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Sample records for hydrogen gas getters

  1. Hydrogen gas getters: Susceptibility to poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Mroz, E.J.; Dye, R.C.; Duke, J.R.; Weinrach, J.

    1998-12-31

    About 40% ({approximately}9,000) of the {approximately}23,000 transuranic (TRU) waste drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are presently unshippable because conservative calculations suggest that the hydrogen concentration may exceed the lower explosive limit for hydrogen. This situation extends across nearly all DOE sites holding and generating TRU waste. The incorporation of a hydrogen getter such as DEB into the waste drums (or the TRUPACT II shipping containers) could substantially mitigate the explosion risk. The result would be to increase the number of drums that qualify for transportation to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without having to resort to expensive re-packaging or waste treatment technologies. However, before this approach can be implemented, key technical questions must be answered. Foremost among these is the question of whether the presence of other chemical vapors and gases in the drum might poison the catalytic reaction between hydrogen and DEB. This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to obtain fundamental information on the chemical mechanism of the catalytic reaction of hydrogen with one commonly used hydrogen getter, DEB. Experiments with these materials showed that the method of exposure affects the nature of the reaction products. The results of this work contributed to the development of a mechanistic model of the reaction.

  2. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27°C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully “gettered” by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in

  3. Hydrogen gettering the overpressure gas from highly radioactive liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.L.; McCoy, J.C.; Schicker, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    Remediation of current inventories of high-activity radioactive liquid waste (HALW) requires transportation of Type-B quantities of radioactive material, possibly up to several hundred liters. However, the only currently certified packaging is limited to quantities of 50 ml (0.01 gal) quantities of Type-B radioactive liquid. Efforts are under way to recertify the existing packaging to allow the shipment of up to 4 L (1.1 gal) of Type-B quantities of HALW, but significantly larger packaging could be needed in the future. Scoping studies and preliminary designs have identified the feasibility of retrofitting an insert into existing casks, allowing the transport of up to 380 L (100 gal) of HALW. However, the insert design and ultimate certification strategy depend heavily on the gas-generating attributes of the HALW. A non-vented containment vessel filled with HALW, in the absence of any gas-mitigation technologies, poses a deflagration threat and, therefore, gas generation, specifically hydrogen generation, must be reliably controlled during all phases of transportation. Two techniques are available to mitigate hydrogen accumulation: recombiners and getters. Getters have an advantage over recombiners in that oxides are not required to react with the hydrogen. A test plan was developed to evaluate three forms of getter material in the presence of both simulated HALW and the gases that are produced by the HALW. These tests demonstrated that getters can react with hydrogen in the presence of simulated waste and in the presence of several other gases generated by the HALW, such as nitrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide. Although the use of such a gettering system has been shown to be technically feasible, only a preliminary design for its use has been completed. No further development is planned until the requirement for bulk transport of Type-B quantities of HALW is more thoroughly defined.

  4. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  5. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminatedmore » the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.« less

  6. Gettering of hydrogen and methane from a helium gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cárdenas, Rosa Elia; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172{sup ®} getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. The optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650 °C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110 °C to remove the hydrogen. This approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  7. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  8. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-29

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  9. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Mead, Keith E.; Smith, Henry M.

    1983-01-01

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  10. Oxidation resistant organic hydrogen getters

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2008-09-09

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably Pt. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently removing hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  11. Hydrogen Uptake of DPB Getter Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Herberg, J L; Saab, A P; Weigle, J; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; McLean II, W

    2008-05-30

    The physical and chemical properties of 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne (DPB) blended with carbon-supported Pd (DPB-Pd/C) in the form of pellets during hydrogenation were investigated. A thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) was employed to measure the kinetics of the hydrogen uptake by the DPB getter pellets. The kinetics obtained were then used to develop a semi-empirical model, based on gas diffusion into solids, to predict the performance of the getter pellets under various conditions. The accuracy of the prediction model was established by comparing the prediction models with independent experimental data on hydrogen pressure buildup in sealed systems containing DPB getter pellets and subjected to known rates of hydrogen input. The volatility of the hydrogenated DPB products and its effects on the hydrogen uptake kinetics were also analyzed.

  12. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area - Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Mark Lee

    2002-04-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB. It has the needed binding rate and capacity, but some of the chemical species that might be present in the containers could interfere with its ability to remove hydrogen. This project is focused upon developing a protective polymeric membrane coating for the DEB getter material, which comes in the form of small, irregularly shaped particles. This report summarizes the experimental results of the second phase of the development of the materials.

  13. Hydrogen and moisture getter and absorber for sealed devices

    DOEpatents

    Smith, H.M.; Schicker, J.R.

    1999-03-30

    The present invention is a hydrogen getter and method for formulating and using the getter. This getter effectively removes hydrogen gas typically present in many hermetically-sealed electronic applications where the presence of such gas would otherwise be harmful to the electronics. The getter is a non-organic composition, usable in a wide range of temperatures as compared to organic getters. Moreover, the getter is formulated to be used without the need for the presence of oxygen. The getter is comprised of effective amounts of an oxide of a platinum group metal, a desiccant, and a gas permeable binder which preferably is cured after composition in an oxygen-bearing environment at about 150 to about 205 degrees centigrade.

  14. Low temperature, low pressure hydrogen gettering

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.R.; Courtney, R.L.; Harrah, L.A.

    1975-07-22

    A system is described for the gettering of hydrogen and its isotopes. The gettering materials are painted or coated onto, or otherwise disposed in an area or volume from which hydrogen is to be removed. (auth)

  15. Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

    2008-06-05

    A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

  16. The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G. L.

    2002-02-11

    The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0

  17. Polymer system for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    2000-01-01

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  18. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  19. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Whinnery, L.L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition is described comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. 1 fig.

