, energy conversion efficiency, reaction kinetics, and laser materials. Continous wave and pulsed laser are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 53 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  12. Definitive proof of graphene hydrogenation by Clemmensen reduction: use of deuterium labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofer, Zden?k; Jankovský, Ond?ej; Libánská, Alena; Šimek, Petr; Nová?ek, Michal; Sedmidubský, David; Macková, Anna; Mikšová, Romana; Pumera, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Graphane is one of the most intensively studied derivatives of graphene. Here we demonstrate the evaluation of exact degree of graphene hydrogenation using the Clemmensen reduction reaction and deuterium labeling. The Clemmensen reduction reaction is based on application of zinc in an acid environment. It effectively reduces various functional groups (like ketones) present in graphite oxide. However, the mechanism of reduction is still unknown and elusive. Here we bring a major insight into the mechanisms of the Clemmensen reduction via deuterium labeling and the topochemical approach applied on graphite oxide. The use of deuterated reactants and the exact measurement of deuterium concentration in reduced/hydrogenated graphene by nuclear methods can be used for accurate estimation of C-H bond abundance in graphene. Various topochemical configurations of experiments showed that the reduction of a ketonic group proceeds in contact with the zinc metal by a carbenoid mechanism. Our results showed that the application of nuclear methods of isotope analysis in combination with deuterium labeling represents a very effective tool for investigation of graphene based materials. Our results demonstrate that graphene based materials can also be effectively used for the investigation of organic reaction mechanisms, because the robust structure of graphene allows the use of various spectroscopic techniques which could not be applied on small organic molecules.Graphane is one of the most intensively studied derivatives of graphene. Here we demonstrate the evaluation of exact degree of graphene hydrogenation using the Clemmensen reduction reaction and deuterium labeling. The Clemmensen reduction reaction is based on application of zinc in an acid environment. It effectively reduces various functional groups (like ketones) present in graphite oxide. However, the mechanism of reduction is still unknown and elusive. Here we bring a major insight into the mechanisms of the Clemmensen reduction via deuterium labeling and the topochemical approach applied on graphite oxide. The use of deuterated reactants and the exact measurement of deuterium concentration in reduced/hydrogenated graphene by nuclear methods can be used for accurate estimation of C-H bond abundance in graphene. Various topochemical configurations of experiments showed that the reduction of a ketonic group proceeds in contact with the zinc metal by a carbenoid mechanism. Our results showed that the application of nuclear methods of isotope analysis in combination with deuterium labeling represents a very effective tool for investigation of graphene based materials. Our results demonstrate that graphene based materials can also be effectively used for the investigation of organic reaction mechanisms, because the robust structure of graphene allows the use of various spectroscopic techniques which could not be applied on small organic molecules. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01356a

  13. Spontaneous versus induced hydrogen and deuterium helical shaped plasmas with electron internal transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbin, M.; Franz, P.; Auriemma, F.; Lorenzini, R.; Marrelli, L.

    2015-09-01

    Electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) in high current plasmas with helical equilibria of the reversed field pinch experiment RFX-mod are analyzed and characterized in detail thanks to a high time resolution double filter diagnostic for the electron temperature spatial profile determination. The large amount of data provided by this diagnostic has required the development of dedicated algorithms and the identification of suitable parameters, reported and described in this paper, in order to perform automatic statistical studies. These numerical tools have been used to examine the effect of three dimensional (3D) magnetic fields applied by the RFX-mod 192 active coils in deuterium and hydrogen discharges with the aim to improve the sustainment and control of helical equilibria with eITBs. It is shown that 3D fields partially increase the occurring of helical states but with only a moderate effect on the eITBs duration; moreover, they have a different impact on the confinement properties in hydrogen and deuterium discharges. Numerical simulations, by the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT, investigate the effect of magnetic topology in plasmas with and without the application of 3D fields on deuterium and hydrogen test ions transport. Results from numerical studies are in agreement with estimates of the particle confinement times showing that particle transport is reduced in deuterium plasmas but not significantly affected by the application of helical boundary conditions.

  14. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (?-Gal-(1?3)-?-GalNAc-(1?4)[?-Neu5Ac-(2?3)]-?-Gal-(1?4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (?-Gal-(1?4)-?-Gal-(1?4)-Glc) and CD-grease (?-Gal-(1?3)-?-Gal-(1?4)-?-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics. Graphical Abstract ?. PMID:26423923

  15. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2015-09-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (?-Gal-(1?3)-?-GalNAc-(1?4)[?-Neu5Ac-(2?3)]-?-Gal-(1?4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (?-Gal-(1?4)-?-Gal-(1?4)-Glc) and CD-grease (?-Gal-(1?3)-?-Gal-(1?4)-?-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  16. Hydrogen and deuterium NMR of solids by magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Eckman, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large specral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, ..beta../sub m/ = Arccos (3/sup -1/2/), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of ..beta... A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H/sub D/ was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal motion. In the general case of large H/sub D/, isotropic spectra were obtained by dilution of /sup 1/H with /sup 2/H combined with magic angle rotation. The resolution obtained represents the practical limit for proton NMR of solids.

  17. Ionization of molecular hydrogen and deuterium by a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser pulses

    E-print Network

    Yulian V. Vanne; Alejandro Saenz

    2009-09-18

    A theoretical study of the intense-field single ionization of molecular hydrogen or deuterium oriented either parallel or perpendicular to a linear polarized laser pulse (400 nm) is performed for different internuclear separations and pulse lengths in an intensity range of $(2-13)\\times10^{13} $W cm$^{-2}$. The investigation is based on a non-perturbative treatment that solves the full time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation of both correlated electrons within the fixed-nuclei and the dipole approximation. The results for various internuclear separations are used to obtain the ionization yields of molecular hydrogen and deuterium in their ground vibrational states. An atomic model is used to identify the influence of the intrinsic diatomic two-center character of the problem.

  18. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange on plasma-exposed W and SS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Ikuji; Nomura, Shinji; Minamimoto, Toshihiro; Akiyoshi, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Taishi; Sasaki, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    The desorption cross section for hydrogen isotopes adsorbed on stainless steel (SS) and tungsten (W) has been evaluated experimentally to provide basic information on tritium exchange. One side of a sample sheet was alternately exposed to H and D plasma, and deuterium density on the surface was repeatedly observed using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) under continuous plasma exposure. From the time dependent change in the deuterium density, the desorption cross sections for SS and W were estimated to be 6.9 ± 2.3 × 10-23 m2 and 4.6 ± 1.0 × 10-23 m2, respectively. No significant differences in the cross section between H and D plasma were observed. Recombinative desorption was found to dominate the desorption process owing to the low incident energy of hydrogen atoms.

  19. Effects of atomic hydrogen and deuterium exposure on high polarization GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    M. Baylac; P. Adderley; J. Brittian; J. Clark; T. Day; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker; M. Stutzman; A. T. Wu; A. S. Terekhov

    2005-12-01

    Strained-layer GaAs and strained-superlattice GaAs photocathodes are used at Jefferson Laboratory to create high average current beams of highly spin-polarized electrons. High electron yield, or quantum efficiency (QE), is obtained only when the photocathode surface is atomically clean. For years, exposure to atomic hydrogen or deuterium has been the photocathode cleaning technique employed at Jefferson Laboratory. This work demonstrates that atomic hydrogen cleaning is not necessary when precautions are taken to ensure that clean photocathode material from the vendor is not inadvertently dirtied while samples are prepared for installation inside photoemission guns. Moreover, this work demonstrates that QE and beam polarization can be significantly reduced when clean high-polarization photocathode material is exposed to atomic hydrogen from an rf dissociator-style atomic hydrogen source. Surface analysis provides some insight into the mechanisms that degrade QE and polarization due to atomic hydrogen cleaning.

  20. Experimental and modeling study of hydrogenation using deuterium step transient response during ethylene hydroformylation

    SciTech Connect

    Brundage, M.A.; Chuang, S.S.C.

    1996-11-01

    Deuterium isotopic step tracing combined with in situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy was utilized to study and model the hydrogenation steps in ethylene hydroformylation on 4 wt% Rh/SiO{sub 2} at 483-573 K and 0.1 MPa. The difference in residence times between H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}, as well as propionaldehyde and deuterated propionaldehyde to the step switch from H{sub 2} to D{sub 2} and D{sub 2} to H{sub 2} during ethylene hydroformylation reflects the presence of an isotope effect for H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} chemisorption and propionaldehyde formation. Compartment modeling of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} responses and qualitative comparison of propionaldehyde and deuterated propionaldehyde responses unravel the presence of a normal equilibrium isotope effect for H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} chemisorption and a normal kinetic isotope effect for hydrogenation/deuteration of adsorbed acyl species. In situ IR coupled with deuterium transient responses shows that the reverse spillover of deuterium from Si-OD participates in the deuteration of adsorbed acyl species, suggesting that the site for deuteration of the adsorbed species, suggesting that the site for deuteration of the adsorbed acyl species is located near the Rh and SiO{sub 2} interface. Significant difference in the deuterated ethane and propionaldehyde responses suggests the different nature of either adsorbed hydrogen/deuterium or the active site for hydrogenation/deuteration of adsorbed ethyl and acyl species. 31 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Scott; Bridgewater, Jon S; Ward, John W; Allen, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH{sub 2}). The heats of solution for PuH{sub s} and PuD{sub s} are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

  2. Kinetic Method for Hydrogen-Deuterium-Tritium Mixture Distillation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, A.B.; Kagramanov, Z.G.; Magomedbekov, E.P.

    2005-07-15

    Simulation of hydrogen distillation plants requires mathematical procedures suitable for multicomponent systems. In most of the present-day simulation methods a distillation column is assumed to be composed of theoretical stages, or plates. However, in the case of a multicomponent mixture theoretical plate does not exist.An alternative kinetic method of simulation is depicted in the work. According to this method a system of mass-transfer differential equations is solved numerically. Mass-transfer coefficients are estimated with using experimental results and empirical equations.Developed method allows calculating the steady state of a distillation column as well as its any non-steady state when initial conditions are given. The results for steady states are compared with ones obtained via Thiele-Geddes theoretical stage technique and the necessity of using kinetic method is demonstrated. Examples of a column startup period and periodic distillation simulations are shown as well.

  3. Kinetics of hydrogen/deuterium exchanges in cometary ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Mathilde; Quirico, Eric; Faure, Alexandre; Schmitt, Bernard; Theulé, Patrice; Marboeuf, Ulysse

    2015-11-01

    The D/H composition of volatile molecules composing cometary ices brings key constraints on the origin of comets, on the extent of their presolar heritage, as well as on the origin of atmospheres and hydrospheres of terrestrial planets. Nevertheless, the D/H composition may have been modified to various extents in the nucleus when a comet approaches the Sun and experiences deep physical and chemical modifications in its subsurface. We question here the evolution of the D/H ratio of organic species by proton exchanges with water ice. We experimentally studied the kinetics of D/H exchanges on the ice mixtures H2O:CD3OD, H2O:CD3ND2 and D2O:HCN. Our results show that fast exchanges occur on the -OH and -NH2 chemical groups, which are processed through hydrogen bonds exchanges with water and by the molecular mobility triggered by structural changes, such as glass transition or crystallization. D/H exchanges kinetic is best described by a second-order kinetic law with activation energies of 4300 ± 900 K and 3300 ± 100 K for H2O:CD3OD and H2O:CD3ND2 ice mixtures, respectively. The corresponding pre-exponential factors ln(A(s-1)) are 25 ± 7 and 20 ± 1, respectively. No exchange was observed in the case of HCN trapped in D2O ice. These results strongly suggest that upon thermal heating (1) -OH and -NH2 chemical groups of any organic molecules loose their primordial D/H composition and equilibrate with water ice, (2) HCN does not experience proton transfer and keeps a primordial D/H composition and (3) C-H chemical groups are not isotopically modified.

  4. Raman measurements of phase transitions in dense solid hydrogen and deuterium to 325 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Chang-sheng; Cohen, R. E.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy of dense hydrogen and deuterium performed to 325 GPa at 300 K reveals previously unidentified transitions. Detailed analysis of the spectra from multiple experimental runs, together with comparison with previous infrared and Raman measurements, provides information on structural modifications of hydrogen as a function of density through the I–III–IV transition sequence, beginning near 200 GPa at 300 K. The data suggest that the transition sequence at these temperatures proceeds by formation of disordered stacking of molecular and distorted layers. Weaker spectral changes are observed at 250, 285, and 300 GPa, that are characterized by discontinuities in pressure shifts of Raman frequencies, and changes in intensities and linewidths. The results indicate changes in structure and bonding, molecular orientational order, and electronic structure of dense hydrogen at these conditions. The data suggest the existence of new phases, either variations of phase IV, or altogether new structures. PMID:24639543

  5. Path integral Monte Carlo calculations of helium and hydrogen-helium plasma thermodynamics and of the deuterium shock Hugoniot

    E-print Network

    Levashov, P R; Filinov, V S; Fortov, V E

    2006-01-01

    In this work we calculate the thermodynamic properties of hydrogen-helium plasmas with different mass fractions of helium by the direct path integral Monte Carlo method. To avoid unphysical approximations we use the path integral representation of the density matrix. We pay special attention to the region of weak coupling and degeneracy and compare the results of simulation with a model based on the chemical picture. Further with the help of calculated deuterium isochors we compute the shock Hugoniot of deuterium. We analyze our results in comparison with recent experimental and calculated data on the deuterium Hugoniot.

  6. Quantum interference effects in laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen, deuterium, and helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Pedro; Franke, Beatrice; Krauth, Julian J.; Diepold, Marc; Fratini, Filippo; Safari, Laleh; Machado, Jorge; Antognini, Aldo; Kottmann, Franz; Indelicato, Paul; Pohl, Randolf; Santos, José Paulo

    2015-08-01

    Quantum interference between energetically close states is theoretically investigated, with the state structure being observed via laser spectroscopy. In this work, we focus on hyperfine states of selected hydrogenic muonic isotopes, and on how quantum interference affects the measured Lamb shift. The process of photon excitation and subsequent photon decay is implemented within the framework of nonrelativistic second-order perturbation theory. Due to its experimental interest, calculations are performed for muonic hydrogen, deuterium, and helium-3. We restrict our analysis to the case of photon scattering by incident linear polarized photons and the polarization of the scattered photons not being observed. We conclude that while quantum interference effects can be safely neglected in muonic hydrogen and helium-3, in the case of muonic deuterium there are resonances with close proximity, where quantum interference effects can induce shifts up to a few percent of the linewidth, assuming a pointlike detector. However, by taking into account the geometry of the setup used by the CREMA collaboration, this effect is reduced to less than 0.2% of the linewidth in all possible cases, which makes it irrelevant at the present level of accuracy.

  7. Structural Analysis of Diheme Cytochrome c by Hydrogen–Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry and Homology Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A lack of X-ray or nuclear magnetic resonance structures of proteins inhibits their further study and characterization, motivating the development of new ways of analyzing structural information without crystal structures. The combination of hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) data in conjunction with homology modeling can provide improved structure and mechanistic predictions. Here a unique diheme cytochrome c (DHCC) protein from Heliobacterium modesticaldum is studied with both HDX and homology modeling to bring some definition of the structure of the protein and its role. Specifically, HDX data were used to guide the homology modeling to yield a more functionally relevant structural model of DHCC. PMID:25138816

  8. The Lamb Shift of Excited S-Levels in Hydrogen and Deuterium Atoms

    E-print Network

    Savely G. Karshenboim

    1996-08-28

    A specific combination of $s$-state Lamb shift $\\Delta E_L(1s_{1/2}) - n^3 \\Delta E_L(ns_{1/2})$ is considered. Its value is calculated both in the hydrogen and deuterium atoms for $n$ up to 12. The result inludes all correction which can contribute $1 kHz$ and particulary: one-loop self energy and vacuum polarization, two-loop contribution. Nuclear finite-size corrections for the isotopic difference of the combination are also evaluated.

  9. Origin of Terrestrial Water: Hydrogen/Deuterium Fractionation into Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen isotopic compositions are among the most important constraints on the origin of Earth's water. Earth's bulk water content, which is small but not negligible, is significantly greater than what the thermal gradient of the solar nebula disk would suggest for planetesimal materials condensed at one astronomical unit. The proto-solar nebula is a likely source of early Earth's water, with probable contributions from one or more of the following: water-rich planetesimals, ordinary and carbonaceous meteorites, comets, asteroids, and interplanetary dust particles. However, all of these sources have been questioned, and the proposed proto-solar nebular origin has been disputed in light of the large difference in hydrogen isotopic composition between it and terrestrial water. Current opposition to the solar nebular hypothesis is based on the critical assumption that no processes in the interior of the early Earth changed the isotopic composition of hydrogen. Nevertheless, a hypothesized hydrogenation reaction of liquid iron (2Fe + xH2 ? 2FeHx) during core formation likely provided a fractionation mechanism between hydrogen and deuterium (D). We propose that modern D/H ratios at Earth's surface resulted from this isotopic fractionation and that terrestrial water originated from oxidation of proto-solar hydrogen dissolved in the magma ocean in the early Earth by coexisting oxides (such as FeO). Thus, the isotopic composition of water on Earth can be mainly explained by internal terrestrial processes.

  10. Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

    2008-08-11

    This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the spillover process (i.e. kinetics of hydrogen dissociation, diffusion and recombination) and allow for optimization of these materials to meet the DOE targets for hydrogen storage. In a parallel effort, we are also designing CA materials as nanoporous scaffolds for metal hydride systems. Recent work by others has demonstrated that nanostructured metal hydrides show enhanced kinetics for reversible hydrogen storage relative to the bulk materials. This effect is diminished, however, after several hydriding/dehydriding cycles, as the material structure coarsens. Incorporation of the metal hydride into a porous scaffolding material can potentially limit coarsening and, therefore, preserve the enhanced kinetics and improved cycling behavior of the nanostructured metal hydride. Success implementation of this approach, however, requires the design of nanoporous solids with large accessible pore volumes (> 4 cm{sup 3}/g) to minimize the gravimetric and volumetric capacity penalties associated with the use of the scaffold. In addition, these scaffold materials should be capable of managing thermal changes associated with the cycling of the incorporated metal hydride. CAs are promising candidates for the design of such porous scaffolds due to the large pore volumes and tunable porosity of aerogel framework. This research is a joint effort with HRL Laboratories, a member of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. LLNL's efforts have focused on the design of new CA materials that can meet the scaffolding requirements, while metal hydride incorporation into the scaffold and evaluation of the kinetics and cycling performance of these composites is performed at HRL.

  11. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System. PMID:26461170

  12. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System. PMID:26461170

  13. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System.

  14. Pulsed hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes conformational changes in amyloid beta (A?) peptide aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Rempel, Don L.; Zhang, Jun; Sharma, Anuj K.; Mirica, Liviu M.; Gross, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Probing the conformational changes of amyloid beta (A?) peptide aggregation is challenging owing to the vast heterogeneity of the resulting soluble aggregates. To investigate the formation of these aggregates in solution, we designed an MS-based biophysical approach and applied it to the formation of soluble aggregates of the A?42 peptide, the proposed causative agent in Alzheimer’s disease. The approach incorporates pulsed hydrogen–deuterium exchange coupled with MS analysis. The combined approach provides evidence for a self-catalyzed aggregation with a lag phase, as observed previously by fluorescence methods. Unlike those approaches, pulsed hydrogen–deuterium exchange does not require modified A?42 (e.g., labeling with a fluorophore). Furthermore, the approach reveals that the center region of A?42 is first to aggregate, followed by the C and N termini. We also found that the lag phase in the aggregation of soluble species is affected by temperature and Cu2+ ions. This MS approach has sufficient structural resolution to allow interrogation of A? aggregation in physiologically relevant environments. This platform should be generally useful for investigating the aggregation of other amyloid-forming proteins and neurotoxic soluble peptide aggregates. PMID:23959898

  15. Isotopic effect study in the LHCD and LHH experiments in hydrogen/deuterium plasmas of the FT-2 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkul, S. I.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Dyachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Irzak, M. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Saveliev, A. N.; Shatalin, S. V.; Stepanov, A. Yu.

    2014-02-12

    Results of comparative experimental studies of the efficiency of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and lower hybrid heating (LHH) in the FT-2 tokamak in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas are presented. In the new comparative experimental runs in deuterium/hydrogen plasmas suppression of the LHCD and beginning of the interaction of LH waves with ions is controlled by the plasma density rise. Role of parametric instabilities in CD switch-off is considered. In order to analyze the experimentally observed effect of LHCD the GRILL3D and FRTC codes has been used.

  16. Comparative study of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film and hard hydrogenated graphitelike carbon film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengbing; Yang, Shengrong; Wang, Qi; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Junyan

    2008-06-01

    The structure, mechanical properties, and friction properties of hydrogenated graphitelike carbon film and typical hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film were investigated comparatively that the hydrogenated graphitelike carbon film has relatively high sp2 content and low bonded hydrogen content and possessed high hardness and elasticity. It was attributed to the curved graphene microstructure, which is able to form three-dimensional covalently bonded network. Furthermore, in comparison with the hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film, the hydrogenated graphitelike carbon film demonstrated excellent friction behavior probably due to the extraordinary structure of hydrogenated graphitelike carbon film.

  17. Carbon-14 and deuterium isotope effects in the borderline solvolysis of isopropyl. beta. -naphthalenesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, T.; Yamataka, H.; Tamura, S.; Hanafusa, T.

    1982-10-06

    The present investigation verifies that ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-carbon-14 kinetic isotope effects are sensitive to mechanistic changes in the borderline solvolysis. Model calculations of kinetic isotope effects using the observed data for all the carbons and deuteriums enables one to describe the variable transition-state structures of the solvolysis of simple secondary substrates, which is still a subject of much debate in recent years. A study along this line is now in progress.

  18. In situ study of erosion and deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films by exposure to a hydrogen atom beam

    SciTech Connect

    Markelj, Sabina; Pelicon, Primoz; Cadez, Iztok; Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Jacob, Wolfgang

    2012-07-15

    This paper reports on the first dual-beam experiment employing a hydrogen atom beam for sample exposure and an ion beam for analysis, enabling in situ and real-time studies of hydrogen atom interaction with materials. The erosion of an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) layer by deuterium atoms at 580 K sample temperature was studied and the uptake of deuterium during the erosion process was measured in real time. The deuterium areal density increased at the beginning to 7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} D cm{sup -2}, but then stabilized at a constant value of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} D cm{sup -2}. Formation of a polymer-like deposit on an a-C:H layer held at room temperature and subjected to the deuterium atom beam was observed and also studied in situ. For both erosion and deposition studies an a-{sup 13}C:H layer on top of an Si substrate was used as a sample, making the experiments isotopically fully specified and thereby differentiating the deposited from the original layer and the interacting D atoms from H atoms present in the layer and in the residual vacuum. From the deposition study it was shown that carbon in the deposited layer originates from carbon-carrying species in the background vacuum that interact with hydrogen atoms. The areal density of the carbon at the surface was determined from the energy shift of the Si edge in the Rutherford backscattering spectrum. The cross section for {sup 7}Li on D at 4.3 MeV Li ion energy and at a recoil angle of 30 Degree-Sign was also determined to be (236 {+-} 16) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -27} cm{sup 2}/sr. This is a factor of 3 {+-} 0.2 times higher than the Rutherford elastic cross section.

  19. Extragalactic Abundances of Hydrogen, Deuterium and Helium New Steps, Missteps and Next Steps

    E-print Network

    Hogan, C J

    1997-01-01

    Estimates of the deuterium abundance in quasar absorbers are reviewed, including a brief account of incorrect claims published by the author and a brief review of the problem of hydrogen contamination. It is concluded that the primordial abundance may be universal with a value $(D/H)_P\\approx 10^{-4}$, within about a factor of two, corresponding to $\\Omega_B h_{0.7}^2\\approx 0.02$ or $\\eta_{10}\\approx 2.7$ in the Standard Big Bang. This agrees with current limits on primordial helium, $Y_P\\le 0.243$, which are shown to be surprisingly insensitive to models of stellar enrichment. It also agrees with a tabulated sum of the total density of baryons in observed components. Much lower primordial deuterium ($\\approx 2\\times 10^{-5}$) is also possible but disagrees with currently estimated helium abundances; the larger baryon density in this case fits better with current models of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest but requires the bulk of the baryons to be in some currently uncounted form.

  20. Extragalactic Abundances of Hydrogen, Deuterium and Helium: New Steps, Missteps and Next Steps

    E-print Network

    Craig J. Hogan

    1997-12-02

    Estimates of the deuterium abundance in quasar absorbers are reviewed, including a brief account of incorrect claims published by the author and a brief review of the problem of hydrogen contamination. It is concluded that the primordial abundance may be universal with a value $(D/H)_P\\approx 10^{-4}$, within about a factor of two, corresponding to $\\Omega_B h_{0.7}^2\\approx 0.02$ or $\\eta_{10}\\approx 2.7$ in the Standard Big Bang. This agrees with current limits on primordial helium, $Y_P\\le 0.243$, which are shown to be surprisingly insensitive to models of stellar enrichment. It also agrees with a tabulated sum of the total density of baryons in observed components. Much lower primordial deuterium ($\\approx 2\\times 10^{-5}$) is also possible but disagrees with currently estimated helium abundances; the larger baryon density in this case fits better with current models of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest but requires the bulk of the baryons to be in some currently uncounted form.

  1. HDXFinder: Automated Analysis and Data Reporting of Deuterium/Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Danny E.; Prasannan, Charulata B.; Villar, Maria T.; Fenton, Aron W.; Artigues, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange in combination with mass spectrometry (H/D MS) is a sensitive technique for detection of changes in protein conformation and dynamics. However, wide application of H/D MS has been hindered, in part, by the lack of computational tools necessary for efficient analysis of the large data sets associated with this technique. We report a novel web-based application for automatic analysis of H/D MS experimental data. This application relies on the high resolution of mass spectrometers to extract all isotopic envelopes before correlating these envelopes with individual peptides. Although a fully automatic analysis is possible, a variety of graphical tools are included to aid in the verification of correlations and rankings of the isotopic peptide envelopes. As a demonstration, the rate constants for H/D exchange of peptides from rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase are mapped onto the structure of this protein.

  2. Determination of hydrogen/deuterium ratio with neutron measurements on MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Klimek, I. Cecconello, M.; Ericsson, G.; Sharapov, S. E.; Harrison, J.

    2014-11-15

    On MAST, compressional Alfvén eigenmodes can be destabilized by the presence of a sufficiently large population of energetic particles in the plasma. This dependence was studied in a series of very similar discharges in which increasing amounts of hydrogen were puffed into a deuterium plasma. A simple method to estimate the isotopic ratio n{sub H}/n{sub D} using neutron emission measurements is here described. The inferred isotopic ratio ranged from 0.0 to 0.6 and no experimental indication of changes in radial profile of n{sub H}/n{sub D} were observed. These findings are confirmed by TRANSP/NUBEAM simulations of the neutron emission.

  3. Aspartic protease nepenthesin-1 as a tool for digestion in hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kadek, Alan; Mrazek, Hynek; Halada, Petr; Rey, Martial; Schriemer, David C; Man, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HXMS) utilizes enzymatic digestion of proteins to localize the information about altered exchange patterns in protein structure. The ability of the protease to produce small peptides and overlapping fragments and provide sufficient coverage of the protein sequence is essential for localizing regions of interest. Recently, it was shown that there is an interesting group of proteolytic enzymes from carnivorous pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes. In this report, we describe successful immobilization and the use of one of these enzymes, nepenthesin-1, in HXMS workflow. In contrast to pepsin, it has different cleavage specificities, and despite its high inherent susceptibility to reducing and denaturing agents, it is very stable upon immobilization and withstands even high concentration of guanidine hydrochloride and reducing agents. We show that denaturing agents can alter digestion by reducing protease activity and/or substrate solubility, and additionally, they influence the trapping of proteolytic peptides onto the reversed phase resin. PMID:24661217

  4. Method and source for producing a high concentration of positively charged molecular hydrogen or deuterium ions

    DOEpatents

    Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA); Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A high concentration of positive molecular ions of hydrogen or deuterium gas is extracted from a positive ion source having a short path length of extracted ions, relative to the mean free path of the gas molecules, to minimize the production of other ion species by collision between the positive ions and gas molecules. The ion source has arrays of permanent magnets to produce a multi-cusp magnetic field in regions remote from the plasma grid and the electron emitters, for largely confining the plasma to the space therebetween. The ion source has a chamber which is short in length, relative to its transverse dimensions, and the electron emitters are at an even shorter distance from the plasma grid, which contains one or more extraction apertures.

  5. Localized Hydration in Lyophilized Myoglobin by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry. 1. Exchange Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Zhang, Jun; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    The local effects of hydration on myoglobin (Mb) in solid matrices containing mannitol or sucrose (1:1 w/w, protein:additive) were mapped using hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (HDX-MS) at 5°C and compared to solution controls. Solid powders were exposed to D2O(g) at controlled activity (aw) followed by reconstitution and analysis of the intact protein and peptides produced by pepsin digestion. HDX varied with matrix type, aw, and position along the protein backbone. HDX was less in sucrose matrices than in mannitol matrices at all aw while the difference in solution was negligible. Differences in HDX in the two matrices were detectable despite similarities in their bulk water content. The extent of exchange in solids is proposed as a measure of the hydration of exchangeable amide groups, as well as protein conformation and dynamics; pepsin digestion allows these effects to be mapped with peptide-level resolution. PMID:22352965

  6. Volume production of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions in a reflex-type ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimbo, K.; Ehlers, K. W.; Leung, K. N.; Pyle, R. V.

    1986-08-01

    The extraction of negative and positive hydrogen and deuterium ions from a reflex-type negative ion source has been investigated. Extracted positive and negative ion currents were measured as functions of the gas flow rate, the axial magnetic field, and the bias potential of the cylindrical wall of the arc-chamber. By biasing the cylindrical wall several volts negative relative to the anode, a maximum H - current of 9.7 mA ( J - ? 100 mA/cm2) and D - current of 4.1 mA ( J - ? 42 mA/cm2) were obtained in steady state operation. This result shows a factor of two improvement over previous data. The total impurity negative ion content was less than 1%. When the source was arranged for positive ion extraction, a high proton ratio (90%) was observed. The extracted negative ion current was approximately as large as the positive ion current.

  7. Dissociative adsorption of molecular deuterium and thermal stability onto hydrogenated, bare and ion beam damaged poly- and single crystalline diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelson, Sh.; Chandran, M.; Zalkind, S.; Shamir, N.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report on dissociative adsorption of deuterium (D2) on bare, hydrogenated and ion beam bombarded polycrystalline and single crystalline diamond surfaces. Polycrystalline diamond films with an average grain size of ~ 300 nm were deposited on silicon substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique from methane/hydrogen gas mixture. Deposited films were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to estimate the phase composition and microstructure. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and direct recoil spectrometry were used to study hydrogen (deuterium) bonding configuration of the upper surface region. Near surface amorphization was achieved by 1 keV Ar+ implantation at ~ 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 at room temperature (RT). As deposited and Ar+ bombarded films are annealed to 500-1000 °C in ultra-high vacuum conditions and also under D2 partial pressure of 5 × 10- 6 Torr. For comparison, key experiments were repeated on the single crystal (100) diamond. Our results clearly show the preferential dissociative adsorption of D2 on low hybridized carbon (sp/sp2) states with activation temperature as low as RT, but with a lower thermal stability compared to pure diamond Csbnd D bonds.

  8. Hydrogen on Cobalt: The Effects of Carbon Monoxide and Sulphur Additives on the D2/Co(0001) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermehl-Cwirzen, K. M. E.; Kauraala, K.; Lahtinen, J.

    Hydrogen reaction on catalytic surfaces is an important field of research in fuel cell science. The adsorption of hydrogen (deuterium) on Co(0001) and the influence of carbon monoxide and sulphur on the adsorption were studied by XPS, TDS, WF measurements and LEED. The WF increased due to D2 adsorption, revealing the electronegative character of deuterium. It was found that the deuterium saturation coverage is âe 1/4 0.17 ML at 320 K and âe 1/4 0.27 ML at 180 K. The activation energy for desorption was estimated to be 33 kJ/mol. The coadsorption measurements with CO indicated a decrease in the deuterium yield by 50%. A downward shift of 50 K in the deuterium desorption temperature was observed as a consequence of coadsorbed CO, but changes in the CO desorption were minimal. At small CO exposures the (2 A~— 2) LEED structure of deuterium was seen, while at exposures of above 5 L the (2 âeš 3 A~— 2 âeš 3)R30… structure was detected by LEED as with pure CO adsorption. Coadsorption with sulphur led also to a decrease in the D2 yield leading to a complete inhibition of hydrogen adsorption at sulphur saturation. The sulphur (2 A~— 2) LEED structure did not underwent changes due to deuterium adsorption. As assumed, sulphur worked as a strong poison to the adsorption on Co(0001).

  9. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  10. Measurements and monitoring of the hydrogen and deuterium contents in the plasma of the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, G. S.; Berezhetskii, M. S.

    2012-04-15

    The program of experiments on ITER includes a sequential change of the plasma isotopic composition from pure hydrogen plasma in the initial stage of research to deuterium and, then, deuterium-tritium plasma with a gradual increase in the tritium content. In this context, the influence of the plasma isotopic composition on the processes of plasma heating and confinement are being actively studied on the existing tokamaks and stellarators. The plasma isotopic composition also depends on the composition of the gas desorbed from the vacuum chamber wall in the course of recycling. Therefore, the rate of change of the plasma isotopic composition after altering the injected gas also depends on the rate of change of the isotopic composition of the gas absorbed in the wall. These effects were studied in the experiments carried out on the L-2M stellarator in which the working gas was changed from hydrogen to deuterium. Spectral measurements of the intensity ratio between the H{sub {alpha}} and D{sub {alpha}} lines made it possible to monitor the isotopic composition of the plasma in the course of cleaning of the chamber wall from earlier absorbed hydrogen and its replacement with deuterium. After returning to hydrogen, the rate of cleaning of the wall from deuterium was also determined. The results of these experiments show that the plasma isotopic composition varies exponentially with the number N of shots after transition to another isotope, {approx}exp(-N/47). Hence, the isotopic composition can be changed almost completely over 2 to 3 working days. This allows one to study the influence of the plasma isotopic composition on plasma confinement during the same experimental session.

  11. Structural analysis of the interleukin-8/glycosaminoglycan interactions by amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Tommy; Samsonov, Sergey A; Pichert, Annelie; Lemmnitzer, Katharina; Schiller, Jürgen; Huster, Daniel; Pisabarro, M Teresa; von Bergen, Martin; Kalkhof, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    The recruitment of different chemokines and growth factors by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as chondroitin sulfate or hyaluronan plays a critical role in wound healing processes. Thus, there is a special interest in the design of artificial extracellular matrices with improved properties concerning GAG interaction with common regulating proteins. In this study, amide hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) combined with molecular modeling and docking experiments was used to obtain structural models of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) in complex with hexameric chondroitin sulfate. Experiments on the intact protein showed a difference in deuterium labeling of IL-8 due to chondroitin sulfate binding. The extent of deuteration was reduced from 24% to 13% after 2min exchange time, which corresponds to a reduced exchange of approximately 10 backbone amides. By local HDX MS experiments, H/D exchange information on the complete sequence of IL-8 could be obtained. A significantly reduced H/D exchange, especially of the C-terminal ?-helical region comprising amino acids 70-77 and to the loop comprising amino acids 27-29 was observed in the presence of chondroitin sulfate. HDX MS data were used to model the IL-8/chondroitin sulfate complex. The binding interface of IL-8 and chondroitin sulfate determined this way correlated excellently with the corresponding NMR based atomistic model previously published. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS in combination with molecular modeling is a valuable approach for the analysis of protein/GAG complexes at physiological pH, temperature, and salt concentration. The fact that HDX-MS requires only micrograms of protein and GAGs makes it a very promising technique to address protein-GAG interactions. PMID:25726910

  12. Nepenthesin from Monkey Cups for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Burns, Kyle M.; Yu, Yaping; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Schriemer, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of protein dynamics, structure and interactions using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) have sharply increased over the past 5–10 years. The predominant technology requires fast digestion at pH 2–3 to retain deuterium label. Pepsin is used almost exclusively, but it provides relatively low efficiency under the constraints of the experiment, and a selectivity profile that renders poor coverage of intrinsically disordered regions. In this study we present nepenthesin-containing secretions of the pitcher plant Nepenthes, commonly called monkey cups, for use in HDX-MS. We show that nepenthesin is at least 1400-fold more efficient than pepsin under HDX-competent conditions, with a selectivity profile that mimics pepsin in part, but also includes efficient cleavage C-terminal to “forbidden” residues K, R, H, and P. High efficiency permits a solution-based analysis with no detectable autolysis, avoiding the complication of immobilized enzyme reactors. Relaxed selectivity promotes high coverage of disordered regions and the ability to “tune” the mass map for regions of interest. Nepenthesin-enriched secretions were applied to an analysis of protein complexes in the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair pathway. The analysis of XRCC4 binding to the BRCT domains of Ligase IV points to secondary interactions between the disordered C-terminal tail of XRCC4 and remote regions of the BRCT domains, which could only be identified with a nepenthesin-based workflow. HDX data suggest that stalk-binding to XRCC4 primes a BRCT conformation in these remote regions to support tail interaction, an event which may be phosphoregulated. We conclude that nepenthesin is an effective alternative to pepsin for all HDX-MS applications, and especially for the analysis of structural transitions among intrinsically disordered proteins and their binding partners. PMID:23197791

  13. Platform Dependencies in Bottom-up Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Kyle M.; Rey, Martial; Baker, Charles A. H.; Schriemer, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry is an important method for protein structure-function analysis. The bottom-up approach uses protein digestion to localize deuteration to higher resolution, and the essential measurement involves centroid mass determinations on a very large set of peptides. In the course of evaluating systems for various projects, we established two (HDX-MS) platforms that consisted of a FT-MS and a high-resolution QTOF mass spectrometer, each with matched front-end fluidic systems. Digests of proteins spanning a 20–110 kDa range were deuterated to equilibrium, and figures-of-merit for a typical bottom-up (HDX-MS) experiment were compared for each platform. The Orbitrap Velos identified 64% more peptides than the 5600 QTOF, with a 42% overlap between the two systems, independent of protein size. Precision in deuterium measurements using the Orbitrap marginally exceeded that of the QTOF, depending on the Orbitrap resolution setting. However, the unique nature of FT-MS data generates situations where deuteration measurements can be inaccurate, because of destructive interference arising from mismatches in elemental mass defects. This is shown through the analysis of the peptides common to both platforms, where deuteration values can be as low as 35% of the expected values, depending on FT-MS resolution, peptide length and charge state. These findings are supported by simulations of Orbitrap transients, and highlight that caution should be exercised in deriving centroid mass values from FT transients that do not support baseline separation of the full isotopic composition. PMID:23197788

  14. HDX Match Software for the Data Analysis of Top-Down ECD-FTMS Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) combined with mass spectrometry is a powerful technique for studying protein structure. The recently developed top-down ECD-FTMS HDX approach (Pan J. et al., JACS, 2008) allows determination of the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of a protein's amide bonds, down to the single residue resolution. One of the existing limitations of this technology has been the laborious manual analysis of the MS/MS spectra. Here we present a software program for processing the data from these experiments. This program assigns the c- and z-fragment ion series of the protein, and calculates the number of the exchanged amide protons for each fragment by fitting the theoretically predicted isotopic envelopes of the deuterated fragments to the experimental data.

  15. Microscopic self-dynamics in liquid hydrogen and in its mixtures with deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colognesi, D.; Celli, M.; Neumann, M.; Zoppi, M.

    2004-12-01

    We have measured the dynamic structure factor of liquid parahydrogen, pure and mixed with deuterium, in various thermodynamic conditions using incoherent inelastic neutron scattering. The experiments were carried out on TOSCA-II, a new time-of-flight, inverse-geometry, crystal-analyzer spectrometer. After an accurate data reduction, the high-energy parts of the neutron spectra recorded in backward scattering were studied through the modified Young and Koppel model, from which the mean kinetic energy values for a hydrogen molecule were estimated. In addition the low-energy parts of the neutron spectra recorded in forward scattering were analyzed in the framework of the Gaussian approximation and fitted through a Levesque-Verlet model for the velocity autocorrelation function. Thus various physical quantities are determined and compared with accurate path integral Monte Carlo simulations. Despite the excellent quality of these fits, the velocity autocorrelation functions derived from the forward-scattering data appear totally unable to properly describe the backward-scattering ones. These findings prove an unquestionable breakdown of the Gaussian approximation in semiquantum liquids. The present results appear of great interest and suggest further investigation on the limits of the widely used Gaussian approximation.

  16. Start2Fold: a database of hydrogen/deuterium exchange data on protein folding and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pancsa, Rita; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter; Vranken, Wim F.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fulfil a wide range of tasks in cells; understanding how they fold into complex three-dimensional (3D) structures and how these structures remain stable while retaining sufficient dynamics for functionality is essential for the interpretation of overall protein behaviour. Since the 1950's, solvent exchange-based methods have been the most powerful experimental means to obtain information on the folding and stability of proteins. Considerable expertise and care were required to obtain the resulting datasets, which, despite their importance and intrinsic value, have never been collected, curated and classified. Start2Fold is an openly accessible database (http://start2fold.eu) of carefully curated hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data extracted from the literature that is open for new submissions from the community. The database entries contain (i) information on the proteins investigated and the underlying experimental procedures and (ii) the classification of the residues based on their exchange protection levels, also allowing for the instant visualization of the relevant residue groups on the 3D structures of the corresponding proteins. By providing a clear hierarchical framework for the easy sharing, comparison and (re-)interpretation of HDX data, Start2Fold intends to promote a better understanding of how the protein sequence encodes folding and structure as well as the development of new computational methods predicting protein folding and stability. PMID:26582925

  17. Start2Fold: a database of hydrogen/deuterium exchange data on protein folding and stability.

    PubMed

    Pancsa, Rita; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter; Vranken, Wim F

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fulfil a wide range of tasks in cells; understanding how they fold into complex three-dimensional (3D) structures and how these structures remain stable while retaining sufficient dynamics for functionality is essential for the interpretation of overall protein behaviour. Since the 1950's, solvent exchange-based methods have been the most powerful experimental means to obtain information on the folding and stability of proteins. Considerable expertise and care were required to obtain the resulting datasets, which, despite their importance and intrinsic value, have never been collected, curated and classified. Start2Fold is an openly accessible database (http://start2fold.eu) of carefully curated hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data extracted from the literature that is open for new submissions from the community. The database entries contain (i) information on the proteins investigated and the underlying experimental procedures and (ii) the classification of the residues based on their exchange protection levels, also allowing for the instant visualization of the relevant residue groups on the 3D structures of the corresponding proteins. By providing a clear hierarchical framework for the easy sharing, comparison and (re-)interpretation of HDX data, Start2Fold intends to promote a better understanding of how the protein sequence encodes folding and structure as well as the development of new computational methods predicting protein folding and stability. PMID:26582925

  18. Volume Production of Negative Hydrogen and Deuterium Ions in aReflex-Type Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbo, K.; Ehlers, K.W.; Leung, K.N.; Pyle, R.V.

    1986-01-01

    The extraction of negative and positive hydrogen and deuterium ions from a reflex-type negative ion source has been investigated. Extracted positive and negative ion currents were measured as functions of the gas flow rate, the axial magnetic field, and the bias potential of the cylindrical wall of the arc-chamber. By biasing the cylindrical wall several volts negative relative to the anode, a maximum H{sup -} current of 9.7 mA(J{sup -} {approx_equal} 100 mA/cm{sup 2}) and D{sup -} current of 4.1 mA (J{sup -} {approx_equal} 42 mA/cm{sup 2})were obtained in steady state operation. This result shows a factor of two improvement over previous data. The total impurity negative ion content was less than 1%. When the source was arranged for positive ion extraction, a high proton ratio (90%) was observed. The extracted negative ion current was approximately as large as the positive ion current.

  19. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  20. Hydrogen/deuterium recycling and initial results of helium ash study in JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, H.; Sakasai, A.; Shimada, M.; Yoshino, R.; Arai, T.; Fukuda, T.; Hirayama, T.; Hosogane, N.; Ishida, S.; Kaminaga, A.; Koide, Y.; Kubo, H.; Nishitani, T.; Sugie, T.

    1992-12-01

    Reduction of particle recycling is an important technique in present plasma devices to improve energy confinement characteristics. Besides obtaining long pulse DT burning plasmas, controlled fuelling of the plasma with the primary species and removal of the helium ash are important issues. In the JT-60U tokamak, about 90% of the inner surface is covered with graphite tiles. Because recycling becomes more important with graphite surfaces, recycling characteristics of an all graphite first wall is important. In this paper, experimental results of JT-60U on recycling and helium ash removal are presented. The effect of wall temperature on recycling was observed. Significant hydrogen dilution was observed during deuterium discharges. Recycling characteristics in the ELMy H-mode discharges are also described where the neutral pressure increases with the electron density similar to L-mode discharges. In high ??/hot ion discharges, a highest neutron production rate of 1.3×10 16 s -1 was obtained with the lowest recycling. Initial results of helium ash experiment with strong He gas puffings in ohmically and neutral beam heated discharges are reported.

  1. Nanostructural activated carbons for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suoding

    A series of nanostructured activated carbons have been synthesized from poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK), and its derivatives. These carbons, with surface area exceeding 3000 m2/g and with average pore diameters of ? 20 A, are proven to be superior hydrogen storage materials, with hydrogen storage capacities up to 5.5 wt% at 77 K and 45 atm. The porous texture of these carbons was controlled via optimizing three synthetic steps: thermo-oxidation of PEEK in air, pyrolysis or carbonization of the oxidized PEEK in an inert atmosphere, and activation of the pre-carbonized PEEK with metal hydroxide. Thermo-oxidation of PEEK and carbonization process were thoroughly studied. These processes have been investigated by MDSC, FTIR, TGA and Py-MS. The pyrolysis or carbonization of PEEK involves the degradation of PEEK chains in three stages. Carbon morphology, including crystallinity and porous texture, is readily controlled by adjusting carbonization temperature. Activation of PEEK carbons, using inorganic bases and other activation agents, produces microporous carbons having a very narrow pore size distribution and an average pore diameter of ? 20 A. The activation control parameters including activation agent, activation temperature, time and carbon morphology have been investigated extensively. High surface area activated carbon is obtained by activating a highly amorphous carbon with a high activation agent/carbon ratio at 800°C. Theoretical calculations show that the pores with smaller diameter, especially smaller than 7 A, favor hydrogen adsorption. The experimental results confirm this fact and show that: (1) the hydrogen adsorption capacity per unit surface area at 77 K and 1 bar is larger in the smaller pores, (2) gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (W(H2)) is directly proportional to the ultramicropore (< 7 A) volume; and (3) the volumetric hydrogen storage capacity is directly proportional to the volume fraction of ultramicropores in carbon. Hydrogen adsorption in activated carbons synthesized from PEEK and poly(ether imide) blends, poly(phenylene oxide), polybenzimidazole and lignin show similar trends. In addition, W( H2) progressively increases as surface area increases for the carbons with similar average pore diameters. Keywords. carbon, activated carbon, poly(ether ether ketone), poly(ether imide), poly(phenylene oxide), polybenzimidazole, lignin, gas adsorption, hydrogen storage

  2. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of bacterial methane in a shallow freshwater lake

    SciTech Connect

    Woltemate, I.; Whiticar, M.J.; Schoell, M.

    1984-09-01

    Anoxic sediments from freshwater environments such as bogs, swamps, and lakes undergoing early diagenesis are frequently characterized by the formation of biogenic methane. Freshwater biogenic methanes exhibit carbon and hydrogen isotopic values strongly depleted in C-13 and deuterium relative to the respective values for carbon dioxide and formation water. The percentages of methane generated by fermentation and carbon dioxide reduction can be estimated by comparison of hydrogen isotopes in the formation water and methane. On the basis of these hydrogen isotope data, about 75% of the methane formation in Wurmsee comes from acetate reduction. Fermentation is thus the dominant although not exclusive process. Carbon dioxide reduction contributed the balance of the bacterial methane generated. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  3. Carbon-hydrogen bonding in near-frictionless carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jackie A.; Woodford, John B; Rajput, Deepak; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Schleuter, John A; Eryilmaz, Osman L; Erdemir, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The uniquely low friction behavior of near frictionless carbon (NFC) as compared to conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) is determined by the bonding within the film. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to probe the bonding environment of carbon and hydrogen; both INS and FTIR can probe the whole sample. Previous work has focused on surface studies; the present results show that in the film as a whole the majority of the hydrogen is adjacent to sp3-bonded carbon. In addition this work has determined the absence of any molecular hydrogen in NFC.

  4. Carbon-hydrogen bonding in near-frictionless carbon.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J. A.; Woodford, J. B.; Rajput, D.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Schleuter, J. A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Univ. of Tennessee Space Inst.; ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The uniquely low friction behavior of near-frictionless carbon (NFC) as compared to conventional diamondlike carbon (DLC) is determined by the bonding within the film. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to probe the bonding environment of carbon and hydrogen; both INS and FTIR can probe the whole sample. Previous work has focused on surface studies; the present results show that in the film as a whole the majority of the hydrogen is adjacent to sp{sup 3}-bonded carbon. In addition this work has determined the absence of any molecular hydrogen in NFC.

  5. Automated Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Electron Transfer Dissociation High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Measured at Single-Amide Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a well established method for the measurement of solution-phase deuterium incorporation into proteins, which can provide insight into protein conformational mobility. However, most HDX measurements are constrained to regions of the protein where pepsin proteolysis allows detection at peptide resolution. Recently, single-amide resolution deuterium incorporation has been achieved by limiting gas-phase scrambling in the mass spectrometer. This was accomplished by employing a combination of soft ionization and desolvation conditions coupled with the radical-driven fragmentation technique electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Here, a hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap XL is systematically evaluated for its utility in providing single-amide deuterium incorporation for differential HDX analysis of a nuclear receptor upon binding small molecule ligands. We are able to show that instrumental parameters can be optimized to minimize scrambling and can be incorporated into an established and fully automated HDX platform making differential single-amide HDX possible for bottom-up analysis of complex systems. We have applied this system to determine differential single amide resolution HDX data for the peroxizome proliferator activated receptor bound with two ligands of interest.

  6. Hydrogen attack - Influence of hydrogen sulfide. [on carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliezer, D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted on 12.5-mm-thick SAE 1020 steel (plain carbon steel) plate to assess hydrogen attack at room temperature after specimen exposure at 525 C to hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m for exposure times up to 240 hr. The results are discussed in terms of tensile properties, fissure formation, and surface scales. It is shown that hydrogen attack from a high-purity hydrogen environment is severe, with the formation of numerous methane fissures and bubbles along with a significant reduction in the room-temperature tensile yield and ultimate strengths. However, no hydrogen attack is observed in the hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide blend environment, i.e. no fissure or bubble formation occurred and the room-temperature tensile properties remained unchanged. It is suggested that the observed porous discontinuous scale of FeS acts as a barrier to hydrogen entry, thus reducing its effective equilibrium solubility in the iron lattice. Therefore, hydrogen attack should not occur in pressure-vessel steels used in many coal gasification processes.

  7. Nuclear Quadrupole Double Resonance Investigation of the Anomalous Temperature Coefficients of the Strong Hydrogen Bonds in Sodium and Potassium Deuterium Diacetate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Eric Max

    This thesis was directed at learning more about the unusual electronic environment near hydrogen within strong hydrogen bonds. "Strong" hydrogen bonds are unique in that the hydrogen atom is symmetrically located, or nearly so, between two electronegative atoms; the bond energies are relatively large. In a "normal" hydrogen bond the hydrogen atom is bonded to, and thus physically closer to, a parent atom, and only weakly attracted to another electronegative atom; bond energies are typically small. To examine these bonds, deuterium was substituted for hydrogen and the electric quadrupole coupling constant (QCC) of deuterium was measured using field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance. The electric quadrupole moment of deuterium is sensitive to changes in the surrounding electric field gradient, and is thus a good probe of the immediate electronic structure. The results show that the temperature dependence of the QCC is opposite to, and much larger than, what one would normally expect to observe for deuterium. The QCC is found to decrease strongly with decreasing temperature. This project was the first to study in detail the temperature dependence of deuterium QCCs in strong hydrogen bonds. The magnitude of the deuterium QCCs for the diacetates was found to be strongly depressed relative to typical values for deuterium. These results parallel large shifts in the infrared vibrational frequencies observed in many molecules which contain strong hydrogen bonds. The asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the departure from axial symmetry of the electric field gradient (EFG) at deuterium, was found to be unusually large for what are known to be linear, or nearly linear, three-center bonds. Based on ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations aimed at determining the EFG at H in the archetypal bifluoride ion, F-H-F^-, the electronic charge density is drastically depleted at H. It is believed that the large reduction in the charge density allows the deuterium EFG to be highly sensitive to the shape of the charge distribution on the atoms to which deuterium is bonded. If these atoms are at points of low crystallographic symmetry, the polarization of these adjacent atoms by other nearby atoms may cause the EFG to depart substantially from being axially symmetric. Also obtained from the molecular orbital calculations for bifluoride ion were the total electronic energy and the electric field gradient at H. From these calculations potential function models for the asymmetric stretch and the bend were constructed. An attempt was made to correlate the predictions made by these models for the temperature dependence of the deuteron quadrupole coupling constant in bifluoride ion with the experimentally observed results for the diacetates.

