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Sample records for hydrogen fluoride samples

  1. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  2. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  3. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  4. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  5. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  6. Vapor-liquid equilibria for the systems difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, dichlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorine + hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.

    1998-01-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, dichlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorine + hydrogen fluoride have been measured. The experimental data for the binary systems are correlated with the NRTL equation with the vapor-phase association model for the mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, and the relevant parameters are presented. The binary system difluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride forms a homogeneous liquid phase, and the others form minimum boiling heterogeneous azeotropes at the experimental conditions.

  7. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  8. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  9. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  10. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for the systems 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1997-03-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for the three binary systems (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride) have been measured. The experimental data for the binary systems are correlated with the NRTL equation with the vapor-phase association model for the mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, and the relevant parameters are presented. All of the systems form minimum boiling heterogeneous azeotropes.

  11. Determination of Stability Constants of Hydrogen and Aluminum Fluorides with a Fluoride-Selective Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    2003-01-06

    The ability to directly determine free fluoride ion concentration (or mean activity) simplifies gathering and interpretation of experimental data for studies of metal complexes. In this work, the new lanthanum fluoride electrode was used to measure free fluoride ion in an investigation of the hydrogen-fluoride and aluminum-fluoride systems in NH4NO3.

  12. Manufacture of high purity low arsenic anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Jenczewski, T.J.; Sturtevant, R.L.; Morgan, T.R.; Boghean, B.J.; Butt, D.C.

    1988-07-12

    A process for manufacturing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity from arsenic contaminated anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is described which comprises: (a) contacting the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with an effective amount of hydrogen peroxide to oxidize the arsenic impurity in the presence of a catalyst which comprises a catalytic amount of (i) molybdenum or an inorganic molybdenum compound and (ii) a phosphate compound, at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to oxidize volatile trivalent arsenic impurities in the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride to non-volatile pentavalent arsenic compounds, and (b) distilling the resulting mixture and recovering anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity.

  13. Hydrogen Fluoride in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monje, Raquel R.; Lis, Dariusz C.; Phillips, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory has provided a unique opportunity to study hydride molecules with large rotational constant in the interstellar medium (ISM) within the nearby universe. Some of the key results from hydride studies with Herschel, and in particular with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI), are the first detection at high spectral resolution of the fundamental J = 1 - 0 rotational transition of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at 1.232 THz, and the discovery of its ubiquitous nature within the ISM of the Milky Way galaxy and nearby galaxies. The remarkable Herschel/ HIFI results suggest, that the HF J = 1 - 0 transition promises to yield an extremely sensitive probe of the diffuse molecular gas along the lines of sight toward background far-infrared continuum sources and, as predicted earlier by chemical models, a valuable surrogate for molecular hydrogen in the nearby and high redshift universe. These and other interesting results on hydrogen fluoride from Herschel observations will be presented, as well as the results from follow-up studies from ground-base facilities on hydride molecules towards luminous lensed high-redshifted galaxies with strong submillimeter continuum.

  14. Development of a passive dosimeter for hydrogen fluoride monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.S.; Monat, J.P.

    1983-02-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF), a toxic industrial chemical, is used in the manufacture of most fluorine products and in many other industrial processes. Major uses are in fluorocarbon manufacture, aluminum production, glass etching, steel pickling, uranium processing, and as a catalyst for petroleum refining. A reliable passive dosimeter has been developed for sampling of airborne hydrogen fluoride vapor. The device is small (7.7 cm x 5.4 cm x 1.9 cm) and can easily and conveniently be worn on one's lapel. It consists of polyethylene and polypropylene parts and an alkaline impregnated polypropylene collection element. It is completely self-contained requiring no pumps, impingers, or sampling tubes. Subsequent to sampling, the collection element is analyzed quickly and easily with a fluoride selective-ion electrode. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine precision, linearity, interference effects, influences of temperature and humidity, and collection element stability over time. Results of the tests indicate that the Gasbadge/sup TM/ HF dosimeter is an excellent passive HF monitor for work spaces, and that results obtained with it are accurate within +/- 17.4% in the action range and +/- 10.3% overall. These results have been corroborated in a field study. (JMT)

  15. Field evaluation of hydrogen fluoride continuous monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, V.V.M.; Dunder, T.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a comparative study of commercially available hydrogen fluoride (HF) continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMSs). The evaluation was conducted at a primary aluminum smelting plant. Three CEMSs-one infrared (IR) absorption analyzer and two ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS) analyzers-gathered data continuously over a 12-day time frame. Manual sampling trains were run concurrently with the CEMSs. All three monitoring systems provided time-averaged emissions estimates within 0.5 parts per million of each other. CEMS data were comparable to data gathered by manual sampling techniques.

  16. Intercomparison of measurements of stratospheric hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankin, William G.; Coffey, M. T.; Chance, K. V.; Traub, W. A.; Carli, B.; Mencaraglia, F.; Piccioli, S.; Farmer, C. B.; Seals, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the vertical profile of hydrogen fluoride (HF) vapor in the stratosphere and of the vertical column amounts of HF above certain altitudes were made using a variety of spectroscopic instruments in the 1982 and 1983 Balloon Intercomparison Campaigns. Both emission instruments working in the far-infrared spectral region and absorption instruments using solar occultation in the 2.5-micron region were employed. No systematic differences were seen in results from the two spectral regions. A mean profile from 20 - 45 km is presented, with uncertainties ranging from 20 to 50 percent. Total columns measured from ground and from 12 km are consistent with the profile if the mixing ratio for HF is small in the troposphere and low stratosphere.

  17. Hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Research cited from the international literature adresses various aspects of hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers. Topics covered include flows, laser outputs, molecular relaxation, molecular rotation, energy conversion efficiency, reaction kinetics, and laser materials. Continous wave and pulsed laser are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 53 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  18. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Wiesmann, Harold

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  19. Quantitative infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Manuta, D.M.

    1997-04-01

    This work was performed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant where hydrogen fluoride is produced upon the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}. This poses a problem for in this setting and a method for determining the mole percent concentration was desired. HF has been considered to be a non-ideal gas for many years. D. F. Smith utilized complex equations in his HF studies in the 1950s. We have evaluated HF behavior as a function of pressure from three different perspectives. (1) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of pressure for 100% HF. (2) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of increasing partial pressure HF. Total pressure = 300 mm HgA maintained with nitrogen. (3) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} for constant partial pressure HF. Total pressure is increased to greater than 800 mm HgA with nitrogen. These experiments have shown that at partial pressures up to 35mm HgA, HIF follows the ideal gas law. The absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} can be quantitatively analyzed via infrared methods.

  20. Corneal welding with the hydrogen fluoride laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John M.; Burstein, Neal L.; Nowicki, Michael J.; Jeffers, William Q.

    1994-06-01

    Our current study has looked at the use of a CW hydrogen fluoride laser to weld human cadaver corneas. The laser used was a Helios CL-II laser operating from 2.3 to 2.6 micrometers . A 6-mm full thickness linear incision was made in the center of the cornea. Two 10-0 nylon sutures were placed to hold the corneal stromal edges apposed during welding. Each specimen was mounted on a motorized micrometer stage. The beam was passed over the incision at a rate of between 0.5-2.0 mm per minute. After welding, the specimens were tested for wound strength by increasing intraocular pressure until the wound leaked. Two eyes had corneal welds performed and pressures of up to twice baseline intraocular pressure could be sustained after the stay sutures were removed. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated full thickness welds to be present. Electron micrographic sections demonstrated apparent interdigitation of collagen fibers between adjacent lamellae. Tissue welding may become an alternate means of wound closure in eye surgery.

  1. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  2. Effects of a documented hydrogen fluoride leak

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    At about 6 a.m. on June 19, 1984, 1037 liters of pressurized HF liquid escaped from a storage tank through a 2 mm diameter hole. 48 hours after the leak was discovered and sealed, visible injury to vegetation was observed 2 miles downwind of the source in a tear drop pattern. Injury symptoms ranged from a slight browning of leaves and needles to death of twigs and leaves and needles. Poplar, white pine, spruce, oak, red maple and several herbaceous plant species were injured. Ragweed was not injured but sensitive fern was severely injured. Goldenrod was also injured but recovered within 3 weeks after exposure. White pine trees within 1/4 of a mile from the source were killed. Fluoride analysis of tissues from upwind and downwind trees and herbaceous plants revealed fluoride tissue levels ranging from 5 to 34,000 ppm. Examples of distance/concentration are given. Soils revealed fluoride levels of about 1 ppm at all locations.

  3. SUMMARY REVIEW OF HEALTH EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH HYDROGEN FLUORIDE AND RELATED COMPOUNDS: HEALTH ISSUE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major natural sources of airborne hydrogen fluoride (HF) are volcanic activity, ocean spray, and crustal weathering of fluoride-containing rocks. Anthropogenic sources include emissions from industrial operations such as aluminum and fluorocarbon production, and uranium proce...

  4. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Levin, Saurabh; Krishnan, Sunderrajan; Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0-2mgl(-1). Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. PMID:26874766

  5. Atomic layer deposition of magnesium fluoride via bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)magnesium and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, John Jewell, April D.; Greer, Frank; Lee, Michael C.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2015-01-15

    A new process has been developed to deposit magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) thin films via atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as optical coatings in the ultraviolet. MgF{sub 2} was deposited in a showerhead style ALD reactor using bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)magnesium and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) as precursors at substrate temperatures from 100 to 250 °C. The use of HF was observed to result in improved morphology and reduced impurity content compared to other reported MgF{sub 2} ALD approaches that use metal fluoride precursors as the fluorine-containing chemistry. Characterization of these films has been performed using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for material deposited on silicon substrates. Films at all substrate temperatures were transparent at wavelengths down to 190 nm and the low deposition temperature combined with low surface roughness makes these coatings good candidates for a variety of optical applications in the far ultraviolet.

  6. Thermodynamic modeling of hydrogen fluoride production relevant to actinide residue treatment

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

    1995-02-01

    This report addresses issues specific to generation of hydrogen fluoride via reaction of calcium fluoride with sulfuric acid. This process has been established on a commercial scale and is under consideration for treatment of calcium fluoride residues from uranium processing. Magnesium fluoride slags are also available as a product of uranium processing. The technique of using sulfuric acid for the production of hydrogen fluoride from magnesium fluoride is also under consideration as a residue processing scheme. In the current study, thermodynamic modeling was used to investigate these chemical processing systems. Results presented herein reveal information relevant to selection of processing temperatures and conditions. Details include predicted effects in system composition based on operating temperatures for both the calcium fluoride and the magnesium fluoride systems.

  7. Development and demonstration of a personal monitoring system for exposure to hydrogen fluoride. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.S.; Monat, J.P.

    1993-09-01

    A good, functional Hydrogen Fluoride Gasbadge dosimeter has been developed for sampling of airborne HF vapor. The device is small (7.7 cm {times} 5.4 cm {times} 1.9 cm) and can easily and conveniently be worn on one`s lapel. It consists of polyethylene and polypropylene parts and a triethanolamine-impregnated polyproylene collection element. It is completely self contained, requiring no pumps, impingers, or sampling tubes. Subsequent to sampling, the collection element is analyzed quickly and easily with a fluoride selective-ion electrode. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine precision, linearity, interference effects, influences of temperature and humidity, and collection element stability over time. Results of the tests indicate that the Abcor Gasbadge HF dosimeter is an excellent passive HF monitor for work spaces, and that results obtained with it are accurate within {plus_minus}25%. These results have been corroborated in a field study.

  8. Acute Symptoms after a Community Hydrogen Fluoride Spill

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to describe the demographic characteristics, and clinical signs and symptoms of patients who visited a general hospital because of the release of chemically hazardous hydrogen fluoride that occurred on September 27, 2012 in Gumi City, Korea. Methods The medical records at 1 general hospital 9 km from the accident site were reviewed using a standardized survey format. There were 1,890 non-hospitalized and 12 hospitalized patients exposed to hydrogen fluoride between September 27 and October 13 2012. Results Among the 12 hospitalized patients, 11 were discharged within 1 week and the other was hospitalized for 10 days. The chief complaints were respiratory symptoms such as hemoptysis and shortness of breath, gastrointestinal symptoms, neurologic symptoms, sore throat, and lip burn. The number of non-hospitalized patients exhibited a bimodal distribution, peaking on the first and twelfth days after the accident. Their chief complaints were sore throat (24.1%), headache (19.1%), cough (13.1%), and eye irritation (9.2%); some patients were asymptomatic (6.2%). Patients who visited the hospital within 3 days (early patients) of the spill more often had shortness of breath (27.0%) and nausea (6.3%) as the chief complaints than patients who visited after 3 days (late patients) (3.5% and 2.6%, respectively). However, cough and rhinorrhea were more common in the late patients (14.0% and 3.3%, respectively) than in the early patients (5.0% and 0.0%, respectively). Patients who were closer to the accident site more often had shortness of breath and sputum as the chief complaints than patients who were farther away. The mean serum calcium concentration was 9.37 mg/dL (range: 8.4–11.0 mg/dL); none of the patients had a decreased serum calcium level. Among 48 pulmonary function test results, 4 showed decreased lung function. None of the patients had abnormal urine fluoride levels on the eighth day after exposure. Conclusions Patients

  9. ADEQUACY OF SAMPLING TRAINS AND ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES USED FOR FLUORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquid nitrogen-cooled cold-traps were used to establish the collection efficiency for fluorides of two different source sampling trains at primary aluminum reduction plants and wet-process phosphoric acid plants. It was found that the glass frit filter support commonly used in s...

  10. First principles Monte Carlo simulations of aggregation in the vapor phase of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Matthew J.; Ghogomu, Julius. N.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Kuo, I-F. Will; Siepmann, J. Ilja

    2010-01-01

    The aggregation of superheated hydrogen fluoride vapor is explored through the use of Monte Carlo simulations employing Kohn-Sham density functional theory with the exchange/correlation functional of Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr to describe the molecular interactions. Simulations were carried out in the canonical ensemble for a system consisting of ten molecules at constant density (2700 Å3/molecule) and at three different temperatures (T = 310, 350, and 390 K). Aggregation-volume-bias and configurational-bias Monte Carlo approaches (along with pre-sampling with an approximate potential) were employed to increase the sampling efficiency of cluster formation and destruction.

  11. Hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in fluoride solution.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2003-05-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in a fluoride solution (0.2% APF) has been investigated by means of a tensile test (after immersion) and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Upon immersion, the tensile strength of the alloy decreased to the critical stress level of martensite transformation. Hydrogen desorption of the immersed specimens appeared with a peak at around 500 degrees C. The amount of absorbed hydrogen in the alloy ranged from 100 to 1000 mass ppm when immersed in the fluoride solution for 2 to 24 h. The immersion in the fluoride solution led to the degradation of mechanical properties due to hydrogen embrittlement. The results of the present study imply that one reason that Ti and its alloys fracture in the oral cavity is the fact that hydrogen is absorbed in a fluoride solution, such as prophylactic agents. PMID:12734810

  12. Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  13. Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen teeth, resist acid, and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children ...

  14. Hydrogen fluoride inhalation injury because of a fire suppression system.

    PubMed

    Zierold, Dustin; Chauviere, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Automatic fire suppression systems (FSSs) use hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) to chemically extinguish fires. At high temperatures, HFC can release hydrogen fluoride (HF), a toxic and potentially lethal gas. We report the deaths of three U.S. military personnel at Bagram Air Base from acute respiratory failure after the FSS in their vehicle received a direct hit from a rocket-propelled grenade. Despite presenting with little to no additional signs of trauma, these individuals all died within 24 hours from HF-induced respiratory failure. When two patients later presented with similar symptoms after damage to their vehicle's FSS, they were aggressively treated with nebulized calcium and positive pressure ventilation. Both survived. The presence of HFC-containing FSSs in military vehicles may lead to future cases of HF inhalation injury, and further research must be done to help rapidly diagnose and effectively treat this injury. PMID:22338991

  15. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  16. HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Van der Tak, F. F. S.; Van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Neufeld, D.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2012-09-10

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC 6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC 6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H{sub 2} of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC 6334 I we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freezeout of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant (3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of interstellar fluorine is controlled by freezeout onto gas grains.

  17. Modeling phase equilibria in mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride and halocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lencka, M. ); Anderko, A. Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa )

    1993-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on the production of environmentally acceptable refrigerants, which not only offer desirable physico-chemical properties, but do not deplete the ozone layer and do not cause the greenhouse effect. The production of such refrigerants involves the separation of multicomponent mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and various chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons. Therefore, it is indispensable to know the phase behavior of these mixtures. While the phase behavior of refrigerant mixtures can be adequately modeled in the absence of HF using standard thermodynamic techniques, drastically increases the complexity of the mixture because of its unusually strong association. The association of HF manifests itself in its significantly reduced gas-phase compressibility factor and the strong nonideality of mixtures containing HF and hydrocarbons or halocarbons. In this work, the authors develop an accurate, yet simple, association model for HF and compare it with simulation data. The model is combined with a simple equation of state to yield a closed-form expression that is applicable to both pure fluids and mixtures. In addition to representing the pure-component data for HF, the theory accurately predicts phase equilibria in HF + halocarbon systems.

  18. Chemical emergency preparedness and prevention advisory: Hydrogen fluoride, series 8, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The advisory recommends ways Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) and chemical facilities can reduce risks posed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in their communities. Hydrogen fluoride, a strong inorganic acid, is produced and used as a gas or liquid without water (i.e., in anhydrous form), or in a water (aqueous) solution. Inhalation of hydrogen fluoride vapor, either in anhydrous form or from water solutions, can cause irritation if the exposure is mild (i.e., low concentration in air for a short time), or severe damage to the respiratory system or death in the case of exposure to high concentrations. Contact with the liquid or vapor can severely burn the skin, eyes, and other tissue. The largest use of hydrogen fluoride is in the manufacture of fluorine-containing chemicals, particularly chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Hydrogen fluoride may be used in some petroleum refinery operations, aluminum production, nuclear applications, glass etching and polishing, and metal treating and cleaning. Hydrogen fluoride's acute toxicity prompted EPA to list it as an extremely hazardous substance (EHS), with a threshold planning quantity (TPQ) of 100 pounds, under Section 302 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (commonly known as SARA Title III).

  19. Rugged approach for hydrogen fluoride monitoring in aluminium smelters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Bruno; Lord, Sylvain; Morin, Andre; Labranche, Bruno; Bernard, Pierre; Galarneau, Pierre

    1995-02-01

    A real time monitor, specifically designed to measure hydrogen fluoride (HF) concentration at the exit of the air purification system of aluminum smelters, has been tested and evaluated over a full year. The system has been designed to be rugged, with a low operating cost and easy to install and maintain in operation. These objectives have been achieved using a cheap halogen lamp as a light source, a simple micromotor as a light modulator, a pair of interference filters as optical analyzing elements and optical fibers as light guides between the central unit and the remote measurement points. In this application, the use of optical fiber provides two great advantages. Firstly, measurements in very demanding conditions become possible since the central unit, which has the task to make the entire optical electronic and digital processing, can be left in a control room where the conditions are much less difficult. Secondly, the capability of the central unit to process the optical information coming from two probe heads significantly reduces the overall costs by measurement points. The detection sensitivity limit achieved is 0.1 mg/m3 with normal stack diameter. The accuracy is around 5% depending on the care devoted to the calibration process. The response time can be adjusted over a large range but is typically set at 10 seconds.

  20. Observations of stratospheric hydrogen fluoride by halogen occultation experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, M.; Cicerone, R. J.; Russel, J. M., III; Huang, T. Y. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) channel on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) is providing the first global measurements of stratospheric HF, the dominant flourine reservoir in the atmosphere. This paper describes the latitudinal and seasonal variations of HALOE-observed HF in terms of vertical profiles, altitude/latitude cross sections, and column abundances. The HF global distribution shows a 'tracerlike' structure and its column amount increases with latitude, in agreement with previous aircraft measurements of the HF column amount. A comparison between the HALOE HF column above 20 km and the ATMOS 1985 measurements is used to estimate the annual rate of increase of stratospheric HF. Exponential rates of 4.9-6.6%/yr and linear growth rates of 6-8.6%/yr in 1985 and 4.3-5.5%/yr in 1992-1993 are found. HALOE HF measurements during the 1993 Antarctic spring are briefly described. This species behaves like a conserved tracer and its distribution shows an area of enhanced mixing ratios correlated with the polar vortex that has a clear latitude boundary. Finally, simulated HF distributions by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) two-dimensional model are used to compare with HALOE observations of HF. Reasonable agreements in the global structure and the absolute amount of HF are found. The differences between the model and the observed results indicate the need for improving treatment of atmospheric dynamics and fluorine-related chemical parameters in the model simulations.

  1. Exposure to hydrogen fluoride: an experimental study in humans of concentrations of fluoride in plasma, symptoms, and lung function.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, K; Ekstrand, J; Boe, J; Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the absorption of inhaled hydrogen fluoride (HF) by measuring plasma fluorides and HF concentrations in the breathing zone during exposure to HF. A possible dose-effect relation was investigated by following airway symptoms and lung function-that is, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC)-during and after exposure to HF. METHODS: 20 healthy, male volunteers were exposed for one hour to constant HF concentrations that ranged from 0.2 to 5.2 mg/m3; these concentrations are known to occur among potroom workers in the primary aluminium industry. Plasma fluorides were analysed before, during, and after exposure. Symptoms from the eyes and the upper and lower airways were registered and graded from 1 to 5 with a standardised questionnaire. RESULTS: The total symptom score was significantly increased at the end of exposure for all the subjects as a group (P < 0.01) and for the group exposed to HF below the present Norwegian standard for total fluorides 0.6 mg/m3 (P = 0.05). No change was detected in FEV15 although a significant decrease was found in FVC in the group exposed to fluorides below the hygienic standard (n = 9) and for the entire group (n = 23). Almost all the symptoms had disappeared four hours after the end of exposure. Symptom scores from the upper airways were significantly correlated with the HF concentration (r = 0.62, P = 0.002), the change in plasma fluoride concentration (delta C) (r = 0.51, P = 0.01), and the maximum plasma fluoride concentration (Cmax) (r = 0.42, P = 0.05). A significant correlation was also found between the total symptom score for airways and the HF concentration. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed a strong relation between inhaled HF and concentrations of fluoride in plasma. Upper airway and eye symptoms occurred after one hour of exposure to HF even when below the Norwegian hygienic standard for fluorides. PMID:9072031

  2. Displacement of the proton in hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride by beryllium and magnesium ions

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Sean A. C.

    2009-05-14

    The displacement of the proton by a beryllium ion and by a magnesium ion from hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride, of varying hydrogen bond strengths, was investigated theoretically using ab initio methods. Stable metal-containing species were obtained from all of the hydrogen-bonded complexes regardless of the strength of the hydrogen bond. It was found that the beryllium ion was energetically very effective in displacing the proton from hydrogen bonds, whereas the magnesium ion was unable to do so. The high stability of the beryllium-containing complexes is mainly due to the strong electrostatic bonding between the beryllium and fluoride atoms. This work supports the recent finding from a multidisciplinary bioinorganic study that beryllium displaces the proton in many strong hydrogen bonds.

  3. Three dimensional simulation of hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, J.A.; Douglass, A.R.; Rood, R.B.; Stolarski, R.S.; Newman, P.A. ); Allen, D.J.; Larson, E.M. ); Coffey, M.T.; Mankin, W.G. ); Toone, G.C. )

    1990-03-01

    Simulations of the evolution of stratospheric distributions of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) have been carried out for the period of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) with a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model. Simulations were performed assuming only homogeneous gas phase chemistry for HF and both homogeneous gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry for HCl. Results show heterogeneous loss of HCl is needed to provide agreement with infrared column measurements. Estimates of the impact of heterogeneous loss on the global HCl distribution are obtained from the model. Reductions of HCl due to heterogeneous loss are calculated to be localized to regions of high vorticity, even after more than a month of integration.

  4. Three dimensional simulation of hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, Jack A.; Rood, Richard B.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Allen, Dale J.; Larson, Edmund M.; Coffey, Michael T.; Mankin, William G.; Toon, Geoffrey C.

    1990-01-01

    Simulations of the evolution of stratospheric distributions of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) have been carried out for the period of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) with a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model. Simulations were performed assuming only homogeneous gas phase chemistry for HF and both homogeneous gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry for HCl. Results show heterogeneous loss of HCl is needed to provide agreement with infrared column measurements. Estimates of the impact of heterogeneous loss on the global HCl distribution are obtained from the model. Reductions of HCl due to heterogeneous loss are calculated to be localized to regions of high vorticity, even after more than a month of integration.

  5. Effect of hydrogen fluoride inhalation on lipid metabolism in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Philibert, C.; Dousset, J.C.; Rioufol, C.; Bourbon, P. )

    1991-01-01

    The action of fluoride in vivo (exposure 96 hrs to 7 mg/m3) on the metabolism of cyclic AMP and relationship between cAMP and lipid metabolism was investigated. The mean values for cAMP, non esterified fatty acids and cholesterol were significantly increased after hydrogen fluoride exposure. cAMP is directly responsible for the increased lipolysis. In animals exposed to HF, theophylline injection causes increases of non esterified fatty acids and not produces modification of cholesterol level.

  6. The Contrasting Character of Early and Late Transition Metal Fluorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dan A; Beweries, Torsten; Blasius, Clemens; Jasim, Naseralla; Nazir, Ruqia; Nazir, Sadia; Robertson, Craig C; Whitwood, Adrian C; Hunter, Christopher A; Brammer, Lee; Perutz, Robin N

    2015-09-16

    The association constants and enthalpies for the binding of hydrogen bond donors to group 10 transition metal complexes featuring a single fluoride ligand (trans-[Ni(F)(2-C5NF4)(PR3)2], R = Et 1a, Cy 1b, trans-[Pd(F)(4-C5NF4)(PCy3)2] 2, trans-[Pt(F){2-C5NF2H(CF3)}(PCy3)2] 3 and of group 4 difluorides (Cp2MF2, M = Ti 4a, Zr 5a, Hf 6a; Cp*2MF2, M = Ti 4b, Zr 5b, Hf 6b) are reported. These measurements allow placement of these fluoride ligands on the scales of organic H-bond acceptor strength. The H-bond acceptor capability β (Hunter scale) for the group 10 metal fluorides is far greater (1a 12.1, 1b 9.7, 2 11.6, 3 11.0) than that for group 4 metal fluorides (4a 5.8, 5a 4.7, 6a 4.7, 4b 6.9, 5b 5.6, 6b 5.4), demonstrating that the group 10 fluorides are comparable to the strongest organic H-bond acceptors, such as Me3NO, whereas group 4 fluorides fall in the same range as N-bases aniline through pyridine. Additionally, the measurement of the binding enthalpy of 4-fluorophenol to 1a in carbon tetrachloride (-23.5 ± 0.3 kJ mol(-1)) interlocks our study with Laurence's scale of H-bond basicity of organic molecules. The much greater polarity of group 10 metal fluorides than that of the group 4 metal fluorides is consistent with the importance of pπ-dπ bonding in the latter. The polarity of the group 10 metal fluorides indicates their potential as building blocks for hydrogen-bonded assemblies. The synthesis of trans-[Ni(F){2-C5NF3(NH2)}(PEt3)2], which exhibits an extended chain structure assembled by hydrogen bonds between the amine and metal-fluoride groups, confirms this hypothesis. PMID:26302048

  7. DIODE LASER-BASED MEASUREMENTS OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE GAS DURING CHEMICAL SUPPRESSION OF FIRES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Near-infrared tunable diode laser (NIR-TDL) spectroscopy is used to quantify hydrogen fluoride (HF) gas produced during fire-suppressant testing of Halon alternatives. Results of comparisons with other techniques for measuring HF gas concentrations are discussed. Measurements of ...

  8. Physics and Chemistry of the Hydrogen Fluoride Production Process from Fluorine Containing Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. N.; Kraydenko, R. I.; Lesnikova, M. S.; Malyutin, L. N.; Petlin, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the aluminum industry wastes on the environment is established. The resource efficient method of aluminum industry fluorine-containing wastes processing, which includes wastes oxidizing roasting to remove carbon component and the interaction of fluorine- containing particles with sulfuric acid in order to produce hydrogen fluoride, is considered. The economic and environmental effect of the proposed processing method is substantiated.

  9. Influence of Hydrogen Fluoride Fumigation on the Water Economy of Soybean Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Wiebe, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen fluoride fumigation on water economy was studied using soybean (Glycine max [L] Merr.). Fumigation caused partial stomatal closure in 1 hour and practically complete closure within 4 hours. The transpiration rate was greatly reduced by fumigation, while the leaf temperature was increased. Water potential increased after 1 day but fell drastically when necrosis occurred. Effects of interrupted fumigation during the day were somewhat less severe in all respects than those of continuous fumigation; nighttime fumigation caused only minor effects. Fluoride uptake was also much less from nighttime than from daytime fumigations. PMID:16658337

  10. Determination of Fluoride and Chloride in LEU Sample Matrices by Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.

    2002-12-06

    This study is a demonstration of fluoride and chloride determinations in Low Enriched Uranium sample matrices as part of technical task request FSS-ALD-2002-00025 deliverable from Central Laboratory Services.

  11. Determination of Fluoride and Chloride in NU Sample Matrices by Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.

    2003-05-21

    This study is a demonstration of fluoride and chloride determinations in natural uranium (NU) sample matrices as part of technical task request FSS-ALD-2002-00025 deliverable from Central Laboratory Services.

  12. Ion chromatographic measurement of fluoride and sulfur dioxide in samples collected at aluminum smelters.

    PubMed

    Balya, D R

    1991-08-01

    Measurement of airborne fluoride and sulfur dioxide in aluminum smelting plants is important for both industrial hygiene and environmental reasons. The traditional analytical techniques employed have been ion-selective electrodes (ISE) for fluoride and barium/thorin titration for SO2. In this study, ion chromatography (IC) was evaluated as a substitute for these two techniques. Dust for particulate fluoride was collected on membrane filters with carbonate-treated backup pads to collect HF and SO2. Gaseous fluoride and SO2 were ultrasonically extracted from the treated pad, but particulate fluoride required a borate/carbonate fusion. Collection efficiency and recovery of the analytes, along with the acceptable working ranges and instrument conditions used with IC, are discussed. IC is a desirable substitute for the electrode and titration methods because it is easily automated and the two determinations may be performed simultaneously. Organic compounds may cause interference in low-level fluoride measurement. Comparison of the techniques for field samples indicates that IC is an adequate substitute for the traditional measurement methods for full-shift samples of fluoride. PMID:1927909

  13. Ion chromatographic measurement of fluoride and sulfur dioxide in samples collected at aluminum smelters

    SciTech Connect

    Balya, D.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Measurement of airborne fluoride and sulfur dioxide in aluminum smelting plants is important for both industrial hygiene and environmental reasons. The traditional analytical techniques employed have been ion-selective electrodes (ISE) for fluoride and barium/thorin titration for SO2. In this study, ion chromatography (IC) was evaluated as a substitute for these two techniques. Dust for particulate fluoride was collected on membrane filters with carbonate-treated backup pads to collect HF and SO2. Gaseous fluoride and SO2 were ultrasonically extracted from the treated pad, but particulate fluoride required a borate/carbonate fusion. Collection efficiency and recovery of the analytes, along with the acceptable working ranges and instrument conditions used with IC, are discussed. IC is a desirable substitute for the electrode and titration methods because it is easily automated and the two determinations may be performed simultaneously. Organic compounds may cause interference in low-level fluoride measurement. Comparison of the techniques for field samples indicates that IC is an adequate substitute for the traditional measurement methods for full-shift samples of fluoride.

  14. Inhibition of hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in acid fluoride solution by hydrogen peroxide addition.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Yazaki, Yushin; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2011-09-01

    Inhibition of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) solution has been attempted by adding various amounts of H(2)O(2). In a 0.2% APF solution, hydrogen absorption is markedly inhibited by adding H(2)O(2), although corrosion is slightly enhanced by increasing the amount of added H(2)O(2). By adding a small amount of H(2)O(2) (0.001 M), in the early stage of immersion, hydrogen embrittlement is inhibited and corrosion is only slightly enhanced. Upon adding H(2)O(2), it appears that the dominant cathodic reactions change from hydrogen evolution to H(2)O(2) reduction reactions, or the surface conditions of the alloy are changed by H(2)O(2) with a high oxidation capability, thereby inhibiting hydrogen absorption. The present study clearly indicates that infinitesimal addition of H(2)O(2) into acid fluoride solutions is effective for the inhibition of the hydrogen embrittlement of the alloy. PMID:21630433

  15. [Micro-determination of fluoride in biological samples by pyrohydrolysis and flow-injection analysis using a fluoride ion-selective electrode].

    PubMed

    Itai, K

    1991-02-01

    An apparatus has been developed for the isolation of fluoride in biological samples through pyrohydrolysis. With this apparatus, it is possible to determine both organic and inorganic fluorocompounds with a recovery close to 100% and precision within 5%. The high recovery rate can be expected even for highly heat-resistant compounds such as CaF2, without using WO3 as a catalyst. For determination of the isolated fluoride, a separate apparatus was developed in which flow-injection analysis was used in conjunction with a fluoride ion-selective electrode as a detector. With this apparatus, fluoride in a sample solution with a volume as small as 0.2 ml, and at a concentration as low as 0.5 microgram/l, can be determined within 3 minutes with a precision of several percent. Combined use of the two apparatuses makes it possible to determine fluoride in different biological samples within 10-15 minutes with a precision of several percent, free from external contamination. By selecting suitable conditions for analysis and using a 1 g sample, it is possible to determine fluoride at a concentration as low as 5 ng/g. By employing these apparatuses, the fluoride content in different biological samples has been determine and the effectiveness of their use confirmed. PMID:2051632

  16. First principles simulation of a superionic phase of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Fried, L E

    2006-04-10

    The authors have conducted Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at pressures of 5-66 GPa along the 900 K isotherm. They predict a superionic phase at 33 GPa, where the fluorine atoms are fixed in a bcc lattice while the hydrogen atoms diffuse rapidly with a diffusion constant of between 2 x 10{sup -5} and 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s. They find that a transformation from asymmetric to symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs in HF at 66 GPa and 900 K. With superionic HF they have discovered a model system where symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs at experimentally achievable conditions. Given previous results on superionic H{sub 2}O[1,2,3] and NH{sub 3}[1], they conclude that high P,T superionic phases of electronegative element hydrides could be common.

  17. Rugged, Portable, Real-Time Optical Gaseous Analyzer for Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey; Gonzales, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a primary evolved combustion product of fluorinated and perfluorinated hydrocarbons. HF is produced during combustion by the presence of impurities and hydrogen- containing polymers including polyimides. This effect is especially dangerous in closed occupied volumes like spacecraft and submarines. In these systems, combinations of perfluorinated hydrocarbons and polyimides are used for insulating wiring. HF is both highly toxic and short-lived in closed environments due to its reactivity. The high reactivity also makes HF sampling problematic. An infrared optical sensor can detect promptly evolving HF with minimal sampling requirements, while providing both high sensitivity and high specificity. A rugged optical path length enhancement architecture enables both high HF sensitivity and rapid environmental sampling with minimal gaseous contact with the low-reactivity sensor surfaces. The inert optical sample cell, combined with infrared semiconductor lasers, is joined with an analog and digital electronic control architecture that allows for ruggedness and compactness. The combination provides both portability and battery operation on a simple camcorder battery for up to eight hours. Optical detection of gaseous HF is confounded by the need for rapid sampling with minimal contact between the sensor and the environmental sample. A sensor is required that must simultaneously provide the required sub-parts-permillion detection limits, but with the high specificity and selectivity expected of optical absorption techniques. It should also be rugged and compact for compatibility with operation onboard spacecraft and submarines. A new optical cell has been developed for which environmental sampling is accomplished by simply traversing the few mm-thick cell walls into an open volume where the measurement is made. A small, low-power fan or vacuum pump may be used to push or pull the gaseous sample into the sample volume for a response time of a few

  18. Quantum monte carlo study of the energetics of small hydrogenated and fluoride lithium clusters.

    PubMed

    Moreira, N L; Brito, B G A; Rabelo, J N Teixeira; Cândido, Ladir

    2016-06-30

    An investigation of the energetics of small lithium clusters doped either with a hydrogen or with a fluorine atom as a function of the number of lithium atoms using fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) simulation is reported. It is found that the binding energy (BE) for the doped clusters increases in absolute values leading to a more stable system than for the pure ones in excellent agreement with available experimental measurements. The BE increases for pure, remains almost constant for hydrogenated, and decreases rapidly toward the bulk lithium for the fluoride as a function of the number of lithium atoms in the clusters. The BE, dissociation energy as well as the second difference in energy display a pronounced odd-even oscillation with the number of lithium atoms. The electron correlation inverts the odd-even oscillation pattern for the doped in comparison with the pure clusters and has an impact of 29%-83% to the BE being higher in the pure cluster followed by the hydrogenated and then by the fluoride. The dissociation energy and the second difference in energy indicate that the doped cluster Li3 H is the most stable whereas among the pure ones the more stable are Li2 , Li4 , and Li6 . The electron correlation energy is crucial for the stabilization of Li3 H. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26992447

  19. Hydrogen Bond and Ligand Dissociation Dynamics in Fluoride Sensing of Re(I)-Polypyridyl Complex.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sandeep; Aute, Sunil; Das, Amitava; Ghosh, Hirendra N

    2015-11-25

    Hydrogen bonding interaction plays an essential role in the early phases of molecular recognition and colorimetric sensing of various anions in aprotic media. In this work, the host-guest interaction between fac-[Re(CO)3Cl(L)] with L = 4-([2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)phenol and fluoride ions is investigated for the hydrogen bond dynamics and the changing local coordination environment. The stoichiometric studies using (1)H NMR and ESI-MS spectroscopies have shown that proton transfer in the H-bonded phenol-fluoride complex activates the dissociation of the CO ligand in the Re(I) center. The phenol-to-phenolate conversion during formation of HF2(-) ion induces nucleophilic lability of the CO ligand which is probed by intraligand charge transfer (ILCT) and ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) transitions in transient absorption spectroscopy. After photoexcitation, phenol-phenoxide conversion rapidly equilibrates in 280 fs time scale and the ensuing excited state [Re(II)(bpy•(-)-phenolate¯) (CO)3Cl]* undergoes CO dissociation in the ultrafast time scale of ∼3 ps. A concerted mechanism of hydrogen cleavage and coordination change is established in anion sensing studies of the rhenium complex. PMID:26514688

  20. Hydrogen embrittlement of work-hardened Ni-Ti alloy in fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Ogawa, Toshio; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of work-hardened Ni-Ti alloy has been examined in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) solutions. Upon immersion in a 2.0% APF solution with a pH of 5.0, tensile strength decreased markedly with immersion time. Moreover, the fracture mode changed from ductile to brittle due to brittle layer formation at the peripheral part of the cross section of the specimen. The amount of absorbed hydrogen increased linearly with immersion time, and it reached above 5000 mass ppm after 24 h. The hydrogen desorption temperature of the immersed specimens shifted from 450 degrees C to a lower temperature with immersion time. As the amount of absorbed hydrogen was larger than 500 mass ppm, the degradation of mechanical properties was recognized. Although the tensile properties and fracture mode scarcely change in a 0.2% APF solution, the slight reduction in hardness and hydrogen absorption of several hundreds mass ppm were observed. The results of the present study imply that work-hardened Ni-Ti alloy is less sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement compared with Ni-Ti superelastic alloy. PMID:15193885

  1. Development of Methods for Sampling and Analysis of Particulate and Gaseous Fluorides from Stationary Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, E. T.; And Others

    A study was conducted which has resulted in the development of tentative sampling and analysis of fluorides emitted from various stationary sources. The study was directed toward developing and understanding the kinds of species which are present in each source emission. The report presents the following information: review of the various unit…

  2. HERSCHEL/HIFI OBSERVATIONS OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE TOWARD SAGITTARIUS B2(M)

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Emprechtinger, M.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Bergin, E. A.; Bell, T. A.; Neufeld, D. A.; Sonnentrucker, P.

    2011-06-10

    Herschel/HIFI observations have revealed the presence of widespread absorption by hydrogen fluoride (HF) J = 1-0 rotational transition, toward a number of Galactic sources. We present observations of HF J = 1-0 toward the high-mass star-forming region Sagittarius B2(M). The spectrum obtained shows a complex pattern of absorption, with numerous features covering a wide range of local standard of rest velocities (-130 to 100 km {sup -1}). An analysis of this absorption yields HF abundances relative to H{sub 2} of {approx}1.3 x 10{sup -8}, in most velocity intervals. This result is in good agreement with estimates from chemical models, which predict that HF should be the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine under a wide variety of interstellar conditions. Interestingly, we also find velocity intervals in which the HF spectrum shows strong absorption features that are not present, or are very weak, in spectra of other molecules, such as {sup 13}CO (1-0) and CS (2-1). HF absorption reveals components of diffuse clouds with small extinction that can be studied for the first time. Another interesting observation is that water is significantly more abundant than hydrogen fluoride over a wide range of velocities toward Sagittarius B2(M), in contrast to the remarkably constant H{sub 2}O/HF abundance ratio with average value close to unity measured toward other Galactic sources.

  3. Prediction of a superionic phase of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at high temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Laurence; Goldman, Nir

    2006-03-01

    We report first principles simulations of hydrogen fluoride. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF were conducted at densities of 1.8 -- 4.0 g/cc along the 900 K isotherm. At experimentally observable conditions, we find a transition to a superionic phase, in which the fluorine ions exhibit a stable lattice and the hydrogen ions exhibit rapid diffusion. This phase is similar to the recently reported superionic phase in water, in that there is a symmetrization of the hydrogen bond, and we observe a transient partially covalent network at pressures greater than 66 GPa. In addition, we describe a mechanism for hydrogen diffusion through the fluorine sub- lattice. Our results provide evidence that superionic solids are prevalent in solids that manifest low temperature symmetric hydrogen bonding. The pressures needed to induce superionic diffusion in HF are significantly lower than what is required for other known superionic hydrides, and thus will permit much more extensive experimental studies of this exotic phase.

  4. Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and molecular structure of the 1,1-difluoroethylene-hydrogen fluoride complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Helen O.; Marshall, Mark D.; Drake, Tasha L.; Pudlik, Tadeuz; Savji, Nazir; McCune, Daniel W.

    2009-11-01

    Fourier transform microwave rotation spectra in the 7-21 GHz region are obtained for the complex formed between 1,1-difluoroethylene and hydrogen fluoride, including the normal isotopomer and two singly substituted C13 species obtained in natural abundance. Spectra are also obtained for the analogous three species formed using deuterium fluoride. Analysis of the spectra provides rotational and hyperfine constants that are used, in combination with information from the analogous complex, 1,1-difluoroethylene-acetylene, to determine a structure for CH2CF2-HF. This structure is similar to that obtained for vinyl fluoride-HF [G. C. Cole and A. C. Legon, Chem. Phys. Lett. 400, 419 (2004)] in that a primary, hydrogen bonding interaction exists between the HF donor and a F atom acceptor on the 1,1-difluoroethylene moiety, while a secondary interaction occurs between the F atom on the HF molecule and the H atom cis to the hydrogen-bonded F atom on the substituted ethylene and causes the hydrogen bond to deviate from linearity. A comparison of the structures of 1,1-difluoroethylene complexes with the protic acids HF, HCl, and HCCH demonstrates that the hydrogen bond length increases with decreasing gas-phase acid strength, whereas a comparison of HF complexes with vinyl fluoride, 1,1-difluoroethylene, and 1,1,2-trifluoroethylene indicates that the nucleophilicity of the F atoms decreases with increasing fluorine substitution, but that the secondary interaction length is remarkably similar in all three complexes.

  5. On-line flow injection solid sample introduction, leaching and potentiometric determination of fluoride in phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Sweileh, Jamal A

    2007-01-01

    A flow injection method with on-line solid sample dissolution was developed for the determination of fluoride in phosphate rock. The fluoride was selectively leached (98-102.4 % recovery) from a 50-mg powdered phosphate rock sample with 0.50 M citric acid. Using the zone sampling technique the fluoride in the buffered leachate was determined by injecting 87 muL into the carrier stream using a fluoride ion-selective electrode detector. The sensing element of the electrode was housed in a home-made sleeve-type flow-through cell. On-line solid sample digestion with 0.50 M citric acid at 55 degrees C resulted in minimum dissolution of interfering iron and aluminum ions with improved accuracy and calibration linearity. The incorporation of relatively high level of fluoride in the carrier stream (40 microg mL(-1)) facilitated the determination of high levels of fluoride in phosphate rock (up to 4.1%) with out the need for excessive on-line dilution. The optimized flow system was applied for the determination of fluoride in phosphate rocks samples and a reference material at a rate of nine samples per hour with a relative standard deviation (n=5) of 2.95-4.0 %. Comparison of the proposed flow injection method with the standard method, which involves steam distillation from sulfuric acid solution and manual titration with thorium nitrate, showed no evidence of bias at the 95% confidence level. PMID:17386441

  6. A new vapor-liquid equilibrium apparatus for hydrogen fluoride containing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jongcheon Lee; Hwayong Kim; Jong Sung Lim; Jae-Duck Kim; Youn Yong Lee

    1996-12-31

    A new circulating type apparatus has been constructed to obtain reliable equilibrium PTxy data for hydrogen fluoride (HF) containing system. Equilibrium cell with Pyrex windows protected by Teflon PFA sheets to prevent the corrosion was used. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a) + HF system at 288.23 and 298.35 K were obtained, and compared with PTx measurement results. Experimental data were correlated using Lencka and Anderko equation of state for HF with the Wong-Sandler mixing rule as well as the van der Waals one fluid mixing rule. The Wong-Sandler mixing rule gives better results. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Effectiveness of water spray mitigation systems for accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Accidental releases of pressurized, superheated hydrogen fluoride (HF) can result in initially dense clouds which will typically contain a mixture of HF vapor, aerosol, and droplets. Previous experiments were performed by Amoco Oil Company and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (the Goldfish series in 1986) to study atmospheric dispersion of these HF clouds. The present study examines the effect of water application on the mitigation of these clouds. To assess the effectiveness of water application (via either sprays or monitor) in mitigating HF clouds two series of tests were conducted in separate flow chambers. Bench scale experiments identified key variables for testing in a larger facility. The larger scale field tests demonstrated that HF releases can be mitigated with water. The impact of numerous design variables on mitigation effectiveness has also been quantified. HF removal efficiencies of 25 to 90+% have been demonstrated at water to HF liquid ratios of 6/1 to 40/1 and higher.

  8. Effectiveness of water spray mitigation systems for accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Accidental releases of pressurized, superheated hydrogen fluoride (HF) can result in initially dense clouds which will typically contain a mixture of HF vapor, aerosol, and droplets. Previous experiments were performed by Amoco Oil Company and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (the Goldfish series in 1986) to study atmospheric dispersion of these HF clouds. The present study examines the effect of water application on the mitigation of these clouds. To assess the effectiveness of water application (via either sprays or monitor) in mitigating HF clouds two series of tests were conducted in separate flow chambers. Bench scale experiments identified key variables for testing in larger scale field tests demonstrated that HF releases can be mitigated with water. The impact of numerous design variables on mitigation effectiveness has also been quantified. HF removal efficiencies of 25 to 90+% have been demonstrated at water to HF liquid ratios of 6/1 to 40/1 and higher. 8 refs., 69 figs., 50 tabs.

  9. Effectiveness of water spray mitigation systems for accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Accidental release of pressurized, superheated hydrogen fluoride (HF) can result in initially dense clouds which will typically contain a mixture of HF vapor, aerosol, and droplets. Previous experiments were performed by Amoco Oil Company and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (the Goldfish series in 1986) to study atmospheric dispersion of these HF clouds. The present study examines the effect of water application on the mitigation of these clouds. To assess the effectiveness of water application (via either sprays or monitor) in mitigating HF clouds two series of tests were conducted in separate flow chambers. Bench scale experiments identified key variables for testing in a larger facility. The larger scale field tests demonstrated that HF releases can be mitigated with water. The impact of numerous design variables on mitigation effectiveness has also been quantified. HF removal efficiencies of 25 to 90+% have been demonstrated at water to HF liquid ratios of 6/1 to 40/1 and higher.

  10. Effectiveness of water spray mitigation systems for accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Accidental release of pressurized, superheated hydrogen fluoride (HF) can result in initially dense clouds which will typically contain a mixture of HF vapor, aerosol, and droplets. Previous studies experiments were performed by Amoco Oil Company and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (the Goldfish series in 1986) to study atmospheric dispersion of these HF clouds. The present study examines the effect of water application on the mitigation of these clouds. To assess the effectiveness of water application (via either sprays or monitor) in mitigating HF clouds two series of tests were conducted in separate flow chambers. Bench scale experiments identified key variables for testing in a larger facility. The large scale field tests demonstrated that HF releases can be mitigated with water. The impact of numerous design variables on mitigation effectiveness has also been quantified. HF removal efficiencies of 25 to 90+% have been demonstrated at water to HF liquid ratios of 6/1 to 40/1 and higher.

  11. Effectiveness of water spray mitigation systems for accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, D.E. . Fluid Mechanics and Wind Engineering Lab.)

    1989-06-01

    Accidental releases of pressurized, superheated hydrogen fluoride (HF) can result in initially dense clouds which will typically contain a mixture of HF vapor, aerosol, and droplets. Previous experiments were performed by Amoco Oil Company and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (the Goldfish series in 1986) to study atmospheric dispersion of these HF clouds. The present study examines the effect of water application on the mitigation of these clouds. To assess the effectiveness of water application (via either sprays or monitor) in mitigating HF clouds two series of tests were conducted in separate flow chambers. Bench scale experiments identified key variables for testing in a larger facility. The large scale field tests demonstrated that HF releases can be mitigated with water. The impact of numerous design variables on mitigation effectiveness has also been quantified. HF removal efficiencies of 25 to 90+% have been demonstrated at water to HF liquid ratios of 6/1 to 40/1 and higher.

  12. Protic Acid Hydrogen Bonding in Chlorofluoroethylenes: the Hydrogen Fluoride-Vinyl Chloride Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Helen O.; Marshall, Mark D.

    2012-06-01

    Our studies of intermolecular complexes formed in the gas phase between protic acids (HX) and chlorofluoroethylene complexes to date have demonstrated a preference for HX binding to a F atom over hydrogen bond formation with the Cl atom. Ab initio calculations suggest that this may not be true for species with an increased degree of halogen substitution on the ethylene. To characterize the nature of hydrogen bond formation with the less electronegative, but more polarizable Cl atom, we have obtained the microwave spectrum of HF-vinyl chloride complex. Analysis of the spectra for the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopologues demonstrate that the complex is planar and provides structural parameters for this species. This allows comparisons to be made between the HX hydrogen bond to Cl and that to F.

  13. Microwave spectrum and molecular structure of the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene-hydrogen fluoride complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Helen O.; Marshall, Mark D.; Bozzi, Aaron T.; Cohen, Paul M.; Lam, Mable

    2011-05-01

    Guided by ab initio calculations, Fourier transform microwave spectra in the 8-22 GHz region are obtained for six isotopomers of the complex formed between 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene and hydrogen fluoride. These include both 35Cl- and 37Cl-containing CH 2CClF with HF and DF, as well as 13CH 2C 35ClF and CH 213C 35ClF with HF. Analysis of the spectra determines the rotational constants, the complete chlorine quadrupole hyperfine coupling tensors in both the inertial and principal electric field gradient axis systems, and where appropriate, the diagonal components of the deuterium quadrupole coupling tensors. Spin-spin hyperfine structure is resolved and analyzed for CH 2C 35ClF-HF and CH 2C 37ClF-HF. The inertial information contained in the rotational constants combined with the HF and DF hyperfine interaction constants provides the structure for CH 2CClF-HF: a primary, hydrogen bonding interaction existing between the HF donor and the F atom acceptor on the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene moiety, while a secondary interaction occurs between the fluorine atom on the HF molecule and the H atom cis to the hydrogen-bonded F atom on the substituted ethylene, which causes the hydrogen bond to deviate from linearity. This is analogous to the structure obtained for 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene-acetylene [H.O. Leung, M.D. Marshall, D.D. Grimes, J. Chem. Phys. 134 (2011) 034303] and similar to that of 1,1-difluoroethylene-HF [H.O. Leung, M.D. Marshall, T.L. Drake, T. Pudlik, N. Savji, D.W. McCune, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 204301], and indeed as with the acetylene complexes, to within experimental uncertainty, the intermolecular interactions in CH 2CClF-HF and its 1,1-difluoroethylene counterpart are practically indistinguishable.

  14. DISCOVERY OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN THE CLOVERLEAF QUASAR AT z = 2.56

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Emprechtinger, M.; Peng, R.; Neufeld, D. A.

    2011-12-15

    We report the first detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) toward a high-redshift quasar. Using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, we detect the HF J = 1-0 transition in absorption toward the Cloverleaf, a broad absorption line quasi-stellar object at z = 2.56. The detection is statistically significant at the {approx}6{sigma} level. We estimate a lower limit of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for the HF column density and using a previous estimate of the hydrogen column density, we obtain a lower limit of 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} for the HF abundance. This value suggests that, assuming a Galactic N(HF)/N{sub H} ratio, HF accounts for at least {approx}10% of the fluorine in the gas phase along the line of sight to the Cloverleaf quasar. This observation corroborates the prediction that HF should be a good probe of the molecular gas at high redshift. Measurements of the HF abundance as a function of redshift are urgently needed to better constrain the fluorine nucleosynthesis mechanism(s).

  15. Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and molecular structure of the 1,1-difluoroethylene-hydrogen fluoride complex.

    PubMed

    Leung, Helen O; Marshall, Mark D; Drake, Tasha L; Pudlik, Tadeuz; Savji, Nazir; McCune, Daniel W

    2009-11-28

    Fourier transform microwave rotation spectra in the 7-21 GHz region are obtained for the complex formed between 1,1-difluoroethylene and hydrogen fluoride, including the normal isotopomer and two singly substituted (13)C species obtained in natural abundance. Spectra are also obtained for the analogous three species formed using deuterium fluoride. Analysis of the spectra provides rotational and hyperfine constants that are used, in combination with information from the analogous complex, 1,1-difluoroethylene-acetylene, to determine a structure for CH(2)CF(2)-HF. This structure is similar to that obtained for vinyl fluoride-HF [G. C. Cole and A. C. Legon, Chem. Phys. Lett. 400, 419 (2004)] in that a primary, hydrogen bonding interaction exists between the HF donor and a F atom acceptor on the 1,1-difluoroethylene moiety, while a secondary interaction occurs between the F atom on the HF molecule and the H atom cis to the hydrogen-bonded F atom on the substituted ethylene and causes the hydrogen bond to deviate from linearity. A comparison of the structures of 1,1-difluoroethylene complexes with the protic acids HF, HCl, and HCCH demonstrates that the hydrogen bond length increases with decreasing gas-phase acid strength, whereas a comparison of HF complexes with vinyl fluoride, 1,1-difluoroethylene, and 1,1,2-trifluoroethylene indicates that the nucleophilicity of the F atoms decreases with increasing fluorine substitution, but that the secondary interaction length is remarkably similar in all three complexes. PMID:19947674

  16. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC. VOLUME 1. CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE (SCAQMD) (SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual summarizes technical information that will assist in identifying and controlling hydrogen fluoride release hazards specific to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) of southern California. The SCAQMD has considered a strategy for reducing the risk of...