  20. Tritium gettering from air with hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Uribe, F.S.; Stevens, C.G.; Tsugawa, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP), a solid proton electrolyte, getters tritium gas and water vapor from air by DC electrical action. We have reduced the formation of residual tritiated water to less than 2%, and demonstrated that HUP can clean a 5.5 m/sup 3/ working glove box. Data are presented to illustrate the parameters of the gettering and a model is derived. Two other tritium gettering electrolytes have been discovered. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Method for charging a hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C.E.; Keyser, M.A.; Benson, D.K.

    1998-09-15

    A method for charging a sample of either a permanent or reversible getter material with a high concentration of hydrogen while maintaining a base pressure below 10{sup {minus}4} torr at room temperature involves placing the sample of hydrogen getter material in a chamber, activating the sample of hydrogen getter material, overcharging the sample of getter material through conventional charging techniques to a high concentration of hydrogen, and then subjecting the sample of getter material to a low temperature vacuum bake-out process. Application of the method results in a reversible hydrogen getter which is highly charged to maximum capacities of hydrogen and which concurrently exhibits minimum hydrogen vapor pressures at room temperatures. 9 figs.

  2. Method for charging a hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Keyser, Matthew A.; Benson, David K.

    1998-01-01

    A method for charging a sample of either a permanent or reversible getter material with a high concentration of hydrogen while maintaining a base pressure below 10.sup.-4 torr at room temperature involves placing the sample of hydrogen getter material in a chamber, activating the sample of hydrogen getter material, overcharging the sample of getter material through conventional charging techniques to a high concentration of hydrogen, and then subjecting the sample of getter material to a low temperature vacuum bake-out process. Application of the method results in a reversible hydrogen getter which is highly charged to maximum capacities of hydrogen and which concurrently exhibits minimum hydrogen vapor pressures at room temperatures.

  3. Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Wen L.

    1989-01-01

    A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm.sup.2. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000.degree. C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity.

  4. Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Wen Ling

    1987-10-14

    A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm/sup 2/. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000/degree/C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity. 2 figs.

  5. Draft test plan for hydrogen getters project

    SciTech Connect

    Mroz, G.; Weinrach, J.

    1998-04-01

    Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (poison) the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The results of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP.

  6. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1990-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  7. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  8. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1991-08-20

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

  9. An issue paper on the use of hydrogen getters in transportation packaging

    SciTech Connect

    NIGREY,PAUL J.

    2000-02-01

    The accumulation of hydrogen is usually an undesirable occurrence because buildup in sealed systems pose explosion hazards under certain conditions. Hydrogen scavengers, or getters, can avert these problems by removing hydrogen from such environments. This paper provides a review of a number of reversible and irreversible getters that potentially could be used to reduce the buildup of hydrogen gas in containers for the transport of radioactive materials. In addition to describing getters that have already been used for such purposes, novel getters that might find application in future transport packages are also discussed. This paper also discusses getter material poisoning, the use of getters in packaging, the effects of radiation on getters, the compatibility of getters with packaging, design considerations, regulatory precedents, and makes general recommendations for the materials that have the greatest applicability in transport packaging. At this time, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory composite getter, DEB [1,4-(phenylethylene)benzene] or similar polymer-based getters, and a manganese dioxide-based getter appear to be attractive candidates that should be further evaluated. These getters potentially can help prevent pressurization from radiolytic reactions in transportation packaging.

  10. Efficient oxygen gettering in Si by coimplantation of hydrogen and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Ou Xin; Koegler, Reinhard; Muecklich, Arndt; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Moeller, Wolfhard; Wang Xi; Gerlach, Juergen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2008-10-20

    Hydrogen preimplantation performed in addition to helium implantation efficiently shrinks the width of the gettering layer in Si and increases the empty volume fraction as well as the internal surface area per unit volume. The gettering efficiency for oxygen is significantly enhanced compared to the single helium implantation, and the helium implantation dose can be strongly reduced. The gas-filled bubble layer induced by the coimplantation of hydrogen and helium has the highest gettering efficiency for the oxygen accumulation. Direct evidence for oxygen gettering at the internal wall of the cavity is demonstrated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Even, Jr., William R.

    2000-01-01

    A novel method for preparing a hydrogenation composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon--carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces and particularly from atmospheres within enclosed spaces that contain air, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide or ammonia. The organic polymers molecules containing carbon--carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble noble metal catalyst composition. High molecular weight polymers may be added to the organic polymer/catalyst mixture in order to improve their high temperature performance. The hydrogenation composition is prepared by dispersing the polymers in a suitable solvent, forming thereby a solution suspension, flash-freezing droplets of the solution in a liquid cryogen, freeze-drying the frozen droplets to remove frozen solvent incorporated in the droplets, and recovering the dried powder thus formed.

  12. Method for absorbing hydrogen using an oxidation resisant organic hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2009-02-03

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably platinum, is disclosed. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently remove hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  13. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  14. Method of gettering hydrogen under conditions of low pressure

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.

    1983-08-09

    A ternary intermetallic compound having the formula Zr(V[sub 1[minus]x]Cr[sub x])[sub 2] where x is in the range of 0.01 to 0.90 is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200 C, at pressures down to 10[sup [minus]6] Torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices. 3 figs.

  15. Method of gettering hydrogen under conditions of low pressure

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Gruen, Dieter M.

    1983-01-01

    A ternary intermetallic compound having the formula Zr(V.sub.1-x Cr.sub.x).sub.2 where x is in the range of 0.01 to 0.90 is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200.degree. C., at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 Torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices.

  16. USE OF HYDROGEN GETTERS FOR ENSURING SAFE STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Woodsmall, T.; Hackney, B.; Traver, L.