  8. Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-02

    An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

  9. A critical compilation of experimental data on spectral lines and energy levels of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Kramida, A.E.

    2010-11-15

    For more than 50 years, Charlotte Moore's compilation of atomic energy levels and its subsequent revisions have been the standard source of reference data for the spectra of hydrogen and its isotopes. In those publications, theoretical data based on quantum-electrodynamic calculations have been given. This reflects the fact that the theory of the hydrogen spectrum has been perfected to an extent far exceeding the capabilities of the best measurements. However, rapid advances in the techniques of laser spectroscopy and optical frequency metrology have recently put experiments on a par with theory in terms of precision. This calls for construction of new comprehensive data sets for H, D, and T that summarize the latest experimental work and can be directly compared with the modern theoretical reference data. The present work compiles several tens of recent measurements of the hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium fine and hyperfine structure intervals and presents sets of energy levels and Ritz wavelengths derived from those measurements. Data exist for the fine structure of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium up to principal quantum number n = 12. For higher lying levels, there are many observed lines with unresolved fine structure. From those observations, level centers (centers of the fine structure) are derived by a least-squares optimization, and Ritz wavelengths of series with upper levels up to n = 40 are obtained. For tritium, the n = 2 and 3 energy level intervals are derived from experimental observations.

  10. Desorption of hydrogen trapped in carbon and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumi, H.; Takemura, Y.; Miyabe, T.; Konishi, T.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2013-11-01

    Thermal desorption behavior of deuterium (D2) from isotropic graphites and a carbon fiber carbon composite (CFC) charged with D2 gas has been investigated to obtain information concerning hydrogen recycling and tritium inventory in fusion experimental devices as well as a futuristic fusion reactor. After thermal desorption experiments were conducted at temperatures up to 1740 K, a desorption peak at approximately 1600 K (peak 4) was discovered. This is in addition to the previously known peak at approximately 1300 K (peak 3). Peak 3 can be attributed to the release of deuterium controlled by the diffusion process in a graphite filler grain and peak 4 can be attributed to the detrapping of deuterium released from an interstitial cluster loop edge site. Activation energies of peaks 3 and 4 are estimated to be 3.48 and 6.93 eV, respectively. TDS spectra of D2 from graphite and CFCs had previously not been thoroughly investigated. A desorption peak at approximately 1600 K was discovered in the TDS spectra for all samples heated with a linear ramp rate of 0.1 K/s. For an isotropic graphite, ISO-880U, four desorption peaks were recognized in the TDS spectra at approximately 660 K, 900 K, 1300 K, and 1600 K. These peaks were named as peaks 1, 2, 3, and 4 in order of increasing temperature. Major desorption peaks (i.e., peaks 3 and 4) were analyzed and discussed in detail. The temperature of peak 3 was dependent on the size of a graphite filler grain. The desorption process is suggested to be controlled by deuterium diffusion within the filler grain with a strong influence of trapping sites, where the migration takes place as a sequence of detrapping and retrapping. The desorption for peak 4 can be ascribed to the detrapping reaction from an interstitial cluster loop edge site. Activation energies were estimated from the peak shift by varying the heating rate of TDS to be 3.48 and 6.93 eV for peaks 3 and 4, respectively. Theoretical desorption curves for peaks 3 and 4 with the above mentioned activation energies were narrower than those for the experimental desorption curve. The observed peak broadening can be attributed to the effects of grain size and activation energy distributions.

  11. Operation of a cw rf driven ion source with hydrogen and deuterium gas{sup a}

    SciTech Connect

    Melnychuk, S.T.; Debiak, T.W.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1996-04-01

    We will describe the operation of a cw rf driven multicusp ion source designed for extraction of high current hydrogen and deuterium beams. The source is driven at 2 MHz by a 2.5 turn induction antenna immersed in the plasma. Bare stainless-steel and porcelain-coated Cu antennas have been used. The plasma load is matched to the rf generator by a variable tap {ital N}:1 transformer isolated to 46 kV, and an LC network on the secondary. With H{sub 2} gas the source can be operated at pressures between 5 and 60 mT with power reflection coefficients {lt}0.01. The extracted ion current density with a porcelain-coated antenna is approximately given by 35 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW with an 80 G dipole filter field for input powers from 3.5 to 6.6 kW. The current density remained constant for operation with a 6 and an 8 mm aperture. The source has been operated for 260 h at 3.6 kW with a single-porcelain-coated antenna. Mass spectrometer measurements of the extracted beam at this power show a species mix for H{sup +}:H{sup +}{sub 2}:H{sup +}{sub 3}:OH{sup +} of 0.49: 0.04: 0.42: 0.04. The calculated beam divergence using the IGUN code is compared with the measured divergence from an electrostatic sweep emittance scanner designed for high-power cw beam diagnostics. Phase space measurements at 40 kV and 23 mA beam current result in a normalized rms emittance of 0.09 {pi}mmmrad. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Guanine nucleotide induced conformational change of Cdc42 revealed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Wei; Ting, Hsiu-Chi; Lo, Yi-Ting; Wu, Ting-Yuan; Huang, Hung-Wei; Yang, Chia-Jung; Chan, Jui-Fen Riva; Chuang, Min-Chieh; Hsu, Yuan-Hao Howard

    2016-01-01

    Cdc42 regulates pathways related to cell division. Dysregulation of Cdc42 can lead to cancer, cardiovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. GTP induced activation mechanism plays an important role in the activity and biological functions of Cdc42. P-loop, Switch I and Switch II are critical regions modulating the enzymatic activity of Cdc42. We applied amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HDXMS) to investigate the dynamic changes of apo-Cdc42 after GDP, GTP and GMP-PCP binding. The natural substrate GTP induced significant decreases of deuteration in P-loop and Switch II, moderate changes of deuteration in Switch I and significant changes of deuteration in the ?7 helix, a region far away from the active site. GTP binding induced similar effects on H/D exchange to its non-hydrolysable analog, GMP-PCP. HDXMS results indicate that GTP binding blocked the solvent accessibility in the active site leading to the decrease of H/D exchange rate surrounding the active site, and further triggered a conformational change resulting in the drastic decrease of H/D exchange rate at the remote ?7 helix. Comparing the deuteration levels in three activation states of apo-Cdc42, Cdc42-GDP and Cdc42-GMP-PCP, the apo-Cdc42 has the most flexible structure, which can be stabilized by guanine nucleotide binding. The rates of H/D exchange of Cdc42-GDP are between the GMP-PCP-bound and the apo form, but more closely to the GMP-PCP-bound form. Our results show that the activation of Cdc42 is a process of conformational changes involved with P-loop, Switch II and ?7 helix for structural stabilization. PMID:26542736

  13. 2D IR cross peaks reveal hydrogen-deuterium exchange with single residue specificity.

    PubMed

    Dunkelberger, Emily B; Woys, Ann Marie; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-12-12

    A form of chemical exchange, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), has long been used as a method for studying the secondary and tertiary structure of peptides and proteins using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we resolve cross peaks between the amide II band and a (13)C(18)O isotope-labeled amide I band, which we show measures HDX with site-specific resolution. By rapidly scanning 2D IR spectra using mid-IR pulse shaping, we monitor the kinetics of HDX exchange on-the-fly. For the antimicrobial peptide ovispirin bound to membrane bilayers, we find that the amide II peak decays with a biexponential with rate constants of 0.54 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 min(-1), which is a measure of the overall HDX in the peptide. The cross peaks between Ile-10-labeled ovispirin and the amide II mode, which specifically monitor HDX kinetics at Ile-10, decay with a single rate constant of 0.36 ± 0.1 min(-1). Comparing this exchange rate to theoretically determined exchange rates of Ile-10 for ovispirin in a solution random coil configuration, the exchange rate at Ile-10 is at least 100 times slower, consistent with the known ?-helix structure of ovispirin in bilayers. Because backbone isotope labels produce only a very small shift of the amide II band, site-specific HDX cannot be measured with FTIR spectroscopy, which is why 2D IR spectroscopy is needed for these measurements. PMID:23659731

  14. Theoretical modeling of infrared spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bond in aspirin crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalla, Houcine; Rekik, Najeh; Michta, Anna; Oujia, Brahim; Flakus, Henryk T.

    2010-01-01

    An extended quantum theoretical approach of the ? IR lineshape of cyclic dimers of weakly H-bonded species is proposed. We have extended a previous approach [M.E.-A. Benmalti, P. Blaise, H.T. Flakus, O. Henri-Rousseau, Chem. Phys. 320 (2006) 267] by accounting for the anharmonicity of the slow mode which is described by a "Morse" potential in order to reproduce the polarized infrared spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bond in acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) crystals. From comparison of polarized IR spectra of isotopically neat and isotopically diluted aspirin crystals it resulted that centrosymmetric aspirin dimer was the bearer of the crystal main spectral properties. In this approach, the adiabatic approximation is performed for each separate H-bond bridge of the dimer and a strong non-adiabatic correction is introduced into the model via the resonant exchange between the fast mode excited states of the two moieties. Within the strong anharmonic coupling theory, according to which the X-H?⋯Y high-frequency mode is anharmonically coupled to the H-bond bridge, this model incorporated the Davydov coupling between the excited states of the two moieties, the quantum direct and indirect dampings and the anharmonicity for the H-bond bridge. The spectral density is obtained within the linear response theory by Fourier transform of the damped autocorrelation functions. The evaluated spectra are in fairly good agreement with the experimental ones by using a minimum number of independent parameters. The effect of deuteration has been well reproduced by reducing simply the angular frequency of the fast mode and the anharmonic coupling parameter.

  15. Stainless-Steel Ball-Milling Method for Hydro-/Deutero-genation using H2 O/D2 O as a Hydrogen/Deuterium Source.

    PubMed

    Sawama, Yoshinari; Kawajiri, Takahiro; Niikawa, Miki; Goto, Ryota; Yabe, Yuki; Takahashi, Tohru; Marumoto, Takahisa; Itoh, Miki; Kimura, Yuuichi; Monguchi, Yasunari; Kondo, Shin-Ichi; Sajiki, Hironao

    2015-11-01

    A one-pot continuous-flow method for hydrogen (deuterium) generation and subsequent hydrogenation (deuterogenation) was developed using a stainless-steel (SUS304)-mediated ball-milling approach. SUS304, especially zero-valent Cr and Ni as constituents of the SUS304, and mechanochemical processing played crucial roles in the development of the reactions. PMID:26493945

  16. Variability of Deuterium Fractionation Associated With Soil Uptake of Atmospheric Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, T.; Randerson, J. T.; Eiler, J.

    2005-12-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is the second most abundant reduced gas in the atmosphere (after methane) with a globally averaged mixing ratio of ~530 nmol/mol. Its largest sources are photochemical oxidation of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons with other recognized sources that include biomass burning, fossil fuel burning, nitrogen fixation, and ocean degassing. These sources are balanced by reaction of H2 with hydroxyl radicals (~25%) in the atmosphere and by deposition at the terrestrial soil surface (~75%). As with other atmospheric trace gases, the stable isotopic content of H2 has the potential to help quantify the various aspects of its production and destruction. The average deuterium content of H2 is dDH2 = ~130 ‰ relative to Standard Mean Ocean Water. While recent studies have begun to elucidate the deuterium content of the individual sources of H2 and the fractionation associated with hydroxyl oxidation has been well established in the laboratory, there are still few data documenting the fractionation associated with soil uptake. We measured the fractionation associated with soil uptake in May, June and August of 2002 in three upland ecosystems that were part of an Alaskan fire chronosequence. Fire occurred at these sites in 1999, 1987, and ~1920. Grasses and herbaceous vegetation establish initially after fire and are gradually replaced by deciduous trees and finally by evergreen trees and moss. All three sites were in interior Alaska near the town of Delta Junction (63° 54'N, 145° 40'W). Fluxes were measured with a Plexiglas flux chamber (8 liter volume) with a manifold of four ~400 ml double-valved glass flasks in parallel and a diaphragm pump for circulation (5 SLPM). Flasks were continuously flushed by the circulating system and isolated sequentially; they were then returned to the laboratory at Caltech for subsequent analysis. In the field, the chamber was seated on Plexiglas collars that were installed prior to initiating the study and left in place for the duration of the study. Permanent collars insured that placement of the chamber/collar system did not cause any localized disturbance and unintentionally perturb the H2 flux and that sampling locations could be reoccupied to investigate seasonal differences. Prior to field deployment the entire system was tested on a plain sheet of Plexiglas to ensure that no H2 was produced or consumed by the diaphragm pump or any of the system parts. While earlier studies have measured HD/HH deposition velocities with a ratio of ~0.96, results of our Alaskan study show deposition velocity ratios of 0.89 ± 0.03 (n=17). Furthermore, sorting of data by season reveals no significant variability in this ratio but sorting by location over all seasons reveals the greatest fractionation at the most recent burn, 0.87 ± 0.02 (n=8) and the least fractionation at the mature spruce forest, 0.93 ± 0.01 (n=3) with fractionation at the intermediate burn site being 0.90 ± 0.02 (n=6). While not statistically conclusive, our results suggest that soil/ecosystem variability may affect fractionation associated with soil uptake of H2, adding further complication to modeling efforts that until now have assumed this parameter to be a constant value.

  17. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry for Probing Higher Order Structure of Protein Therapeutics: Methodology and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Russell, Reb J.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Chen, Guodong; Iacob, Roxana E.; Engen, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The higher order structure of protein therapeutics can be interrogated with hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). HDX-MS is now a widely used tool in the structural characterization of protein therapeutics. In this article, HDX-MS based workflows designed for both protein therapeutic discovery and development processes are presented, focusing on the specific applications of epitope mapping for protein/drug interactions and biopharmaceutical comparability studies. Future trends in the application of HDX-MS to protein therapeutics characterization are also described. PMID:23928097

  18. Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry to Study Conformational Changes in Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor upon PEGylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hui; Ahn, Joomi; Yu, Ying Qing; Tymiak, Adrienne; Engen, John R.; Chen, Guodong

    2012-03-01

    PEGylation is the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol to proteins, and it can be used to alter immunogenicity, circulating half life and other properties of therapeutic proteins. To determine the impact of PEGylation on protein conformation, we applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) to analyze granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) upon PEGylation as a model system. The combined use of HDX automation technology and data analysis software allowed reproducible and robust measurements of the deuterium incorporation levels for peptic peptides of both PEGylated and non-PEGylated G-CSF. The results indicated that significant differences in deuterium incorporation were induced by PEGylation of G-CSF, although the overall changes observed were quite small. PEGylation did not result in gross conformational rearrangement of G-CSF. The data complexity often encountered in HDX MS measurements was greatly reduced through a data processing and presentation format designed to facilitate the comparison process. This study demonstrates the practical utility of HDX MS for comparability studies, process monitoring, and protein therapeutic characterization in the biopharmaceutical industry.

  19. Exclusive Photoproduction of Charged Pions in Hydrogen and Deuterium from 1 to 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lingyan Zhu

    2004-02-28

    The study of the transition region in the description of exclusive processes and hadron structure, from the nucleon-meson degrees of freedom in meson-exchange models at low energy to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom in pQCD at high energy, is essential for us to understand the strong interaction. The differential cross section measurements for exclusive reactions at fixed center-of-mass angles enable us to investigate the constituent counting rule, which explicitly connects the quark-gluon degrees of freedom to the energy dependence of differential cross sections. JLab Experiment E94-104 was carried out in Hall A with two high resolution spectrometers. It included the coincidence cross section measurement for the [gamma]n --> pi{sup -}[p] process with a deuterium target and the singles measurement for the [gamma]p --> pi{sup +}[n] process with a hydrogen target. The untagged real photons were generated by the electron beam impinging on a copper radiator. The photon energies ranged from 1.1 to 5.5 GeV, corresponding to the center-of-mass energies from 1.7 to 3.4 GeV. The pion center-of-mass angles were fixed at 50 deg, 70 deg, 90 deg, and also 100 deg, 110 deg at a few energies. The JLab E94-104 data presented in this thesis contain four interesting features. The data exhibit a global scaling behavior for both [pi]{sup -} and [pi]{sup +} photoproduction at high energies and high transverse momenta, consistent with the constituent counting rule and the existing [pi]{sup +} photoproduction data. This implies that the quark-gluon degrees of freedom start to play a role at this energy scale. The data suggests possible substructure of the scaling behavior, which might be oscillations around the scaling value. There are several possible mechanisms that can cause oscillations, for example the one associated with the generalized constituent counting rule involving quark orbital angular momentum. The data show an enhancement in the scaled cross section at center-of-mass energy near 2.2 GeV, where baryon resonances are not as well known as those at low energies. The differential cross section ratios for exclusive [gamma]n --> pi{sup -}[p] to [gamma]p --> pi{sup +}[n] process at [theta]{sub cm} = 90 deg start to show consistency with the prediction based on one-hard-gluon-exchange diagrams at high energies.

  20. Investigation of atomic deuterium (hydrogen) emission from the surface of some transition metal deuterides (hydrides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicka, E.; Wolfram, Z.; Lisowski, W.; Du?, R.

    1996-01-01

    Deuterium desorption from the surface of decomposing palladium deuteride was studied while monitoring the atomic component of the desorbing gas by means of an adsorption method. A thin gold film was applied as an adsorbent active for D adsorption, but inert against interaction with D 2. The deuterium deposit thereby collected on the Au surface was analysed by means of thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS). The atomic component of deuterium arising by desorption from decomposing PdD y was clearly detected. The experimental results obtained for PdD y are compared with those observed during the decomposition of PdH x, as well as the decomposition of other hydrides including TiH z and VH u.

  1. Deuterium-Tritium Pulse Propulsion with Hydrogen as Propellant and the Entire Spacecraft as a Gigavolt Capacitor for Ignition

    E-print Network

    Friedwardt Winterberg

    2012-07-31

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: 1. By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ~ 105 K. 2. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  2. Investigating the effect of electric field on ionization cross sections in antiproton-hydrogen/deuterium atoms collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Y. K.

    2012-01-01

    The Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method has been used to investigate the effects of aligned electric field on the ionization cross sections in antiproton and hydrogen atoms collisions. The cross sections for the ionization of hydrogen/deuterium collision with antiproton in the energy range 10-500 keV/amu have been calculated and compared with the available experiment and theoretical results. The ionization cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the recently reported experimental and theoretical results. Isotope effect in the ionization cross section is reported to be negligible. The effects of the external electric field are seen to be quite prominent. Differential cross sections for ionization at the scattering angle up to 0.1° are also reported in this paper.

  3. L-H transition physics in hydrogen and deuterium: key role of the edge radial electric field and ion heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryter, F.; Cavedon, M.; Happel, T.; McDermott, R. M.; Viezzer, E.; Conway, G. D.; Fischer, R.; Kurzan, B.; Pütterich, T.; Tardini, G.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-01-01

    Previous work carried out in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak on the role of the edge radial electric field and ion heat flux in the L-H transition physics in deuterium plasmas has been extended in hydrogen plasmas. Similar discharges were performed in the two gases providing a detailed comparison of the edge kinetic profiles and heat fluxes in L-mode up to the L-H transition, as the heating power is increased. At the L-H transition, the edge ion heat flux just inside the separatrix is about two times higher in hydrogen than in deuterium. However, the ion plasma parameters at the plasma edge, T i and \

  4. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of compounds containing both hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespi, H. L.; Harkness, L.; Katz, J. J.; Norman, G.; Saur, W.

    1969-01-01

    Method allows qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of partially deuterated compounds. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy determines location and amount of deuterium in organic compounds but not fully deuterated compounds. Mass spectroscopy can detect fully deuterated species but not the location.

  5. Production of excited atomic hydrogen and deuterium from H2, HD and D2 photodissociation This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Gay, Timothy J.

    Production of excited atomic hydrogen and deuterium from H2, HD and D2 photodissociation.1088/0953-4075/44/4/045201 Production of excited atomic hydrogen and deuterium from H2, HD and D2 photodissociation J R Machacek1,2, V M, fluorescence from excited H photofragments can result. Recent experiments done at BESSY [1], Trieste [2], KEK

  6. Modeling the selectivity of activated carbons for efficient separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jianzhong

    the separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide via adsorption in activated carbons. In the simulations, both hydrogen and carbon dioxide molecules are modeled as Lennard-Jones spheres, and the activated carbons essentially no preference over the two gases and the selectivity of carbon dioxide relative to hydrogen falls

  7. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Scott; Bridgewater, Jon S; Ward, John W; Allen, Thomas H

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen is exothermically absorbed in many transition metals, all rare earths and the actinides. The hydrogen gas adsorbs, dissociates and diffuses into these metals as atomic hydrogen. Absorbed hydrogen is generally detrimental to Pu, altering its properties and greatly enhancing corrosion. Measuring the heat of solution of hydrogen in Pu and its alloys provides significant insight into the thermodynamics driving these changes. Hydrogen is present in all Pu metal unless great care is taken to avoid it. Heats of solution and formation are provided along with evidence for spinodal decomposition.

  8. Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela (State College, PA); Narayanan, Deepa (Redmond, WA)

    2011-03-08

    A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

  9. Studies of THGEM-based detector at low-pressure Hydrogen/Deuterium, for AT-TPC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, Marco; Yurkon, J.; Mittig, W.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Stolz, A.

    2015-09-01

    We study the performance of single- and double- THick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM) detectors in pure Hydrogen (H2) and Deuterium (D2) at low pressures, in the range of 100-450 torr. The effect of the pressure on the maximum achievable gain, ion-back flow and long-term gain stability are investigated for single and double cascade detectors. In particular, it was found that maximum achievable gains above 104, from single-photoelectrons avalanche, can be achieved for pressures of 200 torr and above; for lower pressure the gains are limited by avalanche-induced secondary effects to a values of around 103. The results of this work are relevant in the field of avalanche mechanism in low-pressure, low-mass noble gases, in particular for applications of THGEM end-cap readout for active-target Time Projection Chambers (TPC) in the field of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics.

  10. Structural analysis of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 1 intracellular loop 3 by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ko, In Y; Kim, Dong K; Chung, Ka Y

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) perform vital signaling functions and are involved in various diseases, making GPCRs major drug targets. GPCRs have seven ?-helical transmembrane domains connected by three extracellular loops (ECLs) and three intracellular loops (ICLs). Among the three ICLs, ICL3 has been reported to have a critical function in interacting with downstream signaling molecules. Despite its important role in GPCR signaling, the structure of ICL3 has not been fully defined. In the present study, we used muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 1 (M1) as a model system to analyze the structure of ICL3. Optimized purification conditions for M1_ICL3 comprised His-tag affinity purification and solubilization with n-dodecyl-b-D-maltopyranoside. Purified M1_ICL3 was analyzed using circular dichroism and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry; the results of these analyses suggested that M1_ICL3 is disordered and flexible. PMID:25311205

  11. Testing the performance of a cryogenic visualization system on thermal counterflow by using hydrogen and deuterium solid tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mantia, M.; Chagovets, T. V.; Rotter, M.; Skrbek, L.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental apparatus has been designed to analyze by visualization cryogenic flows of liquid 4He and consequently address unresolved problems of quantum turbulence. The newly implemented flow visualization setup is described and its specific features discussed. Thermal counterflow experiments have been performed and the motion of solid hydrogen and deuterium tracers studied by using the particle tracking velocimetry technique in order to probe the system capabilities. It is shown that the obtained results are consistent with the two-fluid model describing the behavior of superfluid 4He. A number of technical and fundamental issues, such as particles' aggregation, role of rotating particles in counterflow and evidence of non-Gaussian distribution of tracers' velocities, are also discussed. The apparatus appears to be well-suited to the task of analyzing cryogenic flows and potentially capable of obtaining new results stimulating further understanding of the underlying physics.

  12. Probing the dynamic regulation of peripheral membrane proteins using hydrogen deuterium exchange-MS (HDX-MS).

    PubMed

    Vadas, Oscar; Burke, John E

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular signalling events are controlled by the selective recruitment of protein complexes to membranes. Determining the molecular basis for how lipid signalling complexes are recruited, assembled and regulated on specific membrane compartments has remained challenging due to the difficulty of working in conditions mimicking native biological membrane environments. Enzyme recruitment to membranes is controlled by a variety of regulatory mechanisms, including binding to specific lipid species, protein-protein interactions, membrane curvature, as well as post-translational modifications. A powerful tool to study the regulation of membrane signalling enzymes and complexes is hydrogen deuterium exchange-MS (HDX-MS), a technique that allows for the interrogation of protein dynamics upon membrane binding and recruitment. This review will highlight the theory and development of HDX-MS and its application to examine the molecular basis of lipid signalling enzymes, specifically the regulation and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks). PMID:26517882

  13. Studies of THGEM-based detector at low-pressure Hydrogen/Deuterium, for AT-TPC applications

    E-print Network

    Cortesi, Marco; Mittig, Wolfgang; Bazin, Daniel; Beceiro-Novo, Saul; Stolz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We study the performance of single- and double- THick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM) detectors in pure Hydrogen and Deuterium at low pressures, in the range of 100-450 Torr. The effect of the pressure on the maximum achievable gain, ion-back flow and long-term gain stability are investigated for single and double cascade detectors. In particular, it was found that maximum achievable gains above 10^4, from single-photoelectrons avalanche, can be achieved for pressures of 200 Torr and above; for lower pressure the gains are limited by avalanche-induced secondary effects to a values of around 103. The results of this work are relevant in the field of avalanche mechanism in low-pressure, low-mass noble gases, in particular for applications of THGEM end-cap readout for active-target Time Projection Chambers (TPC) in the field of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics.

  14. Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation

    E-print Network

    Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation S.J.V. Frankland *, D hydrogen in individual single-shell carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes using a semiclassical model. The calculations predict that isolated hydrogen molecules inside of nanotubes have a Raman frequency that increases

  15. Optimization and Application of APCI Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX MS) for the Speciation of Nitrogen Compounds.

    PubMed

    Acter, Thamina; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sungji; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-09-01

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the utility of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (APCI HDX MS) to identify the structures of nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds. First, experiments were performed to determine the optimized experimental conditions, with dichloromethane and CH(3)OD found to be good cosolvents for APCI HDX. In addition, a positive correlation between the heated capillary temperature and the observed HDX signal was observed, and it was suggested that the HDX reaction occurred when molecules were contained in the solvent cluster. Second, 20 standard nitrogen-containing compounds were analyzed to investigate whether speciation could be determined based on the different types of ions produced from nitrogen-containing compounds with various functional groups. The number of exchanges occurring within the compounds correlated well with the number of active hydrogen atoms attached to nitrogen, and it was confirmed that APCI HDX MS could be used to determine speciation. The results obtained by APCI HDX MS were combined with the subsequent investigation of the double bond equivalence distribution and indicated that resins of shale oil extract contained mostly pyridine type nitrogen compounds. This study confirmed that APCI HDX MS can be added to previously reported chemical ionization, electrospray ionization, and atmospheric pressure photo ionization-based HDX methods, which can be used for structural elucidation by mass spectrometry. PMID:26115964

  16. Gaseous anion chemistry. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange in mono- and dialcohol alkoxide ions: ionization reactions in dialcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, J.R.; Agosta, W.C.; Field, F.H.

    1980-08-15

    The subject of this work is H-D exchange in certain gaseous anions using D/sub 2/ as the exchanging agent. The anions involved are produced from ethylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, 1,4-butanediol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. Spectra and postulated ionization reactions for these mono- and dialcohols are given. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange occurs in the (M - 1)/sup -/ and (2M - 1)/sup -/ ions of ethylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, and 1,4-butanediol. The amount of exchange occurring is 3-8 times greater in (2M - 1)/sup -/ than in (M - 1)/sup -/. The amount of H-D exchange occurring in ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol is small or zero in the (2M - 1)/sup -/ ions and in the (M - 1)/sup -/ ion for 1-butanol (the only (M - 1)/sup -/ ion which could be examined experimentally). The amount of exchange occurring in the (2M - 1)/sup -/ and (M - 1)/sup -/ ions from ethylene glycol is not affected by the total pressure or composition of the reaction mixture in the ionization chamber of the mass spectrometer. A novel hydrogen-bridging mechanism is suggested to account for the observed exchange occurring in the dialcohols.

  17. Optimization and Application of APCI Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX MS) for the Speciation of Nitrogen Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acter, Thamina; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sungji; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-09-01

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the utility of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (APCI HDX MS) to identify the structures of nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds. First, experiments were performed to determine the optimized experimental conditions, with dichloromethane and CH3OD found to be good cosolvents for APCI HDX. In addition, a positive correlation between the heated capillary temperature and the observed HDX signal was observed, and it was suggested that the HDX reaction occurred when molecules were contained in the solvent cluster. Second, 20 standard nitrogen-containing compounds were analyzed to investigate whether speciation could be determined based on the different types of ions produced from nitrogen-containing compounds with various functional groups. The number of exchanges occurring within the compounds correlated well with the number of active hydrogen atoms attached to nitrogen, and it was confirmed that APCI HDX MS could be used to determine speciation. The results obtained by APCI HDX MS were combined with the subsequent investigation of the double bond equivalence distribution and indicated that resins of shale oil extract contained mostly pyridine type nitrogen compounds. This study confirmed that APCI HDX MS can be added to previously reported chemical ionization, electrospray ionization, and atmospheric pressure photo ionization-based HDX methods, which can be used for structural elucidation by mass spectrometry.

  18. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); England, Christopher (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Mixing of carbon in the form of high sulfur coal with sulfuric acid reduces the temperature of sulfuric acid decomposition from 830.degree. C. to between 300.degree. C. and 400.degree. C. The low temperature sulfuric acid decomposition is particularly useful in thermal chemical cycles for splitting water to produce hydrogen. Carbon dioxide is produced as a commercially desirable byproduct. Lowering of the temperature for the sulfuric acid decomposition or oxygen release step simplifies equipment requirements, lowers thermal energy input and reduces corrosion problems presented by sulfuric acid at conventional cracking temperatures. Use of high sulfur coal as the source of carbon for the sulfuric acid decomposition provides an environmentally safe and energy efficient utilization of this normally polluting fuel.

  19. Characterization of IgG1 Conformation and Conformational Dynamics by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Damian; Arndt, Joseph; Domeier, Wayne; Berkowitz, Steven; Engen, John R.

    2009-04-22

    Protein function is dictated by protein conformation. For the protein biopharmaceutical industry, therefore, it is important to have analytical tools that can detect changes in protein conformation rapidly, accurately, and with high sensitivity. In this paper we show that hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) can play an important role in fulfilling this need within the industry. H/DX-MS was used to assess both global and local conformational behavior of a recombinant monoclonal IgG1 antibody, a major class of biopharmaceuticals. Analysis of exchange into the intact, glycosylated IgG1 (and the Fab and Fc regions thereof) showed that the molecule was folded, highly stable, and highly amenable to analysis by this method using less than a nanomole of material. With improved chromatographic methods, peptide identification algorithms and data-processing steps, the analysis of deuterium levels in peptic peptides produced after labeling was accomplished in 1--2 days. On the basis of peptic peptide data, exchange was localized to specific regions of the antibody. Changes to IgG1 conformation as a result of deglycosylation were determined by comparing exchange into the glycosylated and deglycosylated forms of the antibody. Two regions of the IgG1 (residues 236-253 and 292-308) were found to have altered exchange properties upon deglycosylation. These results are consistent with previous findings concerning the role of glycosylation in the interaction of IgG1 with Fc receptors. Moreover, the data clearly illustrate how H/DX-MS can provide important characterization information on the higher order structure of antibodies and conformational changes that these molecules may experience upon modification.

  20. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., ?2-adrenergic receptor [?2AR], ?-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-?-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of ?2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of ?2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in ?2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  1. Photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberoglu, Halil

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an alternative to thermochemical and electrolytic technologies with the advantage of carbon dioxide sequestration. However, it suffers from low solar to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency due to limited light transfer, mass transfer, and nutrient medium composition. The present study aims at addressing these limitations and can be divided in three parts: (1) experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of hydrogen producing and carbon dioxide consuming microorganisms, (2) solar radiation transfer modeling and simulation in photobioreactors, and (3) parametric experiments of photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration. First, solar radiation transfer in photobioreactors containing microorganisms and bubbles was modeled using the radiative transport equation (RTE) and solved using the modified method of characteristics. The study concluded that Beer-Lambert's law gives inaccurate results and anisotropic scattering must be accounted for to predict the local irradiance inside a photobioreactor. The need for accurate measurement of the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms was established. Then, experimental setup and analysis methods for measuring the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms have been developed and successfully validated experimentally. A database of the radiation characteristics of representative microorganisms have been created including the cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis, the purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii along with its three genetically engineered strains. This enabled, for the first time, quantitative assessment of the effect of genetic engineering on the radiation characteristics of microorganisms. In addition, a parametric experimental study has been performed to model the growth, CO2 consumption, and H 2 production of Anabaena variabilis as functions of irradiance and CO2 concentration. Kinetic models were successfully developed based on the Monod model and on a novel scaling analysis employing the CO2 consumption half-time as the time scale. Finally, the growth and hydrogen production of Anabaena variabilis have been compared in a flat panel photobioreactor using three different nutrient media under otherwise similar conditions. Light to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency for Allen-Arnon medium was superior by a factor of 5.5 to both BG-11 and BG-11o media. This was attributed to the presence of vanadium and larger heterocyst frequency observed in the Allen-Arnon medium.

  2. Functionalized carbon nanostructures for hydrogen catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lung-Hao

    Sodium borohydride, NaBH4, is widely used as a source of pure hydrogen. Hydrogen is of interest because it is a source of clean energy. It can be converted directly into electrical energy by means of fuel cells. One of the objectives of this thesis was to develop a new catalytic process to (i) enhance the rate of hydrogen generation, and (ii) to achieve hydrogen generation equal to 100% of the theoretically expected value. The catalyst investigated in this research is constructed by starting from single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). This material has a very high specific surface area and good conductivity. The SWNT were formed into a paper by a special filtration process. Polysilazane, a polymeric precursor (Ceraset(TM)-SN from KiON Corp., Wiesbaden, Germany) was diluted by acetone and then layered onto SWNT paper. The Ceraset coated SWNT was then pyrolyzed at 1100°C for three hours to form a silicon carbonitride (SiCN), polymer derived ceramic (PDC), layer on the surface of SWNT filtered paper. This functionalized SiCN carbon nanotube paper (SiCN/CNT) was used as the substrate for catalyst dispersions. The catalyst consisted of transition metals, Pt/Pd/Ru. Suspension solutions of Pt, Pd and Ru were impregnated onto the SiCN/CNT paper with the expectation of creating a monolayer of these transition metals on surface of the SiCN/CNT substrate. It is likely that an interaction could occur between the transition metals and the silicon atoms present in the SiCN layer on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. It is known that transition metals and silicon react to form silicides, suggesting the formation of a strong Si-transition metal bond. Therefore, it is possible that this bond could provide good wetting of metal atoms on SiCN functionalized carbon nanotube substrate. In the limit a monolayer of the transition metals may be achieved, which would correspond to a near zero dihedral angle between the substrate and the cluster of transition metals. In such a scenario a very high activity of the catalyst can be achieved raising the figure of merit for hydrogen generation nearly to its highest possible value. The catalytic performance is also related to the intrinsic activity of chemical composition of the catalyst. In the present work, the use of catalysts of a ternary composition has been discovered to enhance the activity of the catalyst. The experiments presented in this work use Pt/Pd/Ru catalyzed SiCN/CNT as the catalyst to react with sodium borohydride for the hydrogen generation. The thickness of SiCN/CNT paper is one of the factors, which influences the hydrogen generation rate: thinner papers produce higher rates of hydrogen generation. The likely reason for this phenomenon is that hydrogen bubbles can become trapped within the mesh of carbon nanotubes that constitute the paper-like structure of the catalyst. It is hypothesized that hydrogen bubbles can escape more easily from the interior of the paper if the paper is thinner. The effect of the paper thickness on the hydrogen generation rate forms the first part of the thesis. In the next phase of the thesis, thin film structures of carbon nanotubes, about 300 nm high, were created to serve as the catalyst substrates. Transition metals were deposited on to these substrates by an electrophoretic process. In these catalysts huge increases in hydrogen generation rates, relative to the CNT-paper architecture, were achieved. Indeed the Figure of Merit (FOM), expressed as liters per minute of hydrogen generated per gram of the precious metals, per unit molar concentration of NaBH4, (Lmin-1g met-1[NaBH4]-1), of these "thin film CNT" catalysts was up to three orders of magnitude greater than could be achieved with the thick CNT paper, as described in the first part of the thesis. These values for the FOM are more than two orders of magnitude greater than the highest values for hydrogen generation from NaBH4 reported in the literature. The reaction mechanism and the catalytic efficiency in the present work is described in terms of an electric charge transfer, as has b

  3. Spherical cauliflower-like carbon dust formed by interaction between deuterium plasma and graphite target and its internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, N.; Yoshimi, M.; Tokitani, M.; Takamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.

    2009-06-01

    Simulated experiments to produce carbon dust particles with cauliflower structure have been performed in a liner plasma device, NAGDIS-II by exposing high density deuterium plasma to a graphite sample (IG-430U). Formation of carbon dust depends on the surface temperature and the incident ion energy. At a surface temperature 600-700 K, a lot of isolated spherical dust particles are observed on the graphite target. The internal structure of an isolated dust particle was observed with Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) in detail. FIB analysis clearly shows there exist honey-combed cell structure with thin carbon walls in the dust particle and the dust particle grows from the graphite surface. TEM image also shows that the dust particle is made of amorphous carbon with crystallized grains with diameters of 10-50 nm.

  4. Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange 

    E-print Network

    Marini, Joseph Thomas

    2004-09-30

    The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular ...

  5. Tunneling effects in the kinetics of helium and hydrogen isotopes desorption from single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilchenko, B. A.; Yaskovets, I. I.; Uvarova, I. Y.; Dolbin, A. V.; Esel'son, V. B.; Basnukaeva, R. M.; Vinnikov, N. A.

    2014-04-01

    The kinetics of desorption both helium isotopes and molecules of hydrogen and deuterium from open-ended or ?-irradiated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles was investigated in temperature range of 10-300 K. The gases desorption rates obey the Arrhenius law at high temperatures, deviate from it with temperature reduction and become constant at low temperatures. These results indicate the quantum nature of gas outflow from carbon nanotube bundles. We had deduced the crossover temperature below which the quantum corrections to the effective activation energy of desorption become significant. This temperature follows linear dependence against the inverse mass of gas molecule and is consistent with theoretical prediction.

  6. Tunneling effects in the kinetics of helium and hydrogen isotopes desorption from single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Danilchenko, B. A. Yaskovets, I. I.; Uvarova, I. Y.; Dolbin, A. V.; Esel'son, V. B.; Basnukaeva, R. M.; Vinnikov, N. A.

    2014-04-28

    The kinetics of desorption both helium isotopes and molecules of hydrogen and deuterium from open-ended or ?-irradiated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles was investigated in temperature range of 10–300?K. The gases desorption rates obey the Arrhenius law at high temperatures, deviate from it with temperature reduction and become constant at low temperatures. These results indicate the quantum nature of gas outflow from carbon nanotube bundles. We had deduced the crossover temperature below which the quantum corrections to the effective activation energy of desorption become significant. This temperature follows linear dependence against the inverse mass of gas molecule and is consistent with theoretical prediction.

  7. Production of ultracold hydrogen and deuterium via Doppler-cooled Feshbach molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Ian C.

    2015-08-01

    A counterintuitive scheme to produce ultracold hydrogen via fragmentation of laser cooled diatomic hydrides is presented where the final atomic H temperature is inversely proportional to the mass of the molecular parent. In addition, the critical density for formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) at a fixed temperature is reduced by a factor (mH / mM H )3 /2 over directly cooled hydrogen atoms. The narrow Feshbach resonances between a S10 atom and hydrogen are well suited to a tiny center of mass energy release necessary during fragmentation. With the support of ab initio quantum chemistry, it is demonstrated that BaH is an ideal diatomic precursor that can be laser cooled to a Doppler temperature of ˜26 ? K with just two rovibronic transitions, the simplest molecular cooling scheme identified to date. Preparation of a hydrogen atom gas below the critical BEC temperature Tc is feasible with present cooling technology, with optical pulse control of the condensation process.

  8. Liquid–solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-28

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} in an ?85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid–solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ?4?K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  9. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Lassila, David H. (Aptos, CA); Bonner, Brian P. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  10. Lattice vibrations of para-hydrogen impurities in a solid deuterium matrix: An inelastic neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colognesi, D.; Celli, M.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Zoppi, M.

    2007-11-01

    In the present study, we report inelastic neutron scattering measurements from para-hydrogen defects in solid normal deuterium at three different concentrations (between 3% and 11%) using the time-of-flight spectrometer TOSCA-II. The measured double-differential cross sections give access to the self-inelastic structure factors for the H2 centers of mass. Corrected experimental data, analyzed through the Young-Koppel model and the Gaussian approximation, are transformed into defect densities of phonon states, which come out to be broad, structured, and nearly concentration independent. Two experimentally determined Bose-corrected spectral moments are found to be in agreement with independent estimates, providing a strong validation of our data reduction procedure. Subsequently, experimental phonon spectra are compared to three calculations, namely, a simple harmonic model at infinite dilution, a more advanced harmonic model with concentration effects, and finally a lattice dynamics simulation based on self-consistent phonon and coherent potential approximations. However, while the first part of the defect spectral density, attributed to the propagating modes, turns out to be roughly explained, the localized part is properly described by none of these models, except for its mean frequency position. The large overall width appears so far impossible to be reproduced, representing a challenge for the physicists involved in quantum dynamics simulations.

  11. Atomic hydrogen-deuterium mixtures at 1 kelvin: Recombination rates, spin-exchange cross sections, and solvation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, M. E.; Hardy, W. N.

    1995-06-01

    A new technique has been applied to the study of atomic hydrogen and deuterium mixtures confined by liquid helium coated walls. The method uses standard low-field hyperfine magnetic resonance of the H atoms at 1420 MHz, but takes advantage of the dramatically different spin-exchange broadening for H-H and H-D collisions to simultaneously monitor the H and D densities. This provides a powerful means for studying the interaction of D with itself and with liquid helium, something otherwise difficult to achieve, and it also makes possible the study of spin-exchange and recombination interactions between H and D. A wide range of experimental results are presented, including the rate constants for H-D and D-D recombination, the spin-exchange broadening cross sections for H-D and D-D collisions, the H-D spin-exchange frequency shift cross section and an improved value for the H-4He buffer gas shift. Finally, a detailed study of the solvation of D into liquid4He has yielded an improved value for the salvation energy, a useful lower bound for the effective mass for D in liquid4He, and evidence for the reaction D + HD ? D2 + H on the surface under the liquid4He film.

  12. Recombinant immobilized rhizopuspepsin as a new tool for protein digestion in hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rey, Martial; Man, Petr; Brandolin, Gérard; Forest, Eric; Pelosi, Ludovic

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange coupled to mass spectrometry is nowadays routinely used to probe protein interactions or conformational changes. The method has many advantages, e.g. very low sample consumption, but offers limited spatial resolution. One way to higher resolution leads through the use of different proteases or their combinations. In the present work we describe recombinant production, purification and use of aspartic protease zymogen from Rhizopus chimensis, protease type XVIII (EC 3.4.23.6), commonly referred to as rhizopuspepsinogen (Rpg). The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli, refolded and purified to homogeneity. A typical yield was approximately 100 mg of pure enzyme per 1 L of original bacterial culture. The kinetics of protease activation, i.e. removal of the propeptide achieved by autolysis in an acidic environment, was followed by mass spectrometry. The digestion efficiency was tested for the protease in solution as well as for the immobilized enzyme. Apomyoglobin was successfully digested under all conditions tested and the protease displayed very low or no autodigestion. The results outperformed those obtained with commercial protease where the digestion of apomyoglobin was incomplete and accompanied by many contaminating peptides. Taken together, the recombinant protease type XVIII can be considered as a new and highly efficient tool for H/D exchange followed by mass spectrometry. PMID:19827048

  13. Applications of hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) for the characterization of conformational dynamics in light-activated photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Robert; Heintz, Udo; Winkler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of optogenetic tools is inherently linked to the understanding of photoreceptor function. Structural analysis of elements involved in signal integration in individual sensor domains provides an initial idea of their mode of operation, but understanding how local structural rearrangements eventually affect signal transmission to output domains requires inclusion of the effector regions in the characterization. However, the dynamic nature of these assemblies renders their structural analysis challenging and therefore a combination of high- and low-resolution techniques is required to appreciate functional aspects of photoreceptors. This review focuses on the potential of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) for complementing the structural characterization of photoreceptors. In this respect, the ability of HDX-MS to provide information on conformational dynamics and the possibility to address multiple functionally relevant states in solution render this methodology ideally suitable. We highlight recent examples demonstrating the potential of HDX-MS and discuss how these results can help to improve existing optogenetic systems or guide the design of novel optogenetic tools. PMID:26157802

  14. Fast Comparative Structural Characterization of Intact Therapeutic Antibodies Using Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange and Electron Transfer Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jingxi; Zhang, Suping; Chou, Albert; Hardie, Darryl B; Borchers, Christoph H

    2015-06-16

    Higher-order structural characterization plays an important role in many stages of therapeutic antibody production. Herein, we report a new top-down mass spectrometry approach for characterizing the higher-order structure of intact antibodies, by combining hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX), subzero temperature chromatography, and electron transfer dissociation on the Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Individual IgG domain-level deuteration information was obtained for 6 IgG domains on Herceptin (HER), which included the antigen binding sites. This is the first time that top-down HDX has been applied to an intact protein as large as 150 kDa, which has never been done before on any instrument. Ligand-binding induced structural differences in HER were determined to be located only on the variable region of the light chain. Global glycosylation profile of antibodies and HDX property of the glycoforms were also determined by accurate intact mass measurements. Although the presence of disulfide bonds prevent the current approach from being able to obtain amino acid level structural information within the disulfide-linked regions, the advantages such as minimal sample manipulation, fast workflow, very low level of back exchange, and simple data analysis, make it well-suited for fast comparative structural evaluation of intact antibodies. PMID:25927482

  15. Characterization of Stress-Exposed Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Using ELISA and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Katsuyoshi; Akashi, Satoko

    2014-10-01

    Information on the higher-order structure is important in the development of biopharmaceutical drugs. Recently, hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate protein conformation, and unique automated systems for HDX-MS are now commercially available. To investigate the potential of this technique for the prediction of the activity of biopharmaceuticals, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which had been subjected to three different stress types, was analyzed using HDX-MS and through comparison with receptor-binding activity. It was found that HDX-MS, in combination with ion mobility separation, was able to identify conformational changes in G-CSF induced by stress, and a good correlation with the receptor-binding activity was demonstrated, which cannot be completely determined by conventional peptide mapping alone. The direct evaluation of biological activity using bioassay is absolutely imperative in biopharmaceutical development, but HDX-MS can provide the alternative information in a short time on the extent and location of the structural damage caused by stresses. Furthermore, the present study suggests the possibility of this system being a versatile evaluation method for the preservation stability of biopharmaceuticals.

  16. Carbon acceptors and carbon-hydrogen complexes in AlSb M. D. McCluskey*

    E-print Network

    McCluskey, Matthew

    Carbon acceptors and carbon-hydrogen complexes in AlSb M. D. McCluskey* Department of Physics modes LVM's arising from carbon impurities in n- and p-type AlSb. The first and second harmonics. A peak at 572.9 cm 1 is tentatively identified as the 13 C LVM. Carbon-hydrogen complexes were formed

  17. Analysis of distinct molecular assembly complexes of keratin K8 and K18 by hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    PubMed

    Premchandar, Aiswarya; Kupniewska, Anna; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Mücke, Norbert; Mauermann, Monika; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Edelman, Aleksander; Herrmann, Harald; Dadlez, Micha?

    2015-12-01

    Keratins are intermediate filament (IF) proteins that form complex filament systems in epithelial cells, thus serving as scaffolding elements and mechanical stress absorbers. The building blocks of keratin IFs are parallel coiled-coil dimers of two distinct sequence-related proteins distinguished as type I and type II keratins. To gain more insight into their structural dynamics, we resorted to hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of keratins K8 and K18, which are characteristic for simple epithelial cells. Using this powerful technique not employed with IFs before, we mapped patterns of protected versus unprotected regions in keratin complexes at various assembly levels. In particular, we localized protein segments exhibiting different hydrogen exchange patterns in tetramers versus filaments. We observed a general pattern of precisely positioned regions of stability intertwining with flexible regions, mostly represented by the non-?-helical segments. Notably, some regions within the coiled-coil domains are significantly more dynamic than others, while the IF-consensus motifs at the end domains of the central ?-helical "rod" segment, which mediate the "head-to-tail" dimer-dimer interaction in the filament elongation process, become distinctly more protected upon formation of filaments. Moreover, to gain more insight into the dynamics of the individual keratins, we investigated the properties of homomeric preparations of K8 and K18. The physiological importance of keratins without a partner is encountered in both pathological and experimental situations when one of the two species is present in robust excess or completely absent, such as in gene-targeted mice. PMID:26434626

  18. Adsorption of Hydrogen Sulfide onto Activated Carbon Fibers: Effect of

    E-print Network

    Borguet, Eric

    Adsorption of Hydrogen Sulfide onto Activated Carbon Fibers: Effect of Pore Structure and Surface chemistry were studied using activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structures and surface areas onto carbon surfaces under dry and anoxic conditions, the effects of carbon pore structure and surface

  19. TRANSITION METAL ACTIVATION AND FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON-HYDROGEN BONDS

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    TRANSITION METAL ACTIVATION AND FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON-HYDROGEN BONDS William D. Jones-H and C-C bond functionalization, and (4) carbon-fluorine bond activation. We have made progress in each in our proposal where we have had success. These include: (1) carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions, (2

  20. Carbonate Thermochemical Cycle for the Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, Juan J; Collins, Jack Lee; Dole, Leslie Robert; Forsberg, Charles W; Haire, Marvin Jonathan; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Lewis Jr, Benjamin E; Wymer, Raymond; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  1. Carbonate thermochemical cycle for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Dole, Leslie R (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ferrada, Juan J (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Forsberg, Charles W (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Haire, Marvin J (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Hunt, Rodney D (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lewis Jr., Benjamin E (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Wymer, Raymond G (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and hydrogen storage studies on porous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruz, Priyanka; Banerjee, Seemita; Pandey, M.; Sudarsan, V.

    2015-06-01

    Porous carbon sample has been prepared, using zeolite-Y as template followed by annealing at 800°C, with view to estimate the extent of hydrogen storage by the sample. Based on XRD, 13C MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopic studies it is confirmed that the porous Carbon sample contains only sp2 hybridized carbon. The hydrogen sorption isotherms have been recorded for the sample at 273, 223K and 123K and the maximum hydrogen absorption capacity is found to be 1.47wt% at 123K. The interaction energy of hydrogen with the carbon framework was determined to be ˜ 10 kJ mol-1at lower hydrogen uptake and gradually decreases with increase in hydrogen loading.

  3. Deuterium/hydrogen microscopy in astrogeological material using an elastic recoil approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, L.; Kristiansson, P.; Borysiuk, M.; Abdel, N.; Elfman, M.; Nilsson, E. J. C.; Pallon, J.