  17. Performance of a tungsten-cerium fluoride sampling calorimeter in high-energy electron beam tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Bianchini, L.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Donega, M.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, M.; Lope, C. Jorda; Meridiani, P.; Nuccetelli, M.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Rahatlou, S.; Soffi, L.; Brianza, L.; Govoni, P.; Martelli, A.; Fatis, T. Tabarelli de; Monti, V.; Pastrone, N.; Trapani, P. P.; Candelise, V.; Ricca, G. Della

    2015-12-01

    A prototype for a sampling calorimeter made out of cerium fluoride crystals interleaved with tungsten plates, and read out by wavelength-shifting fibres, has been exposed to beams of electrons with energies between 20 and 150 GeV, produced by the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerator complex. The performance of the prototype is presented and compared to that of a GEANT4 simulation of the apparatus. Particular emphasis is given to the response uniformity across the channel front face, and to the prototype's energy resolution.

  18. Hydrogen fluoride toward luminous nearby galaxies: NGC 253 and NGC 4945

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Lord, S.; Falgarone, E.; Güsten, R.

    2014-04-10

    We present the detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in two luminous nearby galaxies, NGC 253 and NGC 4945 using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The HF line toward NGC 253 has a P-Cygni profile, while an asymmetric absorption profile is seen toward NGC 4945. The P-Cygni profile in NGC 253 suggests an outflow of molecular gas with a mass of M(H{sub 2}){sub out} ∼ 1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} and an outflow rate as large as M-dot ∼6.4 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In the case of NGC 4945, the axisymmetric velocity components in the HF line profile are compatible with the interpretation of a fast-rotating nuclear ring surrounding the nucleus and the presence of inflowing gas. The gas falls into the nucleus with an inflow rate of ≤1.2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, inside an inner radius of ≤200 pc. The gas accretion rate to the central active galactic nucleus is much smaller, suggesting that the inflow may be triggering a nuclear starburst. From these results, the HF J = 1-0 line is seen to provide an important probe of the kinematics of absorbing material along the sight-line to nearby galaxies with bright dust continuum and a promising new tracer of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies.

  19. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazack, Michael J. M.; Gao, Jiali

    2014-05-01

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points.

  20. Estimation of potential health effects from acute exposure to hydrogen fluoride using a "benchmark dose" approach.

    PubMed

    Alexeeff, G V; Lewis, D C; Ragle, N L

    1993-02-01

    Communities across the United States are examining the manufacture, use, transport, and storage of hydrogen fluoride (HF) near residential areas as a consequence of a major release of HF in Texas in 1987. Reference exposure levels for routine and accidental HF emissions are calculated using existing animal and human data. The approach employs a log-probit extrapolation of concentration-response data to the 95% lower confidence limit on the toxic concentration producing a "benchmark dose" of 1% response (TC01), called a practical threshold. Species-specific and chemical-specific adjustment factors are applied to develop exposure levels applicable to the general public. Using this method, the 1-hr reference exposure level to protect the public against any irritation from a routine emission (REL-1) is 0.7 ppm and the level to protect against severe irritation from a once-in-a-lifetime (REL-2) release is 2 ppm. This approach is compared to a modified "uncertainty factor" approach. PMID:8451461

  1. Effectiveness of water spray mitigation systems for accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, K.W. ); Koopman, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Accidental releases of pressurized, superheated hydrogen fluoride (HF) can result in initially dense clouds which will typically contain a mixture of HF vapor, aerosol, and droplets. Previous experiments were performed by Amoco Oil Company and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (the Goldfish series in 1986) to study atmospheric dispersion of these HF clouds. The present study examines the effect of water application on the mitigation of these clouds. To assess the effectiveness of water application (via either sprays or monitor) in mitigating HF clouds two series of tests were conducted in separate flow chambers. Bench scale experiments identified key variables for testing in a larger facility. The larger scale field tests demonstrated that HF releases can be mitigated with water. The impact of numerous design variables on mitigation effectiveness has also been quantified. HF removal efficiencies of 25 to 90+% have been demonstrated at water to HF liquid ratios of 6/1 to 40/1 and higher. 6 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Effectiveness of water spray mitigation systems for accidental releases of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Holve, D.J.; Harvill, T.L. )

    1989-06-01

    Accidental release of pressurized, superheated hydrogen fluoride (HF) can result in initially dense clouds which will typically contain a mixture of HF vapor, aerosol, and droplets. Previous experiments were performed by Amoco Oil Company and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (the Goldfish series in 1986) to study atmospheric dispersion of these HF clouds. The present study examines the effect of water application on the mitigation of these clouds. To assess the effectiveness of water application (via either sprays or monitor) in mitigating HF clouds two series of tests were conducted in separate flow chambers. Bench scale experiments identified key variables for testing in a larger facility. The larger scale field tests demonstrated that HF releases can be mitigated with water. The impact of numerous design variables on mitigation effectiveness has also been quantified. HF removal efficiencies of 25 to 90+% have been demonstrated at water to HF liquid rates of 6/1 to 40/1 and higher. 8 refs., 69 figs., 50 tabs.

  3. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Mazack, Michael J. M.; Gao, Jiali

    2014-05-28

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points.

  4. Hydrogen Fluoride toward Luminous Nearby Galaxies: NGC 253 and NGC 4945

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monje, R. R.; Lord, S.; Falgarone, E.; Lis, D. C.; Neufeld, D. A.; Phillips, T. G.; Güsten, R.

    2014-04-01

    We present the detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in two luminous nearby galaxies, NGC 253 and NGC 4945 using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The HF line toward NGC 253 has a P-Cygni profile, while an asymmetric absorption profile is seen toward NGC 4945. The P-Cygni profile in NGC 253 suggests an outflow of molecular gas with a mass of M(H2)out ~ 1 × 107 M ⊙ and an outflow rate as large as dot M ~6.4 M ⊙ yr-1. In the case of NGC 4945, the axisymmetric velocity components in the HF line profile are compatible with the interpretation of a fast-rotating nuclear ring surrounding the nucleus and the presence of inflowing gas. The gas falls into the nucleus with an inflow rate of <=1.2 M ⊙ yr-1, inside an inner radius of <=200 pc. The gas accretion rate to the central active galactic nucleus is much smaller, suggesting that the inflow may be triggering a nuclear starburst. From these results, the HF J = 1-0 line is seen to provide an important probe of the kinematics of absorbing material along the sight-line to nearby galaxies with bright dust continuum and a promising new tracer of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies.

  5. The solution of the Wertheim association theory for molecular liquids: Application to hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, P. H.; Richardi, J.

    2000-11-01

    A general numerical method for solving the Wertheim association theory in the case of fully anisotropic polyatomic rigid molecules is proposed. In order to handle the nonspherical shapes of the molecules, the Wertheim association theory is combined with the rotational invariant approach of the molecular Ornstein-Zernike (MOZ) method. Therefore, this approach is called the WMOZ method. It is carried out in the association hypernetted chain (AHNC) approximation which is the only approximation and which consists of the neglect of the bridge functions. The method of solution is implemented by translating the set operations appearing in the Wertheim association theory into an algebraic formalism developed through a one-to-one correspondence between subsets and binary numbers. The Wertheim association theory is explicitly solved for hydrogen fluoride using two interaction site models. For these models, site-site distribution functions, internal excess energies, and dielectric constants obtained by the MOZ and WMOZ methods are compared to the exact molecular dynamics results. The WMOZ method strongly improves the structural description of the H bonding in comparison with the MOZ approximation. The quality of the dielectric and thermodynamic results obtained by the WMOZ approach is discussed in comparison with the simulation values. To our knowledge, this is the first solution of the Wertheim association theory for a liquid of particles of nonspherical shapes.

  6. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    PubMed Central

    Mazack, Michael J. M.; Gao, Jiali

    2014-01-01

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points. PMID:24880295

  7. Liquid-liquid equilibria for hydrogen fluoride + 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane at {minus}20 and 20 C

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1995-03-01

    1,1-Dichloro-1-fluoroethane is presently under consideration as a replacement for trichlorofluoromethane, which is widely used as a foam blowing agent. 1-Chloro-1,1-difluoroethane is the major raw material for the production of poly(vinylidene fluoride). These two materials are normally manufactured by the fluorination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane or vinylidene chloride with hydrogen fluoride. A phase separator is normally used to retrieve hydrogen fluoride from the product stream. To design the phase separator, liquid-liquid equilibrium data are required. Liquid-liquid equilibria for the ternary system (hydrogen fluoride + 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) have been measured at {minus}20 and 20 C. The results are correlated with the NRTL model, and the relevant parameters are presented.

  8. Detection of hydrogen fluoride absorption in diffuse molecular clouds with Herschel/HIFI: an ubiquitous tracer of molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentrucker, P.; Neufeld, D. A.; Phillips, T. G.; Gerin, M.; Lis, D. C.; de Luca, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Black, J. H.; Bell, T. A.; Boulanger, F.; Cernicharo, J.; Coutens, A.; Dartois, E.; Kaźmierczak, M.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Geballe, T. R.; Giesen, T.; Godard, B.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Gry, C.; Gupta, H.; Hennebelle, P.; Herbst, E.; Hily-Blant, P.; Joblin, C.; Kołos, R.; Krełowski, J.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Menten, K. M.; Monje, R.; Mookerjea, B.; Pearson, J.; Perault, M.; Persson, C. M.; Plume, R.; Salez, M.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmidt, M.; Stutzki, J.; Teyssier, D.; Vastel, C.; Yu, S.; Caux, E.; Güsten, R.; Hatch, W. A.; Klein, T.; Mehdi, I.; Morris, P.; Ward, J. S.

    2010-10-01

    We discuss the detection of absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride (HF) along the sight line to the submillimeter continuum sources W49N and W51. We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument in dual beam switch mode to observe the 1232.4762 GHz J = 1-0 HF transition in the upper sideband of the band 5a receiver. We detected foreground absorption by HF toward both sources over a wide range of velocities. Optically thin absorption components were detected on both sight lines, allowing us to measure - as opposed to obtain a lower limit on - the column density of HF for the first time. As in previous observations of HF toward the source G10.6-0.4, the derived HF column density is typically comparable to that of water vapor, even though the elemental abundance of oxygen is greater than that of fluorine by four orders of magnitude. We used the rather uncertain N(CH)-N(H2) relationship derived previously toward diffuse molecular clouds to infer the molecular hydrogen column density in the clouds exhibiting HF absorption. Within the uncertainties, we find that the abundance of HF with respect to H2 is consistent with the theoretical prediction that HF is the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine for these clouds. Thus, hydrogen fluoride has the potential to become an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen, and provides a sensitive probe of clouds of small H2 column density. Indeed, the observations of hydrogen fluoride reported here reveal the presence of a low column density diffuse molecular cloud along the W51 sight line, at an LSR velocity of ~24 km s-1, that had not been identified in molecular absorption line studies prior to the launch of Herschel. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. Fluoride sample matrices and reaction cells — new capabilities for isotope measurements in accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieser, W. E.; Zhao, X.-L.; Eliades, J.; Litherland, A. E.

    2012-04-01

    Two new techniques, which extend the range of elements that can be analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), and which increase its isobar selection capabilities, have been recently introduced. The first consists of embedding the sample material in a fluoride matrix (e.g. PbF2), which facilitates the production, in the ion source, of fluoride molecular anions that include the isotope of interest. In addition to forming anions with large electron binding energies and thereby increasing the range of analysable elements, in many cases by selection of a molecular form with a particular number of fluorine atoms, some isobar discrimination can be obtained. The second technique, for the significant reduction of atomic isobar interferences, is used following mass selection of the rare isotope. It consists of the deceleration, cooling and reaction of the rare mass beam with a gas, selected so that unwanted isobars are greatly attenuated in comparison with the isotope of interest. Proof of principle measurements for the analysis of 36C1 and 41Ca have provided encouraging results and work is proceeding on the integration of these techniques in a new AMS system planned for installation in late 2012 at the University of Ottawa.

  10. Graph theoretical enumeration of topology-distinct structures for hydrogen fluoride clusters (HF)n (n ≤ 6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelil, Mahmutjan; Abaydulla, Alimjan

    2015-07-01

    A graph theoretical procedure to generate all the possible topology-distinct structures for hydrogen fluoride (HF) clusters is presented in this work. The hydrogen bond matrix is defined and used to enumerate the topology-distinct structures of hydrogen fluoride (HF)n (n = 2-8) clusters. From close investigation of the structural patterns obtained, several restrictions that should be satisfied for a structure of the HF clusters to be stable are found. The corresponding digraphs of generated hydrogen bond matrices are used as the theoretical framework to obtain all the topology-distinct local minima for (HF)n (n ≤ 6), at the level of MP2/6-31G**(d, p) of ab initio MO method and B3LYP/6-31G**(d, p) of density functional theory method. For HF clusters up to tetramers, the local minimum structures that we generated are same as those in the literature. For HF pentamers and hexamers, we found some new local minima structures which had not been obtained previously.

  11. Sampling Stoichiometry: The Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide an interesting, quantitative illustration of the stoichiometric relationship between the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of oxygen gas. This 10-minute demonstration uses ordinary hydrogen peroxide and yeast that can be purchased in a supermarket.…

  12. Herschel Legacy Survey of Hydrogen Fluoride and Water Towards Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Monje, Raquel

    Hydride molecules, molecules containing just one heavy element atom with one or more hydrogen atoms, play an importance role in interstellar chemistry, as they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains theorized to form gas phase molecules. This makes hydride molecules a sensitive test of these chemical models, as well as potential tracers of molecular hydrogen. Due to the low moment of inertia, hydrides have their fundamental rotational transitions in the submillimeter band, blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and in most cases, only accessible with the past NASA mission, Herschel Space Observatory. Two of the key results from Herschel observations are: the first detection of the fundamental J = 1 - 0 rotational transition of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at 1.232 THz (243 μm) and the discovery of HF's ubiquitous nature in the Milky Way. HF has not only been observed toward almost every bright continuum source in the Galactic plane, but also in some nearby ultra luminous galaxies, establishing its importance outside the Milky Way as well. Despite fluorine's (F) relative low abundance in the interstellar medium (ISM) (about four times lower than carbon), F plays an important role in the interstellar chemistry due to the unique thermochemistry of the reaction between F and molecular hydrogen (H2). F is the only atom that reacts exothermically with H2, to form the compound HF. Once formed, HF becomes the main reservoir of fluorine in the ISM, with a strong bond only destroyed by reactions with low abundance ions H3+, C+ and He+, or photodissociation. This unusual stability allows the build up of large amounts of HF in the ISM, which has now been confirmed by Herschel. Chemical model predicted that the ground state rotational transition line of HF J = 1 - 0 would yield an extremely sensitive probe of the diffuse molecular gas along the line-of-sight to background far-infrared continuum sources and a

  13. Validation of hydrogen fluoride measurements made by the Halogen Occultation Experiment from the UARS platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, James M.; Deaver, Lance E.; Luo, Mingzhao; Cicerone, Ralph J.; Park, Jae H.; Gordley, Larry L.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Gunson, Michael R.; Traub, Wesley A.; Johnson, David G.; Jucks, Kenneth W.; Zander, Rudolph; Nolt, Ira G.

    1996-04-01

    The hydrogen fluoride (HF) molecule is important as a tracer and for study of chlorine input to the stratosphere due to CFC's. This paper describes the characteristics of and data from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) HF channel, including steps taken to validate the results. The on-orbit precision of the HF measurements is shown to be better than 0.04 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 0.06 ppbv throughout the stratosphere. The estimated accuracy is 14% to 27% depending on altitude. The internal consistency of the HF measurements is excellent as judged by sunrise/sunset differences and comparison with HALOE CH4 distributions. The mean difference between HALOE HF and correlative balloon underflight measurements is <7% from 5 mbar to 50 mbar. Comparisons with the shuttle ATLAS 1 Atmospheric Trace Molecules Observed by Spectroscopy (ATMOS) data are not as good and there is a systematic difference between HALOE (smaller) and ATMOS (larger) ranging from 10% to 20% at altitudes above the 10-mbar pressure level. Differences with ATMOS reach as much as 40% or more below the 10-mbar level. The larger differences in this region are believed to be due to dynamical influences on HF coupled with wide separations in space and time between HALOE and ATMOS measurements. Analysis of HALOE HF pressure versus longitude cross sections shows that obtaining close space and time coincidence can be very important in comparing tracer distributions. Typical characteristics of a pressure versus latitude cross section and polar orthographic projection are also discussed. Comparisons with latitudinal distributions of tracer measurements from previous experiments show similar features like the tropical double minimum due to the semiannual oscillation. All comparisons and analyses conducted provide good confidence in the validity of the HALOE HF results.

  14. Isothermal compressibility maxima of hydrogen fluoride in the supercritical and superheated vapor regions.

    PubMed

    Baburao, Barath; Visco, Donald P

    2006-12-28

    The highly nonideal behavior of hydrogen fluoride (HF) vapor has been considered to be the origin of its numerous vapor phase anomalies. In this work, we report one such potential vapor phase anomaly for HF. For a nonassociating substance like propane, the response functions go through a maximum only once in the supercritical region. However, for HF, when an association model is used to predict the isothermal compressibility (KT), it exhibits a maximum in the supercritical region more than once, and this peak extends well in to the superheated vapor region upon decompression. This theoretical prediction is also supported by two other models recently developed for HF. Note that experimental values of KT for HF have not been reported in the literature so far. Preliminary investigations on this KT maximum for HF have suggested no reentrant spinodal, singularity-free scenario, or any additional first-order phase transition, unlike water, and, also, no lambda (or higher-order phase) transitions, unlike liquid helium. However, this KT peak is similar to the experimentally supported heat capacity (CP) peak of HF which extends into the supercritical and superheated vapor regions. Similar to the CP peak, which is understood based on vapor-phase clustering in HF, we relate KT to the derivatives of enthalpy and entropy of the system. Also, we analyze some of the P-v-T experimental data that are available to provide an overview of the KT behavior in the region of interest, and compare them with the model results. Finally, to explore the effect of including a distribution pattern for the oligomers, we report the results on a model that only includes association. Using this approach, we report KT results with and without a Poisson-type oligomer distribution and show that the KT appears once this distribution scheme is specified. PMID:17181277

  15. Spectroscopic evidence for medium controlled hydrogen bond inhibition of resonance delocalization of charge in complexes of tetrabutylammonium fluoride with phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James H.; Cork, David G.; Tinsdale, Julie A.

    Infrared spectra of tetrabutylammonium fluoride complexes of both 4-cyanophenol and methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate but not 3-cyanophenol reveal the presence of two distinct types of hydrogen bond corresponding to charge localized and partially charge delocalized forms. The latter only occur in polar aprotic protophilic solvents at low temperatures. The activation energies for the interconversion of the two forms reflect the relative abilities of the two groups to delocalize charge through resonance. The chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of the complexes are also medium dependent although the precise nature of this medium dependence is less easily understood.

  16. Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and molecular structure of the trans-1,2-difluoroethylene-hydrogen fluoride complex.

    PubMed

    Leung, Helen O; Marshall, Mark D; Amberger, Brent K

    2009-11-28

    Guided by ab initio calculations, Fourier transform microwave rotation spectra in the 6.5-22 GHz region are obtained for the complex formed between trans-1,2-difluoroethylene and hydrogen fluoride, including the normal isotopomer and two singly substituted (13)C species in natural abundance. Spectra are also obtained for the analogous three species formed using deuterium fluoride. Analysis of the spectra provides rotational and hyperfine constants that are used to determine a structure for trans-CHFCHF-HF. This structure is similar to that obtained for 1,1-difluoroethylene-HF [H. O. Leung et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 204301 (2009)] in that a primary, hydrogen bonding interaction exists between the HF donor and a F atom acceptor on the 1,2-difluoroethylene moiety, while a secondary interaction occurs between the F atom on the HF molecule and the H atom cis to the hydrogen-bonded F atom on the substituted ethylene and causes the hydrogen bond to deviate from linearity. Because the two F atoms and the two H atoms in trans-1,2-difluoroethylene form electrostatically equivalent pairs, the structure of the complex with HF provides insight into the contribution of steric effects to the observed geometries of fluoroethylene-protic acid complexes. A comparison of the observed hydrogen bond lengths and deviations from linearity in 1,1-difluoroethylene-HF and trans-1,2-difluoroethylene-HF suggests that the F atoms in trans-1,2-difluoroethylene are more nucleophilic than those in 1,1-difluoroethylene and that the H atoms are similarly more acidic. Ab initio calculations of electrostatic potentials mapped onto total electron density surfaces for these two molecules support these conclusions. PMID:19947675

  17. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    PubMed

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3 < 7 mm) and 35% had severe periodontal breakdown (CAL > 7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. PMID:25280920

  18. Ab Initio Calculations of Anharmonic Vibrational Spectroscopy for Hydrogen Fluoride (HF)n (n=3,4) and Mixed Hydrogen Fluoride/Water (HF)n(H20)n (n=1,2,4) Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities are computed for hydrogen fluoride clusters (HF)n with n=3,4 and mixed clusters of hydrogen fluoride with water (HF)n(H2O)n where n=1,2. For the (HF)4(H2O)4 complex, the vibrational spectra are calculated at the harmonic level, and anharmonic effects are estimated. Potential energy surfaces for these systems are obtained at the MP2/TZP level of electronic structure theory. Vibrational states are calculated from the potential surface points using the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field (CC-VSCF) method. The method accounts for the anharmonicities and couplings between all vibrational modes and provides fairly accurate anharmonic vibrational spectra that can be directly compared with experimental results without a need for empirical scaling. For (HF)n, good agreement is found with experimental data. This agreement shows that the MP2 potential surfaces for these systems are reasonably reliable. The accuracy is best for the stiff intramolecular modes, which indicates the validity of MP2 in describing coupling between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom. For (HF)n(H2O)n experimental results are unavailable. The computed intramolecular frequencies show a strong dependence on cluster size. Intensity features are predicted for future experiments.

  19. Ab initio calculations of anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy for hydrogen fluoride (HF)n (n = 3, 4) and mixed hydrogen fluoride/water (HF)n(H2O)n (n = 1, 2, 4) clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Gerber, R. Benny

    2002-01-01

    Anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities are computed for hydrogen fluoride clusters (HF)n, with n = 3, 4 and mixed clusters of hydrogen fluoride with water (HF)n(H2O)n where n = 1, 2. For the (HF)4(H2O)4 complex, the vibrational spectra are calculated at the harmonic level, and anharmonic effects are estimated. Potential energy surfaces for these systems are obtained at the MP2/TZP level of electronic structure theory. Vibrational states are calculated from the potential surface points using the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field method. The method accounts for the anharmonicities and couplings between all vibrational modes and provides fairly accurate anharmonic vibrational spectra that can be directly compared with experimental results without a need for empirical scaling. For (HF)n, good agreement is found with experimental data. This agreement shows that the Moller-Plesset (MP2) potential surfaces for these systems are reasonably reliable. The accuracy is best for the stiff intramolecular modes, which indicates the validity of MP2 in describing coupling between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom. For (HF)n(H2O)n experimental results are unavailable. The computed intramolecular frequencies show a strong dependence on cluster size. Intensity features are predicted for future experiments.

  20. Sensitive determination of fluoride in biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Myung; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2014-12-10

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method was developed in this study in order to determine fluoride in plasma and urine after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene. 2-Fluoronaphthalene was chosen as the internal standard. The derivatization of fluoride was performed in the biological sample and the best reaction conditions (10.0 mg mL(-1) of 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene, 1.0 mg mL(-1) of 15-crown-5-ether as a phase transfer catalyst, pH of 7.0, reaction temperature of 70°C, and heating time of 70 min) were established. The organic derivative was extracted with dichloromethane and then measured by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Under the established condition, the detection limits were 11 μg L(-1) and 7 μg L(-1) by using 0.2 mL of plasma or urine, respectively. The accuracy was in a range of 100.8-107.6%, and the precision of the assay was less than 4.3% in plasma or urine. Fluoride was detected in a concentration range of 0.12-0.53 mg L(-1) in six urine samples after intake of natural mineral water containing 0.7 mg L(-1) of fluoride. PMID:25441893

  1. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hof, Martin

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H2O with D2O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H2O and D2O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H2O/D2O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H2O and D2O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl(-) and F(-). PMID:25494787

  2. Rotationally resolved spectroscopy of a librational fundamental band of hydrogen fluoride tetramer

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Thomas A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2000-07-08

    The rotationally resolved spectrum of a fundamental band of hydrogen fluoride tetramer has been recorded using a pulsed slit-jet, diode laser spectrometer. The band has a parallel rotational structure and is assigned as the H-F out-of-plane libration fundamental with A{sub u} symmetry. Ninety-five ground state combination differences were fit to a symmetric top Hamiltonian to give the following ground state rotational constants: B{sup ''}=0.132 081(7) cm{sup -1}, D{sub J}{sup ''}=7.1(7)x10{sup -7} cm{sup -1}, D{sub JK}{sup ''}=-9(2)x10{sup -7} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JJJ}{sup ''}=6(2)x10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JJK}{sup ''}=9(7)x10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JKK}{sup ''}=-1.3(8)x10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}. A total of 190 transitions were fit to determine the upper state spectroscopic constants: v{sub 4}=714.7849(1) cm{sup -1}, B{sup '}=0.129 634(5) cm{sup -1}, {delta}(C-B)=0.001 344 cm{sup -1}, D{sub J}{sup '}=6.4(5)x10{sup -7} cm{sup -1}, D{sub JK}{sup '}=-4.5(6)x10{sup -7} cm{sup -1}, {delta}D{sub K}=2.92(8)x10{sup -6} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JJJ}{sup '}=3(1)x10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JKK}{sup '}=-1.55(6)x10{sup -8} cm{sup -1}; {delta}H{sub KKK}=-4.65(6)x10{sup -8} cm{sup -1}. Furthermore, a perpendicular band centered at 752.7 cm{sup -1} was observed. The band has a rotational line spacing that gives an approximate B{sup ''} value of 0.132 cm{sup -1}; it has been assigned as the E{sub u} symmetry, H-F in-plane libration fundamental of the HF tetramer. Finally, a parallel band was observed at 741.0 cm{sup -1} with B{sup ''}=0.076 cm{sup -1} and has been assigned as the A{sup ''} symmetry, H-F out-of-plane libration fundamental of the HF pentamer. Structural parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are estimated from first-principles, correlated MP2 and CCSD(T) calculations. These are the largest calculations performed to date for this system with respect to both orbital basis set and level of electron correlation. The CCSD(T) harmonic frequencies are, in particular

  3. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on water relations and photosynthesis in White Pine (Pinus strobus) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, K.J.; Zwiazek, J.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Transpiration, photosynthesis, water potential components and tissue fluoride concentrations were determined in mildly drought stressed 9-week-old seedlings fumigated with HF. Only those seedlings which showed no visible signs of fluoride injury were selected for the measurements. Photosynthesis decreased after 1 and 7 days of fumigation with 2, 4 and 20 ppb HF. A decrease in the transpiration rates has been observed after 2, 7 and 22 days of 0.5 ppb HF treatment and after 2 days of 2 ppb HF treatment. The same treatments which reduced transpiration rates resulted in an increase in osmotic potentials and water potentials. Possible mechanism of HF-induced alterations in seedling water relations by altering stomatal movements is discussed.

  4. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1980-10-01

    Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  5. Continuous measurement of peak hydrogen fluoride exposures in aluminum smelter potrooms: instrument development and in-plant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dando, Neal; Xu, Weizong; Peace, Jon Nathaniel

    2008-02-01

    The aluminum smelting process continuously evolves both sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gases. The vast majority of these evolved gases are captured by local exhaust ventilation systems and transported to fume treatment centers. Any gas escaping the ventilation systems could create the potential for workplace exposures. Currently, there are no commercially available sensors that are capable of selectively measuring peak concentrations (< 10 sec) of HF in the presence of SO2. This measurement capability is critical for facilitating a better understanding of the etiology of respiratory health effects. This article presents the development and in-plant testing of a portable, tunable diode-based HF sensor that shows equivalent or improved performance relative to NIOSH Method 7902 and is capable of measuring short-term personal peak HF exposure potentials in operating aluminum smelters. PMID:18074293

  6. HYDROGEN CONCENTRATIONS DURING STORAGE OF 3013 OXIDE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S.; Askew, N.; Laurinat, J.

    2011-03-14

    As part of a surveillance program intended to ensure the safe storage of plutonium bearing nuclear materials in the Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS), samples of these materials are shipped to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. These samples are in the form of solids or powders which will have absorbed moisture. Potentially flammable hydrogen gas is generated due to radiolysis of the moisture. The samples are shipped for processing after chemical analysis. To preclude the possibility of a hydrogen deflagration or detonation inside the shipping containers, the shipping times are limited to ensure that hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of every layer of confinement is below the lower flammability limit of 4 volume percent (vol%). This study presents an analysis of the rate of hydrogen accumulation due to radiolysis and calculation of allowable shipping times for typical KAMS materials.

  7. Determining the Ground State Geometry of the (E)-1-CHLORO-1,2-DIFLUOROETHYLENE--HYDROGEN Fluoride Complex Using Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzi, Aaron T.; Leung, Helen O.; Marshall, Mark D.

    2010-06-01

    To better understand the effects of chlorine substitution on the intermolecular interactions between fluorinated ethylenes and linear, protic acids, the structure of the (E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene--hydrogen fluoride complex has been investigated via ab initio calculations and microwave spectroscopy. It was necessary first to determine an improved experimental structure of (E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene itself, and the rotational spectra of four isotopologues of this monomer have been obtained in the 6-21 GHz range using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy for this purpose. Ab initio calculations for the van der Waals complex with hydrogen fluoride, performed at the MP2 level of theory, predict that the lowest energy conformation is similar to that observed for the trifluoroethylene--HF dimer. Based on these predictions, rotational spectra of three isotopologues of the (E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene--hydrogen fluoride complex spanning 7-19 GHz are collected. Rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and chlorine quadrupole coupling constants are determined using a least-squares fitting program. The data obtained so far are consistent with a planar ground-state structure in which the HF molecule binds to the side of the substituted ethylene by forming a hydrogen bond to fluorine and a secondary interaction with the geminal hydrogen. H.O. Leung and M.D. Marshall, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 114310 (2007).

  8. Degradation in performance of orthodontic wires caused by hydrogen absorption during short-term immersion in 2.0% acidulated phosphate fluoride solution.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degradation in performance of four major alloys of orthodontic wires, namely nickel-titanium, beta titanium, stainless steel, and cobalt-chromium-nickel, caused by hydrogen absorption during short-term immersion in an acid fluoride solutions. The hydrogen-related degradation of orthodontic wires after immersion in 2.0% acidulated phosphate fluoride solution at 37 degrees C for 60 minutes was evaluated by a tensile test, scanning electron microscope observation, and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Upon immersion, the tensile strengths of the nickel-titanium and beta titanium wires decreased. Particularly, the nickel-titanium wire fractured before yielding, and the fracture mode changed from ductile to brittle. The amounts of absorbed hydrogen in the nickel-titanium and beta titanium wires were 200 and 100 mass ppm, respectively. On the other hand, the tensile strengths of the stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-nickel wires were only slightly affected by immersion. The results of this study suggest that degradation in performance of orthodontic wires of titanium alloys occurs because of hydrogen absorption even after a short-term immersion in fluoride solutions. PMID:15387026

  9. Urinary fluoride as an exposure index in aluminum smelting.

    PubMed

    Seixas, N S; Cohen, M; Zevenbergen, B; Cotey, M; Carter, S; Kaufman, J

    2000-01-01

    Urinary fluoride was evaluated as an exposure index for a prospective study of asthma in an aluminum smelter. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the relationship between airborne exposure and urinary excretion over a workweek, and to describe exposures among jobs and over time. Thirty-two subjects were evaluated on Days 1 and 3 of a 3-day workweek. On each day, spot urine samples were collected prior to the start of work and again at the end of the shift. Samples were analyzed for fluoride and expressed as milligrams fluoride per gram of creatinine. Airborne exposures to total particulate, fluoride particulate, and hydrogen fluoride (HF; using a 37-mm filter cassette containing a filter and treated back-up pad) were also evaluated on each subject. In the second study, postshift urine samples were collected from asthma study volunteers in three surveys extending over 1.5 years and analyzed for fluoride. Average airborne exposures were 15.7, 4.1, and 0.7 mg/m3 for particulates, particulate fluorides and HF, respectively, and were substantially higher among carbon setters than other workers. However, average urine fluorides among the same workers were reasonably low, 1.3 and 3.0 mg/g creatinine in pre- and postshift urine samples, respectively. Carbon setters, who routinely wore respiratory protection during high exposure periods, had urinary fluoride levels similar to those of other potroom personnel. A significant variation in dose, as expressed by postshift urinary fluoride levels, was observed between potroom and nonpotroom jobs and over three survey periods. These results suggest that postshift urinary fluorides provide a reasonable exposure index for surveillance of exposure levels for an epidemiologic study, and that a substantial variation of exposure occurs between jobs and over time. Although urinary fluorides may be used for exposure surveillance, additional details on individual exposure agents and patterns of exposure over time are required for

  10. Sample water removal method in volatile organic compound analysis based on diffusion through poly(vinyl fluoride) film.

    PubMed

    Beghi, Sandra; Guillot, Jean-Michel

    2006-09-15

    The humidity caught during air sampling or sample storage causes various problems during volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis and gives unreliable results. In this study, water vapour diffusion capacities through poly(vinyl fluoride) Tedlar, fluoroethylene propylene Teflon and Flex foil film were compared. A new approach to humidity removal has been tested for moderately polluted atmospheres. This approach consists in using the water vapour diffusion property of Tedlar film to remove humidity from bag samples containing a mixture of ten VOCs at 500 ppbv each in a 70% relative humidity atmosphere. The sampling bags were placed in a chamber flushed by a dry air stream at less than 5% relative humidity. After a few hours in the chamber, the samples in the Tedlar bags were dry (relative humidity <5%) and did not show significant VOC loss. This sample water removal (SWR) method is especially interesting as a pretreatment before air sampling on water sensitive adsorbents. PMID:16828784

  11. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  12. Process for converting magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, A.B.; Palmer, D.A.

    1984-12-21

    This invention is a process for the conversion of magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride whereby magnesium fluoride is decomposed by heating in the presence of calcium carbonate, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. Magnesium fluoride is a by-product of the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride to form uranium metal and has no known commercial use, thus its production creates a significant storage problem. The advantage of this invention is that the quality of calcium fluoride produced is sufficient to be used in the industrial manufacture of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, steel mill flux or ceramic applications.

  13. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H{sub 2}O with D{sub 2}O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl{sup −} and F{sup −}.

  14. Beam test results for a tungsten-cerium fluoride sampling calorimeter with wavelength-shifting fiber readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Candelise, V.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Della Ricca, G.; Diemoz, M.; del Re, D.; D'Imperio, G.; Dissertori, G.; Donegà, M.; Dröge, M.; Gelli, S.; Haller, C.; Jorda Lope, C.; Lustermann, W.; Martelli, A.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Quittnat, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Pastrone, N.; Pellegrino, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Schönenberger, M.; Soffi, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Vazzoler, F.

    2015-07-01

    A sampling calorimeter using cerium fluoride scintillating crystals as active material, interleaved with heavy absorber plates, and read out by wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers is being studied as a calorimeter option for detectors at the upgraded High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) collider at CERN. A prototype has been exposed to electron beams of different energies at the INFN Frascati (Italy) Beam Test Facility. This paper presents results from the studies performed on the prototype, such as signal amplitudes, light yield and energy resolution.

  15. Fluoride, hydrogen, and formate activate ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase formation in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Im, D S; Friedrich, C G

    1983-01-01

    Alcaligenes eutrophus formed ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase; EC 4.1.1.39) when grown on fructose. Addition of sodium fluoride (NaF) to fructose minimal medium resulted in a slightly decreased growth rate and a rapid fivefold increase in RuBPCase specific activity. With citrate, a glucogenic carbon source, RuBPCase was also formed, However, addition of NaF to cells growing on citrate resulted in a 50% decrease in RuBPCase specific activity. Among the enzymes of fructose catabolism, NaF (10 mM) inhibited enolase in vitro by 98% and gluconate 6-phosphate dehydratase by 87%. Inhibition of the dehydratase by NaF was insignificant in vivo, as determined with a mutant defective in phosphoglycerate mutase activity. Growth of this mutant on fructose was not inhibited by NaF, and only a minor increase in RuBPCase activity was observed. From these results, we concluded that the product of the enolase reaction, phosphoenolpyruvate, played a role in RuBPCase formation. Addition of H2 or formate to the wild type growing on fructose or citrate did not affect the growth rate but resulted in rapid formation of RuBPCase activity. Mutants impaired in H2 metabolism formed RuBPCase at a low rate during growth on fructose plus H2 but at a high rate on formate. Apparently, additional reductant from H2 or formate metabolism induced RuBPCase formation in A. eutrophus. PMID:6841316

  16. Evaluation of sorbent materials for the sampling and analysis of phosphine, sulfuryl fluoride and methyl bromide in air.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, R; Rittfeldt, L; Åstot, C

    2015-01-01

    Phosphine (PH3), sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) are highly toxic chemical substances commonly used for fumigation, i.e., pest control with gaseous pesticides. Residues of fumigation agents constitute a health risk for workers affected, and therefore accurate methods for air sampling and analysis are needed. In this study, three commercial adsorbent tubes; Carbosieve SIII™, Air Toxics™ and Tenax TA™, were evaluated for sampling these highly volatile chemicals in air and their subsequent analysis by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). The breakthrough volume (BTV) of each fumigant was experimentally determined on the different adsorbents at concentrations at or above their permissible exposure limits, using a method based on frontal chromatography of generated fumigant atmospheres. Carbosieve SIII™, a molecular sieve possessing a very high specific area, proved to be a better adsorbent than both Air Toxics™ and Tenax TA™, resulting in at least a 4-fold increase of the BTV50%. BTV50% for Carbosieve SIII™ at 20°C was measured as 4.7L/g, 5.5L/g and 126L/g for phosphine, sulfuryl fluoride and methyl bromide, respectively, implying safe sampling volumes of 1.9L, 2.2L and 50L, respectively, for a commercial tube packed with 800mg Carbosieve SIII™. The temperature dependence of BTV was strong for Carbosieve SIII™, showing a reduction of 3-5%/°C in breakthrough volume within the range -20 to 40°C. Furthermore, although Carbosieve SIII™ reportedly has a higher affinity for water than most other adsorbents, relative humidity had only a moderate influence on the retention capacity of phosphine. Overall, the applicability of Carbosieve SIII™ adsorbent sampling in combination with TD-GC-MS analysis was demonstrated for highly volatile fumigants. PMID:25512126

  17. Optimal Fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John R.

    1975-01-01

    Optimal fluoridation has been defined as that fluoride exposure which confers maximal cariostasis with minimal toxicity and its values have been previously determined to be 0.5 to 1 mg per day for infants and 1 to 1.5 mg per day for an average child. Total fluoride ingestion and urine excretion were studied in Marin County, California, children in 1973 before municipal water fluoridation. Results showed fluoride exposure to be higher than anticipated and fulfilled previously accepted criteria for optimal fluoridation. Present and future water fluoridation plans need to be reevaluated in light of total environmental fluoride exposure. PMID:1130041

  18. Fluoride release from fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Godoy, F; Abarzua, I; De Goes, M F; Chan, D C

    1997-01-01

    This 30-day study, compared the amounts and patterns of fluoride release from 5 commercially available fluoride-containing pit and fissure sealants: FluroShield, Helioseal-F, Ultraseal XT, Baritone L3, and Teethmate-F; Delton without fluoride, was used as control. Disc-shaped samples of each sealant were immersed in distilled water and the fluoride release was measured periodically until day 30. All the fluoridated sealants tested released measurable fluoride throughout the test period in a similar pattern: the greatest amount of fluoride was released in the first 24 hours after mixing, fell sharply on the second day and decreased slowly for the last days. On day one, Baritone L3 released significantly more fluoride than all other materials. Teethmate-F released the highest amount of fluoride during all the other time intervals from day 2, until day 30. PMID:9643204

  19. Vapor-liquid equilibria for hydrogen fluoride + difluoromethane, + 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, and + 1-chloro-1,2,2,2-tetrafluoromethane at 283.3 and 298.2 K

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Kim, H.; Lim, J.S.; Kim, J.D.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The production of refrigerants involves the separation of multicomponent mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and various chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons. Therefore, it is essential to known the phase behavior of these mixtures. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for hydrogen fluoride (HF) + difluoromethane (HFC-32), HF + 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and HF + 1-chloro-1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethane (HCFC-124) were measured by the P-T-x method at 283.3 and 298.2 K. Vapor compositions were calculated from these results. Among these systems, the HF + HFC-134a and HF + HCFC-124 systems exhibit minimum boiling azeotropes at both temperatures.

  20. Systemic fluoride.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Levy, Steven Marc

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that fluoride, through different applications and formulas, works to control caries development. The first observations of fluoride's effects on dental caries were linked to fluoride naturally present in the drinking water, and then from controlled water fluoridation programs. Other systemic methods to deliver fluoride were later suggested, including dietary fluoride supplements such as salt and milk. These systemic methods are now being questioned due to the fact that many studies have indicated that fluoride's action relies mainly on its post-eruptive effect from topical contact with the tooth structure. It is known that even the methods of delivering fluoride known as 'systemic' act mainly through a topical effect when they are in contact with the teeth. The effectiveness of water fluoridation in many geographic areas is lower than in previous eras due to the widespread use of other fluoride modalities. Nevertheless, this evidence should not be interpreted as an indication that systemic methods are no longer relevant ways to deliver fluoride on an individual basis or for collective health programs. Caution must be taken to avoid excess ingestion of fluoride when prescribing dietary fluoride supplements for children in order to minimize the risk of dental fluorosis, particularly if there are other relevant sources of fluoride intake - such as drinking water, salt or milk and/or dentifrice. Safe and effective doses of fluoride can be achieved when combining topical and systemic methods. PMID:21701196

  1. Hydrogen and fluorine in the surfaces of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leich, D. A.; Goldberg, R. H.; Burnett, D. S.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    The resonant nuclear reaction F-19 (p, alpha gamma)0-16 has been used to perform depth sensitive analyses for both fluorine and hydrogen in lunar samples. The resonance at 0.83 MeV (center-of-mass) in this reaction has been applied to the measurement of the distribution of trapped solar protons in lunar samples to depths of about 1/2 micrometer. These results are interpreted in terms of terrestrial H2O surface contamination and a redistribution of the implanted solar H which has been influenced by heavy radiation damage in the surface region. Results are also presented for an experiment to test the penetration of H2O into laboratory glass samples which have been irradiated with 0-16 to simulate the radiation damaged surfaces of lunar glasses. Fluorine determinations have been performed in a 1 pm surface layer on lunar samples using the same F-19 alpha gamma)0-16 resonance. The data are discussed from the standpoint of lunar fluorine and Teflon contamination.

  2. Hydrogen and fluorine in the surfaces of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leich, D. A.; Goldberg, R. H.; Burnett, D. S.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    The resonant nuclear reaction F-19(p, alpha gamma)O-16 has been used to perform depth-sensitive analyses for both fluorine and hydrogen in lunar samples. The resonance at 0.83 MeV (center-of-mass) in this reaction has been applied to the measurement of the distribution of trapped solar protons in lunar samples to depths up to 0.45 microns. These results are interpreted in terms of terrestrial H2O surface contamination and of a redistribution of the implanted solar H which has been influenced by heavy radiation damage in the surface region. Results are also presented for an experiment to test the penetration of H2O into laboratory glass samples which have been irradiated with O-16 to simulate the radiation-damaged surfaces of lunar glasses. Fluorine determinations have been performed in a 1-micron surface layer on lunar samples using the same F-19(p, alpha gamma)O-16 resonance. The data are discussed from the standpoint that observed fluorine concentrations are a mixture of true lunar fluorine and Teflon contamination.

  3. Simple determination of fluoride in biological samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Myung; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2015-08-14

    A simple and convenient method to detect fluoride in biological samples was developed. This method was based on derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) in a vial, and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric detection. The HS-SPME parameters were optimized as follows: selection of CAR/PDMS fiber, 0.5% 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene, 250 mg/L 15-crown-5-ether as a phase transfer catalyst, extraction and derivatization temperature of 95 °C, heating time of 20 min and pH of 7.0. Under the established conditions, the lowest limits of detection were 9 and 11 μg/L in 1.0 ml of plasma and urine, respectively, and the intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation was less than 7.7% at concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L. The calibration curve showed good linearity of plasma and urine with r=0.9990 and r=0.9992, respectively. This method is simple, amenable to automation and environmentally friendly. PMID:26162669

  4. Atomic layer etching of Al2O3 using sequential, self-limiting thermal reactions with Sn(acac)2 and hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younghee; George, Steven M

    2015-02-24

    The atomic layer etching (ALE) of Al2O3 was demonstrated using sequential, self-limiting thermal reactions with tin(II) acetylacetonate (Sn(acac)2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) as the reactants. The Al2O3 samples were Al2O3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) films grown using trimethylaluminum and H2O. The HF source was HF-pyridine. Al2O3 was etched linearly with atomic level precision versus number of reactant cycles. The Al2O3 ALE was monitored at temperatures from 150 to 250 °C. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies revealed that the sequential Sn(acac)2 and HF reactions were self-limiting versus reactant exposure. QCM measurements also determined that the mass change per cycle (MCPC) increased with temperature from -4.1 ng/(cm(2) cycle) at 150 °C to -18.3 ng/(cm(2) cycle) at 250 °C. These MCPC values correspond to etch rates from 0.14 Å/cycle at 150 °C to 0.61 Å/cycle at 250 °C based on the Al2O3 ALD film density of 3.0 g/cm(3). X-ray reflectivity (XRR) analysis confirmed the linear removal of Al2O3 and measured an Al2O3 ALE etch rate of 0.27 Å/cycle at 200 °C. The XRR measurements also indicated that the Al2O3 films were smoothed by Al2O3 ALE. The overall etching reaction is believed to follow the reaction Al2O3 + 6Sn(acac)2 + 6HF → 2Al(acac)3 + 6SnF(acac) + 3H2O. In the proposed reaction mechanism, the Sn(acac)2 reactant donates acac to the substrate to produce Al(acac)3. The HF reactant allows SnF(acac) and H2O to leave as reaction products. The thermal ALE of many other metal oxides using Sn(acac)2 or other metal β-diketonates, together with HF, should be possible by a similar mechanism. This thermal ALE mechanism may also be applicable to other materials such as metal nitrides, metal phosphides, metal sulfides and metal arsenides. PMID:25604976

  5. Accurately solving the electronic Schrodinger equation of atoms and molecules using explicitly correlated (r12-) multireference configuration interaction. VII. The hydrogen fluoride molecule.

    PubMed

    Cardoen, Wim; Gdanitz, Robert J

    2005-07-01

    We compute the potential-energy curve of the hydrogen fluoride molecule (HF) using a novel variant of the explicitly correlated multireference averaged coupled-pair functional method with a carefully selected basis set and reference space. After correcting for scalar relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling, the potential is used to compute the dissociation energy, the equilibrium bond distance, the harmonic frequency, the anharmonicity, and the vibrational levels up to the dissociation limit. The errors in the equilibrium geometry constants compare favorably with the most elaborate (single reference) calculations of the literature. Starting at the region of RA/angstroms approximately 2,...,3, where the covalent HF bond begins to break and where single-reference methods become impractical, our potential begins to slightly underestimate the atomic interaction, which is reflected in an estimated error in the well depth of -0.2 kcal/mol. PMID:16050742

  6. Dentifrice Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakita, Philip E.

    2004-05-01

    The effectiveness of the fluoride ion in lowering the incidence of dental caries is a major factor in the field of dental health. Observations and research studies in the first half of the 20th century have lead to the widespread adoption of fluoridated water and the use of inorganic fluoride compounds in oral care products, such as toothpaste and dental rinses. This article provides a brief review of the types of compounds used and the chemistry involved.

  7. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Bottled Water Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Consumers drink ... questions about bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, ...

  8. Test beam results with a sampling calorimeter of cerium fluoride scintillating crystals and tungsten absorber plates for calorimetry at the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Donegà, M.; Dröge, M.; Haller, C.; Horisberger, U.; Lustermann, W.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Quittnat, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, M.; D`Imperio, G.; del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Jorda Lope, C.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Martelli, A.; Monti, V.; Pastrone, N.; Trapani, P. P.; Candelise, V.; Della Ricca, G.

    2016-07-01

    A sampling calorimeter using cerium fluoride scintillating crystals as active material, interleaved with absorber plates made of tungsten, and read out by wavelength-shifting fibres has been tested with high-energy electron beams at the CERN SPS H4 beam line, as well as with lower-energy beams at the INFN Frascati Beam Test Facility in Italy. Energy resolution studies revealed a low stochastic term (< 10 % /√{ E }). This result, combined with high radiation hardness of the material used, marks this sampling calorimeter as a good candidate for the detectors' forward regions during the high luminosity phase of LHC.

  9. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Neil; Whalen, J. Marc; Chacon, Lisa

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  10. A pyrolysis/gas chromatographic method for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples.

    PubMed

    Carr, R H; Bustin, R; Gibson, E K

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples. The sample is heated under vacuum after which the evolved gases are separated by gas chromatography with a helium ionization detector. The system is calibrated by injecting known amounts of hydrogen, as determined manometrically. The method, which is rapid and reliable, was checked for a variety of lunar soils; the limit of detection is about 10 ng of hydrogen. PMID:11542122

  11. A pyrolysis/gas chromatographic method for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, R. H.; Bustin, R.; Gibson, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples. The sample is heated under vacuum after which the evolved gases are separated by gas chromatography with a helium ionization detector. The system is calibrated by injecting known amounts of hydrogen, as determined manometrically. The method, which is rapid and reliable, was checked for a variety of lunar soils; the limit of detection is about 10 ng of hydrogen.

  12. Fluoride uptake by Streptococcus mutans 6715.

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, G M; Schuster, G S; Pashley, D H; Venkateswarlu, P

    1977-01-01

    The short-term kinetics of fluoride uptake by cells from 20- to 22-h cultures of Streptococcus mutans strain 6715 were studied using rapid filtration and centrifugation techniques. Saline-suspended organisms were diluted with fluoride-containing solutions buffered at four different pH values (2.0, 4.0, 5.5, and 8.2). Fluoride disappearance from the medium was inversely related to pH and to the duration of the exposure at any given pH. The uptake was rapid and extensive at the lower pH values and decreased as the pH increased. Media fluoride concentrations subsequently increased; i.e., fluoride was released from the cells. The presence of glucose, cyanide, or iodoacetate did not influence the results. However, preincubation of the cells in fluoride-free buffers, followed by the addition of fluoride, reduced fluoride uptake markedly. Cell-to-media pH gradients were determined by the distribution of 14C-labeled 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione. Fluoride uptake was found to be a function of the magnitude of the pH gradient (P less than 0.001). It is hypothesized that fluoride uptake occurs by the diffusion of hydrogen fluoride and the subsequent trapping of ionic fluoride. PMID:22490

  13. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  14. Quantitation of fluoride ion released sarin in red blood cell samples by gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry using isotope dilution and large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, E M; McGuire, J M; Evans, R A; Edwards, J L; Hulet, S W; Benton, B J; Forster, J S; Burnett, D C; Muse, W T; Matson, K; Crouse, C L; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A

    2004-01-01

    A new method for measuring fluoride ion released isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB) in the red blood cell fraction was developed that utilizes an autoinjector, a large-volume injector port (LVI), positive ion ammonia chemical ionization detection in the SIM mode, and a deuterated stable isotope internal standard. This method was applied to red blood cell (RBC) and plasma ethyl acetate extracts from spiked human and animal whole blood samples and from whole blood of minipigs, guinea pigs, and rats exposed by whole-body sarin inhalation. Evidence of nerve agent exposure was detected in plasma and red blood cells at low levels of exposure. The linear method range of quantitation was 10-1000 pg on-column with a detection limit of approximately 2-pg on-column. In the course of method development, several conditions were optimized for the LVI, including type of injector insert, injection volume, initial temperature, pressure, and flow rate. RBC fractions had advantages over the plasma with respect to assessing nerve agent exposure using the fluoride ion method especially in samples with low serum butyrylcholinesterase activity. PMID:15239856

  15. Growth of hollow nickel fluoride whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S. V.; Orekhov, Yu. F.; Fedorov, P. P.

    2009-07-15

    Hollow nickel fluoride whiskers have been obtained by condensation from the vapor phase onto a platinum substrate in a flow of hydrogen fluoride. Crystals up to 5 mm in length have a square cross section with a 300 {+-} 30-{mu}m side. The wall thickness is 85 {+-} 20 {mu}m.

  16. Xenon fluoride solutions effective as fluorinating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, H. H.; Quarterman, L. A.; Sheft, I.

    1967-01-01

    Solutions of xenon fluorides in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride have few disruptive effects and leave a residue consisting of gaseous xenon, which can be recovered and refluorinated. This mild agent can be used with materials which normally must be fluorinated with fluorine alone at high temperatures.

  17. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed reactor system at Building 9212. Draft environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is Iocated within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The current AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems were designed and constructed more than 40 years ago. Because of their deteriorating condition, the corrosive nature of the materials processed, and the antiquated design philosophy upon which they are based, their long-term reliability cannot be assured. The current AHF supply system cannot mitigate an accidental release of AHF and vents fugitive AHF directly to the atmosphere during operations. the proposed action would reduce the risk of exposing the Y-12 Plant work force, the public, and the environment to an accidental release of AHF and would ensure the continuing ability of the Y-12 Plant to manufacture highly enriched uranium metal and process uranium from retired weapons for storage.

  18. Hazardous materials accident report - anhydrous hydrogen fluoride release from NATX 9408, Train No. BNEl3Y at Conrail's Receiving Yard, Elkhart, Indiana, February 4, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-27

    At 6:30 a.m., on February 4, 1985, an empty placarded railroad tankcar, containing an estimated 800 gallons of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, a corrosive liquid, was found leaking in the Consolidated Rail Corporation's Elkhart, Indiana Receiving Yard. During the following 4 hours as local emergency response agencies worked to contain the spill, a vapor cloud formed and traveled approximately 2 1/2 miles affecting nearby residential areas northwest of the yard. A total of 1,500 people within a 1.1-square-mile area adjacent to and northwest of the yard were evacuated for 9 hours as an emergency precaution. Local area hospitals treated 75 persons for minor skin and eye irritations. The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was the decision by Burlington Northern to continue in transportation a tankcar reported to be leaking on February 3, 1985, at its Cicero, Illinois railroad yard. The leak in the tankcar resulted from a failure of the tankcar head at a weld undercut made during its construction. Contributing to the extent of the emergency and the unnecessary endangerment of railroad employees and the surrounding communities was the failure of mechanical inspection and supervisory personnel at both the Burlington Northern Railroad Cicero Yard and the Conrail Elkhart Yard to take prompt, appropriate action once notified of the leak.