    2010-05-20

    Plutonium oxide left over from the 3013 destructive surveillance process is ultimately disposed of as waste. Therefore, this material is not re-stabilized and packaged to meet the requirements of DOE-STD-3013. Instead, it is stored on an interim basis in compliance with the interim safe storage criteria issued by DOE in January 1996. One of the safe storage criteria requires actions to be taken to minimize the formation or accumulation of flammable gases inside the storage container. Personnel responsible for the safe storage of the material have chosen to use a polymer-based, ambient air compatible hydrogen 'getter' to prevent the formation of hydrogen gas inside the storage container and thus prevent the formation of a flammable gas mixture. This paper briefly describes the method in which the getter performs its functions. More importantly, this paper presents the results of the testing that has been performed to characterize the bounding effects of aging and demonstrate the use of the getter for long-term storage. In addition, the favorable results of a post-storage analysis of actual getter material are presented and compared with bounding predictions. To date, bounding test results have shown that after 18 months of continuous storage and 39 months of total storage at 70C, the getter is able to both recombine gaseous hydrogen and oxygen into water when oxygen is available, and irreversibly getter (i.e., scavenge) hydrogen from the vapor space when oxygen is not available, both under a CO{sub 2} environment. Further bounding testing has been deemed unnecessary, and continued post-storage testing will be conducted on a periodic basis. The first post-storage testing of deployed getter material after two years of service revealed that it still performed like new material.

  17. USING POLYMERIC HYDROGEN GETTERS TO PREVENT COMBUSTIBLE ATMOSPHERES DURING INTERIM SAFE STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Woodsmall, T

    2007-05-24

    Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) of WSRC has recently installed the capability to perform both non-destructive and destructive examination of 3013 containers of Pu oxide in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. The containers will be opened and the oxide will be sampled for analysis. The remaining bulk oxide must then be safely stored in a non-3013-compliant configuration. Available processing equipment and controls cannot prevent the oxide from adsorbing moisture during this process. Subsequent radiolysis of moisture during storage may generate combustible quantities of gases while waiting final processing, and satisfying DOE Interim Safe Storage Criteria (ISSC) would require that storage containers be vented at impractical frequencies. With support from an independent National Laboratory, WSRC/NMM has demonstrated that a commercial hydrogen getter material will effectively prevent the accumulation of combustible gas concentrations. A project overview, including storage requirements and strategies, as well as getter technology, current test results, and anticipated future developments will be addressed.

  18. Assessment of Zr-Fe-V getter alloy for gas-gap heat switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prina, M.; Kulleck, J. G.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A commercial Zr-V-Fe alloy (i.e., SAES Getters trade name alloy St-172) has been assessed as reversible hydrogen storage material for use in actuators of gas gap heat switches. Two prototype actuators containing the SAES St-172 material were built and operated for several thousand cycles to evaluate performance of the metal hydride system under conditions simulating heat switch operation.

  19. DPB hydrogen getters on Pd (110) - its action and the effect of impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A; Gee, R

    2005-03-11

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) is used to investigate the action of hydrogen getter 1,4-diphenyl-butadiyne, or DPB, on Pd(110) surface. We study reaction pathways and energetics of several relevant processes, including H{sub 2} adsorption, dissociation and migration on the metal surface, getter-metal interaction, and the energetics of H uptake by the getter. We also explore the effect of impurities like CO and CO{sub 2} on the action of the getter. Activation barriers for certain reactions are computed to shed light on the feasibility of such processes at room temperature.

  20. Studies of Hydrogen Getter Material Self-decomposition and Reaction Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, A P; Dinh, L N

    2007-03-19

    Diacetylene based hydrogen getters are examined in order to gauge their self decomposition products, as well as to determine possible origins for observed losses in origins getter capacity. Simple long term (several months) thermal aging tests were conducted, with periodic solid solid-phase micro micro-extraction (SPME) sampling followed by GC/MS analysis. The results suggest that bis(diphenylethynyl) benzene tends to decompose to give phenyl contaminants more readily than diphenylbutadiyne. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction studies of the palladium catalyst following varying extents of reaction with hydrogen show that there is no change to the catalyst particles, indicating that any change in capacity originates from other causes. These causes are suggested by Sievert's-type experiments on the reaction of the getter with a low pressure (about 10 Torr) hydrogen atmosphere. The reaction data indicate that the getter capacity depends on the pressure of hydrogen to which the material is exposed, and also its thermal history.

  1. A new polymer-based hydrogen getter. [Styrene-butadiene triblock copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliom, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Styrene-butadiene triblock copolymer PS-PB-PS was hydrogenated in the bulk using the Crabtree catalyst (Ir(COD)(py)(tcyp))PF/sub 6/ (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, py = pyridene, tcyp = tricyclohexylphosphine). Since this polymer/catalyst mixture reacts rapidly with hydrogen at ambient temperature and low hydrogen pressures, it should act as an effective hydrogen getter. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Performance testing of aged hydrogen getters against criteria for interim safe storage of plutonium bearing materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Nissen, April; Buffleben, George M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The hydrogen getter HITOP was aged for 3 months at 70 C and tested under both recombination and hydrogenation conditions at 20 and 70 C; partially saturated and irradiated aged getter samples were also tested. The recombination reaction was found to be very fast and well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2h. The gettering reaction, which is planned as the backup reaction in this deployment, is slower and may not meet the requirements alone. Pressure drop measurements and {sup 1}H NMR analyses support these conclusions. Although the experimental conditions do not exactly replicate the deployment conditions, the results of our conservative experiments are clear: the aged getter shows sufficient reactivity to maintain hydrogen concentrations below the flammability limit, between the minimum and maximum deployment temperatures, for three months. The flammability risk is further reduced by the removal of oxygen through the recombination reaction. Neither radiation exposure nor thermal aging sufficiently degrades the getter to be a concern. Future testing to evaluate performance for longer aging periods is in progress.