    2015-04-01

    A new experimental setup for quantitative hydrogen isotopic-ratio microscopy in thin samples (up to 12 ?m) is under development at the Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility. This technique is derived from the proton-proton scattering technique and has been proven to have the same beneficial features, namely a detection limit below 1 wt-ppm and a depth resolution better than 1 ?m. The method gives absolute quantitative information about H or D content in atoms per cm2 and does not depend on the structure, chemical environment or other so called "matrix effects". This work presents an evaluation of the developed technique through measurements on unique material from samples from the Tagish Lake meteorite, which has been suggested to be one of the most primitive solar system materials yet studied. We discuss the capabilities of the technique through the results from measurements on a geological standard.

  4. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (?100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  5. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Aaron J; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (?100K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance (1)H-(2)H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance (2)H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the (2)H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of (1)H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques. PMID:26363582

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Angela D. Lueking; Qixiu Li; John V. Badding; Dania Fonseca; Humerto Gutierrez; Apurba Sakti; Kofi Adu; Michael Schimmel

    2010-03-31

    Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

  7. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotubes: Metallic hydrogen decoration O. Gulseren,1,2

    E-print Network

    Yildirim, Taner

    Effects of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotubes: Metallic hydrogen decoration O. Gu of carbon nanotubes undergo dramatic changes with hydrogen chemisorption from first principle calculations other isomers can be insulating. For both zigzag and armchair nanotubes, hydrogenation of each carbon

  8. UV pumping of hyperfine transitions in the light elements, with application to 21-cm hydrogen and 92-cm deuterium lines from the early universe

    E-print Network

    Leonid Chuzhoy; Paul R. Shapiro

    2006-06-30

    We present new analytic calculations of the coupling between ultraviolet resonance photons and the population of the hyperfine states in the light elements (H, D, He3+) which include several previously neglected physical processes. Among these are the backreaction of resonant scattering on the pumping radiation, the scattering of Ly_beta photons and the effect of local departure from pure Hubble flow. The application of the new treatment to the redshifted hydrogen 21 and deuterium 92 cm lines from the high-redshift universe results in an amplitude correction of up to an order of magnitude. We further show that the standard assumption that ultraviolet pumping drives the spin temperature towards the kinetic temperature does not hold for deuterium, whose spin temperature is generally negative.

  9. Detection of Hydrogen Spillover in Palladium-Modified Activated Carbon Fibers During Hydrogen Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Brown, Craig; Liu, Yun; Bhat, Vinay V; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) are being evaluated for adsorptive hydrogen storage at near-ambient conditions because of their enhanced hydrogen uptake in comparison to Pd-free activated carbon fibers (ACF). The net uptake enhancement (at room temperature and 20 bar) is in excess of the amount corresponding to formation of Pd hydride, and is usually attributed to hydrogen spillover. In this paper, inelastic neutron scattering was used to demonstrate the formation of new C-H bonds in Pd-containing activated carbon fibers after exposure to hydrogen at 20 oC and 1.6 MPa, at the expense of physisorbed H2. This finding is a post-factum proof of the atomic nature of H species formed in presence of a Pd catalyst, and of their subsequent spillover and binding to the carbon support. Chemisorption of hydrogen may explain the reduction in hydrogen uptake from first to second adsorption cycle.

  10. Operation of a cw rf driven ion source with hydrogen and deuterium gas (abstract){sup a}

    SciTech Connect

    Melnychuk, S.T.; Debiak, T.W.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1996-03-01

    We will describe the operation of a cw rf driven multicusp ion source designed for extraction of high current hydrogen and deuterium beams. The source is driven at 2 MHz by a 2.5 turn induction antenna immersed in the plasma. Bare stainless-steel and porcelain-coated Cu antennas have been used. The plasma load is matched to the rf generator by a variable tap {ital N}:1 transformer isolated to 46 kV, and an LC network on the secondary. With H{sub 2} gas the source can be operated at pressures between 5 and 60 mT with power reflection coefficients {lt}0.01. The extracted ion current density with a porcelain-coated antenna is approximately given by 35 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW with an 80 G dipole filter field for input powers from 3.5 to 6.6 kW. The current density remained constant for operation with a 6 and an 8 mm aperture. The source has been operated for 260 h at 3.6 kW with a single-porcelain-coated antenna. Mass spectrometer measurements of the extracted beam at this power show a species mix for H{sup +}:H{sup +}{sub 2}:H{sup +}{sub 3}:OH{sup +} of 0.49: 0.04: 0.42: 0.04. The calculated beam divergence using the IGUN code is compared with the measured divergence from an electrostatic sweep emittance scanner designed for high-power cw beam diagnostics. Phase space measurements at 40 kV and 23 mA beam current result in a normalized rms emittance of 0.09 {pi}mmmrad. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Report on the evening discussion: ``Hydrogen storage in carbon materials''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintel, Andrea

    2000-11-01

    Hydrogen may be the most important energy carrier of the future as soon as the problem of hydrogen storage is solved. Storing of hydrogen under high pressure or as liquid costs much energy. Furthermore, a high pressure or liquid hydrogen tank in a fuel cell driven vehicle would be much larger and heavier compared to a typical gasoline tank. In metal hydride tanks the stored hydrogen density is higher, but the tank would be much too heavy (for a comparison see Fig. 1). Since the first promising results of Heben et al. in 1997 on hydrogen storage in single walled carbon nanotubes and the spectacularly large storage capacities in carbon nanofibers from the Baker and Rodriguez group in 1998, considerable research activity has been started all over the world to investigate hydrogen storage in carbon materials. Especially, car industry is very interested and is waiting for a material with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity above 6.5 wt%. In this report, the evening discussion on "Hydrogen storage in carbon materials" is summarized.

  12. Carbon-deuterium bonds as non-perturbative infrared probes of protein dynamics, electrostatics, heterogeneity, and folding.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2014-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is uniquely able to characterize protein dynamics and microenvironmental heterogeneity because it possesses an inherently high temporal resolution and employs probes of ultimately high structural resolution-the bonds themselves. The use of carbon-deuterium (C-D) bonds as vibrational labels circumvents the spectral congestion that otherwise precludes the use of vibrational spectroscopy to proteins and makes the observation of single vibrations within a protein possible while being wholly non-perturbative. Thus, C-D probes can be used to site-specifically characterize conformational heterogeneity and thermodynamic stability. C-D probes are also uniquely useful in characterizing the electrostatic microenvironment experienced by a specific residue side chain or backbone due to its effect on the C-D absorption frequency. In this chapter we describe the experimental procedures required to use C-D bonds and FT IR spectroscopy to characterize protein dynamics, structural and electrostatic heterogeneity, ligand binding, and folding. PMID:24061918

  13. Carbon-Hydrogen and Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation of Cyclopropane by a Hydridotris(pyrazolyl)borate

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Carbon-Hydrogen and Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation of Cyclopropane by a Hydridotris and re-forming alkanes via carbon-carbon bond activation using heterogeneous catalysts is an important results in C-H activation of the hydrocarbon. The cyclopropyl hydride complex rearranges in benzene

  14. Deuterium-tritium pulse propulsion with hydrogen as propellant and the entire space-craft as a gigavolt capacitor for ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2013-08-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ?105 K. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  15. Determination of Histidine pKa Values in the Propeptides of Furin and Proprotein Convertase 1/3 Using Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Elferich, Johannes; Williamson, Danielle M; David, Larry L; Shinde, Ujwal

    2015-08-01

    Propeptides of proprotein convertases regulate activation of their protease domains by sensing the organellar pH within the secretory pathway. Earlier experimental work highlighted the importance of a conserved histidine residue within the propeptide of a widely studied member, furin. A subsequent evolutionary analysis found an increase in histidine content within propeptides of secreted eukaryotic proteases compared with their prokaryotic orthologs. However, furin activates in the trans-golgi network at a pH of 6.5 while a paralog, proprotein convertase 1/3, activates in secretory vesicles at a pH of 5.5. It is unclear how a conserved histidine can mediate activation at two different pH values. In this manuscript, we measured the pKa values of histidines within the propeptides of furin and proprotein convertase 1/3 using a histidine hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry approach. The high density of histidine residues combined with an abundance of basic residues provided challenges for generation of peptide ions with unique histidine residues, which were overcome by employing ETD fragmentation. During this analysis, we found slow hydrogen-deuterium exchange in residues other than histidine at basic pH. Finally, we demonstrate that the pKa of the conserved histidine in proprotein convertase 1/3 is acid-shifted compared with furin and is consistent with its lower pH of activation. PMID:26110992

  16. Investigation of the role of the micro-porous layer in polymer electrolyte fuel cells with hydrogen deuterium contrast neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu Taek; Mench, Matthew M

    2012-03-28

    In this study, the high resolution hydrogen-deuterium contrast radiography method was applied to elucidate the impact of the micro-porous layer (MPL) on water distribution in the porous fuel cell media. At the steady state, deuterium replaced hydrogen in the anode stream, and the large difference in neutron attenuation of the D(2)O produced at the cathode was used to track the produced water. It was found that the water content peaked in the cathode-side diffusion media (DM) for the cell without MPL, but with an MPL on the anode and cathode DM, the peak water amount was pushed toward the anode, resulting in a relatively flattened water profile through components and demonstrating a liquid barrier effect. Additionally, the dynamic water behavior in diffusion media was analyzed to understand the effect of a MPL and operating conditions. The water content in the DM changed with applied current, although there is a significant amount of residual liquid content that does not appear to be part of capillary channels. The effect of the MPL on irreducible saturation in DM and cell performance was also investigated. PMID:22337210

  17. Hydrogen-deficient atmospheres for cool carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Bower, C. D.; Lemke, D. A.; Luttermoser, D. G.; Petrakis, J. P.; Reinhart, M. D.; Welch, K. A.; Alexander, D. R.; Goebel, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Motivated by recent work which hints at a possible deficiency of hydrogen in non-Mira N-type carbon stars and to further explore the parameter space of chemical composition, computations have been made of a series of hydrogen-deficient models for carbon stars. For these models Teff = 3000 K, and log g = 0.0. Solar abundances are used for all elements except for carbon (which is enhanced to give C/O = 1.05), hydrogen, and helium. As the fractional abundance of hydrogen is decreased, being replaced by helium, the temperature-optical depth relation is affected only slightly, but the temperature-pressure relation is changed. The most striking change in the emergent flux is the decrease of the H(-) peak at 1.65 micron compared with the blackbody peak at 1.00 micron.

  18. Deuterium-free water ( 1H2O) in complex life-support systems of long-term space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyak, Y.; Grigoriev, A.; Gaydadimov, V.; Gurieva, T.; Levinskih, M.; Pokrovskii, B.

    Heavy water containing deuterium displays toxic property. It is stated that any quantity of a heavy isotope of hydrogen—deuterium—is undesirable to animals and plants. It was earlier shown by us that physical-chemical life support systems on board the "MIR" station fractionate (change) isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon. Therefore, the problem of regenerative systems in habitable space objects should include removal, from water, of a heavy stable isotope of hydrogen—deuterium. In this article we consider one method of obtaining deuterium-free water—decomposition of distillate water in an electrolyser to hydrogen and oxygen with subsequent synthesis in a catalytic or high-temperature reactor. The influence of deuterium-free water on the growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana and Japanese quail is investigated. It is shown that with the help of the electrolysis method it is possible to fabricate water containing 80% less deuterium in comparison with SMOW. Experimentally, it is proved on a culture of Arabidopsis thaliana and Japanese quail that water with reduced contents of deuterium (80%) displays positive biological activity.

  19. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of hydrogenated carbon thin films: The effect of hydrogen pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, J.; Tóth, Z.; Juhász, A.; Szakács, G.; Szilágyi, E.; Veres, M.; Koós, M.

    2006-08-01

    Diamondlike properties of amorphous carbon films can be enhanced by applying reactive hydrogen atmosphere during pulsed laser deposition (PLD) as shown by recent studies. The complex phenomena occurring during carbon plume expansion has not been examined yet thoroughly. Therefore we deposited amorphous hydrogenated carbon thin films in hydrogen ambient atmosphere (4×10-4-25Pa) by PLD at room temperature. The deposited films were characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis, Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, and nanoindentation measurements. At low hydrogen pressures (below ˜0.1Pa), when the mean free path of plasma constituents in the background gas is larger than the target substrate distance, the deposited films show diamondlike properties. At higher pressures (above ˜0.1Pa) the deposited films change their diamondlike carbon character towards to a structure which contains increasing amount of sp2 bonded carbon sites. Further increase in pressure (above ˜2Pa) results in hydrogenated carbon films with increasing hydrogen content. Principally these changes are caused by the energy decrease of the plume when plasma is decelerated by the background gas. Chemical reactions also effect the composition of the films especially in the highest pressure domain.

  20. Deuterium abundances

    E-print Network

    M. Lemoine; J. Audouze; L. Ben Jaffel; P. Feldman; R. Ferlet; G. Hebrard; E. B. Jenkins; C. Mallouris; W. Moos; K. Sembach; G. Sonneborn; A. Vidal-Madjar; D. G. York

    1999-03-02

    We discuss the measurements of deuterium abundances in high redshift quasar absorbers, in the solar system and in the interstellar medium. We present new results that indicate spatial variations of the deuterium abundance in the interstellar medium at the level of 50% over scales possibly as small as 10 pc, and discuss plausible causes for the origin of these variations.

  1. THE REMOVAL OF CARBON/BEUTERIUM FROM STAINLESS STEEL AND TUNGSTEN BY TRANSFERRED-ARC CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    K. J. HOLLIS; R. G. CASTRO; ET AL

    2001-04-01

    Tungsten and stainless steel samples have been contaminated with deuterium and carbon to simulate deposited layers in magnetic-confinement fusion devices. Deuterium and carbon were co-deposited onto the sample surfaces using a deuterium plasma seeded with varying amounts of deuterated methane. Deuterium was also implanted into the samples in an accelerator to simulate hydrogen isotope ion implantation conditions in magnetic confinement fusion devices. Cathodic arc, or transferred-arc (TA) cleaning was employed to remove the deposits from the samples. The samples were characterized by ion beam analysis both before and after cleaning to determine deuterium and carbon concentrations present. The deuterium content was greatly reduced by the cleaning thus demonstrating the possibility of using the TA cleaning technique for removing deuterium and/or tritium from components exposed to D-T fuels. Removal of surface layers and significant reduction of subsurface carbon concentrations was also observed.

  2. TENSILE TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A; Thad Adams, T; Ps Lam, P

    2007-05-02

    An infrastructure of new and existing pipelines and systems will be required to carry and to deliver hydrogen as an alternative energy source under the hydrogen economy. Carbon and low alloy steels of moderate strength are currently used in hydrogen delivery systems as well as in the existing natural gas systems. It is critical to understand the material response of these standard pipeline materials when they are subjected to pressurized hydrogen environments. The methods and results from a testing program to quantify hydrogen effects on mechanical properties of carbon steel pipeline and pipeline weld materials are provided. Tensile properties of one type of steel (A106 Grade B) in base metal, welded and heat affected zone conditions were tested at room temperature in air and high pressure (10.34 MPa or 1500 psig) hydrogen. A general reduction in the materials ability to plastically deform was noted in this material when specimens were tested in hydrogen. Furthermore, the primary mode of fracture was changed from ductile rupture in air to cleavage with secondary tearing in hydrogen. The mechanical test results will be applied in future analyses to evaluate service life of the pipelines. The results are also envisioned to be part of the bases for construction codes and structural integrity demonstrations for hydrogen service pipeline and vessels.

  3. MECHANICAL TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A

    2006-05-11

    The methods and interim results from a testing program to quantify hydrogen effects on mechanical properties of carbon steel pipeline and pipeline weld materials are provided. The scope is carbon steels commonly used for natural gas pipelines in the United States that are candidates for hydrogen service in the hydrogen economy. The mechanical test results will be applied in future analyses to evaluate service life of the pipelines. The results are also envisioned to be part of the bases for construction codes and structural integrity demonstrations for hydrogen service pipeline and vessels. Tensile properties of one type of steel (A106 Grade B) in base metal, welded and heat affected zone conditions were tested at room temperature in air and high pressure (1500 psig) hydrogen. A general reduction in the materials ability to plastically deform was noted in this material when specimens were tested in 1500 psig hydrogen. Furthermore, the primary mode of fracture was changed from ductile rupture in air to cleavage with secondary tearing in hydrogen. The mechanical test program will continue with tests to quantify the fracture behavior in terms of J-R curves for these materials at air and hydrogen pressure conditions.

  4. Synthesis of carbon-14, carbon-13 and deuterium labeled forms of thioacetamide and thioacetamide S-oxide

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Diganta; Hanzlik, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Thioacetamide (TA) is a model hepatotoxin that undergoes metabolic activation via two successive S-oxidations. The ultimate toxic metabolite thioacetamide S,S-dioxide, or its tautomer acetimidoyl sulfinic acid CH3C(NH)SO2H, then acylates lysine side chains on cellular proteins leading to cellular dysfunction or death. To identify individual target proteins, quantitate the extent of their modification and elucidate the structural details of their modification we required both radio-labeled and stable-labeled forms of TA and its intermediate metabolite thioacetamide S-oxide (TASO). The latter is stable when purified but can be difficult to isolate. Considering currently available isotopic precursors we devised and report here methods for the synthesis and isolation of TA and TASO labeled with C-14, C-13 and/or deuterium. The methods are straightforward, utilize readily available precursors and are amenable to small scale. PMID:26069392

  5. Hydrogen Confinement in Carbon Nanopores: Extreme Densification at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; He, Lilin; Saha, Dipendu; Contescu, Cristian I; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2011-01-01

    In-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of hydrogen confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) at room-temperature provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H2 at pressures up to 200 bar. The data was used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure, and approaches the liquid hydrogen density in narrow nanopores at 200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of hydrogen within the pores create internal pressures which exceed by a factor of up to ~ 60 the external gas pressures, confirming the benefits of adsorptive over compressive storage. These results can be utilized to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum hydrogen storage capacities at near ambient temperatures.

  6. Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

  7. Effects of atomic hydrogen and active carbon species in 1 mm vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    E-print Network

    Wikswo, John

    Effects of atomic hydrogen and active carbon species in 1 mm vertically aligned single method has been used to investigate the effects of atomic hydrogen and active carbon species and ethylene. The authors find that the presence of atomic hydrogen and active carbon species such as ethylene

  8. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  9. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez Mosqueda, Rosalba; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Kuc, Agnieszka; Pettersson, Lars; Heine, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory. Our simulation model includes a Pt4 cluster for the catalyst nanoparticle and curved and planar circumcoronene for two exemplary single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT), the (10,10) CNT and one of large diameter, respectively. Our results show that the H2 molecule dissociates spontaneously on the Pt4 cluster. However, the dissociated H atoms have to overcome a barrier of more than 2 eV to migrate from the catalyst to the CNT, even if the Pt4 cluster is at full saturation with six adsorbed and dissociated hydrogen molecules. Previous investigations have shown that the mobility of hydrogen atoms on the CNT surface is hindered by a barrier. We find that instead the Pt4 catalyst may move along the outer surface of the CNT with activation energy of only 0.16 eV, and that this effect offers the possibility of full hydrogenation of the CNT. Thus, although we have not found a low-energy pathway to spillover onto the CNT, we suggest, based on our calculations and calculated data reported in the literature, that in the hydrogen-spillover process the observed saturation of the CNT at hydrogen background pressure occurs through mobile Pt nanoclusters, which move on the substrate more easily than the substrate-chemisorbed hydrogens, and deposit or reattach hydrogens in the process. Initial hydrogenation of the carbon substrate, however, is thermodynamically unfavoured, suggesting that defects should play a significant role.

  10. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrogen. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquids. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  11. Non-relativistic contributions in order $?^5m_?c^2$ to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, deuterium and helium ion

    E-print Network

    S. G. Karshenboim; V. G. Ivanov; E. Yu. Korzinin; V. A. Shelyuto

    2010-05-27

    Contributions to the energy levels in light muonic atoms and, in particular, to the Lamb shift fall into a few well-distinguished classes. The related diagrams are calculated using different approaches. In particular, there is a specific kind of non-relativistic contributions. Here we consider such corrections to the Lamb shift in order $\\alpha^5m_\\mu$. These contributions are due to free vacuum polarization loops as well as to various effects of light-by-light scattering. The closed loop in the related diagrams is an electronic one, which allows a non-relativistic consideration of the muon. Both kinds of contributions have been known for a while, however, the results obtained up to date are only partial ones. We complete a calculation of the $\\alpha^5m_\\mu$ contributions for muonic hydrogen. The results are also adjusted for muonic deuterium and muonic helium ion.

  12. Synthesis of alcohols from hydrogenation of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Yin, X.L.; Ji, Y.Y.; Huang, W.; Yin, L.H.

    1994-12-31

    The effect of catalyst preparation and reaction conditions on the catalytic activity and selectivity for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide conversion to alcohols over zeolite supported bimetal catalyst was studied in detail. The transition metals, zeolites and rare earth oxides as well as the pH value of the ion exchange solution were investigated. The influence of the reaction conditions such as temperature, pressure and hydrogen gas/carbon dioxide mole ratio on the catalytic properties were also well studied. XPS and FT-IR methods were used to characterize the catalyst.

  13. Nanopores of carbon nanotubes as practical hydrogen storage media

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sang Soo; Kim, Hyun Seok; Han, Kyu Sung; Lee, Jai Young; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Kang, Jeung Ku; Woo, Seong Ihl; Duin, Adri C.T. van; Goddard, William A. III

    2005-11-21

    We report on hydrogen desorption mechanisms in the nanopores of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The as-grown MWCNTs show continuous walls that do not provide sites for hydrogen storage under ambient conditions. However, after treating the nanotubes with oxygen plasma to create nanopores in the MWCNTs, we observed the appearance of a new hydrogen desorption peak in the 300-350 K range. Furthermore, the calculations of density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that this peak could be attributed to the hydrogen that is physically adsorbed inside nanopores whose diameter is approximately 1 nm. Thus, we demonstrated that 1 nm nanopores in MWCNTs offer a promising route to hydrogen storage media for onboard practical applications.

  14. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

    2011-07-31

    Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

  15. Kaon Electroproduction on Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    David Abbott; Abdellah Ahmidouch, Pawel Ambrozewicz; Chris Armstrong; John Arrington; K. Assamagan; Kevin Bailey; Oliver K. Baker; Shelton Beedoe; Elizabeth Beise; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Jinseok Cha; G. Collins; C. Cothran; W.J. Cummings; Samuel Danagoulian; Fraser Duncan; Jim Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Tom Eden; Rolf Ent; Lars Ewell; H.T. Fortune; Haiyan Gao; Donald Geesaman; Kenneth Gustafsson; Paul Gueye; Jens-Ole Hansen; Wendy Hinton; Hal Jackson; Cynthia Keppel; Andi Klein; D. Koltenok; David Mack; Richard Madey; Pete Markowitz; C.J. Martoff; David Meekins; Joseph Mitchell; R. Mohring; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; S.K. Mtingwa; Tom O'Neill; Gabriel Niculescu; Ioana Niculescu; Dave Potterveld; John Price; Philip Roos; Brian Raue; J.J. Reidy; Juerg Reinhold; G. Savage; Reyad Sawafta; J.P. Schiffer; Ralph Segel; Stepan Stepanyan; V. Tadevosian; Liguang Tang; B. Terburg; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Ben Zeidman; Beni Zihlmann

    1998-08-01

    Kaon electroproduction on deuterium and hydrogen targets has been measured at beam energies of 3.245 and 2.445GeV and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}=0.38 and O.5(GeV/c ){sup 2} Associated production off a proton in the deuteron exhibits a quasifree production mechanism. The electroproduction of a Sigma - off the neutron could be extracted for the first time with reasonable errors.

  16. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production...330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen...

  17. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production...330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen...

  18. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production...330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen...

  19. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production...330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen...

  20. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330...CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  1. The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in interstellar space. IV - The lines of sight to Delta, Epsilon, and Iota Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurent, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; York, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    Deuterium absorption features in spectra of Delta, Epsilon, and Iota Ori obtained with Copernicus are analyzed. The Iota Ori line-of-sight analysis, which is quite detailed because of the high-velocity H I components superposed on the deuterium features, gives a D/H ratio (which is uncertain because of a complex profile) of 0.000014. A D/H ratio of the order of 7 millionths is determined for Delta and Epsilon Ori. For the complex line profiles involved, one may regard this as a formal lower limit. Several attempts were made to increase the ratio N(D I)/N(H I) in the context of reasonable models for the line of sight, but with no success; the derived values are therefore regarded as actual values, not lower limits. Since the derived value is an average on the line of sight, the possibility cannot be ruled out that the true ratios N(D I)/N(H I) in individual nearby components differ from the mean values. The mean value for these two directions is lower by a factor of 4 than the best value for the Zeta Pup line of sight (the highest yet derived for path lengths greater than 50 pc).

  2. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrocarbons. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquid. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  3. Hydrogenation of segregated carbon and adsorbed acetylene on iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzel, H. P.; Krebs, H. J.; Schwarting, W.

    1980-05-01

    Monolayers with segregated carbon and/or adsorbed acetylene on iron foils were prepared in vacuum and characterized by their C 1s XPS spectra. The subsequent hydrogenation of these layers in 1 bar H 2 at 500-560 K produced substantial amounts of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons, up to butane, in support of a chain growth mechanism not involving molecular CO.

  4. Storage of Hydrogen in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A. C.; Jones, K. M.; Bekkedahl, T. A.; Kiang, C. H.; Bethune, D. S.; Heben, M. J.

    1997-03-27

    Pores of molecular dimensions can adsorb large quantities of gases owing to the enhanced density of the adsorbed material inside the pores, a consequence of the attractive potential of the pore walls. Pederson and Broughton have suggested that carbon nanotubes, which have diameters of typically a few nanometres, should be able to draw up liquids by capillarity, and this effect has been seen for low-surface-tension liquids in large-diameter, multi-walled nanotubes. Here we show that a gas can condense to high density inside narrow, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). Temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy shows that hydrogen will condense inside SWNTs under conditions that do not induce adsorption within a standard mesoporous activated carbon. The very high hydrogen uptake in these materials suggests that they might be effective as a hydrogen-storage material for fuel-cell electric vehicles.

  5. Hydrogenation of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Polyamine Reagents: Combined Experimental and

    E-print Network

    Tománek, David

    oxidation of SWNTs using some combination of sulfuric acid, nitric acid, and occasionally hydrogen peroxide9Hydrogenation of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Polyamine Reagents: Combined Experimental hydrogenation of single-wall carbon nanotubes using high boiling polyamines as hydrogenation reagents. Our

  6. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  7. Liquid-like hydrogen densities in engineered carbon nanospaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, Elmar; Gillespie, Andrew; Pfeifer, Peter

    2014-03-01

    High surface area materials, such as those engineered from synthetic carbon compounds, have narrow pore sizes resulting in exceptionally high stored densities for hydrogen. Stored density is a measurement of the average hydrogen density within a pore. At supercritical temperatures and high pressures, these materials can achieve stored densities 20% higher than liquid hydrogen at 1 bar and 20 K. At 77 K and 200 bar, we have achieved stored densities of up to 85 g/L. We can show, depending on the pore structure, a maximum of gravimetric hydrogen excess adsorption at 100 bar and 296 K and binding energies of 8-10 kJ/mol. The occurrence of a maximum of gravimetric excess adsorption at relatively low pressures, indicating a high binding energy, is due to the overlapping adsorption potentials in narrow pores.

  8. Automated Data Reduction for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Experiments, Enabled by High-Resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kazazic, Sasa; Zhang, Hui-Min; Schaub, Tanner M.; Emmett, Mark R.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Blakney, Gregory T.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2010-01-01

    Mass analysis of proteolytic fragment peptides following hydrogen/deuterium exchange offers a general measure of solvent accessibility/hydrogen bonding (and thus conformation) of solution-phase proteins and their complexes. The primary problem in such mass analyses is reliable and rapid assignment of mass spectral peaks to the correct charge state and degree of deuteration of each fragment peptide, in the presence of substantial overlap between isotopic distributions of target peptides, autolysis products, and other interferant species. Here, we show that at sufficiently high mass resolving power (m/?m50% ? 100,000), it becomes possible to resolve enough of those overlaps so that automated data reduction becomes possible, based on the actual elemental composition of each peptide without the need to deconvolve isotopic distributions. We demonstrate automated, rapid, reliable assignment of peptide masses from H/D exchange experiments, based on electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectra from H/D exchange of solution-phase myoglobin. Combined with previously demonstrated automated data acquisition for such experiments, the present data reduction algorithm enhances automation (and thus expands generality and applicability) for high-resolution mass spectrometry- based analysis of H/D exchange of solution-phase proteins. PMID:20116280

  9. Effect of hydrogen on the properties of magnetron sputtering of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Nobuo

    1987-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films have been prepared by magnetron sputtering of silicon in methane-hydrogen-argon gas mixtures, and the dependence of film properties on hydrogen partial pressure (PH) as well as methane partial pressure against total gas pressure has been investigated. With increasing PH, the concentration of carbon increases, accompanied with the increase in the number of Si-C bonds, in spite of the unchanging partial pressure of methane. Following this, the optical band gap and activation energies of dc conductivities increase, and the photoconductivity as well as the dark conductivity decreases. The intensity of Si-H bonds is almost unchanged, while that of C-H bonds increases. These results are discussed mainly from the standpoint of the change of deposition process composed of the chemical decomposition of methane and the physical sputtering of silicon.

  10. Deuterium transport through device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. J.; Wallace, R. M.

    1999-08-01

    We use secondary ion mass spectrometry to characterize the hydrogen/deuterium distribution and concentration on complimentary "metal" oxide silicon (CMOS) test structures subjected to molecular deuterium (D2) anneals. We examine the temperature dependence and the influence of doping on the transport of deuterium to the gate oxide interfaces resulting in interface passivation. We find that undoped polycrystalline silicon appears to be an efficient barrier for deuterium transport at typical postmetallization sintering temperatures. We also examine the permeability of device structures that include dielectric encapsulation layers after typical postmetal sintering conditions employed in a conventional CMOS process flow. It is found that typical low temperature deposited oxide dielectrics are quite permeable by molecular deuterium at typical sintering temperatures (435 °C). In contrast, chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride dielectrics appear to form a complete barrier to deuterium diffusion (even for layers as thin as 300 Å). We also find that nitrides which receive a high thermal budget exposure, such as the source/drain anneal, appears to regain permeability to deuterium diffusion/transport.

  11. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  12. Carbon Nanotube/Magnesium Composite as a Hydrogen Source.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min Kyu; Se, Kwon Oh; Kim, Min Joong; Hwang, Jae Won; Yoon, Byoung Young; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen produced using the steam reforming process contains sulfur and carbon monoxide that are harmful to the Pt catalyst in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, CO-free hydrogen can be generated from the hydrolysis of either Al in strongly alkaline water or Mg in neutral water with chlorides such as sea water. The hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of Mg is extremely slow and linearly proportional to the corrosion rate of Mg in chloride water. In this work, we fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)--reinforced Mg--matrix composite by Spark Plasma Sintering as a fast hydrogen generation source for a PEMFC. The CNTs distributed in the Mg matrix act as numerous local cathodes, and hence cause severe galvanic corrosion between the Mg-matrix anode and CNT-cathode in NaCl solution. It was found that the hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of the 5 vol.% CNT/Mg composite is 3300 times faster than that of the Mg without CNTs due primarily to the galvanic corrosion effect. PMID:26726603

  13. A Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Study on Nickel-based Binary-Ternary Amorphous and Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibhatla, Anasuya

    Hydrogen is a major role player in current global sustainable energy scenario. Research around the world is carried out to harness hydrogen from all possible sources. One of these sources is water gas shift reaction after the coal gasification process. Sustainable infrastructure can be viable in countries like USA and Australia, making this process viable. Various methods are used to harness this hydrogen from the water gas. One of these methods is the use of inorganic membranes based on Pd, Ag, Ni, Zr and other transition metals. Pd addition to the membranes makes the membranes more expensive for commercial use. Various bulk properties like hydrogen permeation and absorption are studied on Pd and Pd-based alloys. Alternate alloys based on Ni, V, Ta etc are being studied to substitute the use of Pd making this technology more cost efficient. A current balance in research in this area is fund to exist by coating the non-precious metal membranes with Pd to improve the surface interaction with hydrogen. The nature of membranes used for hydrogen separation is important aspect for the overall performance. Crystalline materials provide better bulk properties, however, are not durable under high temperature and hydrogen pressure. In this research, non-Pd coated Ni-based amorphous membranes were made by melt spin technique, which have been studied for their surface properties. Gas phase H2-D2 exchange reaction has been carried out on the membrane surface. This provides a measure of catalytic activity of the above mentioned membranes. More studies included the crystallographic phase change determination, bulk hydrogen solubility measurements, surface conduction measurements and surface morphological studies. During this research, it has been observed that crystalline materials provide more surface activity for hydrogen than their amorphous counterparts. Ni64Zr36 alloy has been shown to exhibit similar kinetic rates as metallic Ni. Also, microkinetic analysis was performed to determine the heat of hydrogen absorption and desorption on the alloy surface. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was conducted on the membranes to determine the surface resistance and it was found that Ni64Zr36 as-spun ribbon displayed highest resistance while Ni60Ta20Zr20 showed lowest resistance. Absorption studies on Ni60V 40 binary alloy and Ni60V20Zr20 ternary alloy indicated that the addition of Zr to these non-coated alloys increased the hydrogen solubility in the bulk. SEM and TEM analyses showed the presence of possible nano crystalline phases in Ni64Zr36 membrane. XRD and SEM studies conducted on post treated samples showed the possible phase segregation of Ni and ZrO2. Ni60Nb40 did not show any phase transformations after hydrogen heat treated unlike its ternary composition, Ni60Nb20Zr20. It is noteworthy to mention that bubbles were observed during SEM on Ni 64Zr36 post-treated sample on the surface due to possible hydrogen trapping and subsequent release of hydrogen gas.

  14. Microwave absorption of magnetized hydrogen plasma in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2009-11-15

    A simple model to describe the microwave absorption of magnetized hydrogen plasma embedded inside the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which were grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation (HiPco), is proposed and analyzed. By using Maxwell equations in conjunction with a general expression of the complex permittivity of magnetized hydrogen plasma in HiPco CNTs, known as the Appleton-Hartree formula, the absorption coefficients of the system for right-hand circularly wave propagation along and across the static magnetic field are obtained. The effects of the continuously changing the electron density, the collision frequency, and the cyclotron frequency on the absorption of the microwave are discussed.

  15. Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5 Cristian I carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) were synthesized by melt-spinning, carbonization and activation of an isotropic pitch carbon precursor premixed with an orga- nometallic Pd compound. The hydrogen uptake at 25 °C

  16. Formaldehyde metabolism by Escherichia coli. Carbon and solvent deuterium incorporation into glycerol, 1,2-propanediol, and 1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, B.K.; Nicholls, K.M.; Sanders, J.K.

    1985-07-16

    Escherichia coli were grown on 14.3% uniformly TC-labeled glucose as the sole carbon source and challenged anaerobically with 90% TC-labeled formaldehyde. The major multiply labeled metabolites were identified by TC NMR spectroscopy to be glycerol and 1,2-propanediol, and a minor metabolite was shown to be 1,3-propanediol. In each case, formaldehyde is incorporated only into the C1 position. A novel form of TC NMR isotope dilution analysis of the major products reveals that all the 1,2-diol C1 is formaldehyde derived but that about 40% of the glycerol C1 is derived from bacterial sources. Glycerokinase converted the metabolite (1- TC)glycerol to equal amounts of (3- TC)glycerol 3-phosphate and (1- TC)glycerol 3-phosphate, demonstrating that the metabolite is racemic. When ( TC)formaldehyde incubation was carried out in H2O/D2O mixtures, deuterium incorporation was detected by beta- and gamma-isotope shifts. The 1,3-diol is deuterium labeled only at C2 and only once, while the 1,2-diol and glycerol are each labeled independently at both C2 and C3; C3 is multiply labeled. Deuterium incorporation levels are different for each metabolite, indicating that the biosynthetic pathways probably diverge early.

  17. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Meteorite Sulfonic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Chang, Sherwood

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  18. Selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from gases containing hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide using diethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Haimour, N.; Sandall, O.C.

    1983-01-01

    It is sometimes necessary to selectively remove hydrogen sulfide from gases containing carbon dioxide. This may be the case for example in the production of sulfur using the Claus process. When two gases are simultaneously absorbed into a solution containing a reactant with which each gas can react, the rate of absorption of each component is affected by the presence of the other gas. For the absorption of hydrogen sulfide into primary and secondary amines, the reaction which occurs can usually be considered to be instantaneous. An instantaneous reaction is diffusion-limited since the reaction occurs so rapidly that the liquid phase reactant and the absorbed gas cannot coexist in the same region of the liquid. For primary and secondary amines used for the gas treatment, the reaction with carbon dioxide is much slower than for hydrogen sulfide and can often be considered to be second order. In this work the simultaneous absorption of two gases into a liquid containing a reactant with which both gases can react is modeled using penetration theory. It is assumed that one gas reacts instantaneously and the other gas undergoes a second order reaction. Parameters used in the calculations are those available in the literature corresponding to the absorption of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in diethanolamine.

  19. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  20. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T.; Huang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8?kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500?Nm3 H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry. PMID:24067754

  1. Characterization of the International Humic Substances Society standard and reference fulvic and humic acids by solution state carbon-13 (13C) and hydrogen-1 (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Folan, Daniel W.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Standard and reference samples of the International Humic Substances Society have been characterized by solution state carbon-13 and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Samples included the Suwannee River, soil, and peat standard fulvic and humic acids, the Leonardite standard humic acid, the Nordic aquatic reference fulvic and humic acids, and the Summit Hill soil reference humic acid. Aqueous-solution carbon-13 NMR analyses included the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times, measurement of nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors, measurement of quantitative carbon distributions, recording of attached proton test spectra, and recording of spectra under nonquantitative conditions. Distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer carbon-13 NMR spectra also were recorded on the Suwannee River fulvic acid in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide. Hydrogen-1 NMR spectra were recorded on sodium salts of the samples in deuterium oxide. The carbon aromaticities of the samples ranged from 0.24 for the Suwannee River fulvic acid to 0.58 for the Leonardite humic acid.

  2. Hydrogenated 5-carbon compound and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Frye, John G. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is based upon the surprising discovery that a 5-carbon compound selected from the group of 4-oxopentanoic acid, at least one lactone of 4-oxopentanoic acid, and combinations thereof, may be hydrogenated with a bimetallic catalyst of a noble metal in combination with a second metal and preserve the pendant methyl group. It was further unexpectedly discovered that the same conditions of bimetallic catalyst in the presence of hydrogen are useful for catalyzing the different intermediate reactions for example angelicalactone to gamma-valerolactone and gamma-valerolactone to 1,4-pentanediol. Finally, it was surprising that levulinic acid could be converted to 2-methyltetrahydrofuran with heating in the presence of the bimetallic catalyst and hydrogen in a single process vessel. The method of the present invention unexpectedly produced a fuel or fuel component having 2-methyltetrahydrofuran either in a yield greater than 4.5 mol % or in combination with alcohols.

  3. Hydrogenated 5-carbon compound and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, D.C.; Frye, J.G.

    1999-03-16

    The present invention is based upon the surprising discovery that a 5-carbon compound selected from the group of 4-oxopentanoic acid, at least one lactone of 4-oxopentanoic acid, and combinations thereof, may be hydrogenated with a bimetallic catalyst of a noble metal in combination with a second metal and preserve the pendant methyl group. It was further unexpectedly discovered that the same conditions of bimetallic catalyst in the presence of hydrogen are useful for catalyzing the different intermediate reactions, for example, angelicalactone to gamma-valerolactone and gamma-valerolactone to 1,4-pentanediol. Finally, it was surprising that levulinic acid could be converted to 2-methyltetrahydrofuran with heating in the presence of the bimetallic catalyst and hydrogen in a single process vessel. The method of the present invention unexpectedly produced a fuel or fuel component having 2-methyltetrahydrofuran either in a yield greater than 4.5 mol % or in combination with alcohols. 8 figs.

  4. Hydrogen Bonds Involved in Binding the Qi-site Semiquinone in the bc1 Complex, Identified through Deuterium Exchange

    E-print Network

    Crofts, Antony R.

    Hydrogen Bonds Involved in Binding the Qi-site Semiquinone in the bc1 Complex, Identified through neighbor- hood of the semiquinone (SQ) at the Qi-site of the bc1 complex (ubihydroquinone:cytochrome c- gested that the second quinone processing site of the bc1 com- plex, the Qi-site, through which

  5. Optimization of Nano-Carbon Materials for Hydrogen Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yakobson, Boris I

    2013-08-02

    Research undertaken has added to the understanding of several critical areas, by providing both negative answers (and therefore eliminating expensive further studies of unfeasible paths) and positive feasible options for storage. Theoretical evaluation of the early hypothesis of storage on pure carbon single wall nanotubes (SWNT) has been scrutinized with the use of comprehensive computational methods (and experimental tests by the Center partners), and demonstrated that the fundamentally weak binding energy of hydrogen is not sufficiently enhanced by the SWNT curvature or even defects, which renders carbon nanotubes not practical media. More promising direction taken was towards 3-dimensional architectures of high porosity where concurrent attraction of H2 molecule to surrounding walls of nano-scale cavities can double or even triple the binding energy and therefore make hydrogen storage feasible even at ambient or somewhat lower temperatures. An efficient computational tool has been developed for the rapid capacity assessment combining (i) carbon-foam structure generation, (ii) accurate empirical force fields, with quantum corrections for the lightweight H2, and (iii) grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. This made it possible to suggest optimal designs for carbon nanofoams, obtainable via welding techniques from SWNT or by growth on template-zeolites. As a precursor for 3D-foams, we have investigated experimentally the synthesis of VANTA (Vertically Aligned NanoTube Arrays). This can be used for producing nano-foams. On the other hand, fluorination of VANTA did not show promising increase of hydrogen sorption in several tests and may require further investigation and improvements. Another significant result of this project was in developing a fundamental understanding of the elements of hydrogen spillover mechanisms. The benefit of developed models is the ability to foresee possible directions for further improvement of the spillover mechanism.

  6. Towards efficient solar hydrogen production by intercalated carbon nitride photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Gao, Honglin; Yan, Shicheng; Wang, Jiajia; Huang, Yu An; Wang, Peng; Li, Zhaosheng; Zou, Zhigang

    2013-11-01

    The development of efficient photocatalytic material for converting solar energy to hydrogen energy as viable alternatives to fossil-fuel technologies is expected to revolutionize energy shortage and environment issues. However, to date, the low quantum yield for solar hydrogen production over photocatalysts has hindered advances in the practical applications of photocatalysis. Here, we show that a carbon nitride intercalation compound (CNIC) synthesized by a simple molten salt route is an efficient polymer photocatalyst with a high quantum yield. We found that coordinating the alkali metals into the C-N plane of carbon nitride will induce the un-uniform spatial charge distribution. The electrons are confined in the intercalated region while the holes are in the far intercalated region, which promoted efficient separation of photogenerated carriers. The donor-type alkali metal ions coordinating into the nitrogen pots of carbon nitrides increase the free carrier concentration and lead to the formation of novel nonradiative paths. This should favor improved transport of the photogenerated electron and hole and decrease the electron-hole recombination rate. As a result, the CNIC exhibits a quantum yield as high as 21.2% under 420 nm light irradiation for solar hydrogen production. Such high quantum yield opens up new opportunities for using cheap semiconducting polymers as energy transducers. PMID:24061109

  7. Hydrogen storage reactions on titanium decorated carbon nanocones theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalabi, A. S.; Taha, H. O.; Soliman, K. A.; Abeld Aal, S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen storage reactions on Ti decorated carbon nanocones (CNC) are investigated by using the state of the art density functional theory calculations. The single Ti atom prefers to bind at the bridge site between two hexagonal rings, and can bind up to 6 hydrogen molecules with average adsorption energies of -1.73, -0.74, -0.57, -0.45, -0.42, and -0.35 eV per hydrogen molecule. No evidence for metal clustering in the ideal circumstances, and the hydrogen storage capacity is expected to be as large as 14.34 wt%. Two types of interactions are recognized. While the interaction of 2H2 with Ti-CNC is irreversible at 532 K, the interaction of 3H2 with Ti-CNC is reversible at 392 K. Further characterizations of the former two reactions are considered in terms of projected densities of states, simulated infrared and proton magnetic resonance spectra, electrophilicity, and statistical thermodynamic stability. The free energy of the highest hydrogen storage capacity reaction between 6H2 and Ti-CNC meets the ultimate targets of department of energy at (233.15 K) and (11.843 atm) with surface coverage (0.941) and (direct/inverse) rate constants ratio (1.35).

  8. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-10-15

    The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N(+) and [N-H+D](+) ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N+H](+) and [N+D](+) ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S1O1+H](+) and [S1O1+D](+) ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components. PMID:25913675

  9. Atomic hydrogen interactions with amorphous carbon thin films Bhavin N. Jariwala,1

    E-print Network

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Atomic hydrogen interactions with amorphous carbon thin films Bhavin N. Jariwala,1 Cristian V-scale interactions of H atoms with hydrogenated amorphous carbon a-C:H films were identified using molecular dynamics through a detailed analysis of the MD trajectories. The MD simulations showed that hydrogenation occurs

  10. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling ?2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (É?bio), accounting also for a large part in the ?2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of É?bio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic É?bio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the ?2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of ?2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  11. Kinetic effect of Pd additions on the hydrogen uptake of chemically activated, ultramicroporous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of mixing chemically-activated ultramicroporous carbon (UMC) with Pd nanopowder is investigated. Results show that Pd addition doubles the rate of hydrogen uptake, but does not enhance the hydrogen capacity or improve desorption kinetics. The effect of Pd on the rate of hydrogen adsorption supports the occurrence of the hydrogen spillover mechanism in the Pd - UMC system.

  12. Facile synthesis of hydrogenated carbon nanospheres with a graphite-like ordered carbon structure.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junping; Yao, Mingguang; Zhu, Kai; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Shijia; Lu, Shuangchen; Liu, Bo; Cui, Wen; Liu, Bingbing

    2013-11-21

    We report a synthesis of hydrogenated carbon nanospheres (HCNSs) via a facile solvothermal route at low temperatures (60-100 °C), using CHCl3 as the carbon source and potassium (K) as the reductant. Selective cleavage of the relatively lower stable C-Cl bonds (compared to C-H bonds) of the carbon precursor (CHCl3) by K metal results in the growth of HCNSs. The diameter of HCNSs ranges from 40 to 90 nm. The HCNSs have a graphite-like ordered carbon structure in spite of their high degree of hydrogenation. The HCNSs exhibit an average Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 43 m(2) g(-1), containing a small amount of mesopores and macropores in the structure. The nanospheres' sample as an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) has been studied. It exhibits a high discharge capacity (3539 mA h g(-1) in the first cycle, 978 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles) and good cycling stability, demonstrating advantages as a promising candidate for anode materials in LIBs. The high capacity of the HCNSs is due to their unique nanostructures and high percentage hydrogenation, as well as hydrogenation induced structural defects. PMID:24096808

  13. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  14. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry and Site-Directed Disulfide Cross-Linking Suggest an Important Dynamic Interface between the Two Lysostaphin Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hai-Rong; Gu, Mei-Gang; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Jin-Jiang; Lu, Wan-Ying; Lu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Lysostaphin is a peptidoglycan hydrolase secreted by Staphylococcus simulans. It can specifically lyse Staphylococcus aureus and is being tested as a novel antibacterial agent. The protein contains an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal cell wall targeting domain. Although the two domains from homologous enzymes were structurally determined, the structural organization of lysostaphin domains remains unknown. We used hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) and site-directed disulfide cross-linking to probe the interface between the lysostaphin catalytic and targeting domains. H/DX-MS-mediated comparison of peptides from full-length lysostaphin and the separated domains identified four peptides of lower solvent accessibility in the full-length protein. Cross-linking analysis using cysteine pair substitutions within those peptides showed that two pairs of cysteines can form disulfide bonds, supporting the domain association role of the targeted peptides. The cross-linked mutant exhibited a binding capacity to S. aureus that was similar to that of the wild-type protein but reduced bacteriolytic activity probably because of restraint in conformation. The diminished activity was further reduced with increasing NaCl concentrations that can cause contractions of bacterial peptidoglycan. The lytic activity, however, could be fully recovered by reducing the disulfide bonds. These results suggest that lysostaphin may require dynamic association of the two domains for coordinating substrate binding and target cleavage on the elastic peptidoglycan. Our study will help develop site-specific PEGylated lysostaphin to treat systemic S. aureus infections. PMID:23380729

  15. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  16. Membrane-based systems for carbon capture and hydrogen purification

    SciTech Connect

    Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2010-11-24

    This presentation describes the activities being conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop carbon capture technologies for power systems. This work is aimed at continued development and demonstration of a membrane based pre- and post-combustion carbon capture technology and separation schemes. Our primary work entails the development and demonstration of an innovative membrane technology for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide that operates over a broad range of conditions relevant to the power industry while meeting the US DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program goals of 90% CO{sub 2} capture at less than a 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Separating and capturing carbon dioxide from mixed gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic temperatures and pressures as well as be compatible with large gas volumes. Our project team is developing polymer membranes based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) chemistries that can purify hydrogen and capture CO{sub 2} at industrially relevant temperatures. Our primary objectives are to develop and demonstrate polymer-based membrane chemistries, structures, deployment platforms, and sealing technologies that achieve the critical combination of high selectivity, high permeability, chemical stability, and mechanical stability all at elevated temperatures (> 150 C) and packaged in a scalable, economically viable, high area density system amenable to incorporation into an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) plant for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. Stability requirements are focused on tolerance to the primary synthesis gas components and impurities at various locations in the IGCC process. Since the process stream compositions and conditions (temperature and pressure) vary throughout the IGCC process, the project is focused on the optimization of a technology that could be positioned upstream or downstream of one or more of the water-gas-shift reactors (WGSRs) or integrated with a WGSR.

  17. Interaction between adsorbed hydrogen and potassium on a carbon nanocone containing material as studied by photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Raaen, Steinar

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on a potassium doped carbon nanocone containing material was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and work function measurement. The valence band spectra indicate that there is charge transfer from potassium to carbon. Upon deposition on carbon potassium is in its ionic state for lower doping and shows both ionic and metallic behavior at higher doping. Adsorption of hydrogen facilitates diffusion of potassium on the carbon material as seen by changes in the K2p core level spectrum. Variations in the measured sample work function indicate that hydrogen initially adsorb on the K dopants and subsequently adsorb on the carbon cone containing material.