  19. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed chemical processing systems at Building 9212, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is located within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The proposed replacement system would be based upon modern design criteria and safety analyses. The replacement AHF supply and distribution system equipment would be located on the existing Dock 8/8A at Building 9212. Utilities would be extended to the dock to service the process equipment. The following process equipment modules would be prefabricated for installation at the modified dock: an AHF cylinder enclosure, an AHF supply manifold and vaporizer module, an AHF sump tank and transfer skid, and an AHF supply off-gas scrubber assembly module. The fluidized-bed reactor system would be constructed in an area adjacent to the existing system in Building 9212. The replacement equipment would consist of a new reduction fluidized-bed reactor, a hydrofluorination fluidized-bed reactor, and associated air emission control equipment. The no-action alternative, which is the continued operation of the existing AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems, was also evaluated.

  20. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  1. Hydrogenation Reactions during Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Polymer Samples Using Hydrogen Carrier Gas.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Chuichi; Freeman, Robert R; Teramae, Norio; Ohtani, Hajime

    2016-05-17

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of polymer samples is studied focusing on the effect of hydrogen (H2) carrier gas on chromatographic and spectral data. The pyrograms and the related mass spectra of high density polyethylene (HDPE), low density polyethylene, and polystyrene (PS) serve to illustrate the differences between the species formed in H2 and the helium environment. Differences in the pyrograms and the spectra are generally thought to be a result of the hydrogenation reaction of the pyrolyzates. From the peak intensity changes in the pyrograms of HDPE and PS, hydrogenation of unsaturated pyrolyzates is concluded to occur when the pyrolysis is done in H2. Moreover, additional hydrogenation of the pyrolyzates occurs in the electron ionization source of a MS detector when H2 is used as a carrier gas. Finally, the applicability of mass spectral libraries to characterize pyrograms obtained in H2 is illustrated using 24 polymers. The effect of the hydrogenation reaction on the library search results is found to be negligible for most polymer samples with polar and nonpolar monomer units. PMID:27125864

  2. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  3. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  4. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks.

    PubMed

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Rać, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual samples were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. The highest fluoride levels were determined in the lowest percentage drinks (less than 10 % v/v ethanol), with the lowest fluoride levels observed in the highest percentage drinks (above 40 % v/v ethanol). In terms of types of alcoholic drinks, the highest fluoride levels were determined in beers and wines, while the lowest levels were observed in vodkas. These data confirm the fact that alcoholic beverages need to be considered as a significant source of fluoride delivered into the body. PMID:26475300

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoride in fluoride-bearing minerals after decomposition by fusion with sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Adelantado, J V; Martinez, V P; Moreno, A C; Reig, F B

    1985-03-01

    The decomposition of highly insoluble minerals (fluorspar and cryolite) by fusion with molten alkali-metal hydroxides is studied. The introduction of additives such as aluminium compounds or sodium peroxide to obtain total liberation of fluoride from calcium fluoride samples, is tested. The fusion is done in a silver crucible with a Bunsen burner. The cooled melt is easily soluble, giving solutions suitable for spectrophotometric fluoride determination by the Zr(IV)-fluoride-Erichrome Cyanine R method. PMID:18963832

  6. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054) mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084) mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010) and 0.018 (SD 0.008) mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day) the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake. These results showed that

  7. Corresponding-states behavior of a dipolar model fluid with variable dispersion interactions and its relevance to the anomalies of hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Volker C; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-06-14

    More than two decades ago, the elusiveness of a liquid-vapor equilibrium and a corresponding critical point in simulations of the supposedly simple model of dipolar hard spheres came as a surprise to many liquid matter theorists. van Leeuwen and Smit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3991 (1993)] showed that a minimum of attractive dispersion interactions among the dipolar particles may be needed to observe regular fluid behavior. Here, we adopt their approach and use an only slightly modified model, in which the original point dipole is replaced by a dipole moment produced by charges that are separated in space, to study the influence of dispersion interactions of variable strength on the coexistence and interfacial properties of a polar fluid. The thermophysical properties are discussed in terms of Guggenheim's corresponding-states approach. In this way, the coexistence curve, the critical compressibility factor, the surface tension, Guggenheim's ratio, and modifications of Guldberg's and Trouton's rules (related to the vapor pressure and the enthalpy of vaporization) are analyzed. As the importance of dispersion is decreased, a crossover from simple-fluid behavior to that characteristic of strongly dipolar systems takes place; for some properties, this transition is monotonic, but for others it occurs non-monotonically. For strongly dipolar systems, the reduced surface tension is very low, whereas Guggenheim's ratio and Guldberg's ratio are found to be high. The critical compressibility factor is smaller, and the coexistence curve is wider and more skewed than for simple fluids. For very weak dispersion, liquid-vapor equilibrium is still observable, but the interfacial tension is extremely low and may, eventually, vanish marking the end of the existence of a liquid phase. We discuss the implications of our findings for real fluids, in particular, for hydrogen fluoride. PMID:27306012

  8. Corresponding-states behavior of a dipolar model fluid with variable dispersion interactions and its relevance to the anomalies of hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Volker C.; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    More than two decades ago, the elusiveness of a liquid-vapor equilibrium and a corresponding critical point in simulations of the supposedly simple model of dipolar hard spheres came as a surprise to many liquid matter theorists. van Leeuwen and Smit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3991 (1993)] showed that a minimum of attractive dispersion interactions among the dipolar particles may be needed to observe regular fluid behavior. Here, we adopt their approach and use an only slightly modified model, in which the original point dipole is replaced by a dipole moment produced by charges that are separated in space, to study the influence of dispersion interactions of variable strength on the coexistence and interfacial properties of a polar fluid. The thermophysical properties are discussed in terms of Guggenheim's corresponding-states approach. In this way, the coexistence curve, the critical compressibility factor, the surface tension, Guggenheim's ratio, and modifications of Guldberg's and Trouton's rules (related to the vapor pressure and the enthalpy of vaporization) are analyzed. As the importance of dispersion is decreased, a crossover from simple-fluid behavior to that characteristic of strongly dipolar systems takes place; for some properties, this transition is monotonic, but for others it occurs non-monotonically. For strongly dipolar systems, the reduced surface tension is very low, whereas Guggenheim's ratio and Guldberg's ratio are found to be high. The critical compressibility factor is smaller, and the coexistence curve is wider and more skewed than for simple fluids. For very weak dispersion, liquid-vapor equilibrium is still observable, but the interfacial tension is extremely low and may, eventually, vanish marking the end of the existence of a liquid phase. We discuss the implications of our findings for real fluids, in particular, for hydrogen fluoride.

  9. Determination of Fluoride in Toothpaste Using an Ion-Selective Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Truman S.; Cappuccino, Carleton C.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the theory of chemical potentiometry, describes the experimental procedure for free fluoride determination, and presents sample data of fluoride concentration for various brands of toothpaste. (GS)

  10. DFT study of hydrogen fluoride and sulfur trioxide interactions on the surface of Pt-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Ali Shokuhi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the adsorption properties of hydrogen florid (HF) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) on the surface of platinum decorated graphene (PtG) using density functional theory. We found one optimized configuration for HF and two ones for SO3 upon adsorption on the surface of PtG. Our result show significant adsorption on PtG with calculated energy adsorption of -73.6 (-54.2 BSSE) kJ/mol for HF at its only position and -172.4 (-144.8 BSSE) and -62.7 (-53.7 BSSE) kJ/mol for SO3 at its two positions; P1 and P2, respectively), whereas there is weak physisorption of these analytes on pristine graphene (PG). Results of charge analyses reveled interesting net charge transfer; while the direction of charge is from HF to PtG, reverse direction is found for SO3 for its two configurations. To deep understand the concept of adsorption properties, we used orbital analyses including density of states for interaction of mentioned analytes on the surface of PtG.

  11. Neutral hydrogen observations of a large sample of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.R.; Tully, R.B.

    1981-10-01

    A sample of 1787 nearby galaxies has been observed in the 21 cm line with the NRAO 91 m and 43 m telescopes and the Bonn 100 m telescope. A total of 1171 galaxies were detected. The radio observations provide an accurate heliocentric velocity, an H I flux, and a line profile width for each detection. Literature optical magnitudes, dimensions, and morphological types are reduced to common systems and tabulated. Intrinsic luminosities, dimensions, H I masses, and total masses are determined, assuming distances derived from redshifts.

  12. Multi-saline sample distillation apparatus for hydrogen isotope analyses : design and accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassan, Afifa Afifi

    1981-01-01

    A distillation apparatus for saline water samples was designed and tested. Six samples may be distilled simultaneously. The temperature was maintained at 400 C to ensure complete dehydration of the precipitating salts. Consequently, the error in the measured ratio of stable hydrogen isotopes resulting from incomplete dehydration of hydrated salts during distillation was eliminated. (USGS)

  13. Comprehensive gas chromatography with Time of Flight MS and large volume introduction for the detection of fluoride-induced regenerated nerve agent in biological samples.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, J A; Trap, H C; Noort, D; van der Schans, M J

    2010-05-15

    Recently, several methods have been developed to verify exposure to nerve agents. Most of these methods, such as the fluoride reactivation technique and the analysis of inhibited phosphonylated butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), are based on mass spectrometry. The high specificity of the mass spectrometer might also imply a disadvantage, because the acquisition mass, i.e. the identity of the analyte must be known beforehand in order to direct the MS analysis in the most sensitive mode. In real cases, the identity of the nerve agent is not always known beforehand and the mass spectrometer should be operated in a scanning mode, with the consequence that sensitivity of the method will be lower. Comprehensive GC, or GC x GC, is a technique which offers enhanced separation. The implied larger selectivity of the GC separation allows mass spectrometry to be conducted in a less specific, scanning, mode. By the use of this configuration, the identity of the nerve agent does not have to be known beforehand but can be traced. In order to be able to detect lower concentrations and assess lower exposure levels, a large volume injection technique was developed allowing sample sizes up to 100 microL. The technique was tested with plasma samples that had been inhibited with various nerve agents. Subsequently, the cholinesterase-bound nerve agent was regenerated by the fluoride reactivation technique. Using the newly developed comprehensive GC-MS method it was possible to detect nerve agent at an exposure level of 1% BuChE inhibition, which is approximately 70 pg nerve agent/mL. These low exposure levels cannot be verified with a cholinesterase (ChE) activity assay. Moreover, the identity of the regenerated nerve agent was verified by the mass spectrum that was generated by the TOF mass spectrometer. This paper presents a technique able to deliver full-scan data on the analysis of nerve agents in biomedical samples at relevant exposure levels (1% BuChE inhibition). This full-scan data

  14. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  15. Deposition of fluoride on enamel surfaces released from varnishes is limited to vicinity of fluoridation site

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, A. M.; Yakin, M.; Becker, K.; Buchalla, W.; Attin, R.; Wiegand, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the in-situ study was to determine fluoride uptake in non-fluoridated, demineralized enamel after application of fluoride varnishes on enamel samples located at various distances from the non-fluoridated samples. All enamel samples used were demineralized with acidic hydroxyethylcellulose before the experiment. Intra-oral appliances were worn by ten volunteers in three series: (1, Mirafluorid, 0.15% F; 2, Duraphat, 2.3% F and 3, unfluoridated controls) of 6 days each. Each two enamel samples were prepared from 30 bovine incisors. One sample was used for the determination of baseline fluoride content (BFC); the other was treated according to the respective series and fixed in the intra-oral appliance for 6 days. Additionally, from 120 incisors, each four enamel samples were prepared (one for BFC). Three samples (a–c) were placed into each appliance at different sites: (a) directly neighboured to the fluoridated specimen (=next), (b) at 1-cm distance (=1 cm) and (c) in the opposite buccal aspect of the appliance (=opposite). At these sites, new unfluoridated samples were placed at days 1, 3 and 5, which were left in place for 1 day. The volunteers brushed their teeth and the samples with fluoridated toothpaste twice per day. Both the KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride were determined in all samples to determine fluoride uptake and were statistically analyzed. One day, after fluoridation with Duraphat, KOH-soluble fluoride uptake in specimen a (=next) was significantly higher compared to the corresponding samples of both the control and Mirafluorid series, which in turn were not significantly different from each other. At all other sites and time points, fluoride uptake in the enamel samples were not different from controls for both fluoride varnishes. Within the first day after application, intra-oral-fluoride release from the tested fluoride varnish Duraphat leads to KOH-soluble fluoride uptake only in enamel samples located in close

  16. Fluoride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infants can only get fluoride through drinking infant formulas. Breast milk has a negligible amount of fluoride ... of water to use in concentrated or powdered formulas. DO NOT use any fluoride supplement without talking ...

  17. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Ella A; Dickten, Christoph; Jung, Rico; Krauss, Florian; Rübesamen, Henrik; Schmütsch, Katharina; Sandulescu, Tudor; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity. PMID:26727989

  18. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

    PubMed Central

    Naumova, Ella A.; Dickten, Christoph; Jung, Rico; Krauss, Florian; Rübesamen, Henrik; Schmütsch, Katharina; Sandulescu, Tudor; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H.

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity. PMID:26727989

  19. MStern Blotting-High Throughput Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Membrane-Based Proteomic Sample Preparation for 96-Well Plates.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sebastian T; Ahmed, Saima; Muntel, Jan; Cuevas Polo, Nerea; Bachur, Richard; Kentsis, Alex; Steen, Judith; Steen, Hanno

    2015-10-01

    We describe a 96-well plate compatible membrane-based proteomic sample processing method, which enables the complete processing of 96 samples (or multiples thereof) within a single workday. This method uses a large-pore hydrophobic PVDF membrane that efficiently adsorbs proteins, resulting in fast liquid transfer through the membrane and significantly reduced sample processing times. Low liquid transfer speeds have prevented the useful 96-well plate implementation of FASP as a widely used membrane-based proteomic sample processing method. We validated our approach on whole-cell lysate and urine and cerebrospinal fluid as clinically relevant body fluids. Without compromising peptide and protein identification, our method uses a vacuum manifold and circumvents the need for digest desalting, making our processing method compatible with standard liquid handling robots. In summary, our new method maintains the strengths of FASP and simultaneously overcomes one of the major limitations of FASP without compromising protein identification and quantification. PMID:26223766

  20. Method of treating fluoride contaminated wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.K.; Kakaria, V.K.

    1988-04-05

    A method for treating spent aluminum smelting potliner material containing fluoride contaminants is described which comprises: adding silica to the material to form a mixture thereof; elevating the temperature of the mixture within the range of 1,000/sup 0/ to 1,700/sup 0/C. to form a slag; providing sufficient silica in the mixture and forming the slag in the presence of sufficient water for pyrohydrolysis conditions resulting in the volatilization of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants mostly in the form of hydrogen fluoride; and cooling the slag remaining after volatilizatiion of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants to produce an insoluble silicate glass-residue containing any remaining portion of the fluoride contaminants in an immobile state.

  1. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, V; Rajkumar, S; Murugesh, S; Darchen, A

    2012-07-30

    Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies. PMID:22626627

  2. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Clifton M; Holahan, Erin C; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing is needed. A new filter-paper absorption method to assess the 1-min bioavailable fluoride concentration was developed to meet this need. This method utilizes coiled filter paper that rapidly absorbs the aqueous phase of the dentifrice slurry followed by centrifugation to recover that fluid for fluoride measurement via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The analytical method was used to successfully determine the total fluoride and 1-min bioavailable fluoride in eight dentifrice products containing sodium fluoride (NaF), disodium monofluorophosphate (Na2FPO3, MFP), stannous fluoride (SnF2), or NaF with amorphous calcium phosphate (NaF + ACP). The results showed that some of the dentifrices tested had significantly lower potentially available fluoride than the total fluoride. For a MFP-containing sample, aged seven years past its expiry date, there was significant reduction in the bioavailable fluoride compared to MFP products that were not aged. Other than the aged MFP and the SnF2-containing samples the bioavailable fluoride for all products tested had at least 80 % of the label fluoride concentration. The filter paper absorption method yielded reproducible results for the products tested with MFP samples showing the largest variations. PMID:25821392

  3. Fluorescent sensing of fluoride in cellular system.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F(-) detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F(-) including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F(-) are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F(-), mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be

  4. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  5. How Does Fluoride Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes How Does Fluoride Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Does Fluoride Work? Print A A A Text Size There's fluoride ... even in your water. But how does it work to keep teeth healthy? Let's find out. Fluoride ...

  6. Fluoride in drinking water and dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Mandinic, Zoran; Curcic, Marijana; Antonijevic, Biljana; Carevic, Momir; Mandic, Jelena; Djukic-Cosic, Danijela; Lekic, Charles P

    2010-08-01

    In this study we determined the fluoride content in drinking water and hair of 12-year-old schoolchildren from different Serbian municipalities, i.e. Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, Kacarevo and Vranjska Banja. The analyses were performed using composite fluoride ion-selective electrode. Average fluoride levels were 0.10, 0.15, 0.79 and 11 ppm in well water, 0.07, 0.10, 0.17 and 0.15 ppm in tap water, 19.3, 21.5, 25.4, and 32.5 ppm in hair samples, in Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, Kacarevo and Vranjska Banja, respectively. Correlation analysis indicated statistically significant positive relationship between fluoride in wells water and fluoride in hair, for all municipalities: correlation coefficients were 0.54 (p < 0.05), 0.89, 0.97 and 0.99 (p < 0.001), in Vranjska Banja, Valjevo, Veliko Gradiste, and Kacarevo, respectively. Positive correlation was obtained also between fluoride in tap water and hair samples in all regions under the study, with statistical significance only in Valjevo municipality, p < 0.05. Dental examination of schoolchildren confirmed dental fluorosis only in the region of Vranjska Banja. Moreover, in endemic fluorotic region of Vranjska Banja, positive and statistically significant correlations were confirmed between fluoride in well water and dental fluorosis level (r = 0.61; p < 0.01) and additionally between fluoride in hair and dental fluorosis level (0.62; p < 0.01). The primary findings from this study have shown that fluoride content in hair is highly correlated with fluoride content in drinking water and dental fluorosis level, indicating that hair may be regarded as biomaterial of high informative potential in evaluating prolonged exposure to fluorides and to individuate children at risk of fluorosis regardless of the phase of teeth eruption. PMID:20580811

  7. The quantification of hydrogen and methane in contaminated groundwater: validation of robust procedures for sampling and quantification.

    PubMed

    Dorgerloh, Ute; Becker, Roland; Theissen, Hubert; Nehls, Irene

    2010-10-01

    A number of currently recommended sampling techniques for the determination of hydrogen in contaminated groundwater were compared regarding the practical proficiency in field campaigns. Key characteristics of appropriate sampling procedures are reproducibility of results, robustness against varying field conditions such as hydrostatic pressure, aquifer flow, and biological activity. Laboratory set-ups were used to investigate the most promising techniques. Bubble stripping with gas sampling bulbs yielded reproducible recovery of hydrogen and methane which could be verified for groundwater sampled in two field campaigns. The methane content of the groundwater was confirmed by analysis of directly pumped samples thus supporting the trueness of the stripping results. Laboratory set-ups and field campaigns revealed that bubble stripping of hydrogen may be restricted to the type of used pump. Concentrations of dissolved hydrogen after bubble stripping with an electrically driven submersible pump were about one order of magnitude higher than those obtained from diffusion sampling. The gas chromatographic determination for hydrogen and methane requires manual injection of gas samples and detection by a pulsed discharge detector (PDD) and allows limits of quantification of 3 nM dissolved hydrogen and 1 µg L⁻¹ dissolved methane in groundwater. The combined standard uncertainty of the bubble stripping and GC/PDD quantification of hydrogen in field samples was 7% at 7.8 nM and 18% for 78 nM. PMID:20730246

  8. Leaf water and plant wax hydrogen isotopes in a European sample network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. B.; Kahmen, A.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of plant waxes in sediments is now routinely used as a hydroclimate proxy. This application is based largely on empirical calibrations that have demonstrated continental-scale correlations between source water and lipid hydrogen isotope values. But at smaller spatial scales and for individual locations it is increasingly recognized that factors that modify apparent fractionation between source water and leaf lipid hydrogen isotope values must also be considered. Isotopic enrichment of leaf water during transpiration is key among these secondary factors, and is itself sensitive to changes in hydroclimate. Leaf water enrichment also occurs prior to photosynthetic water uptake, and is therefore independent from cellular-level biomarker synthesis. Recent advances in theory have permitted mechanistic models to be developed that can be used to predict the mean leaf water hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition from readily available meteorological variables. This permits global-scale isoscape maps of leaf water isotopic composition and enrichment above source water to be generated, but these models have not been widely validated at continental spatial scales. We have established a network of twenty-one sites across Europe where we are sampling for leaf-, xylem-, and soil-water isotopes (H and O) at approximately 5-week intervals over the summer growing season. We augment the sample set with weekly to monthly precipitation samples and early- and late-season plant wax lipid samples. Collaborators at each site are conducting the sampling, and most sites are members of the FLUXNET tower network that also record high-resolution meteorological data. We present information on the implementation of the network and preliminary results from the 2014 summer season. The complete dataset will be used to track the evolution of water isotopes from source to leaf water and from leaf water to lipid hydrogen across diverse environments. This will provide

  9. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water Print A ... to 19-year-olds continue Fluoride and the Water Supply For more than 60 years, water fluoridation ...

  10. Crystal structure of μ-fluorido-bis-{(η(4)-cyclo-octa-diene)[hexa-fluorido-anti-monato(V)]platinum(II)} hexa-fluorido-anti-monate(V) hydrogen fluoride 0.75-solvate.

    PubMed

    Seppelt, Konrad; Friedemann, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In the complex cation of the binuclear solvated title salt, [Pt2F(SbF6)2(C8H12)2]SbF6·0.75HF, an F atom bridges the two platinum(II) atoms with a bond angle of 123.3 (2)°. The corresponding Pt-F bond lengths are in the range of other fluorine-bridged binuclear platinum(II) complexes. Two of the three SbF6 (-) anions each coordinate with one F atom to one platinum(II) atom. Including the η(4)-bound cyclo-octa-diene (COD) ligands, the overall coordination sphere of each platinum(II) atom is square-planar. The third SbF6 (-) anion is not bound to the complex. Hydrogen fluoride is present in the crystal structure as a solvent disordered over three positions, each with an occupancy of 0.25. F⋯F distances of 2.5512 (7), 2.6076 (8) and 3.2215 (10) Å to surrounding SbF6 (-) anions are indicative of F-H⋯F hydrogen-bonding inter-actions although no H atoms could be localized for the disordered solvent mol-ecules. The resulting hydrogen-bonded network is three-dimensional. PMID:26870575

  11. A study of fluoride groundwater occurrence in Nathenje, Lilongwe, Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msonda, K. W. M.; Masamba, W. R. L.; Fabiano, E.

    A study was carried out to determine fluoride concentration in groundwaters of Nathenje area situated in Lilongwe District in the central region of Malawi. Water samples were collected from 176 boreholes and shallow wells during different months in 2001 and 2002. Samples were then analysed for fluoride by using a fluoride electrode and an ion selective meter. The results showed that fluoride concentrations for the rainy season varied from <0.5 to 6.98 ± 0.01 mg/l with 52.9% of the boreholes above the World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum permissible limit of 1.5 mg/l. Fluoride concentrations for dry season ranged from <0.5 to 7.02 ± 0.02 mg/l with 50.8% of boreholes above 1.5 mg/l. Fluoride concentrations for the two seasons were significantly different from each other ( p < 0.05). Fluoride data was used to produce a fluoride distribution map. From the map, it was observed that fluoride concentrations in this area followed a pattern. The central part of Nathenje had high fluoride concentration of between 2 and 7.02 mg/l and these high fluoride values seemed to extend eastwards beyond the boundary of the study area. However, the southern and western parts had <1 mg/l of fluoride. The high groundwater fluoride values seem to be associated with the weathered basement complex containing biotite that is a probable source of fluoride. The other suspected sources of fluoride in Nathenje groundwater could be due to the dissolution of hornblende, fluorite and amphibole, which are reported to occur in rocks and soils in this area. There was evidence of dental fluorosis in areas where the fluoride concentration was high.

  12. On-line high-precision stable hydrogen isotopic analyses on nanoliter water samples.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J; Brockwell, T; Merren, T; Fourel, F; Phillips, A M

    2001-08-01

    We describe a new on-line chromium reduction technique for the measurement of stable hydrogen (deltaD) isotopes in waters using continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The on-line Cr reduction method has low intersample memory effects (< 1%) and excellent precision and accuracy for deltaD (+/-0.5% and was used to analyze waters samples as small as 50 nL. The on-line Cr method has a number of significant advantages over conventional offline Zn and U reduction and on-line carbon-based pyrolysis techniques. A single Cr reactor can be used to analyze approximately 1,000 water samples using an injection volume of 0.5 microL, with an individual sample analysis time of 4 min. Intersample memory effects are negligible. The Cr reactor temperature of 1050 degree C is easily attainable on standard elemental analyzers and so does not require the specialized and costly high-temperature furnaces of carbon-based pyrolysis reactors. Furthermore, hydrogen isotopes in extremely small water samples in the 100-nL range or less can be easily measured; hence, this new method opens up a number of exciting application areas in earth and environmental sciences, for example, natural abundance deltaD measurements of individual fluid inclusions in geologic materials using a laser source and measurements of body fluids in physiological and metabolic research. PMID:11510820

  13. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering

  14. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM FLUORIDE FROM BISMUTH PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATE CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Brown, H.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating plutonium from fission products present on a bismuth phosphate carrier. The dried carrier is first treated with hydrogen fluoride at between 500 and 600 deg C whereby some fission product fluorides volatilize away from plutonium tetrafluoride, and nonvolatile fission product fluorides are formed then with anhydrous fluorine at between 400 and 500 deg C. Bismuth and plutonium distill in the form of volatile fluorides away from the nonvolatile fission product fluorides. The bismuth and plutonium fluorides are condensed at below 290 deg C.

  15. Hydrogen isotopes from source water to leaf lipid in a continental-scale sample network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Daniel; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary plant waxes are useful paleoclimate proxies because they are preserved in depositional settings on geologic timescales and the isotopic composition of the hydrogen in these molecules reflects that of the source water available during biosynthesis. This application is based largely on empirical calibrations that have demonstrated continental-scale correlations between source water and lipid hydrogen isotope values. However, the importance of variable net isotopic fractionation between source water and lipid for different species and environmental conditions is increasingly recognized. Isotopic enrichment of leaf water during transpiration is key among these secondary factors, and is itself sensitive to changes in hydroclimate. Leaf water enrichment also occurs prior to photosynthetic water uptake, and is therefore independent from cellular-level biomarker synthesis. Mechanistic models can predict the mean leaf water hydrogen isotope composition from readily available meteorological variables. This permits global-scale isoscape maps of leaf water isotopic composition and enrichment above source water to be generated, but these models have not been widely validated at continental spatial scales. We have established a network of twenty-one sites across Europe where we are sampling for leaf-, xylem-, and soil-water isotopes (H and O) at approximately 5-week intervals over the summer growing season. We augment the sample set with weekly to monthly precipitation samples and early- and late-season plant wax lipid samples. Collaborators at each site are conducting the sampling, and most sites are members of the FLUXNET tower network that also record high-resolution meteorological data. We present information on the implementation of the network and preliminary results from the 2014 summer season. The complete dataset will be used to track the evolution of water isotopes from source to leaf water and from leaf water to lipid hydrogen across diverse environments

  16. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux models for fundamental vibrational intensity changes on H-bond formation of water and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Arnaldo F.; Richter, Wagner E.; Bruns, Roy E.; Terrabuio, Luiz A.; Haiduke, Roberto L. A.

    2014-02-28

    The Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules/Charge-Charge Flux-Dipole Flux (QTAIM/CCFDF) model has been used to investigate the electronic structure variations associated with intensity changes on dimerization for the vibrations of the water and hydrogen fluoride dimers as well as in the water-hydrogen fluoride complex. QCISD/cc-pVTZ wave functions applied in the QTAIM/CCFDF model accurately provide the fundamental band intensities of water and its dimer predicting symmetric and antisymmetric stretching intensity increases for the donor unit of 159 and 47 km mol{sup −1} on H-bond formation compared with the experimental values of 141 and 53 km mol{sup −1}. The symmetric stretching of the proton donor water in the dimer has intensity contributions parallel and perpendicular to its C{sub 2v} axis. The largest calculated increase of 107 km mol{sup −1} is perpendicular to this axis and owes to equilibrium atomic charge displacements on vibration. Charge flux decreases occurring parallel and perpendicular to this axis result in 42 and 40 km mol{sup −1} total intensity increases for the symmetric and antisymmetric stretches, respectively. These decreases in charge flux result in intensity enhancements because of the interaction contributions to the intensities between charge flux and the other quantities. Even though dipole flux contributions are much smaller than the charge and charge flux ones in both monomer and dimer water they are important for calculating the total intensity values for their stretching vibrations since the charge-charge flux interaction term cancels the charge and charge flux contributions. The QTAIM/CCFDF hydrogen-bonded stretching intensity strengthening of 321 km mol{sup −1} on HF dimerization and 592 km mol{sup −1} on HF:H{sub 2}O complexation can essentially be explained by charge, charge flux and their interaction cross term. Atomic contributions to the intensities are also calculated. The bridge hydrogen atomic contributions alone

  17. Fluoridation update 2014.

    PubMed

    Allukian, Myron; Wong, Chloe

    2014-01-01

    This year more than 4 million people living in 140 communities in Massachusetts will have the health and economic benefits of community water fluoridation. However Massachusetts is ranked only 37th in the country for fluoridation, with just 62 percent of the population on a public water supply living in fluoridated communities. Nationally, more than 210 million Americans, about 74.6 percent of the U.S. population on a community water supply live in fluoridated communities. PMID:25226771

  18. Two-dimensional gas chromatography-online hydrogenation for improved characterization of petrochemical samples.

    PubMed

    Potgieter, H; Bekker, R; Govender, A; Rohwer, E

    2016-05-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process produces a variety of hydrocarbons over a wide carbon number range and during subsequent product workup a large variety of synthetic fuels and chemicals are produced. The complexity of the product slate obtained from this process is well documented and the high temperature FT (HT-FT) process products are spread over gas, oil and water phases. The characterization of these phases is very challenging even when using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). Despite the increase in separation power, peak co-elution still occurs when samples containing isomeric compounds are analysed by comprehensive two dimensional GC. The separation of isomeric compounds with the same double bond equivalents is especially difficult since these compounds elute in a similar position on the GC×GC chromatogram and have identical molecular masses and similar fragmentation patterns in their electron ionization (EI) mass spectra. On-line hydrogenation after GC×GC separation is a possible way to distinguish between these isomeric compounds since the number of rings and alkene double bonds can be determined from the mass spectra of the compounds before and after hydrogenation. This paper describes development of a GC×GC method with post column hydrogenation for the determination of the backbone of cyclic/olefinic structures enabling us to differentiate between classes like dienes and cyclic olefins in complex petrochemical streams. PMID:27067493

  19. Isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in some Apollo 14 and 15 lunar samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Irving; Hardcastle, Kenneth G.; Gleason, Jim D.

    1974-01-01

    Isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in some Apollo 14 and 15 lunar samples was determined by use of a newly constructed combustion line that yields low blanks for CO2 and H2. The results from combustion of fines and breccia from Apollo 14 lunar samples and of fines, breccia, and basalt from Apollo 15 were compared with data obtained by heating samples in vacuo to over 1,350°C. The two techniques gave similar results. Total carbon in the fines ranged from 51 to 110 p/m with a C13 of +12 to -8 per mil (parts per thousand) PDB. The breccias contain 22 to 50p/mcarbon with a C13 of -21 to -25 per mil. The crystalline rock (sample 15555) has a carbon content of about 7 p/m and a C13 of -28 per mil. The total hydrogen in the fines ranges from 66 to 120 p/m with a (D/H) X 10-6 of 39 to 90. The breccias contain 8 to 38p/mH2 with a (D/H) X 10-6 of 103 to 144. The crystalline rock contains about 2 p/m H2 with a (D/H) X 10-6 of about 140. Arguments are presented to show that the contamination by earth materials is not as serious a problem as has been proposed by previous authors.

  20. Analysis of diffential absorption lidar technique for measurements of anhydrous hydrogen chloride from solid rocket motors using a deuterium fluoride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, C. H.; Allario, F.

    1977-01-01

    An active optical technique (differential absorption lidar (DIAL)) for detecting, ranging, and quantifying the concentration of anhydrous HCl contained in the ground cloud emitted by solid rocket motors (SRM) is evaluated. Results are presented of an experiment in which absorption coefficients of HCl were measured for several deuterium fluoride (DF) laser transitions demonstrating for the first time that a close overlap exists between the 2-1 P(3) vibrational transition of the DF laser and the 1-0 P(6) absorption line of HCl, with an absorption coefficient of 5.64 (atm-cm) to the -1 power. These measurements show that the DF laser can be an appropriate radiation source for detecting HCl in a DIAL technique. Development of a mathematical computer model to predict the sensitivity of DIAL for detecting anhydrous HCl in the ground cloud is outlined, and results that assume a commercially available DF laser as the radiation source are presented.

  1. Monitoring of fluoride in groundwater resources of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Vaghefi, Kooshiar Azam; Montazeri, Ahmad; Mohebbi, Mohammad Reza; Saeedi, Reza

    2010-04-01

    Fluoride concentration in groundwater resources that used as the source of drinking water in urban areas of Iran was determined. All of the groundwater wells located in urban areas were monitored in 2008. Fluoride concentration of water samples was measured using SPADNS method. The nationwide mean fluoride concentration in the groundwater resources was found to be 0.47 +/- 0.28 (+/- standard deviation) mg/L. Only in Bushehr Province, the provincial mean fluoride level in the groundwater resources was higher than the WHO guideline value of 1.5 mg/L (1.86 +/- 0.86 mg/L). At nationwide level, the portion of extracted groundwater with fluoride concentration lower than the minimum permissible level of 0.5 mg/L, desirable fluoride range of 0.5-1.5 mg/L and elevated fluoride level was 69.2, 29.3 and 1.4%, respectively. In the areas with low fluoride content drinking water, it is recommended that fluoride is absorbed by use of high fluoride content foods and beverages. The recommendations for the circumstances with excessive fluoride content of drinking water are provision of drinking water from alternative sources and defluoridation of drinking water by point-of-use systems, respectively. PMID:20306173

  2. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Water in Chennai, Tamilnadu

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Karunya; Rajapandian, K.; Gurunathan, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Context The optimum level of fluoride in drinking water is 0.7 to 1.2 ppm. Decreased fluoride concentration leads to increased risk of caries and increased concentration can lead to dental or skeletal fluorosis. One crore liters of water is supplied to Chennai and surrounding areas through pouches and bottles which carters about one third of city population. Aim The aim of this study is to determine the fluoride concentration in top 10 bottled waters in Chennai and to check the accuracy of their labelling. Materials and Methods Top selling bottled waters, 6 multinational and 4 Non- multinational brands were selected for the study. Three different batches of each brand were purchased. The labels of the bottled were removed after collecting the details regarding fluoride content. All the bottles were numbered and sent for fluoride content analysis using SPADNS calorimetric method. Results All the brands and batches which were analysed for the study had less than optimal fluoride content and there is a significant variation in fluoride concentration of each brand and among different batches of same brand bottled waters. The range of fluoride level in tested samples was between 0.27 to 0.59. Only one brand’s label had information regarding the fluoride content. Conclusion Standardization of fluoride levels in bottled waters and labelling of fluoride content should become mandatory. PMID:26557612

  3. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature. PMID:27352462

  4. A comparative assessment of fluoride concentration available in saliva using daily prescribed topical fluoride agents

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Manjit; Tewari, Amrit; Chawla, H. S.; Sachdev, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the availability of fluoride concentration in saliva following the use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice. Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out in 7–15 year-old school children of Chandigarh (n = 90). The children were nonfluoride users. Baseline saliva samples were collected. The subjects were exposed to two test agents, i.e., fluoride mouthrinse (0.05%, 225 ppm F) and dentifrice (1000 ppm F) for 7 days and on the day 8, saliva samples were collected over a 20 hrs period. Wash out period of 31/2 months was there before the subjects were exposed to the second test agent. Fluoride in saliva was estimated using fluoride ion-specific electrode. Written informed consent was taken. Statistical Analysis: Kolmogorov–Smirnov test was applied to test the normality of the variables. Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare the fluoride concentration available in saliva at respective time intervals subsequent to use of the two test agents. Results: Fluoride concentration was elevated in saliva compared to baseline for both the test agents. Fluoride mouthrinse (0.05% sodium fluoride [NaF]) and dentifrice (1000 ppm monofluorophosphate [MFP]) showed a biphasic clearance. Peak in saliva occurred at 15 mins postuse. Night-time use resulted in higher concentration of fluoride in saliva compared to baseline. There was statistically significantly higher fluoride concentration available in saliva for the dentifrice at 5 hrs, 10 hrs, and 20 hrs postuse (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Subsequent to the use of NaF (0.05%) daily mouthrinse and MFP dentifrice (1000 ppm) the fluoride concentration in saliva remained elevated to a level of 0.12 ppm for mouthrinse and 0.14 ppm for dentifrice compared to baseline (0.03 ppm) up to 20 hrs postuse. The therapeutic window though not yet established but suggested is 0.1–1 ppm for prevention of demineralization, indicating that daily use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice provides fluoride concentration in

  5. AES analysis of barium fluoride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, G. N.; Makhnjuk, V. I.; Rumjantseva, S. M.; Shchekochihin, Ju. M.

    1993-06-01

    AES analysis of thin films of metal fluorides is a difficult problem due to charging and decomposition of such films under electron bombardment. We have developed a simple algorithm for a reliable quantitative AES analysis of metal fluoride thin films (BaF 2 in our work). The relative AES sensitivity factors for barium and fluorine were determined from BaF 2 single-crystal samples. We have investigated the dependence of composition and stability of barium fluoride films on the substrate temperature during film growth. We found that the instability of BaF 2 films grown on GaAs substrates at high temperatures (> 525°C) is due to a loss of fluorine. Our results show that, under the optimal electron exposure conditions, AES can be used for a quantitative analysis of metal fluoride thin films.

  6. Well waters fluoride in Enugu, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, I Si; Okoro, O Io; Ugwuja, E I

    2012-04-01

    Abnormal fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. To determine the fluoride content of well waters in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, water samples from 50 artisan wells chosen by multistage sampling procedure from the 5 zones of Enugu municipality were analyzed in duplicates for their fluoride content. The zonal mean values were 0.60, 0.70, 0.62, 0.62, and 0.63 mg/L for Abakpa Nike, Achara Layout, Obiagu/ Ogui, Trans Ekulu and Uwani, respectively (p<0.05). The mean value for the whole city was 0.63 mg/L. Although, the mean level of fluoride recorded in this study is currently within safe limits (1.5 mg/L, WHO 2011), it is important to monitor continuously the fluoride content of well waters in the municipality in view of the increasing industrial activities going on in the city and heavy reliance on well water for domestic purposes and the widespread use of consumer products containing fluoride. PMID:23022857

  7. Fluoride in UK rivers.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin; Neal, Margaret; Davies, Helen; Smith, Jennifer

    2003-10-01

    Fluoride concentrations in eastern UK rivers (the Humber, Tweed, Wear, Great Ouse and Thames) are described based on information collected within the Land-Ocean Interaction Study (LOIS) and by the Environment Agency (EA) of England and Wales. The results show varied fluoride concentrations across the region, with a range from <0.01 to >10 mg l(-1); and mean, median and range in mean concentrations of 0.30, 0.21 and 0.05-3.38 mg l(-1) (excluding one outlier point), respectively. Within the main rivers and tributaries, the mean fluoride concentration varied from approximately 0.5 to over 2 mg l(-1) and the highest values occurred within the Don basin (Don, Dearne and Rother) and parts of the Trent basin (upper Tame and mid-upper Derbyshire Derwent) in highly industrialised and urbanised areas (Sheffield and Rotherham in the Don basin; Birmingham and Derby on the Trent). For localised inputs to the rivers, fluoride concentrations were slightly higher, and considerably higher in one outlier case. Correspondingly, the other rivers examined typically had mean fluoride concentrations between approximately 0.2 and 0.5 mg l(-1), but fluoride concentrations were lower in the headwater areas. As there is much less information on fluoride levels in upland areas, extensive data collected as part of an acid waters survey are used to show that fluoride concentrations are generally less than 0.1 mg l(-1) for the upland UK. The data are summarised in terms of both fluoride concentrations and flux, and the values are cross-referenced to other determinands collected within LOIS. The high positive correlation with boron and negative correlation with flow show the importance of point source (sewage) inputs of fluoride, while strong positive correlations between fluoride and barium indicate the relative importance of vein mineralisation in the bedrock in supplying fluoride to the waters of the Yorkshire Ouse and its tributaries. There seems to be some process that limits the fluoride

  8. DPB progress report: Hydrogen uptake capacity for a particular sample of DPB

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Maxwell, R S; Balazs, B; McLean II, W

    2004-11-09

    The authors have performed hydrogen uptake to measure the remaining capacity for two DPB pellet samples. The measurements were made with a Cahn microbalance operating at room temperature. The DPB samples were placed inside a quartz boat and the microbalance was then evacuated to a base pressure of 10{sup -4} Torr overnight. This overnight pumping removed volatile contaminants from the DPB pellets prior to the introduction of 600 Torr of N{sub 2} into the microbalance chamber. Next, a leak valve connecting the microbalance with a research grade source of H{sub 2} was opened to add 100 Torr of H{sub 2} on top of the 600 Torr of N{sub 2} already in the microbalance. When the total pressure in the microbalance reached 700 Torr, the H{sub 2} leak valve was not completely shut off but reduced to a very small positive rate. An automatic gate valve connecting the microbalance to a turbo molecular pump was programmed by a controller to keep the total pressure in the microbalance at 700 {+-} 3 Torr. The balance between H{sub 2} consumption due to DPB uptake and H{sub 2} leak rate into the microbalance was such that the gate valve to the turbo molecular pump was only slightly opened by the controller once in a while (a few seconds per few hours) to keep the total pressure constant at 700 Torr.

  9. Fluorides and non-fluoride remineralization systems.

    PubMed

    Amaechi, Bennett T; van Loveren, Cor

    2013-01-01

    Caries develops when the equilibrium between de- and remineralization is unbalanced favoring demineralization. De- and remineralization occur depending on the degree of saturation of the interstitial fluids with respect to the tooth mineral. This equilibrium is positively influenced when fluoride, calcium and phosphate ions are added favoring remineralization. In addition, when fluoride is present, it will be incorporated into the newly formed mineral which is then less soluble. Toothpastes may contain fluoride and calcium ions separately or together in various compounds (remineralization systems) and may therefore reduce demineralization and promote remineralization. Formulating all these compounds in one paste may be challenging due to possible premature calcium-fluoride interactions and the low solubility of CaF2. There is a large amount of clinical evidence supporting the potent caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpastes indisputably. The amount of clinical evidence of the effectiveness of the other remineralization systems is far less convincing. Evidence is lacking for head to head comparisons of the various remineralization systems. PMID:23817057

  10. Changes in plaque fluoride levels by school-based fluoride rinsing and tablet programs in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Abu Nasir Mohammad Nazmul; Sampaio, Fabio Correia; von der Fehr, Frithjof Ramm; Arneberg, Pål

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of school-based fluoride rinsing and tablet programs on plaque fluoride levels. A total of 42 children (8-9 years) were selected from two neighboring schools in Dhaka, Bangladesh. After caries recordings, vestibular plaque samples from the maxillary central incisors and mandibular first molars were collected and frozen on day 0 (baseline). The subjects of one school (rinsing group, n = 15) rinsed with 0.05% NaF, while those from the other school (tablet group, n = 16) used a 0.5 mg F tablet on the 5 school days during a 3-week period. The surfaces were sampled on the first and last school day every week. The fluoride and protein contents of each sample were analyzed using micro-techniques. The median plaque fluoride levels were 9.1 ppm at baseline in the rinsing group and 2.5 ppm in the tablet group (P < 0.05). This difference could in part be related to reported fluoride toothpaste usage. After 4 days on the fluoride programs, plaque fluoride levels in the rinsing group increased to 27.3, 24.5 and 14.2 ppm in the 3 consecutive weeks. The corresponding values after tablet usage were 8.0, 6.5 and 7.1 ppm, respectively. After 3 days without fluoride during the weekends, levels declined towards baseline values in both groups. Hence, the plaque fluoride levels in 8 to 9-year-old Bangladeshi children were increased by both rinsing and tablet programs, but the effect was not detectable 3 days later. PMID:12635779

  11. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  12. Massachusetts fluoridation update 2006.

    PubMed

    Allukian, Myron

    2006-01-01

    Massachusetts has a long history of activity with community water fluoridation. Although the state has 3.8 million people living in 137 fluoridated communities, there are more than 2 million people who do not have these benefits. The Bay State is ranked 35th in the country regarding the percent of people on public water supplies with fluoridation. We can do better than that. We have more than 60 years of experience receiving the health and economic benefits of fluoridation in our country; however, there is still a lot of misinformation about fluoridation, and the unreliable nature of information posted on the Internet exacerbates much of this misinformation. Dental professionals, their patients, and decision-makers must be continuously educated about the safety, health, and economic benefits of community water fluoridation. Patients from 6 months to 16 years of age living in nonfluoridated communities should be prescribed supplemental fluoride. Dental professionals in nonfluoridated communities should assist them to become fluoridated. All dental professionals need to become more involved in the leadership of their communities. PMID:16683510

  13. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation. PMID:27105409

  14. Indium fluoride glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    Fluoride glasses are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride glass fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide glass fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride glass fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride glasses have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.

  15. Evaluation and calibration of a pulsed neutron method for total hydrogen determination in mineral and concrete samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennun, L.; Santibañez, M.; Gomez, J.; Santisteban, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    We studied the feasibility of a nondestructive method to determine hydrogen concentrations in concrete and mineral samples. The amount of total hydrogen in the sample is directly related to the proportion of water included in the paste preparation; and also considers all subsequent processes which can add or remove hydrogen in a real sample (like rain, evaporation, etc.). The hydrogen proportion is a critical variable in the curing concrete process; its excess or deficiency impacts negatively in the quality of the final product. The proposed technique is based on a pulsed neutron source and the technical support of the time of flight, which allow discriminating epithermal neutrons interacting with hydrogen (inelastic scattering) from the elastic and quasi-isotropic scattering produced by other kinds of atoms. The method was externally calibrated in limestone rocks fragments (CaCO3-main material used in cement fabrication) and in steel, allowing an easy retrieval of the required information. The technique's simplicity may facilitate the development of a mobile measuring device in order to make determinations "in situ." In this paper, we describe the foundations of the proposed method and various analysis results.

  16. Ion release from, and fluoride recharge of a composite with a fluoride-containing bioactive glass

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Harry B.; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C.; Ferracane, Jack L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Materials that are capable of releasing ions such as calcium and fluoride, that are necessary for remineralization of dentin and enamel, have been the topic of intensive research for many years. The source of calcium has most often been some form of calcium phosphate, and that for fluoride has been one of several metal fluoride or hexafluorophosphate salts. Fluoride-containing bioactive glass (BAG) prepared by the sol-gel method acts as a single source of both calcium and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions. The objective of this investigation was to determine if BAG, when added to a composite formulation, can be used as a single source for calcium and fluoride ion release over an extended time period, and to determine if the BAG-containing composite can be recharged upon exposure to a solution of 5,000 ppm fluoride. Methods BAG 61 (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) and BAG 81 (81% Si; 11% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol gel method. The composite used was composed of 50/50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA, 0.8% EDMAB, 0.4% CQ, and 0.05% BHT, combined with a mixture of BAG (15%) and strontium glass (85%) to a total filler load of 72% by weight. Disks were prepared, allowed to age for 24 h, abraded, then placed into DI water. Calcium and fluoride release was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and fluoride ion selective electrode methods, respectively, after 2, 22, and 222 h. The composite samples were then soaked for 5 min in an aqueous 5,000 ppm fluoride solution, after which calcium and fluoride release was again measured at 2, 22, and 222 h time points. Results Prior to fluoride recharge, release of fluoride ions was similar for the BAG 61 and BAG 81 composites after 2 h, and also similar after 22 h. At the four subsequent time points, one prior to, and three following fluoride recharge, the BAG 81 composite released significantly more fluoride ions (p<0.05). Both composites were recharged by exposure to 5,000 ppm fluoride, although the BAG 81

  17. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    PubMed

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room. PMID:26574102

  18. Interaction of Pipeline Materials with Molten Fluoride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimo, Tomáš; Matal, Oldřich; Nesvadba, Lukáś; Dvořák, Vladimír; Kanický, Viktor; Sulovský, Petr; Machát, Jiří

    2007-12-01

    Molten fluoride salts are very promising carriers for the transport of large amounts of heat for example from a high temperature nuclear reactor to a plant which generates hydrogen by chemical processes or from a nuclear reactor to a heat exchanger being a part of the equipment needed to realize the Brayton cycle with a very high power efficiency. Therefore, in the framework of our project, experimental and theoretical investigations of the interactions of fluoride salts as heat carriers needed as high potential and structural materials for pipelines in order to transport heat at temperatures above 600◦C were started. Experimental investigations of Fe-based and Ni-based materials in molten fluoride salts at high temperatures and with different exposure times were performed. Two components salts (LiF-NaF and NaF-NaBF4) and three components salts (LiF-NaF-ZrF4 and LiF-NaF-RbF) were chosen in the experiments. The salt analysis was focussed on the content of metallic elements before and after the exposure of the samples to the salt melts. It was done by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and by titrimetric techniques. The thickness of the material zone affected by the salt melts, characterized by an enriched / reduced content of elements in comparison to the mean original content, and the material attacked zone, characterized by very tiny channels or chains of pores or pits formed preferably at grain boundaries, were the subject of the analysis performed by electron microscopy / microprobe techniques. Theoretical models for the transport of elements in the material samples exposed to salt melts using experimental data were also developed.

  19. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  20. Determination of fluoride in the bottled drinking waters in iran.

    PubMed

    Amanlou, Massoud; Hosseinpour, Maedeh; Azizian, Homa; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Navabpoor, Mojtaba; Souri, Effat

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride is recognized as an effective agent for dental caries prevention. Generally, the main source of fluoride intake is drinking water. In this study, fluoride content in 18 commercial brands of bottled waters was investigated. Six samples from each batch of 18 Iranian commercial brands of bottled waters were supplied. The fluoride content of samples was analyzed by Fluoride Ion Selective Electrode. The mean ± SD fluoride content of the bottled waters was 0.202 ± 0.00152 mg/L with a range from 0.039 to 0.628 mg/L which was lower than the accepted limits for fluoride content of drinking water (1 mg/L). This finding suggested that in the region which water has high fluoride content, drinking bottled water is preferred to drinking tap water, as it could lower the risk of fluorosis. However, the risk of dental caries increases in people who mainly drink bottled waters; thus, they should use fluoride supplements. PMID:24363704

  1. The Effect of Calcium Pre-Rinse on Salivary Fluoride After 900 ppm Fluoride Mouthwash: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Nahid; Ahmadi, Rahil; Heidari, Zahra; Hushmandi, Arezoo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Calcium fluoride deposit during fluoride application. Uptake and retention of fluoride by saliva depends generally on the concentration of calcium. In this study, the effect of calcium pre-rinse on salivary fluoride concentration after a 900 ppm fluoride mouthwash was investigated. Materials and Methods: This cross-over double-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted in a girls’ dormitory in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, southeast Iran. In this study, 42 female dental students were chosen using simple randomization. During the first phase, 21 subjects (group A) used fluoride rinse (F regimen) and the remaining (group B) used calcium pre-rinse followed immediately by fluoride rinse (Ca + F regimen). In the second phase, participants rinsed using the mouthwashes not previously used. Prior to each phase prophylaxis was performed and no fluoridated product was used during a two-week interval between the phases. Salivary samples were taken immediately before (baseline), 1 and 12 hours after rinsing. The salivary fluoride concentration was determined using fluoride sensitive electrode. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: There was significant difference between fluoride concentrations at different time points (P< 0.001). Significant differences were observed when the different time points of two regimens were examined. In contrast to this, the baseline before using F regimen and the baseline before using Ca + F regimen did not show any significance (P= 0.070). Conclusion: Pre-rinsing with calcium before fluoride is recommended because of significant increases in salivary fluoride concentration. PMID:24396357

  2. Novel fluorogenic probe for fluoride ion based on the fluoride-induced cleavage of tert-butyldimethylsilyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2007-06-01

    A highly sensitive and selective fluorogenic probe for fluoride ion, 4-methylumbelliferyl tert-butyldimethylsilyl ether (4-MUTBS), was designed and synthesized. 4-MUTBS was a weakly fluorescent compound and was synthesized via the one-step reaction of 4-MU with tert-butyldimethylsilyl chloride. Upon incubation with fluoride ion in acetone-water solution (7:3, v/v), the Si-O bond of 4-MUTBS was cleaved and highly fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) was released, hence leading to the fluorescence increase of the reaction solution. The fluorescence increase is linearly with fluoride concentration in the range 50-8000 nmol l -1 with a detection limit of 19 nmol l -1 (3 σ). Because of the high affinity of silicon toward fluoride ion, the proposed probe shows excellent selectivity toward fluoride ion over other anions. The method has been successfully applied to the fluoride determination in toothpaste and tap water samples.

  3. Exhaustive Metropolis Monte Carlo sampling and analysis of polyalanine conformations adopted under the influence of hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A; Wild, David L

    2005-10-01

    We propose a novel Metropolis Monte Carlo procedure for protein modeling and analyze the influence of hydrogen bonding on the distribution of polyalanine conformations. We use an atomistic model of the polyalanine chain with rigid and planar polypeptide bonds, and elastic alpha carbon valence geometry. We adopt a simplified energy function in which only hard-sphere repulsion and hydrogen bonding interactions between the atoms are considered. Our Metropolis Monte Carlo procedure utilizes local crankshaft moves and is combined with parallel tempering to exhaustively sample the conformations of 16-mer polyalanine. We confirm that Flory's isolated-pair hypothesis (the steric independence between the dihedral angles of individual amino acids) does not hold true in long polypeptide chains. In addition to 3(10)- and alpha-helices, we identify a kink stabilized by 2 hydrogen bonds with a shared acceptor as a common structural motif. Varying the strength of hydrogen bonds, we induce the helix-coil transition in the model polypeptide chain. We compare the propensities for various hydrogen bonding patterns and determine the degree of cooperativity of hydrogen bond formation in terms of the Hill coefficient. The observed helix-coil transition is also quantified according to Zimm-Bragg theory. PMID:16049911

  4. Analysis of Material Sample Heated by Impinging Hot Hydrogen Jet in a Non-Nuclear Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    A computational conjugate heat transfer methodology was developed and anchored with data obtained from a hot-hydrogen jet heated, non-nuclear materials tester, as a first step towards developing an efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective and thermal radiative, and conjugate heat transfers. Predicted hot hydrogen jet and material surface temperatures were compared with those of measurement. Predicted solid temperatures were compared with those obtained with a standard heat transfer code. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  5. Rhizon sampler alteration of deep ocean sediment interstitial water samples, as indicated by chloride concentration and oxygen and hydrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Madeline D.; Adkins, Jess F.; Hodell, David A.