  3. Oxidation mechanism of porous Zr₂Fe used as a hydrogen getter.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Dror; Nahmani, Moshe; Rafailov, Genadi; Attia, Smadar; Shamish, Zorik; Landau, Miron; Merchuk, Jose; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    We determined the oxidation mechanism of porous ST-198, which mainly comprises Zr2Fe. Oxidation kinetics depended on temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and oxidation extent. The passivation role of oxidation in hydrogen scavenging is probably due to the development of a surface oxide, independent of oxygen concentration. Zr2Fe would be a superior hydrogen getter in oxygen-contaminated environments at high temperatures, as most oxygen will be consumed at the outer shell by mass transfer limitations, protecting the bulk of the getter for hydrogen scavenging. PMID:26408914

  4. Studies on impurity control and hydrogen pumping with chromium gettering in ISX-B

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.; Simpkins, J.E.; Edmonds, P.H.; Isler, R.C.; Lazarus, E.A.; Ma, C.H.; Murakami, M.; Wootton, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Chromium gettering has been proven to be a trouble-free and efficient method of surface pumping in tokamaks. The impurity control capabilities are excellent and comparable to that of titanium. The hydrogen uptake is reduced to monolayer quantities on the surface. The expansion of the operating space is similar to that seen with titanium without the disadvantage of strongly increased hydrogen fluxes. Possible applications of chromium gettering are: impurity control in contemporary tokamaks; surface pumping in short pulse DT-burning devices to minimize tritium inventory, and wall conditioning of future large machines prior to operation.

  5. Gettering of copper to hydrogen-induced cavities in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kinomura, A.; Horino, Y.; Nakano, Y.; Williams, J.S.

    2005-09-15

    The gettering properties of hydrogen-induced cavities have been examined for Cu impurity atoms inherent in multicrystalline Si. Initial areal densities of Cu atoms in the multicrystalline samples were in the range of (3-5)x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, below the level that would provide a complete monolayer coverage of the internal surfaces of the cavities. Samples were first implanted with hydrogen and then annealed at 750 or 850 deg. C for 1 h to form cavities and induce subsequent gettering. Neutron activation analysis with chemical etching of the samples indicated that more than 90% of Cu atoms could be removed from the entire wafer by cavity gettering for both of the annealing temperatures.

  6. Hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the SAES St707 non-evaporable getter at various temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Irving; Mills, Bernice E.

    2010-08-01

    A prototype of a tritium thermoelectric generator (TTG) is currently being developed at Sandia. In the TTG, a vacuum jacket reduces the amount of heat lost from the high temperature source via convection. However, outgassing presents challenges to maintaining a vacuum for many years. Getters are chemically active substances that scavenge residual gases in a vacuum system. In order to maintain the vacuum jacket at approximately 1.0 x 10{sup -4} torr for decades, nonevaporable getters that can operate from -55 C to 60 C are going to be used. This paper focuses on the hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the St707{trademark} non-evaporable getter by SAES. Using a getter testing manifold, we have carried out experiments to test these characteristics of the getter over the temperature range of -77 C to 60 C. The results from this study can be used to size the getter appropriately.

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation on MnO2/Ag2O hydrogen getter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlique, Christophe; Lambertin, David; Galliez, Kévin; Labed, Véronique; Dannoux-Papin, Adeline; Jobic, Stéphane; Deniard, Philippe; Leoni, Elisa

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to show the stability of γ-MnO2/Ag2O hydrogen getter under gamma irradiation in order to be suitable for decreasing the hydrogen risk during the nuclear waste transportation. The chemical and the structural properties of the getter were barely unchanged for irradiated doses up to 4 MGy. The pair distribution function (PDF) analysis showed that the γ-MnO2, which can be describe as an intergrowth of the ramsdellite phase (R-MnO2) and the pyrolusite phase (β-MnO2), had the same intergrowth rate (around 60% for β-MnO2 and 40% for R-MnO2) after irradiation and the silver containing promoter was also unchanged. The getter remains therefore efficient for hydrogen trapping. Furthermore, γ-MnO2/Ag2O was tested in a closed environment in the presence of hydrogen released by organic technological waste radiolysis, such as polyvinyl chloride, ion exchange resins, polyethylene and silicone. Over 80% of the hydrogen, generated by organic radiolysis, was trapped under a 1.5 MGy gamma irradiation.

  8. Studies of chromium gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Stratton, L.W.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results have shown that hydrogen pumping by chromium is a surface effect. Unlike with titanium, the getter material used in many present day tokamaks, there is no significant diffusion into the bulk. Additional experiments have been carried out to measure the basic characteristics of chromium films for gases of interest in tokamak research. These gases include deuterium, oxygen and nitrogen. A vacuum system is described which allowed precise control of the test gas, a constant wall temperature and determination of the projected getter surface area. A quadrupole mass spectrometer, rather than simply a total pressure gauge, was utilized to measure the partial pressure of the test gas as well as the residual gas composition in the system. A quartz crystal monitor was used to measure film thickness. Pumping speeds and sticking coefficients are given as a function of surface coverage for each test gas. A comparison will be made with titanium films deposited in the same vacuum system and under similar conditions.

  9. Poisoning effect on solubility of hydrogen isotopes in getter materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Sato, Yuichi; Ogawa, Hidenori; Shirasu, Yoshirou; Miyake, Masanobu

    1991-03-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys with various compositions have been measured at pressures below 100 Pa. All of the solubility data were found to follow Sieverts' law. The presence of carbon in Ti increased the solubilities of hydrogen isotopes and reduced the enthalpies of solution. The solubility increased and the enthalpy of solution decreased with addition of nitrogen into Zr. The hydrogen solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was larger than the deuterium solubility. Partial thermodynamic functions of hydrogen and deuterium in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys were obtained by a dilute solution model and compared with those in Ti-(O, N) and Zr-O alloys. The isotope effect of hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in the Ti-(O, N, C) and Zr-(O, N) alloys was discussed, and the tritium solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was evaluated from hydrogen and deuterium data.