  18. Single Membrane Reactor Configuration for Separation of Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Micheal Roberts; Robert Zabransky; Shain Doong; Jerry Lin

    2008-05-31

    The objective of the project was to develop a novel complementary membrane reactor process that can consolidate two or more downstream unit operations of a coal gasification system into a single module for production of a pure stream of hydrogen and a pure stream of carbon dioxide. The overall goals were to achieve higher hydrogen production efficiencies, lower capital costs and a smaller overall footprint than what could be achieved by utilizing separate components for each required unit process/operation in conventional coal-to-hydrogen systems. Specifically, this project was to develop a novel membrane reactor process that combines hydrogen sulfide removal, hydrogen separation, carbon dioxide separation and water-gas shift reaction into a single membrane configuration. The carbon monoxide conversion of the water-gas-shift reaction from the coal-derived syngas stream is enhanced by the complementary use of two membranes within a single reactor to separate hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Consequently, hydrogen production efficiency is increased. The single membrane reactor configuration produces a pure H{sub 2} product and a pure CO{sub 2} permeate stream that is ready for sequestration. This project focused on developing a new class of CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for this new process concept. Several approaches to make CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for high-temperature applications have been tested. Membrane disks using the technique of powder pressing and high temperature sintering were successfully fabricated. The powders were either metal oxide or metal carbonate materials. Experiments on CO{sub 2} permeation testing were also performed in the temperature range of 790 to 940 C for the metal carbonate membrane disks. However, no CO{sub 2} permeation rate could be measured, probably due to very slow CO{sub 2} diffusion in the solid state carbonates. To improve the permeation of CO{sub 2}, one approach is to make membranes containing liquid or molten carbonates. Several different types of dual-phase membranes were fabricated and tested for their CO{sub 2} permeation in reducing conditions without the presence of oxygen. Although the flux was quite low, on the order of 0.01-0.001 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min, the selectivity of CO{sub 2}/He was almost infinite at temperatures of about 800 C. A different type of dual-phase membrane prepared by Arizona State University (ASU) was also tested at GTI for CO{sub 2} permeation. The measured CO{sub 2} fluxes were 0.015 and 0.02 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min at 750 and 830 C, respectively. These fluxes were higher than the previous flux obtained ({approx}0.01 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min) using the dual-phase membranes prepared by GTI. Further development in membrane development should be conducted to improve the CO{sub 2} flux. ASU has also focused on high temperature permeation/separation experiments to confirm the carbon dioxide separation capabilities of the dual-phase membranes with La{sup 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF6482) supports infiltrated with a Li/Na/K molten carbonate mixture (42.5/32.5/25.0 mole %). The permeation experiments indicated that the addition of O{sub 2} does improve the permeance of CO{sub 2} through the membrane. A simplified membrane reactor model was developed to evaluate the performance of the process. However, the simplified model did not allow the estimation of membrane transport area, an important parameter for evaluating the feasibility of the proposed membrane reactor technology. As a result, an improved model was developed. Results of the improved membrane reactor model show that the membrane shift reaction has promise as a means to simplify the production of a clean stream of hydrogen and a clean stream of carbon dioxide. The focus of additional development work should address the large area required for the CO{sub 2} membrane as identified in the modeling calculations. Also, a more detailed process flow diagram should be developed that includes integration of cooling and preheating feed streams as well as particulate removal so that stea

  19. Combustion characteristics of hydrogen. Carbon monoxide based gaseous fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, J. J.; White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.; Lecren, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating the combuston performance of a family of fuel gases based on a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These gases, in addition to being members of a family, were also representative of those secondary fuels that could be produced from coal by various gasification schemes. In particular, simulated Winkler, Lurgi, and Blue-water low and medium energy content gases were used as fuels in the experimental combustor rig. The combustor used was originally designed as a low NOx rich-lean system for burning liquid fuels with high bound nitrogen levels. When used with the above gaseous fuels this combustor was operated in a lean-lean mode with ultra long residence times. The Blue-water gas was also operated in a rich-lean mode. The results of these tests indicate the possibility of the existence of an 'optimum' gas turbine hydrogen - carbon monoxide based secondary fuel. Such a fuel would exhibit NOx and high efficiency over the entire engine operating range. It would also have sufficient stability range to allow normal light-off and engine acceleration. Solar Turbines Incorporated would like to emphasize that the results presented here have been obtained with experimental rig combustors. The technologies generated could, however, be utilized in future commercial gas turbines.

  20. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over nanostructured systems: A mechanochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulas, Gabriele; Campesi, Renato; Garroni, Sebastiano; Delogu, Francesco; Milanese, Chiara

    2011-07-01

    In this study we investigated the mechanochemical hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over nanostructured FeCo- and Mg 2Ni-based catalysts. To this aim powdered materials, prepared by mechanical alloying, were subjected to mechanical treatment under CO + H 2 atmosphere. A methodology to evaluate the activity of the solid catalysts on an absolute basis was developed. Conversion data were, indeed, expressed as turnover frequency, TOF, and related to the occurrence of ball to powder collision events through the mechanochemical turnover frequency parameter, MTOF. Differences in the catalytic activity and selectivity were observed for the two FeCo-based studied systems, the solid solution Fe 50Co 50 and its dispersion on TiO 2 support. As for the Mg 2Ni system, we explored the possibility to estimate the specific role of hydrogen pre-activation step. The catalytic properties of the mechanically alloyed Mg 2Ni system were compared with the conversion data shown by the same system pre-hydrogenated and subsequently milled under CO atmosphere.

  1. VOLUME 78, NUMBER 3 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 20 JANUARY 1997 Absolute Frequency Measurement of the 2S-8S D Transitions in Hydrogen and Deuterium

    E-print Network

    Hilico, Laurent

    -photon tran- sitions to two standard lasers (the iodine-stabilized and the methane-stabilized helium of the 2S-8S D tran- sitions in hydrogen and deuterium with a frequency- multiplication chain. The relative indirectly hydrogen fre- quencies to the cesium clock (see Fig. 1). The experiment is carried out at two

  2. Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B. (Livermore, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing a deuterium enriched material by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the working material a gas phase photolytically dissociable organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom which is adjacent to a carbonyl group and consisting of molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as deuterium and molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as another isotope of hydrogen. The organic carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of the deuterium containing species to yield a deuterium enriched stable molecular product. Undissociated carbonyl compound, depleted in deuterium, is preferably redeuterated for reuse.

  3. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Melbourne, FL)

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  4. A STUDY TO EVALUATE CARBON MONOXIDE AND HYDROGEN SULFIDE CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORS AT AN OIL REFINERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An eleven month field evaluation was done on five hydrogen sulfide and four carbon monoxide monitors located at an oil refinery. The hydrogen sulfide monitors sampled a fuel gas feed line and the carbon monoxide monitors sampled the emissions from a fluid cat cracker (FCC). Two o...

  5. Development of Affordable, Low-Carbon Hydrogen Supplies at an Industrial Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roddy, Dermot J.

    2008-01-01

    An existing industrial hydrogen generation and distribution infrastructure is described, and a number of large-scale investment projects are outlined. All of these projects have the potential to generate significant volumes of low-cost, low-carbon hydrogen. The technologies concerned range from gasification of coal with carbon capture and storage…

  6. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher (Allentown, PA); Farris, Thomas Stephen (Bethlehem, PA)

    2008-11-18

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  7. A comparative theoretical study of metal functionalized carbon nanocones and carbon nanocone sheets as potential hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Shalabi, A S; Soliman, K A; Taha, H O

    2014-09-28

    The hydrogen storage of Ti functionalized carbon nanocones and carbon nanocone sheets is investigated by using the state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations. The Ti atom prefers to bind at the hollow site of the hexagonal ring. The average adsorption energies corrected for dispersion forces are -0.54 and -0.39 eV per hydrogen molecule. With no metal clustering, the system gravimetric capacities are expected to be as large as 9.31 and 11.01 wt%. The hydrogen storage reactions are characterized in terms of simulated infrared spectra, projected densities of states, kinetics, and statistical thermodynamics. The free energies and enthalpies of the Ti functionalized carbon nanocone meet the ultimate targets of the Department of Energy for all temperatures and pressures. The closest reactions to zero free energy occur at 378.15 K/2.961 atm for carbon nanocones and 233.15 K/2.961 atm for carbon nanocone sheets. The translational component is found to exert a dominant effect on the total entropy change with temperature. More promising thermodynamics are assigned to the hydrogenation of Ti functionalized carbon nanocone sheets at 233.15 K. As the temperature is increased, the lifetimes of the hydrogen molecules adsorbed at the surface drop and the rate constants increase. At fixed pressure, the rate constants of hydrogenation of Ti functionalized carbon nanocones are smaller than those of Ti functionalized carbon nanocone sheets, while the lifetimes are greater. PMID:25099825

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of erosion and surface evolution of tungsten due to bombardment with deuterium and carbon in

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Available online 24 May 2013 Keywords: Molecular dynamic simulation Carbon irradiation on tungsten dynamics simulation. Tungsten erosion and surface evolution is simulated during irradiation by carbon irradiation on crystal tungsten reveals that tungsten erosion is enhanced at high substrate temperatures

  9. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  10. Kinetic modelling of molecular hydrogen transport in microporous carbon materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hankel, M.; Zhang, H.; Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K.; Gray, S. K.; Smith, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The proposal of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes is explored by employing statistical rate theory methods to describe the kinetics of molecular hydrogen transport in model microporous carbon structures. A Lennard-Jones atom-atom interaction potential is utilized for the description of the interactions between H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} and the carbon framework, while the requisite partition functions describing the thermal flux of molecules through the transition state are calculated quantum mechanically in view of the low temperatures involved in the proposed kinetic molecular sieving application. Predicted kinetic isotope effects for initial passage from the gas phase into the first pore mouth are consistent with expectations from previous modeling studies, namely, that at sufficiently low temperatures and for sufficiently narrow pore mouths D{sub 2} transport is dramatically favored over H{sub 2}. However, in contrast to expectations from previous modeling, the absence of any potential barrier along the minimum energy pathway from the gas phase into the first pore mouth yields a negative temperature dependence in the predicted absolute rate coefficients - implying a negative activation energy. In pursuit of the effective activation barrier, we find that the minimum potential in the cavity is significantly higher than in the pore mouth for nanotube-shaped models, throwing into question the common assumption that passage through the pore mouths should be the rate-determining step. Our results suggest a new mechanism that, depending on the size and shape of the cavity, the thermal activation barrier may lie in the cavity rather than at the pore mouth. As a consequence, design strategies for achieving quantum-mediated kinetic molecular sieving of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} in a microporous membrane will need, at the very least, to take careful account of cavity shape and size in addition to pore-mouth size in order to ensure that the selective step, namely passage through the pore mouth, is also the rate determining step.

  11. Suppression of carbon erosion by hydrogen shielding during high-flux hydrogen bombardment E. Salonen, K. Nordlund, J. Tarus, T. Ahlgren, and J. Keinonen

    E-print Network

    Nordlund, Kai

    Suppression of carbon erosion by hydrogen shielding during high-flux hydrogen bombardment E Garching bei Mu¨nchen, Germany Received 3 August 1999 The erosion of carbon by intensive hydrogen cannot be explained by standard sputtering or erosion mod- els, yet understanding it is central

  12. Apparatus for hydrogen and carbon production via carbon aerosol-catalyzed dissociation of hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor); Smith, Franklyn (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A novel process and apparatus is disclosed for sustainable, continuous production of hydrogen and carbon by catalytic dissociation or decomposition of hydrocarbons at elevated temperatures using in-situ generated carbon particles. Carbon particles are produced by decomposition of carbonaceous materials in response to an energy input. The energy input can be provided by at least one of a non-oxidative and oxidative means. The non-oxidative means of the energy input includes a high temperature source, or different types of plasma, such as, thermal, non-thermal, microwave, corona discharge, glow discharge, dielectric barrier discharge, or radiation sources, such as, electron beam, gamma, ultraviolet (UV). The oxidative means of the energy input includes oxygen, air, ozone, nitrous oxide (NO.sub.2) and other oxidizing agents. The method, apparatus and process of the present invention is applicable to any gaseous or liquid hydrocarbon fuel and it produces no or significantly less CO.sub.2 emissions compared to conventional processes.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of Glycerol Steam Reforming for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogen and carbon dioxide separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Joel M.; Soria, M. A.; Madeira, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic study of Glycerol Steam Reforming (GSR) for hydrogen production with in situ carbon dioxide and hydrogen (reaction products) simultaneous removal was performed. The sorption-enhanced membrane reactor (SEMR) was divided into multiple sub-Gibbs reactors and the Gibbs free energy minimization method was employed. The effects of temperature (600-800 K), molar water-to-glycerol feed ratio (WGFR) (3-9), pressure (1-5 atm) and fraction of hydrogen and carbon dioxide removal (f, 0-0.99) on the GSR process were target of investigation. A hydrogen yield (total moles of hydrogen produced/mole of reacted glycerol) very close to the stoichiometric value of 7 was obtained at 700 K, WGFR of 9, 1 atm and for fCO2 = 0.99 and fH2 = 0.80. This corresponds to an enhancement of 217%, 47% and 22% in terms of hydrogen yield comparatively to the traditional reactor (TR), sorption-enhanced reactor (SER) with carbon dioxide capture (fCO2 = 0.99) and membrane reactor (MR) with hydrogen separation (fH2 = 0.80) , respectively. In terms of coke, its formation was only observed under WGFRs below the stoichiometric value of 3.

  14. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  15. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  16. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  17. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  18. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  19. Two different carbon-hydrogen complexes in silicon with closely spaced energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stübner, R.; Kolkovsky, Vl.; Weber, J.

    2015-08-01

    An acceptor and a single donor state of carbon-hydrogen defects (CHA and CHB) are observed by Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy at 90 K. CHA appears directly after hydrogenation by wet chemical etching or hydrogen plasma treatment, whereas CHB can be observed only after a successive annealing under reverse bias at about 320 K. The activation enthalpies of these states are 0.16 eV for CHA and 0.14 eV for CHB. Our results reconcile previous controversial experimental results. We attribute CHA to the configuration where substitutional carbon binds a hydrogen atom on a bond centered position between carbon and the neighboring silicon and CHB to another carbon-hydrogen defect.

  20. The role of carbon dioxide in chemoselective hydrogenation of halonitroaromatics over supported noble metal catalysts in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Shinichiro; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro; Ikariya, Takao

    2005-02-21

    Chemoselective hydrogenation of halogenated nitrobenzenes over Pt/C catalysts proceeds effectively in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) to produce halogenated anilines with excellent selectivity; the rate of the hydrogenation of nitro groups is markedly enhanced in scCO2 compared to the neat reaction, and the dehalogenation reaction is significantly suppressed. PMID:15700083

  1. Method of producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen by gasification of solid carbonaceous material involving microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, J.L. Jr.

    1984-03-06

    A process is claimed for the gasification of carbon of solid carbonaceous material to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting the material with superheated steam and irradiating the product of said contacting with an amount of microwave energy sufficient to gasify said carbon, and apparatus therefor.

  2. Migration mechanism for atomic hydrogen in porous carbon materials Badri Narayanan,1

    E-print Network

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Migration mechanism for atomic hydrogen in porous carbon materials Badri Narayanan,1 Yufeng Zhao,2 May 2012) To explain the fast kinetics of H in porous carbon, we propose that the migration relies by the porous nature of the material itself. The mechanism proposed is applicable for any porous carbon

  3. Effects of palladium coating on field-emission properties of carbon nanofibers in a hydrogen plasma

    E-print Network

    Javey, Ali

    Effects of palladium coating on field-emission properties of carbon nanofibers in a hydrogen plasma Carbon nanofibers Metal coating Results from electron field-emission studies using arrays of patterned carbon nanofiber bundles are reported. We find that the desired field-emission characteristics were

  4. PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17671774 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated

    E-print Network

    Cal, Mark P.

    2000-01-01

    PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 1767­1774 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for removal of H S at high temperatures (400­6008C) in an2, gas pressure and sorbent regeneration. Adsorption experiments with a zinc-impregnated activated carbon

  5. PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17571765 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated

    E-print Network

    Cal, Mark P.

    2000-01-01

    PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 1757­1765 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H S from a simulated coal gas stream2 at a temperature of 5508C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H S at elevated

  6. Kinetics of the Homogeneous Catalytic Hydrogenation of Olefins in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Using a Fluoroacrylate Copolymer

    E-print Network

    Abdou, Hanan E.

    Kinetics of the Homogeneous Catalytic Hydrogenation of Olefins in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide a fluoroacrylate copolymer grafted rhodium catalyst in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) are reported field of chemical reaction engineering.3-8 Specifically, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2

  7. Acceleration of Hydrogen Ions up to 30 MeV and Generation of 3 × 1012 Neutrons in Megaampere Deuterium Gas-Puff Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Cikhardt, J.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A.; Cherdizov, R.; Fursov, F.; Kokshenev, V.; Kovalchuk, B.; Kurmaev, N.; Labetsky, A.; Ratakhin, N.; Orcikova, H.; Turek, K.

    2013-10-01

    Fusion neutrons were produced with a deuterium gas-puff z-pinch on the GIT-12 generator at the Institute of High Current Electronics in Tomsk. The peak neutron yield from DD reactions reached Yn = (2 . 9 +/- 0 . 3) ×1012 at 100 ?g/cm linear mass density of deuterium, 700 ns implosion time and 2.7 MA current. Such a neutron yield means that the scaling law of deuterium z-pinches Yn ~I4 was extended to 3 MA currents. The further increase of neutron yields up to (3 . 7 +/- 0 . 4) ×1012 was achieved by placing a deuterated polyethylene catcher onto the axis. Maximum neutron energies of 15 and 22 MeV were observed by radial and axial nToF detectors, respectively. A stack of CR-39 track detectors showed up to 40 MeV deuterons (or 30 MeV protons) on the z-pinch axis. Since the energy input into plasmas was 70 kJ, the number of DD neutrons per one joule of stored plasma energy exceeded the value of 5 ×107 . This value implies that deuterium gas-puff z-pinches belong to the most efficient plasma-based sources of DD neutrons. This work was partially supported by the GACR grant No. P205/12/0454 and by the RFBR research project No. 13-08-00479-a.

  8. Structure and hydrogen adsorption properties in low density nanoporous carbons from simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, L.; Morris, James R

    2012-01-01

    We systematically model the hydrogen adsorption in nanoporous carbons over a wide range of carbon bulk densities (0.6 - 2.4 g/cm3) by using tight binding molecular dynamics simulations for the carbon structures and thermodynamics calculations of the hydrogen adsorption. The resulting structures are in good agreement with the experimental data of ultra-microporous carbon (UMC), a wood-based activated carbon, as indicated by comparisons of the microstructure at atomic level, pair distribution function, and pore size distribution. The hydrogen adsorption calculations in carbon structures demonstrate both a promising hydrogen storage capacity (excess uptake of 1.33 wt% at 298K and 5 MPa, for carbon structures at the lower range of densities) and a reasonable heat of adsorption (12-22 kJ/mol). This work demonstrates that increasing the heat of adsorption does not necessarily increase the hydrogen uptake. In fact, the available adsorption volume is as important as the isosteric heat of adsorption for hydrogen storage in nanoporous carbons.

  9. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  10. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER. PMID:26686184

  11. Hydrogen storage in different carbon materials: Influence of the porosity development by chemical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Sánchez, Paula; Valverde, José Luís; Romero, Amaya

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen adsorption capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured as a function of pressure and temperature. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less hydrogen than more amorphous materials. After a chemical activation process, the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbon materials increased markedly in comparison with the non-activated ones. BET surface area of amorphous carbon increased by a factor of 3.5 and the ultramicropore volume doubled, thus increasing the hydrogen adsorption by a factor of 2. However, BET surface area in platelet CNFs increased by a factor of 3 and the ultramicropore volume by a factor of 6, thus increasing the hydrogen storage by a factor of 4.5. The dependency of hydrogen storage capacity of carbon materials on the BET surface area was evaluated using both a condensation model and experimental results. Comparison of data suggests that the hydrogen adsorption capacity clearly depends on the pore structure and so, on the accessibility to the internal surface.

  12. Cometary deuterium.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Owen, T C

    1999-01-01

    Deuterium fractionations in cometary ices provide important clues to the origin and evolution of comets. Mass spectrometers aboard spaceprobe Giotto revealed the first accurate D/H ratios in the water of Comet 1P/Halley. Ground-based observations of HDO in Comets C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), the detection of DCN in Comet Hale-Bopp, and upper limits for several other D-bearing molecules complement our limited sample of D/H measurements. On the basis of this data set all Oort cloud comets seem to exhibit a similar (D/H)H2O ratio in H2O, enriched by about a factor of two relative to terrestrial water and approximately one order of magnitude relative to the protosolar value. Oort cloud comets, and by inference also classical short-period comets derived from the Kuiper Belt cannot be the only source for the Earth's oceans. The cometary O/C ratio and dynamical reasons make it difficult to defend an early influx of icy planetesimals from the Jupiter zone to the early Earth. D/H measurements of OH groups in phyllosilicate rich meteorites suggest a mixture of cometary water and water adsorbed from the nebula by the rocky grains that formed the bulk of the Earth may be responsible for the terrestrial D/H. The D/H ratio in cometary HCN is 7 times higher than the value in cometary H2O. Species-dependent D-fractionations occur at low temperatures and low gas densities via ion-molecule or grain-surface reactions and cannot be explained by a pure solar nebula chemistry. It is plausible that cometary volatiles preserved the interstellar D fractionation. The observed D abundances set a lower limit to the formation temperature of (30 +/- 10) K. Similar numbers can he derived from the ortho-to-para ratio in cometary water, from the absence of neon in cometary ices and the presence of S2. Noble gases on Earth and Mars, and the relative abundance of cometary hydrocarbons place the comet formation temperature near 50 K. So far all cometary D/H measurements refer to bulk compositions, and it is conceivable that significant departures from the mean value could occur at the grain-size level. Strong isotope effects as a result of coma chemistry can be excluded for molecules H2O and HCN. A comparison of the cometary (D/H)H2O ratio with values found in the atmospheres of the outer planets is consistent with the long-held idea that the gas planets formed around icy cores with a high cometary D/H ratio and subsequently accumulated significant amounts of H2 from the solar nebula with a low protosolar D/H. PMID:11543290

  13. Novel nanoporous carbon membranes for recovery of hydrogen from refinery waste gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.B.; Sircar, S.

    1996-12-31

    Petroleum refineries are among the largest users of hydrogen in the chemical industry. Hydrogen is used in hydrogenation, desulfurization and denitrogenation processes and a large source of hydrogen in refining operations is the production of aromatic compounds which are used as octane enhancers in gasoline. Environmental regulations are requiring refiners to reduce the amount of aromatic compounds in transportation fuel and, thus, the total amount of hydrogen produced in dehydrogenation processes is being reduced. In addition, refineries are being forced to use crudes which are higher in sulfur which further increases the total H{sub 2} needs. This requires refiners to make or buy hydrogen by conventional methods such as Steam-Methane Reforming or to recover hydrogen from their processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe the preparation and performance of a new carbon-based gas separation membrane and its application in two new processes for hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams.

  14. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  15. COLLISIONS OF FAST, HIGHLY STRIPPED CARBON, NIOBIUM, AND LEAD IONS WITH MOLECULAR HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A. S.; Berkner, K. H.; Graham, W. G.; Pyle, R. V.; Stearns, J. W.; Tanis, J. A.

    1980-11-01

    The range of experimental confirmation of our scaling rule for electron loss from a hydroqen atom in collision with a heavy, highly stripped ion has been considerably broadened by new measurements for carbon, niobium, and lead ions in molecular hydrogen.

  16. Electrochemical Removal of Carbon Monoxide in Reformate Hydrogen for Fueling Proton Exchange Membrane

    E-print Network

    Weidner, John W.

    Electrochemical Removal of Carbon Monoxide in Reformate Hydrogen for Fueling Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Sivagaminathan Balasubramanian, Charles E. Holland,* and John W. Weidner*,z Center in reformate hydrogen. In this design, the potential and gas flow are switched between the two filter cells so

  17. Direct Evidence for Solid-like Hydrogen in a Nanoporous Carbon Hydrogen Storage Material at Supercritical Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ting, Valeska P; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J; Bimbo, Nuno; Sharpe, Jessica E; Noguera-Diaz, Antonio; Presser, Volker; Rudic, Svemir; Mays, Timothy J

    2015-08-25

    Here we report direct physical evidence that confinement of molecular hydrogen (H2) in an optimized nanoporous carbon results in accumulation of hydrogen with characteristics commensurate with solid H2 at temperatures up to 67 K above the liquid-vapor critical temperature of bulk H2. This extreme densification is attributed to confinement of H2 molecules in the optimally sized micropores, and occurs at pressures as low as 0.02 MPa. The quantities of contained, solid-like H2 increased with pressure and were directly evaluated using in situ inelastic neutron scattering and confirmed by analysis of gas sorption isotherms. The demonstration of the existence of solid-like H2 challenges the existing assumption that supercritical hydrogen confined in nanopores has an upper limit of liquid H2 density. Thus, this insight offers opportunities for the development of more accurate models for the evaluation and design of nanoporous materials for high capacity adsorptive hydrogen storage. PMID:26171656

  18. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  19. Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  20. Nonrelativistic contributions of order {alpha}{sup 5}m{sub {mu}c}{sup 2} to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and deuterium, and in the muonic helium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Karshenboim, S. G.; Ivanov, V. G.; Korzinin, E. Yu.; Shelyuto, V. A.

    2010-06-15

    Contributions to the energy levels in light muonic atoms and, in particular, to the Lamb shift fall into a few well-distinguished classes. The related diagrams are calculated using different approaches. In particular, there is a specific type of nonrelativistic (NR) contribution. Here, we consider such corrections to the Lamb shift of order {alpha}{sup 5}m{sub {mu}.} These contributions are due to free vacuum-polarization loops as well as to various effects of light-by-light scattering. The closed loop in the related diagrams is an electronic one, which allows an NR consideration of the muon. Both types of contributions have been known for some time, however, the results obtained to date are only partial results. We complete a calculation of the {alpha}{sup 5}m{sub {mu}}contributions for muonic hydrogen. The results are also adjusted for muonic deuterium atom and helium ion.

  1. Biofiltration for control of carbon disulfide and hydrogen sulfide vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Fucich, W.J.; Yang, Y.; Togna, A.P.; Alibeckoff, D.

    1997-12-31

    A full-scale biofiltration system has been installed to control carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) vapor emissions at Nylonge Corporation (Nylonge), a cellulose sponge manufacturing facility in Elyria, Ohio. Both CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are toxic and odorous. In addition, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has classified CS{sub 2} as one of the 189 hazardous air pollutants listed under Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Nylonge evaluated several technologies to control CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S vapor emissions. After careful consideration of both removal efficiency requirements and cost, Nylonge selected biological treatment as the best overall technology for their application. A biological based technology has been developed to effectively degrade CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S vapors. Biofiltration is a process that aerobically converts particular vapor phase compounds into CO{sub 2}, biomass, and water vapor. In this process, microorganisms, in the form of a moistened biofilm layer, immobilized on an organic packing material, such as compost, peat, wood chips, etc., are used to catalyze beneficial chemical reactions. As a contaminated vapor stream passes through the biofilter bed, the contaminants are transferred to the biofilm and are degraded by the microorganisms. This paper describes the CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S biofiltration process and the full-scale biofilter system installed at Nylonge`s facility. The system was started in October of 1995, and is designed to treat a 30,000 CFM exhaust stream contaminated with CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S vapors.

  2. Structure, hydrogen bonding and thermal expansion of ammonium carbonate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, A. Dominic; Wood, Ian G.; Alfè, Dario; Hernández, Eduardo R.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Sparkes, Hazel A.

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of ammonium carbonate monohydrate, (NH4)2CO3·H2O, using Laue single-crystal diffraction methods with pulsed neutron radiation. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group Pnma (Z = 4), with unit-cell dimensions a = 12.047?(3), b = 4.453?(1), c = 11.023?(3)?Å and V = 591.3?(3)?Å3 [?calc = 1281.8?(7)?kg?m?3] at 10?K. The single-crystal data collected at 10 and 100?K are complemented by X-ray powder diffraction data measured from 245 to 273?K, Raman spectra measured from 80 to 263?K and an athermal zero-pressure calculation of the electronic structure and phonon spectrum carried out using density functional theory (DFT). We find no evidence of a phase transition between 10 and 273?K; above 273?K, however, the title compound transforms first to ammonium sesquicarbonate monohydrate and subsequently to ammonium bicarbonate. The crystallographic and spectroscopic data and the calculations reveal a quite strongly hydrogen-bonded structure (E HB ? 30–40?kJ?mol?1), on the basis of H?O bond lengths and the topology of the electron density at the bond critical points, in which there is no free rotation of the ammonium cation at any temperature. The barrier to free rotation of the ammonium ions is estimated from the observed librational frequency to be ??36?kJ?mol?1. The c-axis exhibits negative thermal expansion, but the thermal expansion behaviour of the a and b axes is ormal. PMID:25449618

  3. Structure, hydrogen bonding and thermal expansion of ammonium carbonate monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Fortes, A Dominic; Wood, Ian G; Alfè, Dario; Hernández, Eduardo R; Gutmann, Matthias J; Sparkes, Hazel A

    2014-12-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of ammonium carbonate monohydrate, (NH4)2CO3·H2O, using Laue single-crystal diffraction methods with pulsed neutron radiation. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group Pnma (Z = 4), with unit-cell dimensions a = 12.047?(3), b = 4.453?(1), c = 11.023?(3)?Å and V = 591.3?(3)?Å(3) [?calc = 1281.8?(7)?kg?m(-3)] at 10?K. The single-crystal data collected at 10 and 100?K are complemented by X-ray powder diffraction data measured from 245 to 273?K, Raman spectra measured from 80 to 263?K and an athermal zero-pressure calculation of the electronic structure and phonon spectrum carried out using density functional theory (DFT). We find no evidence of a phase transition between 10 and 273?K; above 273?K, however, the title compound transforms first to ammonium sesquicarbonate monohydrate and subsequently to ammonium bicarbonate. The crystallographic and spectroscopic data and the calculations reveal a quite strongly hydrogen-bonded structure (EHB ? 30-40?kJ?mol(-1)), on the basis of H...O bond lengths and the topology of the electron density at the bond critical points, in which there is no free rotation of the ammonium cation at any temperature. The barrier to free rotation of the ammonium ions is estimated from the observed librational frequency to be ??36?kJ?mol(-1). The c-axis exhibits negative thermal expansion, but the thermal expansion behaviour of the a and b axes is ormal. PMID:25449618

  4. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon as protective coating for a forming tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinatti, J. F.; Santos, L. V.; Cruz, N. C.; Rangel, E. C.

    2011-11-01

    This paper investigates the performance of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films as protective coatings for a forming tool made from AISI M2 steel coated with a titanium nitride (TiN) PVD commercial layer. The samples were initially cleaned in ultrasonic baths and subsequently in a plasma ablation procedure. Films were then deposited by plasma immersion ion implantation using 91% of acetylene and 9% of argon at a total pressure of 5.5 Pa. Samples were biased with high voltage negative pulses, P (T = 3.33 ms, pulse on-time: 0.03 ms, pulse off-time: 3.30 ms and application rate: 299 Hz) with amplitudes varying from 1.000 to 4.000 V. The chemical structure and composition of the films were evaluated by infrared spectroscopy. The roughness was determined by profilometry while the surface topography and morphology were investigated by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The friction coefficient was determined by the ball on disk technique. A decrease in the proportion of C-H and O-H groups was observed while the concentration of dangling bonds enhanced with increasing P. Sharp structures were detected on the film surface affecting roughness in two different ways: it increased with enhancing pulse magnitude in the smoothest substrate (AISI M2) and decreased in the roughest one (AISI M2-TiN). The best tribological result was found for the sample deposited with 3.600 V of bias onto TiN-AISI M2 steel.

  5. Temperature dependence of deuterium retention in tungsten deposits by deuterium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, K.; Uehara, K.; Date, H.; Fukada, S.; Watanabe, H.

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten (W) deposits were formed by hydrogen plasma sputtering and blisters were observed on the surface. The W deposits and W foils were exposed to deuterium ions with 2 keV-D2+ to doses of 1.0 × 1021 D2+/m2 at 294 and 773 K in addition to 573 K in the present authors' previous work. Hydrogen isotopes release behaviors from the W deposits and W foils were observed by the thermal desorption spectroscopy method. The amount of deuterium released from the W deposit was considerably larger than that from W foil. The obtained deuterium retention in D/m2 was in the range of deuterium retention in polycrystalline tungsten. Not only implanted deuterium but also hydrogen, which was incorporated during the sputtering-deposition process, were released from the W deposits. A hydrogen release peak at around 1100 K was observed for the W deposits. This is considered to be due to the rupture of the blisters.

  6. Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy

    E-print Network

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks, and carbon dioxide isotherm measurements were performed at 1-85 bar and 77-298 K on the evacuated forms of seven porous covalent organic frameworks (COFs). The uptake behavior and capacity of the COFs is best

  7. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X S

    2013-11-21

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in D-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. PMID:24072134

  8. Merging allylic carbon-hydrogen and selective carbon-carbon bond activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Didier, Dorian; Zabrodski, Tamar; Schinkel, Marvin; Ackermann, Lutz; Marek, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century, many synthetic organic chemists have focused on developing new strategies to regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectively build carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in a predictable and efficient manner. Ideal syntheses should use the least number of synthetic steps, with few or no functional group transformations and by-products, and maximum atom efficiency. One potentially attractive method for the synthesis of molecular skeletons that are difficult to prepare would be through the selective activation of C-H and C-C bonds, instead of the conventional construction of new C-C bonds. Here we present an approach that exploits the multifold reactivity of easily accessible substrates with a single organometallic species to furnish complex molecular scaffolds through the merging of otherwise difficult transformations: allylic C-H and selective C-C bond activations. The resulting bifunctional nucleophilic species, all of which have an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centre, can then be selectively derivatized by the addition of two different electrophiles to obtain more complex molecular architecture from these easily available starting materials.

  9. A trimodal porous carbon as an effective catalyst for hydrogen production by methane decomposition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Lua, Aik Chong

    2016-01-15

    A new type of porous carbon with an interconnected trimodal pore system is synthesized by a nanocasting method using nanoparticulated bimodal micro-mesoporous silica particles as the template. The synthesized template and carbon material are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission electron scanning microscopy (FESEM) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption test. The synthesized carbon material has an extremely high surface area, a large pore volume and an interconnected pore structure, which could provide abundant active sites and space for chemical reactions and minimize the diffusion resistance of the reactants. The resulting carbon is used as the catalyst for hydrogen production by the thermal decomposition of methane. The catalytic results show that the as-synthesized carbon in this study produces much higher methane conversion and hydrogen yield than the commercial carbon materials. PMID:26433477

  10. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X. S.

    2013-10-01

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal.Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03813k

  11. Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-01-07

    On-board hydrogen storage is a key requirement for fuel cell-powered cars and trucks. Porous carbon-based materials can in principle adsorb more hydrogen per unit weight at room temperature than liquid hydrogen at -176 oC. Achieving this goal requires interconnected pores with very high internal surface area, and binding energies between hydrogen and carbon significantly enhanced relative to H2 on graphite. In this project a systematic study of carbide-derived carbons, a novel form of porous carbon, was carried out to discover a high-performance hydrogen sorption material to meet the goal. In the event we were unable to improve on the state of the art in terms of stored hydrogen per unit weight, having encountered the same fundamental limit of all porous carbons: the very weak interaction between H2 and the carbon surface. On the other hand we did discover several strategies to improve storage capacity on a volume basis, which should be applicable to other forms of porous carbon. Further discoveries with potentially broader impacts include • Proof that storage performance is not directly related to pore surface area, as had been previously claimed. Small pores (< 1.5 nm) are much more effective in storing hydrogen than larger ones, such that many materials with large total surface areas are sub-par performers. • Established that the distribution of pore sizes can be controlled during CDC synthesis, which opens the possibility of developing high performance materials within a common family while targeting widely disparate applications. Examples being actively pursued with other funding sources include methane storage, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

  12. Preparation and characterization of ordered porous carbons for increasing hydrogen storage behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seul-Yi; Park, Soo-Jin

    2011-10-15

    We prepared ordered porous carbons (PCs) by using a replication method that had well-organized mesoporous silica as a template with various carbonization temperatures in order to investigate the possibility of energy storage materials. The microstructure and morphologies of the samples are characterized by XRD, TEM, and FT-Raman spectroscopy. N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms are analyzed by the t-plot method, as well as the BET and the H-K method in order to characterize the specific surface area, pore volume, and pore size distribution of the samples, respectively. The capacity of the hydrogen adsorption of the samples is evaluated by BEL-HP at 77 K and 1 bar. From the results, we are able to confirm that the synthesis of the samples can be accurately governed by the carbonization temperature, which is one of the effective parameters for developing the textural properties of the carbon materials, which affects the behaviors of the hydrogen storage. - Graphical abstract: It is described that the considerable long-range ordering and the presence of mono-dimensional aligned channels between the two aligned nanorods of the porous framework from the SBA-15 was retained in the T-950 sample during the carbonization process. Highlights: > Ordered porous carbons (PCs) are synthesized with various carbonization temperatures by using a replication method. > Carbonization temperature plays an important role in shrinking the micropores during the carbonization process of PCs. > The textural and structural properties of the PCs are good parameters for enhancing the hydrogen storage capacity.

  13. Hydrogen Storage Property of Nanoporous Carbon Materials Prepared from Rice Husks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Ikumi; Ono, Hiroki; Takahata, Tomokazu; Ohshio, Shigeo; Akasaka, Hiroki; Himeno, Syuuji; Kokubu, Toshinori; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    Nanoporous carbon materials for use as hydrogen storage materials were fabricated from rice husks. Rice husks from agricultural waste changed to porous carbon materials by heat treating and KOH activation. The specific surface area of the porous carbon materials increased from 11 to 2061 m2/g as the KOH weight ratio increased. The pore volume of the materials also increased from 0.01 to 0.88 cm3/g by KOH activation. The pore sizes of the activated porous carbon materials were distributed around 0.6 and 1.2 nm at micro-pore ranges. These results suggested porous carbon material have micro-pore structure. The hydrogen storage capacity of the porous carbon materials showed a 0.62 wt.% at 298 K under 12 MPa. The fabrication of hydrogen storage materials from agricultural waste rice husks was achieved. The results indicate that porous carbon materials synthesized from rice husks have micro-pore structures which influence their hydrogen storage capabilities.

  14. Continuous monitoring of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at Stromboli volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, Roberto M. R.; Camarda, Marco; Gurrieri, Sergio; Valenza, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    Geochemical monitoring of fumarole and soil gases is a powerful tool for volcano surveillance, for investigating the subsurface magma dynamics, and for hazard assessment in volcanic areas. The monitoring of both carbon dioxide (CO2) flux, and hydrogen (H2) concentration in active volcanic areas helps to improve the understanding of the processes linking the surface gas emissions, the chemistry of the magmatic gases, and the volcanic activity. The CO2 flux measurement is a routine technique for volcano monitoring purposes, because of CO2 is the second-abundant component of the gas phase in silicate magmas, attaining saturation at the mantle to deep crustal level. The H2 concentration has provided indications concerning the oxygen fugacity of magmatic gases, a parameter that changes over a wide range of low values (10-16 - 10-8 bar), and affects the redox state of multivalent elements. This study reports on the use a tailor-made automatic system developed for continuous monitoring purposes of H2 concentration and CO2 flux in the summit area of Stromboli volcano (Aeolian islands). The automatic device consists of an H2-selective electrochemical sensor, and two IR-spectrophotometers for measuring the CO2 flux in agreement with the dynamic concentration method. The data collected by the automatic system deployed at Stromboli from 19 May 2009 to 15 December 2010 are presented herein. The data processing provides a better understanding of the relationships between the evolution of the low temperature fumarolic emissions, and the volcanic activity. The results of the data analysis indicates that the high frequency variations exhibited by CO2 flux and H2 concentration are positively correlated with the eruptive activity of Stromboli, typically changing on time scale of hours or days. Furthermore, the investigation of the relationships between CO2 flux and H2 concentration provides an evaluation of the depth of the degassing source, by which the gas mixture containing H2 and CO2 starts to move through the rock fractures. Our data indicates that the depth of the degassing source ranges between 2 and 4 km in the volcano plumbing system, in agreement with the magma storage zone that has been proposed by other geochemical, volcanological, petrological and geophysical investigations.

  15. Measuring the primordial deuterium abundance during the cosmic dark ages.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, Kris; Furlanetto, Steven R

    2006-09-01

    We discuss how measurements of fluctuations in the absorption of cosmic microwave background photons by neutral gas at redshifts z approximately 7-200 could reveal the primordial deuterium abundance of the Universe. The strength of the cross-correlation of brightness-temperature fluctuations in the redshifted 21-cm line of hydrogen with those in the redshifted 92-cm line of deuterium is proportional to the value of the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio [D/H] fixed during big bang nucleosynthesis. Although challenging, this measurement would provide the cleanest possible determination of [D/H], free from contamination by structure formation processes at lower redshifts. We additionally report our result for the thermal spin-change cross section in deuterium-hydrogen scattering. PMID:17026353

  16. Compound-specific carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids in CM and CR chondrites and their use in evaluating potential formation pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-09-01

    Stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (?D, ?13C, and ?15N) of organic compounds can reveal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may indicate the most likely of these pathways. We have applied gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H stable isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites: CM1/2 Allan Hills (ALH) 83100, CM2 Murchison, CM2 Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, CM2 Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101, CR2 Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, CR2 Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. We compare the isotopic compositions of amino acids in these meteorites with predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways. We observe trends of decreasing ?13C and increasing ?D with increasing carbon number in the ?-H, ?-NH2 amino acids that correspond to predictions made for formation via Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis. We also observe light ?13C signatures for ?-alanine, which may indicate either formation via Michael addition or via a pathway that forms primarily small, straight-chain, amine-terminal amino acids (n-?-amino acids). Higher deuterium enrichments are observed in ?-methyl amino acids, indicating formation of these amino acids or their precursors in cold interstellar or nebular environments. Finally, individual amino acids are more enriched in deuterium in CR chondrites than in CM chondrites, reflecting different parent-body chemistry.

  17. Compound-Specific Carbon, Nitrogen, and Hydrogen Isotopic Ratios for Amino Acids in CM and CR Chondrites and their use in Evaluating Potential Formation Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (oD, 013C, and olSN) of organic compounds can revcal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may indicate the most likely of these pathways. We have applied gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H stable isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites: CM1I2 Allan Hills (ALH) 83100, CM2 Murchison, CM2 Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, CM2 Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101, CRZ Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, CRZ Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. We compare the isotopic compositions of amino acids in these meteorites with predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways. We observe trends of decreasing ODC and increasing oD with increasing carbon number in the aH, (l-NH2 amino acids that correspond to predictions made for formation via Streckercyanohydrin synthesis. We also observe light ODC signatures for -alanine, which may indicate either formation via Michael addition or via a pathway that forms primarily small, straight-chain, amine-terminal amino acids (n-ro-amino acids). Higher deuterium enrichments are observed in amethyl amino acids, indicating formation of these amino acids or their precursors in cold interstellar or nebular environments. Finally, individual amino acids are more enriched in deuterium in CR chondrites than CM chondrites, reflecting different parent-body chemistry.

  18. Suppression of hydrogenated carbon film deposition and hydrogen isotope retention by nitrogen addition into cold remote H/D and CH4 mixture plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, K.; Notani, M.; Uesugi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ishijima, T.

    2015-08-01

    Control of tritium retention and its removal from the first wall of future fusion devices are one of the most crucial issues for safety and effective use for fuel. Nitrogen addition into remote edge plasmas has been considered and tested as an effective method for suppression of carbon film deposition and reduction of hydrogen isotope absorption in the deposited films. In this paper we have investigated the scavenger effects of nitrogen injected into low temperature D2/CH4 plasmas on hydrogenated carbon film growth using a small helical device. The result of the deposition shows that the key reactive particles with CN and ND(H) bonds to suppression of hydrogenated carbon film growth and hydrogen isotope absorption are much slowly generated compared with hydrocarbon particles such as CD(H)x and C2D(H)x. This may be due to the slow atomic nitrogen diffusion into hydrogenated carbon layer and the chemical equilibrium between nitrogen absorption.

  19. Effects of Microstructure of Carbon Nanofibers for Amperometric Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhizhou; Cui, Xiaoli; Zheng, Junsheng; Wang, Qingfei; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-08-10

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with different microstructures, including platelet-carbon nanofibers (PCNFs), fish-bone-carbon nanofibers (FCNFs), and tube-carbon nanofibers (TCNFs), were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for electrochemical sensing of hydrogen peroxide. The CNFs studied here can show several microstructures in which various stacked morphologies and their sizes and graphite-layer ordering can be well controlled. Glassy carbon (GC) electrodes modified by CNFs were fabricated and compared for amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide. Sensors of PCNFs/GC, FCNFs/GC, and TCNFs/GC were used in the amperometric detection of H2O2 in a solution of 0.05 M phosphate buffered saline solution (pH 7.4).

  20. Functionalization of carbon-based nanostructures with light transition-metal atoms for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgun, E.; Ciraci, S.; Yildirim, T.

    2008-02-01

    In a recent letter [T. Yildirim and S. Ciraci, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 175501 (2005)], the unusual hydrogen storage capacity of Ti decorated carbon nanotubes has been revealed. The present paper extends this study further to investigate the hydrogen uptake by light transition-metal atoms decorating various carbon-based nanostructures in different types of geometry and dimensionality, such as carbon linear chain, graphene, and nanotubes. Using first-principles plane-wave method we show that not only outer but also inner surface of a large carbon nanotube can be utilized to bind more transition-metal atoms and hence to increase the storage capacity. We also found that scandium and vanadium atoms adsorbed on a carbon nanotube can bind up to five hydrogen molecules. Similarly, light transition-metal atoms can be adsorbed on both sides of graphene and each adsorbate can hold up to four hydrogen molecules yielding again a high-storage capacity. Interestingly, our results suggest that graphene can be considered as a potential high-capacity H2 storage medium. We also performed transition state analysis on the possible dimerization of Ti atoms adsorbed on the graphene and single-wall carbon nanotube.

  1. Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

    1980-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

  2. Tailoring of nanoscale porosity in carbide-derived carbons for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Gogotsi, Yury; Dash, Ranjan K; Yushin, Gleb; Yildirim, Taner; Laudisio, Giovanna; Fischer, John E

    2005-11-23

    The poor performance of hydrogen storage materials continues to hinder development of fuel cell-powered automobiles. Nanoscale carbons, in particular (activated carbon, exfoliated graphite, fullerenes, nanotubes, nanofibers, and nanohorns), have not fulfilled their initial promise. Here we show that carbon materials can be rationally designed for H2 storage. Carbide-derived carbons (CDC), a largely unknown class of porous carbons, are produced by high-temperature chlorination of carbides. Metals and metalloids are removed as chlorides, leaving behind a collapsed noncrystalline carbon with up to 80% open pore volume. The detailed nature of the porosity-average size and size distribution, shape, and total specific surface area (SSA)-can be tuned with high sensitivity by selection of precursor carbide (composition, lattice type) and chlorination temperature. The optimum temperature is bounded from below by thermodynamics and kinetics of chlorination reactions and from above by graphitization, which decreases SSA and introduces H2-sorbing surfaces with binding energies too low to be useful. Intuitively, pores of different size and shape should not contribute equally to hydrogen storage. By correlating pore properties with 77 K H2 isotherms from a wide variety of CDCs, we experimentally confirm that gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity normalized to total pore volume is optimized in materials with primarily micropores ( approximately 1 nm) rather than mesopores. Thus, in agreement with theoretical predictions, a narrow size distribution of small pores is desirable for storing hydrogen, while large pores merely degrade the volumetric storage capacity. PMID:16287270

  3. Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; van Benthem, Klaus; Li, Sa; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Pennycook, Stephen J; Jena, Puru; Gallego, Nidia C

    2011-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) were synthesized by meltspinning, carbonization and activation of an isotropic pitch carbon precursor premixed with an organometallic Pd compound. The hydrogen uptake at 25 oC and 20 bar on Pd- ACF exceeded the expected capacity based solely on Pd hydride formation and hydrogen physisorption on the microporous carbon support. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub- ngstrom spatial resolution provided unambiguous identification of isolated Pd atoms occurring in the carbon matrix that coexist with larger Pd particles. First principles calculations revealed that each single Pd atom can form Kubas-type complexes by binding up to three H2 molecules in the pressure range of adsorption measurements. Based on Pd atom concentration determined from STEM images, the contribution of various mechanisms to the excess hydrogen uptake measured experimentally was evaluated. With consideration of Kubas binding as a viable mechanism (along with hydride formation and physisorption to carbon support) the role of hydrogen spillover in this system may be smaller than previously thought.

  4. Analysis of diffential absorption lidar technique for measurements of anhydrous hydrogen chloride from solid rocket motors using a deuterium fluoride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, C. H.; Allario, F.

    1977-01-01

    An active optical technique (differential absorption lidar (DIAL)) for detecting, ranging, and quantifying the concentration of anhydrous HCl contained in the ground cloud emitted by solid rocket motors (SRM) is evaluated. Results are presented of an experiment in which absorption coefficients of HCl were measured for several deuterium fluoride (DF) laser transitions demonstrating for the first time that a close overlap exists between the 2-1 P(3) vibrational transition of the DF laser and the 1-0 P(6) absorption line of HCl, with an absorption coefficient of 5.64 (atm-cm) to the -1 power. These measurements show that the DF laser can be an appropriate radiation source for detecting HCl in a DIAL technique. Development of a mathematical computer model to predict the sensitivity of DIAL for detecting anhydrous HCl in the ground cloud is outlined, and results that assume a commercially available DF laser as the radiation source are presented.

  5. Spot-free catalysis using gold carbon nanotube & gold graphene composites for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Siddhardha, R. S.; Lakshminarayanan, V.; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen has been proposed as the green fuel of the future in the wake of depleting fossil fuels. Recently, carbon paste electrodes (CPE) modified with nanomaterials as electrocatalysts have drawn wide attention for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acid medium. The CPEs are advantageous owing to their chemical stability and ease of fabrication. Their applications for HER without any modification, however, are hampered on account of large hydrogen overpotential associated with carbon surface. In the present study, CPE has been modified with novel gold composites as electro-catalysts for HER in acid medium. The nanocomposites have shown ?100 fold increased current density than unmodified CPE at -0.3 V. Most strikingly for the first time, this study has quantitatively brought out the difference in catalysis between surfactant capped and pristine gold nanoparticles in terms of their application as spot-free catalysts towards hydrogen gas production by electrochemical route.

  6. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorinated hydrogen-bond acidic groups are directly attached to the backbone of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without the introduction of intermediate electron donating surface groups. Hexafluoroalcohol functional groups are exceptionally strong hydrogen bond acids, and are added to the nanotube surface using the aryl diazonium approach to create hydrogen-bond acidic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. These groups can promote strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with matrix materials in composites or with molecular species to be concentrated and sensed. In the latter case, this newly developed material is expected to find useful application in chemical sensors and in CNT-based preconcentrator devices for the detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents and explosives.

  7. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  8. Hydrogenolysis of 5-carbon sugars, sugar alcohols, and other methods and compositions for reactions involving hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd A [West Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2002-11-12

    Methods and compositions for reactions of hydrogen over a Re-containing catalyst with compositions containing a 5-carbon sugar, sugar alcohol, or lactic acid are described. It has been surprisingly discovered that reaction with hydrogen over a Re-containing multimetallic catalyst resulted in superior conversion and selectivity to desired products such as propylene glycol. A process for the synthesis of PG from lactate or lactic acid is also described.

  9. Hydrogenolysis Of 5-Carbon Sugars, Sugar Alcohols And Compositions For Reactions Involving Hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd A. (West Richland, WA); Frye, Jr., John G. (Richland, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA); Miller, Dennis J. (Okemos, MI)

    2004-01-13

    Methods and compositions for reactions of hydrogen over a Re-containing catalyst with compositions containing a 5-carbon sugar, sugar alcohol, or lactic acid are described. It has been surprisingly discovered that reaction with hydrogen over a Re-containing multimetallic catalyst resulted in superior conversion and selectivity to desired products such as propylene glycol. A process for the synthesis of PG from lactate or lactic acid is also described.

  10. Relation of Hydrogen and Methane to Carbon Monoxide in Exhaust Gases from Internal-Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Tessmann, Arthur M

    1935-01-01

    The relation of hydrogen and methane to carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases from internal-combustion engines operating on standard-grade aviation gasoline, fighting-grade aviation gasoline, hydrogenated safety fuel, laboratory diesel fuel, and auto diesel fuel was determined by analysis of the exhaust gases. Two liquid-cooled single-cylinder spark-ignition, one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled spark-ignition, and two liquid-cooled single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were used.

  11. Wafer Mapping Using Deuterium Enhanced Defect Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, K.; Holland, O. W.; Hellmer, R.; Vanmil, B.; Bubulac, L. O.; Golding, T. D.

    2010-07-01

    Deuterium (as well as other hydrogen isotopes) binds with a wide range of morphological defects in semiconductors and, as such, becomes distributed similarly to those defects. Thus, the deuterium profile within the sample serves as the basis of a technique for defect mapping known as amethyst wafer mapping (AWM). The efficiency of this technique has been demonstrated by evaluation of ion-induced damage in implanted Si, as well as as-grown defects in HgCdTe (MCT) epilayers. The defect tagging or decoration capability of deuterium is largely material independent and applicable to a wide range of defect morphologies. A number of analytical techniques including ion channeling and etch pit density measurements were used to evaluate the AWM results.