    2014-06-01

    their potential to inform past ocean salinity, δ18O, and temperature, high-resolution depth profiles of interstitial water chloride concentration and hydrogen and oxygen isotopes exist in very few locations. One of the primary limitations to the recovery of these depth profiles is that traditional interstitial water sampling requires 5-10 cm whole rounds of the sediment core, which has the potential to interfere with stratigraphic continuity. The Rhizon sampler, a nondestructive tool developed for terrestrial sediment interstitial water extraction, has been proposed for efficient and nondestructive sampling of ocean sediment pore waters. However, there exists little documentation on the reliability and performance of Rhizon samplers in deep ocean sediments, particularly in regard to their effect on chloride concentration and oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements. We perform an intercomparison of chloride concentration and oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition in samples taken using traditional squeezing versus those taken with Rhizon samplers. We find that samples taken with Rhizons have positive biases in both chloride concentration and stable isotopic ratios relative to those taken by squeezing water from sediments in a hydraulic press. The measured offsets between Rhizon and squeeze samples are consistent with a combination of absorption by and diffusive fractionation through the hydrophilic membrane of the Rhizon sampler. These results suggest caution is needed when using Rhizons for sampling interstitial waters in any research of processes that leave a small signal-to-noise ratio in dissolved concentrations or isotope ratios.

  6. Geological sources of fluoride and acceptable intake of fluoride in an endemic fluorosis area, southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Battaleb-Looie, Sedigheh; Moore, Farid; Jacks, Gunnar; Ketabdari, Mohammad Reza

    2012-10-01

    The present study is the first attempt to put forward possible source(s) of fluoride in the Dashtestan area, Bushehr Province, southern Iran. In response to reports on the high incidence of dental fluorosis, 35 surface and groundwater samples were collected and analysed for fluoride. The results indicate that dissolved fluoride in the study area is above the maximum permissible limit recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). An additional 35 soil and rock samples were also collected and analysed for fluoride, and rock samples were subjected to petrographic investigations and X-ray diffraction. The results of these analyses show that the most likely source for fluoride in the groundwater is from clay minerals (chlorite) and micas (muscovite, sericite, and biotite) in the soils and rocks in the area. We also note that due to the high average temperatures all year round and excessive water consumption in the area, the optimum fluoride dose level should be lower than that recommended by the WHO. PMID:22426705

  7. Fluoride geochemistry of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: I. Aqueous fluoride speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yamin; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Blaine McCleskey, R.

    2011-08-01

    Thermal water samples from Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have a wide range of pH (1-10), temperature, and high concentrations of fluoride (up to 50 mg/l). High fluoride concentrations are found in waters with field pH higher than 6 (except those in Crater Hills) and temperatures higher than 50 °C based on data from more than 750 water samples covering most thermal areas in YNP from 1975 to 2008. In this study, more than 140 water samples from YNP collected in 2006-2009 were analyzed for free-fluoride activity by ion-selective electrode (ISE) method as an independent check on the reliability of fluoride speciation calculations. The free to total fluoride concentration ratio ranged from <1% at low pH values to >99% at high pH. The wide range in fluoride activity can be explained by strong complexing with H + and Al 3+ under acidic conditions and lack of complexing under basic conditions. Differences between the free-fluoride activities calculated with the WATEQ4F code and those measured by ISE were within 0.3-30% for more than 90% of samples at or above 10 -6 molar, providing corroboration for chemical speciation models for a wide range of pH and chemistry of YNP thermal waters. Calculated speciation results show that free fluoride, F -, and major complexes ( HF(aq)0, AlF 2+, AlF2+ and AlF30) account for more than 95% of total fluoride. Occasionally, some complex species like AlF4-, FeF 2+, FeF2+, MgF + and BF(OH)2- may comprise 1-10% when the concentrations of the appropriate components are high. According to the simulation results by PHREEQC and calculated results, the ratio of main fluoride species to total fluoride varies as a function of pH and the concentrations and ratios of F and Al.

  8. Fluoride geochemistry of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: I. Aqueous fluoride speciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deng, Y.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Blaine, McCleskey R.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal water samples from Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have a wide range of pH (1-10), temperature, and high concentrations of fluoride (up to 50mg/l). High fluoride concentrations are found in waters with field pH higher than 6 (except those in Crater Hills) and temperatures higher than 50??C based on data from more than 750 water samples covering most thermal areas in YNP from 1975 to 2008. In this study, more than 140 water samples from YNP collected in 2006-2009 were analyzed for free-fluoride activity by ion-selective electrode (ISE) method as an independent check on the reliability of fluoride speciation calculations. The free to total fluoride concentration ratio ranged from <1% at low pH values to >99% at high pH. The wide range in fluoride activity can be explained by strong complexing with H+ and Al3+ under acidic conditions and lack of complexing under basic conditions. Differences between the free-fluoride activities calculated with the WATEQ4F code and those measured by ISE were within 0.3-30% for more than 90% of samples at or above 10-6 molar, providing corroboration for chemical speciation models for a wide range of pH and chemistry of YNP thermal waters. Calculated speciation results show that free fluoride, F-, and major complexes (HF(aq)0, AlF2+, AlF2+ and AlF30) account for more than 95% of total fluoride. Occasionally, some complex species like AlF4-, FeF2+, FeF2+, MgF+ and BF2(OH)2- may comprise 1-10% when the concentrations of the appropriate components are high. According to the simulation results by PHREEQC and calculated results, the ratio of main fluoride species to total fluoride varies as a function of pH and the concentrations and ratios of F and Al. ?? 2011.

  9. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Isman, R

    1981-07-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media. PMID:7246838

  10. Fluoride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... broken through the gums have changes in the enamel that covers the teeth. Faint white lines or ... regarding fluoride intake from reconstituted infant formula and enamel fluorosis: a report of the American Dental Association ...

  11. Fluoride toothpastes, rinses, and tablets.

    PubMed

    Stephen, K W

    1994-07-01

    Only from the mid-1950's has therapeutic benefit been obtained via dentifrices, initially with stannous fluoride-then monofluorophosphate-containing products which remained stable and efficacious. Altered abrasive systems followed, and both sodium fluoride and monofluorophosphate/sodium fluoride mixtures were introduced as active anti-caries agents, with recent meta-analysis indicating that sodium fluoride > monofluorophosphate/sodium fluoride > monofluorophosphate. With respect to fluoride levels, clear dose-response relationships have been demonstrated. However, at < 1000 ppm F, the situation is less certain. Since the mid-1980's, anticalculus fluoride dentifrices have been marketed, and have been shown to have similar caries-reducing potential as their non-calculus-inhibiting control formulae. Finally, one study has been described where a sodium fluoride dentifrice successfully reduced root caries. Of the many fluoride formulations used for caries-inhibiting mouthrinsing [e.g., acid phosphate fluoride (100-3000 ppm F), sodium fluoride (45-3000 ppm F), stannous fluoride (100-250 ppm F), ammonium fluoride (1000 ppm F), and amine fluoride (250 ppm F)], sodium fluoride would seem to be the preferred agent. Furthermore, rinse frequency is deemed more important than fluoride ion concentration, but caution is urged re the volumes and concentrations to be used by children, no rinsing being recommended below 4 years. Combination of a 440-pp-F sodium fluoride and 0.05% chlorhexidine school-administered rinse appears to have increased the caries-inhibiting benefit as compared with sodium fluoride alone. Fluoride supplements have reduced deciduous caries from 14 to 93%, and in the permanent dentition, from 20 to 81%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7865074

  12. Hydrogen Storage in Diamond Powder Utilizing Plasma NaF Surface Treatment for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, David A.; Leal-Quiros, E.; Velez, Angel; Prelas, Mark A.; Gosh, Tushar

    2006-12-04

    Hydrogen Fuel Cells offer the vital solution to the world's socio-political dependence on oil. Due to existing difficulty in safe and efficient hydrogen storage for fuel cells, storing the hydrogen in hydrocarbon compounds such as artificial diamond is a realistic solution. By treating the surface of the diamond powder with a Sodium Fluoride plasma exposure, the surface of the diamond is cleaned of unwanted molecules. Due to fluorine's electro negativity, the diamond powder is activated and ready for hydrogen absorption. These diamond powder pellets are then placed on a graphite platform that is heated by conduction in a high voltage circuit made of tungsten wire. Then, the injection of hydrogen gas into chamber allows the storage of the Hydrogen on the surface of the diamond powder. By neutron bombardment in the nuclear reactor, or Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis, the samples are examined for parts per million amounts of hydrogen in the sample. Sodium Fluoride surface treatment allows for higher mass percentage of stored hydrogen in a reliable, resistant structure, such as diamond for fuel cells and permanently alters the diamonds terminal bonds for re-use in the effective storage of hydrogen. The highest stored amount utilizing the NaF plasma surface treatment was 22229 parts per million of hydrogen in the diamond powder which amounts to 2.2229% mass increase.

  13. Survey of fluoride levels in vended water stations.

    PubMed

    Jadav, Urvi G; Archarya, Bhavini S; Velasquez, Gisela M; Vance, Bradley J; Tate, Robert H; Quock, Ryan L

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to measure the fluoride concentration of water derived from vended water stations (VWS) and to identify its clinical implications, especially with regard to caries prevention and fluorosis. VWS and corresponding tap water samples were collected from 34 unique postal zip codes; samples were analyzed in duplicate for fluoride concentration. Average fluoride concentration in VWS water was significantly lower than that of tap water (P < 0.001). Fluoride concentration in the VWS water ranged from <0.01 ppm to 0.04 ppm, with a mean concentration of 0.02 ppm (±0.02 ppm). Patients utilizing VWS as their primary source of drinking water may not be receiving optimal caries preventive benefits; thus dietary fluoride supplementation may be indicated. Conversely, to minimize the risk of fluorosis in infants consuming reconstituted infant formula, water from a VWS may be used. PMID:25184716

  14. A study to investigate fluoride contamination and fluoride exposure dose assessment in lateritic zones of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Samal, Alok C; Bhattacharya, Piyal; Mallick, Anusaya; Ali, Md Motakabber; Pyne, Jagadish; Santra, Subhas C

    2015-04-01

    To assess the status of severity of fluoride contamination in lateritic Bankura and Purulia districts of West Bengal, concentrations of fluoride in different water sources and agricultural field soils were investigated. The fluoride content (mg/l) was observed to differ with aquifer depths: 0.19-0.47 in dug wells, 0.01-0.17 in shallow tube wells, and 0.07-1.6 in deep tube wells. Fluoride within the World Health Organization (WHO) prescribed range (1.0-1.5 mg/l) was estimated only in ~17% of the total collected water samples while ~67% showed <0.7 mg/l fluoride and thus may impede in the production and maintenance of healthy teeth and bones of the residents, especially children. Fluoride in water was found to be significantly correlated (r = 0.63) with pH. The exposure dose of fluoride (mg/kg/day) from drinking water in infants, children, and adults was estimated in the ranges 0.02-0.53, 0.01-0.24, and 0.01-0.14, respectively against the standard value of 0.05. A clear risk of dental fluorosis is apparent in infants and children of the study area. The fluoride in soil (55-399 mg/kg) was detected to be significantly correlated with the fluoride content in deep tube wells and soil pH (r = 0.56 and 0.71, respectively). The relationships of soil fluoride with total hardness and that with phosphate were not significant. There is a high possibility of bioaccumulation of fluoride from contaminated soil and water of the study area to cultivated crops. This will enhance the quantity of fluoride intake into human food chain in addition to drinking water pathway. PMID:25408071

  15. Analysis of hydrogen peroxide field samples by HPLC/FD and HPLC/ED in DC mode.

    PubMed

    Tarvin, Megan; McCord, Bruce; Mount, Kelly; Miller, Mark L

    2011-06-15

    The goal of this paper is to describe applications of two recently developed HPLC methods for the analysis and confirmation of the presence of hydrogen peroxide residues in field studies. The procedure utilizes two different HPLC systems, one with post-column derivatization followed by fluorescence detection (HPLC/FD), and the other with electrochemical detection (HPLC/ED). The two systems were utilized to detect hydrogen peroxide in a variety of typical forensic samples including pre- and post-blast samples, as well as a series of environmental control samples. Peroxide-based organic explosives were also examined due to their propensity to produce peroxide residues following detonation. Because samples collected from post-blast scenes are frequently shipped or stored prior to analysis, the effects of storage time, temperature and type of substrate material on the recovery of hydrogen peroxide residues were also investigated. The combined results of the study demonstrate the capability of two HPLC approaches with selective detection in the analysis and investigation of suspected incidents involving peroxide based explosives. PMID:21324615

  16. Effect of exercise on fluoride metabolism in adult humans: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    V Zohoori, Fatemeh; Innerd, Alison; Azevedo, Liane B; Whitford, Gary M; Maguire, Anne

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of all aspects of fluoride metabolism is critical to identify its biological effects and avoid fluoride toxicity in humans. Fluoride metabolism and subsequently its body retention may be affected by physiological responses to acute exercise. This pilot study investigated the effect of exercise on plasma fluoride concentration, urinary fluoride excretion and fluoride renal clearance following no exercise and three exercise intensity conditions in nine healthy adults after taking a 1-mg Fluoride tablet. After no, light, moderate and vigorous exercise, respectively, the mean (SD) baseline-adjusted i) plasma fluoride concentration was 9.6(6.3), 11.4(6.3), 15.6(7.7) and 14.9(10.0) ng/ml; ii) rate of urinary fluoride excretion over 0-8 h was 46(15), 44(22), 34(17) and 36(17) μg/h; and iii) rate of fluoride renal clearance was 26.5(9.0), 27.2(30.4), 13.1(20.4) and 18.3(34.9) ml/min. The observed trend of a rise in plasma fluoride concentration and decline in rate of fluoride renal clearance with increasing exercise intensity needs to be investigated in a larger trial. This study, which provides the first data on the effect of exercise with different intensities on fluoride metabolism in humans, informs sample size planning for any subsequent definitive trial, by providing a robust estimate of the variability of the effect. PMID:26581340

  17. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Windt, Norman F.; Williams, Joe L.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  18. Photoelastic properties of magnesium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; Carleton, H.R.

    1980-05-01

    Magnesium fluoride (MgF/sub 2/) has the rutile crystal structure with a tetragonal space lattice (P4/mnm). The crystal is uniaxial positive with n/sub omega/ = 1.378 and n/sub epsilon/ = 1.390 for sodium D light. A single crystal of MgF/sub 2/ grown by the Materials Research Corporation was used in this study. The crystal was approximately 1 cm/sup 3/ with polished faces in the (001), (110), and (anti 110) crystal planes as verified by the back-reflection Laue method. Sample preparations and measurements are described.

  19. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study.

    PubMed

    Olaka, Lydia A; Wilke, Franziska D H; Olago, Daniel O; Odada, Eric O; Mulch, Andreas; Musolff, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02-75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F(-) concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2-9.2mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27-75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from -6.2 to +5.8‰ and -31.3 to +33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750-6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (<1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F(-) enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management in Naivasha as well as similar

  20. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    MedlinePlus

    ... from my well has less than the recommended level of fluoride for preventing tooth decay? The recommended ... if the water from my well has fluoride levels that are higher than the recommended level for ...

  1. Ion chromatography detection of fluoride in calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Jamie E; Ivey, Michelle M

    2011-09-01

    Fluoride in aquatic systems is increasing due to anthropogenic pollution, but little is known about how this fluoride affects organisms that live in and around aquatic habitats. Fluoride can bioaccumulate in structures comprised of calcium carbonate, such as shells and skeletons of both freshwater and saltwater species as diverse as snails, corals, and coccolithophorid algae. In this article, ion chromatography (IC) techniques are developed to detect and quantify fluoride in a matrix of calcium carbonate. Solid samples are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, pretreated to remove the majority of the chloride ions, and then analyzed using IC. With these methods, the 3σ limit of detection is 0.2 mg of fluoride/kg of calcium carbonate. PMID:21859530

  2. Method for converting UF5 to UF4 in a molten fluoride salt

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Melvin R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.; Kelmers, A. Donald

    1977-01-01

    The reduction of UF.sub.5 to UF.sub.4 in a molten fluoride salt by sparging with hydrogen is catalyzed by metallic platinum. The reaction is also catalyzed by platinum alloyed with gold reaction equipment.

  3. MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

    1960-01-01

    Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

  4. Oxygen-hydrogen meter assembly for use in remote sodium sampling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, G.B.; Bohringer, A.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    An assembly of an electrolytic oxygen meter and a diffusion type hydrogen meter was designed to fit into the Multipurpose Sampler hardware already installed and operating on the four FFTF sodium systems. One of the key elements in this assembly is a ceramic-metal sealed oxygen sensor which allows use of a metal tube to extend the 51 cm (20 in.) between the sampler top and the flowing sodium region.

  5. Four-sample lactose hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Fox, Mark; Chu, Hua; Zheng, Xia; Long, Yan-Qin; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Dai, Ning

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To validate 4-sample lactose hydrogen breath testing (4SLHBT) compared to standard 13-sample LHBT in the clinical setting. METHODS: Irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea (IBS-D) and healthy volunteers (HVs) were enrolled and received a 10 g, 20 g, or 40 g dose lactose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. The lactase gene promoter region was sequenced. Breath samples and symptoms were acquired at baseline and every 15 min for 3 h (13 measurements). The detection rates of lactose malabsorption (LM) and lactose intolerance (LI) for a 4SLHBT that acquired four measurements at 0, 90, 120, and 180 min from the same data set were compared with the results of standard LHBT. RESULTS: Sixty IBS-D patients and 60 HVs were studied. The genotype in all participants was C/C-13910. LM and LI detection rates increased with lactose dose from 10 g, 20 g to 40 g in both groups (P < 0.001). 4SLHBT showed excellent diagnostic concordance with standard LHBT (97%-100%, Kappa​​ 0.815-0.942) with high sensitivity (90%-100%) and specificity (100%) at all three lactose doses in both groups. CONCLUSION: Reducing the number of measurements from 13 to 4 samples did not significantly impact on the accuracy of LHBT in health and IBS-D. 4SLHBT is a valid test for assessment of LM and LI in clinical practice. PMID:26140004

  6. Ferrimyoglobin-Fluoride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an experiment which is designed to investigate the reaction of the protein ferrimyoglobin with fluoride. The activity uses readily available apparatus and the technique of optical absorbance for measurement of concentrations. Experimental design, procedures, and treatment of the equilibrium data are detailed. (CW)

  7. Other Fluoride Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... in preventing tooth decay in people of all ages. Use the information listed below to compare the other fluoride products ... even among children younger than 6 years of age. Proper application technique ... cleared for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as ...

  8. Fluorine (soluble fluoride)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fluorine ( soluble fluoride ) ; CASRN 7782 - 41 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  9. Short-term fluoride release from various aesthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Tham, S Y; Zhu, L Y; Lee, H K

    2002-01-01

    The short-term fluoride release of a giomer (Reactmer), a compomer (Dyract AP), a conventional glass ionomer cement (Fuji II Cap) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC) was evaluated and compared. Specimen discs (6 +/-0.2 mm diameter and 1 +/- 0.2 mm thick) were prepared for each material using custom molds. Each disc was placed in 1 ml of deionized for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. After one day, the water was extracted and analyzed. The specimen discs were then re-immersed into another 1 ml of fresh deionized water. The procedure of removing and refilling the water was repeated for 28 days. Sample solutions taken during the first seven days and at days 14, 21 and 28 were introduced into a capillary electrophoresis system using field amplified sample injection (FASI) to determine fluoride release. Data was analyzed using factorial ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc test at significance level 0.05. An initial fluoride "burst" effect was observed with glass ionomers. Both compomer and giomer did not show an initial fluoride "burst" effect. With the exception of the compomer, fluoride release at day one was generally significantly greater than at the other time intervals. The glass ionomers released significantly more fluoride than the compomer and giomer at day one. Although fluoride release of the giomer was significantly greater than the other materials at day seven, it became significantly lower at day 28. PMID:12022457

  10. The stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, J.D.; Schroder, L.J.; Morden-Moore, A. L.; Bowersox, V.C.

    1995-01-01

    Separate experiments by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Illinois State Water Survey Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) independently assessed the stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures. The USGS experiment represented a test of sample stability under a diverse range of conditions, whereas the CAL experiment was a controlled test of sample stability. In the experiment by the USGS, a statistically significant (?? = 0.05) relation between [H+] and time was found for the composited filtered, natural, wet-deposition solution when all reported values are included in the analysis. However, if two outlying pH values most likely representing measurement error are excluded from the analysis, the change in [H+] over time was not statistically significant. In the experiment by the CAL, randomly selected samples were reanalyzed between July 1984 and February 1991. The original analysis and reanalysis pairs revealed that [H+] differences, although very small, were statistically different from zero, whereas specific-conductance differences were not. Nevertheless, the results of the CAL reanalysis project indicate there appears to be no consistent, chemically significant degradation in sample integrity with regard to [H+] and specific conductance while samples are stored at room temperature at the CAL. Based on the results of the CAL and USGS studies, short-term (45-60 day) stability of [H+] and specific conductance in natural filtered wet-deposition samples that are shipped and stored unchilled at ambient temperatures was satisfactory.

  11. Potential Energy Curves of Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fallon, Robert J.; Vanderslice, Joseph T.; Mason, Edward A.

    1960-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the X(sup 1)sigma+ and V(sup 1)sigma+ states of HF and DF have been calculated by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. The results calculated from the different sets of data for HF and DF are found to be in very good agreement. The theoretical results of Karo are compared to the experimental results obtained here.

  12. A neutral hydrogen survey of polar-ring galaxies, 1: Green Bank observations of the northern sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, O.-G.; Sackett, P. D.; Sparke, L. S.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of a neutral hydrogen survey conducted with the Green Bank 140 foot radio telescope of 47 northern objects in the polar-ring galaxy atlas of Whitmore et al. (1990). We detected 39 of these above our detection limit of 1.7 Jy km/s; the average measured flux of 21 Jy km/s corresponds to an average neutral hydrogen mass of 5.3 x 109 solar mass for a Hubble constant of Hzero = 75 km/s/Mpc. For the polar-ring galaxies in our sample that have also been observed with radio arrays, we find that the 21 full width at half maximum (FWHM) Green Bank beam often includes much more flux than found by the synthesis instruments for the polar rings alone; some of these galaxies are known to have gas-rich companions. We compare the neutral hydrogen content of the sample to the blue luminosity and Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) fluxes. The H I-mass-to-blue-light ratios of the confirmed and probable polar rings are around unity in solar units, indicating that polar-ring galaxies (or their environments) are as gas-rich as typical irregular galaxies. For their blue luminosity, the confirmed polar rings are underluminous in the far infrared, as compared with the rest of the sample. They are also far infrared (FIR) underluminous for their H I masses, which suggests that most of the gas in the ring may be in stable orbits, rather than flowing inward to trigger star formation in the central galaxy. The more disordered class of 'related objects,' which includes a number of obvious mergers, is highly luminous in the far infrared. Detailed notes for each galaxy, including information about companions within the GB 140 min beam that may contribute to the total H I line integral and its width, are contained in the Appendix.

  13. Comparison of two stable hydrogen isotope-ratio measurement techniques on Antarctic surface-water and ice samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopple, J.A.; Hannon, J.E.; Coplen, T.B.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison of the new hydrogen isotope-ratio technique of Vaughn et al. ([Vaughn, B.H., White, J.W.C., Delmotte, M., Trolier, M., Cattani, O., Stievenard, M., 1998. An automated system for hydrogen isotope analysis of water. Chem. Geol. (Isot. Geosci. Sect.), 152, 309-319]; the article immediately preceding this article) for the analysis of water samples utilizing automated on-line reduction by elemental uranium showed that 94% of 165 samples of Antarctic snow, ice, and stream water agreed with the ??2H values determined by H2-H2O platinum equilibration, exhibiting a bias of +0.5??? and a 2 - ?? variation of 1.9???. The isotopic results of 10 reduction technique samples, however, gave ??2H values that differed by 3.5??? or more, and were too negative by as much as 5.4??? and too positive by as much as 4.9??? with respect to those determined using the platinum equilibration technique.

  14. Response of grapevines to fluoride under field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, F.

    1983-07-01

    Grapevines (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) were fumigated in open-top chambers with hydrogen fluoride for 64 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.17 or 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/. Other grapevines grown under ambient conditions in the vineyard or maintained in control chambers were exposed to 0.13 or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, respectively. Leaves of grapevines exposed to 0.28, 0.17, 0.13, or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ accumulated up to 85, 55, 20, or 11 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was observed on plants exposed to 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, but no injury symptoms were observed at 0.17 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ or in control plants. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions had significantly greater mean bunch weight, peduncle weight, number of grapes per bunch, and leaf protein levels than the fumigated treatments. However, these differences may be associated with a chamber effect rather than with an effect of fluoride on grapevines. No significant differences were found between treatments for grape potential alcohol content, fruit acids, number of bunches or grapes per vine, fresh weight of grapes, or leaf chlorophyll content, despite foliar fluoride concentrations in the highest fluoride fumigation level reaching 85 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/. No evidence was found of significant fluoride accumulation in berries or canes. 26 references, 4 tables.

  15. Rapid determination of fluoride in potable waters by potentiometric flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, D.E.; Mulcahy, D.E.; O'Connell, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    A potentiometric flow injection analysis system is described, enabling tap water and other fluoride-bearing matrices of low interferent level to be determined at the rate of 360 samples per hour using an electrode polished with slurried alumina. Important parameters, such as carrier stream composition, sample volume and detector cell design are discussed with respect to their system. Fluoride electrodes regenerated with silver fluoride and silver epoxy are evaluated in flow injection mode, both before and after polishing.

  16. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Windt, N.F.; Williams, J.L.

    In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel contianing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  17. Sensitivity of two biomarkers for biomonitoring exposure to fluoride in children and women: A study in a volcanic area.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Diana Paula Silva; Garcia, Patrícia Ventura; Amaral, Leslie; Ferreira, Teresa; Cury, Jaime A; Vieira, Waldomiro; Rodrigues, Armindo Dos Santos

    2016-07-01

    The natural enrichment of water with fluoride is related to natural sources such as volcanic activity, with it being documented that fluorosis, an endemic and widespread disease in volcanic areas, is associated to the ingestion of high levels of fluoride through water. Thus, in this study, we aimed to define the fluoride concentration in drinking waters of volcanic origin and compare the sensitivity of urine and nail clippings as biomarkers for fluoride exposure in adults and children. Samples of drinking water from four villages in São Miguel Island (Azores) were used and the fluoride concentration was determined, as well the fluoride content in urine and toenails clippings from 66 children and 63 adults from these villages. A validated diet questionnaire, assessing sources of fluoride, was recorded for each participant. The fluoride determination in urine and nail clipping samples was made using a fluoride-specific electrode. A positive correlation was found between the fluoride daily intake and fluoride content in children urine (rs = 0.475; p < 0.001) and in their nail clippings (rs = 0.475; p < 0.001), while in adult women, the fluoride daily intake correlated positively with fluoride content nail clippings (rs = 0.495, p < 0.001). This reveals that nail clippings are more reliable as biomarkers of chronic exposure to fluoride than urine for populations of different ages (children vs. adults). Furthermore, nail clippings are more suitable than urine fluoride levels to assess long term exposure to fluoride in areas where the exposure to fluoride in drinking water is considered within, or slightly above, the recommended legal values. PMID:27155929

  18. [Operational control of water fluoridation in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Maia, Lucianne Cople; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim; Soares, Eduardo Lúcio; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the operational control of water fluoridation at the city water supply plant in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from January to December 2000. The water treatment supervisor filled out a questionnaire on the control of water fluoridation. In addition, water samples were collected every two weeks for fluoride analysis before and after treatment. Samples were analyzed by an independent laboratory using an ion-specific electrode. According to the water treatment supervisor, the entire process for controlling fluoride concentration in the water was rigorous and complied with Brazilian guidelines, but according to testing, 96% of samples were inadequate in terms of risks/benefits of fluoride use from water. The information obtained from the plant supervisor and the test data were thus mutually inconsistent. Based on these data, an independent water fluoride concentration control program is needed to ensure the benefits of dental caries prevention for the population. PMID:12700784

  19. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  20. Comparative exploration of hydrogen sulfide and water transmembrane free energy surfaces via orthogonal space tempering free energy sampling.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chao; Aitchison, Erick W; Wu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Lianqing; Cheng, Xiaolin; Yang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S), a commonly known toxic gas compound, possesses unique chemical features that allow this small solute molecule to quickly diffuse through cell membranes. Taking advantage of the recent orthogonal space tempering (OST) method, we comparatively mapped the transmembrane free energy landscapes of H2 S and its structural analogue, water (H2 O), seeking to decipher the molecular determinants that govern their drastically different permeabilities. As revealed by our OST sampling results, in contrast to the highly polar water solute, hydrogen sulfide is evidently amphipathic, and thus inside membrane is favorably localized at the interfacial region, that is, the interface between the polar head-group and nonpolar acyl chain regions. Because the membrane binding affinity of H2 S is mainly governed by its small hydrophobic moiety and the barrier height inbetween the interfacial region and the membrane center is largely determined by its moderate polarity, the transmembrane free energy barriers to encounter by this toxic molecule are very small. Moreover when H2 S diffuses from the bulk solution to the membrane center, the above two effects nearly cancel each other, so as to lead to a negligible free energy difference. This study not only explains why H2 S can quickly pass through cell membranes but also provides a practical illustration on how to use the OST free energy sampling method to conveniently analyze complex molecular processes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26119423

  1. Comparative Exploration of Hydrogen Sulfide and Water Trans-Membrane Free Energy Surfaces via Orthogonal Space Tempering Free Energy Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Chao; Aitchison, Erick W.; Wu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Lianqing; Cheng, Xiaolin; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a commonly known toxic gas compound, possesses unique chemical features that allow this small solute molecule to quickly diffuse through cell membranes. Taking advantage of the recent orthogonal space tempering (OST) method, we comparatively mapped the trans-membrane (POPC) free energy landscapes of H2S and its structural analogue, water (H2O), seeking to decipher the molecular determinants that govern their drastically different permeabilities. As revealed by our OST sampling results, in contrast to the highly polar water solute, hydrogen sulfide is evidently amphipathic, and thus inside membrane is favorably localized at the interfacial region, i.e. the interface between the polar head-group and non-polar acyl chain regions. Because the membrane binding affinity of H2S is mainly governed by its small hydrophobic moiety and the barrier height in between the interfacial region and the membrane center is largely determined by its moderate polarity, the trans-membrane free energy barriers to encounter by this toxic molecule are very small. Moreover when H2S diffuses from the bulk solution to the membrane center, the above two effects nearly cancel each other, so as to lead to a negligible free energy difference. This study not only explains why H2S can quickly pass through cell membranes but also provides a practical illustration on how to employ the OST free energy sampling method to conveniently analyze complex molecular processes. PMID:26119423

  2. Laboratory validation and field verification of a new passive colorimetric air monitoring badge for sampling hydrogen sulfide in air.

    PubMed

    Kring, E V; Damrell, D J; Henry, T J; DeMoor, H M; Basilio, A N; Simon, C E

    1984-01-01

    The Pro-Tek passive colorimetric air monitoring badge for personal or area sampling of hydrogen sulfide is described. The badge has been validated over the range of 1.8 to 164 ppm-hours (0.23-21 ppm on an 8-hour TWA basis). It has an overall accuracy throughout this range of +/- 15.9% and meets the NIOSH accuracy criteria for an analytical and sampling method. The colorimetric analytical method used is based on the Texas Air Control Board's Molybdenum Blue method. Color-activated exposed badge solutions are read out on a standard laboratory spectrophotometer using 1 centimeter (10 mm) cells. Variations in exposure temperature (between 10 degrees and 40 degrees C), relative humidity, and face velocity (between 2 and 250 ft/min) do not affect badge performance. Unexposed badges are stable for more than 12 months refrigerated and for two months at room temperature. PMID:6702591

  3. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  4. Fluoride occurrence in publicly supplied drinking water in Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karro, Enn; Indermitte, Ene; Saava, Astrid; Haamer, Kadri; Marandi, Andres

    2006-06-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the content and spatial distribution of fluoride in drinking water. Water samples (735) from public water systems covering all Estonian territory were analysed using SPADNS method. In order to specify the natural source of fluoride, the chemistry data from five aquifer systems utilised for water supply were included into the study. Fluoride concentrations in tap water, to a great extent, ranged from 0.01 to 6.95 mg/l. Drinking water in southern Estonia, where terrigenous Middle-Devonian aquifer system is exploited, has a fluoride concentration lower than recommended level (0.5 mg/l), thus promoting susceptibility to dental caries. The western part of the country is supplied by water with excess fluoride content (1.5-6.9 mg/l). Groundwater abstracted for drinking purposes originates from Ordovician and Silurian carbonate rocks. The content of fluoride in Silurian-Ordovician aquifer system is associated with the groundwater abstraction depth and the main controlling factors of dissolved fluoride are the pH value and the chemical type of water.

  5. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; McKenzie, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  6. Containerless processing of fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

  7. Comparative study of fluoride released and recharged from conventional pit and fissure sealants versus surface prereacted glass ionomer technology

    PubMed Central

    Salmerón-Valdés, Elias Nahum; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Alanis-Tavira, Jorge; Morales-Luckie, Raúl Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Context: The fluoride release of sealants in vitro shows a marked decrease. Giomers are distinguishable from manufactured resin-based sealants and contain prereacted glass-ionomer particles (PRG). Aims: To compare the amounts of fluoride released from the main pit and fissure of a resin-based sealant with that from a Giomer and to assess the abilities of the sealant and the Giomer to recharge when exposed to regular use of fluoride rinse. Materials and Methods: The readings for the fluoride concentration were carried out for 60 days using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. After this period, the samples were recharged using a fluoride mouth rinse. The amount of fluoride released after this recharge was determined for 5 days. The data were analyzed using Student's t- and analysis of variance tests. Results: In general, all materials presented higher fluoride release in the first 24 h; G1 and G4 showed a higher fluoride release in this period. On the other hand, G3 and G1 presented the most constant fluoride release until the 8th day, wherein all the sealants considerably decreased in the amount of fluoride released. Conclusion: G1 and G3 released higher concentrations of fluoride, although no significant differences were found. Giomers recharged in the first 24 h after polymerization presented an improved and sustained fluoride release. PMID:26957792

  8. Determination of fluoride source in ground water using petrographic studies in Dashtestan area, south of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaleb-Looie, Sedigheh; Moore, Farid, ,, Dr.

    2010-05-01

    The groundwater occurs in Dashtestan area, contains a high level of fluoride. Since groundwater is vastly used for drinking and irrigation purposes, the local residents are at high risk of fluoride toxicity, as already evidenced by the occurrence of dental Fluorosis in many residents. 35 surface and groundwater samples were collected in September, 2009. The results show that in 23 samples the fluoride concentration is above the permissible level (1.5ppm). Petrographic study of lithological units in the catchment area indicates that mica minerals are the most probable source of fluoride content in the study area.

  9. Aqueous geochemistry of fluoride enriched groundwater in arid part of Western India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chander Kumar; Mukherjee, Saumitra

    2015-02-01

    Fluoride-enriched water has become a major public health issue in India. The present study tries to evaluate the geochemical mechanism of fluoride enrichment in groundwater of western India. Total 100 groundwater samples were collected for the study spreading across the entire study area. The results of the analyzed parameters formed the attribute database for geographical information system (GIS) analysis and final output maps. A preliminary field survey was conducted and fluoride testing was done using Hach make field kits. The fluoride concentration ranges from 0.08 to 6.6 mg/L (mean 2.4 mg/L), with 63 % of the samples containing fluoride concentrations that exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) drinking water guideline value of 1.5 mg/L and 85 % samples exceeding the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) guidelines of 1 mg/L. The study also reveals high concentration of nitrate that is found to be above WHO standrads. The dominant geochemical facies present in water are Na-Cl-HCO3 (26 samples), Na-Ca-Cl-HCO3 (20 samples), Na-Cl (14 samples), and Na-Ca-Mg-Cl-HCO3 (11 samples); however, sodium and bicarbonate being the major component in all the water types of 100 samples, which in fact has a tendency to increase fluoride concentration in water by dissolving fluoride from fluorite. The thermodynamic considerations between the activities of calcium, fluoride, and bicarbonate suggest that fluoride concentration is being governed by activity of calcium ion. X-ray diffraction analysis of sediments reveals calcite and fluorite are the main solubility-control minerals controlling the aqueous geochemistry of high fluoride groundwater. The results indicate that the fluoride concentration in groundwater is mainly governed by geochemical composition of rocks, such as metamorphic granites and sedimentary rocks, alkaline hydrogeological environment, climatic conditions, high temperature and lesser rainfall, and geochemical processes such as weathering, evaporation

  10. Temperature measurements and hydrogen transformation under dynamic compression up to 150 GPA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Dmitry; Pyalling, Alexey; Kvitov, Sergey; Fortov, Vladimir

    2012-03-01

    Lithium fluoride single crystal window was used for optical light emission registration during quasi-isentropic compression of hydrogen to the pressures 100-150 GPa. Initially gaseous hydrogen samples at 78 K temperature and different pressures in the range 3-30 MPa were investigated. Recorded brightness temperature profiles in near infrared range of wavelength were analyzed to evaluate optical and transport properties of the investigated hydrogen sample and window. Two EOS models of hydrogen, with and without metallic region were used for 1-D simulation of it's properties under dynamic compression and estimation of hydrogen temperature within compressed layer. The obtained data demonstrate abrupt change of final temperatures after heating higher then 3500K.

  11. Temperature measurements and hydrogen transformation under dynamic compression up to 150 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitry, Nikolaev; Vladimir, Ternovoi; Alexei, Pyalling; Sergey, Kvitov; Vladimir, Fortov

    2011-06-01

    Lithium fluoride single crystal window was used for registration of optical light emission during quasi-isentropic compression of hydrogen to the pressures 100-150 GPa. Initially gaseous hydrogen samples at 78 K temperature and different pressures in the range 4-30 MPa were investigated. Recorded brightness temperature profiles at near infrared wavelengths were analyzed to evaluate optical and transport properties of the investigated hydrogen sample and window. Different models of hydrogen EOS were used for one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of compression process and estimation of hydrogen temperature within compressed layer. The obtained data demonstrate abrupt change of final temperatures after heating higher then 3500K. Supported by program of Presidium RAS ``Investigation of matter under extreme conditions''

  12. Effect of home-used water purifier on fluoride concentration of drinking water in southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Kheirmand, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fluoride in drinking water plays a key role in dental health. Due to the increasing use of water-purifier, the effect of these devices on fluoride concentration of drinking water was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Drinking water samples were collected before and after passing through a home water-purifier, from four different water sources. The fluoride, calcium and magnesium concentration of the samples were measured using the quantitative spectrophotometery technique. Data were analyzed by the Wilcoxon test. P value < 0.1 was considered as significant. Results: The result showed that the concentration of fluoride was 0.05-0.61 ppm before purification and was removed completely afterward. Furthermore, other ions reduced significantly after treatment by the water purifier. Conclusion: This study revealed that this device decreases the fluoride content of water, an issue which should be considered in low and high-fluoridated water sources. PMID:24130584

  13. The fluoride content of antlers as an indicator of fluoride exposure in red deer (Cervus elaphus): A historical biomonitoring study.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, U; Kierdorf, H

    2000-01-01

    Bone fluoride concentrations were analyzed in 141 red deer antlers grown between the 17th/early 18th century and 1997, that originated from four study areas (Arnsberg, Bad Berleburg, Dämmerwald, Schmidtheim) in the federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Fluoride concentrations in the specimens ranged between 27.7 and 1, 392.1 mg F(-)/kg ash and varied significantly both between samples collected during different time-spans in the same area and between samples taken from different study areas over the same period. For antlers (n = 8) collected prior to 1860 in the study areas Arnsberg and Schmidtheim, values between 27.7 and 78.7 mg F(-)/kg ash were recorded. It is assumed that antler fluoride contents in this range are quite close to baseline levels for these regions, i.e., represent concentrations largely unaffected or only slightly influenced by fluoride from anthropogenic sources. With the onset and expansion of large-scale industrial activities, bone fluoride concentrations in the antler samples markedly increased over these baseline values, indicating fluoride deposition from industrial emissions into the red deer habitats. In the later 1980s and the 1990s, a pronounced decline in antler fluoride content was observed, which is attributed to the reduction of industrial fluoride discharges due to effective emission control programs. However, even the lowest fluoride values recorded for antlers grown in the 1990s (study area Schmidtheim, n = 10, range 158.5-367.3 mg F(-)/kg ash) clearly exceeded the concentrations found in the antlers collected prior to 1860, thereby indicating an additional fluoride burden from anthropogenic sources on the recent populations. The present study has corroborated the view that antlers are good indicators of fluoride exposure in deer. The facts that they grow during a seasonally fixed time-span and thus constitute relatively well "naturally standardized" samples and are often kept over long periods of time make antlers

  14. Gas and hydrogen isotopic analyses of volcanic eruption clouds in Guatemala sampled by aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.I., Jr.; Cadle, R.D.; Heidt, L.E.; Friedman, I.; Lazrus, A.L.; Huebert, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Gas samples were collected by aircraft entering volcanic eruption clouds of three Guatemalan volcanoes. Gas chromatographic analyses show higher H2 and S gas contents in ash eruption clouds and lower H2 and S gases in vaporous gas plumes. H isotopic data demonstrate lighter isotopic distribution of water vapor in ash eruption clouds than in vaporous gas plumes. Most of the H2O in the vaporous plumes is probably meteoric. The data are the first direct gas analyses of explosive eruptive clouds, and demonstrate that, in spite of atmospheric admixture, useful compositional information on eruptive gases can be obtained using aircraft. ?? 1980.

  15. Effects of flossing and rinsing with a fluoridated mouthwash after brushing with a fluoridated toothpaste on salivary fluoride clearance.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, R M; Horay, C; Huntington, E; Mehta, V

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that flossing after brushing with a fluoridated toothpaste may lower salivary fluoride (F), and to evaluate the consequence of subsequent F mouthwash use. Twenty adults used 3 oral hygiene regimes in a randomised order: A, brushing with an NaF toothpaste; B, as A but followed by professional flossing; C, as B followed by rinsing with an NaF mouthwash. Saliva samples were collected up to 120 min after each regime and analysed for F. The mean area under the clearance curve value for regime C was statistically significantly greater than the corresponding values for A and B (p < 0.0001), which differed little. The regime that included the mouthwash may provide better anticaries protection. PMID:19776569

  16. Sampling procedure for the measurement of dissolved hydrogen and volatile fatty acids in the rumen of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Wang, R; Janssen, P H; Zhang, X M; Sun, X Z; Pacheco, D; Tan, Z L

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved hydrogen (dH) influences the pathways of VFA production and is a precursor of methane formation in the rumen. Measurements of dH in rumen fluid taken at the same time as measuring other rumen fermentation end products would improve our quantitative understanding of the role of dH as a controller of rumen fermentation. Sample collections though a rumen cannula and using oral stomach tubing were compared for measurements of dissolved gases and fermentation end products in the rumen fluid of 4 ruminally cannulated dairy cows fed a total mixed ration of corn silage and concentrate. Rumen fluid was collected at 0, 2.5, and 6 h after morning feeding through the cannula from cranial dorsal rumen, cranial ventral rumen, central rumen, caudal dorsal rumen, and caudal ventral rumen and in parallel by oral stomach tubing at 2 insertion depths of 180 cm (sampling the central rumen) and 200 cm (sampling the caudal dorsal rumen). The cranial dorsal rumen had the greatest pH and smallest VFA concentration among 5 sites sampled. Samples collected by oral stomach tubing had greater ( < 0.001) rumen pH and less ( < 0.001) dissolved methane (dCH) and lower VFA concentration than that collected through rumen cannula. The dH concentrations were positively correlated ( > 0.8) in rumen samples collected by the 2 sampling techniques, with a concordance correlation coefficient larger than 0.8 and scale shift being about 0.1 away from unity. The variations in the measurement of dH, dCH, pH, and VFA in samples collected by oral stomach tubing are most likely the result of saliva contamination. The time of sampling relative to feeding had significant influence ( < 0.01) on dissolved gases and fermentation end products, with the greatest concentrations of dH, dCH, and VFA measured 2.5 h after morning feeding. The dH was correlated positively ( > 0.58) with dCH and negatively ( < -0.65) with the estimated net H production relative to the amount of VFA produced. This indicated that

  17. Destabilization effect of transition metal fluorides on sodium borohydride.

    PubMed

    Kalantzopoulos, Georgios N; Guzik, Matylda N; Deledda, Stefano; Heyn, Richard H; Muller, Jiri; Hauback, Bjørn C

    2014-10-14

    The effect of transition metal fluorides on the decomposition of NaBH4 has been investigated for NaBH4 ball milled with TiF3, MnF3 or FeF3. The compounds were examined by thermal programmed desorption with residual gas analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis and volumetric measurements using a Sieverts-type apparatus. The phase formation process during thermal decomposition was studied by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction on the as-milled powders. NaBF4 was among the products in all mechano-chemical reactions. (11)B-NMR spectra analysis gave NaBF4 : NaBH4 ratios of 1 : 150 for Na-Ti, 1 : 40 for Na-Mn, and 1 : 10 for Na-Fe. Pure NaBH4 possessed a hydrogen release onset temperature of 430 °C. The hydrogen release in the NaBH4-MnF3 system began as low as 130 °C. FeF3 decreased the onset temperature to 161 °C and TiF3 to 200 °C. TiF3 reacted completely with NaBH4 below 320 °C. All the examined systems have negligible emissions of diborane species. H-sorption studies performed at selected temperatures above 300 °C exhibited relatively fast desorption kinetics. Partial hydrogen re-absorption was observed for the Na-Mn and Na-Fe samples. PMID:25140831

  18. Effect of Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Fluoride-chlorhexidine Mouthwashes on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Count and the Prevalence of Oral Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Sadat Sajadi, Fatemeh; Moradi, Mohammad; Pardakhty, Abbas; Yazdizadeh, Razieh; Madani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Streptococcus mutans is the main pathogenic agent involved in dental caries, and may be eliminated using mouthwashes. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of fluoride, chlorhexidine, and fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes on salivary S. mutans count after two weeks of use and determine the prevalence of their side effects on the oral mucosa. Materials and methods. In this clinical trial, 120 12-14 year-old students were selected and divided into three groups. Each group was given one of fluoride, chlorhexidine, or fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes. They were asked to use it twice a day for two weeks. Salivary samples were collected at baseline and after two weeks. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results. In all the study groups, there were statistically significant reductions in salivary S. mutans counts two weeks after using the mouthwashes (P < 0.05). In addition, fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwash had a significant effect on the reduction of S. mutans count in comparison with fluoride alone. The prevalence of oral side effects in fluoride-chlorhexidine mouth-wash was more than 90%. Conclusion. Adding fluoride to chlorhexidine mouthwash can significantly decrease salivary S. mutans count after two weeks. Fluoride-chlorhexidine has the highest rate of oral side effects between the evaluated mouthwash compounds. PMID:25973155

  19. Sustainable approach for recycling waste lamb and chicken bones for fluoride removal from water followed by reusing fluoride-bearing waste in concrete.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zainab Z; AbdelKareem, Hala N

    2015-11-01

    Sustainable management of waste materials is an attractive approach for modern societies. In this study, recycling of raw waste lamb and chicken bones for defluoridation of water has been estimated. The effects of several experimental parameters including contact time, pH, bone dose, fluoride initial concentration, bone grains size, agitation rate, and the effect of co-existing anions in actual samples of wastewater were studied for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. Results indicated excellent fluoride removal efficiency up to 99.4% and 99.8% using lamb and chicken bones, respectively at fluoride initial concentration of 10 mg F/L and 120 min contact time. Maximum fluoride uptake was obtained at neutral pH range 6-7. Fluoride removal kinetic was well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Both, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models could fit the experimental data well with correlation coefficient values >0.99 suggesting favorable conditions of the process. Furthermore, for complete sustainable management of waste bones, the resulted fluoride-bearing sludge was reused in concrete mixes to partially replace sand. Tests of the mechanical properties of fluoride sludge-modified concrete mixes indicated a potential environmentally friendly approach to dispose fluoride sludge in concrete and simultaneously enhance concrete properties. PMID:26162903

  20. Effect of Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Fluoride-chlorhexidine Mouthwashes on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Count and the Prevalence of Oral Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sadat Sajadi, Fatemeh; Moradi, Mohammad; Pardakhty, Abbas; Yazdizadeh, Razieh; Madani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Streptococcus mutans is the main pathogenic agent involved in dental caries, and may be eliminated using mouthwashes. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of fluoride, chlorhexidine, and fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes on salivary S. mutans count after two weeks of use and determine the prevalence of their side effects on the oral mucosa. Materials and methods. In this clinical trial, 120 12-14 year-old students were selected and divided into three groups. Each group was given one of fluoride, chlorhexidine, or fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes. They were asked to use it twice a day for two weeks. Salivary samples were collected at baseline and after two weeks. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results. In all the study groups, there were statistically significant reductions in salivary S. mutans counts two weeks after using the mouthwashes (P < 0.05). In addition, fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwash had a significant effect on the reduction of S. mutans count in comparison with fluoride alone. The prevalence of oral side effects in fluoride-chlorhexidine mouth-wash was more than 90%. Conclusion. Adding fluoride to chlorhexidine mouthwash can significantly decrease salivary S. mutans count after two weeks. Fluoride-chlorhexidine has the highest rate of oral side effects between the evaluated mouthwash compounds. PMID:25973155

  1. WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-11-25

    The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

  2. Topical fluoride for caries prevention

    PubMed Central

    Weyant, Robert J.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Anselmo, Theresa (Tracy); Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D.; Donly, Kevin J.; Frese, William A.; Hujoel, Philippe P.; Iafolla, Timothy; Kohn, William; Kumar, Jayanth; Levy, Steven M.; Tinanoff, Norman; Wright, J. Timothy; Zero, Domenick; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Meyer, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding professionally applied and prescription-strength, home-use topical fluoride agents for caries prevention. These recommendations are an update of the 2006 ADA recommendations regarding professionally applied topical fluoride and were developed by using a new process that includes conducting a systematic review of primary studies. Types of Studies Reviewed The authors conducted a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for clinical trials of professionally applied and prescription-strength topical fluoride agents—including mouthrinses, varnishes, gels, foams and pastes—with caries increment outcomes published in English through October 2012. Results The panel included 71 trials from 82 articles in its review and assessed the efficacy of various topical fluoride caries-preventive agents. The panel makes recommendations for further research. Practical Implications The panel recommends the following for people at risk of developing dental caries: 2.26 percent fluoride varnish or 1.23 percent fluoride (acidulated phosphate fluoride) gel, or a prescription-strength, home-use 0.5 percent fluoride gel or paste or 0.09 percent fluoride mouthrinse for patients 6 years or older. Only 2.26 percent fluoride varnish is recommended for children younger than 6 years. The strengths of the recommendations for the recommended products varied from “in favor” to “expert opinion for.” As part of the evidence-based approach to care, these clinical recommendations should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences. PMID:24177407

  3. Fluoride concentrations in a crystalline bedrock aquifer Marathon County, Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsvath, David L.

    2006-05-01

    Water samples from 2,789 private water-supply wells in Marathon County, Wisconsin reveal that fluoride concentrations in the crystalline bedrock range from <0.01 to 7.60 mg/L, with 0.6% of the values exceeding the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) maximum contaminant level of 4 mg/L, and 8.6% exceeding the EPA’s secondary maximum contaminant level of 2.0 mg/L. Roughly a quarter of the wells contain dissolve fluoride within the range considered optimal for human health (between 0.5 and 1.5 mg/L), whereas 63.3% fall below 0.5 mg/L. Consistent with studies conducted in other regions, felsic rocks have significantly higher fluoride concentrations than mafic and metasedimentary rocks. Syenites yield the most fluoriferous groundwaters, but the highest median concentration occurs in a sodium-plagioclase granite. A relationship between plagioclase composition and fluoride concentrations suggests that dissolved fluoride levels are controlled by fluorite solubility and that higher fluoride concentrations are found in soft, sodium-rich groundwater.

  4. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  5. Comparative evaluation and effect of organic and inorganic fluoride dentifrices on enamel microhardness: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Krishna Prasad; Satish, S. V.; Gouda, Veerbhadra; Badade, Abhishek Rajpal; Gouda, Basavana; Patil, Snehalata

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare and evaluate the microhardness of enamel surface after the application of organic fluoride and inorganic fluoride dentifrices. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted premolars were collected and decoronation of all the teeth was done at cementoenamel junction. The crowns were sectioned mesiodistally into two halves with the help of diamond disc, and then the subsequent forty samples kept in 1% citric acid for the demineralization and divided into two groups by simple randomization, that is, Group A (inorganic sodium fluoride dentifrice) and Group B (organic amine fluoride dentifrice). They were treated using same protocol for 3 min, daily twice for 7 days. Those samples preserved in artificial saliva in between treatment. The enamel surface microhardness evaluated using Vickers hardness test at base level, after demineralization, as well as after remineralization. Statistical analysis of surface microhardness obtained at different stages done by Student's t-test and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The samples which were treated with sodium fluoride (Group A) could not restore the mean microhardness after treatment to that of preoperative level whereas amine fluoride (Group B) treated samples showed a statistically significant increase in mean surface microhardness from baseline. Conclusion: Organic fluoride (amine fluoride) remineralization was more effective in restoring enamel microhardness than inorganic fluoride (sodium fluoride) remineralization. PMID:27114952

  6. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: an extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques.

    PubMed

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Meijer, Harro A J; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ(2)H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ(2)H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  7. Effects of simulated solar radiation on the transmission of magnesium fluoride and cryolite thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heslin, T.

    1974-01-01

    Thin films of cryolite magnesium fluoride on fused silica substrates were exposed to 1126 equivalent sun-hours of radiation. The optical transmissions of the samples were measured before and after irradiation. The results indicate that, after the degradation of the silica substrate is accounted for, the cryolite is severely affected by the simulated solar radiation, but the magnesium fluoride is only slightly affected.

  8. Optical Restoration of Lead Fluoride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Spilker, A.; Cole, P. L.; Forest, T. A.; Mestari, M.; Naeem, S.; LeBaron, N.; Bertin, P.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Roche, J.