  10. Engineering Report on the Fission Gas Getter Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Lynne; Ghose, Sanjit; Gill, Simerjeet; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2012-11-01

    In 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested that a Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)-led team research the possibility of using a getter material to reduce the pressure in the plenum region of a light water reactor fuel rod. During the first two years of the project, several candidate materials were identified and tested using a variety of experimental techniques, most with xenon as a simulant for fission products. Earlier promising results for candidate getter materials were found to be incorrect, caused by poor experimental techniques. In May 2012, it had become clear that none of the initial materials had demonstrated the ability to adsorb xenon in the quantities and under the conditions needed. Moreover, the proposed corrective action plan could not meet the schedule needed by the project manager. BNL initiated an internal project review which examined three questions: 1. Which materials, based on accepted materials models, might be capable of absorbing xenon? 2. Which experimental techniques are capable of not only detecting if xenon has been absorbed but also determine by what mechanism and the resulting molecular structure? 3. Are the results from the previous techniques useable now and in the future? As part of the second question, the project review team evaluated the previous experimental technique to determine why incorrect results were reported in early 2012. This engineering report is a summary of the current status of the project review, description of newly recommended experiments and results from feasibility studies at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS).

  11. Characterization Of The Hydrogenation Products Of Bix (phenylethynyl) Benzene (DEB) Getter Using Combined GC/FTIR/MS, FT-Raman, and ATR Spectroscopies (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Smyrl, N. R.; Powell, G. L.

    2011-06-09

    Organic hydrogen getters are utilized to minimize hydrogen accumulation in sealed systems where such build up could produce either a safety problem from pressure build up or corrosion problem due the hydriding of metals contained in the sealed vessel. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) is a hydrogen getter that is based on the palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to single bonds in aromatic aryl compound. DEB is a getter mixed with 25% carbon and 1% Pd and pressed into pellets with some porosity. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reactions with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates.

  12. Evaluation of RTV as a Moldable Matrix When Combined With Molecular Sieve and Organic Hydrogen Getter

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    This work was undertaken in an effort to develop a combined RTV 615/3Å molecular sieve/DEB molded component. A molded RTV 615/3Å molecular sieve component is currently in production, and an RTV 615/DEB component was produced in the past. However, all three materials have never before been combined in a single production part, and this is an opportunity to create a new component capable of being molded to shape, performing desiccation, and hydrogen gettering. This analysis looked at weapons system parameters and how they might influence part design. It also looked at material processing and how it related to mixing, activating a dessicant, and hydrogen uptake testing.

  13. Gas handling systems using titanium-sponge and uranium bulk getters

    SciTech Connect

    Kherani, N.P.; Shmayda, W.T.

    1985-09-01

    A protium gas handling system using titanium and uranium bulk getters was designed, constructed and tested. Numerous process operations were carried out on this system to aid in the design of a tritium gas handling system four times the experimental scale. Experimental results have shown that high percentages of tritium on long-term titanium storage beds can be recovered in a relatively short period of time and be transferred to uranium bed(s) in direct (pump-less) and pump-aided transfers. An optimum storage time after which the rate of interstitial /sup 3/He evolution would be prohibitive to conduct direct tritium transfers is estimated.

  14. Absorption and desorption of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium for Zr--V--Fe getter

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, K.; Inoue, N.; Watanabe, K.; Takeuchi, T.

    1984-07-01

    Nonevaporable getters have wide applicability for developing the tritium handling techniques for thermonuclear fusion devices. From this viewpoint, mechanisms of the absorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes and the isotope effects were investigated for a Zr--V--Fe alloy (St-707) by means of the mass analyzed thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was observed that the absorption rate was proportional to the first power of the pressure, indicating that the rate limiting step is the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen isotopes on the surface. The activation energy was very small, in the order of magnitude of a few tens of calories per mole in a temperature range from -196 to 200 /sup 0/C. The desorption rate was proportional to the square of the amount of absorption, indicating that the rate limiting step is the associative desorption reaction of hydrogen atoms or ions diffused to the surface from the bulk. The rate constants for hydrogen and deuterium were determined as k/sub d/(H/sub 2/) = (5.3/sup +2.6//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.0 +- 0.7) x 10/sup 3//RT) and k/sub d/(D/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +2.7//sub -1.7/)exp(-(28.6 +- 0.8) x 10/sup 3//RT) in (1/Pa 1 s), respectively, where R is in (cal/mol deg). With regard to tritium, the rate constant was evaluated as k/sub d/(T/sub 2/) = (5.0/sup +20//sub -4.0/)exp(-(29.3 +- 3) x 10/sup 3//RT), however, the frequency factor will have to be corrected by knowing the relative sensitivity factor of the mass spectrometer for tritium (T/sub 2/).

  15. Impurity and recycling control with gettering in ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Isler, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    The vacuum vessel of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is Ti-gettered with a surface coverage of 70%. The major effects of gettering are: (1) reduction of the oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen content in the plasma and (2) improved density control due to wall pumping of the working gas hydrogen. The overall leak rate in ATF is 2{times}10{sup {minus}4} Torr-l/s which is too high for successful plasma operation. Ti-gettering is routinely employed every morning prior to operation and compensates for this shortcoming by reducing the partial pressure of nitrogen and other residual gas components to the low 10{sup {minus}9} Torr range which is close to the RGA background pressure. Rate-of-rise measurements at this stage show only argon and some methane. The argon is used to monitor the leak rate. In addition to impurity reduction, gettering leads to low recycling of the working gas which appears to be crucial for density control in ATF. The capacity of the gettered surface is large enough to show a strong effect even after 24 hours. An extensive data base on the short-term and long-term effects of gettering on the residual gas composition and its effects on plasma performance has been established over the past three years and will be discussed in this paper. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Impurity gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, S.T.