  12. Carbon hybridized halloysite nanotubes for high-performance hydrogen storage capacities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiao; Fu, Liangjie; Yang, Huaming; Ouyang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid nanotubes of carbon and halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with different carbon:HNTs ratio were hydrothermally synthesized from natural halloysite and sucrose. The samples display uniformly cylindrical hollow tubular structure with different morphologies. These hybrid nanotubes were concluded to be promising medium for physisorption-based hydrogen storage. The hydrogen adsorption capacity of pristine HNTs was 0.35% at 2.65?MPa and 298?K, while that of carbon coated HNTs with the pre-set carbon:HNTs ratio of 3:1 (3C-HNTs) was 0.48% under the same condition. This carbon coated method could offer a new pattern for increasing the hydrogen adsorption capacity. It was also possible to enhance the hydrogen adsorption capacity through the spillover mechanism by incorporating palladium (Pd) in the samples of HNTs (Pd-HNTs) and 3C-HNTs (Pd-3C-HNTs and 3C-Pd-HNTs are the samples with different location of Pd nanoparticles). The hydrogen adsorption capacity of the Pd-HNTs was 0.50% at 2.65?MPa and 298?K, while those of Pd-3C-HNTs and 3C-Pd-HNTs were 0.58% and 0.63%, respectively. In particular, for this spillover mechanism of Pd-carbon-HNTs ternary system, the bidirectional transmission of atomic and molecular hydrogen (3C-Pd-HNTs) was concluded to be more effective than the unidirectional transmission (Pd-3C-HNTs) in this work for the first time. PMID:26201827

  13. Synthesis of superlow friction carbon films from highly hydrogenated methane plasmas.

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Nilufer, I. B.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-10-13

    In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of diamondlike carbon films (DLC) derived from increasingly hydrogenated methane plasmas. The films were deposited on steel substrates by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature and the tribological tests were performed in dry nitrogen. Tests results revealed a close correlation between the hydrogen in source gas plasma and the friction and wear coefficients of the DLC films. Specifically, films grown in plasmas with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios had much lower friction coefficients and wear rates than did films derived from source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.003) was achieved with a film derived from 25% methane--75% hydrogen, while a coefficient of 0.015 was found for films derived from pure methane. Similar correlations were observed for wear rates. Films derived from hydrogen-rich plasmas had the least wear, while films derived from pure methane suffered the highest wear. We used a combination of surface analytical methods to characterize the structure and chemistry of the DLC films and worn surfaces.

  14. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with average diameter size at less than 1 nm. However, initial tests performed at our collaborator’s lab at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) did not indicate improved hydrogen sorption properties for the smaller-diameter nanotubes (compared with other types of nanotubes). As work continued, the difficulties in purification, large-scale synthesis, and stability of small diameter SWNTs became a major concern. In 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) made a no-go decision on future applied R&D investment in pure, undoped, single-walled carbon nanotubes for vehicular hydrogen storage.2 The second phase of the project involved developing a low-cost and scalable approach for the synthesis of microporous carbon materials with well-controlled pore sizes that would be suitable for hydrogen storage. The team studied several approaches, including the use of different zeolites as a template, the use of organic micelle structures as a template, and the slow oxidation of polymer precursors. Among them, the slow activation of Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) under either CO2 environment or H2O vapor produced microporous carbon with an average pore size of less than 2 nm. Initial testing at 77K at both NREL and the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) showed that these materials can store ~5.1 wt% hydrogen (excess) at 40 bar and 77K. The main feature to note with this material is that while the excess gravimetric capacities (>5 wt% at 77K) and specific surface areas (>3100 m2/g) are similar to AX-21 and other “super activated” commercial carbon sorbents at the same temperatures and pressures, due to the smaller pore sizes, bulk densities greater than 0.7 g/ml can be achieved, enabling excess volumetric capacities greater than 35 g/L; more than double that of AX-21.

  15. Chemisorption of hydrogen molecules on carbon nanotubes: charging effect from first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Guo, Wanlin; Tang, Chun

    2008-02-20

    We report a systematic investigation of the charging effect on hydrogen molecule chemisorption on (3, 3), (5, 5), (5, 0), and (8, 0) carbon nanotubes by first-principles calculations. The influence of injected charge on the chemisorption energy barriers is found to be sensitive to the nanotube diameter and chirality. The calculated results also indicate that electron injection is more effective in lowering the energy barrier for armchair carbon nanotubes while hole injection is more effective for zigzag nanotubes. The origin of these interesting trends and systematics can be understood by a close examination of the underlying electronic structure and the electron transfer between the hydrogen molecules and the nanotubes. PMID:21817655

  16. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2007-04-18

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  17. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Andrew Duncan, A; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2009-04-27

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  18. Efficient and durable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst based on nonmetallic nitrogen doped hexagonal carbon

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanming; Yu, Hongtao; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Yaobin

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of renewable energy technology, hydrogen production by water electrolysis, depends on the design of efficient and durable electrocatalyst composed of earth-abundant elements. Herein, a highly active and stable nonmetallic electrocatalyst, nitrogen doped hexagonal carbon (NHC), was developed for hydrogen production. It exhibited high activity for hydrogen evolution with a low overpotential of only 65?mV, an apparent exchange current density of 5.7 × 10?2?mA cm?2 and a high hydrogen production rate of 20.8?mL cm?2 h?1 at ?0.35?V. The superior hydrogen evolution activity of NHC stemmed from the intrinsic electrocatalytic property of hexagonal nanodiamond, the rapid charge transfer and abundance of electrocatalytic sites after nitrogen doping. Moreover, NHC was stable in a corrosive acidic solution during electrolysis under high current density. PMID:25354806

  19. The effect of hydrogen on the parameters of plastic deformation localization in low carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lunev, Aleksey G. E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Nadezhkin, Mikhail V. E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Shlyakhova, Galina V.; Barannikova, Svetlana A.; Zuev, Lev B.

    2014-11-14

    In the present study, the effect of interstitial hydrogen atoms on the mechanical properties and plastic strain localization patterns in tensile tested polycrystals of low-carbon steel Fe-0.07%C has been studied using double exposure speckle photography technique. The main parameters of plastic flow localization at various stages of deformation hardening have been determined in polycrystals of steel electrolytically saturated with hydrogen in a three-electrode electrochemical cell at a controlled constant cathode potential. Also, the effect of hydrogen on changing of microstructure by using optical microscopy has been demonstrated.

  20. Microwave response of magnetized hydrogen plasma in carbon nanotubes: multiple reflection effects

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2010-04-01

    We derived simple sets of equations to describe the microwave response of the magnetized hydrogen plasma slab embedded inside carbon nanotubes, which were grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation. These equations, which are useful when interference effects due to multiple reflections between plasma film interfaces are small, were used to analyze the reflection, absorption, and transmission coefficients of the magnetized hydrogen plasma slab. A discussion on the effects of the continuously changing external magnetic field and hydrogen plasma parameters on the reflected power, absorbed power, and transmitted power in the system is presented.

  1. Microwave response of magnetized hydrogen plasma in carbon nanotubes: multiple reflection effects.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Afshin

    2010-04-01

    We derived simple sets of equations to describe the microwave response of the magnetized hydrogen plasma slab embedded inside carbon nanotubes, which were grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation. These equations, which are useful when interference effects due to multiple reflections between plasma film interfaces are small, were used to analyze the reflection, absorption, and transmission coefficients of the magnetized hydrogen plasma slab. A discussion on the effects of the continuously changing external magnetic field and hydrogen plasma parameters on the reflected power, absorbed power, and transmitted power in the system is presented. PMID:20357852

  2. New Pathways and Metrics for Enhanced, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Boron-Doped Carbon Nanospaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Peter; Wexler, Carlos; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Lee, Mark W.; Jalistegi, Satish S.

    2014-08-14

    This project, since its start in 2007—entitled “Networks of boron-doped carbon nanopores for low-pressure reversible hydrogen storage” (2007-10) and “New pathways and metrics for enhanced, reversible hydrogen storage in boron-doped carbon nanospaces” (2010-13)—is in support of the DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, as part of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program’s comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for the successful commercialization and market acceptance of hydrogen powered vehicles. Storing sufficient hydrogen on board a wide range of vehicle platforms, at energy densities comparable to gasoline, without compromising passenger or cargo space, remains an outstanding technical challenge. Of the main three thrust areas in 2007—metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, and sorption-based hydrogen storage—sorption-based storage, i.e., storage of molecular hydrogen by adsorption on high-surface-area materials (carbons, metal-organic frameworks, and other porous organic networks), has emerged as the most promising path toward achieving the 2017 DOE storage targets of 0.055 kg H2/kg system (“5.5 wt%”) and 0.040 kg H2/liter system. The objective of the project is to develop high-surface-area carbon materials that are boron-doped by incorporation of boron into the carbon lattice at the outset, i.e., during the synthesis of the material. The rationale for boron-doping is the prediction that boron atoms in carbon will raise the binding energy of hydro- gen from 4-5 kJ/mol on the undoped surface to 10-14 kJ/mol on a doped surface, and accordingly the hydro- gen storage capacity of the material. The mechanism for the increase in binding energy is electron donation from H2 to electron-deficient B atoms, in the form of sp2 boron-carbon bonds. Our team is proud to have demonstrated the predicted increase in binding energy experimentally, currently at ~10 kJ/mol. The synthetic route for incorporation of boron at the outset is to create appropriately designed copoly- mers, with a boron-free and a boron-carrying monomer, followed by pyrolysis of the polymer, yielding a bo- ron-substituted carbon scaffold in which boron atoms are bonded to carbon atoms by synthesis. This is in contrast to a second route (funded by DE-FG36-08GO18142) in which first high-surface area carbon is cre- ated and doped by surface vapor deposition of boron, with incorporation of the boron into the lattice the final step of the fabrication. The challenge in the first route is to create high surface areas without compromising sp2 boron-carbon bonds. The challenge in the second route is to create sp2 boron-carbon bonds without com- promising high surface areas.

  3. Renewable Hydrogen Carrier Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The hydrogen economy presents an appealing energy future but its implementation must solve numerous problems ranging from low-cost sustainable production, high-density storage, costly infrastructure, to eliminating safety concern. The use of renewable carbohydrate as a high-density hydrogen carrier and energy source for hydrogen production is possible due to emerging cell-free synthetic biology technology called cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB). Assembly of numerous enzymes and co-enzymes in vitro can create complicated set of biological reactions or pathways that microorganisms cannot complete, for example, C6H10O5 (aq) + 7 H2O (l) 12 H2 (g) + 6 CO2 (g) (PLoS One 2007, 2:e456). Thanks to 100% selectivity of enzymes, modest reaction conditions, and high-purity of generated hydrogen, carbohydrate is a promising hydrogen carrier for end users. Gravimetric density of carbohydrate is 14.8 H2 mass% if water can be recycled from PEM fuel cells or 8.33% H2 mass% without water recycling. Renewable carbohydrate can be isolated from plant biomass or would be produced from a combination of solar electricity/hydrogen and carbon dioxide fixation mediated by high-efficiency artificial photosynthesis mediated by SyPaB. The construction of this carbon-neutral carbohydrate economy would address numerous sustainability challenges, such as electricity and hydrogen storage, CO2 fixation and long-term storage, water conservation, transportation fuel production, plus feed and food production.

  4. Hydrogen Generation During the Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    WIERSMA, BRUCEJ.

    2004-08-01

    A literature review of the corrosion mechanism for carbon steel in oxalic acid was performed to determine the ratio of moles of iron corroded to moles of hydrogen evolved during the corrosion of iron in oxalic acid. The theory of corrosion of carbon steel in oxalic acid and experimental work were reviewed. It was concluded that the maximum ratio of moles of hydrogen evolved to moles of iron corroded is 1:1. This ratio would be observed in a de-aerated environment. If oxygen or other oxidizing species are present, the ratio could be much less than 1:1. Testing would be necessary to determine how much less than 1:1 the ratio might be. Although the ratio of hydrogen evolution to iron corroded will not exceed 1:1, the total amount of hydrogen evolved can be influenced by such things as a decrease in the exposed surface area, suppression of hydrogen generation by gamma radiation, the presence of corrosion products on steel surface, etc. These and other variables present during chemical cleaning operations of the waste tank have not been examined by the tests reported in the literature i.e., the tests have focused on clean corrosion coupons in oxalic acid solutions. It is expected that most of these variables would reduce the total amount of hydrogen evolved. Further testing would need to be performed to quantify the reduction in hydrogen generation rate associated with these variables.

  5. Preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films from polymers by nano- and femtosecond pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, Judit; Bereznai, Miklós; Szakács, Gábor; Szilágyi, Edit; Tóth, Zsolt

    2007-07-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films can be simply produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) from targets containing hydrogen and carbon, e.g. polymers. Films deposited from polyethyleneterephtalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) were compared to samples prepared from glassy carbon. Several lasers were used to explore the influence of pulse duration (˜30 ns and ˜500 fs) and wavelength (248 and 193 nm) on the properties of laser deposited films. The film composition was characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and elastic recoil detection analysis. Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry gave information about the thickness and optical properties of the films. It was demonstrated that a consistent interpretation of the laser ablation, caused by rather different laser sources on various targets, is possible using the parameter of volumetric power density (intensity divided by light or heat penetration depth). PLD from polymer targets resulted in amorphous hydrogenated films, where hydrogen and oxygen content was decreased compared to the composition of the original target. PLD from glassy carbon target resulted in graphitic, diamond like and porous carbon films with increasing volumetric power density.

  6. Preparation, microstructure and hydrogen sorption properties of nanoporous carbon aerogels under ambient drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. Y.; Buckley, C. E.; Mulè, S.; Paskevicius, M.; Dhal, B. B.

    2008-11-01

    Organic aerogels are prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with furfural. These aerogels are further carbonized in nitrogen in order to obtain their corresponding carbon aerogels (CA); a sample which was carbonized at 900 °C was also activated in a carbon dioxide atmosphere at 900 °C. The chemical reaction mechanism and optimum synthesis conditions are investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermoanalyses (thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses) with a focus on the sol-gel process. The carbon aerogels were investigated with respect to their microstructures, using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption measurements at 77 K. SAXS studies showed that micropores with a radius of gyration of <0.35 ± 0.07 to 0.55 ± 0.05 nm were present, and TEM measurements and nitrogen adsorption showed that larger mesopores were also present. Hydrogen storage properties of the CA were also investigated. An activated sample with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1539 ± 20 m2 g-1 displayed a reasonably high hydrogen uptake at 77 K with a maximum hydrogen sorption of 3.6 wt% at 2.5 MPa. These results suggest that CA are promising candidate hydrogen storage materials.

  7. N-doped carbon networks: alternative materials tracing new routes for activating molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Remedios; Ferrante, Francesco; Roggan, Stefan; Duca, Dario

    2015-02-23

    The fragmentation of molecular hydrogen on N-doped carbon networks was investigated by using molecular (polyaromatic macrocycles) as well as truncated and periodic (carbon nanotubes) models. The computational study was focused on the ergonicity analysis of the reaction and on the properties of the transition states involved when constellations of three or four pyridinic nitrogen atom defects are present in the carbon network. Calculations show that whenever N-defects are embedded in species characterized by large conjugated ?-systems, either in polyaromatic macrocycles or carbon nanotubes, the corresponding H2 bond cleavage is largely exergonic. The fragmentation Gibbs free energy is affected by the final arrangement of the hydrogen atoms on the defect and by the extension of the ?-electron cloud, but it is not influenced by the curvature of the system. PMID:25614208

  8. Contrasting H-mode behaviour with deuterium fuelling and nitrogen seeding in the all-carbon and metallic versions of JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddison, G. P.; Giroud, C.; Alper, B.; Arnoux, G.; Balboa, I.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Boboc, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Coffey, I.; da Silva Aresta Belo, P. C.; Devaux, S.; Devynck, P.; Eich, T.; Felton, R. C.; Flanagan, J.; Frassinetti, L.; Garzotti, L.; Groth, M.; Jachmich, S.; Järvinen, A.; Joffrin, E.; Kempenaars, M. A. H.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K. D.; Lehnen, M.; Leyland, M. J.; Liu, Y.; Lomas, P. J.; Lowry, C. G.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G. F.; McCormick, G. K.; Meigs, A. G.; Morris, A. W.; Neu, R.; Nunes, I. M.; Oberkofler, M.; Rimini, F. G.; Saarelma, S.; Sieglin, B.; Sips, A. C. C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.; Ward, D. J.; Wischmeier, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-07-01

    The former all-carbon wall on JET has been replaced with beryllium in the main torus and tungsten in the divertor to mimic the surface materials envisaged for ITER. Comparisons are presented between type I H-mode characteristics in each design by examining respective scans over deuterium fuelling and impurity seeding, required to ameliorate exhaust loads both in JET at full capability and in ITER. Attention is focused upon a common high-triangularity, single-null divertor configuration at 2.5 MA, q95 ? 3.5 yielding the most robust all-C performance. Contrasting results between the alternative linings are found firstly in unseeded plasmas, for which purity is improved and intrinsic radiation reduced in the ITER-like wall (ILW) but normalized energy confinement is ?30% lower than in all-C counterparts, owing to a commensurately lower (electron) pedestal temperature. Divertor recycling is also radically altered, with slower, inboard-outboard asymmetric transients at ELMs and spontaneous oscillations in between them. Secondly, nitrogen seeding elicits opposite responses in the ILW to all-C experience, tending to raise plasma density, reduce ELM frequency, and above all to recover (electron) pedestal pressure, hence global confinement, almost back to previous levels. A hitherto unrecognized role of light impurities in pedestal stability and dynamics is consequently suggested. Thirdly, while heat loads on the divertor outboard target between ELMs are successfully reduced in proportion to the radiative cooling and ELM frequency effects of N in both wall environments, more surprisingly, average power ejected by ELMs also declines in the same proportion for the ILW. Detachment between transients is simultaneously promoted. Finally, inter-ELM W sources in the ILW divertor tend to fall with N input, although core accumulation possibly due to increased particle confinement still leads to significantly less steady conditions than in all-C plasmas. This limitation of ILW H-modes so far will be readdressed in future campaigns to continue progress towards a fully integrated scenario suitable for D-T experiments on JET and for ‘baseline’ operation on ITER. The diverse changes in behaviour between all-C and ILW contexts demonstrate essentially the strong impact which boundary conditions and intrinsic impurities can have on tokamak-plasma states.

  9. Migration Mechanism for Atomic Hydrogen in Porous Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, B.; Zhao, Y. F.; Ciobanu, C. V.

    2012-05-14

    To explain the fast kinetics of H in porous carbon, we propose that the migration relies on H hopping from a carbon nanotube (CNT) to another. Using density functional theory, we have found that the barrier for H hopping becomes smaller than that for diffusion along a tube for certain CNT separations, decreasting to less than 0.5 eV for separations of -3.1 {angstrom}. Such significant reduction occurs irrespective of radius, chirality, registry, and orientation of the two CNTs: the diffusion is thus facilitated by the porous nature of the material itself. The mechanism proposed is applicable for any porous carbon-based nanomaterials.

  10. HYDROGENATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC COMPOUNDS USING NI SUPPORT ON H-BETA ZEOLITE IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary rationale for use of supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent in hydrogenation is the elimination of mass transfer limitations, through enhancement of the solubility of hydrogen at the reaction locus. Hydrogenation of anthracene was performed using NiHB-zeolite catal...

  11. Double-Stranded DNA Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrids for Optical Hydrogen Peroxide and Glucose Sensing

    E-print Network

    Chen, Liwei

    Double-Stranded DNA Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrids for Optical Hydrogen Peroxide and Glucose acid (DNA) reacted with either hydrogen peroxide H2O2 or glucose in the presence of the glucose oxidase the hydrogen peroxide. This study reinforces the potential of DNA-SWNT hybrids for use in immunoassays

  12. Advances in CarbonHydrogen Activation W D Jones, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    ELSEVIER AUTHOR PROOF 1.25 a0005 Advances in Carbon­Hydrogen Activation W D Jones, University.25.2 Fundamental Aspects of C­H Bond Activation 1 1.25.2.1 Metal­Carbon Bond Strengths 1 1.25.2.2 Alkane evidence for alkane '-complexes 6 1.25.2.2.3 Isotope effects in C­H bond activation 6 1.25.3 Activation

  13. Exfoliated graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets as efficient catalysts for hydrogen evolution under visible light.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shubin; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhan, Liang; Ma, Lulu; Fang, Zheyu; Vajtai, Robert; Wang, Xinchen; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-05-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets are extracted, produced via simple liquid-phase exfoliation of a layered bulk material, g-C3N4. The resulting nanosheets, having ?2 nm thickness and N/C atomic ratio of 1.31, show an optical bandgap of 2.65 eV. The carbon nitride nanosheets are demonstrated to exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution under visible light. PMID:23450777

  14. System and method for controlling hydrogen elimination during carbon nanotube synthesis from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-03-23

    A system and method for producing carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition includes a catalyst support having first and second surfaces. The catalyst support is capable of hydrogen transport from the first to the second surface. A catalyst is provided on the first surface of the catalyst support. The catalyst is selected to catalyze the chemical vapor deposition formation of carbon nanotubes. A fuel source is provided for supplying fuel to the catalyst.

  15. Effects of radial strain on the desorption of hydrogen from the surface of palladium-doped carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. H.; Yan, X. H.; Yang, Y. R.

    2006-08-01

    By using the first-principles method, the authors study the strain effects on hydrogen desorption on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is found that hydrogen chemisorbed on the surface of carbon nanotubes doped with Pd can be released under large radial strain, for the desorbed hydrogen atoms are molecularly bound by Pd atoms with several tenths of an eV. The method of desorption for the chemisorbed hydrogen can be expected to release the residual hydrogen on the surface of SWCNTs.

  16. Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong; Cao, Juexian

    2012-12-15

    The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

  17. Probing the Room Temperature Spatial Distribution of Hydrogen in Nanoporous Carbon by Use of Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Cheng-Si; Li, Mingda; Zhang, Yang; Leao, Juscelino B; Chiang, Wei-Shan; Chung, Tsui-Yun; Tzeng, Yi-Ren; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2010-01-01

    The spatial distribution of hydrogen physically adsorbed in a nanoporous carbon at room temperature (RT) as a function of H2 gas pressure is investigated for the first time using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). A hierarchical pore structure consisting of micropores and a fractal mesopore network of the used activated carbon is also studied to correlate the relationship between the spatial distribution of hydrogen and the pore confinement. The cylinder-like cluster of aggregated hydrogen is formed and is confined in the disklike micropore. The evolution of spatial structures of adsorbed hydrogen with hydrogen pressure is elucidated. A direct experimental observation of the spatial distribution and the behavior of hydrogen adsorbed in the porous materials at RT is still scarce to date. The analysis results obtained by SANS provide new information for the future investigations of the RT storage mechanism of hydrogen in the nanoporous materials developed for the purpose of on-board hydrogen storage.

  18. Deuterium formation and abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Madjar, A.

    1987-05-01

    The importance of deuterium (as well as helium) is underlined. Formed during the early universe nucleosynthesis, it represents one of the few available cosmological probes. Different observational methods are mentioned and the most precise one described in more details. It leads to a possible "average" D/H value in the interstellar medium of 10-5. Variations of the deuterium abundance seem to be observed now on small galactic scales. Comparison with theory shows that many more observations are needed.

  19. The Role of Hydrogen in Small Amorphous Carbon Grains: The IR Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennella, V.; Colangeli, L.; Pestellini, C. Cecchi; Palomba, E.; Palumbo, P.; Rotundi, A.; Bussoletti, E.

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary results on the evolution of the IR spectrum of hydrogenated carbon grains as a function of heat treatment are presented. The transformation of C-H and C-C bonding configurations is considered and the correlation with other properties of grains, such as their microstructure, is analyzed.

  20. On the Nature of Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Activation at Rhodium and Related Reactions

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    On the Nature of Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Activation at Rhodium and Related Reactions William D. Jones an overview of the use of pentamethylcyclopentadienyl and trispyrazolylborate rhodium complexes to reaction also. In this paper, a historical summary is made in the use of rhodium complexes for discerning

  1. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF ANHYDRIDES TO LACTONES UNDER SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective Hydrogenation of Anhydrides to Lactones Under Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Medium

    Endalkachew Sahle-Demessie Unnikrishnan R Pillai
    U.S. EPA , 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45268 Phone: 513-569-7739
    Fax: 513-569-7677
    Abstract:
    Hydrogenat...

  2. Micro Strip Gas Chambers Overcoated with Carbon, Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon, and Glass Films

    E-print Network

    Micro Strip Gas Chambers Overcoated with Carbon, Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon, and Glass Films M of this type consisted of a a bulk substrate, quartz or polyimide, where a surface layer, typically t ¸ 1¯m implantation [5][6]. Another possibility is to cover a highly resistive bulk substrate with a thin 2 #12; film

  3. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  4. Direct synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide by hydrogenation in acidic media

    PubMed Central

    Moret, Séverine; Dyson, Paul J.; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important as CO2 levels in the atmosphere continue to rise as a consequence of human activities. In this article we describe the direct hydrogenation of CO2 into formic acid using a homogeneous ruthenium catalyst, in aqueous solution and in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), without any additives. In water, at 40?°C, 0.2?M formic acid can be obtained under 200?bar, however, in DMSO the same catalyst affords 1.9?M formic acid. In both solvents the catalysts can be reused multiple times without a decrease in activity. Worldwide demand for formic acid continues to grow, especially in the context of a renewable energy hydrogen carrier, and its production from CO2 without base, via the direct catalytic carbon dioxide hydrogenation, is considerably more sustainable than the existing routes. PMID:24886955

  5. Plasma deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films on III-V semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.; Liu, David C.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films were grown on GaAs, InP and fused silica substrates using plasmas generated from hydrocarbon gases. Methane and n-butane sources were utilized. The effects of flow rate and power density on film growth were investigated. Carbon was the major constituent in the films. The degree of asymmetry at the carbon-semiconductor interface was approximately independent of the power density. Different H-C bonding configurations were detected by the technique of secondary-ion mass spectrometry. Band gaps up to 3 eV were obtained from optical absorption studies. Breakdown strengths as high as 600 MV/m were measured.

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet of hydrogenated amorphous carbons. II. Small hydrocarbons production in Photon Dominated Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alata, I.; Jallat, A.; Gavilan, L.; Chabot, M.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Béroff, K.; Dartois, E.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Hydrogenated amorphous carbons (a-C:H) are a major component of the carbonaceous solids present in the interstellar medium. The production and existence of these grains is connected in particular with the balance between their photolysis, radiolysis, and hydrogenation. During grain processing, H2 and other small organic molecules, radicals, and fragments are released into the gas phase. Aims: We perform photolytic experiments on laboratory produced interstellar a-C:H analogues to monitor and quantify the release of species and compare to relevant observations in the interstellar medium. Methods: Hydrogenated amorphous carbon analogues at low temperature are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) photons, under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The species produced are monitored using mass spectrometry and post irradiation temperature-programmed desorption. Additional experiments are performed using deuterated analogues and the species produced are unambiguously separated from background contributions. We implement the laboratory measured yields for the released species in a time dependent model to investigate the effect of the UV photon irradiation of hydrogenated amorphous carbons in a photon dominated region, and estimate the associated time scale. Results: The UV photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons leads to the production of H2 molecules and small hydrocarbons. The model shows that the photolytic evolution of a-C:Hs in photon dominated regions, such as the Horsehead Nebula, can raise the abundance of carbonaceous molecules by several orders of magnitude at intermediate visual extinctions, i.e., after the C+ maximum and before the dense cloud conditions prevail where models generally show a minimum abundance for such carbonaceous species. The injection time peak ranges from a thousand to ten thousand years in the models, considering only the destruction of such grains and no re-hydrogenation. This time scale is consistent with the estimated advection front of a photon dominated region, which replenishes it with freshly exposed material. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Chemisorption and associative adsorption of hydrogen in carbon nanostructures synthesized on zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. P.; Bondarenko, G. N.; Sorokina, E. Yu.

    2015-02-01

    The chemisorptive and adsorptive interactions of hydrogen accumulated in cylindrical and planar graphene nanostructures (CPGNSes) formed on TsVM and TsVN zeolites with chemical compounds of these zeolites are studied for the first time. CPGNSes are synthesized at a temperature of 800°C using methane as a pyrolyzed reagent and saturated with hydrogen under pressures of 9.2-12.2 MPa. Using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in combination with mass spectrometry, it is determined that hydrogen is desorbed from the CPGNSes at temperatures of 250 and 450°C, indicating two mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption. It is shown that at temperatures of 200 and 240°C, chemical structures with m/ e = 15 and 31 undergo desorption at the same time as the removal of H2 by the first mechanism. Using IR spectroscopy, it is shown that carbon atoms can react with zeolites at a temperature of 800°C to form carbonate structures during the formation of CPGNSes. Our study of hydrogen adsorption in CPGNSes showed that the above mechanisms may be considered associative and are characterized by the formation of new structures close to superacid sites and a chemisorptive mechanism attributable to the strong coordination of the hydrogen molecule on the C=O bonds of carbonate groups. A quantitative estimate of hydrogen adsorption in CPGNSes synthesized on TsVM and TsVN is made. It is found that the total adsorption (by the first and second mechanisms) is ˜70 cm3/g in the first case; this value is slightly higher than the one for CPGNSes on TsVN (˜65 cm3/g), while the magnitude of adsorption by the first mechanism is ˜2.5 times higher than for the second.

  8. Fractionation of carbon and hydrogen isotopes by methane-oxidizing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, D.D.; Risatti, J.B.; Schoell, M.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon isotopic analysis of methane has become a popular technique in the exploration for oil and gas because it can be used to differentiate between thermogenic and microbial gas and can sometimes be used for gas-source rock correlations. Methane-oxidizing bacteria, however, can significantly change the carbon isotopic composition of methane; the origin of gas that has been partially oxidized by these bacteria could therefore be misinterpreted. We cultured methane-oxidizing bacteria at two different temperatures and monitored the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of the residual methane. The residual methane was enriched in both 13C and D. For both isotopic species, the enrichment at equivalent levels of conversion was greater at 26??C than at 11.5??C. The change in ??D relative to the change in ??13C was independent of temperature within the range studied. One culture exhibited a change in the fractionation pattern for carbon (but not for hydrogen) midway through the experiment, suggesting that bacterial oxidation of methane may occur via more than one pathway. The change in the ??D value for the residual methane was from 8 to 14 times greater than the change in the ??13C value, indicating that combined carbon and hydrogen isotopic analysis may be an effective way of identifying methane which has been subjected to partial oxidation by bacteria. ?? 1981.

  9. Confident methods for the evaluation of the hydrogen content in nanoporous carbon microfibers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous carbon microfibers were grown by chemical vapor deposition in the vapor-liquid solid mode using different fluid hydrocarbons as precursors in different proportions. The as-grown samples were further treated in argon and hydrogen atmospheres at different pressure conditions and annealed at several temperatures in order to deduce the best conditions for the incorporation and re-incorporation of hydrogen into the microfibers through the nanopores. Since there are some discrepancies in the results on the hydrogen content obtained under vacuum conditions, in this work, we have measured the hydrogen content in the microfibers using several analytical methods in ambient conditions: surface tension, mass density, and Raman measurements. A discussion on the validity of the results obtained through the correlation between them is the purpose of the present work. PMID:23095321

  10. Hydrogen and oxygen trapping and retention in stainless steel and graphite materials irradiated in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L.; Ayrapetov, A.; Ermakov, V.; Kaplevsky, A.; Sadovsky, Ya.; Shigin, P.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental investigation of energy and flux dependences of hydrogen isotopes and oxygen trapping in carbon materials (carbon fiber composite and pyrolitic graphite), and metals (stainless steel and nickel) under irradiation in the deuterium gas discharge plasma with and without oxygen addition. The dependence of hydrogen trapping on ion energy, ion current density, oxygen addition in deuterium plasma are presented and analyzed. The sorbed molecules, containing hydrogen atoms from the residual gas and deuterium atoms of the working gas are shown to be the important source of hydrogen trapping in both carbon based materials and stainless steel. Irradiation of the SS vacuum vessel with the neutrals or/and ions of (D2 + O2) plasma initiate the hydrogen diffusion from the vessel wall and H2, HD, D2O, HDO, H2O molecule formation on the wall surface. Trapping of the low energy plasma particles and the particles from the sorbed molecules as well as modification of working gas composition are considered as the processes provided at the expense of the potential energy of plasma particles with respect to the surface and occurred through their inelastic collisions with the surface. The hydrogen trapping occurred due to “potential” processes was named as “potential”, and in contrast the trapping of fast particles due to their kinetic energy was labeled as “kinetic”.

  11. ENHANCED HYDROGEN ECONOMICS VIA COPRODUCTION OF FUELS AND CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, Elliot B; Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Dadyburjor, Dady; Dixit, Santhoshi; Garlapalli, Ravinder; Magean, Liviu; Mukkha, Mayuri; Olajide, Olufemi A; Stiller, Alfred H; Yurchick, Christopher L

    2011-03-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research effort to develop environmentally cleaner projects as a spin-off of the FutureGen project, which seeks to reduce or eliminate emissions from plants that utilize coal for power or hydrogen production. New clean coal conversion processes were designed and tested for coproducing clean pitches and cokes used in the metals industry as well as a heavy crude oil. These new processes were based on direct liquefaction and pyrolysis techniques that liberate volatile liquids from coal without the need for high pressure or on-site gaseous hydrogen. As a result of the research, a commercial scale plant for the production of synthetic foundry coke has broken ground near Wise, Virginia under the auspices of Carbonite Inc. This plant will produce foundry coke by pyrolyzing a blend of steam coal feedstocks. A second plant is planned by Quantex Energy Inc (in Texas) which will use solvent extraction to coproduce a coke residue as well as crude oil. A third plant is being actively considered for Kingsport, Tennessee, pending a favorable resolution of regulatory issues.

  12. The role of destabilization of palladium hydride on the hydrogen uptake of Pd-containing activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on differences in stability of Pd hydride phases in palladium particles with various degrees of contact with microporous carbon supports. A sample containing Pd embedded in activated carbon fiber (Pd-ACF; 2 wt% Pd) was compared with commercial Pd nanoparticles deposited on microporous activated carbon (Pd-catalyst, 3 wt% Pd) and with support-free nanocrystalline palladium (Pd-black). The morphology of materials was characterized by electron microscopy, and the phase transformations were analyzed over a large range of hydrogen partial pressures (0.003 - 10 bar) and at several temperatures using in-situ X-ray diffraction. The results were verified with volumetric hydrogen uptake measurements. Results indicate that higher degree of Pd-carbon contacts for Pd particles embedded in a microporous carbon matrix induce efficient pumping of hydrogen out of -PdHx. It was also found that thermal cleaning of carbon surface groups prior to exposure to hydrogen further enhances the hydrogen pumping power of the microporous carbon support. In brief, this study highlights that the stability of -PdHx phase supported on carbon depends on the degree of contact between Pd-carbon and the nature of the carbon surface.

  13. Charge Modulation in Graphitic Carbon Nitride as a Switchable Approach to High-Capacity Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-11-01

    Electrical charging of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C4 N3 and g-C3 N4 ) is proposed as a strategy for high-capacity and electrocatalytically switchable hydrogen storage. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of H2 molecules on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets is dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At full hydrogen coverage, the negatively charged graphitic carbon nitride achieves storage capacities up to 6-7?wt?%. In contrast to other hydrogen storage approaches, the storage/release occurs spontaneously once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charging voltage. Therefore, this approach promises both facile reversibility and tunable kinetics without the need of specific catalysts. Importantly, g-C4 N3 has good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility, which can be a very good candidate for electron injection/release. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of high-capacity hydrogen storage materials. PMID:26384030

  14. Creation of active sites by impregnation of carbon fibers: application to the fixation of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Meljac, Laure; Perier-Camby, Laurent; Thomas, Gérard

    2004-06-01

    Activated carbon fibers, which exhibit high specific area and numerous active surface sites, constitute very powerful adsorbents and are widely used in filtration to eliminate pollutants from liquid or gaseous effluents. The fibers studied in this work are devoted to the filtration of gaseous effluent containing very small amounts (few vpm) of hydrogen sulfide. Preliminary experiments evidenced that these fibers weakly adsorb hydrogen sulfide. To improve their fixation capacity toward H(2)S the activated fibers are impregnated in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide. The impregnation treatment usually takes place before activation but in this work it occurs at room temperature after activation of the fibers. A further thermal treatment is performed to increase the efficiency of the system. The overall treatment leads to the creation of basic sites showing a great activity for H(2)S gas in the presence of water vapor. The mechanism has been established by a series of characterizations before, during, and after the different operation units. The KOH deposited after impregnation is carbonated into KHCO(3) at room temperature and then decomposed into K(2)CO(3) during the thermal treatment. K(2)CO(3) and H(2)S dissolve in a liquid aqueous solution formed on the fiber surface. Then carbonate ions and H(2)S molecules react together almost completely to yield HS(-) species. As a consequence the sorption capacities of hydrogen sulfide on the impregnated fibers are much higher, even for small hydrogen sulfide volume fractions. PMID:15120288

  15. (Carbon and hydrogen metabolism of green algae in light and dark)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this project was the elucidation of anaerobic metabolism in ecuaryotic green algae, chlamydomonas reinhardii. Chlamydomonas is a versatile organism that can grow under disparate conditions such as fresh water lakes and sewage ponds. The cell an photoassimilate CO{sub 2} aerobically and anaerobically, the latter after adaptation'' to a hydrogen metabolism. It can recall the knallgas or oxyhydrogen reaction and utilize hydrogen the simplest of all reducing agents for the dark assimilation of CO{sub 2} by the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle. The dark reduction with hydrogen lies on the border line between autotrophic and heterotrophic carbon assimilation. Both autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are known in which molecular hydrogen can replace either inorganic or organic hydrogen donors. Here the dark reduction of CO{sub 2} acquires a particular importance since it occurs in the same cell that carries on photoreduction and photosynthesis. We will demonstrate here that the alga chloroplast possesses a respiratory capacity. It seems likely that Chlamydomonas may have retained the chloroplastic respiratory pathway because of the selective advantage provided to the algae under a wide range of environmental conditions that the cells experience in nature. The ability to cycle electrons and poise the reduction level of the photosynthetic apparatus under aerobic and microaerobic conditions could allow more efficient CO{sub 2} fixation and enhanced growth under unfavorable conditions or survival under more severe conditions.

  16. In vivo isotope-fractionation factors and the measurement of deuterium- and oxygen-18-dilution spaces from plasma, urine, saliva, respiratory water vapor, and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.W.; Cochran, W.J.; Klish, W.J.; Smith, E.O.; Lee, L.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    In vivo isotope-fractionation factors were determined for hydrogen and oxygen between plasma water samples and samples of urine, saliva, respiratory water vapor, and carbon dioxide in 20 normal adults. The isotope-fractionation factors ranged from 0.944 to 1.039 for /sup 2/H in breath water vapor and for /sup 18/O in breath CO/sub 2/, respectively. When corrected for isotope fractionation, the /sup 2/H- and /sup 18/O-dilution spaces determined from urine, saliva, respiratory water, and CO/sub 2/ were within -0.10 +/- 1.09 kg (mean +/- SD, n = 60) and 0.04 +/- 0.68 kg (n = 80), respectively, of the values determined from plasma. In the absence of these corrections, we observed a 6% overestimation of /sup 2/H-dilution space and a 1% overestimation of /sup 18/O-dilution space from the use of respiratory water values. A 4% underestimation of the /sup 18/O-dilution space was observed for breath CO/sub 2/ without correction for isotope fractionation.

  17. Toward New Candidates for Hydrogen Storage: High Surface Area Carbon Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Kabbour, H; Baumann, T F; Satcher, J H; Saulnier, A; Ahn, C C

    2007-02-05

    We report the hydrogen surface excess sorption saturation value of 5.3 wt% at 30 bar pressure at 77 K, from an activated carbon aerogel with a surface area of 3200 m{sup 2}/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. This sorption value is one of the highest we have measured in a material of this type, comparable to values obtained in high surface area activated carbons. We also report, for the first time, the surface area dependence of hydrogen surface excess sorption isotherms of carbon aerogels at 77 K. Activated carbon aerogels with surface areas ranging from 1460 to 3200 m{sup 2}/g are evaluated and we find a linear dependence of the saturation of the gravimetric density with BET surface area for carbon aerogels up to 2550 m{sup 2}/g, in agreement with data from other types of carbons reported in the literature. Our measurements show these materials to have a differential enthalpy of adsorption at zero coverage of {approx}5 to 7 kJ/mole. We also show that the introduction of metal nanoparticles of nickel improves the sorption capacity while cobalt additions have no effect.

  18. Hydrogen dissociation catalyzed by carbon coated nickel nanoparticles: experiment and theory

    E-print Network

    Yermakov, A Ye; Uimin, M A; Lokteva, E S; Erokhin, A V; Schegoleva, N N

    2012-01-01

    Based on combination of experimental measurements and first-principles calculations we report a novel carbon-based catalytic material and describe significant acceleration of the hydrogenation of magnesium at room temperature in presence of nickel nanoparticles wrapped in multilayer graphene. Increase of the rate of magnesium hydrogenation in contrast to the mix of graphite and nickel nanoparticles evidences intrinsic catalytic properties of explored nanocomposites. Results of simulations demonstrate that the doping from metal substrate and the presence of Stone-Wales defects turn multilayer graphene from chemically inert to chemically active mode. The role of the size of nanoparticles and temperature are also discussed.

  19. Structure and Reactions of Carbon and Hydrogen on Ru(0001): A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-09

    The interaction between carbon and hydrogen atoms on a Ru(0001) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Density Functional Theory (DFT) and STM image calculations. Formation of CH species by reaction between adsorbed H and C was observed to occur readily at 100 K. When the coverage of H increased new complexes of the form CH+nH (n = 1, 2 and 3) were observed. These complexes, never observed before, might be precursors for further hydrogenation reactions. DFT analysis reveals that a considerable energy barrier exists for the CH+H {yields} CH{sub 2} reaction.

  20. Predicting Big Bang deuterium

    E-print Network

    Hata, N; Steigman, G; Thomas, D; Walker, T P; Hata, N; Scherrer, R J; Steigman, G; Thomas, D; Walker, T P

    1994-01-01

    We present new upper and lower bounds to the primordial abundances of deuterium and helium-3 based on observational data from the solar system and the interstellar medium. Independent of any model for the primordial production of the elements we find: 1.5 \\times 10^{-5} \\le (D/H)_P \\le 5.5 \\times 10^{-5} and (^3He/H)_P \\le 1.7\\times 10^{-5}. When combined with the predictions of standard big bang nucleosynthesis, these constraints lead to a ``best fit'' prediction for the primordial abundance of deuterium: (D/H)_{best} = (2.3^{+1.7}_{-0.8})\\times 10^{-5}. Measurements of deuterium absorption in the spectra of high redshift QSOs will directly test this prediction. The implications of this prediction for the primordial abundances of helium-4 and lithium-7 are discussed, as well as those for the universal density of baryons.

  1. Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.; Jung, J.; Gilligan, J.

    1984-04-01

    A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the /sup 3/He from the D(D,n)/sup 3/He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general).

  2. The Deuterium Chemistry of the Early Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, P.C.; Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.

    1998-12-01

    The chemistry of deuterium, as well as that of hydrogen and helium, in the postrecombination era of the expanding early universe is presented. A thorough survey of all potentially important gas-phase reactions involving the primordial elements produced in the Big Bang, with a particular emphasis on deuterium, is given. The reaction set, consisting of 144 processes, is used in a nonequilibrium chemistry model to follow the production of primordial molecules in the postrecombination era. It is found that significant deuterium fractionation occurs for HD{sup +}, HD, and H{sub 2}D{sup +}, while the abundance of D{sup +} is reduced compared to the proton abundance. Even with the enhanced fractionation of H{sub 2}D{sup +}, its abundance is predicted to be too small to cause any interesting cosmological consequences, such as possible attenuation of spatial anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation field, detections of the epochs of reionization and reheating, or constraints on the primordial deuterium abundance. HD, being the second most abundant primordial molecule after H{sub 2}, may play a role in subsequent structure formation because of its cooling radiation. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  3. The primordial abundance of deuterium: ionization correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ryan; Pettini, Max

    2016-01-01

    We determine the relative ionization of deuterium and hydrogen in low metallicity damped Lyman ? (DLA) and sub-DLA systems using a detailed suite of photoionization simulations. We model metal-poor DLAs as clouds of gas in pressure equilibrium with a host dark matter halo, exposed to the Haardt & Madau background radiation of galaxies and quasars at redshift z ? 3. Our results indicate that the deuterium ionization correction correlates with the H I column density and the ratio of successive ion stages of the most commonly observed metals. The N(N II)/N(N I) column density ratio provides the most reliable correction factor, being essentially independent of the gas geometry, H I column density, and the radiation field. We provide a series of convenient fitting formulae to calculate the deuterium ionization correction based on observable quantities. The ionization correction typically does not exceed 0.1 per cent for metal-poor DLAs, which is comfortably below the current measurement precision (2 per cent). However, the deuterium ionization correction may need to be applied when a larger sample of D/H measurements becomes available.

  4. The Deuterium Chemistry of the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, P. C.; Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.

    1998-12-01

    The chemistry of deuterium, as well as that of hydrogen and helium, in the postrecombination era of the expanding early universe is presented. A thorough survey of all potentially important gas-phase reactions involving the primordial elements produced in the Big Bang, with a particular emphasis on deuterium, is given. The reaction set, consisting of 144 processes, is used in a nonequilibrium chemistry model to follow the production of primordial molecules in the postrecombination era. It is found that significant deuterium fractionation occurs for HD+, HD, and H2D+, while the abundance of D+ is reduced compared to the proton abundance. Even with the enhanced fractionation of H2D+, its abundance is predicted to be too small to cause any interesting cosmological consequences, such as possible attenuation of spatial anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation field, detections of the epochs of reionization and reheating, or constraints on the primordial deuterium abundance. HD, being the second most abundant primordial molecule after H2, may play a role in subsequent structure formation because of its cooling radiation.

  5. Effect of p-type multi-walled carbon nanotubes for improving hydrogen storage behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seul-Yi; Yop Rhee, Kyong; Nahm, Seung-Hoon; Park, Soo-Jin

    2014-02-15

    In this study, the hydrogen storage behaviors of p-type multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated through the surface modification of MWNTs by immersing them in sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at various ratios. The presence of acceptor-functional groups on the p-type MWNT surfaces was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Measurement of the zeta-potential determined the surface charge transfer and dispersion of the p-type MWMTs, and the hydrogen storage capacity was evaluated at 77 K and 1 bar. From the results obtained, it was found that acceptor-functional groups were introduced onto the MWNT surfaces, and the dispersion of MWNTs could be improved depending on the acid-mixed treatment conditions. The hydrogen storage was increased by acid-mixed treatments of up to 0.36 wt% in the p-type MWNTs, compared with 0.18 wt% in the As-received MWNTs. Consequently, the hydrogen storage capacities were greatly influenced by the acceptor-functional groups of p-type MWNT surfaces, resulting in increased electron acceptor–donor interaction at the interfaces. - Graphical abstract: Hydrogen storage behaviors of the p-type MWNTs with the acid-mixed treatments are described. Display Omitted Display Omitted.

  6. Production of activated carbon and its catalytic application for oxidation of hydrogen sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azargohar, Ramin

    Hydrogen sulphide is an environmentally hazardous gas which is present in many gas streams associated with oil and gas industry. Oxidation of H 2S to sulphur in air produces no bulky or waste material and requires no further purification. Activated carbon is known as a catalyst for this reaction. In this research, a coal-based precursor (luscar char) and a biomass-based precursor (biochar) were used for production of activated carbons by two common methods of activation: physical and chemical activation in which steam and potassium hydroxide (KOH), respectively, were used. Experiments were designed by the statistical central composite design method. Two models were developed for the BET surface area and reaction yield of each activation process. These models showed the effects of operating conditions, such as activation temperature, mass ratio of activating agent to precursor, activation time, and nitrogen flowrate on the BET surface area and reaction yield for each activation method for each precursor. The optimum operating conditions were calculated using these models to produce activated carbons with relatively large BET surface area (> 500 m2/g) and high reaction yield (> 50 wt %). The BET surface area and reaction yield for activated carbons produced at optimum operating conditions showed maximum 7 and 7.4% difference, respectively, comparing to the values predicted by models. The activated carbons produced at optimum operating conditions were used as the base catalysts for the direct oxidation of 1 mol % hydrogen sulphide in nitrogen to sulphur at the temperature range of 160-205°C and pressure of 700 kPa. Originally activated carbons showed a good potential for oxidation of hydrogen sulphide by their selectivity for sulphur product and low amount of sulphur dioxide production. To improve the performance of steam-activated carbons, the catalysts were modified by acid-treatment followed by thermal desorption. This method increased the break-through times for coal-based and biomass-based catalysts to 115 and 141 minutes, respectively. The average amounts of sulphur dioxide produced during the reaction time were 0.14 and 0.03% (as % of hydrogen sulphide fed to the reactor) for modified activated carbons prepared from biochar and luscar char, respectively. The effects of porous structure, surface chemistry, and ash content on the performances of these activated carbon catalysts were investigated for the direct oxidation reaction of hydrogen sulphide. The acid-treatment followed by thermal desorption of activated carbons developed the porosity which produced more surface area for active sites and in addition, provided more space for sulphur product storage resulting in higher life time for catalyst. Boehm titration and temperature program desorption showed that the modification method increased basic character of carbon surface after thermal desorption in comparison to acid-treated sample. In addition, the effects of impregnating agents (potassium iodide and manganese nitrate) and two solvents for impregnation process were studied on the performance of the activated carbon catalysts for the direct oxidation of H2S to sulphur. Sulphur L-edge X-ray near edge structure (XANES) showed that the elemental sulphur was the dominant sulphur species in the product. The kinetic study for oxidation reaction of H2S over LusAC-O-D(650) was performed for temperature range of 160-190°C, oxygen to hydrogen sulphide molar ratio of 1-3, and H2S concentration of 6000-10000 ppm at 200 kPa. The values of activation energy were 26.6 and 29.3 kJ.gmol-1 for Eley-Rideal and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms, respectively.

  7. Insoluble surface carbon on steel sheet annealed in hydrogen-nitrogen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biber, H. E.; Takacs, R. C.; Dickey, A. E.

    1983-09-01

    The way in which heating in hydrogen-nitrogen atmosphere affects the pyrolysis of the residual lubricant on cold-reduced steel sheet was studied to discover the factors responsible for the formation of carbonaceous films on the steel surface. These films, referred to as insoluble surface carbon, cannot be removed with the usual solvents or water-base cleaners and adversely affect the paintability of the steel. A surprising result was the observation that the full-hard steel surface has a significant amount of insoluble surface carbon; amounts in excess of 0.010 gm/m2 (1 mg/ft2) were observed. The origin of this “initial” insoluble carbon can be traced to the pickling operation after hot rolling. During annealing much of the residual rolling lubricant on the surface is driven off by evaporation, but concurrently insoluble pyrolysis products are formed. The amount of insoluble pyrolysis product formed is directly related to the amount of “initial” insoluble carbon on the surface before annealing. The results show that at some point during annealing the total amount of insoluble carbon on the surface is more than double the amount of “initial” insoluble carbon. These insoluble pyrolysis products can also be driven from the surface at higher temperatures than are required for evaporation of the oil. The results suggest that removal of the “initial” insoluble carbon prior to cold reduction might be very beneficial with respect to decreasing the amount of insoluble carbon on the surface of steel sheet after annealing.

  8. Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth of a plain carbon pipeline steel under conditions of cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation described was aimed at establishing the degree of compatibility between a plain carbon pipeline-type steel and hydrogen and also hydrogen-rich environments containing small additions of H2S, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, and natural gas at pressures near 1 atm. Test were carried out under conditions of static and cyclic loading; the subcritical crack growth was monitored. The rates of crack growth observed in the hydrogen and hydrogen-rich environments are compared with the crack rate observed in a natural gas environment to determine the compatibility of the present natural gas transmission system with gaseous hydrogen transport.

  9. Exploiting microbial hyperthermophilicity to produce an industrial chemical, using hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, MW; Schut, GJ; Lipscomb, GL; Menon, AL; Iwuchukwu, IJ; Leuko, TT; Thorgersen, MP; Nixon, WJ; Hawkins, AS; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2013-04-09

    Microorganisms can be engineered to produce useful. products, including chemicals and fuels from sugars derived from renewable feedstocks, such as plant biomass. An alternative method is to use low potential reducing power from nonbiomass sources, such as hydrogen gas or electricity, to reduce carbon dioxide directly into products. This approach circumvents the overall low efficiency of photosynthesis and the production of sugar intermediates. Although significant advances have been made in manipulating microorganisms to produce useful products from organic substrates, engineering them to use carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas has not been reported. Herein, we describe a unique temperature-dependent approach that confers on a microorganism (the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally on carbohydrates at 100 degrees C) the capacity to use carbon dioxide, a reaction that it does not accomplish naturally. This was achieved by the heterologous expression of five genes of the carbon fixation cycle of the archaeon Metallosphaera sedula, which grows autotrophically at 73 degrees C. The engineered P. furiosus strain is able to use hydrogen gas and incorporate carbon dioxide into 3-hydroxypropionic acid, one of the top 12 industrial chemical building blocks. The reaction can be accomplished by cell-free extracts and by whole cells of the recombinant P. furiosus strain. Moreover, it is carried out some 30 degrees C below the optimal growth temperature of the organism in conditions that support only minimal growth but maintain sufficient metabolic activity to sustain the production of 3-hydroxypropionate. The approach described here can be expanded to produce important organic chemicals, all through biological activation of carbon dioxide.