    2009-03-10

    Due to its relatively high resistance to high radiation, lead fluoride (PbF{sub 2}) crystals are becoming an increasingly popular material of choice for electromagnetic calorimetry, such as for experiments requiring the measurement of high-energy photons in Hall A of Jefferson Lab. For our studies we irradiated the PbF{sub 2} crystals using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) followed by exposing the crystals to blue light so as to restore the nominal optical properties. This technique of optical bleaching with blue light affords an efficient and low-cost means for reversing the deleterious effects of optical transmission loss in radiation-damaged lead fluoride crystals. Whereas earlier experiments irradiated the PbF{sub 2} samples with 1.1 and 1.3 MeV gammas from {sup 60}Co, we used pulsed beams of energetic electrons from the tunable 25-MeV LINAC at Idaho Accelerator Center of Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. A 20-MeV beam of electrons was targeted onto four separate 19 cm length samples of lead fluoride over periods of 1, 2, and 4 hours yielding doses between 7 kGy and 35 kGy. Samples were then bleached with blue light of wavelength 410-450 nm for periods between 19.5 and 24 hours. We performed this process twice - radiation, bleaching, radiation, and then followed by bleaching again - for each of these four PbF{sub 2} samples. We shall discuss the efficacy of blue light curing on samples that have undergone two cycles of electron irradiation and optical bleaching.

  9. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  10. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  11. Optimisation of sorbent trapping and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric conditions for sampling and analysis of hydrogen cyanide in air.

    PubMed

    Juillet, Yannick; Le Moullec, Sophie; Bégos, Arlette; Bellier, Bruno

    2005-06-01

    Among the chemicals belonging to the schedules of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), sampling and analysis of highly volatile compounds such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) require special consideration. The latter is present in numerous old chemical weapons that are stockpiled awaiting destruction in Northeastern France: thus, sampling on stockpile area and subsequent verification of HCN levels is compulsory to ensure safety of workers on these areas. The ability of several commercial sorbents to trap hydrogen cyanide at various concentration levels and in various humidity conditions, was evaluated. Furthermore, thermal desorption of the corresponding samples, followed by analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was also optimised. Carbosieve S-III, a molecular sieve possessing a very high specific area, proved the most efficient sorbent for HCN sampling in all conditions tested. Conversely, the presented results show that Tenax, albeit generally considered as the reference sorbent for air monitoring and analysis of CWC-related chemicals, is not suitable for HCN trapping. PMID:15912249

  12. Prompt gamma tests of LaBr3:Ce and BGO detectors for detection of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen in bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Al-Matouq, Fares A.; Khiari, F. Z.; Isab, A. A.; Rehman, Khateeb-ur; Raashid, M.

    2012-08-01

    Prompt gamma ray tests of cylindrical lanthanum halide (LaBr3:Ce) and bismuth germanate (BGO) gamma ray detectors have been carried out for detection of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen concentrations in bulk samples via inelastic scattering of neutrons using a 14 MeV neutron-based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis setup. Regardless of its intrinsic activity, the LaBr3:Ce detector showed superior performance than the BGO detector for the detection of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen concentrations in benzene, water, toluene, propanol, ethanol and methanol bulk samples. The BGO detector has a large concentration of oxygen in its detector material and is consequently less sensitive for oxygen detection in bulk samples. Hence, it is not a suitable choice for oxygen determination in bulk samples.

  13. Fluoride: A naturally-occurring health hazard in drinking-water resources of Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chuah, C Joon; Lye, Han Rui; Ziegler, Alan D; Wood, Spencer H; Kongpun, Chatpat; Rajchagool, Sunsanee

    2016-03-01

    In Northern Thailand, incidences of fluorosis resulting from the consumption of high-fluoride drinking-water have been documented. In this study, we mapped the high-fluoride endemic areas and described the relevant transport processes of fluoride in enriched waters in the provinces of Chiang Mai and Lamphun. Over one thousand surface and sub-surface water samples including a total of 995 collected from shallow (depth: ≤ 30 m) and deep (> 30 m) wells were analysed from two unconnected high-fluoride endemic areas. At the Chiang Mai site, 31% of the shallow wells contained hazardous levels (≥ 1.5 mg/L) of fluoride, compared with the 18% observed in the deep wells. However, at the Lamphun site, more deep wells (35%) contained water with at least 1.5mg/L fluoride compared with the shallow wells (7%). At the Chiang Mai site, the high-fluoride waters originate from a nearby geothermal field. Fluoride-rich geothermal waters are distributed across the area following natural hydrological pathways of surface and sub-surface water flow. At the Lamphun site, a well-defined, curvilinear high-fluoride anomalous zone, resembling that of the nearby conspicuous Mae Tha Fault, was identified. This similarity provides evidence of the existence of an unmapped, blind fault as well as its likely association to a geogenic source (biotite-granite) of fluoride related to the faulted zone. Excessive abstraction of ground water resources may also have affected the distribution and concentration of fluoride at both sites. The distribution of these high-fluoride waters is influenced by a myriad of complex natural and anthropogenic processes which thus created a challenge for the management of water resources for safe consumption in affected areas. The notion of clean and safe drinking water can be found in deeper aquifers is not necessarily true. Groundwater at any depth should always be tested before the construction of wells. PMID:26747991

  14. Salivary retention after application of fluoride gel using toothbrush or tray: a crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Cecilia Claudia Costa; Lula, Estevam Carlos de Oliveira; Azevedo, Izabelle Maria Cabral de; Maia, Mariana de Figueiredo Lopes E; Lopes, Fernanda Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there are no studies in the literature evaluating salivary fluoride retention after small amounts of fluoride gel are applied to children's teeth. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to compare salivary retention after gel application using a toothbrush or by traditional application with trays. In this crossover study, children with active caries (n = 10) were randomized into one of the following treatment groups: a) application of fluoride gel using a tray (control), or b) application of fluoride gel with a toothbrush (treatment). After a 7-day washout period, the treatments were inverted. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected at baseline and 0.5, 5, 15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes after acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel application in order to analyze fluoride retention in saliva. The area under the curve (AUC) was also calculated. There were no differences in fluoride retention after application of small amounts of APF with a toothbrush compared to traditional gel application using trays at all time points studied, and no differences in AUC were observed (Student t-test, p > 0.05). These results suggest that application of fluoride gel in children using a toothbrush can be utilized as an option rather than traditional trays, since the same salivary retention of fluoride is obtained using a lower dose. PMID:23184162

  15. Do Fluoride Ions Protect Teeth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Begins with the procedure and results from an investigation on the effect of fluoride on the reaction between eggshell (substitute teeth) and dilute ethanoic acid. Describes an elegantly modified and improvised apparatus. (DDR)

  16. [The passage of fluoride across the placenta. An intra-uterine study].

    PubMed

    Forestier, F; Daffos, F; Said, R; Brunet, C M; Guillaume, P N

    1990-01-01

    Until now, transplacental passage of fluoride could only be checked during delivery. Recent developments in fetal blood sampling techniques in utero have made it possible to study its passage in pregnancy. Two tablets of 2.212 mg of sodium fluoride (Zymafluor) were given to 11 women with an average age of 27 1/2 years whose pregnancies on an average had lasted 22 weeks. They were having prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound guided fetal blood sampling in any case. The levels of fluoride were measured by the use of a specific electrode before the mother took fluoride and 40 minutes after she had taken it in both maternal and fetal blood samples. The results were compared with a controlled group of 11 pregnant women with similar characteristics: maternal age, duration of pregnancy and basal maternal fluoride levels. Fetal blood levels of fluorides in mothers who had taken sodium fluoride was statistically higher than in the controlled group (2.6 mumol/l and less than 1 mumol/l); this demonstrates in a statistically significant way that fluoride passes across the placenta in the fifth and sixth months of pregnancy which is the time when the milk teeth start to develop in the uterus. PMID:2182701

  17. Comparison of the Biological Impacts of the Fluoride Compounds by Graphical Risk Visualization Map Technique.

    PubMed

    Usuda, Kan; Kono, Rei; Ueno, Takaaki; Ito, Yuichi; Dote, Tomotaro; Yokoyama, Hirotaka; Kono, Koichi; Tamaki, Junko

    2015-09-01

    Various fluoride compounds are widely used in industry. The present risk assessment study was conducted using a series of inorganic binary fluorides of the type XFn, where X(n) = Na(+), K(+), Li(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Al(3+), Nd(3+), La(3+), Ce(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Y(3+), Yb(2+), and Zn(2+). The aqueous solutions of these salts were orally administrated to 16 experimental groups (one for each of the salts tested). The levels of fluoride, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase in cumulative 24-h urine samples and creatinine clearance were measured to assess possible acute renal damages. The levels of fluoride, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase were also determined in serum samples to assess possible acute hepatic damages. The results reveal that sodium fluoride (NaF), potassium fluoride (KF), and zinc fluoride tetrahydrate (ZnF2 (.)4H2O) can carry the fluoride ion into the bloodstream and that it is excreted via urine more readily than the other compounds tested. These fluorides were assigned the highest risk impact factor. Most of the rare earth fluorides are insoluble in water while those groups 2 and 13 of the periodic table are slightly soluble, so that they do not have a significant negative risk. These findings suggest that the biological impact of fluoride depends on the accompanying counter ion and its solubility. The risk map obtained in the present study shows that the graphical visualization map technique employed is a valuable new tool to assess the toxicological risk of chemical compounds. PMID:25749926

  18. Geochemical evaluation of fluoride contamination of groundwater in the Thoothukudi District of Tamilnadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaraja, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Anandhan, P.; Prasanna, M. V.; Thivya, C.; Thilagavathi, R.; Sarathidasan, J.

    2014-09-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that has been shown to cause significant effects on human health through drinking water. Different forms of fluoride exposure are of importance and have shown to affect the body's fluoride content and thus increasing the risks of fluoride-prone diseases. Fluoride has beneficial effects on teeth; however, low concentrations of fluoride intensify the risk of tooth decay. Fluoride can also be quite detrimental at higher concentrations at skeletal fluorosis. The Thoothukudi District is a hard rock and alluvial plain marked as one of the Fluoride-increase area in Tamilnadu due to occurrence of various rock types including fluoride-bearing minerals. The F- content of groundwater can thus originate from the dissolution of Fluoride-bearing minerals in the bed rock. Hundred representative groundwater samples from Thoothukudi District were collected during two different seasons. Samples were analysed for F-, other major cations and anions. The study area is chiefly composed of hornblende biotite gneiss, charnockite, alluvio marine, fluvial marine and granite with small patches of quartzite and sandstone. Higher concentration of fluoride is observed during pre-monsoon (3.3 mg l-1) compared to the post-monsoon (2.4 mg l-1) due to the dilution effect. Spatial distribution and factor score show that higher concentrations of F- are noted in the north and central part of the study area owing to lithology. Bicarbonate is well correlated with F- which explains that both ions were derived from the weathering. While F- has a very weak correlation with pH which may be due to the increase of alkalinity resulting from the increase of carbonate and bicarbonate ions.

  19. Aminobenzohydrazide based colorimetric and 'turn-on' fluorescence chemosensor for selective recognition of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Anand, Thangaraj; Sivaraman, Gandhi; Iniya, Murugan; Siva, Ayyanar; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2015-05-30

    Chemosensors based on aminobenzohydrazide Schiff bases bearing pyrene/anthracene as fluorophores have been designed and synthesized for F(-) ion recognition. The addition of fluoride ions to the receptors causes a dramatically observable colour change from pale yellow to brown/red. (1)H NMR studies confirm that the F(-) ion facilitates its recognition by forming hydrogen bond with hydrogens of amide and amine groups. Moreover these sensors have also been successfully applied to detection of fluoride ion in commercial tooth paste solution. PMID:25998453

  20. Determination of glucose using a coupled-enzymatic reaction with new fluoride selective optical sensing polymeric film coated in microtiter plate wells

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Rabboh, Hisham S. M.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of glucose in beverages is demonstrated using newly developed fluoride selective optical sensing polymeric film that contains aluminum (III) octaethylporphyrin (Al[OEP]) ionophore and the chromoionophore ETH7075 cast at the bottom of wells of a 96-well polypropylene microtiter plate. The method uses a dual enzymatic reaction involving glucose oxidase enzyme (GOD) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), along with an organofluoro-substrate (4-fluorophenol) as the source of fluoride ions. The concentration of fluoride ions after enzymatic reaction is directly proportional to the glucose level in the sample. The method has a detection limit of 0.8 mmol L−1, a linear range of 0.9– 40 mmol L−1 and a sensitivity of 0.125 absorbance unit/decade of glucose concentration. Glucose levels in several beverage samples determined using the proposed method correlate well with a reference spectrophotometric enzyme method based on detection of hydrogen peroxide using bromopyrogallol red dye (BPR). The new method can also be used to determine H2O2 concentrations in the 0.1 - 50 mmol L−1 range using a single enzymatic reaction involving H2O2 oxidation of 4-fluorophenol catalyzed by HRP. The methodology could potentially be used to detect a wide range of substrates for which selective oxidase enzymes exist (to generate H2O2), with the high throughput of simple microtiter plate detection scheme. PMID:18480896

  1. Total and Free Fluoride Concentration in Various Brands of Toothpaste Marketed in India

    PubMed Central

    Siddanna, Sunitha

    2015-01-01

    Background For fluoridated toothpaste to be effective in controlling dental caries, an adequate concentration of soluble fluoride must be available in the oral cavity. Aim To determine the total and free fluoride concentration in various brands of toothpaste marketed in India. Materials and Methods Three samples of 12 different toothpastes were purchased from supermarkets in Mysore city, Karnataka, India. Toothpastes were analysed in duplicate using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. The concentration of total fluoride (TF) and total soluble fluoride (TSF) were determined. Results Measured TF was consistent with that declared by the manufacturer in five products. Four toothpastes showed lower TF and two higher TF than declared. Most toothpastes exhibited TSF concentrations similar to the TF content except four samples that displayed considerably lower TSF than TF. Conclusion The measurement of total and free fluoride concentrations of toothpastes available in India showed inhomogenities. Therefore there is a need for stringent regulatory control measures for the determination of fluoride content in toothpastes in developing country like India. PMID:26557607

  2. Geochemical factors controlling the occurrence of high fluoride groundwater in the Nagar Parkar area, Sindh, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Tahir; Naseem, Shahid; Usmani, Tanzil Haider; Bashir, Erum; Khan, Farooque Ahmed; Bhanger, Muhammad Iqbal

    2009-11-15

    Fluoride concentrations in groundwater near Nagar Parkar in the Thar Desert of southeastern Pakistan range from 1.13 to 7.85 mg/l, and roughly 78% of the samples contain fluoride in concentrations that exceed the drinking water standard of 1.5mg/l set by WHO. The groundwater is alkaline (pH 7.1-8.4), brackish (TDS 449-15,933 mg/l), and classified as Na-Cl type water. This prevailing chemical character reflects the influence of saltwater intrusion, high evaporation rates, and ion exchange. Groundwater is also supersaturated with respect to calcite, which promotes the removal of Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) from solution. As a result, groundwater is generally undersaturated with respect to fluorite, the mineral that typically controls the upper limit of fluoride concentrations. This study examines a number of geochemical parameters in an effort to discover the controls on fluoride concentrations in groundwater. High fluoride concentrations are associated with high TDS, high pH, high Na concentrations, and high sodium absorption ratios (SAR). This suggests that elevated fluoride levels are the result of enhanced fluorite solubility due to Ca depletion and high ionic strength and the release of fluoride from colloid surfaces under high pH conditions. Contrary to what has been found in other studies, sample depth and water temperature do not appear to have a significant role in the distribution of fluoride within the groundwater. PMID:19586721

  3. Effect of Fluoride Gels on Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    China, Ana L.P; Souza, Nayara M; Gomes, Yasmin do S. B. de L; Alexandrino, Larissa D; Silva, Cecy M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of bleaching treatments containing added calcium and combined with neutral or acidic fluoride gels on tooth enamel was investigated in vitro through Knoop microhardness (KHN) and surface roughness (SR) measurements. A total of 60 bovine incisors were tested, including 30 for SR measurements and 30 for KHN measurements. The specimens were divided into 12 groups and subjected to a bleaching agent with hydrogen peroxide 35% (Whiteness HP 35% Maxx, FGM) or hydrogen peroxide 35% with calcium (Whiteness HP 35% Blue Calcium, FGM) and a fluoride treatment flugel acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) or flugel neutral fluoride (NF). Control specimens were submitted to bleaching treatments without fluoride. Microhardness tests were performed using a Knoop indentor. Roughness measurements were obtained using a roughness analyzer. Measurements were obtained before and after treatment. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C between treatments. The results were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Treatments using APF combined with 35% HP caused a decrease in microhardness, while NF combined with HP 35% Ca increased the enamel hardness. Fluoride gels did not alter the SR of the bleached enamel. PMID:25419249

  4. Prevalence of fluorosis and identification of fluoride endemic areas in Manur block of Tirunelveli District, Tamil Nadu, South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Subarayan Bothi; Viswanathan, Gopalan; Siva Ilango, S.

    2012-12-01

    Prevalence of fluorosis is mainly due to the consumption of more fluoride through drinking water. It is necessary to identify the fluoride endemic areas to adopt remedial measures for the people under the risk of fluorosis. The objectives of this study were to identify the exact location of fluoride endemic areas in Manur block of Tirunelveli District and to estimate fluoride exposure level through drinking water for different age groups. Identification of fluoride endemic areas was performed through Isopleth and Google earth mapping techniques. Fluoride level in drinking water samples was estimated by fluoride ion selective electrode method. A systematic clinical survey conducted in 19 villages of Manur block revealed the rate of prevalence of fluorosis. From this study, it has been found that Alavanthankulam, Melapilliyarkulam, Keezhapilliyarkulam, Nadupilliyarkulam, Keezhathenkalam and Papankulam are the fluoride endemic villages, where the fluoride level in drinking water is above 1 mg/l. Consumption of maximum fluoride exposure levels of 0.30 mg/kg/day for infants, 0.27 mg/kg/day for children and 0.15 mg/kg/day for adults were found among the respective age group people residing in high fluoride endemic area. As compared with adequate intake level of fluoride of 0.01 mg/kg/day for infants and 0.05 mg/kg/day for other age groups, the health risk due to excess fluoride intake to the people of Alavanthankulam and nearby areas has become evident. Hence the people of these areas are advised to consume drinking water with optimal fluoride to avoid further fluorosis risks.

  5. High Fluoride and Geothermal Activities In Continental Rift Zones, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldesenbet, S. F.; Wohnlich, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Main Ethiopian Rift basin is a continental rift system characterized by volcano-tectonic depression endowed with huge geothermal resource and associated natural geochemical changes on groundwater quality. Chemical composition of groundwater in the study area showed a well defined trend along flow from the highland and escarpment to the rift floor aquifer. The low TDS (< 500mg/l) Ca-Mg-HCO3 dominated water at recharge area in the highlands and escarpments evolve progressively into Ca-Na-HCO3 and Na-Ca-HCO3 type waters along the rift ward groundwater flow paths. These waters finally appear as moderate TDS (mean 960mg/l) Na-HCO3 type and as high TDS (> 1000 mg/l) Na-HCO3-Cl type in volcano-lacustrine aquifers of the rift floor. High concentrations of fluoride (up to 97.2 mg/l) and arsenic (up to 98μg/l) are recognized feature of groundwaters which occur mostly in the vicinity of the geothermal fields and the rift lakes in the basin. Fluoride and arsenic content of dry volcaniclastic sediments close to these areas are in the range 666-2586mg/kg and 10-13mg/kg respectively. The relationship between fluoride and calcium concentrations in groundwaters showed negative correlation. Near-equilibrium state attained between the mineral fluorite (CaF2) and the majority of fluoride-rich (>30mg/l) thermal groundwater and shallow cold groundwater. This indicated that the equilibrium condition control the high concentration of fluoride in the groundwaters. Whereas undersaturation state of fluorite in some relatively low-fluoride (<30mg/l) thermal waters indicated a dilution by cold waters. Laboratory batch leaching experiments showed that fast dissolution of fluoride from the sediment samples suddenly leached into the interacting water at the first one hour and then remain stable throughout the experiment. The concentrations of leached fluoride from the hot spring deposits, the lacustrine sediments, and the pyroclastic rock are usually low (1% of the total or less than

  6. Fluoride and Geothermal Activities In Continental Rift Zones, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldesenbet, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Main Ethiopian Rift basin is a continental rift system characterized by volcano-tectonic depression endowed with huge geothermal resource and associated natural geochemical changes on groundwater quality. Chemical composition of groundwater in the study area showed a well defined trend along flow from the highland and escarpment to the rift floor aquifer. The low TDS (< 500mg/l) Ca-Mg-HCO3 dominated water at recharge area in the highlands and escarpments evolve progressively into Ca-Na-HCO3 and Na-Ca-HCO3 type waters along the rift ward groundwater flow paths. These waters finally appear as moderate TDS (mean 960mg/l) Na-HCO3 type and as high TDS (> 1000 mg/l) Na-HCO3-Cl type in volcano-lacustrine aquifers of the rift floor. High concentrations of fluoride (up to 97.2 mg/l) and arsenic (up to 98μg/l) are recognized feature of groundwaters which occur mostly in the vicinity of the geothermal fields and the rift lakes in the basin. Fluoride and arsenic content of dry volcaniclastic sediments close to these areas are in the range 666-2586mg/kg and 10-13mg/kg respectively. The relationship between fluoride and calcium concentrations in groundwaters showed negative correlation. Near-equilibrium state attained between the mineral fluorite (CaF2) and the majority of fluoride-rich (>30mg/l) thermal groundwater and shallow cold groundwater. This indicated that the equilibrium condition control the high concentration of fluoride in the groundwaters. Whereas undersaturation state of fluorite in some relatively low-fluoride (<30mg/l) thermal waters indicated a dilution by cold waters. Laboratory batch leaching experiments showed that fast dissolution of fluoride from the sediment samples suddenly leached into the interacting water at the first one hour and then remain stable throughout the experiment. The concentrations of leached fluoride from the hot spring deposits, the lacustrine sediments, and the pyroclastic rock are usually low (1% of the total or less than

  7. Fluoride varnishes with calcium glycerophosphate: fluoride release and effect on in vitro enamel demineralization.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Peters, Bianca Glerean; Rios, Daniela; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Sampaio, Fabio Correia; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Bönecker, Marcelo José Strazzeri

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to assess the amount of fluoride (F) released from varnishes containing calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) and (2) to assess the effect of the experimental varnishes on in vitro demineralization. Six test groups using 5 varnishes: base varnish (no active ingredients); Duraphat® (2.26% NaF); Duofluorid® (5.63% NaF/CaF2); experimental varnish 1 (1% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2); experimental varnish 2 (5% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2); and no varnish were set up. In stage 1, 60 acrylic blocks were randomly distributed into 6 groups (n = 10). Then 300 µg of each varnish was applied to each block. The blocks were immersed in deionized water, which was changed after 1, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Fluoride concentration in the water was analyzed using a fluoride electrode. In stage 2, 60 bovine enamel samples were distributed into 6 groups (n = 10), and treated with 300 µg of the respective varnish. After 6 h the varnish was removed and the samples were subjected to a 7-day in vitro pH cycle (6 h demineralization/18 h remineralization per day). The demineralization was measured using surface hardness. The results showed that both experimental varnishes released more fluoride than Duofluorid® and Duraphat® (p < 0.05), but Duraphat® showed the best preventive effect by decreasing enamel hardness loss (p < 0.05). Therefore, we conclude that even though (1) the experimental varnishes containing CaGP released greater amounts of F, (2) they did not increase in the preventive effect against enamel demineralization. PMID:26176358

  8. EPR, NMR and molecular dynamics in fluoride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silly, G.; Buzaré, J. Y.; Bureau, B.; Legein, C.; Boulard, B.

    1999-11-01

    This paper deals with the method of investigation of local order in Transition Metal Fluoride Glasses that has been developed in the past few years using magnetic resonance techniques associated to molecular dynamics calculations. The results presented here will concern lead fluoride PZG (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3) glasses of the PbF2-MtIIF2-MtIIIF3 family, but the method remains valid for any other disordered compound. The only limitations are that the sample may be doped with transition metal ions (S⩾1) for EPR measurements or contain quadrupolar nuclei (I⩾1) to perform NMR investigations.

  9. Aquaporin 5 Interacts with Fluoride and Possibly Protects against Caries.

    PubMed

    Anjomshoaa, Ida; Briseño-Ruiz, Jessica; Deeley, Kathleen; Poletta, Fernardo A; Mereb, Juan C; Leite, Aline L; Barreta, Priscila A T M; Silva, Thelma L; Dizak, Piper; Ruff, Timothy; Patir, Asli; Koruyucu, Mine; Abbasoğlu, Zerrin; Casado, Priscila L; Brown, Andrew; Zaky, Samer H; Bayram, Merve; Küchler, Erika C; Cooper, Margaret E; Liu, Kai; Marazita, Mary L; Tanboğa, İlknur; Granjeiro, José M; Seymen, Figen; Castilla, Eduardo E; Orioli, Iêda M; Sfeir, Charles; Owyang, Hongjiao; Buzalaf, Marília A R; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQP) are water channel proteins and the genes coding for AQP2, AQP5, and AQP6 are clustered in 12q13. Since AQP5 is expressed in serous acinar cells of salivary glands, we investigated its involvement in caries. DNA samples from 1,383 individuals from six groups were studied. Genotypes of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the aquaporin locus were tested for association with caries experience. Interaction with genes involved in enamel formation was tested. The association between enamel microhardness at baseline, after creation of artificial caries lesion, and after exposure to fluoride and the genetic markers in AQP5 was tested. Finally, AQP5 expression in human whole saliva, after exposure to fluoride in a mammary gland cell line, which is known to express AQP5, and in Wistar rats was also verified. Nominal associations were found between caries experience and markers in the AQP5 locus. Since these associations suggested that AQP5 may be inhibited by levels of fluoride in the drinking water that cause fluorosis, we showed that fluoride levels above optimal levels change AQP5 expression in humans, cell lines, and rats. We have shown that AQP5 is involved in the pathogenesis of caries and likely interacts with fluoride. PMID:26630491

  10. Fluorides in groundwater and its impact on health.

    PubMed

    Shailaja, K; Johnson, Mary Esther Cynthia

    2007-04-01

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring toxic mineral present in drinking water and causes yellowing of teeth, tooth problems etc. Fluorspar, Cryolite and Fluorapatite are the naturally occurring minerals, from which fluoride finds its path to groundwater through infiltration. In the present study two groundwater samples, Station I and Station II at Hyderabad megacity, the capital of Andhra Pradesh were investigated for one year from January 2001 to December 2001. The average fluoride values were 1.37 mg/l at Station I and 0.91 mg/l at Station II. The permissible limit given by BIS (1983) 0.6-1.2 mg/l and WHO (1984) 1.5 mg/l for fluoride in drinking water. The groundwaters at Station I exceeded the limit while at Station II it was within the limits. The study indicated that fluoride content of 0.5 mg/l is sufficient to cause yellowing of teeth and dental problems. PMID:17915775

  11. Aquaporin 5 Interacts with Fluoride and Possibly Protects against Caries

    PubMed Central

    Deeley, Kathleen; Poletta, Fernardo A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Leite, Aline L.; Barreta, Priscila A. T. M.; Silva, Thelma L.; Dizak, Piper; Ruff, Timothy; Patir, Asli; Koruyucu, Mine; Abbasoğlu, Zerrin; Casado, Priscila L.; Brown, Andrew; Zaky, Samer H.; Bayram, Merve; Küchler, Erika C.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Liu, Kai; Marazita, Mary L.; Tanboğa, İlknur; Granjeiro, José M.; Seymen, Figen; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Sfeir, Charles; Owyang, Hongjiao; Buzalaf, Marília A. R.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQP) are water channel proteins and the genes coding for AQP2, AQP5, and AQP6 are clustered in 12q13. Since AQP5 is expressed in serous acinar cells of salivary glands, we investigated its involvement in caries. DNA samples from 1,383 individuals from six groups were studied. Genotypes of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the aquaporin locus were tested for association with caries experience. Interaction with genes involved in enamel formation was tested. The association between enamel microhardness at baseline, after creation of artificial caries lesion, and after exposure to fluoride and the genetic markers in AQP5 was tested. Finally, AQP5 expression in human whole saliva, after exposure to fluoride in a mammary gland cell line, which is known to express AQP5, and in Wistar rats was also verified. Nominal associations were found between caries experience and markers in the AQP5 locus. Since these associations suggested that AQP5 may be inhibited by levels of fluoride in the drinking water that cause fluorosis, we showed that fluoride levels above optimal levels change AQP5 expression in humans, cell lines, and rats. We have shown that AQP5 is involved in the pathogenesis of caries and likely interacts with fluoride. PMID:26630491

  12. Fluoride bioavailability in saliva and plaque

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Different fluoride formulations may have different effects on caries prevention. It was the aim of this clinical study to assess the fluoride content, provided by NaF compared to amine fluoride, in saliva and plaque. Methods Eight trained volunteers brushed their teeth in the morning for 3 minutes with either NaF or amine fluoride, and saliva and 3-day-plaque-regrowth was collected at 5 time intervals during 6 hours after tooth brushing. The amount of collected saliva and plaque was measured, and the fluoride content was analysed using a fluoride sensitive electrode. All subjects repeated all study cycles 5 times, and 3 cycles per subject underwent statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results Immediately after brushing the fluoride concentration in saliva increased rapidly and dropped to the baseline level after 360 minutes. No difference was found between NaF and amine fluoride. All plaque fluoride levels were elevated after 30 minutes until 120 minutes after tooth brushing, and decreasing after 360 minutes to baseline. According to the highly individual profile of fluoride in saliva and plaque, both levels of bioavailability correlated for the first 30 minutes, and the fluoride content of saliva and plaque was back to baseline after 6 hours. Conclusions Fluoride levels in saliva and plaque are interindividually highly variable. However, no significant difference in bioavailability between NaF and amine fluoride, in saliva, or in plaque was found. PMID:22230722

  13. High concentration aqueous sodium fluoride certified reference materials for forensic use certified by complexometric titration.

    PubMed

    Archer, Marcellé; Brits, Martin; Prevoo-Franzsen, Désirée; Quinn, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Sodium fluoride in concentrations of 1 to 2 % is used to prevent the formation of ethanol in blood and urine samples that are to be analysed for ethanol content. The majority of such samples form part of forensic investigations into alleged drunken driving. In South Africa, the laboratory performing the tests is required to prove that the sodium fluoride concentration in the blood samples is above 1 g/100 ml on receipt. This is done by using a fluoride ion-selective electrode calibrated with external aqueous solutions of sodium fluoride. The National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA) prepares sodium fluoride solutions in concentrations from 0.3 to 3.0 g/100 ml. No other certified sodium fluoride reference solutions in these concentrations are available commercially. The sodium fluoride is certified by precipitation of the fluoride as lead chlorofluoride (PbClF) through the addition of a known excess of lead nitrate. The excess lead is back-titrated with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) using a photometric electrode to detect the endpoint. Aqueous sodium fluoride solutions are prepared and the concentrations verified by the precipitation/back-titration method. This paper shows the application of a classical complexometric method to the certification of reference materials and describes the procedures for the preparation of the sodium fluoride solutions, verification of the concentrations, homogeneity and stability by primary titrimetry. It also briefly covers the calculation of uncertainty, the establishment of traceability and the quality control measures applied to ensure the quality of the certified reference materials (CRMs). PMID:25326884

  14. Industrial fluoride pollution. Chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall Island cattle.

    PubMed

    Krook, L; Maylin, G A

    1979-04-01

    An aluminum plant on the south bank of the St. Lawrence river, southwest of Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada, has emitted 0.816 metric tons of fluoride daily since 1973; considerably higher amounts were emitted from 1959 to 1973. The plant has been designated as the "major source of fluoride emissions impacting on Cornwall Island." Chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall island cattle was manifested clinically by stunted growth and dental fluorosis to a degree of severe interference with drinking and mastication. Cows died at or were slaughtered after the third pregnancy. The deterioration of cows did not allow further pregnancies. Fluoride concentrations in ash of biopsied coccygeal vertebrae increased significantly with age and were dependent on distance from and direction to the aluminum plant. Fluoride in bone ash of a 7-month old-fetus exceeded 500 ppm; fluoride thus was passed transplacentally. Analyses of fluoride in ash of bones obtained at necropsy of cattle from 4 months of age to 4 to 5 years of age showed increased amounts with age. Cancellous bone retained far higher amounts than cortical bone, a reflection of the normally higher metabolic rate of cancellous bone. Concentrations exceeding 10,000 ppm fluoride were recorded in cancellous bone of a 4-to 5-year-old cow. The target cells for fluoride in chronic fluorosis were shown to be the ameloblasts, the dental pulp cells and the odontoblasts and, in bone, primarily the resorbing osteocytes and also the osteoblasts. Atrophy and necrosis of the ameloblasts were responsible for enamel defects. The existing enamel showed brown discoloration from fluoride deposits. The pulp cells underwent fibrous and osseous metaplasia and necrosis of the ectopic bone occurred. The odontoblasts were atrophic and the dentin showed brown discoloration. The resorbing osteocytes were inactive and osteosclerosis resulted. This was especially pronounced in areas of normally great apposition, i.e. in the metaphyses. The epiphyseal

  15. Effect of fluoride exposure on serum glycoprotein pattern and sialic acid level in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Gulay; Cenesiz, Sena; Yarim, Gul Fatma; Nisbet, Ozlem; Nisbet, Cevat; Cenesiz, Metin; Guvenc, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the effects of fluoride exposure on the protein profile, glycoprotein pattern, and total sialic acid concentration of serum in rabbits. For this aim; 20 healthy New Zealand rabbits were used. The rabbits were divided into two equal groups each with ten animals according to their weighing: control group and experimental group. The rabbits in control group were given drinking tap water containing 0.29 mg/l sodium fluoride and experimental group received the same tap water to which was added 40 mg/l sodium fluoride for 70 days. Blood samples were taken from each rabbit on day 70. Serum fluoride concentrations were measured by a fluoride-specific ion electrode in serum. The fluoride levels in the serum were found as 18.4 (+/-1.58) microg/L in control and 301.3 (+/-52.18) microg/L in fluoride exposed rabbits. The sialic acid levels were found as 69.2 (+/-0.32) mg/dL in control and 43.4 (+/-0.13) mg/dL in fluoride exposed group. The electrophoretic patterns of serum proteins, glycoproteins, and total sialic acid concentration were determined. Fifteen different protein fractions with molecular weights ranging from 22 to 249 kDa were displayed in the serum protein electrophoretic gel of both groups. The raw concentrations of the protein fractions decreased in fluoride exposed rabbits as compared with the control rabbits. The serum glycoprotein pattern revealed seven major protein bands from 47 to 167 kDa in experimental and control groups. The slight decrease of raw concentration of the protein bands in glycoprotein pattern of serum was observed in fluoride toxication comparing to control. The results suggest that serum TSA determination and serum protein electrophoresis can be used to evaluate prognosis of fluoride exposure as a supplementary laboratory test in combination with clinical and other laboratory findings of fluorosis. PMID:19904501

  16. Microcratering in Polyvinylidene Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Anthony John

    Dust is defined as macroparticles as small as a few molecules up to several micrometers in diameter. In the context of space exploration, it was originally seen only as a technical obstacle to applications; dust can damage instrument surfaces, coat mating surfaces preventing proper seals, and impair or obstruct measurements. Because of the ubiquity of dust in the solar system and its role in the origin of planets and other bodies, the study of dust and related phenomena has evolved to a scientific subdiscipline which can provide us insight into the origins and evolution of our solar system. In order to facilitate this, a hypervelocity dust accelerator has been built at the University of Colorado at Boulder and is being used to probe impact phenomena, dust mitigation techniques, dust detection techniques, and more. One such dust detector is a Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) dust detector. The PVDF dust detector is very lightweight and consumes little power. Due to these properties, PVDF detectors can potentially be used on any spacecraft to gain information on the local dust environment. It is not fully understood how this PVDF dust detector signal is generated, so at present can only be used as a dust counter. In this thesis I discuss the importance of the study of dust phenomena, describe the accelerator experiment, and describe a study conducted to determine the underlying physical principles of PVDF dust detectors. This included measuring crater size scaling laws, measuring the detailed shape of craters, and applying this data to simulations of the signals being generated by PVDF detectors.

  17. Removal of fluoride ions from water by adsorption onto carbonaceous materials produced from coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Tominaga, Hisato; Yabutani, Hitoshi; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2011-01-01

    Carbonaceous material for the removal of fluoride ions from water was prepared from coffee grounds (CGs) by calcination and subsequent HCl treatment. The characteristics of the CGs, including the surface area, mean pore diameter, pore volume, and surface functional groups were determined, and the morphological characteristics were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption isotherms, saturated amount of fluoride ions adsorbed, and the effect of contact time and temperature on the adsorption of fluoride ions were investigated for a sample of tap water. The specific surface area of CG calcined at 600° (CG600) was larger than that of CGs calcined at 400, 800, and 1000°. Phenolic, lactonic, and carboxyl groups were detected on the CG600 surface. The adsorption capacity of the carbonized CGs for fluoride was ranked in the order CG400 < CG1000 < CG800 < CG600 (where the numeral indicates the carbonization temperature), whereas virgin CG and CG600-NAT (not treated with hydrochloric acid solution) did not exhibit any adsorption ability for fluoride ions. The amount of fluoride ions adsorbed onto CG600 increased with increasing temperature and was consistent with chemical adsorption. The mechanism of adsorption of fluoride ions onto CG600 proceeded via ion exchange with chloride ions (1:1) present on the surface of CG600. The adsorption isotherms were fitted to the Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Moreover, CG600 showed an acceptable adsorption capacity for fluoride ions present in tap water. PMID:22123243

  18. A Manual for Rural School Fluoridation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprouse, Larman W.; Brooks, John

    The product of a 1972 Dental Health Branch contract with the U.S. Public Health Service, this manual is designed to aid in the development of school fluoridation programs and presents: background information on general concepts relating to the action of fluoride on teeth; discussions dealing with community and school fluoridation studies; and the…

  19. The Effect of Fluoride in Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, L. R.; Gallagher, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of fluoride on bone tissue and the possible role of fluoride in the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, fluoride treatment should be restricted to clinical trials until its risks and benefits have been further evaluated. (Author/MT)

  20. Preparation and thermal decomposition of yttrium hydroxide fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, H.; Okumoto, K.; Mitsushio, T.

    1991-06-01

    The hydrothermal treatment of Y 2O 3 in KF solution at 400°C gave single phase of yttrium hydroxide fluorides, Y(OH) 3- xF x (0.65 < x < 1.43). Rietveld refinements of X-ray powder intensity data were performed for these solid solution phases. The hexagonal UCl 3 type system was retained over the whole range of x observed. All these solid solutions were thermally decomposed to oxide fluorides up to 500°C. Single phase of metastable cubic YOF and tetragonal YO 1- XF 1+2 x were obtained at 450°C for the solid solution with x = 0.98 and x = 1.43, respectively. The interatomic distances of anions (OH -,F -), IR data, and dehydration temperature of x < 1 phases supported the existence of hydrogen bonds.

  1. Delayed fracture of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen-related degradation of the mechanical properties of a Ni-Ti superelastic alloy has been examined by means of delayed fracture tests in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Delayed fracture took place in both solutions; the time to fracture was shorter in the acidic solutions than in the neutral solutions with the same fluoride concentration. The time to fracture was reduced in both solutions when applied stress exceeded the critical stress for martensite transformation. In the acidic solutions, Ni-Ti superelastic alloy underwent general corrosion and absorbed substantial amounts of hydrogen. Fractographic features suggested that the delayed fracture in the acidic solutions was attributable to hydrogen embrittlement, whereas in the neutral solutions, a different fracture mode appeared associated with localized corrosion only in the vicinity of the fracture initiation area. In the neutral solutions, the amount of absorbed hydrogen was much less than that in the acidic solutions, and the delayed fracture was likely to be induced by active path corrosion accompanying hydrogen absorption. The results of the present study imply that the hydrogen-related degradation of performance of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys occurs in the presence of fluoride. PMID:14999757

  2. Fabrication of a miniaturized capillary waveguide integrated fiber-optic sensor for fluoride determination.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Wang, Chengjie; Tao, Tao; Duan, Ming; Tan, Jun; Wu, Jiayi; Wang, Dong

    2016-05-10

    Fluoride concentration is a key aspect of water quality and essential for human health. Too much or too little fluoride intake from water supplies is harmful to public health. In this study, a capillary waveguide integrated fiber-optic sensor was fabricated for fluoride measurement in water samples. The sensor was modularly designed with three parts, i.e., a light source, capillary flow cell and detector. When light propagated from a light emitting diode (LED) to the capillary waveguide cell through an excitation fiber, it interacted with the sensing reagent, and its intensity changed with different fluoride concentrations. Then, the light propagated to the detector through a detection fiber for absorption determination of fluoride according to Beer's law. This miniaturized sensor showed advantages of fast analysis (9.2 s) and small reagent demand (200 μL) per sample, and it also had a low detection limit (8 ppb) and high selectivity for fluoride determination. The sensor was applied to fluoride determination in different water samples. The results obtained were compared with those obtained by conventional spectrophotometry and ion chromatography, showing agreement and validating the sensor's potential application. PMID:27067512

  3. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.J.; Sheft, I.

    1959-08-11

    A method is presented for preparing the halides of elements which are relatively non-reactive with halogenating agents. The method involves reacting a mixture of an oxygen containing salt of a difficulty halogenated metal with an oxygen containing salt of an easily halogenated metal with a halogenating agent. Accordingly plutonium tetrafluoride is produced by reacting a mixture of plutonium dioxide and uranium octaoxide with bromine trifluoride. The reaction proceeds smoothly at moderate temperatures and the resulting plutonium trifluoride may be readily separated from many impurities which form volatile fluorides by volatilizing these volatile fluorides from the reaction chamber.

  4. "Borderline" fluorotic region in Serbia: correlations among fluoride in drinking water, biomarkers of exposure and dental fluorosis in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Antonijevic, Evica; Mandinic, Zoran; Curcic, Marijana; Djukic-Cosic, Danijela; Milicevic, Nemanja; Ivanovic, Mirjana; Carevic, Momir; Antonijevic, Biljana

    2016-06-01

    This study explores relation between dental fluorosis occurrence in schoolchildren, residents of Ritopek, a small local community near Belgrade, and fluoride exposure via drinking water. Additionally, fluoride levels were determined in children's urine and hair samples, and efforts were made to correlate them with dental fluorosis. Dental fluorosis and caries prevalence were examined in a total of 52 schoolchildren aged 7-15 years (29 boys and 23 girls). Fluoride levels in three types of samples were analyzed using composite fluoride ion-selective electrode. Results showed high prevalence of dental fluorosis (34.6 %) and low prevalence of dental caries (23.1 %, mean DMFT 0.96) among children exposed to wide range of water fluoride levels (0.11-4.14 mg/L, n = 27). About 11 % of water samples exceeded 1.5 mg/L, a drinking-water quality guideline value for fluoride given by the World Health Organization (2006). Fluoride levels in urine and hair samples ranged between 0.07-2.59 (n = 48) and 1.07-19.83 mg/L (n = 33), respectively. Severity of dental fluorosis was positively and linearly correlated with fluoride levels in drinking water (r = 0.79). Fluoride levels in urine and hair were strongly and positively correlated with levels in drinking water (r = 0.92 and 0.94, respectively). Fluoride levels in hair samples appeared to be a potentially promising biomarker of fluoride intake via drinking water on one hand, and severity of dental fluorosis on the other hand. Based on community fluorosis index value of 0.58, dental fluorosis revealed in Ritopek can be considered as "borderline" public health issue. PMID:26423526

  5. Fluoride distribution and biological availability in the fallout from Mount St. Helens, 18 to 21 May 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Taves, D.R.

    1980-12-19

    Concentrations of fluoride in the ash fallout in central Washington from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens varied severalfold, but none are high enough to constitute any immediate hazard to animal life. The heaviest fallout (Moses Lake) contained 113 parts per million (ppm) of acid-labile fluoride, but of this only 11 ppm was water-soluble and 20 ppm was available to rats. The fluoride concentrations in the urine of cattle feeding for 4 days on hay contaminated with this ash were essentially normal. Samples of ash from other areas generally had higher concentrations of acid-labile fluoride but lower concentrations of water-soluble fluoride. The concentrations of water-soluble fluoride was inversely correlated with the coarseness of the fallout. 8 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  6. Towards the determination of the equation of state of hydrogen and helium at extreme densities: Laser induced shocks on pre-compressed samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubeyre, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The determination of the equation of state of helium and hydrogen at very high density is an important problem at the frontier between condensed matter physics and plasma physics. It is also an important issue in planetary physics for understanding the formation of giant and extrasolar planets. However, the extreme densities relevant to most of the interior of Jupiter are unreachable by either static or single-shock compression techniques alone. Recently, a laser-driven shock-wave in a hydrogen sample, pre-compressed in a diamond anvil cell, has been demonstrated [1]. Consequently, the compression factors of the dynamic and static techniques can now be multiplied. We will present our current effort with the Omega laser at LLE to measure accurately the Hugoniot curves of hydrogen and helium pre-compressed up to 1.5 GPa. The metrology and error bars of the measurements will be discussed. The Hugoniot data points will be compared to published calculations, and an interesting difference in the insulator-metal transition of hydrogen and helium will be discussed. Co-authors are Stephanie Brygoo, CEA, France; Jon Eggert, Peter Celliers, Guilbert Collins, LLNL, Livermore CA 94551 USA; Ryan McWilliam, Raymond Jeanloz, University of California, CA 94720 USA; and Tom Boehly, LLE, New-York 14623 USA. [1] P. Loubeyre et al., High Pressure Research 24, 25- 31 (2004).

  7. Automated ion-selective electrode method for determining fluoride in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erdmann, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    An automated fluoride method which uses AutoAnalyzer modules in conjunction with a fluoride ion-selective electrode was evaluated. The results obtained on 38 natural water samples are in excellent agreement with those determined by a similar manual method (average difference = 0.026 mg/l). An average fluoride concentration of 0.496 mg/l was found when several natural water samples were spiked with 0.50 mg/l fluoride. Aluminum is the only significant interfering substance, and it can be easily tolerated if its concentration does not exceed 2 mg/l. Thirty samples were analyzed per hour over a concentration range of 0-2 mg/l.

  8. Methods of using ionic liquids having a fluoride anion as solvents

    DOEpatents

    Pagoria, Philip; Maiti, Amitesh; Gash, Alexander; Han, Thomas Yong; Orme, Christine; Fried, Laurence

    2011-12-06

    A method in one embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having a fluoride anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of about 90.degree. C. or less during the contacting. A method in another embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having an acetate or formate anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of less than about 90.degree. C. during the contacting.

  9. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    George, Liza; Baby, Allu; Dhanapal, T. Prasanth; Charlie, K. M.; Joseph, Asha; Varghese, Anjum Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent. PMID:26604568

  10. Modified zirconium-eriochrome cyanine R determination of fluoride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, L.L.

    1957-01-01

    The Eriochrome Cyanine R method for determining fluoride in natural water has been modified to provide a single, stable reagent solution, eliminate interference from oxidizing agents, extend the concentration range to 3 p.p.m., and extend the phosphate tolerance. Temperature effect was minimized; sulfate error was eliminated by precipitation. The procedure is sufficiently tolerant to interferences found in natural and polluted waters to permit the elimination of prior distillation for most samples. The method has been applied to 500 samples.

  11. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  12. Spectral diversity crystalline fluoride lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jenssen, H.P.; Gabbe, D.R.; Linz, A.; Naiman, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Within the realm of crystalline laser materials, the class of fluorides distinguishes itself mostly by the wide variety of laser wavelengths displayed. Laser operation has now been reported from 3.9 micrometers in the infrared to 286 nm in the ultraviolet. Many are operated flash-lamp pumped, while others have shown high utility as linear down conversion lasers and rare earth ion, while others are sensitized by other co-dopants which absorb the pump energy and transfer it to the active laser ions. The potential of large spectral diversity for laser operation is due both to the wide window of transparency that fluorides possess and the lower rates of nonradiative decay. The high band gap in the ultraviolet also leads to low linear absorption, low nonlinear refractive indices and multiphoton absorption. Additionally, the good chemical stability displayed by high-purity stoichiometric fluoride compounds allows their use with ultraviolet pump sources at high energies, without incurring UV-induced damage. The most recent research associated with such materials, particularly the host crystal, lithium yttrium fluoride, LiYF4 (YLF) is reviewed.

  13. [Absorption of fluorides by synthetic hydroxyapatites].

    PubMed

    Yévenes, I; Sánchez, U; Medina, M E

    1988-01-01

    We studied the adsorption of sodium fluoride, ammonium fluoride, tin fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate to synthetic hydroxiapatite in function of the pH (pH 4.7, 5.5 and 6.1). In two models; in a first model was eluted the fluorides of the hydroxiapatite column with artificial saliva; in the second model were incubated the fluoride with bufferized hydroxiapatite to the above pH. The fluoride determination was done by potentiometric method with a specific ion activity electrode. The results in the elution indicated that the sodium and tin fluorides give elution levels different at the pH studied. By other hand ammonium fluoride did not present differences. The results with incubation demonstrated that ammonium fluoride gives the greater adsorption, the sodium fluoride is slightly lower, and the sodium monofluorophosphate the lowest. Also, was observed that the adsorption decrease with the increase of the pH for the three fluorides. The comparison of both models showed that the incubation presented higher values of adsorption than the elution for the pH studied. PMID:3155417

  14. The role of fluoride in erosion therapy.

    PubMed

    Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Young, Alix; Ganss, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The role of fluoride in erosion therapy has long been questioned. However, recent research has yielded positive results. In this chapter, an overview of the literature is provided regarding the application of fluorides in the prevention and treatment of erosion and erosive wear. The results are presented and discussed for different fluoride sources such as monovalent and polyvalent fluorides, and for different vehicles such as toothpastes, solutions and rinses, as well as varnishes and gels. It is concluded that fluoride applications are very likely to be of use in the preventive treatment of erosive wear. Most promising are high-concentration, acidic formulations and the polyvalent fluoride sources, with the best evidence available for stannous fluoride. However, the evidence base for clinical effectiveness is still small. PMID:24993271

  15. Geochemical controls of high fluoride groundwater in Umarkot Sub-District, Thar Desert, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Tahir; Naseem, Shahid; Ozsvath, David; Hussain, Riaz; Bhanger, Muhammad Iqbal; Usmani, Tanzil Haider

    2015-10-15

    Groundwater samples (n=152) were collected in the Thar Desert of the Umarkot Sub-District, Pakistan to evaluate the geochemical controls on the occurrence of high fluoride (F(-)) levels within the study area. Fluoride concentrations range from 0.06 to 44.4 mg/L, with mean and median values of 5.22 and 4.09 mg/L, respectively; and roughly 84% of the samples contain fluoride concentrations that exceed the 1.5mg/L drinking water standard set by WHO. The overall groundwater quality reflects the influences of silicate mineral weathering and evaporation. Fluoride originates from the weathering of minerals derived from Type-A granite and possibly anion exchange (OH(-) for F(-)) on clays and weathered micas under high pH conditions. High fluoride levels are associated with Na-HCO3 type water produced by calcite precipitation and/or base ion exchange. Depleted calcium levels in groundwater allow higher fluoride concentrations to occur before the solubility limit for fluoride is reached. PMID:26047861

  16. Lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles for radiosensitization of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Konstantin; Bekah, Devesh; Cooper, Daniel; Shastry, Sathvik; Hill, Colin; Bradforth, Stephen; Nadeau, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Dense inorganic nanoparticles have recently been identified as promising radiosensitizers. In addition to dose enhancement through increased attenuation of ionizing radiation relative to biological tissue, scintillating nanoparticles can transfer energy to coupled photosensitizers to amplify production of reactive oxygen species, as well as provide UVvisible emission for optical imaging. Lanthanum fluoride is a transparent material that is easily prepared as nanocrystals, and which can provide radioluminescence at a number of wavelengths through simple substitution of lanthanum ions with other luminescent lanthanides. We have prepared lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles doped with cerium, terbium, or both, that have good spectral overlap with chlorine6 or Rose Bengal photosensitizer molecules. We have also developed a strategy for stable conjugation of the photosensitizers to the nanoparticle surface, allowing for high energy transfer efficiencies on a per molecule basis. Additionally, we have succeeded in making our conjugates colloidally stable under physiological conditions. Here we present our latest results, using nanoparticles and nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates to demonstrate radiation dose enhancement in B16 melanoma cells. The effects of nanoparticle treatment prior to 250 kVp x-ray irradiation were investigated through clonogenic survival assays and cell cycle analysis. Using a custom apparatus, we have also observed scintillation of the nanoparticles and conjugates under the same conditions that the cell samples are irradiated.

  17. Temporal variation of fluoride concentration in antlers of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) living in an area exposed to emissions from iron and steel industry, 1948-2000.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst

    2003-09-01

    Temporal changes of environmental fluoride concentration in the industrialized area of Siegen, western Germany were assessed by studying the fluoride content of antlers (n=116) collected between 1948 and 2000 from the resident roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) population. During the analyzed period, major fluoride emission sources in the study area have been iron- and steelworks. Fluoride concentrations in the antlers ranged between 118 and 5428 mg/kg of bone ash. There was an overall increase in antler fluoride content from the late 1940s/early 1950s to the late 1950s/mid-1960s. Thereafter, antler fluoride levels overall steadily declined. For statistical analysis, the data were grouped into five periods (1948-1959, 1960-1969, 1970-1979, 1980-1989, and 1990-2000). Geometric mean fluoride concentrations of the samples ranged from 323 (period 1990-2000) to 2096 mg/kg of bone ash (period 1960-1969). Sample means for the periods 1980-1989 and 1990-2000, respectively, were always significantly lower than those of older samples. The decrease in antler fluoride concentrations during recent decades suggests a drop of ambient fluoride levels, that is hypothetically attributed to a reduction in the number of emission sources in the area and a decline of fluoride discharges from both local and more distant sources due to improved emission control measures. Comparison with antler fluoride data for other roe deer populations from western Germany further suggests that the roe deer from the Siegen area were recently exposed to an only moderate additional fluoride load from industrial sources. Studying antler fluoride concentrations is a convenient and cost-effective method of monitoring temporal changes in ambient fluoride levels. PMID:12871734

  18. Fluoride in groundwater: toxicological exposure and remedies.

    PubMed

    Jha, S K; Singh, R K; Damodaran, T; Mishra, V K; Sharma, D K; Rai, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that is found most frequently in groundwater and has become one of the most important toxicological environmental hazards globally. The occurrence of fluoride in groundwater is due to weathering and leaching of fluoride-bearing minerals from rocks and sediments. Fluoride when ingested in small quantities (<0.5 mg/L) is beneficial in promoting dental health by reducing dental caries, whereas higher concentrations (>1.5 mg/L) may cause fluorosis. It is estimated that about 200 million people, from among 25 nations the world over, may suffer from fluorosis and the causes have been ascribed to fluoride contamination in groundwater including India. High fluoride occurrence in groundwaters is expected from sodium bicarbonate-type water, which is calcium deficient. The alkalinity of water also helps in mobilizing fluoride from fluorite (CaF2). Fluoride exposure in humans is related to (1) fluoride concentration in drinking water, (2) duration of consumption, and (3) climate of the area. In hotter climates where water consumption is greater, exposure doses of fluoride need to be modified based on mean fluoride intake. Various cost-effective and simple procedures for water defluoridation techniques are already known, but the benefits of such techniques have not reached the rural affected population due to limitations. Therefore, there is a need to develop workable strategies to provide fluoride-safe drinking water to rural communities. The study investigated the geochemistry and occurrence of fluoride and its contamination in groundwater, human exposure, various adverse health effects, and possible remedial measures from fluoride toxicity effects. PMID:23573940

  19. Method for the determination of lignin content of a sample by flash pyrolysis in an atmosphere of hydrogen or helium and method therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy (Inventor); Kwack, Eug Y. (Inventor); Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The lignin content of wood, paper pulp or other material containing lignin (such as filter paper soaked in black liquor) is more readily determined by flash pyrolysis of the sample at approximately 550.degree. C. in a reducing atmosphere of hydrogen or in an inert atmosphere of helium followed by a rapid analysis of the product gas by a mass spectrometer. The heated pyrolysis unit as fabricated comprises a small platinum cup welded to an electrically-heated stainless steel ribbon with control means for programmed short duration (1.5 sec, approximately) heating and means for continuous flow of hydrogen or helium. The pyrolysis products enter an electron-ionization mode mass spectrometer for spectral evaluation. Lignin content is obtained from certain ratios of integrated ion currents of many mass spectral lines, the ratios being linearly related to the Kappa number of Klason lignin.