    1995-06-01

    Transition metal impurities are well known to cause detrimental effects when present in the active regions of Si devices. Their presence degrades minority carrier lifetime, provides recombination-generation centers, increases junction leakage current and reduces gate oxide integrity. Thus, gettering processes are used to reduce the available metal impurities from the active region of microelectronic circuits. Gettering processes are usually divided into intrinsic (or internal) and extrinsic (or external) categories. Intrinsic refers to processing the Si wafer in a way to make available internal gettering sites, whereas extrinsic implies externally introduced gettering sites. Special concerns have been raised for intrinsic gettering. Not only will the formation of the precipitated oxide and denuded zone be difficult to achieve with the lower thermal budgets, but another inherent limit may set in. In this or any process which relies on the precipitation of metal silicides the impurity concentration can only be reduced as low as the solid solubility limit. However, the solubilities of transition metals relative to silicide formation are typically found to be {approx_gt}10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3} at temperatures of 800 C and above, and thus inadequate to getter to the needed concentration levels. It is thus anticipated that future microelectronic device processing will require one or more of the following advances in gettering technology: (1) new and more effective gettering mechanisms; (2) quantitative models of gettering to allow process optimization at low process thermal budgets and metal impurity concentrations, and/or (3) development of front side gettering methods to allow for more efficient gettering close to device regions. These trend-driven needs provide a driving force for qualitatively new approaches to gettering and provide possible new opportunities for the use of ion implantation in microelectronics processing.

  17. Deposition and Characterization of Improved Hydrogen Getter Materials - Report on FY 14-15 Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Kevin Mark; Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen

    2015-10-15

    The goals of this work have been two-fold. First, to perform an initial, quantitative, optimization of getter performance, with the primary variables being DEB/Pd ratio and UV power. Second, to simplify the deposition process to make it more compatible with the DOE production environment.

  18. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  19. Metal getters for tritium storage

    SciTech Connect

    Willin, E.; Sirch, M.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Devillers, M.

    1988-09-01

    Whereas titanium is a getter material mainly suitable for the long-term storage of tritium, zirconium cobalt alloy can also be employed for the interim storage and transport of this gas. Activated zirconium cobalt alloy reacts within minutes with hydrogen at room temperature. At the composition of /ZrCoH/sub 0.8/ the dissociation pressure at room temperature is estimated to be 10/sup -3/ Pa. The zirconium cobalt/H/sub 2/ system is not pyrophoric at room temperature. Methane is partially cracked on Ti and on ZrCo at temperatures above 600 and 300/sup 0/C respectively. With titanium the corresponding carbide is formed without affecting the storage properties of the getter. After reaction of ZrCo with CH/sub 4/ or N/sub 2/ the hydrogen adsorption capacity is reduced. Titanium powder, sponge or sheet react with nitrogen at temperatures above 750/sup 0/C with a parabolic rate law. In the overlayer of the metal substrate the phases N dissolved in /alpha/-Ti, Ti/sub 2/N and TiN were identified. The same phases were observed when NH/sub 3/ reacts with this metal.

  20. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Rupe, J. H.; Kushida, R. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by injecting air and hydrocarbon fuel at one end of a cylindrically shaped chamber to form a mixture and igniting the mixture to provide hot combustion gases by partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon fuel. The combustion gases move away from the ignition region to another region where water is injected to be turned into steam by the hot combustion gases. The steam which is formed mixes with the hot gases to yield a uniform hot gas whereby a steam reforming reaction with the hydrocarbon fuel takes place to produce a hydrogen rich gas.

  1. Hydrogen gettering and strain-induced platelet nucleation in tensilely strained Si0.4Ge0.6/Ge for layer exfoliation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitera, Arthur J.; Fitzgerald, E. A.

    2005-05-01

    We show that tensilely strained epitaxial layers getter interstitially dissolved hydrogen and accelerate the nucleation of platelets. Both of these result in subsurface crack propagation leading to surface blistering and eventual exfoliation of a H+-implanted semiconductor surface. In this work, a strained Si0.4Ge0.6 layer was used to enhance the exfoliation kinetics of relaxed Ge/Si1-xGex/Si virtual substrates by gettering hydrogen and providing a preferential nucleation site for platelets. Using platelet morphology and strain relaxation data, a nucleation and growth model was formulated accounting for both chemical and strain energy contributions to the free energy of platelet formation, revealing two kinetically limited growth regimes for platelets in tensilely strained Si0.4Ge0.6 films. Low-temperature (<200°C) annealing nucleates 1011-cm-2 platelets which grow in the strain-limited regime with minimal loss of hydrogen to surface effusion. At 250 °C, platelet growth is diffusion limited, requiring transport of H2 molecules to the strained layer. Subsequent annealing of strained Si0.4Ge0.6/Ge gettering structures at a temperature exceeding 300 °C results in significantly improved surface blistering kinetics over samples which do not contain a gettering layer. Incorporation of tensilely strained layers has the potential of reducing the implantation dose and annealing temperature necessary for layer transfer. Combined with virtual substrate bonding, they provide a promising solution for economical integration of high-performance semiconductors with silicon.

  2. Gas controlled hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Mohd-Zaki, Zuhaida; Zeng, Raymond J; Bernet, Nicolas; Pratt, Steven; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Batstone, Damien John

    2012-04-01

    Acidogenic fermentation is an anaerobic process of double purpose, while treating organic residues it produces chemical compounds, such as hydrogen, ethanol and organic acids. Therefore, acidogenic fermentation arises as an attractive biotechnology process towards the biorefinery concept. Moreover, this process does not need sterile operating conditions and works under a wide range of pH. Changes of operating conditions produce metabolic shifts, inducing variability on acidogenic product yield. To induce those changes, experiments, based on reactor headspace N(2)-flushing (gas phase), were designed. A major result was the hydrogen yield increase from 1 to 3.25±0.4 ( [Formula: see text] ) at pH 4.5 and N(2)-flushing of 58.4 (L·d(-1)). This yield is close to the theoretical acidogenic value (4 [Formula: see text] ). The mechanisms that explain this increase on hydrogen yield shifts are related to the thermodynamics of three metabolic reactions: lactate hydrogenase, NADH hydrogenase and homoacetogenesis, which are affected by the low hydrogen partial pressures. PMID:22342590

  3. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device is disclosed. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500 C to about 700 C for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal. 1 fig.

  4. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C. for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal.

  5. MECHANICAL ALLOYING AND THERMAL TREATMENT FOR PRODUCTION OF ZIRCONIUM IRON HYDROGEN ISOTOPE GETTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.