  10. Self-assembled multiwalled carbon nanotube films assisted by ureidopyrimidinone-based multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sumin; Guo, Hao; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Qiguan; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Xinhai

    2014-11-01

    Self-assembled functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films were successfully constructed, linked by a kind of strong binding strength from the self-complementary hydrogen-bonding array of ureidopyrimidinone-based modules (UPM) attached. Employing the feasible reaction of isocyanate containing ureidopyrimidinone with amine modified MWNTs, the UPMs composed of ureidopyrimidinone and ureido were attached to MWNTs with the content as low as 0.6 mmol/g MWNTs. Upon multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions from incorporation of the AADD (A, hydrogen-bonding acceptor; D, hydrogen-bonding donor) quadruple hydrogen bonds of ureidopyrimidinone and the double hydrogen bonds of ureido group, UPM functionalized MWNTs (MWNT-UPM) can be well dispersed in the polar solvent of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), while they tend to self-assemble to give a self-supported film in the apolar solvent of CHCl3. In addition, by using the multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions as the driving force, the layer-by-layer (LBL) MWNT-UPM films with high coverage on solid slides can be processed. Because of the self-association of MWNT-UPM in apolar solvent, it was found that the LBL assembly of MWNT-UPM was more favorable in the polar solvent of DMF than in the apolar solvent of CHCl3. Moreover, the hydrogen-bonding linked MWNT-UPM films showed good stability upon soaking in different solvents. Furthermore, the as-prepared LBL films showed electrochemical active behaviors, exhibiting a remarkable catalytic effect on the reduction of nifedipine. PMID:25296167

  11. Carbon synthesis in steady-state hydrogen and helium burning on accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Jeremy; Brown, Edward F.; Cyburt, Richard; Schatz, Hendrik; Cumming, Andrew

    2014-08-20

    Superbursts from accreting neutron stars probe nuclear reactions at extreme densities (? ? 10{sup 9} g cm{sup –3}) and temperatures (T > 10{sup 9} K). These bursts (?1000 times more energetic than type I X-ray bursts) are most likely triggered by unstable ignition of carbon in a sea of heavy nuclei made during the rapid proton capture process (rp-process) of regular type I X-ray bursts (where the accumulated hydrogen and helium are burned). An open question is the origin of sufficient amounts of carbon, which is largely destroyed during the rp-process in X-ray bursts. We explore carbon production in steady-state burning via the rp-process, which might occur together with unstable burning in systems showing superbursts. We find that for a wide range of accretion rates and accreted helium mass fractions large amounts of carbon are produced, even for systems that accrete solar composition. This makes stable hydrogen and helium burning a viable source of carbon to trigger superbursts. We also investigate the sensitivity of the results to nuclear reactions. We find that the {sup 14}O(?, p){sup 17}F reaction rate introduces by far the largest uncertainties in the {sup 12}C yield.

  12. Lanthanum-hexaboride carbon composition for use in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Kovach, Louis (Oak Ridge, TN); Taylor, Albert J. (Ten Mile, TN)

    1981-01-01

    The present invention relates to a structural composition useful in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments at temperatures in excess of 1400.degree. K. The composition is formed of a isostatically pressed and sintered or a hot-pressed mixture of lanthanum hexaboride particles and about 10-30 vol. % carbon. The lanthanum-hexaboride reacts with the high-temperature fluorine-containing bases to form an adherent layer of corrosion-inhibiting lanthanum trifluoride on exposed surfaces of the composition. The carbon in the composite significantly strengthens the composite, enhances thermal shock resistance, and significantly facilitates the machining of the composition.

  13. STEM Imaging of Single Pd Atoms in Activated Carbon Fibers Considered for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Klaus; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Contescu, Cristian I; Pennycook, Stephen J; Gallego, Nidia C

    2011-01-01

    Aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to demonstrate the feasibility of imaging individual Pd atoms that are highly dispersed throughout the volume of activated carbon fibers. Simultaneous acquisition of high-angle annular dark-field and bright-field images allows correlation of the location of single Pd atoms with microstructural features of the carbon host material. Sub-Angstrom imaging conditions revealed that 18 wt% of the total Pd content is dispersed as single Pd atoms in three re-occurring local structural arrangements. The identified structural configurations may represent effective storage sites for molecular hydrogen through Kubas complex formation as discussed in detail in the preceding article.

  14. Plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated carbon films and their tribological properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work on the properties of diamondlike carbon films and their dependence on preparation conditions are reviewed. The results of the study indicate that plasma deposition enables one to deposit a variety of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H ) films exhibiting more diamondlike behavior to more graphitic behavior. The plasma-deposited a-C:H can be effectively used as hard, wear-resistant, and protective lubricating films on ceramic materials such as Si(sub 3)N(sub 4) under a variety of environmental conditions such as moist air, dry nitrogrn, and vacuum.

  15. Plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated carbon films and their tribological properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work on the properties of diamondlike carbon films and their dependence on preparation conditions are reviewed. The results of the study indicate that plasma deposition enables one to deposit a variety of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films exhibiting more diamondlike behavior to more graphitic behavior. The plasma-deposited a-C:H can be effectively used as hard, wear-resistant, and protective lubricating films on ceramic materials such as Si(sub 3)N(sub 4) under a variety of environmental conditions such as moist air, dry nitrogen, and vacuum.

  16. Lanthanum-hexaboride carbon composition for use in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.; Taylor, A.J.

    1980-01-22

    The present invention relates to a structural composition useful in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments at temperatures in excess of 1400/sup 0/K. The composition is formed of a isostatically pressed and sintered or a hot-pressed mixture of lanthanum hexaboride particles and about 10 to 30 vol% carbon. The lanthanum-hexaboride reacts with the high-temperature fluorine-containing gases to form an adherent layer of corrosion-inhibiting lanthanum trifluoride on exposed surfaces of the composition. The carbon in the composite significantly strengthens the composite, enhances thermal shock resistance, and significantly facilitates the machining of the composition.

  17. In situ photoelectron spectroscopy of titanium-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, Andreas; Gampp, Ronald; Oelhafen, Peter

    1999-12-01

    Titanium-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H/Ti) have been deposited by a medium-frequency-driven physical vapor deposition plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition process at 40 kHz. Core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and valence-band photoelectron spectroscopy have served as means for the characterization of these films. The spectroscopic data are interpreted by a structural model on the basis of a nanocomposite containing titanium carbide clusters embedded in an amorphous hydrogenated carbon matrix. Within this model parallel energy shifts in the measured positions of the Ti 2p core levels and of the Fermi edge can be explained by a one-electron charging effect of nanometer-sized TiC clusters due to the photoemission process.

  18. Ammonia-induced robust photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of graphitic carbon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengju; Zhao, Jianghong; Qiao, Wei; Li, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2015-11-01

    We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 ?mol h-1 to 316.7 ?mol h-1 under visible light.We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 ?mol h-1 to 316.7 ?mol h-1 under visible light. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05570a

  19. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on the alkaline hydrolysis of carbon disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S. )

    1990-02-01

    The stability of carbon disulfide in aqueous alkaline solutions has been compared in the absence and presence of hydrogen peroxide, by a headspace gas chromatography technique. Reactant decay is first order in CS{sub 2} and OH{sup {minus}} in solutions containing sodium hydroxide alone. At room temperature, the second-order rate constant 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} matches previous measurements for basic hydrolysis and, along with the activation energy 22 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, is consistent with rate control in a carbonate-like hydration step. In alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions, loss is also first order in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, suggesting reaction between CS{sub 2} and the HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} anion with a second-order rate constant in the range 10-100 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}.

  20. Fundamental studies of hydrogen attack in carbon-0.5molybdenum steel and weldments applied in petroelum and petrochemical industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng

    High temperature hydrogen attack (HTHA) is a form of surface decarburization, internal decarburization, and/or intergranular cracking in steels exposed to high temperature (>400°F) and high hydrogen pressure. Hydrogen attack is an irreversible process which can cause permanent damage resulting in degradation of mechanical properties and failures such as leakage, bursting, fire, and/or explosion. The continuous progression of hydrogen attack in C-0.5Mo steel and weldments below the C-0.5Mo Nelson Curve has caused a significant concern for the integrity and serviceability of C-0.5Mo steel utilized for pressure vessels and piping in the petroleum refinery and petrochemical industries. A state-of-the-art literature review was implemented to provide a comprehensive overview of the published research efforts on hydrogen attack studies. The evolution of "Nelson Curves" for carbon steel, C-0.5Mo, and Cr-Mo steels was historically reviewed in regard to design applications and limitations. Testing techniques for hydrogen attack assessment were summarized under the categories of hydrogen exposure testing, mechanical evaluation, and dilatometric swelling testing. In accord with the demands of these industries, fundamental studies of hydrogen attack in C-0.5Mo steel and weldments were accomplished in terms of quantitative methodologies for hydrogen damage evaluation; hydrogen damage assessment of service exposed weldments and autoclave exposed materials; effects of carbon and alloying elements, heat treatments, hot and cold working, welding processes and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) on hydrogen attack susceptibility; development of continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams for C-0.5Mo base metals and the coarse grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ); carbide evaluation for the C-0.5Mo steel after service exposure and heat treatment; methane evolution by the reaction of hydrogen and carbides; hydrogen diffusion and methane pressure through the wall thickness of one-sided hydrogen exposure assembly; hydrogen attack mechanism and hydrogen attack limit modeling.

  1. Spiroacetal Formation through Telescoped Cycloaddition and Carbon–Hydrogen Bond Functionalization: Total Synthesis of Bistramide A

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xun; Floreancig, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Spiroacetals can be formed through a one-pot sequence of a hetero Diels-Alder reaction, an oxidative carbon–hydrogen bond cleavage, and an acid treatment. This convergent approach expedites access to a complex molecular subunit that is present in numerous biologically active structures. The utility of the protocol is demonstrated through its application to a brief synthesis of the actin-binding cytotoxin bistramide A. PMID:25196585

  2. Macroscopic 3D Porous Graphitic Carbon Nitride Monolith for Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qinghua; Li, Zhi; Yu, Xiaoliang; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2015-08-19

    A macroscopic 3D porous graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) monolith is prepared by the one-step thermal polymerization of urea inside the framework of a commercial melamine sponge and exhibits improved photocatalytic water-splitting performance for hydrogen evolution compared to g-CN powder due to the 3D porous interconnected network, larger specific surface area, better visible light capture, and superior charge-separation efficiency. PMID:26135383

  3. Ammonia-induced robust photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of graphitic carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengju; Zhao, Jianghong; Qiao, Wei; Li, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2015-12-01

    We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 ?mol h(-1) to 316.7 ?mol h(-1) under visible light. PMID:26514964

  4. Weak Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen Interactions Affect the Heterocyclic Ligand Bonding Modes in Barium Complexes Containing 2-Tetrazolato

    E-print Network

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Weak Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen Interactions Affect the Heterocyclic Ligand Bonding Modes in Barium ligands.6 Our idea is that the coordination chemistry of these nitrogen- rich heterocyclic ligands should

  5. Efficient hydrogenation of organic carbonates, carbamates and formates indicates alternative routes to methanol based on CO2 and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaraman, Ekambaram; Gunanathan, Chidambaram; Zhang, Jing; Shimon, Linda J. W.; Milstein, David

    2011-08-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of organic carbonates, carbamates and formates is of significant interest both conceptually and practically, because these compounds can be produced from CO2 and CO, and their mild hydrogenation can provide alternative, mild approaches to the indirect hydrogenation of CO2 and CO to methanol, an important fuel and synthetic building block. Here, we report for the first time catalytic hydrogenation of organic carbonates to alcohols, and carbamates to alcohols and amines. Unprecedented homogeneously catalysed hydrogenation of organic formates to methanol has also been accomplished. The reactions are efficiently catalysed by dearomatized PNN Ru(II) pincer complexes derived from pyridine- and bipyridine-based tridentate ligands. These atom-economical reactions proceed under neutral, homogeneous conditions, at mild temperatures and under mild hydrogen pressures, and can operate in the absence of solvent with no generation of waste, representing the ultimate ‘green’ reactions. A possible mechanism involves metal-ligand cooperation by aromatization-dearomatization of the heteroaromatic pincer core.

  6. Hydrogen sorption properties of Pd-Co nanoalloys embedded into mesoporous carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotea, Claudia; Ghimbeu, Camelia Matei; Oumellal, Yassine; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Latroche, Michel

    2015-09-01

    Pd90Co10 and Pd75Co25 nanoalloys embedded into mesoporous carbon hosts have been prepared by two synthetic methods: direct and indirect. The average nanoparticles size can be tuned by both the temperature during thermal treatment and the chemical composition: the higher the treatment temperature and the richer the Pd composition, the larger the nanoparticle size. Twofold size- and composition-dependence of the hydrogen sorption properties at room temperature are evidenced. The Co substitution in Pd nanoalloys increases the equilibrium pressure at room temperature relative to nanosized Pd. The hydrogen sorption capacity decreases by Co substitution in Pd, as also demonstrated by SQS + DFT calculations.Pd90Co10 and Pd75Co25 nanoalloys embedded into mesoporous carbon hosts have been prepared by two synthetic methods: direct and indirect. The average nanoparticles size can be tuned by both the temperature during thermal treatment and the chemical composition: the higher the treatment temperature and the richer the Pd composition, the larger the nanoparticle size. Twofold size- and composition-dependence of the hydrogen sorption properties at room temperature are evidenced. The Co substitution in Pd nanoalloys increases the equilibrium pressure at room temperature relative to nanosized Pd. The hydrogen sorption capacity decreases by Co substitution in Pd, as also demonstrated by SQS + DFT calculations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: fcc solid solution of the Co-Pd system subjected to SQS/DFT calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03143e

  7. Insights into hydrogen bond donor promoted fixation of carbon dioxide with epoxides catalyzed by ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengshuai; Gao, Kunqi; Liang, Lin; Wang, Fangxiao; Shi, Lei; Sheng, Li; Sun, Jianmin

    2015-02-28

    Catalytic coupling of carbon dioxide with epoxides to obtain cyclic carbonates is an important reaction that has been receiving renewed interest. In this contribution, the cycloaddition reaction in the presence of various hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) catalyzed by hydroxyl/carboxyl task-specific ionic liquids (ILs) is studied in detail. It was found that the activity of ILs could be significantly enhanced in the presence of ethylene glycol (EG), and EG/HEBimBr were the most efficient catalysts for the CO2 cycloaddition to propylene oxide. Moreover, the binary catalysts were also efficiently versatile for the CO2 cycloaddition to less active epoxides such as styrene oxide and cyclohexene oxide. Besides, the minimum energy paths for this hydrogen bond-promoted catalytic reaction were calculated using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The DFT results suggested that the ring-closing reaction was the rate-determining step in the HEBimBr-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction but the EG addition could remarkably reduce its energy barrier as the formation of a hydrogen bond between EG and the oxygen atom of epoxides led this process along the standard SN2 mechanism. As a result, the ring-opening reaction became the rate-determining step in the EG/HEBimBr-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction. The work reported herein helped the understanding and design of catalysts for efficient fixation of CO2 to epoxides via hydrogen bond activation. PMID:25639733

  8. Fractography of the high temperature hydrogen attack of a medium carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, H. G.; Moorhead, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    Microscopic fracture processes were studied which are associated with hydrogen attack of a medium carbon steel in a well-controlled, high-temperature, high-purity hydrogen environment. Exposure to a hydrogen pressure and temperature of 3.5 MN/m2 and 575 C was found to degrade room temperature tensile properties with increasing exposure time. After 408 hr, yield and ultimate strengths were reduced by more than 40 percent and elongation was reduced to less than 2 percent. Initial fissure formation was found to be associated with manganese rich particles, most probably manganese oxide, aligned in the microstructure during the rolling operation. Fissure growth was found to be associated with a reduction in carbide content of the microstructure and was inhibited by the depletion of carbon. The interior surfaces of sectioned fissures or bubbles exhibit both primary and secondary cracking by intergranular separation. The grain surfaces were rough and rounded, suggesting a diffusion-associated separation process. Specimens that failed at room temperature after exposure to hydrogen were found to exhibit mixed mode fracture having varying amounts of intergranular separation, dimple formation, and cleavage, depending on exposure time.

  9. Vapor Phase Hydrogenation of Nitrobenzene to Aniline Over Carbon Supported Ruthenium Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Chakravartula S; Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Viswanadham, Balaga; Srikanth, Amirineni; Chary, Komandur V R

    2015-07-01

    A series of Ru/Carbon catalysts (0.5-6.0 wt%) were prepared by impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), CO-chemisorption, surface area and pore-size distribution measurements. The catalytic activities were evaluated for the vapor phase hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. The dispersion measured by CO-uptake values suggests that a decrease of dispersion is observed with increasing Ru loading on carbon support. These findings are well supported by the crystallite size measured from XRD measurements. XPS study reveals the formation of Ru0 after reduction at 573 K for 3 h. The catalysts exhibit high conversion/selectivity at 4.5 wt% Ru loading during hydrogenation reaction. The particle size measured from CO-chemisorption and TEM analysis are related to the TOF during the hydrogenation reaction. Ru/C catalysts are found to show higher conversion/selectivities during hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline. PMID:26373150

  10. Diamond-like carbon films prepared by reactive pulsed laser deposition in hydrogen and methane ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, Judit; Tóth, Sára; Tóth, Zsolt; Koós, Margit

    2007-07-01

    The properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films, like their hardness and optical band gap drastically depends on their hydrogen content. By reactive pulsed laser deposition in hydrogen containing gas, the hydrogenation of the films can be achieved. The application of reactive gases of different chemical composition can influence the film properties in a different manner. Therefore, we investigated deposition of a-C:H films in H 2 and CH 4 atmosphere (0.001-50 Pa). The deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and infrared spectroscopy. The optical and structural properties of the films prepared in the two different ambient gas show similarities: at low pressure below 1 Pa, the films are diamond-like, at ˜1-10 Pa, the films become graphite-like and at higher pressures, the films show polymer-like properties. Differences in the films prepared in H 2 and CH 4 are found in their thickness and infrared absorption. When increasing the pressure up to medium pressures the thicknesses of both series of films increase, and the films become thinner in the highest pressure domain. However, the films prepared in CH 4 are ˜1.5 times thicker than the films prepared in H 2. Since the mass differences of C atoms and CH 4 is small, the CH x radicals are efficiently accelerated by the carbon plasma and are incorporated into the films, too.

  11. Electrical properties of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon carbon alloys: effect of deposition parameters and light soaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiaschi, S.; Gueunier-Farret, M.-E.; Longeaud, C.; Johnson, E. V.

    2015-07-01

    New materials with electrical properties similar to those of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) or hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium alloys, but that are stable under light soaking, could be a breakthrough for multi-junction thin-film silicon solar cell technology. With this aim, hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon-carbon alloy (? c-\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}1-x}{{\\text{C}}x} :H) thin films seem like promising candidates as the variation of the carbon in the alloy composition can be used to tune the effective bandgap, keeping a high crystalline fraction. In this study, a highly hydrogen-diluted silane and methane gas mixture was used to deposit ? c-\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}1-x}{{\\text{C}}x} :H thin films by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD). The effect of the independent variation of three deposition parameters (variation of methane flow rate, addition of a small amount of silicon tetrafluoride and variation of the RF-power density) on the electronic transport and defect properties was investigated. Selected samples were studied in their ‘as deposited’ state, after light soaking until saturation, and after a high temperature annealing. Particular care was paid to comparing the behaviour of this new material system to that of a reference a-Si:H sample, deposited by standard RF-PECVD.

  12. Catalytic conversion of hydrocarbons to hydrogen and high-value carbon

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Naresh; Panjala, Devadas; Huffman, Gerald P.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention provides novel catalysts for accomplishing catalytic decomposition of undiluted light hydrocarbons to a hydrogen product, and methods for preparing such catalysts. In one aspect, a method is provided for preparing a catalyst by admixing an aqueous solution of an iron salt, at least one additional catalyst metal salt, and a suitable oxide substrate support, and precipitating metal oxyhydroxides onto the substrate support. An incipient wetness method, comprising addition of aqueous solutions of metal salts to a dry oxide substrate support, extruding the resulting paste to pellet form, and calcining the pellets in air is also discloses. In yet another aspect, a process is provided for producing hydrogen from an undiluted light hydrocarbon reactant, comprising contacting the hydrocarbon reactant with a catalyst as described above in a reactor, and recovering a substantially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen product stream. In still yet another aspect, a process is provided for catalytic decomposition of an undiluted light hydrocarbon reactant to obtain hydrogen and a valuable multi-walled carbon nanotube coproduct.

  13. Is Deuterium Nuclear Fusion Catalyzed by Antineutrinos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shomer, Isaac

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of Fischbach and Jenkins that neutrinos emitted from the sun accelerate radioactive decay is noted. It is thought that neutrinos accelerate beta decay by reacting with neutron-rich nuclides to form a beta particle and a daughter product, with no antineutrino emitted. Conversely, it is proposed that antineutrinos can react with proton-rich nuclides to cause positron decay, with no neutrino emitted. It is also proposed that the nuclear fusion of the hydrogen bomb is triggered not only by the energy of the igniting fission bomb, but by the antineutrinos created by the rapid beta decay of the daughter products in the fission process. The contemplated mechanism for antineutrino initiated fusion is the following: 1. The antineutrinos from the fission daughter products cause positron decay of deuterium by the process outlined above. 2. In a later fusion step, these positrons subsequently react with neutrons in deuterium to create antineutrinos. Electrons are unavailable to annihilate positrons in the plasma of the hydrogen bomb. 3. These antineutrinos thereafter react with more deuterium to form positrons, thereby propagating a chain reaction. )

  14. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of benzene and toluene during hydrophobic sorption in multistep batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Imfeld, G; Kopinke, F-D; Fischer, A; Richnow, H-H

    2014-07-01

    The application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for evaluating degradation of organic pollutants in the field implies that other processes affecting pollutant concentration are minor with respect to isotope fractionation. Sorption is associated with minor isotope fractionation and pollutants may undergo successive sorption-desorption steps during their migration in aquifers. However, little is known about isotope fractionation of BTEX compounds after consecutive sorption steps. Here, we show that partitioning of benzene and toluene between water and organic sorbents (i.e. 1-octanol, dichloromethane, cyclohexane, hexanoic acid and Amberlite XAD-2) generally exhibits very small carbon and hydrogen isotope effects in multistep batch experiments. However, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the benzene-octanol pair after several sorption steps (??(13)C=1.6 ± 0.3‰ and ??(2)H=88 ± 3‰), yielding isotope fractionation factors of ?C=1.0030 ± 0.0005 and ?H=1.195 ± 0.026. Our results indicate that the cumulative effect of successive hydrophobic partitioning steps in an aquifer generally results in insignificant isotope fractionation for benzene and toluene. However, significant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation cannot be excluded for specific sorbate-sorbent pairs, such as sorbates with ?-electrons and sorbents with OH-groups. Consequently, functional groups of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) may specifically interact with BTEX compounds migrating in an aquifer, thereby resulting in potentially relevant isotope fractionation. PMID:24726480

  15. Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometric (LC/ESI-MS/MS) Study for the Identification and Characterization of In Vivo Metabolites of Cisplatin in Rat Kidney Cancer Tissues: Online Hydrogen/Deuterium (H/D) Exchange Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandu, Raju; Ahn, Hyun Soo; Lee, Joon Won; Kim, Yong Woo; Choi, Seon Hee; Kim, Hak Jin; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    In vivo rat kidney tissue metabolites of an anticancer drug, cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [II]) (CP) which is used for the treatment of testicular, ovarian, bladder, cervical, esophageal, small cell lung, head and neck cancers, have been identified and characterized by using liquid chromatography positive ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) in combination with on line hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. To identify in vivo metabolites, kidney tissues were collected after intravenous administration of CP to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 3 per group). The tissue samples were homogenized and extracted using newly optimized metabolite extraction procedure which involves liquid extraction with phosphate buffer containing ethyl acetate and protein precipitation with mixed solvents of methanol-water-chloroform followed by solid-phase clean-up procedure on Oasis HLB 3cc cartridges and then subjected to LC/ESI-HRMS analysis. A total of thirty one unknown in vivo metabolites have been identified and the structures of metabolites were elucidated using LC-MS/MS experiments combined with accurate mass measurements. Online HDX experiments have been used to further support the structural characterization of metabolites. The results showed that CP undergoes a series of ligand exchange biotransformation reactions with water and other nucleophiles like thio groups of methionine, cysteine, acetylcysteine, glutathione and thioether. This is the first research approach focused on the structure elucidation of biotransformation products of CP in rats, and the identification of metabolites provides essential information for further pharmacological and clinical studies of CP, and may also be useful to develop various effective new anticancer agents. PMID:26244343

  16. Engineering Bacteria for Efficient Fuel Production: Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Free Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-12

    Electrofuels Project: OPX Biotechnologies is engineering a microorganism currently used in industrial biotechnology to directly produce a liquid fuel from hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). The microorganism has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. OPX Biotechnologies is modifying the microorganism to divert energy and carbon away from growth and towards the production of liquid fuels in larger, commercially viable quantities. The microbial system will produce a fuel precursor that can be chemically upgraded to various hydrocarbon fuels.

  17. Computational analysis of structural transformations in carbon nanostructures induced by hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz, Andre R.

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, have attracted significant interest over the past several years due to their outstanding and unusual combination of physical properties. These properties can be modified in a controllable way by chemical functionalization in order to enable specific technological applications. One example is hydrogenation, achieved by the exposure of these materials to a source of atomic hydrogen. This process has been considered for hydrogen storage purposes and for the control of the band gap of these materials for applications in carbon-based electronics. Hydrogen atoms are chemisorbed onto the surface of these materials, introducing sp3-hybridized C-C bonds in a structure originally formed by delocalized sp2 C-C bonding. This bonding transition causes severe structural and morphological changes to the graphene layers/walls. Also, it has been demonstrated that the exposure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to a H2 plasma leads to the formation of diamond nanocrystals embedded within the nanotube walls. This thesis presents a computational analysis of the effects of hydrogen chemisorption on the structure and morphology of graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), as well as of the different nanostructures that can be generated upon formation of inter-shell and inter-layer sp 3 C-C bonds in MWCNTs and few-layer graphene (FLG), respectively. The analysis is based on a synergistic combination of atomic-scale modeling tools, including first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations and classical molecular-dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The results demonstrate that SWCNTs and graphene swell upon hydrogenation and provide interpretations to experiments reported in the literature; this swelling depends strongly on the hydrogen surface coverage. A MC/MD-based compositional relaxation procedure generates configurations whose arrangements of H atoms are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. Detailed structural analysis of the hydrogenated surfaces is carried out, providing information which cannot be extracted easily from conventional experimental techniques. The findings of the analysis are used to explain the limitations on the maximum H storage capacity of SWCNT bundles upon their exposure to an atomic H flux. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the structures resulting from formation of inter-shell or inter-layer C-C bonds are stable and provide seeds for the nucleation of crystalline carbon phases embedded into the shells and layers of the MWCNT and FLG structures, respectively. The key parameter that determines the type and size of the generated nanocrystals is the chiral-angle difference between adjacent layers/walls in the original structure. A novel type of carbon structure, consisting of fullerene-like caged configurations embedded within adjacent graphene layers, has been discovered for the case where the graphene layers are rotated with respect to each other; interestingly, one class of these structures retains the unique and desired electronic properties of single-layer graphene.

  18. Physical Chemist Harold Clayton Urey (1893-1981) Columbia Chemistry Professor Harold Urey experimentally discovered deuterium

    E-print Network

    Physical Chemist Harold Clayton Urey (1893-1981) Columbia Chemistry Professor Harold Urey experimentally discovered deuterium in 1931. Early in that year Urey conceived and worked out a method hydrogen was distilled down to 1 cc. Urey detected deuterium by its predicted spectrum in a discharge

  19. [Removal of fluorescent whitening agent by hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Long; Zhang, Zhong-Min; Zhao, Xia; Jiao, Ru-Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Degradation of fluorescent whitening agent VBL in the processes of activated carbon (AC) and activated carbon modified (ACM) adsorptions, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidation, and hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon were studied. Mechanism of the above catalytic oxidation was also investigated by adding tert-Butyl alcohol (TBA), the free radical scavenger, and detecting the released gases. The results showed that: the activated carbon modified by Fe (NO3)3 (ACM)exhibited better adsorption removal than AC. Catalytic oxidation showed efficient removal of VBL, and the catalytic removal of AC (up to 95%) was significantly higher than that of ACM (58% only). Catalytic oxidation was inhibited by TBA, which indicates that the above reaction involved *OH radicals and atom oxygen generated by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of AC. The results of H2O2 decomposition and released gases detection involved in the process showed that activated carbon enhanced the decomposition of H2O2 which released oxygen and heat. More O2 was produced and higher temperature of the reactor was achieved, which indicated that H2O2 decomposition catalyzed by ACM was significantly faster than that of AC. Combining the results of VBL removal, it could be concluded that the rate of active intermediates (*OH radicals and atom oxygen) production by ACM catalytic reaction was faster than that of AC. These intermediates consumed themselves and produced O2 instead of degrading VBL. It seemed that the improper mutual matching of the forming rate of activating intermediates and the supply rate of reactants was an important reason for the lower efficiency of ACM catalytic reaction comparing with AC. PMID:25158496

  20. Molecular Hydrogen, Deuterium, and Metal Abundances in the Damped Ly? System at zabs=3.025 toward Q0347-3819

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, Sergei A.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; D'Odorico, Sandro; Molaro, Paolo

    2002-02-01

    We have detected in high-resolution spectra of the quasar Q0347-3819 obtained with the UV-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at the VLT/Kueyen telescope over 80 absorption features in the Lyman and Werner H2 bands at the redshift of a damped Ly? (DLA) system at zabs=3.025. At the same redshift, numerous absorption lines of atoms and low ions (H I, D I, C II, C II*, N I, O I, Si II, P II, Ar I, Cr II, Fe II, and Zn II) were identified. The zabs=3.025 system spans over ~80 km s-1 and exhibits a multicomponent velocity structure in the metal lines. The main component at zabs=3.024855 shows a total H2 column density N(H2)=(4.10+/-0.21)×1014 cm-2 and a fractional molecular abundance fH2=(1.94+/-0.10)×10-6 derived from the H2 lines arising from the J=0-5 rotational levels of the ground electronic vibrational state. In the second strong component at zabs=3.024684 we were able to set a stringent upper limit to fH2 of 3.3×10-9 (3 ? c.l.). The population of the J levels can be represented by a single excitation temperature of Tex=825+/-110 K. The ortho-H2:para-H2 ratio equals 3.1+/-0.3. This ratio is comparable to that calculated from hot H2 formation upon grain surfaces (ortho-H2:para-H2=3:1) but is higher than the ``freezeout'' quantity (ortho-H2:para-H2=1:4) predicted for cosmological epochs at z<20, implying recent formation of the hydrogen molecules following photodissociation of pristine H2. In the main component the properties of the neutral atoms and low ions can be described with the same broadening parameter b~=3 km s-1 of the H2 cloud. The rate at which UV photons are absorbed in the Lyman and Werner bands is found to be ?0~=2×10-9 s-1. Taking into account that similar ?0 values are observed in the Galactic diffuse molecular clouds, it shows that the UV radiation fields in the DLA and in the Milky Way are very much alike. We also found the H2 formation rate of RnH~=3×10-16 s-1 at zabs=3.025, which is consistent with observations in the Galactic disk diffuse clouds where nH2 is low. Comparing the relative rotational population ratios of H2 with the measured C II*/C II ratio, we can infer that nH~=6 cm-3 in the main component, which gives a size of D~=14 pc along the line of sight. The mean value of the dust-to-gas ratio estimated for the whole zabs=3.025 system from the [Cr/Zn] ratio is equal to k=0.032+/-0.005 (in units of the mean Galactic interstellar medium value). For the first time we unambiguously reveal a pronounced [?-element/iron peak] enhancement of [O,Si/Zn]=0.6+/-0.1 (1 ? c.l.) at high redshift. The simultaneous analysis of metal and hydrogen lines leads to D/H=(3.75+/-0.25)×10-5. This value is consistent with standard big bang nucleosynthesis if the baryon-to-photon ratio, ?, lies within the range 4.37×10-10<~?<~5.32×10-10, implying 0.016<~?bh2100<~0.020. Based on public data released from UVES Commissioning at the VLT Kueyen telescope, ESO, Paranal, Chile.

  1. GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P

    2006-06-08

    This report is a compendium of sets of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following the short-term effects of hydrogen exposure. The property sets include the following: Yield Strength; Ultimate Tensile Strength; Uniform Elongation; Reduction of Area; Threshold Cracking, K{sub H} or K{sub th}; Fracture Toughness (K{sub IC}, J{sub IC}, and/or J-R Curve); and Fatigue Crack Growth (da/dN). These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  2. Redox Control and Hydrogen Production in Sediment Caps Using Carbon Cloth Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mei; Yan, Fei; Zhang, Ruiling; Reible, Danny D.; Lowry, Gregory V.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2010-01-01

    Sediment caps that degrade contaminants can improve their ability to contain contaminants relative to sand and sorbent-amended caps, but few methods to enhance contaminant degradation in sediment caps are available. The objective of this study was to determine if, carbon electrodes emplaced within a sediment cap at poised potential could create a redox gradient and provide electron donor for the potential degradation of contaminants. In a simulated sediment cap overlying sediment from the Anacostia River (Washington, DC), electrochemically induced redox gradients were developed within 3 days and maintained over the period of the test (~100 days). Hydrogen and oxygen were produced by water electrolysis at the electrode surfaces and may serve as electron donor and acceptor for contaminant degradation. Electrochemical and geochemical factors that may influence hydrogen production were studied. Hydrogen production displayed zero order kinetics with ~75% coulombic efficiency and rates were proportional to the applied potential between 2.5V to 5V and not greatly affected by pH. Hydrogen production was promoted by increasing ionic strength and in the presence of natural organic matter. Graphite electrode-stimulated degradation of tetrachlorobenzene in a batch reactor was dependent on applied voltage and production of hydrogen to a concentration above the threshold for biological dechlorination. These findings suggest that electrochemical reactive capping can potentially be used to create “reactive” sediments caps capable of promoting chemical or biological transformations of contaminants within the cap. PMID:20879761

  3. The effect of hydrogen bonds on diffusion mechanism of water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qu; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wu, Tao

    2014-06-01

    Nanopores can serve as a molecule channel for transport of fluid, where water diffusion differs remarkably from that of simple particles. Hydrogen bonds play an essential role in the diffusion anomaly. Detailed investigations are carried out on the systems of rigid (6, 6), (7, 7), (8, 8), (9, 9), and (10, 10) armchair carbon nanotubes, solvated with Lennard-Jones water fluids. The role of hydrogen bonds is examined by diffusivity statistics and animation snapshots. It is found that in small (6,6) CNT, hydrogen bonds tend to aggregate water into a wire and lead to rapid collective drift. Confinement can stabilize the hydrogen bond of water molecules and enhance its lifetime. In relatively smaller CNTs, the diffusion mechanism could be altered by the temperature. Moreover, in larger nanotubes hydrogen bonding network allows the water to form regional concentrated clusters. This allows water fluid in extremely low density exhibit rather slow self-diffusion motion. This fundamental study attempts to provide insights in understanding nanoscale delivery system in aqueous solution.

  4. Deuterium content of the Venus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Clarke, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The abundance of deuterium in the atmosphere of Venus is an important clue to the role of water in the planet's history, because ordinary and deuterated water escape the atmosphere at different rates. The high-resolution mode of the IUE was used to measure hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission from Venus, but only an upper limit on deuterium Lyman-alpha emission was found, from which was inferred a D/H ratio of less than 0.002-0.005. This is smaller by a factor of 3-8 than the D/H ratio derived from measurements by the Pioneer Venus Large Probe, and may indicate either a stratification of D/H ratio with altitude or a smaller overall ratio than previously thought.

  5. Biological sulfate reduction using gas-lift reactors fed with hydrogen and carbon dioxide as energy and carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Houten, R.T. van; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Lettinga, G. . Dept. of Environmental Technology)

    1994-08-20

    Feasibility and engineering aspects of biological sulfate reduction in gas-lift reactors were studied. Hydrogen and carbon dioxide were used as energy and carbon source. Attention was paid to biofilm formation, sulfide toxicity, sulfate conversion rate optimization, and gas-liquid mass transfer limitations. Sulfate-reducing bacteria formed stable biofilms on pumice particles. Biofilm formation was not observed when basalt particles were used. However, use of basalt particles led to the formation of granules of sulfate-reducing biomass. The sulfate-reducing bacteria, grown on pumice, easily adapted to free H[sub 2]S concentrations up to 450 mg/L. Biofilm growth rate then equilibrated biomass loss rate. These high free H[sub 2]S concentrations caused reversible inhibition rather than acute toxicity. When free H[sub 2]S concentrations were kept below 450 mg/L, a maximum sulfate conversion rate of 30 g SO[sub 4][sup 2[minus

  6. Dissolution of Irradiated Commercial UO2 Fuels in Ammonium Carbonate and Hydrogen Peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Hanson, Brady D.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Carson, Katharine J.; Peper, Shane M.

    2011-01-18

    We propose and test a disposition path for irradiated nuclear fuel using ammonium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide media. We demonstrate on a 13 g scale that >98% of the irradiated fuel dissolves. Subsequent expulsion of carbonate from the dissolver solution precipitates >95% of the plutonium, americium, curium, and substantial amounts of fission products, effectively partitioning the fuel at the dissolution step. Uranium can be easily recovered from solution by any of several means, such as ion exchange, solvent extraction, or direct precipitation. Ammonium carbonate can be evaporated from solution and recovered for re-use, leaving an extremely compact volume of fission products, transactinides, and uranium. Stack emissions are predicted to be less toxic, less radioactive, chemically simpler, and simpler to treat than those from the conventional PUREX process.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia removal on activated carbon fiber cloth-supported metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Le Leuch, L M; Subrenat, A; Le Cloirec, P

    2005-11-01

    The present investigation attempts to provide mechanisms for the influence of metal catalysts on carbon supports in odorous gas removal. For this purpose, an activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) was subjected to successive metal impregnation to modify its surface properties and so increase its treatment capacity. The carbon fiber cloth adsorbent was prepared by classical incipient wetness impregnation followed by calcination in order to obtain metal oxide phases. Different impregnation parameters (type of metal, level of impregnation, calcination temperature) in the removal of hydrogen sulfide and ammonia were studied. Adsorption kinetics and capacities were carried out in a batch reactor at room temperature. It was found that removal activity depended on metal loading as well as on the order of the metal addition and calcination phase. The capacity of ACFC-supported metal oxides to adsorb both pollutants showed great improvement compared to the virgin adsorbent. PMID:16335599

  8. Graphitic Mesoporous Carbon as a Support of Promoted Rh Catalysts for Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Songhai; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Xiqing; Kidder, Michelle; Schwartz, Viviane; Golden, Melissa L; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, Deen

    2012-01-01

    Graphitic mesoporous carbon (GMC), prepared through high-temperature graphitization of soft-templated amorphous mesoporous carbon (AMC), was used as the support for Mn, Li, and Fe triple-promoted Rh catalysts for CO hydrogenation to ethanol. The use of GMC results in C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH selectivity and formation rate comparable to nonporous SiO{sub 2} support along with a significant inhibition on the formation of undesired CH{sub 4} and light hydrocarbons at the expense of appreciable amounts of CO{sub 2} produced. The better catalytic performance of promoted-Rh/GMC than those supported on other carbon allotropes (AMC and non-porous graphitic carbon black) seems to be associated with the specific graphitic structure and mesoporosity of GMC. The surface modification of GMC by wet oxidation leads to considerable increases in C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH selectivity and formation rate. The modified GMC as a support shows substantially greater CO{sub 2}-free selectivity for C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH than the SiO{sub 2}.

  9. Nickel embedded in N-doped porous carbon for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to p-aminophenol in sulphuric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Dong, Zhen; Fu, Teng; Zhao, Yanchao; Wang, Tian; Wang, Yongzheng; Chen, Yi; Han, Baohang; Ding, Weiping

    2015-12-01

    An acid-resistant catalyst composed of nickel embedded in N-doped porous carbon is developed for the catalytic hydrogenation of nitrobenzene (NB) to p-aminophenol (PAP). The catalyst, due to a special electron donation from nickel to the N-doped porous carbon, shows an excellent catalytic performance and stability in sulphuric acid solution. PMID:26489366

  10. Henry Cavendish (1731-1810): hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water, and weighing the world.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-07-01

    Henry Cavendish (1731-1810) was an outstanding chemist and physicist. Although he was not a major figure in the history of respiratory physiology he made important discoveries concerning hydrogen, carbon dioxide, atmospheric air, and water. Hydrogen had been prepared earlier by Boyle but its properties had not been recognized; Cavendish described these in detail, including the density of the gas. Carbon dioxide had also previously been studied by Black, but Cavendish clarified its properties and measured its density. He was the first person to accurately analyze atmospheric air and reported an oxygen concentration very close to the currently accepted value. When he removed all the oxygen and nitrogen from an air sample, he found that there was a residual portion of about 0.8% that he could not characterize. Later this was shown to be argon. He produced large amounts of water by burning hydrogen in oxygen and recognized that these were its only constituents. Cavendish also worked on electricity and heat. However, his main contribution outside chemistry was an audacious experiment to measure the density of the earth, which he referred to as "weighing the world." This involved determining the gravitational attraction between lead spheres in a specially constructed building. Although this was a simple experiment in principle, there were numerous complexities that he overcame with meticulous attention to experimental details. His result was very close to the modern accepted value. The Cavendish Experiment, as it is called, assures his place in the history of science. PMID:24793169

  11. Hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of chloromethane by methylotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nadalig, Thierry; Greule, Markus; Bringel, Françoise; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Keppler, Frank

    2013-12-01

    Chloromethane (CH3 Cl) is a widely studied volatile halocarbon involved in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Nevertheless, its global budget still remains debated. Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool to constrain fluxes of chloromethane between various environmental compartments which involve a multiplicity of sources and sinks, and both biotic and abiotic processes. In this study, we measured hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation of the remaining untransformed chloromethane following its degradation by methylotrophic bacterial strains Methylobacterium extorquens CM4 and Hyphomicrobium sp. MC1, which belong to different genera but both use the cmu pathway, the only pathway for bacterial degradation of chloromethane characterized so far. Hydrogen isotope fractionation for degradation of chloromethane was determined for the first time, and yielded enrichment factors (?) of -29‰ and -27‰ for strains CM4 and MC1, respectively. In agreement with previous studies, enrichment in (13) C of untransformed CH3 Cl was also observed, and similar isotope enrichment factors (?) of -41‰ and -38‰ were obtained for degradation of chloromethane by strains CM4 and MC1, respectively. These combined hydrogen and carbon isotopic data for bacterial degradation of chloromethane will contribute to refine models of the global atmospheric budget of chloromethane. PMID:24019296

  12. Hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of chloromethane by methylotrophic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nadalig, Thierry; Greule, Markus; Bringel, Françoise; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Keppler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Chloromethane (CH3Cl) is a widely studied volatile halocarbon involved in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Nevertheless, its global budget still remains debated. Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool to constrain fluxes of chloromethane between various environmental compartments which involve a multiplicity of sources and sinks, and both biotic and abiotic processes. In this study, we measured hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation of the remaining untransformed chloromethane following its degradation by methylotrophic bacterial strains Methylobacterium extorquens CM4 and Hyphomicrobium sp. MC1, which belong to different genera but both use the cmu pathway, the only pathway for bacterial degradation of chloromethane characterized so far. Hydrogen isotope fractionation for degradation of chloromethane was determined for the first time, and yielded enrichment factors (?) of ?29‰ and ?27‰ for strains CM4 and MC1, respectively. In agreement with previous studies, enrichment in 13C of untransformed CH3Cl was also observed, and similar isotope enrichment factors (?) of ?41‰ and ?38‰ were obtained for degradation of chloromethane by strains CM4 and MC1, respectively. These combined hydrogen and carbon isotopic data for bacterial degradation of chloromethane will contribute to refine models of the global atmospheric budget of chloromethane. PMID:24019296

  13. CARBON NANOMATERIALS AS CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGEN UPTAKE AND RELEASE IN NAALH4

    SciTech Connect

    Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Andrew Harter, A

    2008-06-19

    A synergistic approach involving experiment and first-principles theory not only shows that carbon nanostructures can be used as catalysts for hydrogen uptake and release in complex metal hydrides such as sodium alanate, NaAlH{sub 4}, but also provides an unambiguous understanding of how the catalysts work. The stability of NaAlH{sub 4} originates from the charge transfer from Na to the AlH{sub 4} moiety, resulting in an ionic bond between Na{sup +} and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and a covalent bond between Al and H. Interaction of NaAlH{sub 4} with an electro-negative substrate such as carbon fullerene or nanotube affects the ability of Na to donate its charge to AlH{sub 4}, consequently weakening the Al-H bond and causing hydrogen to desorb at lower temperatures as well as facilitating the absorption of H{sub 2} to reverse the dehydrogenation reaction. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation further reveals the time evolution of the charge transfer process with hydrogen desorption occurring when the charge transfer is complete.

  14. Nanocomposite of Au Nanoparticles/Helical Carbon Nanofibers and Application in Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Mumu; Cui, Rongjing; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Genhua; Lin, Wang; Yu, Lingjun

    2015-06-01

    A combined sol-gel/hydrogen reduction method has been developed for the mass production of helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs) by the pyrolysis of acetylene at 425 degrees C in the presence of NiO nanoparticles. The synthesized HCNFs were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The helical-structured carbon nanofibers have a large specific surface area and excellent biocompatibility. A novel enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor was then successfully fabricated based on the nanocomposites containing HCNFs and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The results indicated that the Au/HCNFs nanocomposites exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of H2O2, offering a wide linear range from 1.0 ?M to 3157 ?M with a detection limit as low as 0.46 ?M. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant of the biosensor was 0.61 mM. The as-fabricated biosensor showed a rapid and sensitive amperometric response to hydrogen peroxide with acceptable preparation reproducibility and excellent stability. Because of their low cost and high stability, these novel HCNFs represent seem to be a kind of promising biomaterial and may find wide new applications in scopes such as biocatalysis, immunoassay, environmental monitoring and so on. PMID:26369097

  15. A highly sensitive hydrogen peroxide sensor based on (Ag-Au NPs)/poly[o-phenylenediamine] modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Karimi, Ziba; Amouzadeh Tabrizi, Mahmoud

    2015-11-01

    Herein, the poly(o-phenylenediamine) decorated with gold-silver nanoparticle (Ag-Au NPs) nanocomposite modified glassy carbon was used for the determination of hydrogen peroxide. Electrochemical experiments indicated that the proposed sensor possesses an excellent sensitivity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The resulting sensor exhibited a good response to hydrogen peroxide over linear range from 0.2 to 60.0?M with a limit of detection of 0.08?M, good reproducibility, long-term stability and negligible interference from ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine. The proposed sensor was successfully applied to the determination of hydrogen peroxide in human serum sample. PMID:26249610

  16. Stability of electron emission current in hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.J.; Moon, J.H.; Park, K.C.; Oh, M.H.; Milne, W.I.; Jang, J.

    1997-10-01

    We have studied the electron emission characteristics of the hydrogen-free diamondlike carbon (DLC) and conventional DLC films. The electron emission current of conventional DLC increases at first and then decreases continuously with bias stress time. The emission current of the hydrogen-free DLC, deposited by the layer-by-layer technique, increases at first and then stabilizes with increasing stress time. The resistivity of the hydrogen-free DLC decreases after long bias stress, and that appears to be due to the changes in the density of states in the gap of the hydrogen-free DLC. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Deuterium microbomb rocket propulsion

    E-print Network

    Friedwardt Winterberg

    2008-12-02

    Large scale manned space flight within the solar system is still confronted with the solution of two problems: 1. A propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits. 2. A cost effective lifting of large payloads into earth orbit. For the solution of the first problem a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimegampere proton beam, drawn from the magnetically insulated spacecraft acting in the ultrahigh vacuum of space as a gigavolt capacitor. For the solution of the second problem, the ignition is done by argon ion lasers driven by high explosives, with the lasers destroyed in the fusion explosion and becoming part of the exhaust.

  18. Deuterium microbomb rocket propulsion

    E-print Network

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-01-01

    Large scale manned space flight within the solar system is still confronted with the solution of two problems: 1. A propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits. 2. A cost effective lifting of large payloads into earth orbit. For the solution of the first problem a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimegampere proton beam, drawn from the magnetically insulated spacecraft acting in the ultrahigh vacuum of space as a gigavolt capacitor. For the solution of the second problem, the ignition is done by argon ion lasers driven by high explosives, with the lasers destroyed in the fusion explosion and becoming part of the exhaust.

  19. Interstellar helium and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Madjar, A.

    The importance of helium and deuterium is underlined: both are probably ashes of the primordial nucleosynthesis and represent some of the most abundant elements in the universe. For both elements the different observational methods used in the interstellar medium are mentioned and the most precise ones described in more details. A discussion of the results in comparison with current theories shows that many more observations are needed. Typical future possibilities are suggested.

  20. Hydrogen bonding and cation coordination effects in primary and secondary amines dissolved in carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Nathalie; Frech, Roger

    2007-04-12

    Raman and infrared spectroscopy were used to investigate hydrogen-bonding interactions and cation coordination effects in solutions of lithium triflate (LiCF3SO3) dissolved in two primary amines, hexylamine (HEXA) and N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (DMEDA), and in a secondary amine, dipropylamine (DPA). Strong intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions and weaker intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions that occur only in DMEDA were spectroscopically distinguished in a comparison of pure HEXA, pure DMEDA, and the dilute solutions of these amines in CCl4. The spectroscopic shifts in intensity and frequency in the NH stretching region of DPA and DPA diluted in CCl4 were similar to those of HEXA. Dilute electrolyte solutions in carbon tetrachloride were prepared to analyze specifically the cation coordination effect. In these solutions, limited intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions are present, and the observed spectral shifts correspond primarily to the cation-induced shifts. The symmetric SO3 stretching region of the triflate anion was investigated to probe further the coordination of the cation. The local structures of the triflate ions and the amine groups in the electrolyte solutions dissolved in CCl4 are similar to the local structures in the corresponding amine-salt crystals previously reported by us. PMID:17388371

  1. Molecular metal-Nx centres in porous carbon for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Brüller, Sebastian; Dong, Renhao; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of precious platinum with efficient and low-cost catalysts for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution at low overpotentials holds tremendous promise for clean energy devices. Here we report a novel type of robust cobalt-nitrogen/carbon catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that is prepared by the pyrolysis of cobalt-N4 macrocycles or cobalt/o-phenylenediamine composites and using silica colloids as a hard template. We identify the well-dispersed molecular CoNx sites on the carbon support as the active sites responsible for the HER. The CoNx/C catalyst exhibits extremely high turnover frequencies per cobalt site in acids, for example, 0.39 and 6.5?s(-1) at an overpotential of 100 and 200?mV, respectively, which are higher than those reported for other scalable non-precious metal HER catalysts. Our results suggest the great promise of developing new families of non-precious metal HER catalysts based on the controlled conversion of homogeneous metal complexes into solid-state carbon catalysts via economically scalable protocols. PMID:26250525

  2. Molecular metal-Nx centres in porous carbon for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Brüller, Sebastian; Dong, Renhao; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Replacement of precious platinum with efficient and low-cost catalysts for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution at low overpotentials holds tremendous promise for clean energy devices. Here we report a novel type of robust cobalt-nitrogen/carbon catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that is prepared by the pyrolysis of cobalt-N4 macrocycles or cobalt/o-phenylenediamine composites and using silica colloids as a hard template. We identify the well-dispersed molecular CoNx sites on the carbon support as the active sites responsible for the HER. The CoNx/C catalyst exhibits extremely high turnover frequencies per cobalt site in acids, for example, 0.39 and 6.5 s-1 at an overpotential of 100 and 200 mV, respectively, which are higher than those reported for other scalable non-precious metal HER catalysts. Our results suggest the great promise of developing new families of non-precious metal HER catalysts based on the controlled conversion of homogeneous metal complexes into solid-state carbon catalysts via economically scalable protocols.