  20. Chemistry control and corrosion mitigation of heat transfer salts for the fluoride salt reactor (FHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, B. C.; Sellers, S. R.; Anderson, M. H.; Sridharan, K.; Scheele, R. D.

    2012-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was a prototype nuclear reactor which operated from 1965 to 1969 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The MSRE used liquid fluoride salts as a heat transfer fluid and solvent for fluoride based {sup 235}U and {sup 233}U fuel. Extensive research was performed in order to optimize the removal of oxide and metal impurities from the reactor's heat transfer salt, 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} (FLiBe). This was done by sparging a mixture of anhydrous hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen gas through the FLiBe at elevated temperatures. The hydrofluoric acid reacted with oxides and hydroxides, fluorinating them while simultaneously releasing water vapor. Metal impurities such as iron and chromium were reduced by hydrogen gas and filtered out of the salt. By removing these impurities, the corrosion of reactor components was minimized. The Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison is currently researching a new chemical purification process for fluoride salts that make use of a less dangerous cleaning gas, nitrogen trifluoride. Nitrogen trifluoride has been predicted as a superior fluorinating agent for fluoride salts. These purified salts will subsequently be used for static and loop corrosion tests on a variety of reactor materials to ensure materials compatibility for the new FHR designs. Demonstration of chemistry control methodologies along with potential reduction in corrosion is essential for the use of a fluoride salts in a next generator nuclear reactor system. (authors)

  1. Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

  2. Studies on sorption of some geomaterials for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Sujana, M G; Pradhan, H K; Anand, S

    2009-01-15

    In the present study the defluoridation capacities of some of the naturally occurring materials like low and high iron containing lateritic ores, overburden from chromite mines of Orissa Mining Corporation (OMC) and Tata Steel have been estimated. The various experimental parameters studied for fluoride sorption from aqueous solutions were: time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, sorbent dose and temperature. The three geomaterials, namely chromite overburden from Orissa Mining Corporation, both low and high iron containing lateritic ores sorbed fluoride effectively. The sorption kinetics for these samples was found to follow first order rate expression and the experimental equilibrium sorption data fitted reasonably well to both Langmuir and Freundlich models. The negative values of DeltaG degrees suggest the sorption of fluoride onto three samples to be spontaneous and the exothermic nature of sorption is confirmed by the -DeltaH degrees values. The negative DeltaS degrees values for these sorbents point towards decreased randomness at the solid/solution interface. The sorption studies were also carried out at natural pH conditions for fluoride removal from ground water samples and the fluoride level could be reduced from 10.25 to <1.0mgL(-1) by multistage adsorption process using OMC and NH samples. PMID:18450373

  3. Lithological Influences on Occurrence of High-Fluoride Waters in The Central Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaka, L. A.; Musolff, A.; Mulch, A.; Olago, D.; Odada, E. O.

    2013-12-01

    Within the East African rift, groundwater recharge results from the complex interplay of geology, land cover, geomorphology, climate and on going volcano-tectonic processes across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The interrelationships between these factors create complex patterns of water availability, reliability and quality. The hydrochemical evolution of the waters is further complex due to the different climatic regimes and geothermal processes going on in this area. High fluoridic waters within the rift have been reported by few studies, while dental fluorosis is high among the inhabitants of the rift. The natural sources of fluoride in waters can be from weathering of fluorine bearing minerals in rocks, volcanic or fumarolic activities. Fluoride concentration in water depends on a number of factors including pH, temperature, time of water-rock formation contact and geochemical processes. Knowledge of the sources and dispersion of fluoride in both surface and groundwaters within the central Kenya rift and seasonal variations between wet and dry seasons is still poor. The Central Kenya rift is marked by active tectonics, volcanic activity and fumarolic activity, the rocks are majorly volcanics: rhyolites, tuffs, basalts, phonolites, ashes and agglomerates some are highly fractured. Major NW-SE faults bound the rift escarpment while the rift floor is marked by N-S striking faults We combine petrographic, hydrochemistry and structural information to determine the sources and enrichment pathways of high fluoridic waters within the Naivasha catchment. A total of 120 water samples for both the dry season (January-February2012) and after wet season (June-July 2013) from springs, rivers, lakes, hand dug wells, fumaroles and boreholes within the Naivasha catchment are collected and analysed for fluoride, physicochemical parameters and stable isotopes (δ2 H, δ18 O) in order to determine the origin and evolution of the waters. Additionally, 30 soil and

  4. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, 18F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  5. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D; Davis, Jared H; Gordon, Patricia B; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2013-11-19

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, (18)F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  6. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used... fluoride resins consist of basic resins produced by the polymerization of vinylidene fluoride. (b)...

  7. Efficacy of xylitol and fluoride mouthrinses on salivary mutans streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Arunakul, Malee; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Asvanund, Yuwadee; Charoenchaikorn, Kesinee

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of salivary Mutans streptococci (MS) after rinsing with xylitol, fluoride, and a combination of xylitol and fluoride solutions, compared with distilled water. Methods Eighty healthy 8-9 years old subjects with high level of MS (> 105 CFU/mL) were equally divided into 4 groups. Subjects rinsed their mouths for 1 min with 10 mL of 0.05% (w/v) sodium fluoride (NaF), 12.5% (w/v) xylitol or 0.05% (w/v) NaF + 12.5% (w/v) xylitol 3 times daily over 10 weeks. Distilled water rinsed group served as a control. Paraffin-stimulated whole saliva samples were collected at baseline, 5 weeks, and 10 weeks after rinsing to determine the level of salivary MS by culturing on Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar. The statistical significance was calculated by Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney U, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests at a significant level of P< 0.05. Results Significant reductions in MS count were observed in subjects using 0.05% NaF + 12.5% xylitol over other groups within 5 weeks and after 10 weeks and 12.5% xylitol alone after 10 weeks compared with baseline. Conclusions The present study provides evidence for the inhibitory effect of xylitol, used in combination with fluoride, delivered in the form of mouthrinse, on salivary MS in the group of schoolchildren. PMID:23569819

  8. Fluoride penetration from three orthodontic adhesives: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Szepietowska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the prophylactic potential of 3 orthodontic bonding adhesives: Fuji Ortho SC, Illuminate, and Resilience. Methods Thirty-six Wistar Wag rats were randomly divided into 4 groups consisting of 9 rats each. One of the groups received no treatment and was used as a control. In the other groups, individual bands coated with one of the 3 adhesives were cemented to the lower incisors. Enamel samples were obtained after 6 and 12 weeks and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive spectrometry. Results Six weeks after band cementation, no fluoride was found in the enamel of the lower incisors. After 12 weeks, there was no fluoride in the enamel of teeth coated with the Resilience composite. However, in the case of the Illuminate composite and the resin-modified glass ionomer Fuji Ortho SC cement, the depth of fluoride penetration reached 2 µm and 4.8 - 5.7 µm, respectively. Conclusions Fluoride ions from orthodontic adhesives can be incorporated into the surface layer of the enamel. Orthodontists may apply orthodontic adhesives, such as the Fuji Ortho SC, to reduce the occurrence of caries during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. PMID:23502591

  9. Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides

    DOEpatents

    FitzPatrick, John R.; Dunn, Jerry G.; Avens, Larry R.

    1987-01-01

    Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF.sub.4 is not further oxidized to AmF.sub.6 by the application of O.sub.2 F at room temperature, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF.sub.6, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride.

  10. Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides

    DOEpatents

    FitzPatrick, J.R.; Dunn, J.G.; Avens, L.R.

    1987-02-13

    Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF/sub 4/ is not further oxidized to AmF/sub 6/ by the application of O/sub 2/F at room temperature thereto, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF/sub 6/, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride thereof.

  11. Assay of fluoride by a novel organic-inorganic mesoporous nano-sized sensor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianmin; Lai, Yuming; Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Qianming

    2016-08-01

    In this report, we prepared a novel mesoporous silica nanostructure for selective detection of fluoride through ultraviolet absorption and emission changes. In the sensing system, a silica coupling reagent (3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl isocyanate) linked 1-naphthylamine has been covalently grafted onto the mesopores of inorganic network. These specially designed nanospheres can recognize fluoride from other anions based on hydrogen bond interactions. This approach may provide new opportunities for designing related sensing systems with enhanced physical or chemical properties. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26729521

  12. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM SLUDGE SAMPLE BOTTLES CAUSED BY RADIOLYSIS AND CHEMISTRY WITH CONCETNRATION DETERMINATION IN A STANDARD WASTE BOX (SWB) OR DRUM FOR TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    RILEY DL; BRIDGES AE; EDWARDS WS

    2010-03-30

    A volume of 600 mL of sludge, in 4.1 L sample bottles (Appendix 7.6), will be placed in either a Super Pig (Ref. 1) or Piglet (Ref. 2, 3) based on shielding requirements (Ref. 4). Two Super Pigs will be placed in a Standard Waste Box (SWB, Ref. 5), as their weight exceeds the capacity of a drum; two Piglets will be placed in a 55-gallon drum (shown in Appendix 7.2). The generation of hydrogen gas through oxidation/corrosion of uranium metal by its reaction with water will be determined and combined with the hydrogen produced by radiolysis. The hydrogen concentration in the 55-gallon drum and SWB will be calculated to show that the lower flammability limit of 5% hydrogen is not reached. The inner layers (i.e., sample bottle, bag and shielded pig) in the SWB and drum will be evaluated to assure no pressurization occurs as the hydrogen vents from the inner containers (e.g., shielded pigs, etc.). The reaction of uranium metal with anoxic liquid water is highly exothermic; the heat of reaction will be combined with the source term decay heat, calculated from Radcalc, to show that the drum and SWB package heat load limits are satisfied. This analysis does five things: (1) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water; (2) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from radiolysis (using Radcalc 4.1); (3) Combines both H{sub 2} generation amounts, from Items 1 and 2, and determines the percent concentration of H{sub 2} in the interior of an SWB with two Super Pigs, and the interior of a 55-gallon drum with two Piglets; (4) From the combined gas generation rate, shows that the pressure at internal layers is minimal; and (5) Calculates the maximum thermal load of the package, both from radioactive decay of the source and daughter products as calculated/reported by Radcalc 4.1, and from the exothermic reaction of uranium metal with water.

  13. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  14. High-Density, Scintillating, Fluoride Glass Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgun, Ugur; Xie, Qiuchen

    2014-03-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Here, we propose to use high density, scintillating, fluoride glasses as active media in calorimeters. CHG3 is a special example of this glass family, which has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. In this presentation, the results from a computational study on the performances of the two different designs of CHG3 glass calorimeters are reported. First design reads the signal directly from the edge of the glass plate; the second design utilizes wavelength-shifting fibers to carry the signal out of the glass plate. Each simulation model is a sampling calorimeter with 20 alternating layers of glass and iron absorber. By changing the absorber thickness we tested hadronic as well as electromagnetic capabilities of the calorimeter models.

  15. Systematic review of water fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Marian S; Whiting, Penny F; Wilson, Paul M; Sutton, Alex J; Chestnutt, Ivor; Cooper, Jan; Misso, Kate; Bradley, Matthew; Treasure, Elizabeth; Kleijnen, Jos

    2000-01-01

    Objective To review the safety and efficacy of fluoridation of drinking water. Design Search of 25 electronic databases and world wide web. Relevant journals hand searched; further information requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Main outcome measures Decayed, missing, and filled primary/permanent teeth. Proportion of children without caries. Measure of effect was the difference in change in prevalence of caries from baseline to final examination in fluoridated compared with control areas. For potential adverse effects, all outcomes reported were used. Results 214 studies were included. The quality of studies was low to moderate. Water fluoridation was associated with an increased proportion of children without caries and a reduction in the number of teeth affected by caries. The range (median) of mean differences in the proportion of children without caries was −5.0% to 64% (14.6%). The range (median) of mean change in decayed, missing, and filled primary/permanent teeth was 0.5 to 4.4 (2.25) teeth. A dose-dependent increase in dental fluorosis was found. At a fluoride level of 1 ppm an estimated 12.5% (95% confidence interval 7.0% to 21.5%) of exposed people would have fluorosis that they would find aesthetically concerning. Conclusions The evidence of a beneficial reduction in caries should be considered together with the increased prevalence of dental fluorosis. There was no clear evidence of other potential adverse effects. PMID:11021861

  16. Fluoride laser crystals: old and new

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenssen, Hans P.; Cassanho, Arlete

    2006-02-01

    The development of oxide and fluoride materials as gain materials of choice for solid state lasers ranges from early materials such as Calcium Fluoride and Calcium Tungstate crystals to the now ubiquitous Nd hosts YLF, YAG and Vanadate. Among Tunable laser materials, MgF II - an early favorite, gave way to superior oxides such as Alexandrite and Ti:Sapphire only to be followed by development of still newer tunable fluoride media, notably, fluoride colquiriites such as Cr-doped LiSAF and LiCaF. Newer fluoride crystals, such as Barium Yttrium Fluoride BaY II F 8 (BYF), KY 3F 10 (KYF) and the tunable Cr doped LiCaGaF 6 are attractive laser materials, but their growth has not been optimized. Key advantages of two of these new crystals are discussed. Crystal growth results for BYF and Cr:LiCaGaF 6 as well as some material characterization are presented.

  17. Hydrogeochemistry of high-fluoride groundwater at Yuncheng Basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengcheng; Gao, Xubo; Wang, Yanxin

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogeochemical and environmental isotope methods were integrated to delineate the spatial distribution and enrichment of fluoride in groundwater at Yuncheng Basin in northern China. One hundred groundwater samples and 10 Quaternary sediment samples were collected from the Basin. Over 69% of the shallow groundwater (with a F(-) concentration of up to 14.1mg/L), 44% of groundwater samples from the intermediate and 31% from the deep aquifers had F(-) concentrations above the WHO provisional drinking water guideline of 1.5mg/L. Groundwater with high F(-) concentrations displayed a distinctive major ion chemistry: Na-rich and Ca-poor with a high pH value and high HCO3(-) content. Hydrochemical diagrams and profiles and hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions indicate that variations in the major ion chemistry and pH are controlled by mineral dissolution, cation exchange and evaporation in the aquifer systems, which are important for F(-) mobilization as well. Leakage of shallow groundwater and/or evaporite (gypsum and mirabilite) dissolution may be the major sources for F(-) in groundwater of the intermediate and deep aquifers. PMID:25478652

  18. Delayed fracture of beta titanium orthodontic wire in fluoride aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2003-05-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of a beta titanium orthodontic wire has been examined by means of a delayed-fracture test in acid and neutral fluoride aqueous solutions and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. The time to fracture increased with decreasing applied stress in 2.0% and 0.2% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) solutions. The fracture mode changed from ductile to brittle when the applied stress was lower than 500MPa in 2.0% APF solution. On the other hand, the delayed fracture did not occur within 1000h in neutral NaF solutions, although general corrosion was also observed similar to that in APF solutions. Hydrogen desorption of the delayed-fracture-tested specimens was observed with a peak at approximately 500 degrees C. The amount of absorbed hydrogen was 5000-6500 mass ppm under an applied stress in 2.0% APF solution for 24h. It is concluded that the immersion in fluoride solutions leads to the degradation of the mechanical properties and fracture of beta titanium alloy associated with hydrogen absorption. PMID:12628832

  19. Preparation and characterization of γ-AlOOH @CS magnetic nanoparticle as a novel adsorbent for removing fluoride from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhen; Chen, Wei; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Yu; Dong, Changlong

    2015-04-01

    For this study, a novel adsorbent of γ-AlOOH @CS (pseudoboehmite and chitosan shell) magnetic nanoparticles (ACMN) with magnetic separation capabilities was developed to remove fluoride from drinking water. The adsorbent was first characterized, and then its performance in removing fluoride was evaluated. Kinetic data demonstrated rapid fluoride adsorption with more than 80% fluoride adsorption within the initial 20 min and equilibrium reached in 60 min. Based on the results of kinetic and isotherm models, the fluoride adsorption process on the ACMN's surface was a monolayer adsorption on a homogeneous surface. Thermodynamic parameters presented that the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The mechanism for the adsorption involved electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. Moreover, the calculated adsorption capacity of the ACMN for fluoride using the Langmuir model was 67.5 mg/g (20°C, pH=7.0±0.1), higher than other fluoride removal adsorbents. This nanoadsorbent performed well over a pH range of 4-10. The study found that PO4(3-) was the co-existing anion most able to hinder the nanoparticle's fluoride adsorption, followed by NO3(-) then Cl(-). Experimental results suggest that ACMN is a promising adsorbent for treating fluoride-contaminated water. PMID:25540828

  20. Comparison of the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorhexidine, sodium fluoride, fluoride with essential oils, alum, green tea, and garlic with lime mouth rinses on cariogenic microbes

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ann; Thakur, Sneha; Mhambrey, Sanjana

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of natural mouth rinse formulations are being proposed as an alternative to the widely used chemical mouth rinses. Objective: To evaluate and compare the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorhexidine (0.2%), sodium fluoride (0.05%), fluoride with essential oils (0.05%), alum (0.02 M), green tea, and garlic with lime mouth rinses against Streptococcus mutans, lactobacilli, and Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: The three microbes were isolated from the saliva samples collected from children with severe early childhood caries. The zone of minimum inhibition was assessed using agar diffusion method. The data were statistically analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Against S. mutans and lactobacilli, chlorhexidine mouth rinse was found to be the most effective as compared to sodium fluoride (P < 0.001, P < 0.001), fluoride with essential oils (P < 0.001, P < 0.001), alum (P < 0.001, P < 0.001), green tea (P < 0.001, P < 0.001), and garlic with lime (P < 0.001, P < 0.001) mouth rinses, respectively. But against C. albicans, garlic with lime mouth rinse was found to be the most effective as compared to chlorhexidine (P < 0.001), sodium fluoride (P < 0.001), fluoride with essential oils (P < 0.001), alum (P < 0.001), and green tea (P < 0.001) mouth rinses. Against S. mutans and lactobacilli, after chlorhexidine mouth rinse, garlic with lime mouth rinse was found to be significantly more effective than sodium fluoride (P = 0.053, P = 0.001), fluoride with essential oils (P < 0.001, P < 0.001), alum (P < 0.001, P < 0.001), and green tea (P < 0.001, P < 0.001) mouth rinses. Conclusion: As a natural mouth rinse, garlic with lime mouth rinse was found to be the most promising. However, further studies are needed in this field. PMID:26312230

  1. Parental preference for fluoride varnish: a new concept in a rapidly developing nation

    PubMed Central

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jama, Hibaq A; Siddiqui, Faisal J; Elsiddig, Sohair A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate parental preference for fluoride varnish in a country where the average percentage of dental caries in young children is up to ~73%. Consequently, the aim of this study, despite being a pilot, was to create a nationwide project in the State of Qatar to promote oral health in children. Methods A cross-sectional perspective study was conducted at Hamad Medical Corporation in Qatar. Parents of children aged ≤5 years were offered an interview survey. A total of 200 questionnaires were completed (response rate =100%). The study was conducted between December 1, 2014 and March 30, 2015, and included all children aged >1 year and <5 years who came to the outpatient clinics for well-child and sick visits. We also included children who were admitted to the inpatient wards. Results The mean age of participant children was 2.8±1.1 years. When inquiring regarding parents’ knowledge and awareness of dental health, we found that >90% of families were aware that dental health affects the health of the whole body. The study showed that ~70% of parents were not aware of the existence of fluoride varnish, but would allow a health provider to apply fluoride varnish. Furthermore, ~80% of parents would not stop brushing their child’s teeth and would not skip dentist appointments if varnish was to be applied. Approximately 40% of parents conveyed some concerns regarding the safety of fluoride varnish, despite being considered as a new concept. The main concern was that the child might swallow some of the fluoride. Another important concern expressed by parents was the availability of the fluoride varnish in all clinics. Conclusion The robust positive attitude of parents in this sample suggests that introducing fluoride varnish is feasible and acceptable in our community. Actions to augment fluoride varnish acceptability in the developing world, such as focusing on safety, could be important in the disseminated

  2. FLUORIDATION CHEMISTRY: EQUILIBRIA AND KINETICS OF FLUORIDE AND FLUORO-COMPLEXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most common fluoridating agents used by major American waterworks are hexafluorosilicic acid (H2SiF6) and sodium hexxafluorosilicate (Na2SiF6). According to the 1992 Water Fluoridation Census where 10,002 utilities responded affirmatively to fluoridating their water, 59
    % ...

  3. PRECIPITATION OF URANIUM PEROXIDE OF LOW FLUORIDE CONTENT FROM SOLUTIONS CONTAINING FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    King, E.J.; Clark, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    S>A method is described for the preparation of fluoride free uraniunn peroxide precipitates, even though the solution from which the precipitation is made is contaminated with fluorides. This is accomplished by add ing aluminum ions to the solution, where they complex any fluoride present and prevent its precipitation with the uramum peroxide.

  4. Fluoride enrichment in groundwater of semi-arid urban area: Khan Younis City, southern Gaza Strip (Palestine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Jabal, Mohamed Shaban; Abustan, Ismail; Rozaimy, Mohd Remy; Al-Najar, Hussam

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine fluoride enhancement in the groundwater of semi-arid urban area of Khan Younis City, southern Gaza Strip. Physicochemical data for a total of 200 groundwater samples were analyzed. The fluoride concentrations were varied from 0.3 to 6.45 mg/L with average value of 2.87 mg/L. Correlations between fluorides with other measured ions were relatively observed, negative correlation with calcium and the positive correlation with pH, bicarbonate and sodium increase the dissolution/solubility of fluoride bearing minerals, leading to fluoride leaching into the groundwater. Fluoride enrichment in the groundwater of the area is due to water hydrochemistry, mineral-water interaction (mainly calcite and fluorite), fluorite resulted from fluorapatite dissolution. The saturation indexes evaluation indicated that 42% of the samples are over saturated with respect to calcite and 35.5% under saturated with respect to fluorite, while 40.5% approached equilibrium with respect to both calcite and fluorite. At fluoride concentrations of less than 2.2 mg/L fluorite saturation indexes show under-saturation condition for fluorite and at higher fluoride concentrations show near saturation condition.

  5. Structural studies of magnesium nitride fluorides by powder neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, Michael A.; Hughes, Robert W.; Smith, Ronald I.; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2012-01-15

    Samples of ternary nitride fluorides, Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF have been prepared by solid state reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} at 1323-1423 K and investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} is cubic (space group: Pm3m) and has a structure related to rock-salt MgO, but with one cation site vacant. Mg{sub 2}NF is tetragonal (space group: I4{sub 1}/amd) and has an anti-LiFeO{sub 2} related structure. Both compounds are essentially ionic and form structures in which nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered. The nitride fluorides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 5 and 300 K. - Graphical abstract: Definitive structures of the ternary magnesium nitride fluorides Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and the lower temperature polymorph of Mg{sub 2}NF have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. The nitride halides are essentially ionic and exhibit weak temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definitive structures of Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF were determined by neutron diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered in both structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds exhibit weak, temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compounds are essentially ionic with ionicity increasing with F{sup -} content.

  6. Characterization of the terbium-doped calcium fluoride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznov, Dmitry S.; Starobor, Aleksey V.; Palashov, Oleg V.

    2015-08-01

    Optical, thermo-optical and magneto-optical characteristics of the terbium-doped (10 at.%) calcium fluoride sample were investigated. It was made the analysis, confirmed the possibility of development of a Faraday isolator and a cryogenic Faraday isolator based on the studied medium, which will provide more than 30 dB isolation ratio of laser radiation in the "eye-safe" wavelength range (1530-1620 nm) at the 5 and 20 kW power, respectively.

  7. Study of changes in phosphate, calcium and fluoride ions in plaque and saliva after the administration of a fluoride mouth rinse.

    PubMed

    Poureslami, H R; Torkzadeh, M; Sefadini, M R

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the effects of 0.2% sodium fluoride mouthwash solution on calcium, phosphate and fluoride ion contents of saliva and microbial plaque was assessed. Fourteen volunteer students (7-12 years of age) of a boarding educational centre in Kerman City (Iran) were selected and under defined conditions, their saliva and plaque samples were collected. The concentrations of fluoride, calcium and phosphate ions of the samples were determined, and after 14 days, under the same conditions, the students were asked to rinse their mouth with 0.2% sodium fluoride mouthwash solution. The second set of saliva and plaque samples were collected and the concentrations of the ions were determined. Data was analyzed using paired t-test and the results were presented as tables. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. After using 0.2% sodium fluoride mouthwash solution, a significant increase was observed in the F 2 ion concentration both plaque ( P P < 0.000) of all the studied subjects, while the concentration of phosphate decreased in both saliva and plaque; however, this decrease was significant only in plaque ( P < 0.01). The calcium ion concentration decreased in both plaque and saliva; however, in none of them, the decrease was significant ( P> 0.09 and P> 0.2, respectively). PMID:17951927

  8. Determination of fluoride in tap water in Morocco using a direct electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    El Jaoudi, Rachid; Mamouch, Fouzia; Ait El Cadi, Mina; Bousliman, Yassir; Cherrah, Yahia; Bouklouze, Abdelaziz

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the fluoride concentration in tap drinking water in different cities of Morocco using an electrochemical ion-selective method. Three samples were collected from each thirteen selected cities in the period between March and May 2011. The median value of fluoride was 0.94 mg/L (0.21-2.97). High fluoride concentrations (>0.8 mg/L) were found in sixteen cities. Very high values were found in phosphate regions such as Khouribga which is known to be an endemic dental fluorosis area. This study has shown that the concentration of fluoride in drinking water exceeds the limit especially in phosphate regions. PMID:22706888

  9. Direct determination of fluoride in aluminium reduction materials by using an ion-selective electrode.

    PubMed

    Palmer, T A

    1972-10-01

    Macro amounts of fluoride in aluminium reduction materials are successfully determined with a fluoride electrode. Except for anhydrous aluminium fluoride, which requires fusion with sodium hydroxide, samples are dissolved in aqueous media. Cryolite and sodium fluorosilicatc are dissolved in boiling sodium hydroxide solution. Other materials containing fluoride, such as fluorspar and the reduction cell bath and pot-lining, require dissolution in a hydrochloric acid solution of aluminium chloride. Potential interference from large amounts of aluminium (and calcium, if present) is eliminated and pH control attained by using ammoniacal sulphosalicylate (and EDTA). The procedures are reasonably rapid. Relative errors of less than 2% and a relative standard deviation of 1% are achieved. PMID:18961164

  10. Efficacy of calcium- and fluoride-containing materials for the remineralization of primary teeth with early enamel lesion.

    PubMed

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Soltanimehr, Elham; Sattarahmady, Naghmeh

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of different products containing fluoride, calcium and phosphate for enamel remineralization in eroded primary teeth. A total of 90 sound primary canine teeth were randomly divided into 5 groups of 18 teeth each: 1) control (polished enamel), 2) 5% DuraShield sodium fluoride varnish, 3) 500 ppm fluoridated toothpaste, 4) casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) cream, and 5) Clinpro White varnish containing functionalized tri-calcium phosphate (fTCP). Enamel microhardness (EMH) was measured in all samples before and after demineralization and after 28 days of remineralization. Also 8 samples in groups 2 to 5 and four samples of sound and demineralized enamel were examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). All data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA (p<0.05). Mean microhardness of demineralized enamel was significantly lower than in enamel at baseline (p<0.001). Remineralization significantly increased microharness in groups 2 to 5 compared to the control group (p<0.001). Percent EMH after remineralization with CPP-ACP was significantly higher than after fTCP (p=0.029), toothpaste (p< 0.001) or fluoride varnish (p<0.001); however, there was no significant difference between toothpaste and fluoride varnish (p=0.062). Microhardness increased more after fTCP treatment than after treatment with sodium fluoride varnish (p<0.001) or fluoridated toothpaste (p=0.045). AFM images showed that enamel roughness decreased most after treatment with fTCP, followed by CPP-ACP, toothpaste and fluoride varnish. The efficacy of CPP-ACP cream for remineralizing eroded enamel was greater than fluoride toothpaste, fluoride varnish or fTCP varnish. PMID:26179280

  11. Sampling, characterization, and remote sensing of aerosols formed in the atmospheric hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; McCulla, W.H.; Pickrell, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    When gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) is released into the atmosphere, it rapidly reacts with ambient moisture to form an aerosol of uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). As part of their Safety Analysis program, the authors have performed several experimental releases of UF/sub 6/ in contained volumes in order to investigate techniques for sampling and characterizing the aerosol materials. The aggregate particle morphology and size appear to be dependent upon several conditions, including the relative humidity of the air into which it is released, and the elapsed time after the release. Aerosol composition and settling rate have been investigated using stationary samplers for the separate collection of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ and HF, and via laser spectroscopic remote sensing (Mie scatter and infrared spectroscopy).

  12. Fluoride coatings make effective lubricants in molten sodium environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Coating bearing surfaces with calcium fluoride-barium fluoride film provides effective lubrication against sliding friction in molten sodium and other severe environments at high and low temperatures.

  13. Stability of fluoride complex with silica and its distribution in natural water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberson, C.E.; Barnes, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoride reacts with silicic acid to form SiF2-6. A fluoride electrode was used to obtain an equilibrium constant of 1030.18 for the reaction:Si(OH) 0 6 + 6F-+4H+ = SiF 2- 6 + 4H2O at 25??C. Although there may be some experimental evidence for existence of traces of species containing less than six F- ions per silicon (n = 6), the species SiF2-6 predominates for n values from about 0.1 to 6. Silicic-acid complexing with fluoride is important only in solutions which have rather low pH and low concentrations of other cations which compete with silicon for fluoride. Computations for cold volcanic condensates from Hawaii indicate that for some samples much of the silicon is complexed by fluoride as SiF2-6. However, in most cooled acidic natural water samples Al and Fe are more important than Si in complexing fluoride. ?? 1978.

  14. Distribution of fluoride in groundwater of Maku area, northwest of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari Moghaddam, Asghar; Fijani, Elham

    2008-11-01

    High fluoride groundwater occurs in Maku area, in the north of West Azarbaijan province, northwest of Iran. Groundwater is the main source of drinking water for the area residents. Groundwater samples were collected from 72 selected points including 40 basaltic and 32 nonbasaltic springs and wells, in two stages, during June and August 2006. The areas with high fluoride concentrations have been identified, and the possible causes for its variation have been investigated. Regional hydrogeochemical investigation indicates that water-rock interaction is probably the main reason for the high concentration of ions in groundwater. The concentration of F- in groundwater is positively correlated with that of HCO3 - and Na+, indicating that groundwater with high HCO3 - and Na+ concentrations help to dissolve some fluoride-rich minerals. All of the water samples, collected from the basaltic areas do not meet the water quality standards for fluoride concentration and some other parameters. Hence, it is not suitable for consumption without any prior treatment. Inhabitants of the area that obtain their drinking water supplies from basaltic springs and wells are suffering from dental fluorosis. The population of the study area is at a high risk due to excessive fluoride intake especially when they are unaware of the amount of fluoride being ingested due to lack of awareness.

  15. Fluoride metabolism in Acacia georginae Gidyea

    PubMed Central

    Peters, R. A.; Murray, L. R.; Shorthouse, M.

    1965-01-01

    1. The metabolism of fluoride in seedlings and small plants of Acacia georginae has been studied with the idea of finding the conditions under which the plant makes fluoroacetate in the laboratory. 2. Individual seedlings vary in the extent to which they take up fluoride and convert it into a form other than inorganic which is here called `organic' fluoride, F(org.). The differences between the toxicity of A. georginae Gidyea trees may therefore be genetic in origin. 3. The uptake of fluoride from solutions 0·525–1·05mm (10–20p.p.m.) was not large. In 1–4 days it reached 8 p.p.m. in the aerial parts and 16 p.p.m. in the roots. Unlike the distribution of the halogen in grass, total fluoride was greater than inorganic fluoride. It was almost a rule that more `organic' fluoride was present in the roots than in the aerial parts. 4. With higher concentrations of fluoride 10·5–15·75mm (200–300p.p.m.) much larger amounts of fluoride were taken up, especially by the roots, and much more apparent organic fluoride was formed. 5. pH had a large influence upon the intake, this being lowest at an initial pH8·4 and highest at pH4·0. The pH outside this range was not investigated. Some observations have been made with a view to clarifying the biochemical paths for the synthesis of the C–F bond. 6. There is no evidence that chloride is an intermediary in synthesis. 7. Succinate is not accumulated in fluoride-stressed plants, suggesting that succinate dehydrogenase is not inhibited. 8. Enolase does not appear to be inhibited in vivo. PMID:14342508

  16. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi Zenouz, Ghazaleh; Ezoji, Fariba; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide– amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10) of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPPACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV) had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027). The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: All the remineralizing agents were effective for rehardening the enamel after microabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential. PMID:27252753

  17. Luminescence from Edge Fracture in Shocked Lithium Fluoride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, W. D.; Stevens, G. D.; Capelle, G. A.; Grover, M.; Holtkamp, D. B.; LaLone, B. M.; Veeser, L. R.

    2013-01-01

    Light emitted from a [100] lithium fluoride crystal was characterized under shock wave compression to 28GPa followed by complete stress release at the edges. The light was examined using time-gated optical spectrometry and imaging, time-resolved optical emission measurements, and hydrodynamic modeling. The shock arrival at the circumference of the crystal was delayed relative to the center so that the two regions could be studied at different times. The majority of the light emission originated when the shock waves released at the circumference of the crystal. Unlike previously reported results for shocked lithium fluoride, we found that the light spectrum is not strictly broad band, but has spectral lines associated with atomic lithium in addition to a broad band background. Also, the emission spectrum depends strongly on the gas surrounding the sample. Based on our observations, the line emission appears to be related to fracture of the lithium fluoride crystal from the shock wave releasing at the edges. Experimenters frequently utilize lithium fluoride crystals as transparent windows for observing shock compressed samples. Because of the experimental geometries used, the shock wave in such cases often reaches the circumference of the window at nearly the same moment as when it reaches the center of the sample-window interface. Light generated at the circumference could contaminate the measurement at the interface when this light scatters into the observed region. This background light may be reduced or avoided using experimental geometries which delay the arrival of the shock wave at the edges of the crystal.

  18. Fluoride concentration in dentin of exfoliated primary teeth as a biomarker for cumulative fluoride exposure.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, G G; Rozier, R G; Bawden, J W

    2008-01-01

    A biomarker for lifetime fluoride exposure would facilitate population-based research and policy making but currently does not exist. This study examined the suitability of primary tooth dentin as a biomarker by comparing dentin fluoride concentration and fluoride exposures. Ninety-nine children's exfoliated primary teeth were collected from 2 fluoridated and 2 fluoride-deficient communities in North Carolina. Coronal dentin was isolated by microdissection and fluoride concentration assayed using the microdiffusion, ion-specific electrode technique. Information on children's fluoride exposures since birth from drinking water, toothpaste, supplements, rinses, food and beverages was collected by a self-reported questionnaire administered to caregivers. Only a small portion of the variance (10%) in incisor dentin fluoride (mean 792, SD 402 mg/kg) was accounted for by the best linear regression model as evaluated by the adjusted R(2). A moderate portion of the variance (60%) of molar dentin fluoride (mean 768, SD 489 mg/kg) was predicted by dietary fluoride supplement exposures, community of residence, and frequent tea consumption. Results for molars suggest that primary tooth dentin concentration may prove to be a satisfactory biomarker for fluoride exposure. PMID:18832828

  19. Fluoride Concentration in Dentin of Exfoliated Primary Teeth as a Biomarker for Cumulative Fluoride Exposure

    PubMed Central

    dela Cruz, G.G.; Rozier, R.G.; Bawden, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    A biomarker for lifetime fluoride exposure would facilitate population-based research and policy making but currently does not exist. This study examined the suitability of primary tooth dentin as a biomarker by comparing dentin fluoride concentration and fluoride exposures. Ninety-nine children's exfoliated primary teeth were collected from 2 fluoridated and 2 fluoride-deficient communities in North Carolina. Coronal dentin was isolated by microdissection and fluoride concentration assayed using the microdiffusion, ion-specific electrode technique. Information on children's fluoride exposures since birth from drinking water, toothpaste, supplements, rinses, food and beverages was collected by a self-reported questionnaire administered to caregivers. Only a small portion of the variance (10%) in incisor dentin fluoride (mean 792, SD 402 mg/kg) was accounted for by the best linear regression model as evaluated by the adjusted R2. A moderate portion of the variance (60%) of molar dentin fluoride (mean 768, SD 489 mg/kg) was predicted by dietary fluoride supplement exposures, community of residence, and frequent tea consumption. Results for molars suggest that primary tooth dentin concentration may prove to be a satisfactory biomarker for fluoride exposure. PMID:18832828

  20. Evaluation of Effect of Brushite-Calcite and Two Indigenous Herbs in Removal of Fluoride from Water

    PubMed Central

    Naveenkumar, Puvvadi Gopalakrishna; Prashant, Gouder Manjunath; Sakeenabi, Basha; Allamaprabhu; Vijetha, Kothyala

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The acceptable concentration of fluoride in drinking water is 1.5mg/l. Excess fluoride in drinking water causes fluorosis. Fluorosis is an important public health problem in India. Several treatment technologies suggested in the past for removing excess fluoride generated and causes various chemical byproductswhich are hazardous to public. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest to use natural materials due to cost and associated health and environmental concerns of synthetic organic polymers and inorganic chemicals. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the defluoridating capability of the brushite-calcite with that of two indigenous herbs, tulsi and wheat grass. Materials and Methods One gram of brushite-calcite combination, tulsi and wheat grass were separately added to 10 containers, each containing 1.0 l of prepared distilled water with a fluoride concentration of 5ppm and naturally fluoridated water at 2ppm. Half of the samples were boiled for one minute in a domestic electric kettle for one minute and allowed to cool. The remaining half of the samples was left un-boiled. Fluoride concentration in all the samples was assessed at the end of 30 minutes and 24 hours using fluoride ion selective electrode method. Data was analyzed using unpaired t-test and one-way ANOVA. Results For water with 2ppm and 5ppm fluoride, brushite-calcite had shown highest de-fluoridation capacity (p=0.001) at the end of both 30 minutes and 24 hours in boiled samples whereas tulsi (p=0.001) was most effective in un-boiled samples. Conclusion The results of the study suggest that tulsi can be used for domestic water defluoridation as it is economic, safe and effective. PMID:27504417

  1. A comprehensive study of H emission in a TEA CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma for highly sensitive analysis of hydrogen in metal samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Khumaeni, Ali; Niki, Hideaki; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Hedwig, Rinda; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Lee, Yong Inn

    2012-07-01

    Our previous work on an innovative method of hydrogen (H) analysis using the specific characteristics of a TEA CO2 laser, "selective detection method of H", has been improved to realize a high H sensitive analysis with a detection limit of several µg/g. For this purpose, first, we clarified the origin of the H emission disturbance coming from H2O molecules; namely, we showed that most of the H emission came from H2O on the metal surface and not from H2O existing in the surrounding gas when we formed a laser-induced gas plasma. Second, the difference in the emission characteristics between the H emission from H2O on the metal surface and H emission from inside in sample was studied to determine the optimum gating time of the optical multi-channel analyzer (OMA). Third, the gas plasma was totally covered by fresh helium gas using a big pipe (5 mm in diameter) and by flowing a high amount of He (10 l/min). Also, we demonstrated that our methods could potentially be applied to H analysis in steel samples, where an H analysis with a sensitivity of less than 1 µg/g is required without employing a heating process, by removing H2O on the sample surface with the aid of defocused TEA CO2 laser irradiation. Thus, we stress that our method can be used for a highly sensitive, in-situ analysis of H for metal samples.

  2. Welsh water should reinstate fluoridation on Anglesey.

    PubMed

    Hulse, G; Kenrick, A; Thomas, C H; Thomas, A; Davies, D J; Lennon, M A

    1995-01-21

    In 1992, Welsh Water withdrew the successful water fluoridation scheme on Anglesey. Despite evidence of the benefits of water fluoridation and the rise in number of children with tooth decay since the scheme's withdrawal, Welsh Water is still not prepared to re-establish the scheme. PMID:7848746

  3. Method of making porous ceramic fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Reiner, Robert H.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1990-01-01

    A process for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  4. The Pivotal Role of Alumina Pore Structure in HF Capture and Fluoride Return in Aluminum Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Grant J.; Agbenyegah, Gordon E. K.; Hyland, Margaret M.; Metson, James B.

    2016-07-01

    Fluoride emissions during primary aluminum production are mitigated by dry scrubbing on alumina which, as the metal feedstock, also returns fluoride to the pots. This ensures stable pot operation and maintains process efficiency but requires careful optimization of alumina for both fluoride capture and solubility. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 70-80 m2 g-1 is currently accepted. However, this does not account for pore accessibility. We demonstrate using industry-sourced data that pores <3.5 nm are not correlated with fluoride return. Reconstructing alumina pore size distributions (PSDs) following hydrogen fluoride (HF) adsorption shows surface area is not lost by pore diameter shrinkage, but by blocking the internal porosity. However, this alone cannot explain this 3.5 nm threshold. We show this is a consequence of surface diffusion-based inhibition with surface chemistry probably playing an integral role. We advocate new surface area estimates for alumina which account for pore accessibility by explicitly ignoring <3.5 nm pores.

  5. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF/sub 4/ and UF/sub 6/, including UF/sub 4/ (solid and gas), U/sub 4/F/sub 17/ (solid), U/sub 2/F/sub 9/ (solid), UF/sub 5/ (solid and gas), U/sub 2/F/sub 10/ (gas), and UF/sub 6/ (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior.

  6. Effects of enamel matrix genes on dental caries are moderated by fluoride exposures.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Carlson, Jenna C; Stanley, Brooklyn O C; Feingold, Eleanor; Cooper, Margaret; Vanyukov, Michael M; Maher, Brion S; Slayton, Rebecca L; Willing, Marcia C; Reis, Steven E; McNeil, Daniel W; Crout, Richard J; Weyant, Robert J; Levy, Steven M; Vieira, Alexandre R; Marazita, Mary L

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common chronic disease, worldwide, affecting most children and adults. Though dental caries is highly heritable, few caries-related genes have been discovered. We investigated whether 18 genetic variants in the group of non-amelogenin enamel matrix genes (AMBN, ENAM, TUFT1, and TFIP11) were associated with dental caries experience in 13 age- and race-stratified samples from six parent studies (N = 3,600). Linear regression was used to model genetic associations and test gene-by-fluoride interaction effects for two sources of fluoride: daily tooth brushing and home water fluoride concentration. Meta-analysis was used to combine results across five child and eight adult samples. We observed the statistically significant association of rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 with dental caries experience via meta-analysis across adult samples (p < 0.002) and the suggestive association for multiple variants in TFIP11 across child samples (p < 0.05). Moreover, we discovered two genetic variants (rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 and missense rs7439186 in AMBN) involved in gene-by-fluoride interactions. For each interaction, participants with the risk allele/genotype exhibited greater dental caries experience only if they were not exposed to the source of fluoride. Altogether, these results confirm that variation in enamel matrix genes contributes to individual differences in dental caries liability, and demonstrate that the effects of these genes may be moderated by protective fluoride exposures. In short, genes may exert greater influence on dental caries in unprotected environments, or equivalently, the protective effects of fluoride may obviate the effects of genetic risk alleles. PMID:25373699

  7. Recent advancements in fluoride: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ankita; Ingle, Navin Anand; Kaur, Navpreet; Ingle, Ekta

    2015-01-01

    To review advancements of fluoride in dentistry, a search of 21 electronic databases and World Wide Web was conducted. Relevant journals were hand searched and further information was requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Fluoride has become an important tool in preventive dentistry. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. Fluoride therapy in the form of varnish, gel, mouth rinse, or toothpaste has been used extensively as a caries-preventive intervention for over three decades. The purpose of this review is to inform the reader about new research related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. PMID:26539383

  8. Plant tissue hybrid electrode for determination of phosphate and fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, F.; Renneberg, R.; Scheller, F.W.; Kirstein, L.

    1984-08-01

    A biosensor for inorganic phosphate and fluoride has been developed by coupling a potato (Solanum tuberosum) tissue slice and immobilized glucose oxidase with a Clark oxygen electrode. Measurement is based on the inhibition by either ion of potato acid phosphates catalyzed glucose 6-phosphate hydrolysis. The precision is 1.7% and 6.5% and the lower detection limit 2.5 X 10/sup -5/ M and 1 X 10/sup -4/ M for phosphate and fluoride, respectively. For phosphate determination the hybrid sensor is stable for 28 days or 300 assays. With a higher limit of detection the sensor can be applied in a commercial enzyme electrode based device. Its application for phosphate determination in fertilizer and urine samples is described.

  9. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Adam M.; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A.; Peretz, Fred J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Wilson, Dane F.; Yoder, Jr, Graydon L.

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  10. Southern hemisphere ground based measurements of Carbonyl Fluoride (COF2) and Hydrogen Fluoride (HF): Partitioning between Fluoride reservoir species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisinger, Andreas R.; Jones, Nicholas B.; Matthews, W. Andrew; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1994-01-01

    We report infrared ground based total column measurements of the stratospheric fluorine reservoir gases COF2 and HF above Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S, 167.8 deg E) obtained between April 1993 and January 1994. The average retrieved COF2 and HF total columns are 2.81(+/- 0.56) x 10(exp 14) and 9.91(+/- 1.09) x 10(exp 14) molecules/sq cm respectively. The daily average COF2 and HF columns are correlated; this correlation is likely the result of dynamics. The average HF/COF2 column ratio on days with measurements of both HF and COF2 is 3.63 (+/- 0.55). Comparison of this ratio with model calculations implies that the quantum yield for COF2 photolysis is near unity. Our measured COF2 columns are higher than all previously reported values, but inconsistencies among the earlier measurements and uncertainty in the latitudinal gradient of the COF2 column preclude an accurate determination of the long-term COF2 trend.

  11. The structure of trimethyltin fluoride.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Praveen; Bieringer, Mario; Hazendonk, Paul; Gerken, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The solid-state structure of (CH3)3SnF was reinvestigated by X-ray diffraction techniques as well as by multi-nuclear solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Trimethyltin fluoride crystallizes from hot ethanol in the orthorhombic space group Pnma at room temperature and changes to a low-temperature orthorhombic phase (space group: Cmcm) below -70 °C. In both modifications, trimethyltin fluoride adopts a linear chain structure with symmetric fluorine bridges, in contrast to previous reports. During its synthesis, (CH3)3SnF precipitates in another, poorly crystalline modification, as shown by powder X-ray diffraction. Solid-state MAS NMR experiments of both room-temperature phases of (CH3)3SnF (non-recrystallized and recrystallized) were carried out for the (1)H, (13)C, (19)F, and (119)Sn nuclei. The (119)Sn{(19)F, (1)H} and (19)F{(1)H} NMR spectra offer unambiguous determination for the (19)F and (119)Sn shielding tensors. The (119)Sn{(1)H} solid-state NMR spectra are in agreement with pentacoordination of Sn in this compound for the non-recrystallized and the recrystallized modifications. Based on the solid-state NMR results, the non-recrystallized modification of (CH3)3SnF also consists of linear, symmetrically fluorine-bridged chains, and differs from the recrystallized orthorhombic phase only in packing of the chains. PMID:26300008

  12. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Colon, M; Todolí, J L; Hidalgo, M; Iglesias, M

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S(2-)) at low levels (microgL(-1)) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H(2)S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H(2)S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H(2)S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5microgL(-1) to 25mgL(-1) of sulfide. Detection limits of 5microgL(-1) and 6microgL(-1) were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters. PMID:18261510

  13. Mechanism of Calcium Fluoride Acceleration for Vacuum Carbothermic Reduction of Magnesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yun; Liu, Yu-qin; Ma, Hong-wen; Zhou, Wei-gong

    2016-04-01

    The use of a small amount of calcium fluoride as an additive greatly accelerated the reduction of magnesia during the preparation of magnesium from magnesia using the vacuum carbothermic reduction method. At 1573 K (1300 °C), the magnesia reaction rates of the samples with 1, 3, and 5 pct CaF2 were all approximately 26 pct, three times that of free CaF2, and they were arranged in order of the calcium fluoride weight percentages at 1673 K (1400 °C). The residues were analyzed using chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, EDS, and XRF. The possible acceleration mechanism was discussed. Calcium fluoride combined with magnesia and silicon dioxide to form a eutectic that melted as a channel to aid the solid-solid reaction between carbon and magnesia at approximately 1573 K (1300 °C). Calcium fluoride in the molten state offered free calcium ions and fluorine ions. Fluorine ions entered and distorted the magnesia crystal lattice. The structural strength and chemical stability of the magnesia crystal lattice decreased, which facilitated the magnesia reduction by carbon. Calcium ions were employed to generate the calcium and magnesium silicate. The easyly evaporating fluorides, including magnesium fluoride and silicon tetrafluoride, were regarded as the main reason for the loss of fluorine.

  14. Fluoride supplements in pregnancy, effectiveness in the prevention of dental caries in a group of children

    PubMed Central

    MATURO, P.; COSTACURTA, M.; PERUGIA, C.; DOCIMO, R.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY This clinical, retrospective study intends to evaluate whether the systemic administration of fluoride during pregnancy can reduce caries incidence in a group of paediatric patients, compared to a control group. 84 patients were selected out of a sample of 2000 children (3–15 years of age) and then divided in two groups: TEST Group: 34 patients (16M – 18F, mean age 9.23), whose mothers had taken fluoride during pregnancy; CONTROL Group: 50 patients (23M – 27F, mean age 9) whose mothers had not taken fluoride. Patients underwent a clinical and radiographic inspection to assess the dfs/DFS value as caries index (decayed or filled surfaces for deciduous or permanent teeth). Results: dfs/DFS value: TEST Group: 3.41, CONTROL group 2.49. The TEST group was further divided in individuals who were administered fluoride only during pregnancy (33%) with a dfs/DFS of 3.14 and individuals who were administered fluoride also after birth (67%) with a dfs/DFS of 3. Caries index (dfs/DFS) did not show any significant differences between the test and control groups. Fluoride administration during pregnancy and postpartum does not seem to have a significant impact on the reduction of caries incidence. More preventive strategies should be investigated to contrast the multifactorial etiology of children caries. PMID:23285398

  15. On the relationship between the rate of salivary flow and salivary fluoride clearance.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Ralph M; Jones, S

    2015-01-01

    The amount of fluoride retained in the mouth following the application of dentifrices, mouthwashes, etc. may be important in determining their anticaries efficacy. In this study we investigated the relationship between the salivary flow rate and salivary fluoride clearance. Ten adults tested six mouthrinses, consisting of aqueous sodium fluoride solutions (0.013, 0.026 mol/l) with and without added sodium chloride (1.28 mol/l) or sucrose (0.44 mol/l), in a randomised order. Prior to each test, subjects swallowed, rinsed for 2 min with 2 ml water and then expectorated into a preweighed container to obtain a measure of initial saliva flow rate. Next, the procedure was repeated using one of the test rinses. Finally, samples of unstimulated whole saliva were collected for up to 3 h after each mouthrinse application and analysed for fluoride. Salivary fluoride concentrations were significantly lower after application of mouthrinses that contained either sucrose or NaCl, both of which compounds markedly enhanced salivary flow, than after the use of corresponding mouthrinses without any additive. Area under the salivary fluoride clearance curve (AUC) values were inversely correlated with salivary flow rate on an individual basis (p < 0.01). The observed behaviour could not be completely attributed to treatment dilution by saliva at the time of application. PMID:25634162

  16. The occurrence and geochemistry of fluoride in some natural waters of Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaciri, S. J.; Davies, T. C.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years the acquisition of considerable additional data on the hydrogeochemical behaviour of fluoride in natural waters of Kenya has been made possible by extensive surface-water and groundwater sampling campaigns as well as by improvements in analytical techniques. Ultimately, the principal source of fluoride relates to emissions from volcanic activity associated with the East African Rift System. Through various intermediate steps, but also directly, fluoride passes into the natural water system and components of the food chain. Ingestion by man is mainly through drinking water and other beverages. River waters in Kenya generally have a fluoride concentration lower than the recommended level (1.3 ppm) for potable water, thus promoting susceptibility to dental caries. Groundwaters and lake waters show considerably higher fluoride contents, resulting in the widespread incidence of fluorosis in areas where groundwater is the major source of drinking water, and lake fish is a regular component of the diet. This paper presents a synthesis of the data so far obtained on the sources and distribution of fluoride in the hydrological system of Kenya, examines the extent of fluorine toxicity and puts forward recommendations to combat or minimise the problem.

  17. Invitro Evaluation of Fluoride Release from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer with or without Protective Coating

    PubMed Central

    Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) is well known for its fluoride releasing property but has its own drawbacks of poor mechanical properties, sensitivity to initial desiccation and moisture contamination. To overcome these, search led to the reinforcement of hydroxyapatite and application of surface coating agent but their effect on fluoride release is still not clear. Aim To evaluate and compare the release of fluoride from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer (HA-GIC) with and without protective coating. Materials and Methods Specimens were prepared as follows- Eight percent by weight conventional glass ionomer was replaced by hydroxyapatite powder (HA) and an indigenous product was prepared (HA-GIC). This powder was mixed with liquid of conventional GIC and allowed to set, then G coat plus coating agent was applied in surface coated group and light cured. Fluoride release of the sample was measured every 24 hrs for seven days and weekly from 7th to 21st day using combination ion selective electrode. Results Mean values clearly reveal a significant decrease in the fluoride release from day 1 to day 21 for both the groups. Results of repeated measure ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference between two groups (p <0.001). Conclusion Coating the hydroxyapatite reinforced glass ionomer will allow for slow and steady release of fluoride for a long period of time into oral environment. PMID:27190957

  18. Radiative and collisional processes in translationally cold samples of hydrogen Rydberg atoms studied in an electrostatic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Ch; Agner, J. A.; Pillet, P.; Merkt, F.