    2008-02-20

    The objective of this task was to demonstrate that metal hydrides could be produced by mechanical alloying in the quantities needed to support production-scale hydrogen isotope separations. Three starting compositions (ratios of elemental Zr and Fe powders) were selected and attritor milled under argon for times of 8 to 60 hours. In general, milling times of at least 24 hours were required to form the desired Zr{sub 2}Fe and Zr{sub 3}Fe phases, although a considerable amount of unalloyed Zr and Fe remained. Milling in liquid nitrogen does not appear to provide any advantages over milling in hexane, particularly due to the formation of ZrN after longer milling times. Carbides of Zr formed during some of the milling experiments in hexane. Elemental Zr was present in the as-milled material but not detected after annealing for milling times of 48 and 60 hours. It may be that after intimate mixing of the powders in the attritor mill the annealing temperature was sufficient to allow for the formation of a Zr-Fe alloy. Further investigation of this conversion is necessary, and could provide an opportunity for reducing the amount of unreacted metal powder after milling.

  6. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Phillip, Bradley L.

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100.degree. C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  7. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Phillip, Bradley L.

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compostions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  8. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  9. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  10. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  11. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M.

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  12. Neutral beam dump with cathodic arc titanium gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.; Korepanov, S. A.; Putvinski, S.; Krivenko, A. S.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Savkin, V. Ya.

    2011-03-15

    An incomplete neutral beam capture can degrade the plasma performance in neutral beam driven plasma machines. The beam dumps mitigating the shine-through beam recycling must entrap and retain large particle loads while maintaining the beam-exposed surfaces clean of the residual impurities. The cathodic arc gettering, which provides high evaporation rate coupled with a fast time response, is a powerful and versatile technique for depositing clean getter films in vacuum. A compact neutral beam dump utilizing the titanium arc gettering was developed for a field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by 1 MW, 20-40 keV neutral hydrogen beams. The titanium evaporator features a new improved design. The beam dump is capable of handling large pulsed gas loads, has a high sorption capacity, and is robust and reliable. With the beam particle flux density of 5 x 10{sup 17} H/(cm{sup 2}s) sustained for 3-10 ms, the beam recycling coefficient, defined as twice the ratio of the hydrogen molecular flux leaving the beam dump to the incident flux of high-energy neutral atoms, is {approx}0.7. The use of the beam dump allows us to significantly reduce the recycling of the shine-through neutral beam as well as to improve the vacuum conditions in the machine.

  13. Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Lee, Myung W.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

  14. Evolution of gettering technologies for vacuum tubes to getters for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiotti, M.

    2008-05-01

    Getter materials are technically proven and industrially accepted practical ways to maintain vacuum inside hermetically sealed tubes or devices to assure high reliability and long lifetime of the operating devices. The most industrially proven vacuum tube is the cathode rays tubes (CRTs), where large surfaces are available for the deposition of an evaporated barium film by a radio frequency inductive heating of a stainless steel container filled with a BaAl4 powder mixed to Ni powder. The evolution of the CRTs manufacturing technologies required also new types of barium getters able to withstand some thermal process in air without any deterioration of the evaporation characteristics. In other vacuum tubes such as traveling waves tubes, the space available for the evaporation of a barium film and the sorption capacity required to assure the vacuum for the lifetime of the devices did not allow the use of the barium film, prompting the development of sintered non evaporable getter pills that can be activated during the manufacturing process or by flowing current through an embedded resistance. The same sintered non evaporable getter pills could find usage also in evacuated parts to thermally isolate the infrared sensors for different final applications. In high energy physics particle accelerators, the getter technology moved from localized vacuum getter pumps or getter strips to a getter coating over the surface of vacuum chambers in order to guarantee a more uniform pumping speed. With the advent of solid state electronics, new challenges faced the getter technology to assure long life to vacuum or inert gas filled hermetical packages containing microelectronic devices, especially in the telecommunication and military applications. A well known problem of GaAs devices with Pd or Pt metalization is the H2 poisoning of the metal gate: to prevent this degradation a two layer getter film has been develop to absorb a large quantity of H2 per unit of getter surface. The

  15. Development of a Tritium Cleanup System for a Large Helical Device Using Nonvolatile Getter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Takao; Sakuma, Yoichi; Kabutomori, Toshiki; Shibuya, Mamoru

    2000-01-15

    A tritium cleanup system has been conceptually developed for the large helical device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science. The system is a processing device employed to remove tritium from exhaust gas. In the exhaust gas discharged from the LHD in normal operation, the major part of tritium constituents should be in a form of hydrogen molecules because the fuel used in plasma experiments with the LHD is hydrogen molecules. From this viewpoint, we have designed a tritium cleanup system, which is characterized by tritium being removed and stored in a form of hydrogen molecules with less impurities, like oxygen and carbon, and its decomposition and the separation processes are introduced to convert various tritiated compounds into a form of hydrogen molecules of high purity. Besides these, there is another aspect in that getter materials are applied in both decomposition of tritiated compounds and storage of hydrogen molecules containing tritium.The system design is composed of three essential component parts: a hydrogen separator, a hydrogen absorbing vessel, and a decomposition process vessel. The hydrogen separator and the decomposition process vessel make a process loop repeat to remove hydrogen into a form of hydrogen molecules with less impurities. It is important that 'less impurities' means having a less bad influence on hydrogen-absorbing materials used in the storage vessel.We think that the hydrogen separator will be manufactured by employing a palladium hydrogen purifier system, which is available in the marketplace, and the hydrogen storage vessel will also be manufactured by using hydrogen-absorbing alloys like titanium. Thus, the serious problem imposed on us is how to realize the decomposition process vessel. To develop the decomposition process vessel, we thought nonvolatile getter materials were promising and carried out performance tests of methane decomposition by the nonvolatile getter materials, where methane was used because it is

  16. Hydrogen gas relief valve

    DOEpatents

    Whittlesey, Curtis C.