  3. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  4. Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Taylor; J. P. Allain; P. S. Krstic; J. Dadras; C. H. Skinner; K. E. Luitjohan

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to approximately 16% and then bombarded with deuterium. XPS showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

  5. Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. N.; School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 ; Allain, J. P.; Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 ; Luitjohan, K. E.; Krstic, P. S.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996; TheoretiK, Knoxville, Tennessee 379XX ; Dadras, J.; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 ; Skinner, C. H.

    2014-05-15

    Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to ?16% and then bombarded with deuterium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

  6. The effect of base plate carbon content on the microstructure and hydrogen content of steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Swallow, E.; Gee, R.

    1996-12-31

    In industry, the hydrogen contents of steel welds are normally determined by a standard test involving single pass bead-on-plate welds. The present work investigates the effect of base plate composition on the measured values for a single welding consumable. An increase in the diffusible hydrogen content was observed with increasing carbon content of the base plate. The results are explained in terms of a lowering of the base plate melting point, an increase in fused metal volume, a decrease in the solidification temperature of the weld pool and a decrease in the proportion of {delta}-ferrite formed during the primary solidification. It is concluded that a tighter specification for base plate composition is required in such tests.

  7. Synergistic etch rates during low-energetic plasma etching of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T. A. R.; Weber, J. W.; Colsters, P. G. J.; Mestrom, D. M. H. G.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Engeln, R.

    2012-07-01

    The etch mechanisms of hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films in low-energetic (<2 eV) high flux plasmas are investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results indicate a synergistic effect for the etch rate between argon ions and atomic hydrogen, even at these extremely low kinetic energies. Ion-assisted chemical sputtering is the primary etch mechanism in both Ar/H{sub 2} and pure H{sub 2} plasmas, although a contribution of swift chemical sputtering to the total etch rate is not excluded. Furthermore, ions determine to a large extent the surface morphology during plasma etching. A high influx of ions enhances the etch rate and limits the surface roughness, whereas a low ion flux promotes graphitization and leads to a large surface roughness (up to 60 nm).

  8. Covalent immobilization of protein onto a functionalized hydrogenated diamond-like carbon substrate.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Hari Shankar; Datta, Jagannath; Chowdhury, D P; Reddy, A V R; Ghosh, Uday Chand; Srivastava, Arvind Kumar; Ray, Nihar Ranjan

    2010-11-16

    Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (HDLC) has an atomically smooth surface that can be deposited on high-surface area substrata and functionalized with reactive chemical groups, providing an ideal substrate for protein immobilization. A synthetic sequence is described involving deposition and hydrogenation of DLC followed by chemical functionalization. These functional groups are reacted with amines on proteins causing covalent immobilization on contact. Raman measurements confirm the presence of these surface functional groups, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirms covalent protein immobilization. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of immobilized proteins is reproducible because proteins do not move as a result of interactions with the AFM probe-tip, thus providing an advantage over mica substrata typically used in AFM studies of protein. HDLC offers many of the same technical advantages as oxidized graphene but also allows for coating large surface areas of biomaterials relevant to the fabrication of medical/biosensor devices. PMID:20949913

  9. Carbon quantum dots coated BiVO4 inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Feng; Kang, Zhenhui; Wang, Junling; Shen, Mingrong; Fang, Liang

    2015-04-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) coated BiVO4 inverse opal (io-BiVO4) structure that shows dramatic improvement of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation has been fabricated using electrodeposition with a template. The io-BiVO4 maximizes photon trapping through slow light effect, while maintaining adequate surface area for effective redox reactions. CQDs are then incorporated to the io-BiVO4 to further improve the photoconversion efficiency. Due to the strong visible light absorption property of CQDs and enhanced separation of the photoexcited electrons, the CQDs coated io-BiVO4 exhibit a maximum photo-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.35%, which is 6 times higher than that of the pure BiVO4 thin films. This work is a good example of designing composite photoelectrode by combining quantum dots and photonic crystal.

  10. Applications of functional carbon nanomaterials from hydrogen storage to drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Ashley Dawn

    This dissertation describes the modification and functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). These SWCNTs were then investigated for their use in medical applications and for the storage of hydrogen. A technique was developed that leads to highly customized, individually suspended aqueous solutions of SWCNTs. These newly generated water-soluble SWCNTs were then functionalized further in water, thereby permitting the second functionalization addends to be chemically sensitive functional groups, for example drugs, that would not withstand the strongly acidic conditions of the first functionalization. The radical scavenging properties of nanovectors derived from SWCNTs were investigated and it was found that even the poorest SWCNT nanovector studied was nearly 40 times more effective at scavenging radicals than dendrite-fullerene DF-1, which has been shown to be a radioprotective to zebrafish via an antioxidant niechanism. This was used as the base to investigate using SWCNTs as protectors and mitigators of radiation exposure. SWCNTs were then explored for their use as drug delivery agents, in particular, the water insoluble chemotherapy drug, paclitaxel. SWCNTs showed promising in vivo and in vitro efficacy in the delivery of paclitaxel. Toxicity and biodistribution studies of the SWCNTs as drug delivery agents were performed in vivo using SWCNTs functionalized with radiolabeled indium. It was found that SWCNTs could be used for hydrogen storage by chemically crosslinking 3-dimensional frameworks of SWCNT fibers. These frameworks were shown to physisorb twice as much hydrogen, at low pressures, with respect to their surface areas, than typical macroporous carbon materials. This makes these SWCNT frameworks attractive materials for the development of a hydrogen vehicle fuel tank.

  11. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to formic acid by transition-metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Junzhong; Li, Z.; Wang, H.; Wang, C.

    1993-12-31

    For the unfavorable effects of carbon dioxide on the environment and ecology and for the increasing scarcity of organic carbon carriers for the future, the study of conversion of CO{sub 2} into organic compounds is currently attracting widespread interest. The production of formic acid from the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide in alcohol by transition metals (Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Fe, Co, Ni) and their complexes as catalysts is reported. RuH{sub 2}(CO)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}, RhH(CO)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}, and IrH(CO)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}, have been found to be effective catalysts for the hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} in hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} in alcohol`s under mild conditions (loading pressures of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, 2.5MPa each, and 333K) to provide formic acid. Ru and its complex RuH{sub 2}(CO)(Ph{sub 3}){sub 3} were shown to be most effective. Its activity reached at 40 mol HCOOH/mol cat-hr under conditions mention above. A catalytic cycle is proposed, which starts with formation of RuH{sub 2}(C)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3} as the catalytic activity species, then CO{sub 2} insertion taking place to form metal-formate intermediate, and last releasing formic acid from metal center, either by reductive elimination of the hydrido formato ligands or ligand-assisted heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen with loss of formic acid.

  12. Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Reveals Unique Conformational and Chemical Transformations Occurring upon [4Fe-4S] Cluster Binding in the Type 2 L-Serine Dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuetian; Grant, Gregory A; Gross, Michael L

    2015-09-01

    The type 2 L-serine dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila (lpLSD) contains a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster that acts as a Lewis acid to extract the hydroxyl group of L-serine during the dehydration reaction. Surprisingly, the crystal structure shows that all four of the iron atoms in the cluster are coordinated with protein cysteinyl residues and that the cluster is buried and not exposed to solvent. If the crystal structure of lpLSD accurately reflects the structure in solution, then substantial rearrangement at the active site is necessary for the substrate to enter. Furthermore, repair of the oxidized protein when the cluster has degraded would presumably entail exposure of the buried cysteine ligands. Thus, the conformation required for the substrate to enter may be similar to those required for a new cluster to enter the active site. To address this, hydrogen-deuterium exchange combined with mass spectrometry (HDX MS) was used to probe the conformational changes that occur upon oxidative degradation of the Fe-S cluster. The regions that show the most significant differential HDX are adjacent to the cluster location in the holoenzyme or connect regions that are adjacent to the cluster. The observed decrease in flexibility upon cluster binding provides direct evidence that the "tail-in-mouth" conformation observed in the crystal structure also occurs in solution and that the C-terminal peptide is coordinated to the [4Fe-4S] cluster in a precatalytic conformation. This observation is consistent with the requirement of an activation step prior to catalysis and the unusually high level of resistance to oxygen-induced cluster degradation. Furthermore, peptide mapping of the apo form under nonreducing conditions revealed the formation of disulfide bonds between C396 and C485 and possibly between C343 and C385. These observations provide a picture of how the cluster loci are stabilized and poised to receive the cluster in the apo form and the requirement for a reduction step during cluster formation. PMID:26266572

  13. Distribution of Hydrogen Peroxide, Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfuric Acid in Europa's Icy Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) detected hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide and a hydrated material on Europa's surface, the latter interpreted as hydrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4*nH2O) or hydrated salts. Related compounds are molecular oxygen, sulfur dioxide, and two chromophores, one that is dark in the ultraviolet(UV) and concentrated on the trailing side, the other brighter in the UV and preferentially distributed in the leading hemisphere. The UV-dark material has been suggested to be sulfur.

  14. Simultaneous determination of stable carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen isotopes in cellulose.

    PubMed

    Loader, N J; Street-Perrott, F A; Daley, T J; Hughes, P D M; Kimak, A; Levani?, T; Mallon, G; Mauquoy, D; Robertson, I; Roland, T P; van Bellen, S; Ziehmer, M M; Leuenberger, M

    2015-01-01

    A technological development is described through which the stable carbon-, oxygen-, and nonexchangeable hydrogen-isotopic ratios (?(13)C, ?(18)O, ?(2)H) are determined on a single carbohydrate (cellulose) sample with precision equivalent to conventional techniques (?(13)C 0.15‰, ?(18)O 0.30‰, ?(2)H 3.0‰). This triple-isotope approach offers significant new research opportunities, most notably in physiology and medicine, isotope biogeochemistry, forensic science, and palaeoclimatology, when isotopic analysis of a common sample is desirable or when sample material is limited. PMID:25495958

  15. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen. PMID:25902034

  16. A regenerative process for carbon dioxide removal and hydrogen production in IGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh Khayyat, Armin

    Advanced power generation technologies, such as Integrated Gasification-Combined Cycles (IGCC) processes, are among the leading contenders for power generation conversion because of their significantly higher efficiencies and potential environmental advantages, compared to conventional coal combustion processes. Although the increased in efficiency in the IGCC processes will reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide per unit of power generated, further reduction in CO2 emissions is crucial due to enforcement of green house gases (GHG) regulations. In IGCC processes to avoid efficiency losses, it is desirable to remove CO2 in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C, which makes regenerable MgO-based sorbents ideal for such operations. In this temperature range, CO2 removal results in the shifting of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction towards significant reduction in carbon monoxide (CO), and enhancement in hydrogen production. However, regenerable, reactive and attrition resistant sorbents are required for such application. In this work, a highly reactive and attrition resistant regenerable MgO-based sorbent is prepared through dolomite modification, which can simultaneously remove carbon dioxide and enhance hydrogen production in a single reactor. The results of the experimental tests conducted in High-Pressure Thermogravimetric Analyzer (HP-TGA) and high-pressure packed-bed units indicate that in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C at 20 atm more than 95 molar percent of CO2 can be removed from the simulated coal gas, and the hydrogen concentration can be increased to above 70 percent. However, a declining trend is observed in the capacity of the sorbent exposed to long-term durability analysis, which appears to level off after about 20 cycles. Based on the physical and chemical analysis of the sorbent, a two-zone expanding grain model was applied to obtain an excellent fit to the carbonation reaction rate data at various operating conditions. The modeling results indicate that more than 90 percent purification of hydrogen is achievable, either by increasing the activity of the sorbent towards water-gas shift reaction or by mixing the sorbent bed with a commercialized water-gas shift catalyst. The preliminary economical evaluation of the MgO-based process indicates that this process can be economically viable compared to the commercially available WGS/Selexol(TM) processes.

  17. Large surface area ordered porous carbons via nanocasting zeolite 10X and high performance for hydrogen storage application.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinjun; Li, Liangjun; Lv, Xiaoxia; Yang, Chunpeng; Zhao, Xuebo

    2014-01-01

    We report the preparation of ordered porous carbons for the first time via nanocasting zeolite 10X with an aim to evaluate their potential application for hydrogen storage. The synthesized carbons exhibit large Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas in the 1300-3331 m(2)/g range and pore volumes up to 1.94 cm(3)/g with a pore size centered at 1.2 nm. The effects of different synthesis processes with pyrolysis temperature varied in the 600-800 °C range on the surface areas, and pore structures of carbons were explored. During the carbonization process, carbons derived from the liquid-gas two-step routes at around 700 °C are nongraphitic and retain the particle morphology of 10X zeolite, whereas the higher pyrolysis temperature results in some graphitic domains and hollow-shell morphologies. In contrast, carbons derived from the direct acetylene infiltration process have some incident nanoribbon or nanofiber morphologies. A considerable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.1 wt % at 77 K and 20 bar was attained for the carbon with the surface area up to 3331 m(2)/g, one of the top-ranked capacities ever observed for large surface area adsorbents, demonstrating their potential uses for compacting gaseous fuels of hydrogen. The hydrogen capacity is comparable to those of previously reported values on other kinds of carbon-based materials and highly dependent on the surface area and micropore volume of carbons related to the optimum pore size, therefore providing guidance for the further search of nanoporous materials for hydrogen storage. PMID:24344972

  18. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. Progress report, December 15, 1991--December 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  19. Influence of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria on the corrosion of low carbon steel: Local electrochemical investigations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Rebeca; Schütz, Marta K; Libert, Marie; Tribollet, Bernard; Vivier, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Low carbon steel has been considered a suitable material for component of the multi-barrier system employed on the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). A non negligible amount of dihydrogen (H2) is expected to be produced over the years within the geological repository due to the anoxic corrosion of metallic materials and also to the water radiolysis. The influence of the activity of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria (HOB) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) on carbon steel corrosion is considered in this study because of the high availability of energetic nutriments (H2, iron oxides and hydroxides) produced in anoxic disposal conditions. Local electrochemical techniques were used for investigating the activity of IRB as a promoter of local corrosion in the presence of H2 as electron donor. A local consumption of H2 by the bacteria has been evidenced and impedance measurements indicate the formation of a thick layer of corrosion products. PMID:24177135

  20. Hydrogen depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator performance improvements and cell pair structural tests. [for manned space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, J. D.; Aylward, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The investigations and testing associated with the CO2 removal efficiency and voltage degradation of a hydrogen depolarized carbon oxide concentrator are reported. Also discussed is the vibration testing of a water vapor electrolysis cell pair. Performance testing of various HDC cell pairs with Cs2CO3 electrolyte provided sufficient parametric and endurance data to size a six man space station prototype CO2 removal system as having 36 HDC cell pairs, and to verify a life capability exceeding six moths. Testing also demonstrated that tetramethylammonium carbonate is an acceptable HDC electrolyte for operating over the relative humidity range of 30 to 90 percent and over a temperature range of 50 to 80 F.

  1. Plasma deposited hydrogenated carbon on GaAs and InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J. D.; Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Liu, D. C.; Lanford, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of diamond like carbon films grown by RF flow discharge 30 kHz plasma using methane are reported. The Cis XPS line shape of films showed localized hybrid carbon bonds as low as 40 to as high as 95 percent. Infrared spectroscopy and N(15) nuclear reaction profiling data indicated 35 to 42 percent hydrogen, depending inversely on deposition temperature. The deposition rate of films on Si falls off exponentially with substrate temperature, and nucleation does not occur above 200 C on GaAs and InP. Optical data of the films showed bandgap values of 2.0 to 2.4 eV increasing monotonically with CH4 flow rate.

  2. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators. PMID:25133545

  3. Carbon/hydrogen clusters [CnHx+] formation from laser irradiation of coronene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, F.; Poveda, J. C.; Alvarez, I.; Guerrero, A.; Cisneros, C.

    2015-04-01

    This article presents the photo induced dehydrogenation of a cooled molecular jet of coronene, exposed to 266 nm laser radiation. Using unfocused laser radiation of 1064 nm, synchronously coupled with the ionization laser pulses, a system recently developed. Molecular beams were produced by laser desorption of coronene. Analysis of the photoproducts made by time-of flight mass spectrometer showed that a wide variety of ionic species were formed; more than 300 different species were observed. The results showed carbon clusters C+n with n up to 24 as well as carbon/hydrogen clusters C+nH+x with masses higher than 300 m/z. The effect on the laser irradiance on the formation of different ions, in the rage from 109 W/cm2 to 1010 W/cm2, is discussed as it is reflected on the evolution from the big ions to the smaller ones.

  4. Preparation and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Capacity of Nanoporous Carbon Materials Synthesized using an Aerosol-Assisted Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qingyuan; Lu, Yunfeng; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2008-03-01

    Spherical nanoporous carbon particles were synthesized from carbon precursor solutions of sucrose with either silica sols, colloidal silica particles, or both, in a direct one-step aerosol-assisted process, followed by carbonization and then removal of the silica template. The resulting particles show very high porosity with narrow pore size distributions, surface areas up to 2000 m^2/g, and pore volumes up to 4.0 cm^3/g. The porosity and pore sizes depend on the type and amount of silica template precursor added to the sucrose precursor solutions. The carbon particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and nitrogen sorption surface area measurements. Hydrogen adsorption was measured at various temperatures between 77 K and room temperature and at pressures up to 50 bars. The maximum hydrogen uptake of up to 4.0 wt% at 77 K and >20 bar was found for nanoporous carbon particles made using the silica sol template.

  5. Structural influence of ordered mesoporous carbon supports for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to alcohols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Chae, Ho-Jeong; Ha, Kyoung Su; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Kim, Tae-Wan

    2013-11-01

    A series of ordered mesoporous carbon materials (OMCs) possessing well-ordered nanoporosity with different mesopore structures were synthesized by the template-synthesis route. Two different pore strucutes (2-dimensional hexagonal and 3-dimensional cubic structures) and two different framework-configurations (rod-type and hollow-type carbon frameworks) are prepared by using the two different silica templates and synthetic conditions. The ordered mesoporous carbon supported promoted-rhodium catalysts were preparted by an incipient wetness method. The promoted Rh-OMC catalysts are tested by a fixed bed reactor for the catalytic conversion of syngas-to-alcohols. The characteristics of the promoted Rh-OMCs catalysts were scrutinized through a series of different techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and N2 sorption analysis, and the catalytic performance was tested in a fixed-bed reactor. It was found that the promoted Rh-OMC catalysts exhibited the different catalytic activity and selectivity of alcohols, which could be attributed to the size of metal nanoparticles being confined by the different mesostructure of OMCs. PMID:24245283

  6. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of the Deuterium Exchange in Classical Keto-Enol Tautomeric Equilibrium Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Michael A.; Waner, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the classic keto-enol tautomerization of beta-dicarbonyl compounds into a kinetic analysis of deuterium exchange is presented. It is shown that acetylacetone and ethyl acetoacetate undergo nearly complete deuterium exchange of the alpha-methylene carbon when dissolved in methanol-d[subscript 4]. The extent of deuteration may be…

  7. Reorganization of graphite surfaces into carbon micro- and nanoparticles under high flux hydrogen plasma bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Bystrov, Kirill; Vegt, Lenze van der; De Temmerman, Gregory; Arnas, Cecile; Marot, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Fine-grain graphite samples were exposed to high density low temperature (n{sub e}{approx}10{sup 20} m{sup -3}, T{sub e}{approx}1 eV) hydrogen plasmas in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma generator. Redeposition of eroded carbon is so strong that no external precursor gas injection is necessary for deposits to form on the exposed surface during the bombardment. In fact, up to 90% of carbon is redeposited, most noticeably in the region of the highest particle flux. The redeposits appear in the form of carbon microparticles of various sizes and structures. Discharge parameters influence the efficiency of the redeposition processes and the particle growth rate. Under favorable conditions, the growth rate reaches 0.15 {mu}m/s. The authors used high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to study the particle growth mode. The columnar structure of some of the large particles points toward surface growth, while observation of the spherical carbon nanoparticles indicates growth in the plasma phase. Multiple nanoparticles can agglomerate and form bigger particles. The spherical shape of the agglomerates suggests that nanoparticles coalesce in the gas phase. The erosion and redeposition patterns on the samples are likely determined by the gradients in plasma flux density and surface temperature across the surface.

  8. Revibrational Spectra of Molecules Sputtered of Carbon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag

    2008-10-01

    Irradiation of the carbon surfaces by hydrogen isotopes results in processes of crucial importance for the carbon based divertor tiles of a fusion reactor. Thus the sputtering and implantation, result in erosion, plasma pollution, and tritium retention, as well as carbon deposition all over the reactor first wall. The molecules chemically sputtered upon impact of deuterium of deuterated carbon surface are various hydrocarbons as well as We study the translational and rovibrational energy and angular spectra of sputtered molecules. The energy distributions of ejected molecules confirm the partial thermalization of the impact cascade. Sputtered hydrocarbon molecules have rovibrational energies in the range 1.5-2 eV, with relatively cold translational and rotational motion, close to 0.5 eV. In contrast, translational and rovibrational energies of sputtered deuterium molecules are close to 1 eV, with approximate equipartition between rotational and vibrational modes.

  9. Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Swain; Greg M.

    2009-04-13

    The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

  10. Method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G. (Dover, MA); Mitchell, William L. (Belmont, MA); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (Westford, MA); Thijssen, Johannes H. J. (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide within a reformer 10 is disclosed. According to the method, a stream including an oxygen-containing gas is directed adjacent to a first vessel 18 and the oxygen-containing gas is heated. A stream including unburned fuel is introduced into the oxygen-containing gas stream to form a mixture including oxygen-containing gas and fuel. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and unburned fuel is directed tangentially into a partial oxidation reaction zone 24 within the first vessel 18. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and fuel is further directed through the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 to produce a heated reformate stream including hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide. Steam may also be mixed with the oxygen-containing gas and fuel, and the reformate stream from the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 directed into a steam reforming zone 26. High- and low-temperature shift reaction zones 64,76 may be employed for further fuel processing.

  11. Long term hydrogen retention in the plasma facing carbon tiles of JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masafumi; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Kazuyoshi; Hayashi, Takao; Nakano, Tomohide; Yagyu, Junnichi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Masaki, Kei; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate how fuel (H + D) retention increases with discharge time, we have measured long term H + D retention of the carbon tiles exposed to plasmas in JT-60U by TDS and SEM. The H + D retention in the re-deposited carbon layers on divertor tiles linearly increases with the thickness of the re-deposited layers with a constant hydrogen concentration of (H + D)/C ˜ 0.013. The C-deposition and H + D retention rates are in the order of ˜1 × 10 20 C/m 2/s and ˜3.8 × 10 18 H + D atoms/m 2/s, respectively. The H + D retentions in the near surface regions of eroded tiles both at outer divertor and outer first wall did not go over 5 × 10 22 H + D atoms/m 2, suggesting hydrogen saturation at the near surface regions. However, in a little deeper region of the outer first wall tiles, direct implantation of energetic D originated from Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) caused gradual increase of the retention until saturation in the implanted depth.

  12. Adsorption and dissociation of hydrogen molecules on bare and functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dag, S.; Ozturk, Y.; Ciraci, S.; Yildirim, T.

    2005-10-01

    Interaction between hydrogen molecules and bare as well as functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is investigated using first-principles plane wave method. It is found that the binding energy of the H2 physisorbed on the outer surface of the bare SWNT is very weak, and cannot be enhanced significantly either by increasing the curvature of the surface through radial deformation, or by the coadsorption of a Li atom that makes the semiconducting tube metallic. Although the bonding is strengthened upon adsorption directly to the Li atom, its nature continues to be physisorption. However, the character of the bonding changes dramatically when SWNT is functionalized by the adsorption of a Pt atom. A single H2 is chemisorbed to the Pt atom on the SWNT either dissociatively or molecularly. The dissociative adsorption is favorable energetically and is followed by the weakening of the Pt-SWNT bond. Out of two adsorbed H2 , the first one can be adsorbed dissociatively and the second one is chemisorbed molecularly. The nature of bonding is a very weak physisorption for the third adsorbed H2 . Palladium also promotes the chemisorption of H2 with relatively smaller binding energy. Present results reveal the important effect of transition metal atom adsorbed on SWNT and these results advance our understanding of the molecular and dissociative adsorption of hydrogen for efficient hydrogen storage.

  13. Anti-reflection coatings for silicon solar cells from hydrogenated diamond like carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debajyoti; Banerjee, Amit

    2015-08-01

    Aiming towards a specific application as antireflection coatings (ARC) in Si solar cells, the growth of hydrogenated diamond like carbon (HDLC) films, by RF magnetron sputtering, has been optimized through comprehensive optical and structural studies. Various physical properties of the films e.g., (ID/IG) ratio in the Raman spectra, percentage of sp3 hybridization in XPS spectra, H-content in the network, etc., have been correlated with different ARC application properties e.g., transmittance, reflectance, optical band gap, refractive index, surface roughness, etc. The ARC properties have been optimized on unheated substrates, through systematic variations of RF power, gas flow rate, gas pressure and finally controlled introduction of hydrogen to the DLC network at its most favorable plasma parameters. The optimum HDLC films possess (T700)max ? 95.8%, (R700)min ? 3.87%, (n700)min ? 1.62 along with simultaneous (Eg)max ? 2.53 eV and ?75.6% of sp3 hybridization in the C-network, corresponding to a bonded H-content of ?23 at.%. Encouraging improvements in the ARC properties over the optimized DLC film were obtained with the controlled addition of hydrogen, and the optimum HDLC films appear quite promising for applications in Si solar cells. Systematic materials development has been performed through comprehensive understanding of the parameter space and its optimization, as elaborately discussed.

  14. Deuterium enrichment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by photochemically induced exchange with deuterium-rich cosmic ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Bernstein, M. P.; Allamandola, L. J.; Gillette, J. S.; Zare, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) coronene (C24H12) frozen in D2O ice in a ratio of less than 1 part in 500 rapidly exchanges its hydrogen atoms with the deuterium in the ice at interstellar temperatures and pressures when exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Exchange occurs via three different chemical processes: D atom addition, D atom exchange at oxidized edge sites, and D atom exchange at aromatic edge sites. Observed exchange rates for coronene (C24H12)-D2O and d12-coronene (C24D12)-H2O isotopic substitution experiments show that PAHs in interstellar ices could easily attain the D/H levels observed in meteorites. These results may have important consequences for the abundance of deuterium observed in aromatic materials in the interstellar medium and in meteorites. These exchange mechanisms produce deuteration in characteristic molecular locations on the PAHs that may distinguish them from previously postulated processes for D enrichment of PAHs.

  15. Raman micro-spectroscopy as a tool to measure the absorption coefficient and the erosion rate of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films heat-treated under hydrogen bombardment

    E-print Network

    Pardanaud, Cedric; Martin, C; Ruffe, R; Angot, T; Roubin, P; Hopf, C; Schwarz-Selinger, T; Jacob, W

    2013-01-01

    We present a fast and simple way to determine the erosion rate and absorption coefficient of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films exposed to a hydrogen atomic source based on ex-situ Raman micro-spectroscopy. Results are compared to ellipsometry measurement. The method is applied to films eroded at different temperatures. A maximum of the erosion rate is found at ~ 450 {\\degree}C in agreement with previous results. This technique is suitable for future quantitative studies on the erosion of thin carbonaceous films, especially of interest for plasma wall interactions occurring in thermonuclear fusion devices.

  16. Carbon-protected bimetallic carbide nanoparticles for a highly efficient alkaline hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yipu; Li, Guo-Dong; Yuan, Long; Ge, Lei; Ding, Hong; Wang, Dejun; Zou, Xiaoxin

    2015-02-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is one of the two important half reactions in current water-alkali and chlor-alkali electrolyzers. To make this reaction energy-efficient, development of highly active and durable catalytic materials in an alkaline environment is required. Herein we report the synthesis of carbon-coated cobalt-tungsten carbide nanoparticles that have proven to be efficient noble metal-free electrocatalysts for alkaline HER. The catalyst affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at a low overpotential of 73 mV, which is close to that (33 mV) required by Pt/C to obtain the same current density. In addition, this catalyst operates stably at large current densities (>30 mA cm-1) for as long as 18 h, and gives nearly 100% Faradaic yield during alkaline HER. The excellent catalytic performance (activity and stability) of this nanocomposite material is attributed to the cooperative effect between nanosized bimetallic carbide and the carbon protection layer outside the metal carbide. The results presented herein offer the exciting possibility of using carbon-armoured metal carbides for an efficient alkaline HER, although pristine metal carbides are not, generally, chemically stable enough under such strong alkaline conditions.The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is one of the two important half reactions in current water-alkali and chlor-alkali electrolyzers. To make this reaction energy-efficient, development of highly active and durable catalytic materials in an alkaline environment is required. Herein we report the synthesis of carbon-coated cobalt-tungsten carbide nanoparticles that have proven to be efficient noble metal-free electrocatalysts for alkaline HER. The catalyst affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at a low overpotential of 73 mV, which is close to that (33 mV) required by Pt/C to obtain the same current density. In addition, this catalyst operates stably at large current densities (>30 mA cm-1) for as long as 18 h, and gives nearly 100% Faradaic yield during alkaline HER. The excellent catalytic performance (activity and stability) of this nanocomposite material is attributed to the cooperative effect between nanosized bimetallic carbide and the carbon protection layer outside the metal carbide. The results presented herein offer the exciting possibility of using carbon-armoured metal carbides for an efficient alkaline HER, although pristine metal carbides are not, generally, chemically stable enough under such strong alkaline conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06295g

  17. Hydrogen and electricity from coal with carbon dioxide separation using chemical looping reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Wenguo; Chen Yingying

    2007-08-15

    Concern about global climate change has led to research on low CO{sub 2} emission in the process of the energy conversion of fossil fuel. One of the solutions is the conversion of fossil fuel into carbon-free energy carriers, hydrogen, and electricity with CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper, the main purpose is to investigate the thermodynamics performance of converting coal to a hydrogen and electricity system with chemical-looping reactors and to explore the influences of operating parameters on the system performance. Using FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} as an oxygen carrier, we propose a carbon-free coproduction system of hydrogen and electricity with chemical-looping reactors. The performance of the new system is simulated using ASPEN PLUS software tool. The influences of the chemical-looping reactor's temperature, steam conversion rate, and O{sub 2}/coal quality ratio on the system performance, and the exergy performance are discussed. The results show that a high-purity of H{sub 2} (99.9%) is reached and that CO{sub 2} can be separated. The system efficiency is 57.85% assuming steam reactor at 815 C and the steam conversion rate 37%. The system efficiency is affected by the steam conversion rate, rising from 53.17 to 58.33% with the increase of the steam conversion rate from 28 to 41%. The exergy efficiency is 54.25% and the losses are mainly in the process of gasification and HRSG. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Carbon sequestration in soybean crop soils: the role of hydrogen-coupled CO2 fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A.; Layzell, D. B.; Scott, N. A.; Cen, Y.; Kyser, T. K.

    2011-12-01

    Conversion of native vegetation to agricultural land in order to support the world's growing population is a key factor contributing to global climate change. However, the extent to which agricultural activities contribute to greenhouse gas emissions compared to carbon storage is difficult to ascertain, especially for legume crops, such as soybeans. Soybean establishment often leads to an increase in N2O emissions because N-fixation leads to increased soil available N during decomposition of the low C:N legume biomass. However, soybean establishment may also reduce net greenhouse gas emissions by increasing soil fertility, plant growth, and soil carbon storage. The mechanism behind increased carbon storage, however, remains unclear. One explanation points to hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation; the process by which nitrogen fixation releases H2 into the soil system, thereby promoting chemoautotrophic carbon fixation by soil microbes. We used 13CO2 as a tracer to track the amount and fate of carbon fixed by hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation during one-year field and laboratory incubations. The objectives of the research are to 1) quantify rates of 13CO2 fixation in soil collected from a field used for long-term soybean production 2) examine the impact of H2 gas concentration on rates of 13CO2 fixation, and 3) measure changes in ?13C signature over time in 3 soil fractions: microbial biomass, light fraction, and acid stable fraction. If this newly-fixed carbon is incorporated into the acid-stable soil C fraction, it has a good chance of contributing to long-term soil C sequestration under soybean production. Soil was collected in the field both adjacent to root nodules (nodule soil) and >3cm away (root soil) and labelled with 13CO2 (1% v/v) in the presence and absence of H2 gas. After a two week labelling period, ?13C signatures already revealed differences in the four treatments of bulk soil: -17.1 for root, -17.6 for nodule, -14.2 for root + H2, and -6.1 for nodule + H2. Labelled soil was then placed in nylon mesh bags and buried in the field at a depth of 15cm in a soybean field at the Central Experiment Farm in Ottawa, Ontario. Samples will be removed at intervals of 1,2,3,6,9,12, and 15 months, and the ?13C of three soil fractions will be examined to reveal changes in carbon storage over time. Our results will provide insights into the fate of carbon fixed during hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation, and demonstrate whether this CO2 fixation can contribute to the long-term greenhouse gas balance of soybean production systems.

  19. Geochemistry and origin of formation waters in the western Canada sedimentary basin-I. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitchon, B.; Friedman, I.

    1969-01-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen, together with chemical analyses, were determined for 20 surface waters, 8 shallow potable formation waters, and 79 formation waters from oil fields and gas fields. The observed isotope ratios can be explained by mixing of surface water and diagenetically modified sea water, accompanied by a process which enriches the heavy oxygen isotope. Mass balances for deuterium and total dissolved solids in the western Canada sedimentary basin demonstrate that the present distribution of deuterium in formation waters of the basin can be derived through mixing of the diagenetically modified sea water with not more than 2.9 times as much fresh water at the same latitude, and that the movement of fresh water through the basin has redistributed the dissolved solids of the modified sea water into the observed salinity variations. Statistical analysis of the isotope data indicates that although exchange of deuterium between water and hydrogen sulphide takes place within the basin, the effect is minimized because of an insignificant mass of hydrogen sulphide compared to the mass of formation water. Conversely, exchange of oxygen isotopes between water and carbonate minerals causes a major oxygen-18 enrichment of formation waters, depending on the relative masses of water and carbonate. Qualitative evidence confirms the isotopic fractionation of deuterium on passage of water through micropores in shales. ?? 1969.

  20. Kinetic modeling of ?-hydrogen abstractions from unsaturated and saturated oxygenate compounds by carbon-centered radicals.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Paschalis D; Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Papayannakos, Nikos; Marin, Guy B

    2014-06-23

    Hydrogen abstractions are important elementary reactions in a variety of reacting media at high temperatures in which oxygenates and hydrocarbon radicals are present. Accurate kinetic data are obtained from CBS-QB3 ab initio (AI) calculations by using conventional transition-state theory within the high-pressure limit, including corrections for hindered rotation and tunneling. From the obtained results, a group-additive (GA) model is developed that allows the Arrhenius parameters and rate coefficients for abstraction of the ?-hydrogen from a wide range of oxygenate compounds to be predicted at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1500 K. From a training set of 60 hydrogen abstractions from oxygenates by carbon-centered radicals, 15 GA values (?GAV°s) are obtained for both the forward and reverse reactions. Among them, four ?GAV°s refer to primary contributions, and the remaining 11 ?GAV°s refer to secondary ones. The accuracy of the model is further improved by introducing seven corrections for cross-resonance stabilization of the transition state from an additional set of 43 reactions. The determined ?GAV°s are validated upon a test set of AI data for 17 reactions. The mean absolute deviation of the pre-exponential factors (log A) and activation energies (E(a)) for the forward reaction at 300 K are 0.238 log(m(3) ?mol(-1) ?s(-1)) and 1.5 kJ?mol(-1), respectively, whereas the mean factor of deviation between the GA-predicted and the AI-calculated rate coefficients is 1.6. In comparison with a compilation of 33 experimental rate coefficients, the between the GA-predicted values and these experimental values is only 2.2. Hence, the constructed GA model can be reliably used in the prediction of the kinetics of ?-hydrogen-abstraction reactions between a broad range of oxygenates and oxygenate radicals. PMID:24829125

  1. HE 1015-2050: DISCOVERY OF A HYDROGEN-DEFICIENT CARBON STAR AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Aruna; Karinkuzhi, Drisya; Shantikumar, N. S.

    2010-11-10

    Medium-resolution spectral analysis of candidate Faint High Latitude Carbon (FHLC) stars from the Hamburg/ESO survey has given us the potential to discover objects of rare types. Two primary spectral characteristics of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are hydrogen deficiency and weaker CN bands relative to C{sub 2} bands. They are also characterized by their characteristic location in the J - H and H - K planes with respect to cool carbon stars. From a spectral analysis of a sample of 243 candidate FHLC stars, we have discovered a hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) star HE 1015-2050, at high Galactic latitude. A differential analysis of its spectrum with that of the spectrum of U Aquarii (U Aqr), a well-known cool HdC star of RCB type, provides sufficient evidence to put this object in a same group as that of U Aqr. Furthermore, it is shown that HE 1015-2050 does not belong to any of the C-star groups CH, C-R, C-N, or C-J. Cool RCB stars form a group of relatively rare astrophysical objects; approximately 51 are known in the Galaxy and some 18 in the Large Magellanic Cloud and five in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The present discovery adds a new member to this rare group. Although its spectral characteristics and its location in the J - H versus H - K plane place HE 1015-2050 in the same group to which U Aqr belongs, extended photometric observations would be useful to learn if there is any sudden decline in brightness, this being a characteristic property of HdC stars of RCB type.

  2. Fundamental aspects of deuterium retention in tungsten at high flux plasma exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.

    2015-08-01

    An effect of enhanced trapping of deuterium in tungsten at high flux was discovered. It was shown analytically and confirmed experimentally that the deuterium trapping in a presence of high density of defects in tungsten (W) depends on the ion energy and ion flux. Newly developed analytical model explains experimentally observed discrepancy of deuterium trapping at radiation-induced defects in tungsten at different ion fluxes that significantly improves a prediction of hydrogen isotope accumulation in different plasma devices, including ITER and DEMO. The developed model can be used for many system of hydrogen in a metal in both normal and extreme environments (high fluxes, elevated temperatures, neutron irradiation, etc.). This new model allows, for the first time, to validate density function theory (DFT) predictions of multiple occupation of a defect with deuterium against experimental data that bridge the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiments. By comparing first-principle calculations based on DFT and semi-empirical "adsorption model," it was proved that the mechanism of hydrogen isotope trapping in a vacancy cluster is similar to a chemisorption on a surface. Binding energies of deuterium with different types of defects in W were defined. Moreover, the surface barrier of deuterium to be chemisorbed on a clean W surface was found to be less than 1 eV and kinetics of deuterium release is limited by de-trapping from defects rather than to be limited by surface effects.

  3. Effect of Hydrogen and Carbon on the Melting Temperature of the Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Sakamaki, K.; Takahashi, E.; Fukai, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Funakoshi, K.

    2007-12-01

    The temperature of the Earth's outer core has been discussed based on the melting temperature of Fe- O-S alloys (e.g., Boehler, 1996). Although hydrogen and carbon are the possible candidates of the core component, their effects on the melting temperature of iron at high-pressures are unclear. Using a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus at SPring-8 synchrotron, we carried out a series of melting experiments on FeH and Fe3C up to 20 and 28 GPa, respectively. In the experiments on FeH, Fe sponge mixed with MgO was packed into a NaCl container with a hydrogen source, LiAlH4 (e.g., Fukai et al., 1989). During heating under high-pressures, hydrogenation of iron was observed by volume change. The phase boundary between ?'-phase (low-temperature phase) and ?-phase (high-temperature phase) of iron-hydride was determined using both cooling and heating experiments. Hydrogen concentrations in the ?-FeHx and ?'-FeHx were calculated based on the excess volume data from that of pure iron. It is found that ?-FeHx and ?'-FeHx synthesized in our experiments at pressures between 10 and 20 GPa are nearly stoichiometric FeH. Melting temperature of the ?-FeH was determined by the abrupt change in the X-ray diffraction patterns (crystalline to amorphous). The melting temperatures were determined to be 1473, 1473, 1493, 1573 and 1593 K at 10, 11.5, 15, 18 and 20 GPa, respectively. In the experiments using Fe3C, the synthesized Fe3C powder was encapsulated in a MgO container. In the diffraction sequences during heating, the peaks of Fe3C disappeared, and the new peaks identified as those of Fe7C3 were observed with halo caused by liquid. Finally, the Fe7C3 peaks disappeared, and only the halo pattern was observed. Based on these observations, the incongruent melting of Fe3C to Fe7C3 and liquid is estimated to occur at 1823 and 1923 K at 19.7 and 27.0 GPa, respectively. The liquidus temperatures of the Fe3C composition are found to be at 2098 and 2198 K at 19.5 and 26.8 GPa, respectively. The melting temperatures of Fe3C determined by our experiments are >700 K lower than that of the previous estimation based on thermodynamic calculation (Wood, 1993). Our experimental results show a possibility that the hydrogen and carbon lower the melting temperature of iron (outer core) dramatically. The melting temperatures of ?-FeH and Fe3C at 20 GPa are already 500 K lower than that of pure iron estimated by Anderson and Isaak (2000). Extrapolating our experimental melting curves for FeH and Fe3C to core pressures using Lindemann's melting law, we obtained the melting temperatures to be ~2600 and ~2900 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), respectively. In the presence of both hydrogen and carbon, melting temperature of the Earth's outer core could be >1500 K lower than that of the previous estimates, implying that the temperature gap at CMB could be much smaller than the current estimates.

  4. Deuterium Enrichment of PAHs by VUV Irradiation of Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Gillette, J. Seb; Zare, Richard N.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory results demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rapidly exchange their hydrogen atoms with those of nearby molecules when they are frozen into low-temperature ices and exposed to vacuum ultraviolet radiation. As a result, PAHs quickly become deuterium-enriched when VUV irradiated in D-containing ices. This mechanism has important consequences for several astrophysical issues owing to the ubiquitous nature of PAHs in the interstellar medium. For example, this process may explain the deuterium enrichments found in PAHs in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. These results also provide general predictions about the molecular siting of the deuterium on aromatic materials in meteorites if this process produced a significant fraction of their D-enrichment.

  5. Biogeochemistry of the Stable Isotopes of Hydrogen and Carbon in Salt Marsh Biota Author(s): Bruce N. Smith and Samuel Epstein

    E-print Network

    Faraon, Andrei

    Biogeochemistry of the Stable Isotopes of Hydrogen and Carbon in Salt Marsh Biota Author(s): Bruce-742 Biogeochemistry of the Stable Isotopes of Hydrogen and Carbon in Salt MarshBiota1 Receivedfor publicationJune8 and South Africa. We studied several species of plants and animals growing in close proximity in salt marsh

  6. Carbon-protected bimetallic carbide nanoparticles for a highly efficient alkaline hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yipu; Li, Guo-Dong; Yuan, Long; Ge, Lei; Ding, Hong; Wang, Dejun; Zou, Xiaoxin

    2015-02-21

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is one of the two important half reactions in current water-alkali and chlor-alkali electrolyzers. To make this reaction energy-efficient, development of highly active and durable catalytic materials in an alkaline environment is required. Herein we report the synthesis of carbon-coated cobalt-tungsten carbide nanoparticles that have proven to be efficient noble metal-free electrocatalysts for alkaline HER. The catalyst affords a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at a low overpotential of 73 mV, which is close to that (33 mV) required by Pt/C to obtain the same current density. In addition, this catalyst operates stably at large current densities (>30 mA cm(-1)) for as long as 18 h, and gives nearly 100% Faradaic yield during alkaline HER. The excellent catalytic performance (activity and stability) of this nanocomposite material is attributed to the cooperative effect between nanosized bimetallic carbide and the carbon protection layer outside the metal carbide. The results presented herein offer the exciting possibility of using carbon-armoured metal carbides for an efficient alkaline HER, although pristine metal carbides are not, generally, chemically stable enough under such strong alkaline conditions. PMID:25611887

  7. Characterization of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films electrochemically deposited on a silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. B.; Xu, T.; Yang, S. R.; Liu, H. W.; Xue, Q. J.

    2004-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on a Si substrate by electrolysis in a methanol solution at ambient pressure and low temperature. The morphology and microstructure of the resulting DLC films were analysed using atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and x-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES). The surface energy and mechanical properties of the DLC films were examined, and the growth mechanism of the DLC films in liquid phase electro-deposition is discussed as well. The results of the study show that the hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films are smooth and compact. The percentage of sp3 carbon in the DLC films is determined as 55-60%, based on the corresponding XPS and first-derivative XAES spectra of graphite, diamond, and the tested films. The DLC films show low surface free energy, good mechanical properties, excellent friction-reduction and wear-resistance. It is suggested that methanol dissociates to generate the active species of CH_{3}^{+} and C2H4 at high voltage applied to the electrode, followed by the generation of the alkyl chain [-CH2-CH2-]n whose C-C and C-H bond lengths and C-C-C and H-C-H bond angles are close to that of diamond. Subsequently, a diamond-like structure was formed by the ordered dehydrogenation of a short-chain [-CH2-CH2-]n in the electrolysis process.

  8. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-15

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  9. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-01

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  10. Carbon-coated ceramic membrane reactor for the production of hydrogen by aqueous-phase reforming of sorbitol.

    PubMed

    Neira D'Angelo, M F; Ordomsky, V; Schouten, J C; van der Schaaf, J; Nijhuis, T A

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen was produced by aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of sorbitol in a carbon-on-alumina tubular membrane reactor (4 nm pore size, 7 cm long, 3 mm internal diameter) that allows the hydrogen gas to permeate to the shell side, whereas the liquid remains in the tube side. The hydrophobic nature of the membrane serves to avoid water loss and to minimize the interaction between the ceramic support and water, thus reducing the risks of membrane degradation upon operation. The permeation of hydrogen is dominated by the diffusivity of the hydrogen in water. Thus, higher operation temperatures result in an increase of the flux of hydrogen. The differential pressure has a negative effect on the flux of hydrogen due to the presence of liquid in the larger pores. The membrane was suitable for use in APR, and yielded 2.5 times more hydrogen than a reference reactor (with no membrane). Removal of hydrogen through the membrane assists in the reaction by preventing its consumption in undesired reactions. PMID:24989121

  11. Dynamics of carbon-hydrogen and carbon-methyl exchanges in the collision of 3P atomic carbon with propene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shih-Huang; Chen, Wei-Kan; Chin, Chih-Hao; Huang, Wen-Jian

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the dynamics of the reaction of 3P atomic carbon with propene (C3H6) at reactant collision energy 3.8 kcal mol-1 in a crossed molecular-beam apparatus using synchrotron vacuum-ultraviolet ionization. Products C4H5, C4H4, C3H3, and CH3 were observed and attributed to exit channels C4H5 + H, C4H4 + 2H, and C3H3 + CH3; their translational-energy distributions and angular distributions were derived from the measurements of product time-of-flight spectra. Following the addition of a 3P carbon atom to the C=C bond of propene, cyclic complex c-H2C(C)CHCH3 undergoes two separate stereoisomerization mechanisms to form intermediates E- and Z-H2CCCHCH3. Both the isomers of H2CCCHCH3 in turns decompose to C4H5 + H and C3H3 + CH3. A portion of C4H5 that has enough internal energy further decomposes to C4H4 + H. The three exit channels C4H5 + H, C4H4 + 2H, and C3H3 + CH3 have average translational energy releases 13.5, 3.2, and 15.2 kcal mol-1, respectively, corresponding to fractions 0.26, 0.41, and 0.26 of available energy deposited to the translational degrees of freedom. The H-loss and 2H-loss channels have nearly isotropic angular distributions with a slight preference at the forward direction particularly for the 2H-loss channel. In contrast, the CH3-loss channel has a forward and backward peaked angular distribution with an enhancement at the forward direction. Comparisons with reactions of 3P carbon atoms with ethene, vinyl fluoride, and vinyl chloride are stated.

  12. Sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope geochemistry of the Idaho cobalt belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Craig A.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Slack, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt-copper ± gold deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt, including the deposits of the Blackbird district, have been analyzed for their sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope compositions to improve the understanding of ore formation. Previous genetic hypotheses have ranged widely, linking the ores to the sedimentary or diagenetic history of the host Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks, to Mesoproterozoic or Cretaceous magmatism, or to metamorphic shearing. The ?34S values are nearly uniform throughout the Blackbird dis- trict, with a mean value for cobaltite (CoAsS, the main cobalt mineral) of 8.0 ± 0.4‰ (n = 19). The data suggest that (1) sulfur was derived at least partly from sedimentary sources, (2) redox reactions involving sulfur were probably unimportant for ore deposition, and (3) the sulfur was probably transported to sites of ore for- mation as H2S. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of the ore-forming fluid, which are calculated from analyses of biotite-rich wall rocks and tourmaline, do not uniquely identify the source of the fluid; plausible sources include formation waters, metamorphic waters, and mixtures of magmatic and isotopically heavy meteoric waters. The calculated compositions are a poor match for the modified seawaters that form vol- canogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of siderite, a mineral that is widespread, although sparse, at Blackbird, suggest formation from mixtures of sedimentary organic carbon and magmatic-metamorphic carbon. The isotopic compositions of calcite in alkaline dike rocks of uncertain age are consistent with a magmatic origin. Several lines of evidence suggest that siderite postdated the emplacement of cobalt and copper, so its significance for the ore-forming event is uncertain. From the stable isotope perspective, the mineral deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt contrast with typical VMS and sedimentary exhalative deposits. They show characteristics of deposit types that form in deeper environments and could be related to metamorphic processes or magmatic processes, although the isotopic evidence for magmatic components is relatively weak.

  13. Solvent Control of the Soft Angular Potential in Hydroxyl-Hydrogen Bonds: Inertial Orientational Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Solvent Control of the Soft Angular Potential in Hydroxyl- Hydrogen Bonds: Inertial Orientational with the hydrogen bond. The complexes studied are composed of phenol-OD (hydroxyl hydrogen replaced by deuterium orientational motions of phenol-OD (phenyl hydroxyl hydrogen replaced by deuterium) in phenol/-base complexes

  14. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown in hydrogen atmosphere: An x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Maniwa, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Ryuji; Kira, Hiroshi; Tou, Hideki; Nishibori, Eiji; Takata, Masaki; Sakata, Makoto; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Zhao, Xinluo; Iijima, Sumio

    2001-08-15

    X-ray diffraction study of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) grown by arc discharge in hydrogen atmosphere is presented. It is found that the thermal-expansion coefficient along the radial direction of MWNT is widely distributed in a range from 1.6 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} to 2.6 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}, indicating the existence of both of Russian doll MWNT and highly defective MWNT. Russian doll MWNT is suggested to have the outer diameter less than {approx}100 Aa. Thicker MWNT's are typically highly defective, and may have the jelly roll (scroll) or defective polygonal structure consisting of flat graphite domains.

  15. Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to aromatic hydrocarbons by using an iron/iron oxide nanocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Jim; Shrestha, Tej B; Thapa, Prem S; Moore, David; Wu, Xiaorong; Ikenberry, Myles; Troyer, Deryl L; Wang, Donghai; Hohn, Keith L

    2014-01-01

    Summary The quest for renewable and cleaner energy sources to meet the rapid population and economic growth is more urgent than ever before. Being the most abundant carbon source in the atmosphere of Earth, CO2 can be used as an inexpensive C1 building block in the synthesis of aromatic fuels for internal combustion engines. We designed a process capable of synthesizing benzene, toluene, xylenes and mesitylene from CO2 and H2 at modest temperatures (T = 380 to 540 °C) employing Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles as catalyst. The synthesis of the catalyst and the mechanism of CO2-hydrogenation will be discussed, as well as further applications of Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles in catalysis. PMID:24991513

  16. Chemoselective hydrogenation of functionalized nitroarenes and imines by using carbon nanofiber-supported iridium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Yukihiro; Taguchi, Masahiro; Desmira, Nelfa; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao; Nagashima, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of three types of carbon nanofibers (CNFs; platelet: CNF-P, tubular: CNF-T, herringbone: CNF-H) with Ir4(CO)12 in mesitylene at 165 °C provided the corresponding CNF-supported iridium nanoparticles, Ir/CNFs (Ir content=2.3-2.6 wt.%). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of these Ir/CNF samples revealed that size-controlled Ir nanoparticles (average particle size of 1.1-1.5 nm) existed on the CNFs. Among the three Ir/CNF samples, Ir/CNF-T showed an excellent catalytic activity and chemoselectivity towards hydrogenation of functionalized nitroarenes and imines; the corresponding aniline derivatives were obtained with high turnover numbers at ambient temperature under 10 tm of H2 , and the catalyst is reusable. Ir/CNF-T was also effective for the reductive N-alkylation of anilines with carbonyl compounds. PMID:24347068

  17. Carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen isotopes in solvent-extractable organic matter from carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    CCl4 and CH3OH solvent extractions were performed on the Murray, Murchison, Orgueil and Renazzo carbonaceous chondrites. Delta-D values of +300-+500% are found in the case of the CH3OH-soluble organic matter. The combined C, H and N isotope data makes it unlikely that the CH3OH-soluble components are derivable from, or simply related to, the insoluble organic polymer found in the same meteorites. A relation between the event that formed hydrous minerals in CI1 and CM2 meteorites and the introduction of water- and methanol-soluble organic compounds is suggested. Organic matter soluble in CCl4 has no N, and delta-C-13 values are lower than for CH3OH-soluble phases. It is concluded that there either are large isotopic fractionations for carbon and hydrogen between different soluble organic phases, or the less polar components are partially of terrestrial origin.