    2016-05-01

    Supersonic beams of hydrogen atoms, prepared selectively in Rydberg–Stark states of principal quantum number n in the range between 25 and 35, have been deflected by {90}\\circ , decelerated and loaded into off-axis electric traps at initial densities of ≈ {10}6 atoms cm‑3 and translational temperatures of 150 mK. The ability to confine the atoms spatially was exploited to study their decay by radiative and collisional processes. The evolution of the population of trapped atoms was measured for several milliseconds in dependence of the principal quantum number of the initially prepared states, the initial Rydberg-atom density in the trap, and the temperature of the environment of the trap, which could be varied between 7.5 and 300 K using a cryorefrigerator. At room temperature, the population of trapped Rydberg atoms was found to decay faster than expected on the basis of their natural lifetimes, primarily because of absorption and emission stimulated by the thermal radiation field. At the lowest temperatures investigated experimentally, the decay was found to be multiexponential, with an initial rate scaling as {n}-4 and corresponding closely to the natural lifetimes of the initially prepared Rydberg–Stark states. The decay rate was found to continually decrease over time and to reach an almost n-independent rate of more than (1 ms)‑1 after 3 ms. To analyze the experimentally observed decay of the populations of trapped atoms, numerical simulations were performed which included all radiative processes, i.e., spontaneous emission as well as absorption and emission stimulated by the thermal radiation. These simulations, however, systematically underestimated the population of trapped atoms observed after several milliseconds by almost two orders of magnitude, although they reliably predicted the decay rates of the remaining atoms in the trap. The calculations revealed that the atoms that remain in the trap for the longest times have larger absolute values

  19. The investigation of kinetic and isotherm of fluoride adsorption onto functionalize pumice stone.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Ghorban; Roshani, Babak; Ghanizadeh, Ghader

    2012-05-30

    In this research work, pumice that is functionalized by the cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), is used as an adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from drinking water. This work was carried out in two parts. The effects of HDTMA loading, pH (3-10), reaction time (5-60 min) and the adsorbent dosage (0.15-2.5 g L(-1)) were investigated on the removal of fluoride as a target contaminate from water through the design of different experimental sets in the first part. The results from this first part revealed that surfactant-modified pumice (SMP) exhibited the best performance at dose 0.5 g L(-1), pH 6, and it adsorbs over 96% of fluoride from a solution containing 10 mg L(-1) fluoride after 30 min of mixing time. The four linear forms of the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms model were applied to determine the best fit of equilibrium expressions. Apart from the regression coefficient (R(2)), four error functions were used to validate the isotherm and kinetics data. The experimental adsorption isotherm complies with Langmuir equation model type 1. The maximum amount of adsorption (Q(max)) was 41 mg g(-1). The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of fluoride best fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic type 1. Thermodynamic parameters evaluation of fluoride adsorption on SMP showed that the adsorption process under the selected conditions was spontaneous and endothermic. The suitability of SMP in defluoridation at field condition was investigated with natural groundwater samples collected from a nearby fluoride endemic area in the second part of this study. Based on this study's results, SMP was shown to be an affordable and a promising option for the removal of fluoride in drinking water. PMID:22476092

  20. Evaluation of stannous fluoride and chlorhexidine sprays on plaque and gingivitis in handicapped children.

    PubMed

    Chikte, U M; Pochee, E; Rudolph, M J; Reinach, S G

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of twice-daily oral sprays of 2 ml chlorhexidine (0.2%) and 2 ml stannous fluoride (0.2%) as the sole oral hygiene measure on plaque and gingivitis in handicapped children. 52 institutionalized mentally handicapped individuals (aged 10-26 years) were divided into 4 groups to participate in a 9-week, double-blind, randomized clinically controlled trial, which included a cross-over. For the first 3 weeks, groups 3 and 2 had their mouths sprayed with chlorhexidine and stannous fluoride, respectively. Following a 3-week wash-out interval, groups 1 and 4 were sprayed with chlorhexidine and stannous fluoride, respectively. The alternate groups received a placebo, water. Plaque (PI) and gingival indices (GI) were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected and counts of spirochaetes, motile rods and cocci were taken using darkfield microscopy. By the 9th week of trial, the PI and GI were reduced by 48% and 52% for the stannous fluoride group. In the chlorhexidine group, reductions of 75% (PI) and 78% (GI) were achieved. Pair-wise comparisons of placebo, stannous fluoride and chlorhexidine using the U-test of Mann-Whitney revealed significant (p less than 0.05) differences for both PI and GI scores in the placebo/stannous fluoride and placebo/chlorhexidine pair by the 9th week of the trial. In the stannous fluoride/chlorhexidine pair, only the PI was significantly reduced for those on chlorhexidine. Coccoid cells were more dominant at sites with low PI and GI scores (stannous fluoride and chlorhexidine groups), while spirochaetes and motile rods were more frequent at sites with high PI and GI scores (placebo group). PMID:1829732

  1. Dental fluorosis and skeletal fluoride content as biomarkers of excess fluoride exposure in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Death, Clare; Coulson, Graeme; Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Morris, William K; Hufschmid, Jasmin

    2015-11-15

    Particulate and gaseous fluoride emissions contaminate vegetation near fluoride-emitting industries, potentially impacting herbivorous wildlife in neighboring areas. Dental fluorosis has been associated with consumption of fluoride-contaminated foliage by juvenile livestock and wildlife in Europe and North America. For the first time, we explored the epidemiology and comparative pathology of dental fluorosis in Australian marsupials residing near an aluminium smelter. Six species (Macropus giganteus, Macropus rufogriseus, Wallabia bicolor, Phascolarctos cinereus, Trichosurus vulpecula, Pseudocheirus peregrinus) demonstrated significantly higher bone fluoride levels in the high (n=161 individuals), compared to the low (n=67 individuals), fluoride areas (p<0.001). Necropsy examinations of all six species from the high-fluoride area near the smelter revealed dental lesions considered characteristic of dental fluorosis in eutherian mammals. Within the high-fluoride area, 67% of individuals across the six species showed dental enamel lesions, compared to 3% in the low-fluoride areas. Molars that erupted before weaning were significantly less likely to display pathological lesions than those developing later, and molars in the posterior portion of the dental arcade were more severely fluorotic than anterior molars in all six species. The severity of dental lesions was positively associated with increasing bone fluoride levels in all species, revealing a potential biomarker of excess fluoride exposure. PMID:26188404

  2. Oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope content in daily-collected precipitation samples at Dome C, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreossi, Giuliano; Stenni, Barbara; Del Guasta, Massimo; Bonazza, Mattia; Grigioni, Paolo; Karlicek, Daniele; Mognato, Riccardo; Scarchilli, Claudio; Turchetti, Filippo; Zannoni, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic ice cores allow to obtain exceptional past climate records, thanks to their water stable isotope content, which provides integrated tracers of the atmospheric water cycle and local climate. Low accumulation sites of the East Antarctic plateau provide the oldest ice core records, with the record-breaking EPICA Dome C drilling covering the last eight climate cycles. However, the isotope-temperature relationship, commonly used to derive the temperature, may be characterized by significant geographical and temporal variations. Moreover, post-depositional effects may further complicate the climate interpretation. A continuous series of precipitation data is needed in order to gain a better understanding of the factors affecting the water stable isotopes in Antarctic precipitation at a specific site. In this study, we use the first and so-far only multi-year series of daily precipitation sampling and isotope measurements from the French-Italian Concordia Station, located at Dome C in East Antarctica (75°06'S 123°21'E; elevation: 3233 m a.s.l.; mean annual temperature: -54.5°C; snow accumulation rate: 25 kg m-2 yr-1), where the oldest deep Antarctic ice core has been retrieved. Surface air temperature data have been provided by the US automatic weather station (AWS), placed 1.5 km away from the base, while tropospheric temperature profiles are obtained by means of a radiosonde, launched once per day by the IPEV/Italian Antarctic Meteo-climatological Observatory. The new dataset also enables us for the first time to study the isotope-temperature relationship distinguishing between different types of precipitation, namely diamond dust, hoar frost and snowfall, identified by the observations carried out by the winter-over personnel collecting the snow samples. Here we present the complete data series of water stable isotopes in precipitation at Dome C spanning the time period from 2008 to 2014, in the framework of the PNRA PRE-REC project.

  3. A preliminary investigation of lithogenic and anthropogenic influence over fluoride ion chemistry in the groundwater of the southern coastal city, Tamilnadu, India.

    PubMed

    Selvam, S

    2015-03-01

    A total of 72 groundwater samples were collected from open wells and boreholes during pre- and post-monsoon periods in Tuticorin. Samples were analyzed for physicochemical properties, major cations, and anions in the laboratory using the standard methods given by the American Public Health Association. The fluoride concentration was analyzed in the laboratory using Metrohm 861 advanced compact ion chromatography. The geographic information system-based spatial distribution map of different major elements has been prepared using ArcGIS 9.3. The fluoride concentration ranges between 0.16 mg/l and 4.8 mg/l during pre-monsoon and 0.2-3.2 mg/l during post-monsoon. Alkaline pH, low calcium concentrations, high groundwater temperatures, and semiarid climatic conditions of the study area may cause elevated fluoride concentrations in groundwater, by increasing the solubility of fluoride-bearing formations (fluoride). Linear trend analysis on seasonal and annual basis clearly depicted that fluoride pollution in the study area is increasing significantly. Fluoride concentrations showed positive correlations with those of Na(+) and HCO3 (-) and negative correlations with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). The alkaline waters were saturated with calcite in spite of the low Ca(2+) concentrations. Northwestern parts of the study area are inherently enriched with fluorides threatening several ecosystems. The saturation index indicates that dissolution and precipitation contribute fluoride dissolution along with mixing apart from anthropogenic activities. PMID:25666649

  4. Brushing abrasion of eroded dentin after application of sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Attin, T; Zirkel, C; Hellwig, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of sodium fluoride solutions on brushing abrasion of eroded dentin. Dentin specimens were prepared from 60 bovine incisors. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin, ground flat, polished and subsequently covered with tape exposing an area of 1.8 mm x 10.0 mm in the center of the exposed dentin. The samples were alternatingly stored in a demineralizing solution (5 min) and a remineralizing solution (1 min) for 5 times. The erosive soft drink Sprite light(R) served as a demineralizing solution and artificial saliva was used as a remineralizing solution. Prior to storage in artificial saliva 15 specimens were each treated for 1 min with 250 and 2,000 ppm fluoride solution, respectively. Fifteen specimens were treated with distilled water instead of the fluoride solution (= eroded controls). The remaining samples were neither eroded with the soft drink nor fluoridated (= uneroded controls). After each immersion in artificial saliva the specimens were submitted to abrasion in a toothbrushing machine. After 5 demineralization-remineralization brushing cycles the total amount of tooth wear due to erosion and subsequent abrasion was profilometrically evaluated. Statistical analysis revealed the significantly lowest wear in the uneroded controls and the highest amount of abrasion in the eroded controls. Application of the fluoride solutions increased the wear resistance of the eroded dentin specimens, showing significantly better protection by the high-concentration compared to the low-concentration solution. The susceptibility to abrasion of the eroded dentin specimens treated with the high-concentration fluoride solution did not differ significantly from the uneroded dentin samples. It is concluded that application of 2,000 ppm sodium fluoride solutions immediately before toothbrushing significantly reduces abrasion of eroded dentin in vitro. PMID:9701659

  5. Automatic microdistillation flow-injection system for the spectrophotometric determination of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Katsuhisa; Shimoda, Tetsuro; Kokusen, Hisao; Nakano, Shigenori

    2005-03-31

    An automatic flow-injection (FI) system including on-line separation by microdistillation and spectrophotometric detection has been developed for the determination of trace amounts of fluoride. This ion was separated from sample matrix by distillation in the presence of sulfuric and phosphoric acids, and was subsequently determined with spectrophotometry based on the mixed-ligand complex of lanthanum(III)-fluoride-alizarin complexone. The proposed FI system has high sampling frequency (20 samplesh(-1)), small sample size (600 microl) and the dynamic range of 0.05-15 mgl(-1) with relative standard deviations of below 1.2%. Interfering ions such as aluminum(III) and iron(III) was effectively eliminated. The method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoride in industrial drainage after water treatment. PMID:18969965

  6. 21 CFR 872.6870 - Disposable fluoride tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disposable fluoride tray. 872.6870 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6870 Disposable fluoride tray. (a) Identification. A disposable fluoride tray is a device made of styrofoam intended to apply fluoride topically...

  7. Fluoridation and Defluoridation. Training Module 2.230.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, L. D.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with fluoridation and fluoride feeding equipment. Enclosed are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts and transparency masters. The module considers the principles and purposes of fluoridation, methods of feeding fluoride,…

  8. 21 CFR 872.6870 - Disposable fluoride tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disposable fluoride tray. 872.6870 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6870 Disposable fluoride tray. (a) Identification. A disposable fluoride tray is a device made of styrofoam intended to apply fluoride topically...

  9. Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

  10. 21 CFR 872.6870 - Disposable fluoride tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disposable fluoride tray. 872.6870 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6870 Disposable fluoride tray. (a) Identification. A disposable fluoride tray is a device made of styrofoam intended to apply fluoride topically...

  11. Comparison of storage stability of odorous VOCs in polyester aluminum and polyvinyl fluoride tedlar bags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole air sampling using containers such as flexible bags or rigid canisters is commonly used to collect samples of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in air. The objective of this study was to compare the stability of polyester aluminum (PEA) and polyvinyl fluoride (PVF, brand name Tedlar®) bags for ...

  12. Recovery of agricultural odors and odorous compounds from polyvinyl fluoride film bags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate sampling methods are necessary when quantifying odor and volatile organic compound emissions at agricultural facilities. The commonly accepted methodology in the U.S. has been to collect odor samples in polyvinyl fluoride bags (PVF, brand name Tedlar®) and, subsequently, analyze with human ...

  13. Fluoride Plus Functionalized β-TCP

    PubMed Central

    Karlinsey, R.L.; Pfarrer, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    With more than 50 years of clinical success, fluoride serves as the gold standard agent for preventing tooth decay. In particular, the action of fluoride facilitates saliva-driven remineralization of demineralized enamel and alters solubility beneficially. Still, tooth decay remains problematic, and one way to address it may be through the development of new mineralizing agents. Laboratory and clinical studies have demonstrated that the combination of fluoride and functionalized β-tricalcium phosphate (fTCP) produces stronger, more acid-resistant mineral relative to fluoride, native β-TCP, or fTCP alone. In contrast to other calcium-based approaches that seem to rely on high levels of calcium and phosphate to drive remineralization, fTCP is a low-dose system designed to fit within existing topical fluoride preparations. The functionalization of β-TCP with organic and/or inorganic molecules provides a barrier that prevents premature fluoride-calcium interactions and aids in mineralization when applied via common preparations and procedures. While additional clinical studies are warranted, supplementing with fTCP to enhance fluoride-based nucleation activity, with subsequent remineralization driven by dietary and salivary calcium and phosphate, appears to be a promising approach. PMID:22899679

  14. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J.

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  15. Non-enzymatic amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide in human blood serum samples using a modified silver nanowire electrode.

    PubMed

    Thirumalraj, Balamurugan; Zhao, Duo-Han; Chen, Shen-Ming; Palanisamy, Selvakumar

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, we report a highly sensitive amperometric H2O2 sensor based on silver nanowires (AgNWs) modified screen printed carbon electrode. The AgNWs were synthesized using polyol method. The synthesized AgNWs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The average diameter and length of the synthesized AgNWs were found as 86±5 and 385nm, respectively. Under optimum conditions, the AgNWs modified electrode shows a stable amperometric response for H2O2 and was linear over the concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 704.8μM. The non-enzymatic sensor showed a high sensitivity of 662.6μAmM(-1)cm(-2) with a detection limit of 29nM. The response time of the sensor was found as 2s. Furthermore, the AgNWs modified electrode exhibited a good recovery of H2O2 (94.3%) in the human blood serum samples. PMID:26939075

  16. A comparative study of removal of fluoride from contaminated water using shale collected from different coal mines in India.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Gargi; Dutta, Manjari; Dutta, Susmita; Adhikari, Kalyan

    2016-05-01

    Low-cost water defluoridation technique is one of the most important issues throughout the world. In the present study, shale, a coal mine waste, is employed as novel and low-cost adsorbent to abate fluoride from simulated solution. Shale samples were collected from Mahabir colliery (MBS) and Sonepur Bazari colliery (SBS) of Raniganj coalfield in West Bengal, India, and used to remove fluoride. To increase the adsorption efficiency, shale samples were heat activated at a higher temperature and samples obtained at 550 °C are denoted as heat-activated Mahabir colliery shale (HAMBS550) and heat-activated Sonepur Bazari colliery shale (HASBS550), respectively. To prove the fluoride adsorption onto different shale samples and ascertain its mechanism, natural shale samples, heat-activated shale samples, and their fluoride-loaded forms were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction study, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The effect of different parameters such as pH, adsorbent dose, size of particles, and initial concentration of fluoride was investigated during fluoride removal in a batch contactor. Lower pH shows better adsorption in batch study, but it is acidic in nature and not suitable for direct consumption. However, increase of pH of the solution from 3.2 to 6.8 and 7.2 during fluoride removal process with HAMBS550 and HASBS550, respectively, confirms the applicability of the treated water for domestic purposes. HAMBS550 and HASBS550 show maximum removal of 88.3 and 88.5 %, respectively, at initial fluoride concentration of 10 mg/L, pH 3, and adsorbent dose of 70 g/L. PMID:26620857

  17. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings. PMID:23840230

  18. High-repetition-rate, recirculating hydrogen fluoride/deuterium fluoride laser

    SciTech Connect

    Rudko, R.I.; Drozdowicz, Z.; Linhares, S.; Bua, D.

    1982-04-01

    A compact, gas-efficient, pulsed chemical laser operated with HF, DF, or HF and DF simultaneously, is described. This laser produced over 1 mJ/pulse up to over 4000 pps repetition rates with maximum average power over 4.5 W. Maximum repetition rate was 10 000 pulse/s.

  19. Drinking Water Fluoride Levels for a City in Northern Mexico (Durango) Determined Using a Direct Electrochemical Method and Their Potential Effects on Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Molina Frechero, Nelly; Sánchez Pérez, Leonor; Castañeda Castaneira, Enrique; Oropeza Oropeza, Anastasio; Gaona, Enrique; Salas Pacheco, José; Bologna Molina, Ronell

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is ingested primarily through consuming drinking water. When drinking water contains fluoride concentrations >0.7 parts per million (ppm), consuming such water can be toxic to the human body; this toxicity is called “fluorosis.” Therefore, it is critical to determine the fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The objective of this study was to determine the fluoride concentration in the drinking water of the city of Durango. The wells that supply the drinking water distribution system for the city of Durango were studied. One hundred eighty-nine (189) water samples were analyzed, and the fluoride concentration in each sample was quantified as established by the law NMX-AA-077-SCFI-2001. The fluoride concentrations in such samples varied between 2.22 and 7.23 ppm with a 4.313 ± 1.318 ppm mean concentration. The highest values were observed in the northern area of the city, with a 5.001 ± 2.669 ppm mean value. The samples produced values that exceeded the national standard for fluoride in drinking water. Chronic exposure to fluoride at such concentrations produces harmful health effects, the first sign of which is dental fluorosis. Therefore, it is essential that the government authorities implement water defluoridation programs and take preventative measures to reduce the ingestion of this toxic halogen. PMID:24348140

  20. A study of high proper-motion white dwarfs - I. Spectropolarimetry of a cool hydrogen-rich sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawka, Adéla; Vennes, Stéphane

    2012-09-01

    We conducted a spectropolarimetic survey of 58 high proper-motion white dwarfs which achieved uncertainties of >rsim 2 kG in the Hα line and >rsim 5 kG in the upper Balmer line series. The survey aimed at detecting low magnetic fields (≲ 100 kG) and helped identify the new magnetic white dwarfs NLTT 2219, with a longitudinal field Bl = -97 kG, and NLTT 10480 (Bl = -212 kG). Furthermore, we report the possible identification of a very low-field white dwarf with Bl = -4.6 kG. The observations show that ≈5 per cent of white dwarfs harbour low fields (˜10 to ˜102 kG) and that increased survey sensitivity may help uncover several new magnetic white dwarfs with fields below ˜1 kG. A series of observations of the high-field white dwarf NLTT 12758 revealed changes in polarity occurring within an hour possibly associated with an inclined, fast rotating dipole. Also, the relative strength of the π and σ components in NLTT 12758 possibly revealed the effect of a field concentration ('spot'), or, most likely, the presence of a non-magnetic white dwarf companion. Similar observations of NLTT 13015 also showed possible polarity variations, but without a clear indication of the time-scale. The survey data also proved useful in constraining the chemical composition, age and kinematics of a sample of cool white dwarfs as well as in constraining the incidence of double degenerates. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 80.D-0521, 82.D-0521, 83.D-0750 and 84.D-0862.

  1. An atlas of selected beta-ray spectra and depth-dose distributions in lithium fluoride and soft tissue generated by a fast Monte-Carlo-based sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; Gillespie, Timothy J.; Chris Wang, C.-K.

    1996-12-01

    A method to generate depth-dose distributions due to beta radiation in LiF and soft tissue is proposed. In this method, the EGS4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code is initially used to generate a library of monoenergetic electron depth-dose distributions in the material for electron energies in the range of 10 keV to 5 MeV in 10 keV increments. A polynomial least-squares fit is applied to each distribution. In addition, a theoretical model is developed to generate beta-ray energy spectra of selected radionuclides. A standard Monte Carlo random sampling technique is then employed to sample the spectra and generate the depth-dose distributions in LiF and soft tissue. The proposed method has an advantage over more traditional methods in that the actual radiation transport in the media is performed only once for a set of monoenergetic cases and the beta depth-dose distributions are easily generated by sampling this previously-acquired database in a matter of minutes. This method therefore reduces the demand on computer resources and time. The method can be used to calculate depth-dose distribution due to any beta-emitting nuclide or combination of nuclides with up to ten beta components.

  2. The potentiometric titration of fluoride using pH electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.S.

    1987-07-01

    Sodium fluoride solutions with an initial pH of 4.46 yielded poorly defined endpoint breaks with a pH electrode system and Ce(III) or La(III) as titrants. At this initial pH, however, the fluoride ISE yielded acceptable S-shaped titration curves. At an initial pH of 6.30, both electrode systems and titrant combinations yielded acceptable endpoint breaks and titration curves. While a partially nonaqueous medium (50% methanol) enhanced the steepness of the endpoint breaks, the standard deviation also increased. This was possibly caused by evaporation of some of the solvent. We therefore do not see the necessity for, nor recommend a partially nonaqueous medium. There is no advantage in using Ce(III) rather than La(III) as titrant. Increasing the initial pH from 4.46 to 6.3 decreased the mean normality of the titrant (or increased the titration volume) for both electrode systems and titrants. We therefore recommend that the sodium fluoride standard solutions be adjusted to the same pH as the samples to be determined. For the most accurate results, the standardization should be done with a good approximation of the salt content of the unknown solution.

  3. PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

    1957-10-01

    This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

  4. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems. PMID:21117653

  5. REDUCTION OF FLUORIDE TO METAL

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, O.N.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spedding, F.H.

    1960-08-30

    A process is given for making yttrium metal by reducing yttrium fluoride with calcium plus magnesium. Calcium is added in an excess of from 10 to 20% and magnesium in a quantity to yield a magnesium--yttrium alloy containing from 12 to 25% magnesium when the reaction mass is heated in an inert atmosphere at from 900 to 1106 deg C, but preferably above the melting point of the alloy. Calcium chloride may be added so as to obtain a less viscous slag containing from 30 to 60% calcium chloride. After removal of the slag the alloy is vacuum-heated at about 1100 deg C for volatilization of the magnesium and calcium.

  6. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Afshin; Daraei, Hiua; Mohammadi, Elham; Zandi, Shiva; Teymouri, Pari; Mahvi, Amir Hossien; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan). The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea) and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea), respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas (P < 0.05). However, the additives had no significant effect on the fluoride release into the infusions (P > 0.05). Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers. PMID:27042093

  7. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Afshin; Daraei, Hiua; Mohammadi, Elham; Zandi, Shiva; Teymouri, Pari; Mahvi, Amir Hossien; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan). The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea) and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea), respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas (P < 0.05). However, the additives had no significant effect on the fluoride release into the infusions (P > 0.05). Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers. PMID:27042093

  8. Effects of treatment with sodium fluoride and subsequent starvation on fluoride content of earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    The two experiments described here originated during a long-term investigation into the occurrence and movement of pollutant fluoride in a terrestrial ecosystem. Moles (Talpa europaea) whose diet consist largely of various species of earthworm Lumbricidae, are one of the species under investigation. Bone fluoride in moles was found to be higher, on average, than in foxes or small rodents. Moles probably acquire fluoride from their earthworm diet. Earthworms do not have any readily identifiable tissue in which to store large amounts of fluoride but, for their size, they have a considerable amount of soil in their gut, up oto 20% of their dry weight. Preliminary measurements of fluoride in whole earthworms suggested that observed levels could probably be accounted for by fluoride bound in the mineral part of contained soil and released during preparatory ashing. Two experiments to investigate this situation are described; here their aims were: to expose earthworms kept in soil to different concentrations of sodium fluoride; to measure resulting fluoride in earthworms when soil was removed from their gut by starvation for varying periods of time; and to compare amounts of fluoride in whole starved earthworms with those in starved earthworms from which remaining soil had also been physically removed by dissection and washing.

  9. An enhanced hydrogen adsorption enthalpy for fluoride intercalated graphite compounds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hansong; Sha, Xianwei; Chen, Liang; Cooper, Alan C; Foo, Maw-Lin; Lau, Garret C; Bailey, Wade H; Pez, Guido P

    2009-12-16

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study on H(2) physisorption in partially fluorinated graphite. This material, first predicted computationally using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and subsequently synthesized and characterized experimentally, represents a novel class of "acceptor type" graphite intercalated compounds that exhibit significantly higher isosteric heat of adsorption for H(2) at near ambient temperatures than previously demonstrated for commonly available porous carbon-based materials. The unusually strong interaction arises from the semi-ionic nature of the C-F bonds. Although a high H(2) storage capacity (>4 wt %) at room temperature is predicted not to be feasible due to the low heat of adsorption, enhanced storage properties can be envisaged by doping the graphitic host with appropriate species to promote higher levels of charge transfer from graphene to F(-) anions. PMID:19928879

  10. Hydrogen fluoride capture by imidazolium acetate ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-04-01

    Extraction of hydrofluoric acid (HF) from oils is a drastically important problem in petroleum industry, since HF causes quick corrosion of pipe lines and brings severe health problems to humanity. Some ionic liquids (ILs) constitute promising scavenger agents thanks to strong binding to polar compounds and tunability. PM7-MD simulations and hybrid density functional theory are employed here to consider HF capture ability of ILs. Discussing the effects and impacts of the cation and the anion separately and together, we evaluate performance of imidazolium acetate and outline systematic search guidelines for efficient adsorption and extraction of HF.

  11. Raman scattering of hydrogen- and deuterium-implanted cadmium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Stutzmann, M.; Tatarkiewicz, J.

    1987-11-01

    The effects of proton and deuteron implantation on the Raman spectra of CdF/sub 2/ crystals have been investigated. It is found that Raman scattering can provide a quantitative measure for the structural damage caused by the implantation procedure. These results also elucidate the intrinsic or extrinsic origin of Raman peaks observed in semiconducting CdF/sub 2/.

  12. Materials corrosion in molten lithium fluoride-sodium fluoride-potassium fluoride eutectic salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Luke Christopher

    Static corrosion studies were undertaken to determine the compatibility of several candidate high temperature materials for a heat transfer loop in a molten alkali fluoride eutectic salt, LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol % (commonly referred to as FLiNaK), as well as a molten chloride near eutectic salt, KCl-MgCl2: 68-32 mol %. Several high temperature alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, Nb-1Zr, a nearly pure Ni alloy Ni-201, and a C/SiSiC ceramic were exposed to molten FLiNaK at 850°C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion occurred predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the Cr bearing alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries. Corrosion was noted to occur from selective attack of the Si phase in the C/SiSiC ceramic. Alloy weight-loss/area due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys' weight-loss/area was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present in the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. The corrosion mechanisms for the chloride based salt were found to be similar to those observed in FLiNaK, but the chemical attack was found to be less aggressive. Sulfamate Ni electroplating and Mo plasma spraying of Fe-Ni-Cr alloy coupons was investigated to mitigate Cr dissolution. A chemical vapor deposited pyrolytic carbon and SiC coating was also investigated to protect the C/SiSiC composites. Results indicate that Ni-plating has the potential to provide protection against alloy corrosion in molten fluoride salts. Furthermore, the presence of a chromium-oxide interlayer at the interface of the Ni-plating and alloy substrate can further improve the efficacy of the Ni-plating. The pyrolytic carbon and SiC coating on the C/SiSiC composites

  13. Factors affecting fluoride and natural organic matter (NOM) removal from natural waters in Tanzania by nanofiltration/reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Junjie; Schäfer, Andrea I

    2015-09-15

    This study examined the feasibility of nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) in treating challenging natural tropical waters containing high fluoride and natural organic matter (NOM). A total of 166 water samples were collected from 120 sources within northern Tanzania over a period of 16 months. Chemical analysis showed that 81% of the samples have fluoride levels exceeding the WHO drinking guideline of 1.5mg/L. The highest fluoride levels were detected in waters characterized by high ionic strength, high inorganic carbon and on some occasions high total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations. Bench-scale experiments with 22 representative waters (selected based on fluoride concentration, salinity, origin and in some instances organic matter) and 6 NF/RO membranes revealed that ionic strength and recovery affected fluoride retention and permeate flux. This is predominantly due to osmotic pressure and hence the variation of diffusion/convection contributes to fluoride transport. Different membranes had distinct fluoride removal capacities, showing different raw water concentration treatability limits regarding the WHO guideline compliance. BW30, BW30-LE and NF90 membranes had a feed concentration limit of 30-40 mg/L at 50% recovery. NOM retention was independent of water matrices but is governed predominantly by size exclusion. NOM was observed to have a positive impact on fluoride removal. Several mechanisms could contribute but further studies are required before a conclusion could be drawn. In summary, NF/RO membranes were proved to remove both fluoride and NOM reliably even from the most challenging Tanzanian waters, increasing the available drinking water sources. PMID:26005995

  14. In Vitro Comparison of the Effects of Diode Laser and CO2 Laser on Topical Fluoride Uptake in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Sorouri, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Fluoride therapy is important for control and prevention of dental caries. Laser irradiation can increase fluoride uptake especially when combined with topical fluoride application. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of CO2 and diode lasers on enamel fluoride uptake in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Forty human primary molars were randomly assigned to four groups (n=10). The roots were removed and the crowns were sectioned mesiodistally into buccal and lingual halves as the experimental and control groups. All samples were treated with 5% sodium fluoride (NaF) varnish. The experimental samples in the four groups were irradiated with 5 or 7W diode or 1 or 2W CO2 laser for 15 seconds and were compared with the controls in terms of fluoride uptake, which was determined using an ion selective electrode after acid dissolution of the specimens. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using ANOVA treating the control measurements as covariates. Results: The estimated amount of fluoride uptake was 59.5± 16.31 ppm, 66.5± 14.9 ppm, 78.6± 12.43 ppm and 90.4± 11.51 ppm for 5W and 7 W diode and 1W and 2 W CO2 lasers, respectively, which were significantly greater than the values in the conventional topical fluoridation group (P<0.005). There were no significant differences between 7W diode laser and 1W CO2 laser, 5W and 7W diode laser, or 1W and 2W CO2 laser in this regard. Conclusion: The results showed that enamel surface irradiation by CO2 and diode lasers increases the fluoride uptake. PMID:27123018

  15. On the structure and morphology of poly (vinylidene fluoride) nanoscrolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Gabriel; Gleeson, Sarah; Mei, Shan; Qi, Hao; Li, Christopher

    Beyond its widely popular piezoelectric effect and β-phase molecular conformation, poly (vinylidene fluoride) PVDF also offers great intrigue as it relates to understanding its intrinsic crystallization behavior and morphological preference. It has been suggested that the γ-phase of PVDF adopts a highly regular scrolling lamellar habit which can be attributed to small differences in the folding volume of atomic level hydrogen and fluorine atoms resulting in the evolution of highly curved polymer lamellae. To date this scrolled morphology of γ-phase PVDF has been witnessed via high temperature melt crystallization of crystalline thin films and via severe chemical etching of PVDF bulk films. Here we show the first growth of free-standing γ-phase PVDF scrolls via the solution crystallization technique. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transformed-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) have been used to both characterize and to further understand the fundamental preferred crystalline habit of the γ-phase of poly (vinylidene fluoride).

  16. Shock Induced Birefringence in Lithium Fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N C

    2001-06-01

    We have used an ellipsometer to measure the birefringence of lithium fluoride in shock compression experiments. In previous x-ray diffraction experiments, single crystal [100] LiF has been reported to remain cubic at moderate pressures.

  17. Determination of fluoride using ion-selective electrodes in the presence of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Borjigin, Siqingaowa; Ashimura, Yuuta; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Mizoguchi, Tadaaki

    2009-12-01

    We describe a method for determining fluoride with ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). Tartrate and Tris-based total ionic strength adjustment buffers (TISABs) were found to lower the interference from aluminum to a greater extent than conventional citrate-based TISABs. We adopted a solid TISAB addition method that is simple to perform, and can be carried out without lowering the level of fluoride. The apparent recovery of fluoride was 95% or higher, even at 500 mg L(-1) of Al3+ when a tartrate and Tris-based TISAB was used. Interferences from common ions were not observed at 100 mg L(-1) levels. We determined the fluoride content in solid silicate samples with ISEs without preliminary steam distillation after alkali fusion processing. Adding a solid TISAB mixture consisting of tartaric acid, sodium tartrate, and Tris, however, eliminated any interference from high levels of aluminum and sodium and potassium carbonates. The proposed analytical method was also applied to the determination of fluoride in geochemical reference samples. PMID:20009331

  18. Validation of an ion selective electrode system for the analysis of serum fluoride ion.

    PubMed

    Duly, E B; Luney, S R; Trinick, T R; Murray, J M; Comer, J E

    1995-01-01

    A high impedance unit was developed for use with a fluoride/pH electrode system for the measurement of serum fluoride. The linearity, accuracy, precision and detection limit of the system is reported. At a pH of 1.55, the system was linear over a range of serum fluoride concentrations up to 100 mumol l(-1), with a lower limit of detection of 0.3 mumol l(-1). Recoveries at this pH were 94-105% in the range 2.6-100 mumol l(-1). Within-run CVs ranged from 4.2% at a level of 2.3 mumol l(-1) to 1.2% at a level of 55.7 mumol l(-1), while day-to-day CVs ranged from 12.8% at a level of 2.2 mumol l(-1) to 4.6% at a level of 51.7 mumol l(-1). The system demonstrated a rapid response time and has the potential for a smaller sample size requirement with alternative electrode shape. Continued development of this unit into an automated fluoride ion selective electrode system is recommended, since the measurement of serial serum fluoride samples is of greatest importance in assessing the impact of new anaesthetic agents on renal function. PMID:18925049

  19. COMPRESSIVE FATIGUE IN TITANIUM DENTAL IMPLANTS SUBMITTED TO FLUORIDE IONS ACTION

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana Lúcia Roselino; Noriega, Jorge Roberto; Dametto, Fábio Roberto; Vaz, Luís Geraldo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of a fluoridated medium on the mechanical properties of an internal hexagon implant-abutment set, by means of compression, mechanical cycling and metallographic characterization by scanning electronic microscopy. Five years of regular use of oral hygiene with a sodium fluoride solution content of 1500 ppm were simulated, immersing the samples in this medium for 184 hours, with the solutions being changed every 12 hours. Data were analyzed at a 95% confidence level with Fisher's exact test. After the action of fluoride ions, a negative influence occurred in the mechanical cycling test performed in a servohydraulic machine (Material Test System-810) set to a frequency of 15 Hz with 100,000 cycles and programmed to 60% of the maximum resistance of static compression test. The sets tended to fracture by compression on the screw, characterized by mixed ruptures with predominance of fragile fracture, as observed by microscopy. An evidence of corrosion by pitting on sample surfaces was found after the fluoride ions action. It may be concluded that prolonged contact with fluoride ions is harmful to the mechanical properties of commercially pure titanium structures. PMID:19089148

  20. Materials processing apparatus development for fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Sue; Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride glasses have great potential for optical fiber communications due to the high transmittance when no microcrystallites occur during drawing operations. This work has developed apparatus to test the occurrence of microcrystallites during recrystallization in reduced gravity on the KC-135. The apparatus allows fluoride glass fiber, such as ZBLAN, to be melted and recrystallized during both the low and high g portions the parabolic flight.

  1. Hydrogen mitigation in submerged arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimowicz, Steven

    removes the moisture that is added by the water based binder. The second phase of the project was to modify the flux with fluoride additions to remove hydrogen from the arc while welding. The introduction of fluorine into the arc would lower the amount of hydrogen that may be absorbed as diffusible hydrogen by the weld metal. To select the fluorides a series of thermodynamic calculations were performed as well as simple tests to determine the fluorides behavior in a welding arc and flux. From these tests the following fluorides were selected to be used to be added to EM12K flux as oneweight percent additions: SrF 2, K2TiF6, K2SiF6, and LiF. Welds were then run with the experimental fluxes according to AWS A4.3 standard for diffusible hydrogen testing. From these tests it was found that none experimental fluxes were able to achieve a diffusible hydrogen content lower than the original EM12K flux. It was also found that fluoride reduction in a simple flux is a better predictor of fluoride effectiveness than decomposition temperature.

  2. Effects of enamel matrix genes on dental caries are moderated by fluoride exposures

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, John R.; Carlson, Jenna C.; Stanley, Brooklyn O. C.; Feingold, Eleanor; Cooper, Margaret; Vanyukov, Michael M.; Maher, Brion S.; Slayton, Rebecca L.; Willing, Marcia C.; Reis, Steven E.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Crout, Richard J.; Weyant, Robert J.; Levy, Steven M.; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common chronic disease, worldwide, affecting most children and adults. Though dental caries is highly heritable, few caries-related genes have been discovered. We investigated whether 18 genetic variants in the group of nonamelogenin enamel matrix genes (AMBN, ENAM, TUFT1, and TFIP11) were associated with dental caries experience in 13 age- and race-stratified samples from six parent studies (N=3,600). Linear regression was used to model genetic associations and test gene-byfluoride interaction effects for two sources of fluoride: daily tooth brushing and home water fluoride concentration. Meta-analysis was used to combine results across five child and eight adult samples. We observed the statistically significant association of rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 with dental caries experience via meta-analysis across adult samples (p<0.002) and the suggestive association for multiple variants in TFIP11 across child samples (p<0.05). Moreover, we discovered two genetic variants (rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 and missense rs7439186 in AMBN) involved in gene-by-fluoride interactions. For each interaction, participants with the risk allele/genotype exhibited greater dental caries experience only if they were not exposed to the source of fluoride. Altogether, these results confirm that variation in enamel matrix genes contributes to individual differences in dental caries liability, and demonstrate that the effects of these genes may be moderated by protective fluoride exposures. In short, genes may exert greater influence on dental caries in unprotected environments, or equivalently, the protective effects of fluoride may obviate the effects of genetic risk alleles. PMID:25373699

  3. Debating Water Fluoridation Before Dr. Strangelove.

    PubMed

    Carstairs, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    In the 1930s, scientists learned that small amounts of fluoride naturally occurring in water could protect teeth from decay, and the idea of artificially adding fluoride to public water supplies to achieve the same effect arose. In the 1940s and early 1950s, a number of studies were completed to determine whether fluoride could have harmful effects. The research suggested that the possibility of harm was small. In the early 1950s, Canadian and US medical, dental, and public health bodies all endorsed water fluoridation. I argue in this article that some early concerns about the toxicity of fluoride were put aside as evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of water fluoridation mounted and as the opposition was taken over by people with little standing in the scientific, medical, and dental communities. The sense of optimism that infused postwar science and the desire of dentists to have a magic bullet that could wipe out tooth decay also affected the scientific debate. PMID:26066938

  4. Delivery Challenges for Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Xylitol

    PubMed Central

    Featherstone, John DB

    2006-01-01

    The progression or reversal of dental caries is determined by the balance between pathological and protective factors. It is well established that a) fluoride inhibits demineralization and enhances remineralization, b) chlorhexidine reduces the cariogenic bacterial challenge, and c) xylitol is non-cariogenic and has antibacterial properties. The challenge that we face is how best to deliver these anti-caries entities at true therapeutic levels, over time, to favorably tip the caries balance. High caries risk people, including children with Early Childhood Caries (ECC), are a special challenge, since high cariogenic bacterial activity can override fluoride therapy. Current fluoride and chlorhexidine varnishes deliver all their activity within about 24 hours. Early studies with experimental slow release fluoride devices retained elevated levels of fluoride for months in a therapeutic range but have not been pursued. Preventive dentistry has largely ignored the benefits of reducing the bacterial challenge, partially due to primitive and inadequate delivery systems. For example, Chlorhexidine applied as a rinse partially reduces some bacteria but not others that are hiding within the biofilm. Better antibacterials and better delivery systems are needed. Xylitol delivered by gum or lozenge appears to be effective clinically in reducing cariogenic bacteria and caries levels, but novel systems that deliver therapeutic amounts when needed would be a major advance, especially for young children. Reducing the cariogenic bacterial challenge and enhancing the effect of fluoride by the use of new sustained-delivery systems would have a major effect on dealing with caries as a disease. PMID:16934125

  5. Absence of salting out effects in forensic blood alcohol determination at various concentrations of sodium fluoride using semi-automated headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Miller, B A; Day, S M; Vasquez, T E; Evans, F M

    2004-01-01

    Blood alcohol measurements determined by headspace gas chromatography have been challenged on the grounds that the presence of the preservative sodium fluoride in blood samples artificially increases headspace alcohol concentrations due to a salting out effect. Blood samples containing varying amounts of ethanol and sodium fluoride were tested using semi-automated headspace gas chromatography with n-propyl alcohol as the internal standard to assess the validity of this challenge. We find, in fact, that under these test conditions the measured alcohol levels are systematically depressed as the amount of sodium fluoride in the blood sample increases. The challenge thus has no basis. PMID:15112594

  6. Influence of Individual Saliva Secretion on Fluoride Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Naumova, E.A; Gaengler, P; Zimmer, S; Arnold, W.H

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to compare the individual saliva secretion rate with the fluoride bioavailability in saliva after using sodium fluoride and amine fluoride. Methods: To assess oral fluoride kinetics 10 highly trained volunteers brushed their teeth with one of the formulations and saliva was collected. The amount of saliva was measured, and the fluoride content was determined. Data underwent statistical analysis using the Mann-Whitney-U test and Pearson correlation. The ex vivo experiment I included individual saliva collection of the same volunteers. Then the oral hygiene products were solved in equal amounts of whole saliva (ex-vivo experiment II), and the fluoride content was measured. Finally, both products were dispersed in distilled water (ex-vivo experiment III) to calculate the dissociation of both products in water. Results: In vivo results of fluoride content after 3 min. tooth brushing demonstrated a negative correlation with saliva secretion: for NaF r = -0.695 (p<0.01) and for amine fluoride r = -0.446 (p<0.01). The in-vitro experiment I resulted for NaF in 251.7±22.4 µg/g fluoride and for amine fluoride in 171.7±14.4 µg/g. Conclusions: Fluoride bioavailability of saliva after exposure to NaF was higher compared to amine fluoride. The individual secretion rate changes the fluoride content and normal secretors keep the fluoride availability longer. PMID:21221176

  7. The effective use of fluorides in public health.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A.; Petersen, Poul Erik; Lennon, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research and development was concerned with waterborne fluorides, both naturally occurring and added, and their effects on the prevalence and incidence of dental caries and dental fluorosis. In the latter half of the 20th century, the focus of research was on fluoride toothpastes and mouth rinses. More recently, systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on: recent water fluoridation schemes in California, USA; salt fluoridation in Jamaica; milk fluoridation in Chile; and the development of "affordable" fluoride toothpastes in Indonesia. Common themes are the concern to reduce demands for compliance with fluoride regimes that rely upon action by individuals and their families, and the issue of cost. We recommend that a community should use no more than one systemic fluoride (i.e. water or salt or milk fluoridation) combined with the use of fluoride toothpastes, and that the prevalence of dental fluorosis should be monitored in order to detect increases in or higher-than-acceptable levels. PMID:16211158

  8. The geographic distribution of fluoride in surface and groundwater in Ethiopia with an emphasis on the Rift Valley.

    PubMed

    Tekle-Haimanot, Redda; Melaku, Zenebe; Kloos, Helmut; Reimann, Clemens; Fantaye, Wondwossen; Zerihun, Legesse; Bjorvatn, Kjell

    2006-08-15

    This paper analyzes the most extensive database on fluoride distribution in Ethiopia. Of the total 1438 water samples tested, 24.2% had fluoride concentrations above the 1.5 mg/l recommended optimum concentration recommended by WHO. Regionally, by far the highest fluoride levels were recorded in the Rift Valley, where 41.2% of all samples exceeded the 1.5 mg/l level. Only 1.0% of the samples from the central and northwestern highlands and 10.0% in the southeastern highlands exceeded 1.5 mg/l. Larger proportions of deep wells (50.0%) and hot springs (90.0%) than shallow wells (27.2%) and cold springs (12.6%) exceeded the 1.5 mg/l level. The highest fluoride concentrations were recorded for Rift Valley lakes Shala (264.0 mg/l) and Abijata (202.4 mg/l) and the lowest in Lake Tana, and rivers, wells and springs in the highlands. The fluoride concentrations of the Awash River, which originates in the highlands and flows through the Rift Valley, increase downstream, giving concern over the current diversion of high-fluoride water from Lake Beseka. Of the various flourosis prevention methods tried in Ethiopia, the treatment of surface water has been shown to be the most feasible and effective for towns and large commercial farms in the Rift Valley, although defluoridation methods should be considered for smaller rural communities. PMID:16360195

  9. Musculoskeletal problems and fluoride exposure: A cross-sectional study among metal smelting workers.

    PubMed

    Saha, A; Mukherjee, A K; Ravichandran, B

    2016-09-01

    Frequent and repetitive activities in job and awkward postures are shown as major contributors of musculoskeletal problems in most of the occupational health studies; however, efforts to explore newer risk factor are important to plan interventional measures. In this backdrop, this study examined contribution of fluoride exposure to musculoskeletal complaints. A cross-sectional interviewer-administered questionnaire survey was conducted involving 180 randomly selected subjects from a metal smelting industry. Clinical examination of the subjects was also performed to assess their health status and morbidity details. Assessment of personal exposure to particulate and gaseous fluoride at workplace was conducted. Urinary fluoride level was also examined in post-shift samples collected from study subjects. The mean age of the study subjects was 39.1 (±6.7) years. Majority of the workers (42.5%) were engaged in pot room. About 54% workers were suffering from backache and 66% subjects had joint pain. Exposure of workers to both particulate and gaseous fluoride and post-working shift urinary fluoride level was significantly higher in pot-room workers in comparison with all other workers. It was observed that age (odds ratio (OR): 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-2.34), drinking untreated water (OR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.03-2.76), working in pot room (OR: 1.44; 95% CI: 1.13-1.91) and urinary fluoride level (OR: 2.71; 95% CI: 1.81-3.75) had significant effects on musculoskeletal complaints. This study concludes that along with other predictors such as nature of work, posture at work and age of worker, exposure to fluoride also has significant role in the occurrence of musculoskeletal morbidity. PMID:25653036

  10. Effects of Different Concentrations of Fluoride in Oral Mucosal Cells in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, P.Ajay; Rao, T.Madhusudhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fluoride has been described to be physiologically essential for the normal development and growth of human beings. However, it is well known that excessive fluoride causes skeletal, nonskeletal and dental complications. Therefore, outlining the cytogenetic effects induced by fluorosis is necessary. Objectives To evaluate the cytomorphology of exfoliated oral mucosal cells among various concentrations of fluoride. Study design: Study group comprised of 12 Albino Wistar rats, categorized into A,B and C groups (fed with 25 ppm,50 ppm and 100 ppm concentration of NaF), each group consisting of 4 rats, with 4 controls (fed with 1ppm concentration of NaF in distilled water). Each group was fed for a period of 42 days. Materials and Methods Cytological smears were taken from the buccal mucosa of each group after 42 days of fluoride administration. The samples were stained with the papanicolaou method and assessed for Cytomorphometrical changes in maximum diameter of nucleus, minimum diameter of nucleus, perimeter of the nucleus, maximum diameter of the cell, minimum diameter of the cell and perimeter of the cell by image analysis software and the results were statistically analysed using SPSS software. Results Mean values of maximum diameter, minimum diameter and perimeter of the nucleus increased in fluoride induced study groups when compared to controls and the results showed that p-value was statistically significant (p-value: 0.000, 0.001). Mean value of maximum diameter, minimum diameter and perimeter of the cell decreased in fluoride induced subjects when compared with controls which were statistically not significant (p-value: 0.791, 0.600 & 0.719). A continuous increase in the nuclear size and decrease in the cell size was identified in fluoride induced groups as compared to controls. Conclusion The observations of our present study revealed that cellular changes occur with severity of fluorosis. These cellular morphological changes may possibly

  11. The role of nonbonding interactions and the presence of fluoride on the conformational isomerism of 1,2-ethanediol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Weslley G. D. P.; Silla, Josué M.; Cormanich, Rodrigo A.; Fernandes, Sergio A.; Freitas, Matheus P.

    2016-07-01

    This work reports the analysis of the effects ruling the conformational preference of 1,2-ethanediol (1,2-ED) using theoretical calculations, since there is no general consensus about the role of intramolecular hydrogen bond on the conformational isomerism of 1,2-ED. While the predominance of the gauche conformers along with the Osbnd Csbnd Csbnd O fragment relative to the trans ones was found to be mainly due to hyperconjugation, the orientation of the hydroxyl groups is better described by a balance between low steric hindrance and high stabilization from hyperconjugation than by intramolecular hydrogen bond. Nevertheless, the presence of a fluoride anion induces a conformational change in 1,2-ED that maximizes hydrogen bonds between the fluoride and the hydroxyl groups. This effect was observed experimentally by the shift of 1H(O) and 19F NMR signals upon complexation, then suggesting that compounds containing the 1,2-ED moiety can be possible anion transporters.

  12. Measuring Hydrogen Concentrations in Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial corrosion-measurement system adapted to electrochemical determination of hydrogen concentrations in metals. New technique based on diffusion of hydrogen through foil specimen of metal. In sample holder, hydrogen produced on one side of foil, either by corrosion reaction or by cathodic current. Hydrogen diffused through foil removed on other side by constant anode potential, which leads to oxidation of hydrogen to water. Anode current is measure of concentration of hydrogen diffusing through foil. System used to study hydrogen uptake, hydrogen elimination by baking, effect of heat treatment, and effect of electroplating on high-strength steels.

  13. Oral fluoride levels 1 h after use of a sodium fluoride rinse: effect of sodium lauryl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Gerald L; Schumacher, Gary E; Chow, Laurence C; Tenuta, Livia M A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the concentration of free fluoride in oral fluids is an important goal in the use of topical fluoride agents. Although sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is a common dentifrice ingredient, the influence of this ion on plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of SLS on these parameters and to examine the effect of this ion on total (or whole) plaque fluoride, an important source of plaque fluid fluoride after a sufficient interval following fluoride administration, and on total salivary fluoride, a parameter often used as a surrogate measure of salivary fluid fluoride. Ten subjects accumulated plaque for 48 h before rinsing with a 12 mmol/l NaF (228 µg/g F) rinse containing or not containing 0.5% (w/w) SLS. SLS had no statistically significant effect on total plaque and total saliva fluoride but significantly increased salivary fluid and plaque fluid fluoride (by 147 and 205%, respectively). These results suggest that the nonfluoride components of topical agents can be manipulated to improve the fluoride release characteristics from oral fluoride reservoirs and that statistically significant change may be observed in plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride concentrations that may not be observed in total plaque and total saliva fluoride concentrations. PMID:25924684

  14. Fluoride-selective optical sensor based on aluminum(III)-octaethylporphyrin in thin polymeric film: further characterization and practical application.

    PubMed

    Badr, Ibrahim H A; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2005-10-15

    More detailed analytical studies of a new fluoride-selective optical sensor based on the use of aluminum(III)-octaethylporphyrin and a lipophilic pH indicator (4',5'-dibromofluorescein octadecyl ester; ETH-7075) within a thin plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) film are reported. The sensor exhibits extraordinary optical selectivity for fluoride over a wide range of other anions, including anions with far more positive free energies of hydration (e.g., perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, etc.). UV-visible spectrophotometric studies of the sensing films indicate that fluoride interacts with the Al(III) center of the porphyrin structure, yielding both a change in the Soret band lambda(max) of the porphyrin and a change in the protonation state of the pH indicator within the film. The same change in spectral properties of the metalloporphyrin occurs in the absence of added pH indicator or with added tetraphenylborate derivative anionic sites, but optical responses to fluoride in these cases are shown to be irreversible. The presence of the pH indicator and the simultaneous fluoride/proton coextraction equilibrium chemistry is shown to greatly enhance the reversibility of fluoride binding to the Al(III) porphyrin. Optical response toward fluoride can be observed in the range of 0.1 microM-1.6 mM. Optical selectivity coefficients of <10(-6) for common anions (e.g., sulfate, chloride, nitrate, etc.) and <10(-4) for perchlorate and thiocyanate are obtained. Measurements of fluoride in drinking water via the new optical sensor are shown to correlate well with values obtained for the same samples using a classical LaF3-based fluoride ion-selective electrode method. PMID:16223262

  15. Fluoride Selective Optical Sensor Based on Aluminum(III)-Octaethylporphyrin in Thin Polymeric Film: Further Characterization and Practical Application

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Ibrahim H. A.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    More detailed analytical studies of a new fluoride selective optical sensor based on the use of aluminum(III)-octaethylporphyrin and a lipophilic pH indicator (4′,5′-dibromofluorescein octadecyl ester; ETH-7075) within a thin plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) film are reported. The sensor exhibits extraordinary optical selectivity for fluoride over a wide range of other anions, including anions with far more positive free energies of hydration (e.g., perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, etc.). UV-VIS spectrophotometric studies of the sensing films indicate that fluoride interacts with the Al(III) center of the porphyrin structure, yielding both a change in the Soret band λmax of the porphyrin as well as a change in the protonation state of the pH indicator within the film. The same change in spectral properties of the metalloporphyrin occurs in the absence of added pH indicator or with added tetraphenylborate derivative anionic sites, but optical responses to fluoride in these cases are shown to be irreversible. The presence of the pH indicator and the simultaneous fluoride/proton coextraction equilibrium chemistry is shown to greatly enhance the reversibility of fluoride binding to the Al(III) porphyrin. Optical response toward fluoride can be observed in the range of 0.1 μM to 1.6 mM. Optical selectivity coefficients of < 10−6 for common anions (e.g., sulfate, chloride, nitrate etc.) and < 10−4 for perchlorate and thiocyanate are obtained. Measurements of fluoride in drinking water via the new optical sensor are shown to correlate well with values obtained for the same samples using a classical LaF3 based fluoride ion-selective electrode method. PMID:16223262

  16. Environmental evaluation of fluoride in drinking water at "Los Altos de Jalisco," in the central Mexico region.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Roberto; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    Naturally occurring fluoride has been detected and quantified in drinking water in several cities of the "Los Altos de Jalisco" (LAJ) region. LAJ is located in the northeastern part of the state of Jalisco-Mexico, covering an area of 16,410 km2 with a population of 696,318 in 20 municipalities. Drinking water comes mainly from groundwater aquifers, located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is a volcanic region characterized by hydrothermal activity. Results indicated that water supply from 42% of the municipalities had a fluoride concentration over the Mexican standards of 1.5 mg/L. It is important to notice that there are three cities, Lagos de Moreno (1.66-5.88 mg/L F(-)), Teocaltiche (3.82-18.58 mg/L F(-)), and Encarnación de Díaz (2.58-4.40 mg/L F(-)) where all water samples resulted in fluoride concentration over the maximum contaminant level. The total population from these three cities is over 122,000 inhabitants. Another important city with high levels of fluoride in the water supply was Tepatitlán de Morelos (2 wells with 6.54 and 13.47 mg/L F(-)). In addition to water supply, 30 samples of brand-name bottled water were tested. Surprisingly, 8 samples (27%) demonstrated fluoride level over the standards, mainly Agua de Lagos with 5.27 mg/L. Fluoridated table salt (200-300 mg/kg F(-)) is another important source of fluoride. A large number of people living in the region, mainly school children, might be under adverse health risk because they are consuming contaminated drinking water. It is well known that long-term exposure to water with high levels of fluoride produces severe health problems. PMID:15371213

  17. Influence of the method of fluoride administration on toxicity and fluoride concentrations in Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Schuler, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Young Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were administered NaF for 16 d either in their diet or by esophageal intubation. Based on the total fluoride ion (Emg F-) intake over the l6-d experimental period, fluoride administered by intubation was at least six times more toxic than that fed in the diet. Dietary concentrations of 1,000 ppm F- (Emg F- for 16 d = approx. 144) produced no mortality, whereas intubated doses produced 73% or greater mortality in all groups administered 54 mg F- /kg/d or more (Emg F- for 16 d _ approx. 23 mg). GraphIc companson of the regression of log F- ppm in femurs/mg F- intake showed that fluoride levels in the femurs of quail administered fluoride by intubation were higher than in those administered fluoride in the diet.

  18. Mechanism of Electrophilic Fluorination with Pd(IV): Fluoride Capture and Subsequent Oxidative Fluoride Transfer(.)

    PubMed

    Brandt, Jochen R; Lee, Eunsung; Boursalian, Gregory B; Ritter, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Electrophilic fluorinating reagents derived from fluoride are desirable for the synthesis of (18)F-labeled molecules for positron emission tomography (PET). Here, we study the mechanism by which a Pd(IV)-complex captures fluoride and subsequently transfers it to nucleophiles. The intermediate Pd(IV)-F is formed with high rates even at the nano- to micromolar fluoride concentrations typical for radiosyntheses with (18)F due to fast formation of an outer-sphere complex between fluoride and Pd(IV). The subsequent fluorine transfer from the Pd(IV)-F complex is proposed to proceed through an unusual SET/fluoride transfer/SET mechanism. The findings detailed in this manuscript provide a theoretical foundation suitable for addressing a more general approach for electrophilic fluorination with high specific activity (18)F PET imaging. PMID:24376910

  19. Fluoride ion contamination in the groundwater of Mithi sub-district, the Thar Desert, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Tahir; Naseem, Shahid; Bhanger, Muhammad I.; Usmani, Tanzil H.

    2008-11-01

    Groundwater samples were collected from various localities of Mithi sub-district of the Thar Desert of Pakistan and analysed for fluoride ion along with other chemical parameters. The area is mainly covered by sand dunes and kaolin/granite at variable depths. Results showed that collected water samples were severely contaminated by the presence of fluoride ion and most of the samples have higher concentration than prescribed WHO standards (1.5 mg/l) for drinking water. Fluoride ion concentrations ranged between 0.09 and 11.63 mg/l with mean and median values of 3.64 and 3.44 mg/l, respectively, in this area whereas, distribution pattern showed high concentrations in the vicinity of Islamkot and Mithi towns. The content of F- has also been correlated with other major ions found in the groundwater of the study area. The positive correlation of F- with Na+ and HCO3 - showed that the water with high Na+ and HCO3 - stabilizes F- ions in the groundwater of the Thar Desert. The pH versus F- plots signifies high fluoride concentration at higher pH values, implying that alkaline environment favours the replacement of exchangeable OH- with F- in the groundwater of Mithi area. The saturation indices (SI) of fluorite (CaF2) and calcite (CaCO3) in the groundwater samples showed that most of the samples are oversaturated with respect to calcite whereas majority of samples have been found under saturated with respect to fluorite. The log TDS and Na/Na+Ca ratio reflected supremacy of weathering of rocks, which promotes the availability of fluoride ions in the groundwater. Piper diagram has been used to classify the hydrofacies. In the cation triangle, all samples are Na-type, while the anion triangle reflects major dominance of Cl-type with a minor influence of HCO3 - and SO4 -.

  20. SAMPLING AND DETERMINATION OF GAS-PHASE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF OZONE BY GAS-PHASE REACTION WITH NITRIC OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for determination of hydrogen peroxide in the ambient atmosphere is described, using impinger or diffusion scrubber collection of hydrogen peroxide with aqueous-phase analysis by an enzyme-catalyzed fluorescence technique. Interference from ozone at ambient levels is rem...

  1. Effect of various rinsing protocols after use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride toothpaste on the bacterial composition of dental plaque.

    PubMed

    van Loveren, C; Gerardu, V A M; Sissons, C H; van Bekkum, M; ten Cate, J M

    2009-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effect of different oral hygiene protocols on the bacterial composition of dental plaque. After a 2-week period of using fluoride-free toothpaste, 30 participants followed three 1-week experimental protocols, each followed by 2-week fluoride-free washout periods in a randomized crossover examiner-blind controlled trial. The 1-week experimental protocols comprised the use of AmF/SnF(2) toothpaste twice daily, after which participants either (1) rinsed with tap water, (2) did not rinse but only spat out the toothpaste, or (3) rinsed with an AmF/SnF(2) mouthwash. In the fluoride-free washout periods, the participants brushed their teeth with fluoride-free toothpaste without further instructions. Six hours after the last brushing (+/- rinsing) of each period, buccal plaque samples in the upper molar region were taken. The microbiota composition of the plaque samples was analyzed by checkerboard DNA:DNA hybridization. A statistically significant reduction was found in the total amount of DNA of the 39 major plaque species measured, and in the proportions of some acid-producing bacterial strains after the period having used the AmF/SnF(2) toothpaste + AmF/SnF(2) mouthrinsing. The results indicate that using the AmF/SnF(2) toothpaste and rinse combination could result in plaque of lower cariogenicity. PMID:20016176

  2. Global Measurements of Atmospheric Sulfuryl Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühle, J.; Harth, C. M.; Salameh, P.; Miller, B. R.; Weiss, R. F.; Porter, L. W.; Fraser, P. J.; Greally, B. R.; O'Doherty, S.

    2006-12-01

    Sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) is used increasingly as a fumigant, but information about its emissions to the atmosphere is limited. Its atmospheric fate and lifetime are uncertain, with hydrolysis in the basic surface waters of the oceans a likely dominant sink, and its roles as a greenhouse gas and as a sulfur source to the stratosphere are unknown. We present here the first results of two years of high-frequency high-precision in situ observations of sulfuryl fluoride in the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) global measurement program. At La Jolla, California, baseline conditions are rarely achieved, and pollution events of up to 1.7 ppb (the exposure limit is 5 ppm) from nearby structural fumigation are common. At the Mace Head, Ireland, and Cape Grim, Tasmania, AGAGE stations, baseline conditions are observed with mixing ratios at the beginning of 2005 of ~1.0 ppt and ~0.9 ppt, respectively. Measured growth rates at these stations are ~0.06 ppt per year and ~0.04 ppt per year, respectively. Using these preliminary results and assuming no significant emissions in the southern hemisphere, a simple 2-box model can be used to estimate the tropospheric lifetime of sulfuryl fluoride as about one and a half decades, which is substantially longer than previous industry estimates. The corresponding modeled sulfuryl fluoride flux to the troposphere is ~2 x 109 g per year. Based on these initial measurements, the current global warming contribution of sulfuryl fluoride is likely small. Although the lifetime of sulfuryl fluoride is longer than that of carbonyl sulfide, sulfuryl fluoride is likely less important as source of sulfur to the stratosphere, due to its low atmospheric mixing ratio.

  3. Caries inhibition by fluoride-releasing primers.

    PubMed

    Kerber, L J; Donly, K J

    1993-10-01

    This study evaluated the caries inhibition of dentin primers with the addition of fluoride. Two standardized Class V preparations were placed in 20 molars, the gingival margin placed below the cementoenamel junction and the occlusal margin placed in enamel. Two dentin primers (Syntac and ScotchPrep) were placed in equal numbers of 20 preparations, according to manufacturer's instructions. Ammonium fluoride (10% by weight) was then added to these primers and they were placed in the remaining 20 preparations, opposing the non-fluoridated primer of the same system. All teeth were then restored with a non-fluoridated resin composite. All teeth were subjected to an artificial caries challenge (pH 4.2) for 5 days. Sections of 100 microns were obtained, photographed under polarized light microscopy, then demineralized areas were quantitated by digitization. Results demonstrated the mean areas (mm2 +/- S.D.) demineralization at 0.25 mm, 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm from the restoration margin to be: Syntac/fluoride (1.44 +/- 0.49, 1.68 +/- 0.54, 3.72 +/- 0.74); Syntac (1.99 +/- 0.58, 1.50 +/- 0.35, 2.98 +/- 1.26); ScotchPrep/fluoride (1.23 +/- 0.68, 1.55 +/- 0.64, 3.08 +/- 1.16); ScotchPrep (1.90 +/- 0.83, 1.71 +/- .038, 3.36 +/- 0.62). A paired t-test indicated primers with fluoride to demonstrate significantly less demineralization 0.25 mm from the restoration margin (P < 0.07). PMID:7880460

  4. Zero-gravity growth of a sodium chloride-lithium fluoride eutectic mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yeh, C. W.; Yue, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous lithium fluoride fibers embedded in a sodium chloride matrix were produced in space and on Earth, respectively. The production of continuous fibers in a eutectic mixture was attributed to the absence of convective current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and Earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It was found that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of lithium fluoride fibers along the growth direction.

  5. Apparent stimulation of tree growth by low ambient levels of fluoride in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, H.W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Fluoride emissions from the aluminum smelter of Kitimat, British Columbia have been affecting the adjacent forests since 1954. A review is given of this study conducted from 1954 to 1979. The effects were determined on the foliage analysis, lichen growth, observed plume/air flow and topography. The trees in the plots were measured and recorded by species, diameter, height, and condition. The areas of forest exposed to a very low level of fluoride in the ambient air showed growth rates higher than expected under normal conditions. The effect of the emissions in the inner zone was to reduce the growth rate by 28.1%. The growth rate of the outer zone was reduced by 19.0%. The surround zone showed a small loss of growth at 2.2% At the 1979 remeasurement of the growth from 1974 to 1979, it was found that growth reduction in the inner zone had continued, but the outer and surround zones now showed increases in growth of 2.8% and 13.6% respectively. During the period 1974-1979, the rate of fluoride emission of the smelter had been reduced by 64% of what it had been in the preceding period. It is possible that certain low levels of fluoride may stimulate tree growth without prior injury by higher levels of fluoride. Analysis of results following 1984 remeasurement of sample trees may provide greater understanding of this situation. 1 figure, 1 table.

  6. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Cristiane Suzy; Rego, Marcos Augusto do; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Giannini, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10) with 10% CP (CP) and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF) or were left unbleached (control). Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP) were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. The enamel μTBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached) were higher (p < 0.05) than those of the bleached interfaces (FL > FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP). The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar μTBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength. PMID:23184165

  7. Experimental evaluation of sorptive removal of fluoride from drinking water using iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebede, Beekam; Beyene, Abebe; Fufa, Fekadu; Megersa, Moa; Behm, Michael

    2016-03-01

    High concentrations of fluoride in drinking water is a public health concern globally and of critical importance in the Rift Valley region. As a low-cost water treatment option, the defluoridation capacity of locally available iron ore was investigated. Residence time, pH, agitation rate, particle size of the adsorbent, sorbent dose, initial fluoride concentration and the effect of co-existing anions were assessed. The sorption kinetics was found to follow pseudo-first-order rate and the experimental equilibrium sorption data fitted reasonably well to the Freundlich model. The sorption capacity of iron ore for fluoride was 1.72 mg/g and the equilibrium was attained after 120 min at the optimum pH of 6. The sorption study was also carried out at natural pH conditions using natural ground water samples and the fluoride level was reduced from 14.22 to 1.17 mg/L (below the WHO maximum permissible limit). Overall, we concluded that iron ore can be used in water treatment for fluoride removal in the Rift Valley region and beyond.

  8. Diagnostic and prognostic characteristics of phytotoxicity caused by fluoride on Spondias dulcis Forst. F. (Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna-Santos, Bruno F; Azevedo, Aristéa A; Silva, Luzimar C; Oliva, Marco A

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the symptoms and microscopic damage caused by fluoride on Spondias dulcis, a fluoride-sensitive species. The plants were exposed to simulated fog with fluoride (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 mg L(-1)) for 20 min daily during four consecutive days. Samples from leaflets without any apparent fluoride injury were collected to microscopic analysis. The percentage of necrosed leaf area was measured, and the level of pollutant in the dry matter from the basal and apical portions of the plant was determined. The necroses began 24 h after the first simulation mainly from the base of the leaflets. A higher level of necrosis was observed at the apical portion of the plants, a region of higher fluoride accumulation. The damage on the surface of the leaflets was characterized as plasmolysis, erosion of the epicuticular waxes and epidermal rupture. Structurally, the noticeable accumulation of granules and droplets green stained by toluidine blue in the spongy parenchima and the boundaries of ending veinlets was observed. The limb thickness reduction occurred due to plasmolysis in the mesophyll, showing an apparent correlation with the damage observed on the surface. The parameters observed in the laboratory are promising for field biomonitoring studies. PMID:22832541

  9. Formation of deep mesa-structures on SiC using fluoride plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Romanov, A. A.; Serkov, A. V.; Chigirev, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A process of deep profiles formation on silicon carbide using ion-plasma etching in fluoride plasma is discussed. An industrial equipment «Caroline PE 15» (Russia) with ICP plasma source was used in experiments. The obtained experimental samples are perspective in power electronics applications.

  10. Stability of ammonium fluoride-treated Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Michael R.; Maboudian, Roya

    1995-09-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle analyses have been employed to investigate the chemical stability of silicon surfaces treated by an ammonium fluoride (NH4F) solution. Consistent with earlier results [Dumas and Chabal, Chem. Phys. Lett. 181, 537 (1991)], it is found that an NH4F final etch produces surfaces exhibiting lower oxygen and carbon contamination levels in comparison to the surfaces obtained with the traditional HF or buffered HF (BHF) etch. In conjunction with lower contamination levels, surfaces treated in ammonium fluoride show higher contact angles with water, indicating lower surface free energies. The Si-H surfaces produced by the ammonium fluoride etch were found to remain hydrophobic for weeks in air and showed no signs of oxidation for several days. After an induction period of about one week in air, oxidation began to occur in a more rapid fashion. The stability of the Si-H surfaces in water was also investigated, and it was found that the oxygen contamination levels measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were extremely sensitive to the final rinse time. An induction period of approximately one hour in water existed before any signs of oxidation were evident. Despite the fact that the NH4F-treated samples were initially cleaner than the HF-treated samples, both of these surfaces showed similar temporal behavior in air and water. We attribute this finding to the surface topographies produced by these treatments, as well as to the extreme sensitivity of the results to such factors as water rinse time.

  11. Material properties of lithium fluoride for predicting XUV laser ablation rate and threshold fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blejchař, Tomáś; Nevrlý, Václav; Vašinek, Michal; Dostál, Michal; Pečínka, Lukáś; Dlabka, Jakub; Stachoň, Martin; Juha, Libor; Bitala, Petr; Zelinger, Zdeněk.; Pira, Peter; Wild, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with prediction of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser ablation of lithium fluoride at nanosecond timescales. Material properties of lithium fluoride were determined based on bibliographic survey. These data are necessary for theoretical estimation of surface removal rate in relevance to XUV laser desorption/ablation process. Parameters of XUV radiation pulses generated by the Prague capillary-discharge laser (CDL) desktop system were assumed in this context. Prediction of ablation curve and threshold laser fluence for lithium fluoride was performed employing XUV-ABLATOR code. Quasi-random sampling approach was used for evaluating its predictive capabilities in the means of variance and stability of model outputs in expected range of uncertainties. These results were compared to experimental data observed previously.

  12. Photoluminescence excitation of lithium fluoride films by surface plasmon resonance in Kretschmann configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulíř, Jiří; Zikmund, Tomáš; Novotný, Michal; Lančok, Ján; Fekete, Ladislav; Juha, Libor

    2016-04-01

    We report on excitation of the photoluminescence of lithium fluoride by means of the surface plasmon resonance of Al layer. Advantage of this method is high efficiency of the excitation, which is applicable to ultra-thin films. P-polarized UV diode laser light is coupled to the surface plasmon resonance using a fused silica prism in Kretschmann configuration. The angular dependence of the reflected intensity is measured using a theta-2theta goniometer. The surface plasmon at resonance condition induces photoluminescence in the adjacent lithium fluoride layer. The fluoride layers were deposited on Al-coated fused silica substrates by electron beam evaporation. For the experiment, we prepared several samples with thickness ranging from 20 to 71 nm. We studied the effect of the luminescence enhancement by the surface plasmon resonance effect. Strong quenching effect was observed in the thinnest LiF layer. Influence of X-ray irradiation on the photoluminescence was studied.

  13. Observations of the freeze/thaw performance of lithium fluoride by motion picture photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    To gain direct observation of the molten salt phase change, a novel containerless technique was developed where the high surface tension of lithium fluoride was used to suspend a bead of the molten salt inside a specially designed wire cage. By varying the current passing through the wire, the cage also served as a variable heat source. In this way, the freeze/thaw performance of the lithium fluoride could be photographed by motion picture photography without the influence of container walls. The motion picture photography of the lithium fluoride sample revealed several zones during the phase change, a solid zone and a liquid zone, as expected, and a slush zone that was predicted by thermal analysis modeling.

  14. Optical Fluoride Sensor Based on Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium of Scandium(III)-Octaethylporphyrin in a Plasticized Polymeric Film

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Youngjea; Kampf, Jeff W.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    A fluoride-selective optical sensor based on scandium(III) octaethylporphyrin (Sc(III)OEP) as an ionophore within a plasticized PVC film is described. The presence of fluoride ion in the aqueous sample phase increases the formation of a difluoro-bridged Sc(III)OEP dimer species in the polymer film. The ability of the Sc(III) porphyrin to form the dimeric structure in the presence of fluoride is confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. For more practical sensing applications, a pH chromoionophore (ETH 7075) is added to the plasticized PVC film along with Sc(III)OEP and the observed optical response is based on co-extraction of protons with sample phase fluoride to create the dimeric porphyrin and a protonated chromoionophore species. The selectivity pattern observed is F-≫ClO4-, SCN-, NO3->Br-, Cl-. Only organic salicylate is a significant interferent. Fast and reversible fluoride response is observed over the range of 10-4 ~10-2 M fluoride, allowing use of the sensing film in a waveguide configuration for flow-injection measurements. PMID:17719905

  15. A Comparative Evaluation of the Amount of Fluoride Release and Re-Release after Recharging from Aesthetic Restorative Materials: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ruchika

    2015-01-01

    Aim To measure the amount of fluoride released and re released after recharging from various restorative materials: Conventional Glass Ionomer Cement (Fuji II), Light Cure Resin Modified GIC (Fuji II LC), Giomer (Beautifil II), Compomer (Dyract). Materials and Methods Fifteen cylindrical specimens were prepared from each material. The specimens were immersed in 20 ml of deionized water. The amount of released fluoride was measured during the 1st day, 7th day and on the day15 by using specific fluoride electrode and an ion-analyser. After 15 days each material was divided into three Sub Groups of five samples each. Sub Group A served as control, Sub Group B was exposed to 2% NaF solution, Sub Group C to 1000ppm F toothpaste. The amount of fluoride re-released was measured during the 1st day, 7th day and on the day15 by using specific fluoride electrode and an ion-analyser. The results were statistically analysed using analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA) and Tukey Kramer multiple comparison tests (p≤0.05). Results Independent of the observation time period of the study the Conventional GIC released the highest amount of fluoride followed by RMGIC, Giomer and Compomer. The initial burst effect was seen with GIC’S but not with Giomer and Compomer. After topical fluoride application fluoride re release was highest in Sub Group B and GIC had a greater recharging ability followed by RMGIC, Giomer and Compomer. The fluoride re release was greatest on 1st day followed by rapid return to near exposure levels. Conclusion From the study it was concluded that, the initial Fluoride release was highest from Conventional GIC followed by Resin Modified GIC, Giomer and Compomer. The Fluoride re release was high when recharging with professional regime (2% NaF) as compared to home regime (Toothpaste). Conventional GIC had a greater recharging ability followed by Resin Modified GIC, Giomer and Compomer. PMID:26436037

  16. The Northland fluoridation advocacy programme: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Sunitha; Thomas, David R

    2008-12-01

    On 20 July 2006, the Far North District Council resolved to fluoridate Kaitaia and Kaikohe. This was the first such initiative by any Territorial Local Authority (TLA) in New Zealand for 23 years, and resulted from a fluoridation advocacy programme. This paper describes the programme implementation, assesses its consistency with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and critically examines the collaboration between the fluoride advocate and the key stakeholders. Process evaluation identified three main categories of programme implementation: policy advocacy, community action projects, and media advocacy. The collaboration of iwi, Maori health providers and the community suggests that the programme was consistent with the principles (partnership, participation and protection) ofthe Treaty ofWaitangi. Media advocacy played an important role in reflecting and engaging community views on fluoridation, and it influenced decision-making by the Far North District Council. The simultaneous, combined 'top-down and bottom-up' approach was an effective and successful strategy for fluoridation advocacy in the community. Less integrated approaches implemented on their own (such as the 'top down' approach in Whangarei and the 'bottom-up' approach in Dargaville) were not effective. PMID:19180864

  17. Fluoride and chlorhexidine release from filled resins.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Zhang, N-Z; Anusavice, K J

    2010-09-01

    Resin-based materials that release either fluoride or chlorhexidine have been formulated for inhibiting caries activity. It is not known if the two agents, when incorporated into one material, would interact and affect their release potential. We hypothesized that the ratio of fluoride to chlorhexidine incorporated into a resin, and the pH of the storage medium, will affect their releases from the material. The material investigated contained 23 wt% of filler, and the ratios of calcium fluoride to chlorhexidine diacetate were 8/2, 5/5, and 2/8. The release was conducted in pH 4, 5, and 6 acetate buffers. The results showed that release of either agent increased as the pH of the medium decreased. The presence of fluoride salt substantially reduced the chlorhexidine release, while the presence of a specific quantity of chlorhexidine significantly increased fluoride release. This interaction can be utilized to optimize the release of either agent for therapeutic purposes. PMID:20581354

  18. The fin whale, a marine top consumer, exposes strengths and weaknesses of the use of fluoride as ecological tracer.

    PubMed

    Vighi, Morgana; García-Nisa, I; Borrell, A; Aguilar, A

    2015-05-01

    Fluoride is retained in bone tissues of animals and its availability in the environment varies between regions according to natural and anthropogenic sources. These properties suggest this element as a suitable tracer of origin, distribution or movements of animals. In marine environments, krill builds-up fluoride concentrations that are transferred to its predators. In this study we examine the ability of bone fluoride concentrations to discriminate two separate populations of a krill consumer, the fin whale. Background levels of the sampling areas (Western Iceland and North-Western Spain) were determined through the analysis of krill samples. As expected, due to the high load of volcanic-derived fluoride in Icelandic waters, krill from W Iceland showed much higher fluoride concentrations than that from NW Spain. Concentrations in whales' bone were correlated with sex and age, increasing linearly with age in females and showing significantly lower values and a different age-related pattern of accumulation in males. Fluoride concentrations in whales' bone were much higher than in krill, indicating accumulation of the element but, rather unexpectedly, the area of origin had no influence on concentrations. This apparent contradiction may be explained either by the integration in bone of food consumed in other areas, or by the activation of homeostatic responses at very high levels of fluoride exposure. It is concluded that fluoride can be a useful tracer only if age and sex data are integrated into the analysis, year-round information on diet is available and/or the investigated population is exposed to mild levels of this element. PMID:25746921

  19. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  20. High-Pressure Studies of the Hydrogen Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Allen Israel

    This dissertation presents an experimental study of hydrogen bonding in the solid hydrogen halides under high pressure. The high pressures were obtained with a diamond-anvil high pressure cell. Raman scattering experiments were performed on hydrogen bromide and hydrogen fluoride under pressures up to 200 kilobars. Powder x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on hydrogen bromide under pressures up to 220 kilobars. All measurements were performed at low-temperature (approximately 20 Kelvin) in the ordered orthorhombic phase III consisting of planar zig-zag chains of hydrogen bonded molecules. In the x-ray measurements on hydrogen bromide, all three orthorhombic lattice parameters were measured. The out-of-plane c-lattice parameter decreased initially much faster than the b-lattice parameter which is in the direction of the zig-zag hydrogen bonded chains. This is expected due to the weak interchain forces as opposed to the much stronger hydrogen and molecular bond forces in the chain. Surprisingly, the a and b-lattice parameters have the same pressure dependence. Raman spectra were taken of both the high frequency molecular stretching modes and the lattice modes. The stretching mode frequencies of all three hydrogen halides decrease with increasing pressure, indicative of charge transfer out of the molecular bond and into the hydrogen bond. The stretching frequency of hydrogen fluoride was observed to decrease at the greatest rate with increasing pressure. In hydrogen bromide, the two lowest frequency librational modes crossed frequencies at about 50 kilobars. After this crossing, the lower frequency mode exhibited an unusual lack of pressure dependence and an unusually large intensity. The hydrogen fluoride lattice mode frequencies all appear flat with very little pressure dependence. The ambient temperature ruby pressure scale, used for all pressure measurements in this dissertation, was calibrated at 20 Kelvin by comparison to the equation -of-state for gold

  1. Effective use of self-care fluoride administration in Asia.

    PubMed

    Zero, D T; Marinho, V C C; Phantumvanit, P

    2012-02-01

    The caries-preventive benefits of fluoride are generally accepted by dental researchers and practicing professionals worldwide. The benefits of fluoride toothpastes and mouthrinses have been supported by several high-quality systematic reviews. The formulation of a fluoride toothpaste and biological (salivary flow rate) and behavioral factors (brushing frequency, brushing time, post-brushing rinsing practices, timing of brushing, and amount of toothpaste applied) can influence anticaries efficacy. Fluoride mouthrinses have simpler formulations and can have better oral fluoride retention profiles than fluoride toothpastes, depending on post-brushing rinsing behaviors. Fluoride continues to be the mainstay of caries control; however, there is still the need to determine the most effective approach for fluoride utilization in children and adults who remain caries-active. PMID:22261258

  2. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  3. American Academy of Pediatrics. Fluoride supplementation. Committee on Nutrition.

    PubMed

    1986-05-01

    This statement reviews the rationale for the use of fluoride supplements for infants and children. The concept of fluoridation of water supplies as an effective and cost-beneficial method of reducing caries prevalence in the general population is strongly supported. In the absence of an adequately fluoridated water supply, fluoride supplements should be given to all children. This should begin at about 2 weeks of age; the dosage will depend on the concentration of fluoride in the local water supply. Fluoride-containing dentifrices are an important source of topical fluoride, but it is essential that parents be aware of the danger of excessive fluoride intake and that they teach their children to avoid swallowing toothpaste. PMID:3703642

  4. Risk Assessment Study of Fluoride Salts: Probability-Impact Matrix of Renal and Hepatic Toxicity Markers.

    PubMed

    Usuda, Kan; Ueno, Takaaki; Ito, Yuichi; Dote, Tomotaro; Yokoyama, Hirotaka; Kono, Koichi; Tamaki, Junko

    2016-09-01

    The present risk assessment study of fluoride salts was conducted by oral administration of three different doses of sodium and potassium fluorides (NaF, KF) and zinc fluoride tetrahydrate (ZnF2 •4H2O) to male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into control and nine experimental groups, to which oral injections of 0.5 mL distilled water and 0.5 mL of fluoride solutions, respectively, were given. The dosage of fluoride compounds was adjusted to contain 2.1 mg (low-dose group, LG), 4.3 mg (mid-dose group, MG), and 5.4 mg fluoride per 200 g rat body weight (high-dose group, HG) corresponding to 5, 10, and 12.5 % of LD50 values for NaF. The 24-h urine volume, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and creatinine clearance (Ccr) were measured as markers of possible acute renal impact. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were determined in serum samples as markers of acute hepatic impact. The levels of serum and urinary fluoride were determined to evaluate fluoride bioavailability. The results reveal that higher doses of NaF, KF, and ZnF2 induced renal damage as indicated by higher urinary NAG (p < 0.05 with ≥90th percentile of control). High doses of ZnF2 also induced a significant Ccr decrease (p < 0.05 with ≤10th percentile of control). Low doses of NaF and mid-doses of ZnF2 induced polyuria (p < 0.05 with ≥90th percentile of control) while medium doses of NaF and low doses of KF also induced liver damage, as indicated by a high level of AST (p < 0.05 with ≥90th percentile of control). These findings suggest that oral administration of fluoride is a potential, dose-dependent risk factor of renal tubular damage. PMID:26892107

  5. FLUORIDE: A REVIEW OF USE AND EFFECTS ON HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Kanduti, Domen; Sterbenk, Petra; Artnik, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual’s health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. Aim: The aim of our research was to review the literature about fluoride toxicity and to inform physicians, dentists and public health specialists whether fluoride use is expedient and safe. Methods: Data we used in our review were systematically searched and collected from web pages and documents published from different international institutions. Results: Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment but we consume it in small amounts. Exposure can occur through dietary intake, respiration and fluoride supplements. The most important factor for fluoride presence in alimentation is fluoridated water. Methods, which led to greater fluoride exposure and lowered caries prevalence, are considered to be one of the greatest accomplishments in the 20th century`s public dental health. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Fluoride can be transmitted through the plasma into the mother’s milk; however, the concentration is low. The most important action of fluoride is topical, when it is present in the saliva in the appropriate concentration. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralization and demineralization of tooth enamel. Acute toxicity can occur after ingesting one or more doses of fluoride over a short time period which then leads to poisoning. Today, poisoning is mainly due to unsupervised ingestion of products for dental and oral hygiene and over-fluoridated water. Conclusion: Even though fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations, it`s topical use is safe. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their

  6. METHOD FOR DISSOLVING LANTHANUM FLUORIDE CARRIER FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.; Willard, J.E.

    1961-08-01

    A method is described for dissolving lanthanum fluoride precipitates which is applicable to lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation processes for recovery of plutonium values from aqueous solutions. The lanthanum fluoride precipitate is contacted with an aqueous acidic solution containing dissolved zirconium in the tetravalent oxidation state. The presence of the zirconium increases the lanthanum fluoride dissolved and makes any tetravalent plutonium present more readily oxidizable to the hexavalent state. (AEC)

  7. New spectrophotometric methods for the determinations of hydrogen sulfide present in the samples of lake water, industrial effluents, tender coconut, sugarcane juice and egg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyla, B.; Nagendrappa, G.

    2012-10-01

    The new methods are working on the principle that iron(III) is reduced to iron(II) by hydrogen sulfide, catechol and p-toluidine the system 1/hydrogen sulfide the system 2, in acidic medium followed by the reduced iron forming complex with 1,10-phenanthroline with λmax 510 nm. The other two methods are based on redox reactions between electrolytically generated manganese(III) sulfate taken in excess and hydrogen sulfide followed by the unreacted oxidant oxidizing diphenylamine λmax 570 the system 3/barium diphenylamine sulphonate λmax 540 nm, the system 4. The increase/decrease in the color intensity of the dye products of the systems 1 and 2 or 3 and 4 are proportional to the concentration of hydrogen sulfide with its quantification range 0.035-1.40 μg ml-1/0.14-1.40 μg ml-1.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of fluoride in toddlers after application of 5% sodium fluoride dental varnish.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Peter; Taves, Donald M; Kim, Amy S; Watson, Gene E; Horst, Jeremy A

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of dental caries (tooth decay) among preschool children is increasing, driven partially by an earlier age of onset of carious lesions. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends application of 5% sodium fluoride varnish at intervals increasing with caries risk status, as soon as teeth are present. However, the varnishes are marketed for treatment of tooth sensitivity and are regulated as medical devices rather than approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention of dental caries (tooth decay). The objective of this research is to examine the safety of use in toddlers by characterizing the absorption and distribution profile of a currently marketed fluoride varnish. We measured urinary fluoride for 5 hours after application of fluoride varnish to teeth in 6 toddlers aged 12 to 15 months. Baseline levels were measured on a separate day. The urine was extracted from disposable diapers, measured by rapid diffusion, and extrapolated to plasma levels. The mean estimated plasma fluoride concentration was 13 μg/L (SD, 9 μg/L) during the baseline visit and 21 μg/L (SD, 8 μg/L) during the 5 hours after treatment. Mean estimated peak plasma fluoride after treatment was 57 μg/L (SD, 22 μg/L), and 20 μg/kg (SD, 4 μg/L) was retained on average. Retained fluoride was 253 times lower than the acute toxic dose of 5 mg/kg. Mean plasma fluoride after placement of varnish was within an SD of control levels. Occasional application of fluoride varnish following American Academy of Pediatrics guidance is safe for toddlers. PMID:25136045

  9. Corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anie; Sridhar, Sathyanarayanan; Aghyarian, Shant; Watkins-Curry, Pilanda; Chan, Julia Y; Pozzi, Alessandro; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2016-02-01

    Objective The corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) representing acidic environments and fluoride treatments was studied. Material and Methods Zirconia rods were immersed in 1.23% and 0.123% APF solutions and maintained at 37°C for determined periods of time. Surfaces of all specimens were imaged using digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sample mass and dimensions were measured for mass loss determination. Samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to detect changes in crystallinity. A biosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to detect ion dissolution of material into the immersion media. Results Digital microscopy revealed diminishing luster of the materials and SEM showed increased superficial corrosion of zirconia submerged in 1.23% APF. Although no structural change was found, the absorption of salts (sodium phosphate) onto the surface of the materials bathed in 0.123% APF was significant. EIS indicated a greater change of impedance for the immersion solutions with increasing bathing time. Conclusion Immersion of zirconia in APF solutions showed deterioration limited to the surface, not extending to the bulk of the material. Inferences on zirconia performance in acidic oral environment can be elucidated from the study. PMID:27008257

  10. Corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anie; Sridhar, Sathyanarayanan; Aghyarian, Shant; Watkins-curry, Pilanda; Chan, Julia Y.; Pozzi, Alessandro; Rodrigues, Danieli C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) representing acidic environments and fluoride treatments was studied. Material and Methods Zirconia rods were immersed in 1.23% and 0.123% APF solutions and maintained at 37°C for determined periods of time. Surfaces of all specimens were imaged using digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sample mass and dimensions were measured for mass loss determination. Samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to detect changes in crystallinity. A biosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to detect ion dissolution of material into the immersion media. Results Digital microscopy revealed diminishing luster of the materials and SEM showed increased superficial corrosion of zirconia submerged in 1.23% APF. Although no structural change was found, the absorption of salts (sodium phosphate) onto the surface of the materials bathed in 0.123% APF was significant. EIS indicated a greater change of impedance for the immersion solutions with increasing bathing time. Conclusion Immersion of zirconia in APF solutions showed deterioration limited to the surface, not extending to the bulk of the material. Inferences on zirconia performance in acidic oral environment can be elucidated from the study. PMID:27008257

  11. A new perspective on metals and other contaminants in fluoridation chemicals*

    PubMed Central

    Mullenix, Phyllis J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fluoride additives contain metal contaminants that must be diluted to meet drinking water regulations. However, each raw additive batch supplied to water facilities does not come labeled with concentrations per contaminant. This omission distorts exposure profiles and the risks associated with accidents and routine use. Objectives: This study provides an independent determination of the metal content of raw fluoride products. Methods: Metal concentrations were analyzed in three hydrofluorosilicic acid (HFS) and four sodium fluoride (NaF) samples using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Arsenic levels were confirmed using graphite furnace atomic absorption analysis. Results: Results show that metal content varies with batch, and all HFS samples contained arsenic (4.9–56.0 ppm) or arsenic in addition to lead (10.3 ppm). Two NaF samples contained barium (13.3–18.0 ppm) instead. All HFS (212–415 ppm) and NaF (3312–3630 ppm) additives contained a surprising amount of aluminum. Conclusions: Such contaminant content creates a regulatory blind spot that jeopardizes any safe use of fluoride additives. PMID:24999851

  12. Association between Urine Fluoride and Dental Fluorosis as a Toxicity Factor in a Rural Community in the State of San Luis Potosi

    PubMed Central

    Jarquín-Yañez, Lizet; Mejía-Saavedra, José de Jesús; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Gaona, Enrique; Rocha-Amador, Diana Olivia; López-Guzmán, Olga Dania; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate urine fluoride concentration as a toxicity factor in a rural community in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Materials and Methods. A sample of 111 children exposed to high concentrations of fluoride in drinking water (4.13 mg/L) was evaluated. Fluoride exposure was determined by measuring urine fluoride concentration using the potentiometric method with an ion selective electrode. The diagnosis of dental fluorosis was performed by clinical examination, and the severity of damage was determined using Dean's index and the Thylstrup-Fejerskov (TF) index. Results. The range of exposure in the study population, evaluated through the fluoride content in urine, was 1.1 to 5.9 mg/L, with a mean of 3.14 ± 1.09 mg/L. Dental fluorosis was present in all subjects, of which 95% had severe cases. Higher urine fluoride levels and greater degrees of severity occurred in older children. Conclusions. The results show that dental fluorosis was determined by the presence of fluoride exposure finding a high positive correlation between the severity of fluorosis and urine fluoride concentration and the years of exposure suggested a cumulative effect. PMID:25789336

  13. Contamination of fluoride in groundwater and its effect on human health: a case study in hard rock aquifers of Siddipet, Telangana State, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narsimha, A.; Sudarshan, V.

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogeochemical investigation has been carried out in the granitic terrain of Siddipet area, Medak district, Telangana State, India with an aim to understand the distribution of fluoride in the groundwater and to understand the relationship of fluoride with other major ions, and also to identify the high fluoride-bearing groundwater zones. 104 groundwater samples were analyzed in the study area for fluoride and other major ions like calcium, magnesium, chloride, carbonate, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, sulfate, and nitrate in addition to pH and electrical conductivity. The studies revealed that the concentration of fluoride in groundwater is ranging from 0.2 to 2.2 mg L-1 with a mean of 1.1 mg L-1. Nearly 22 % of groundwater has more than the permissible limit of fluoride (1.5 mg L-1), which is responsible for the endemic dental fluorosis in the area concerned. Geochemical classification of groundwater shows that Na-HCO3, Ca-Cl, and Ca-HCO3-Na are the dominant hydrochemical facies. Gibbs diagram shows rock-water interaction dominance and evaporation dominance, which are responsible for the change in the quality of water in the hard rock aquifer of the study area. The groundwater in villages and its environs are affected by fluoride contamination, and consequently majority of the population living in these villages suffer from dental fluorosis. Hence, they are advised to consume drinking water which has less than 1.5 mg L-1 fluoride to avoid further fluorosis risks.

  14. 49 CFR 179.102-4 - Vinyl fluoride, stabilized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. 179.102-4 Section 179... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-4 Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. Each tank used to transport vinyl fluoride, stabilized, must comply with the following...

  15. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  16. 40 CFR 60.212 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.212 Section... Industry: Superphosphoric Acid Plants § 60.212 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 5.0 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5...

  17. 40 CFR 60.232 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.232 Section... Industry: Triple Superphosphate Plants § 60.232 Standard for fluorides. On and after the date on which the... gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 100 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed (0.20...

  18. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  19. 40 CFR 60.242 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.242 Section... Industry: Granular Triple Superphosphate Storage Facilities § 60.242 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and... atmosphere from any affected facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 0.25...

  20. 40 CFR 60.242 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.242 Section... Industry: Granular Triple Superphosphate Storage Facilities § 60.242 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and... atmosphere from any affected facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 0.25...

  1. 40 CFR 60.212 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.212 Section... Industry: Superphosphoric Acid Plants § 60.212 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 5.0 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5...

  2. 49 CFR 179.102-4 - Vinyl fluoride, stabilized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. 179.102-4 Section 179... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-4 Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. Each tank used to transport vinyl fluoride, stabilized, must comply with the following...

  3. 40 CFR 60.232 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.232 Section... Industry: Triple Superphosphate Plants § 60.232 Standard for fluorides. On and after the date on which the... gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 100 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed (0.20...

  4. 40 CFR 60.242 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.242 Section... Industry: Granular Triple Superphosphate Storage Facilities § 60.242 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and... atmosphere from any affected facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 0.25...

  5. 40 CFR 60.222 - Standard for fluorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.222 Section... Industry: Diammonium Phosphate Plants § 60.222 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 30 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed...

  6. 49 CFR 179.102-4 - Vinyl fluoride, stabilized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. 179.102-4 Section 179... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-4 Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. Each tank used to transport vinyl fluoride, stabilized, must comply with the following...

  7. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  8. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  9. 40 CFR 180.575 - Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for... § 180.575 Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for residues. (a)(1) General. Tolerances are established for residues of sulfuryl fluoride in or on the following commodities from the postharvest fumigation...

  10. Fluoride inhibition of proton-translocating ATPases of oral bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, S V; Bender, G R; Marquis, R E

    1987-01-01

    The ATPases of isolated membranes of lactic acid bacteria were found to be inhibited by fluoride in a complex manner. Among the enzymes tested, that of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 was the most sensitive to fluoride, and the initial rate of hydrolysis of ATP was reduced 50% by approximately 3 mM fluoride. The enzyme of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 4646 was the most resistant, and about 25 mM fluoride was required for 50% inhibition. The response to fluoride appeared to involve reversible, noncompetitive inhibition during short exposure to low levels of fluoride and nonreversible inhibition at higher fluoride levels. In addition, kinetic studies of the effects of fluoride on the enzymes of membranes of S. mutans and L. casei indicated that reversible inhibition was at least partly overcome at high levels of either ATP or Mg. The effects of pH on fluoride inhibition of ATPases were markedly different from the effects of pH on inhibition of acid/base regulation of intact cells by fluoride. It appeared that formation of HF was not required for inhibition of the ATPases. F1 ATPases isolated from the membranes by washing with buffers of low ionic strength proved to be less sensitive to fluoride than the membrane-associated F1F0 holoenzymes, and it was concluded that the F0 or membrane sector of the holoenzyme is involved in fluoride inhibition. PMID:2889674

  11. The future of fluorides and other protective agents in erosion prevention.

    PubMed

    Lussi, Adrian; Carvalho, Thiago Saads

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of fluoride in caries prevention has been convincingly proven. In recent years, researchers have investigated the preventive effects of different fluoride formulations on erosive tooth wear with positive results, but their action on caries and erosion prevention must be based on different requirements, because there is no sheltered area in the erosive process as there is in the subsurface carious lesions. Thus, any protective mechanism from fluoride concerning erosion is limited to the surface or the near surface layer of enamel. However, reports on other protective agents show superior preventive results. The mechanism of action of tin-containing products is related to tin deposition onto the tooth surface, as well as the incorporation of tin into the near-surface layer of enamel. These tin-rich deposits are less susceptible to dissolution and may result in enhanced protection of the underlying tooth. Titanium tetrafluoride forms a protective layer on the tooth surface. It is believed that this layer is made up of hydrated hydrogen titanium phosphate. Products containing phosphates and/or proteins may adsorb either to the pellicle, rendering it more protective against demineralization, or directly to the dental hard tissue, probably competing with H(+) at specific sites on the tooth surface. Other substances may further enhance precipitation of calcium phosphates on the enamel surface, protecting it from additional acid impacts. Hence, the future of fluoride alone in erosion prevention looks grim, but the combination of fluoride with protective agents, such as polyvalent metal ions and some polymers, has much brighter prospects. PMID:25871415

  12. Graphite Fluoride Fiber Composites For Heat Sinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Long, Martin; Stahl, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Graphite fluoride fiber/polymer composite materials consist of graphite fluoride fibers in epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene, or polyimide resin. Combines high electrical resistivity with high thermal conductivity and solves heat-transfer problems of many electrical systems. Commercially available in powder form, for use as dry lubricant or cathode material in lithium batteries. Produced by direct fluorination of graphite powder at temperature of 400 to 650 degree C. Applications include printed-circuit boards for high-density power electronics, insulators for magnetic-field cores like those found in alternators and transformers, substrates for thin-film resistors, and electrical-protection layers in aircraft de-icers.

  13. Graphite fluoride fibers and their applications in the space industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Chen; Long, Martin; Dever, Therese

    1990-01-01

    Characterization and potential space applications of graphite fluoride fibers from commercially available graphitized carbon fibers are presented. Graphite fluoride fibers with fluorine to carbon ratios of 0.65 and 0.68 were found to have electrical resistivity values of 10(exp 4) and 10(exp 11) Ohms-cm, respectively, and thermal conductivity values of 24 and 5 W/m-K, respectively. At this fluorine content range, the fibers have tensile strength of 0.25 + or - 0.10 GPa (36 + or - 14 ksi), Young's modulus of 170 + or - 30 GPa (25 + or - 5 Msi). The coefficient of thermal expansion value of a sample with fluorine to carbon ratio of 0.61 was found to be 7 ppm/C. These properties change and approach the graphite value as the fluorine content approach 0. Electrically insulative graphite fluoride fiber is at least five times more thermally conductive than fiberglass. Therefore, it can be used as a heat sinking printed circuit board material for low temperature, long life power electronics in spacecraft. Also, partially fluorinated fiber with tailor-made physical properties to meet the requirements of certain engineering design can be produced. For example, a partially fluorinated fiber could have a predetermined CTE value in -1.5 to 7 ppm/C range and would be suitable for use in solar concentrators in solar dynamic power systems. It could also have a predetermined electrical resistivity value suitable for use as a low observable material. Experimental data indicate that slightly fluorinated graphite fibers are more durable in the atomic oxygen environment than pristine graphite. Therefore, fluorination of graphite used in the construction of spacecraft that would be exposed to the low Earth orbit atomic oxygen may protect defect sites in atomic oxygen protective coatings and therefore decrease the rate of degradation of graphite.

  14. Reconstructing temporal variation of fluoride uptake in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from a high-fluoride area by analysis of fluoride distribution in dentine.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Horst; Rhede, Dieter; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Kierdorf, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Trace element profiling in the incrementally formed dentine of mammalian teeth can be applied to reconstruct temporal variation of incorporation of these elements into the tissue. Using an electron microprobe, this study analysed fluoride distribution in dentine of first and third mandibular molars of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a high-fluoride area, to assess temporal variation in fluoride uptake of the animals. Fluoride content in the early-formed dentine of first molars was significantly lower than in the late-formed dentine of these teeth, and was also lower than in both, the early and the late-formed dentine of third molars. As early dentine formation in M1 takes place prior to weaning, this finding indicates a lower dentinal fluoride uptake during the pre-weaning compared to the post-weaning period. This is hypothetically attributed to the action of a partial barrier to fluoride transfer from blood to milk in lactating females and a low bioavailability of fluoride ingested together with milk. Another factor contributing to lower plasma fluoride levels in juveniles compared to adults is the rapid clearance of fluoride from blood plasma in the former due to their intense skeletal growth. The combined action of these mechanisms is considered to explain why in kangaroos from high-fluoride areas, the (early-formed) first molars are not affected by dental fluorosis while the (later-formed) third and fourth molars regularly exhibit marked to severe fluorotic lesions. PMID:26736058

  15. Fluoride release, recharge, and re-release from four orthodontic bonding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, Amy Johanna

    Objectives: To determine the amount of initial fluoride release from four orthodontic bonding systems over a period of four weeks, and then to subject these materials to an external source of fluoride for recharge in order to measure the amount of fluoride re-release over another four-week interval. Additionally the surface morphology of these materials was analyzed under the scanning electron microscope in order to identify microscopic changes in the materials that may have occurred during the experiment. Methods: Four orthodontic adhesives: Fuji Ortho LC (GC America, Alsip, IL), Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA), Illuminate Light Cure (Ortho Organizers, Carlsbad, CA), and Opal Seal with Opal Bond MV (Ultradent, South Jordan, UT), n=120 (30/material) were tested for fluoride release at 1 hour, 24 hours, 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 4 weeks. Samples (10/subgroup/material) were then recharged with an external source of fluoride (toothpaste, foam, or varnish), and retested for fluoride re-release at 1 hour, 24 hours, 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 4 weeks. The scanning electron microscope was utilized in order to assess each material's surface morphology before testing and after completion of the experiment (n=16). Descriptive statistics, means and standard deviations were calculated for all four materials and their subgroups at each time interval. A mixed model two-way ANOVA was run, using a level of significance of 0.05. Bonferroni multiple comparison tests were conducted using if groups were found to be statistically significantly different. To determine significant differences between fluoride release and re-release for each recharge subgroup within each material group, paired t-tests were performed for the time intervals of 24 hours, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks. For the paired t-tests, the level of significance used was 0.02 to allow for Bonferroni correction. Results: During the initial 24 hours the fluoride measurements (in mg/L or ppm) were as

  16. Some electronic and magnetic properties of Fluoride ion in Fluoride structure nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imtani, Ali Nasir

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the environment potential around Fluoride ion on some important electronic and magnetic properties such as dipole polarisability, moment of oscillator strengths S(k) and magnetic susceptibility. The theoretical procedure is based on the variational-perturbation theory with two parameter trial functions incorporated in an ionic model. We estimate these properties in four cases for Fluoride ion; free ion, ion under different potentials, ion in the crystals and ion in nanocrystal, CdF2, CaF2, PbF2, SrF2 and BaF2. Our results indicate that these properties vary with ion environments and the free state of Fluoride ion has higher values and there is linearity behaviour of these properties with lattice constant. For Fluoride ion in nanocrystal, we have found that there is an extra parameter that can also affect the dipole polarisability, the number of ions in the structure.

  17. Plaque fluoride concentrations in a community without water fluoridation: effects of calcium and use of a fluoride or placebo dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Whitford, G M; Buzalaf, M A R; Bijella, M F B; Waller, J L

    2005-01-01

    The results of a recent study by Whitford et al. [Caries Res 2002;36:256-265] with subjects whose drinking water was fluoridated led to two major conclusions: (1) Compared to the use of a placebo dentifrice, plaque fluoride concentrations ([F]) throughout much of the day are not significantly increased by the use of an F dentifrice but (2) they are positively related to plaque [Ca] (p = 0.0001). The present double-blind, double-crossover study with 16 subjects used the same protocol and was done to: (1) determine the effects of the use of an F dentifrice on salivary and plaque [F] in a community without water fluoridation and (2) further examine the relationship between plaque [Ca] and [F]. Following the use of an F dentifrice or placebo for one week, whole saliva and plaque were collected 1.0 and 12 h after the last use of the products. The study was repeated to include rinsing with a 20 mmol/l CaCl(2) solution immediately before the use of the dentifrices. The CaCl(2) rinse had only minor effects on salivary [Ca] and [F] and none on the plaque concentrations. Unlike the results found in the fluoridated community, all salivary and plaque [F] associated with the use of the F dentifrice were significantly higher than those associated with the use of the placebo. The results suggest that the cariostatic effectiveness of an F dentifrice should be greater in areas without water fluoridation. As noted previously, plaque [F] were positively related to plaque [Ca] (p = 0.0001). PMID:15741721

  18. Fluoride: a risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease?

    PubMed

    Follin-Arbelet, Benoit; Moum, Bjørn

    2016-09-01

    Although the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and oral hygiene has been noticed before, there has been little research on prolonged fluoride exposure as a possible risk factor. In the presented cases, exposure to fluoride seems indirectly associated with higher incidence of IBD. Fluoride toxicology and epidemiology documents frequent unspecific chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and intestinal inflammation. Efflux genes that confer resistance to environmental fluoride may select for IBD associated gut microbiota and therefore be involved in the pathogenesis. Together these multidisciplinary results argue for further investigation on the hypothesis of fluoride as a risk factor for IBD. PMID:27199224

  19. PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF AMMONIUM URANIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, A.S.; Mooney, R.B.

    1953-08-25

    This patent relates to the preparation of ammonium uranium fluoride. The process comprises adding a water soluble fluoride to an aqueous solution of a uranous compound containing an ammonium salt, and isolating the resulting precipitate. This patent relates to the manufacture of uranium tetnafluoride from ammonium uranium fluoride, NH/sub 4/UF/sub 5/. Uranium tetrafluoride is prepared by heating the ammonium uranium fluoride to a temperature at which dissociation occurs with liberation of ammonium fluoride. Preferably the process is carried out under reduced pressure, or in a current of an inert gas.

  20. Fabrication of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) Nanofibers Containing Nickel Nanoparticles as Future Energy Server Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Travis; Macossay, Javier; Kim, Hern

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we introduce Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers containing nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (NPs) as a result of an electrospinning. Typically, a colloidal solution consisting of PVDF/Ni NPs was prepared to produce nanofibers embedded with solid NPs by electrospinning process. The resultant nanostructures were studied by SEM analyses, which confirmed well oriented nanofibers and good dispersion of Ni NPs over them. The XRD results demonstrated well crystalline feature of PVDF and Ni in the obtained nanostructures. Physiochemical aspects of prepared nano-structures were characterized for TEM which confirmed nanofibers were well-oriented and had good dispersion of Ni NPs. Furthermore, the prepared nano-structures were studied for hydrogen production applications. Due to high surface to volume ratio of nanofibers form than the thin film ones, there was tremendous increase in the rate of hydrogen production. Overall, results satisfactorily confirmed the use of these materials in hydrogen production. PMID:24416470