  18. Authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anne-Mette Sølvbjerg; Fromberg, Arvid; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2014-10-22

    Authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors were investigated using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). Vanilla flavors produced by chemical synthesis (n = 2), fermentation (n = 1), and extracted from two different species of the vanilla orchid (n = 79) were analyzed. The authenticity of the flavor compound vanillin was evaluated on the basis of measurements of ratios of carbon stable isotopes (?(13)C). It was found that results of ?(13)C for vanillin extracted from Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla tahitensis were significantly different (t test) and that it was possible to differentiate these two groups of natural vanillin from vanillin produced otherwise. Vanilla flavors were also analyzed for ratios of hydrogen stable isotopes (?(2)H). A graphic representation of ?(13)C versus ?(2)H revealed that vanillin extracted from pods grown in adjacent geographic origins grouped together. Accordingly, values of ?(13)C and ?(2)H can be used for studies of authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors. PMID:25266169

  19. Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.

    SciTech Connect

    Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

    2009-07-01

    Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

  20. Efficient generation of fast neutrons by magnetized deuterons in an optimized deuterium gas-puff z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Shishlov, A. V.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kubes, P.; Labetsky, A. Yu; Rezac, K.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Dudkin, G. N.; Fursov, F. I.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Kravarik, J.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Orcikova, H.; Padalko, V. N.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Sila, O.; Turek, K.; Varlachev, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Z-pinch experiments with deuterium gas puffs have been carried out on the GIT-12 generator at 3 MA currents. Recently, a novel configuration of a deuterium gas-puff z-pinch was used to accelerate deuterons and to generate fast neutrons. In order to form a homogeneous, uniformly conducting layer at a large initial radius, an inner deuterium gas puff was surrounded by an outer hollow cylindrical plasma shell. The plasma shell consisting of hydrogen and carbon ions was formed at the diameter of 350 mm by 48 plasma guns. A linear mass of the plasma shell was about 5 µg cm-1 whereas a total linear mass of deuterium gas in single or double shell gas puffs was about 100 µg cm-1. The implosion lasted 700 ns and seemed to be stable up to a 5 mm radius. During stagnation, m = 0 instabilities became more pronounced. When a disruption of necks occurred, the plasma impedance reached 0.4 ? and high energy (>2 MeV) bremsstrahlung radiation together with high energy deuterons were produced. Maximum neutron energies of 33 MeV were observed by axial time-of-flight detectors. The observed neutron spectra could be explained by a suprathermal distribution of deuterons with a high energy tail f?ft({{E}\\text{d}}\\right)\\propto E\\text{d}-(1.8+/- 0.2) . Neutron yields reached 3.6 × 1012 at a 2.7 MA current. A high neutron production efficiency of 6 × 107 neutrons per one joule of plasma energy resulted from the generation of high energy deuterons and from their magnetization inside plasmas.

  1. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-07-11

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials’ properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: • Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen. • Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure. • Hydrogen storage material made from activated PEEK is well suited for hydrogen storage due to its controlled microporous structure and large surface area. • A new porosimetry method for evaluating the pore landscape using H2 as a probe was developed. 1H NMR can probe the nanoscale pore structure of synthesized material and can assess the pore dimension over a range covering 1.2 nm to 2.5 nm, the size that is desired for H2 adsorption. • Analysis of 1H NMR spectra in conjunction with the characterization of the bonding structure of the adsorbent by 13C NMR distinguishes between a heterogeneous and homogeneous pore structure as evidenced by the work on AX21 and activated PEEK. • Most of the sorbents studied are suited to hydrogen storage at low temperature (T < 100K). Of the materials investigated, only boron substituted graphite has the potential to work at higher temperatures if the boron content in the favorable planar BC3 configuration that actively contributes to adsorption can be increased.

  2. Efficient hydrogenation of organic carbonates, carbamates and formates indicates alternative routes to methanol based on CO2 and CO.

    PubMed

    Balaraman, Ekambaram; Gunanathan, Chidambaram; Zhang, Jing; Shimon, Linda J W; Milstein, David

    2011-08-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of organic carbonates, carbamates and formates is of significant interest both conceptually and practically, because these compounds can be produced from CO2 and CO, and their mild hydrogenation can provide alternative, mild approaches to the indirect hydrogenation of CO2 and CO to methanol, an important fuel and synthetic building block. Here, we report for the first time catalytic hydrogenation of organic carbonates to alcohols, and carbamates to alcohols and amines. Unprecedented homogeneously catalysed hydrogenation of organic formates to methanol has also been accomplished. The reactions are efficiently catalysed by dearomatized PNN Ru(II) pincer complexes derived from pyridine- and bipyridine-based tridentate ligands. These atom-economical reactions proceed under neutral, homogeneous conditions, at mild temperatures and under mild hydrogen pressures, and can operate in the absence of solvent with no generation of waste, representing the ultimate 'green' reactions. A possible mechanism involves metal-ligand cooperation by aromatization-dearomatization of the heteroaromatic pincer core. PMID:21778980

  3. Methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the sediments of a eutrophic lake

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, D.R.; Klug, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    /sup 14/C-tracer techniques were used to examine the metabolism of methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in sediments from the profundal and littoral zones of eutrophic Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. Methanogens were primarily responsible for the metabolism of methanol, mono-methylammine, and trimethylamine and maintained the pool size of these substrates below 10 ..mu..M in both sediment types. Methanol and methylamines were the precursors for less than 5 and 1%, respectively, of the total methane produced. Methanol and methylamines continued to be metabolized to methane when the sulfate concentration in the sediment was increased to 20 mM. Less than 2% of the total acetate production was derived from carbon dioxide reduction. Hydrogen consumption by hydrogen-oxidizing acetogens was 5% or less of the total hydrogen uptake by acetogens and methanogens. These results, in conjunction with previous studies, emphasize that acetate and hydrogen are the major methane precursors and that methanogens are the predominant hydrogen consumers in the sediments of this eutrophic lake.

  4. Methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the sediments of a eutrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Klug, M J

    1983-04-01

    C-tracer techniques were used to examine the metabolism of methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in sediments from the profundal and littoral zones of eutrophic Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. Methanogens were primarily responsible for the metabolism of methanol, monomethylamine, and trimethylamine and maintained the pool size of these substrates below 10 muM in both sediment types. Methanol and methylamines were the precursors for less than 5 and 1%, respectively, of the total methane produced. Methanol and methylamines continued to be metabolized to methane when the sulfate concentration in the sediment was increased to 20 mM. Less than 2% of the total acetate production was derived from carbon dioxide reduction. Hydrogen consumption by hydrogen-oxidizing acetogens was 5% or less of the total hydrogen uptake by acetogens and methanogens. These results, in conjunction with previous studies, emphasize that acetate and hydrogen are the major methane precursors and that methanogens are the predominant hydrogen consumers in the sediments of this eutrophic lake. PMID:16346271

  5. Ultrafine Metal Phosphide Nanocrystals in Situ Decorated on Highly Porous Heteroatom-Doped Carbons for Active Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Pei; Xu, Xueyan; Su, Huan; Liu, Yu-Ping; Chen, Tiehong; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2015-12-30

    In spite of being technologically feasible, electrochemical water reduction to facilitate hydrogen production is confronted with issues mainly due to the lack of affordable and efficient catalysts for the water reduction half reaction. Reported herein is the fabrication of metal phosphides nanocrystals uniformly loaded on highly porous heteroatom-modified carbons through one-step carbonization-phosphization methodology. Remarkably, the well-structured porosity and the increased electrochemically accessible active sites ensure the high catalytic efficiency for electrochemical hydrogen evolution in acidic medium in terms of small onset potentials (33 mV) and large cathodic current density (0.481 mA cm(-2)), even comparable to the state-of-the-art Pt/C benchmark. The easily prepared composite catalysts of structural and textural peculiarities may serve as promising non-noble metal catalysts for realistic hydrogen evolution. PMID:26633079

  6. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation by microbial methane oxidation: Improved determination

    SciTech Connect

    Mahieu, Koenraad . E-mail: Koenraad.Mahieu@Ugent.be; Visscher, Alex De; Vanrolleghem, Peter A.; Cleemput, Oswald Van

    2006-07-01

    Isotope fractionation is a promising tool for quantifying methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. For good quantification an accurate determination of the isotope fractionation factor ({alpha}) of methane oxidation based on independent batch experiments with soil samples from the landfill cover is required. Most studies so far used data analysis methods based on approximations of the Rayleigh model to determine {alpha}. In this study, the two most common approximations were tested, the simplified Rayleigh approach and the Coleman method. To do this, the original model of Rayleigh was described in measurable variables, methane concentration and isotopic abundances, and fitted to batch oxidation data by means of a weighted non-linear errors-in-variables regression technique. The results of this technique were used as a benchmark to which the results of the two conventional approximations were compared. Three types of batch data were used: simulated data, data obtained from the literature, and data obtained from new batch experiments conducted in our laboratory. The Coleman approximation was shown to be acceptable but not recommended for carbon fractionation (error on {alpha} - 1 up to 5%) and unacceptable for hydrogen fractionation (error up to 20%). The difference between the simplified Rayleigh approach and the exact Rayleigh model is much smaller for both carbon and hydrogen fractionation (error on {alpha} - 1 < 0.05%). There is also a small difference when errors in both variables (methane concentration and isotope abundance) are accounted for instead of assuming an error-free independent variable. By means of theoretical calculations general criteria, not limited to methane, {sup 13}C, or D, were developed for the validity of the simplified Rayleigh approach when using labelled compounds.

  7. Metal and Precursor Effect during 1-Heptyne Selective Hydrogenation Using an Activated Carbon as Support

    PubMed Central

    Lederhos, Cecilia R.; Badano, Juan M.; Carrara, Nicolas; Coloma-Pascual, Fernando; Almansa, M. Cristina; Liprandi, Domingo; Quiroga, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673?K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX > PdNRX > PtClRX ? RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX = PdNRX > RuClRX > PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects. PMID:24348168

  8. Discovery of a shell of neutral atomic hydrogen surrounding the carbon star IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, L. D.; Gérard, E.; Le Bertre, T.

    2015-05-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to perform the most sensitive search to date for neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) in the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of the carbon star IRC+10216. Our observations have uncovered a low surface brightness H I shell of diameter ˜1300 arcsec (˜0.8 pc), centred on IRC+10216. The H I shell has an angular extent comparable to the far ultraviolet-emitting astrosphere of IRC+10216 previously detected with the GALEX satellite, and its kinematics are consistent with circumstellar matter that has been decelerated by the local interstellar medium. The shell appears to completely surround the star, but the highest H I column densities are measured along the leading edge of the shell, near the location of a previously identified bow shock. We estimate a total mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the IRC+10216 CSE of M_{H I} ˜ 3× 10^{-3} M_{?}. This is only a small fraction of the expected total mass of the CSE (<1 per cent) and is consistent with the bulk of the stellar wind originating in molecular rather than atomic form, as expected for a cool star with an effective temperature Teff ? 2200 K. H I mapping of a 2° × 2° region surrounding IRC+10216 has also allowed us to characterize the line-of-sight interstellar emission in the region and has uncovered a link between diffuse FUV emission south-west of IRC+10216 and the Local Leo Cold Cloud.

  9. Inverted supercritical carbon dioxide/aqueous biphasic media for rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Burgemeister, Katja; Franciò, Giancarlo; Gego, Volker H; Greiner, Lasse; Hugl, Herbert; Leitner, Walter

    2007-01-01

    An inverted supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2))/aqueous biphasic system has been used as reaction media for Rh-catalysed hydrogenation of polar substrates. Chiral and achiral CO(2)-philic catalysts were efficiently immobilised in scCO(2) as the stationary phase, while the polar substrates and products were contained in water as the mobile phase. Notably, product separation and catalyst recycling were conducted without depressurisation of the autoclave. The catalyst phase was reused several times with high conversion and product recovery of more than 85 %. Loss of rhodium and phosphorus by leaching were found to be below the detection limit after the first two cycles in the majority of repetitive experiments. The reaction conditions were optimised with a minimum of experiments by using a simplex algorithm in a sequential optimisation. Total turnover numbers (TTNs) of up to 1600, turnover frequencies (TOFs) of up to 340 h(-1) and ee's up to 99 % were obtained in repetitive batch operations. The scope of the devised catalytic system has been investigated and a semicontinuous reaction setup has been implemented. The chiral ligand (R,S)-3-H(2)F(6)-BINAPHOS allowed highly enantioselective hydrogenation of itaconic acid and methyl-2-acetamidoacrylate combined with a considerable catalyst stability in these reaction media. PMID:17295365

  10. Comment on 'Microwave attenuation of hydrogen plasma in carbon nanotubes' [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 124315 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2010-03-15

    In a recent article, Babaei and Solari [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 124315 (2008)] studied the effects of the electron temperature, and the external static magnetic field on the attenuation (ATT) of the microwave in the hydrogen plasma embedded inside the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which were grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation (HiPco). They showed that the position of ATT peak shifts significantly toward high frequency with increasing thermal frequency and in the presence of an external magnetic field in the Faraday configuration, for {upsilon}{sub c}<20 GHz, the ATT coefficient increases with increasing cyclotron frequency, and for {upsilon}{sub c}>20 GHz, the ATT level variations extremely increase, where {upsilon}{sub c} is the cyclotron frequency. Here we derive the correct form of the microwave absorption coefficient of the magnetized hydrogen plasma embedded inside the CNTs and show that the absorption band moves from low to high frequencies when the magnetic field strength increases. Also, we show that the ATT of the microwave in the system is not sensitive to the thermal frequency.

  11. Kinetics and mechanisms of iron sulfide reductions in hydrogen and in carbon monoxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltowski, T.; Hinckley, C.C.; Smith, Gerard V.; Nishizawa, T.; Saporoschenko, Mykola; Shiley, R.H.; Webster, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The reduction of iron sulfides by hydrogen and by carbon monoxide has been studied using plug flow and thermogravimetric methods. The reactions were studied in the 523-723??K temperature range and were found to be first-order processes. Plug flow studies were used to correlate reaction rates between pyrite and the gases as a function of the surface area of the pyrite. The rate of H2S formation increases with the surface area of the pyrite sample. The results of thermogravimetric experiments indicate that the reactions consist of several steps. Rate constants for the pyrite reduction by H2 and by CO were obtained. The activation energies increased with degree of reduction. Values of Ea were 113.2 (step I) and 122.5 kJ/mole (step II) for pyrite reduction with CO and 99.4 (step I), 122.4 (step II), 125.2 (step III), and 142.6 kJ/mole (step IV) for pyrite reduction with hydrogen. ?? 1987.

  12. Factors affecting activated carbon-based catalysts for selective hydrogen sulfide oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huixing; Monnell, J.D.; Alvin, M.A.; Vidic, R.D.

    2008-09-01

    The primary product of coal gasification processes is synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of CO, H2, CO2, H2O and a number of minor components. Among the most significant minor components in syngas is hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In addition to its adverse environmental impact, H2S poisons the catalysts and hydrogen purification membranes, and causes severe corrosion in gas turbines. Technologies that can remove H2S from syngas and related process streams are, therefore, of considerable practical interest. To meet this need, we work towards understanding the mechanism by which prospective H2S catalysts perform in simulated fuel gas conditions. Specifically, we show that for low-temperature gas clean-up (~1408C) using activated carbon fibers and water plays a significant role in H2S binding and helps to prolong the lifetime of the material. Basic surface functional groups were found to be imperative for significant conversion of H2S to daughter compounds, whereas metal oxides (La and Ce) did little to enhance this catalysis. We show that although thermal regeneration of the material is possible, the regenerated material has a substantially lower catalytic and sorption capacity.

  13. Atomic Hydrogen in the Extended Circumstellar Envelope of the Carbon Star IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lynn D.

    2014-06-01

    IRC+10216 (CW Leo) is the nearest and best-known carbon star. It is currently undergoing a high rate of mass loss 10-5 M? yr-1) and is believed to be approaching the end of its lifetime on the asymptotic giant branch. Mass loss from IRC+10216 has led to the formation of an extensive circumstellar envelope (CSE) that spans more than half a degree (>1.3 parsecs) across and is both structurally and chemically complex. While the CSE of IRC+10216 has been widely studied through emission from dust and molecular lines, the properties of the predominant CSE constituent—hydrogengas—have remained poorly known, including the total mass and extent of the circumstellar hydrogen and the ratio of atomic to molecular hydrogen throughout the envelope. I will present new insights into these questions based on a study of IRC+10216 in the HI 21-cm lineusing the Very Large Array and the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. I will also highlight the value of HI line emission as a probe of the interface between the circumstellar and interstellar environment of the star.

  14. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane as a True One Box Unit for Large Scale Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Liu

    2012-05-01

    IGCC coal-fired power plants show promise for environmentally-benign power generation. In these plants coal is gasified to syngas then processed in a water gas-shift (WGS) reactor to maximize the hydrogen/CO{sub 2} content. The gas stream can then be separated into a hydrogen rich stream for power generation and/or further purified for sale as a chemical and a CO{sub 2} rich stream for the purpose of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Today, the separation is accomplished using conventional absorption/desorption processes with post CO{sub 2} compression. However, significant process complexity and energy penalties accrue with this approach, accounting for ~20% of the capital cost and ~27% parasitic energy consumption. Ideally, a â??one-boxâ? process is preferred in which the syngas is fed directly to the WGS reactor without gas pre-treatment, converting the CO to hydrogen in the presence of H{sub 2}S and other impurities and delivering a clean hydrogen product for power generation or other uses. The development of such a process is the primary goal of this project. Our proposed "one-box" process includes a catalytic membrane reactor (MR) that makes use of a hydrogen-selective, carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane, and a sulfur-tolerant Co/Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The membrane reactorâ??s behavior has been investigated with a bench top unit for different experimental conditions and compared with the modeling results. The model is used to further investigate the design features of the proposed process. CO conversion >99% and hydrogen recovery >90% are feasible under the operating pressures available from IGCC. More importantly, the CMS membrane has demonstrated excellent selectivity for hydrogen over H{sub 2}S (>100), and shown no flux loss in the presence of a synthetic "tar"-like material, i.e., naphthalene. In summary, the proposed "one-box" process has been successfully demonstrated with the bench-top reactor. In parallel we have successfully designed and fabricated a full-scale CMS membrane and module for the proposed application. This full-scale membrane element is a 3" diameter with 30"L, composed of ~85 single CMS membrane tubes. The membrane tubes and bundles have demonstrated satisfactory thermal, hydrothermal, thermal cycling and chemical stabilities under an environment simulating the temperature, pressure and contaminant levels encountered in our proposed process. More importantly, the membrane module packed with the CMS bundle was tested for over 30 pressure cycles between ambient pressure and >300 -600 psi at 200 to 300°C without mechanical degradation. Finally, internal baffles have been designed and installed to improve flow distribution within the module, which delivered â?¥90% separation efficiency in comparison with the efficiency achieved with single membrane tubes. In summary, the full-scale CMS membrane element and module have been successfully developed and tested satisfactorily for our proposed one-box application; a test quantity of elements/modules have been fabricated for field testing. Multiple field tests have been performed under this project at National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The separation efficiency and performance stability of our full-scale membrane elements have been verified in testing conducted for times ranging from 100 to >250 hours of continuous exposure to coal/biomass gasifier off-gas for hydrogen enrichment with no gas pre-treatment for contaminants removal. In particular, "tar-like" contaminants were effectively rejected by the membrane with no evidence of fouling. In addition, testing was conducted using a hybrid membrane system, i.e., the CMS membrane in conjunction with the palladium membrane, to demonstrate that 99+% H{sub 2} purity and a high degree of CO{sub 2} capture could be achieved. In summary, the stability and performance of the full-scale hydrogen selective CMS membrane/module has been verified in multiple field tests in the presence of coal/biomass gasifier off-gas under this project. A promi

  15. Environmental and biosynthetic influences on carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, F. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Polissar, P. J.; Feakins, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Both carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf-wax n-alkanes are influenced by the availability of water in a plant's growth environment. Carbon isotope ratios of bulk tissues in C3 plants demonstrate a strong inverse relationship with measures of available moisture (e.g. mean annual precipitation and precipitation/evaporation). Similarly, hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes (?Dl) can be enriched relative to precipitation (?Dw) by transpiration, which is related to relative humidity and the leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit. Thus, D-enrichment of leaf-wax n-alkanes relative to precipitation, termed the apparent fractionation (2?l/w), becomes more positive with increasing aridity. In theory, more positive values of leaf-wax ?13C (?13Cl) and 2?l/w of leaf-wax n-alkanes should both correspond to more arid conditions in C3 plants. Here we review published and unpublished data on over 100 plants to examine this relationship. Contrary to expectations, C3 dicots show no clear relationship between ?13Cl and 2?l/w. This global lack of correlation is surprising given our understanding of aridity related isotopic effects in C3 plants. One possibility is that the implicit assumption of constant fractionation between lipid and bulk tissue is flawed due to the effects of different biosynthetic carriers and reaction pathways. We explore this possibility by examining the offset of leaf-wax carbon isotopes from the bulk leaf tissue (13?l/bulk). Different offsets would indicate additional biosynthetic processes are affecting ?13Cl in addition to any direct effects from aridity. We find that 13?l/bulk is highly variable, ranging from -1 to -16‰, which could explain the lack of correlation between ?13Cl and 2?l/w. In addition, 13?l/bulk values for C3 and C4 monocots (averages of -10.6 and -11.4‰ respectively) represent significantly greater offset between leaf wax and bulk tissue than in C3 dicots (average of -4.3‰), which is consistent with previous studies. Notably, 2?l/w and 13?l/bulk are positively correlated for all C3 plants, as well as for sub-divided C3 plant groups of dicots, monocots and gymnosperms. The positive relationship of 2?l/w and 13?l/bulk for C3 plants suggests co-varying influences of environmental properties on biosynthetic fractionation, such as root carbon storage use and water isotopes at the time of lipid synthesis. In contrast, C4 plants showed no correlation between 2?l/w and 13?l/bulk, which could signify differences in biosynthetic pathways or resource strategies between C3 and C4 plants. Paired leaf-wax carbon and hydrogen isotopic measurements have potential to elucidate isotope effects associated with ecohydrology and biosynthesis, which can strengthen paleoenvironmental interpretations of molecular isotopic data. Our analysis suggests both effects may be important determinants of plant-lipid isotope values.

  16. Biocatalytic methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in an anaerobic three-phase system.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, M; Koschack, T; Busch, G

    2015-02-01

    A new type of anaerobic trickle-bed reactor was used for biocatalytic methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide under mesophilic temperatures and ambient pressure in a continuous process. The conversion of gaseous substrates through immobilized hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea in a biofilm is a unique feature of this type of reactor. Due to the formation of a three-phase system on the carrier surface and operation as a plug flow reactor without gas recirculation, a complete reaction could be observed. With a methane concentration higher than c(CH4) = 98%, the product gas exhibits a very high quality. A specific methane production of P(CH4) = 1.49 Nm(3)/(m(3)(SV) d) was achieved at a hydraulic loading rate of LR(H2) = 6.0 Nm(3)/(m(3)(SV) d). The relation between trickle flow through the reactor and productivity could be shown. An application for methane enrichment in combination with biogas facilities as a source of carbon dioxide has also been positively proven. PMID:25193088

  17. Metallic WO2-Carbon Mesoporous Nanowires as Highly Efficient Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Zhang, Jingfang; Shi, Yanmei; Liu, Dali; Zhang, Bin

    2015-06-10

    The development of electrocatalysts to generate hydrogen, with good activity and stability, is a great challenge in the fields of chemistry and energy. Here we demonstrate a "hitting three birds with one stone" method to synthesize less toxic metallic WO2-carbon mesoporous nanowires with high concentration of oxygen vacancies (OVs) via calcination of inorganic/organic WO3-ethylenediamine hybrid precursors. The products exhibit excellent performance for H2 generation: the onset overpotential is only 35 mV, the required overpotentials for 10 and 20 mA/cm(2) are 58 and 78 mV, the Tafel slope is 46 mV/decade, the exchange current density is 0.64 mA/cm(2), and the stability is over 10 h. Further studies, in combination with density functional theory, demonstrate that the unusual electronic structure and the large amount of active sites, generated by the high concentration of OVs, as well as the closely attached carbon materials, were key factors for excellent performance. Our results experimentally and theoretically establish metallic transition metal oxides (TMOs) as intriguing novel electrocatalysts for H2 generation. Such TMOs with OVs might be promising candidates for other energy storage and conversion applications. PMID:25992910

  18. Airborne sulfur trace species intercomparison campaign: Sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Hoell, James M., Jr.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of sulfur trace gases are presented. The intercomparison was part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) and was conducted during the summer of 1989. The intercomparisons were conducted on the Wallops Electra aircraft during flights from Wallops Island, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil. Sulfur measurements intercompared included sulfur dioxide (SO2), dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Measurement techniques ranged from filter collection systems with post-flight analyses to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph systems employing various methods for measuring and identifying the sulfur gases during flight. Sampling schedules for the techniques ranged from integrated collections over periods as long as 50 minutes to one- to three-minute samples every ten or fifteen minutes. Several of the techniques provided measurements of more than one sulfur gas. Instruments employing different detection principles were involved in each of the sulfur intercomparisons. Also included in the intercomparison measurement scenario were a host of supporting measurements (i.e., ozone, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, total sulfur, aerosols, etc.) for purposes of: (1) interpreting results (i.e., correlation of any noted instrument disagreement with the chemical composition of the measurement environment); and (2) providing supporting chemical data to meet CITE-3 science objectives of studying ozone/sulfur photochemistry, diurnal cycles, etc. The results of the intercomparison study are briefly discussed.

  19. Study of ion-irradiated tungsten in deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khripunov, B. I.; Gureev, V. M.; Koidan, V. S.; Kornienko, S. N.; Latushkin, S. T.; Petrov, V. B.; Ryazanov, A. I.; Semenov, E. V.; Stolyarova, V. G.; Danelyan, L. S.; Kulikauskas, V. S.; Zatekin, V. V.; Unezhev, V. N.

    2013-07-01

    Experimental study aimed at investigation of neutron induced damage influence on fusion reactor plasma facing materials is reported. Displacement damage was produced in tungsten by high-energy helium and carbon ions at 3-10 MeV. The reached level of displacement damage ranged from several dpa to 600 dpa. The properties of the irradiated tungsten were studied in steady-state deuterium plasma on the LENTA linear divertor simulator. Plasma exposures were made at 250 eV of ion energy to fluence 1021-1022 ion/?m2. Erosion dynamics of the damaged layer and deuterium retention were observed. Surface microstructure modifications and important damage of the 5 ?m layer shown. Deuterium retention in helium-damaged tungsten (ERD) showed its complex behavior (increase or decrease) depending on implanted helium quantity and the structure of the surface layer.

  20. Etude du stockage de l'hydrogene sur des nanostructures de carbone microporeuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Le stockage de l'hydrogene par adsorption sur des adsorbants nano-structures a ete etudie sous differentes conditions de pression et de temperature. Les adsorbants etudies sont principalement des nanotubes de carbone a simple paroi ainsi que des structures metallo-organiques. Les mesures ont ete realisees a l'aide de systemes gravimetriques et volumetriques tres sensibles specialement mis au point pour de petits echantillons necessitant un degazage in situ. Les appareils developpes, au nombre de quatre, comprennent deux systemes gravimetriques et deux systemes volumetriques. Ensemble, ces systemes couvrent la plage de pressions (0-100) bars ainsi que la plage de temperatures (77-295) K. Les differentes analyses montrent que l'adsorption d'hydrogene sur les adsorbants nano-structures etudies est maximale a 77 K et varie entre environ (1.5 et 4) % masse. A temperature ambiante, l'adsorption croit lineairement avec la pression et demeure sous les 1% masse pour des pressions inferieures a 100 bars. L'adsorption d'hydrogene sur ces materiaux dans ces conditions se compare notamment a celle obtenue sur des charbons actives. La modelisation de l'adsorption a egalement ete realisee dans des conditions cryogeniques a l'aide du modele de Dubinin-Astakhov sous une forme adaptee pour l'adsorption supercritique. Les enthalpies d'adsorption calculees a partir de ce modele varient sous les 6 kJ/mole et sont donc consistantes avec des processus de physisorption. L'applicabilite du modele de Dubinin-Astakhov suggere que l'adsorption d'hydrogene puisse etre representee par un processus de remplissage des pores par un pseudo-liquide. Ces travaux s'inscrivent dans un contexte ou la capacite d'adsorption reelle des nanostructures de carbone est sujette a la controverse. En consequence, l'approche experimentale adoptee se distingue par les differentes demarches mises de l'avant pour l'obtention de mesures fiables sur des echantillons de faibles masses ainsi que par son caractere comparatif. Ces demarches incluent le developpement, l'etalonnage et la contreverification de systemes de mesures volumetriques et gravimetriques sensibles au microgramme. Ces systemes sont de plus adaptes au degazage sous vide et a haute temperature des echantillons. La mise au point d'un systeme de controle de temperature sur un petit volume pour des mesures a hautes pressions et basses temperatures constitue egalement un aspect original de ces travaux. De plus, d'un point de vue davantage theorique, cette these se caracterise par la modelisation de l'adsorption supercritique d'hydrogene sur differents materiaux et la derivation d'une expression pour l'enthalpie d'adsorption independante de la temperature a l'aide du modele de Dubinin-Astakhov.

  1. Environment of ore deposition in the Creede mining district, San Juan Mountains, Colorado; Part IV, source of fluids, from oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon isotope studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bethke, P.M.; Rye, R.O.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of fluids responsible for formation of the near-surface silver-base metal vein deposits at Creede was measured by direct analysis of inclusion fluids in sphalerite, quartz, and rhodochrosite and was estimated from analyses of illite and chlorite. The oxygen isotopic composition was determined directly on inclusion fluids in sphalerite and was estimated from analyses of quartz, illite, rhodochrosite, siderite, and adularia. The carbon isotopic composition was estimated from analyses of rhodochrosite and siderite. The ranges in isotopic composition for water and CO2 in the fluids associated with the formation of each of the minerals is given below (number of determinations given in parentheses):Mineral delta D (sub H2) O ppm delta 18 O (sub H2) O ppm delta 13 C (sub CO2) ppmSphalerite -81 to -54 (4) -10.1 to -4.5 (4)Quartz -97 to -86 (4) -5.9 to 1.8 (18)Illite -62 to -50 (8) -1.6 to 1.2(7)Chlorite -64 to -55 (10) -2.2 to 0.8 (10)Adularia 4.2 (1)Rhodochrosite -82 to -78 (2) 4.2 to 9.4 (9) -5.7 to -4.2 (9)Siderite 4.9 to 9.9 (6) -6.9 to -2.7 (6)The delta D (sub H2) O and delta 18 O (sub H2) O values of fluids associated with the formation of sphalerite, quartz, illite/chlorite, and carbonate minerals differ substantially from one another, and these differences appear to have been maintained throughout the depositional history, regardless of the positions of the minerals in the paragenetic sequence.The data suggest that waters from three coexisting reservoirs fed the vein system alternately and episodically during vein formation, and apparently there was little mixing of the fluids from the different reservoirs. The hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon isotope data suggest that the carbonate waters were deep seated, probably dominantly magmatic, in origin. The sphalerite and illite/chlorite waters must have been dominantly meteoric in origin and substantially oxygen shifted by exchange with the volcanic country rocks. The quartz waters were also oxygen shifted meteoric waters but were some 40 per mil lower in deuterium content than the sphalerite and illite/chlorite waters.We propose that the quartz fluids entered the vein system from reservoirs beneath the mountainous areas to the north in the vicinity of the present Continental Divide, but that the sphalerite and illite/chlorite fluids entered the vein system from a topographically low area to the south along the structural moat of the Creede caldera. The difference in delta D between the two meteoric waters may reflect differences in altitude of the recharge areas for the two reservoirs or may be clue to isotopic evolution of the closed-basin lake and interstitial waters in the moat surrounding the Creede caldera.

  2. [Consideration of the deuterium-free water supply to an expedition to Mars].

    PubMed

    Siniak, Iu E; Turusov, V S; Grigor'ev, A I; Zaridze, D G; Ga?dadymov, V B; Gus'kova, E I; Antoshina, E E; Gor'kova, T G; Trukhanova, L S

    2003-01-01

    Interplanetary missions, including to Mars, will put crews into severe radiation conditions. Search for methods of reducing the risk of radiation-induced cancer is of the top priority in preparation for the mission to Mars. One of the options is designing life support systems that will generate water with low content of the stable hydrogen isotope (deuterium) to be consumed by crewmembers. Preliminary investigations have shown that a decrease of the deuterium fraction by 65% does impart to water certain anti-cancer properties. Therefore, drinking deuterium-free water has the potential to reduce the risk of cancer consequent to the extreme radiation exposure of the Martian crew. PMID:14959623

  3. The origin of deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainer, B. V.; Shchekinov, Iu. A.

    1985-05-01

    Zel'dovich and Novikov (1967) have noted that there is good agreement between the observed abundance of helium and the results of calculations using the hot model of the universe. The authors pointed out, however, that the problem can be finally solved only after more accurate information is obtained regarding the amount of helium which is being synthesized in the stars. It is found that by studying the abundance of the chemical elements, it would, in principle, be possible to reconstruct the entire history of the metagalaxy. The present review is concerned with the mechanisms which can alter to some extent the abundance of the products of cosmological nucleosynthesis. An analysis of the effectiveness of these mechanisms makes it possible to obtain more definite estimates of the magnitudes of these changes. The obtained information can provide a basis for utilizing the observations of the light elements in making a selection among the cosmological models. The problem of the origin of deuterium is found to be related to the general problem of the origin of light elements.

  4. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-01-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to investigate the organisms and biochemical pathways involved in the metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. Our results clearly demonstrate that the activity of bacterial reductive acetogens is a key factor in the reduced methane output of kangaroos. In in vitro fermentations, the microbial community of the kangaroo foregut produced very little methane, but produced a significantly greater proportion of acetate derived from carbon dioxide than the microbial community of the bovine rumen. A bacterial operational taxonomic unit closely related to the known reductive acetogen Blautia coccoides was found to be associated with carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism in the kangaroo foregut. Other bacterial taxa including members of the genera Prevotella, Oscillibacter and Streptococcus that have not previously been reported as containing hydrogenotrophic organisms were also significantly associated with metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. PMID:24621520

  5. Influence of CO{sub 2} activation on hydrogen storage behaviors of platinum-loaded activated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seul-Yi; Park, Soo-Jin

    2010-12-15

    In this work, platinum (Pt) metal loaded activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared with different structural characteristics for hydrogen storage applications. The process was conducted by a gas phase CO{sub 2} activation method at 1200 {sup o}C as a function of the CO{sub 2} flow time. Pt-loaded activated MWNTs were also formulated to investigate the hydrogen storage characteristics. The microstructures of the Pt-loaded activated MWNTs were characterized by XRD and TEM measurements. The textural properties of the samples were analyzed using N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at 77 K. The BET, D-R, and BJH equations were used to observe the specific surface areas and the micropore and mesopore structures. The hydrogen storage capacity of the Pt-loaded activated MWNTs was measured at 298 K at a pressure of 100 bar. The hydrogen storage capacity was increased with CO{sub 2} flow time. It was found that the micropore volume of the activated MWNTs plays a key role in the hydrogen storage capacity. -- Graphical abstract: The hydrogen storage capacities of the Pt-loaded activated MWNTs as a function of CO{sub 2} flow time are described. Display Omitted

  6. Dissolution of Uranium(IV) Oxide in Solutions of Ammonium Carbonate and Hydrogen Peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven C.; Peper, Shane M.; Douglas, Matthew; Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Finn, Erin C.

    2009-09-12

    Understanding the dissolution characteristics of uranium oxides is of fundamental scientific interest. Bench scale experiments were conducted to determine the optimal dissolution parameters of uranium(IV) oxide (UO2) powder in solutions of ammonium carbonate [(NH4)2CO3] and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Experimental parameters included variable peroxide and carbonate concentrations, and temperature. Results indicate the dissolution rate of UO2 in 1 M (NH4)2CO3 increases linearly with peroxide concentration ranging from 0.05 – 2 M (1:1 to 40:1 mol ratio H2O2:U), with no apparent maximum rate reached under the limited conditions used in our study. Temperature ranging studies show the dissolution rate of UO2 in 1 M (NH4)2CO3 and 0.1 M H2O2 (2:1 mol ratio H2O2:U) increases linearly from 15 °C to 60 °C, again with no apparent maximum rate reached. Dissolution of UO2 in solutions with constant [H2O2] and [(NH4)2CO3] ranging from 0.5 to 2 M showed no difference in rate; however dissolution was significantly reduced in 0.05 M (NH4)2CO3 solution. The results of this study demonstrate the influence of [H2O2], [(NH4)2CO3], and temperature on the dissolution of UO2 in peroxide-containing (NH4)2CO3 solutions. Future studies are planned to elucidate the solution and solid state complexes in these systems.

  7. Carbon-coated MoS2 nanosheets as highly efficient electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Dou, Shuo; Wu, Jianghong; Tao, Li; Shen, Anli; Huo, Jia; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-01-29

    As a green and highly efficient energy resource, hydrogen (H2) has attracted much attention in recent years. Electrochemical water splitting is an economic process to generate H2. MoS2 is a promising candidate to replace traditional Pt-based electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) under acidic conditions. But low electrical conductivity is one of bottlenecks for the large-scale application of MoS2. In this work, a carbon-coated MoS2 hybrid electrocatalyst was prepared with a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) approach to improve the electrical conductivity of MoS2. In addition to the surface-coating carbon, a small graphene-like layer could also be inserted into the interlayers of MoS2 during the CVD process which resulted in more active sites being exposed in MoS2. Enhanced electrical conductivity and more exposed active sites lead to excellent HER activity. PMID:26657536

  8. Calcium as a superior coating metal in functionalization of carbon fullerenes for high-capacity hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Yang, Shenyuan; Hicke, Christian; Wang, Enge; Geohegan, David B; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    We explore theoretically the feasibility of functionalizing carbon nanostructures for hydrogen storage, focusing on the coating of C60 fullerenes with light alkaline-earth metals. Our first-principles density functional theory studies show that both Ca and Sr can bind strongly to the C60 surface, and highly prefer monolayer coating, thereby explaining existing experimental observations. The strong binding is attributed to an intriguing charge transfer mechanism involving the empty d levels of the metal elements. The charge redistribution, in turn, gives rise to electric fields surrounding the coated fullerenes, which can now function as ideal attractors upon molecular hydrogen adsorption with binding strengths strong enough for potential room temperature applications but weak enough to avoid H2 dissociation. With a hydrogen uptake of >8.4wt% on Ca32C60, Ca is superior to all the recently suggested metal coating elements.

  9. Carbon doped molybdenum disulfide nanosheets stabilized on graphene for the hydrogen evolution reaction with high electrocatalytic ability.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Wang, Jiao; Tian, Xike; Ma, Longlong; Dai, Chu; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Zhaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Fabricating a cost effective hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst without using precious metal elements is in crucial demand for environmentally-benign energy production. In this work, the thin and edge-rich molybdenum disulfide nanosheets, with carbon doped in the interlayers and decorated on graphene, were developed by a facile solvothermal process. The as-synthesized nanohybrids exhibited high catalytic ability for the hydrogen evolution electrochemical reaction with an onset overpotential of 0.165 mV and a Tafel slope of 46 mV dec(-1). Furthermore, the prepared nanohybrids also showed better durability and stability. Our work may lead to a potential method for in situ production of metal carbide-sulphur hybrid nanomaterials with promising applications for the hydrogen evolution reaction. PMID:26695379

  10. Method and apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G. (Dover, MA); Mitchell, William L. (Belmont, MA); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (Westford, MA); Thijssen, Johannes H.J. (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for converting hydrocarbon fuel or an alcohol into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide. The apparatus includes a first vessel having a partial oxidation reaction zone and a separate steam reforming reaction zone that is distinct from the partial oxidation reaction zone. The first vessel has a first vessel inlet at the partial oxidation reaction zone and a first vessel outlet at the steam reforming zone. The reformer also includes a helical tube extending about the first vessel. The helical tube has a first end connected to an oxygen-containing source and a second end connected to the first vessel at the partial oxidation reaction zone. Oxygen gas from an oxygen-containing source can be directed through the helical tube to the first vessel. A second vessel having a second vessel inlet and second vessel outlet is annularly disposed about the first vessel. The helical tube is disposed between the first vessel and the second vessel and gases from the first vessel can be directed through second vessel.

  11. Theoretical model of the interaction of glycine with hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC).

    PubMed

    Timón, Vicente; Gálvez, Óscar; Maté, Belén; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J; Escribano, Rafael

    2015-10-28

    A theoretical model of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) is developed and applied to study the interaction of glycine with HAC surfaces at astronomical temperatures. Two models with different H content are tried for the HAC surface. The theory is applied at the Density Functional Theory (DFT) level, including a semiempirical dispersion correlation potential, d-DFT or Grimme DFT-D2. The level of theory is tested on glycine adsorption on a Si(001) surface. Crystalline glycine is also studied in its two stable phases, ? and ?, and the metastable ? phase. For the adsorption on Si or HAC surfaces, molecular glycine is introduced in the neutral and zwitterionic forms, and the most stable configurations are searched. All theoretical predictions are checked against experimental observations. HAC films are prepared by plasma enhanced vapor deposition at room temperature. Glycine is deposited at 20 K into a high vacuum, cold temperature chamber, to simulate astronomical conditions. Adsorption takes place through the acidic group COO(-) and when several glycine molecules are present, they form H-bond chains among them. Comparison between experiments and predictions suggests that a possible way to improve the theoretical model would require the introduction of aliphatic chains or a polycyclic aromatic core. The lack of previous models to study the interaction of amino-acids with HAC surfaces provides a motivation for this work. PMID:26456640

  12. Solar hydrogen production using carbon quantum dots and a molecular nickel catalyst.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Benjamin C M; Hutton, Georgina A M; Caputo, Christine A; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-05-13

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are established as excellent photosensitizers in combination with a molecular catalyst for solar light driven hydrogen production in aqueous solution. The inexpensive CQDs can be prepared by straightforward thermolysis of citric acid in a simple one-pot, multigram synthesis and are therefore scalable. The CQDs produced reducing equivalents under solar irradiation in a homogeneous photocatalytic system with a Ni-bis(diphosphine) catalyst, giving an activity of 398 ?molH2 (gCQD)(-1) h(-1) and a "per Ni catalyst" turnover frequency of 41 h(-1). The CQDs displayed activity in the visible region beyond ? > 455 nm and maintained their full photocatalytic activity for at least 1 day under full solar spectrum irradiation. A high quantum efficiency of 1.4% was recorded for the noble- and toxic-metal free photocatalytic system. Thus, CQDs are shown to be a highly sustainable light-absorbing material for photocatalytic schemes, which are not limited by cost, toxicity, or lack of scalability. The photocatalytic hybrid system was limited by the lifetime of the molecular catalyst, and intriguingly, no photocatalytic activity was observed using the CQDs and 3d transition metal salts or platinum precursors. This observation highlights the advantage of using a molecular catalyst over commonly used heterogeneous catalysts in this photocatalytic system. PMID:25864839

  13. Hydrogen accumulation as the origin of delamination at the a-carbon/SiO2 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Gutfreund, P.; Imbert, G.; Ponard, A.; Cubitt, R.

    2015-06-01

    This work reports the characterization of the interface amorphous carbon (a-C)/SiO2 by neutron and X-ray reflectometry. Neutrons have shown the existence of an intermediate layer (IL) between the a-C and the SiO2 layers that was not evidenced by XRR. This IL has been associated with the accumulation of H inside the SiO2 layer near the interface with the a-C. The characteristics of this layer, in particular, its H-concentration and thickness, seem to be correlated with the weakness of this interface. A plot of the molecular weight as a function of the mass density for the SiO2 and the IL layers graphically demonstrates the risk of delamination of each sample. The combination of NR and XRR is shown to be a powerful technique in the characterization of layers and interfaces used in the micro/nanoelectronics industry. The same approach can be extended to other interfaces of interest involving hydrogen.

  14. Investigation of optimal hydrogen sensing performance in semiconducting carbon nanotube network transistors with palladium electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bongsik; Lee, Dongil; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Jeon, Minsu; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-11-01

    The work function of palladium (Pd) is known to be sensitive to hydrogen (H2) via the formation of a surface dipole layer or Pd hydride. One approach to detect such a change in the work function is based on the formation of a Schottky barrier between Pd and a semiconductor. Here, we demonstrate a H2 sensor operable at room temperature by assembling solution-processed, pre-separated semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network bridged by Pd source/drain (S/D) electrodes in a configuration of field-effect transistors (FETs) with a local back-gate electrode. To begin with, we observed that the H2 response of the fabricated SWNT FETs can be enhanced in the linear operating regime, where the change in the work function of the Pd S/D electrodes by H2 can be effectively detected. We also explore the H2 responses in various SWNT FETs with different physical dimensions to optimize the sensing performance.

  15. Phases and properties of nanocomposites of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystals and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, M.; Katranchev, B.; Rafailov, P. M.; Naradikian, H.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Keskinova, E.; Spassov, T.

    2013-10-01

    We investigated a series of nanocomposites, built of the hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (LC) p-n-heptyloxybenzoic acid (7OBA) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by optical microtexture analysis and other complementary methods. The surface orientation strength of the LC cell and the bulk interaction of the dimeric LC molecules with the SWCNTs turn out to mainly govern the type (symmetry), thermal stability, and chirality of the LC states induced in these nanocomposites. As a result, a cascade of phase transitions and phases not typical for pristine 7OBA were observed and additionally confirmed by temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The most effective SWCNT concentrations in the LC matrix, ensuring both the necessary conformability between these materials and induction of liquid crystal phases with unique optical and electro-optical properties, were found to be in the range of 0.01-0.007 wt %. Reversal of smectic phases into reentrant nematic states as well as induction of chirality in all LC phases were observed in the SWCNT-7OBA nanocomposite, even though pure 7OBA is typically achiral. However, our most intriguing result is the detection below the reentrant nematic of a triclinic smectic-CG phase, which is chiral and biaxial, and exhibits bulk ferroelectricity.

  16. Adair-based hemoglobin equilibrium with oxygen, carbon dioxide and hydrogen ion activity.

    PubMed

    Mateják, Marek; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    As has been known for over a century, oxygen binding onto hemoglobin is influenced by the activity of hydrogen ions (H?), as well as the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO?). As is also known, the binding of both CO?and H? on terminal valine-1 residues is competitive. One-parametric situations of these hemoglobin equilibria at specific levels of H?, O?or CO?are also well described. However, we think interpolating or extrapolating this knowledge into an 'empirical' function of three independent variables has not yet been completely satisfactory. We present a model that integrates three orthogonal views of hemoglobin oxygenation, titration, and carbamination at different temperatures. The model is based only on chemical principles, Adair's oxygenation steps and Van't Hoff equation of temperature dependences. Our model fits the measurements of the Haldane coefficient and CO?hemoglobin saturation. It also fits the oxygen dissociation curve influenced by simultaneous changes in H?, CO?and O?, which makes it a strong candidate for integration into more complex models of blood acid-base with gas transport, where any combination of mentioned substances can appear. PMID:25594800

  17. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings on implants drastically reduce biofilm formation and water permeation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernsmann, Falk; Laube, Norbert; Baldsiefen, Gerhard; Castellucci, Mattia

    2014-11-01

    Inflammations and crystalline bacterial biofilms (encrustations) remain a major complication in long-term artificial urinary tract drainage. To solve this problem we present urological implants with coatings made of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) that show excellent protection from encrustation in-vitro as well as in-vivo. Part of the success of a-C:H coatings is attributed to their ability to act as a diffusion barrier between an implant and the body, which prevents leaching of solvents from polymeric implants. To further enhance their barrier properties a-C:H coatings are combined with parylene coatings to develop diffusion-barrier multilayer coatings with a total thickness between 0.2 ?m and 0.8 ?m. The combination of the two types of coatings leads to a reduction of water diffusion by a factor of up to ten with respect to uncoated 25 ?m thick polyimide sub-strates. The diffusion of water vapour from a controlled atmospheric pressure chamber through coated foils to a vacuum chamber is measured in a custom-built device.

  18. Coupled long-range carbon-hydrogen correlation experiment without refocusing delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, V. V.; Nunlist, Rudi

    In long-range carbon-hydrogen correlation experiments with standard heteronuclear shift correlation sequences cross-peak intensities can be severely attenuated due to modulation by "interfering" long-range couplings with other protons. Often cross peaks, even if the polarization transfer delay, ?1, is optimized, can be missed due to the wrong choice of the refocusing delay, ?2. A useful improvement is to eliminate the ?2 delay and acquire without proton decoupling. A one-step low-pass J filter is introduced before evolution to suppress one-bond correlations and this sequence is compared to decoupled versions (the standard heteronuclear shift correlation sequence and the COLOC sequence with one-step low-pass J filter before evolution and a BIRD pulse midway through ?2). Using rotenone as an example we show the advantages of removing the "refocusing" ("defocusing") delay and retaining 1H coupling in the F2 dimension. It is suggested that the decrease in S/ N (by a factor of 2 or less) is often not very significant compared to the danger of accidental missing of cross peaks due to the wrong choice of ?2.

  19. Highly efficient hydrogen production through ethanol photoreforming by a carbon nanocone/Pd@TiO2 hybrid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Melchionna, M; Beltram, A; Montini, T; Monai, M; Nasi, L; Fornasiero, P; Prato, M

    2015-12-24

    Production of molecular hydrogen (H2) is becoming an increasingly prominent process, due to high expectations as a new green energy carrier and key reagent for many industrial processes. Herein we report the high efficiency of H2 production via photoreforming of ethanol using a catalyst based on hierarchical carbon nanocones hybridised with an inorganic layer of nanocrystalline TiO2 containing Pd nanoparticles. PMID:26568371

  20. Hydrogenation of the nanopowders that form in a carbon-helium plasma stream during the introduction of Ni and Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Churilov, G. N. Osipova, I. V.; Tomashevich, Ye. V.; Glushchenko, G. A.; Fedorov, A. S.; Popov, Z. I.; Bulina, N. V.; Vereshchagin, S. N.; Zhizhaev, A. M.; Cherepakhin, A. V.

    2011-12-15

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of magnesium, nickel, and carbon atoms are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The calculations performed in terms of the density functional theory show that the jump frequency of hydrogen atoms in nickel-containing magnesium hydride increases substantially near impurity nickel atoms; as a result, the rate of hydrogen absorption by magnesium also increases. Nickel on the magnesium surface is shown to be absorbed via an island growth mechanism. Composite Mg-C, Ni-C, and Mg-Ni-C powders are produced by plasmachemical synthesis in a carbon-helium plasma stream. Hydrogen is introduced into a chamber during synthesis. It is found by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis that, among these three composites, only Mg-Ni-C contains magnesium fixed in the MgH{sub 2} compound. The process of such 'ultrarapid' hydrogenation of magnesium, which occurs in the time of formation of composite nanoparticles, can be explained by the catalytic action of nickel, which is enhanced by a high temperature. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs demonstrate the dynamics of the dehydrogenation of Mg-Ni-C composite nanoparticles in heating by an electron beam.