    1985-01-01

    An improved battery stack design for an electrochemical system having at least one cell from which a gas is generated and an electrolyte in communication with the cell is described. The improved battery stack design features means for defining a substantially closed compartment for containing the battery cells and at least a portion of the electrolyte for the system, and means in association with the compartment means for selectively venting gas from the interior of the compartment means in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. The venting means includes a relief valve having a float member which is actuated in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. This float member is adapted to close the relief valve when the level of the electrolyte is above a predetermined level and open the relief valve when the level of electrolyte is below this predetermined level.

  17. RENEWABLE LIQUID GETTERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.

    1962-08-21

    A method and structure were developed for pumping gases by simple absorption into a liquid gettering material. The invention comprises means ror continuously pumping a liquid getterrng material from a reservoir to the top of a generally vertical surface disposed in a vacuum pumping chamber to receive gaseous and other particles in the liquid gettering material which continuously flows downward over the vertical suiface. Means are provided for continuous removal, degassing, and return of a portion of the liquid gettering material from the reservoir connected with collectrng means at the base of the generally vertical plate. (AEC)

  18. New Gas Polarographic Hydrogen Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Barile, Ron

    2004-01-01

    Polarography is the measurement of the current that flows in solution as a function of an applied voltage. The actual form of the observed polarographic current depends upon the manner in which the voltage is applied and on the characteristics of the working electrode. The new gas polarographic H2 sensor shows a current level increment with concentration of the gaseous H2 similar to those relating to metal ions in liquid electrolytes in well-known polarography. This phenomenon is caused by the fact that the diffusion of the gaseous H2 through a gas diffusion hole built in the sensor is a rate-determining step in the gaseous-hydrogen sensing mechanism. The diffusion hole artificially limits the diffusion of the gaseous H2 toward the electrode located at the sensor cavity. This gas polarographic H2 sensor. is actually an electrochemical-pumping cell since the gaseous H2 is in fact pumped via the electrochemical driving force generated between the electrodes. Gaseous H2 enters the diffusion hole and reaches the first electrode (anode) located in the sensor cavity to be transformed into an H+ ions or protons; H+ ions pass through the electrolyte and reach the second electrode (cathode) to be reformed to gaseous H2. Gas polarographic 02 sensors are commercially available; a gas polarographic 02 sensor was used to prove the feasibility of building a new gas polarographic H2 sensor.

  19. Assuring ultra-clean environments in microsystem packages : irreversible and reversible getters.

    SciTech Connect

    Zifer, Thomas; Whinnery, LeRoy L., Jr.; Hollenshead, Jeromy Todd; Buffleben, George M.; McElhanon, James Ross; Nilson, Robert H.

    2003-11-01

    A new generation of irreversible, chemically reacting getters specifically targeted toward assuring the integrity of the local environment within microsystem packages were developed and evaluated. These reactive getters incorporate volatile species into a polymer through covalent bonds, thus producing a non-volatile product. These reactive getters will be combined with getters that rely on absorption media (e.g. zeolites and high surface area carbon fibers) to scavenge non-reactive species, like solvents. Our getter systems will rely on device packaging to limit exchange between the microsystem and the global environment. Thus, the internal getters need only provide local environmental control within the microsystem package. A series of experiments were conducted to determine uptake rates and capacities absorption and reactive-based getters. Diffusion rates through the binder used to hold the getter particles together were also investigated. Getters were evaluated in environments with a saturated headspace and with a limited amount of the volatile species of interest. One- and two-dimensional numerical models and analysis techniques have been developed and used to predict the transport of contaminant species within a representative microsystem package consisting of an open gas-filled volume adjacent to a polymer layer containing embedded particles of getter. The two-dimensional model features explicit representation of the individual getter particles while the one-dimensional treatment assumes a homogeneous distribution of getter material within the getterlpolymer layer. Example calculations illustrate the dependence of getter performance on reaction rates, polymer diffusivity, and getter particle volume fraction. In addition, the model is used to deduce surface reaction rates, solid phase diffusivities, and maximum-loading densities by least-squares fitting of model predictions to measured histories of gas-phase contaminant concentration and getter weight gain.

  20. Device removes hydrogen gas from enclosed spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, W. N.

    1966-01-01

    Hydrogen-oxidant galvanic cell removes small amounts of hydrogen gas continually released from equipment, such as vented silver-zinc batteries, in enclosed compartments where air venting is not feasible. These cells are used in satellite compartments.

  1. QED-1 device and measurements of gettering efficiency for a simulated divertor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, D.K.; Yamada, M.

    1980-03-01

    The QED-1 device at PPL has provided gettering efficiency data for neutralized hydrogen plasma on titanium. The hollow-anode arcjet produces a plasma column 1 cm in diameter with 10/sup 12/ < n/sub e/ < 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub i/ approx.< T/sub e/ = 3-10 eV, confined by an axial magnetic field of 1-6 kG. The gettering measurements are based on monitoring neutral gas density with respect to time in the divertor simulation chamber of QED-1. The present results indicate that the plasma particles lose their charge and most of their energy when they strike the neutralizer plate.

  2. A new technique for pumping hydrogen gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    A system for pumping hydrogen gas without isotopic fractionation has been developed. The pump contains uranium metal, which when heated to about 80??C reacts with hydrogen to form UH3. The UH3 is heated to above 500??C to decompose the hydride and regenerate the hydrogen. ?? 1970.

  3. Hydrogen gas sensor and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    McKee, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the pressure of hydrogen gas in a nuclear reactor, and method of manufacturing the same. The sensor comprises an elongated tube of hydrogen permeable material which is connected to a pressure transducer through a feedthrough tube which passes through a wall at the boundary of the region in which hydrogen is present. The tube is pressurized and flushed with hydrogen gas at an elevated temperature during the manufacture of the sensor in order to remove all gasses other than hydrogen from the device.

  4. User’s Guide for Getter Rate Test System

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, Monte R.

    2007-06-27

    This User’s Guide describes the operation and maintenance of the Getter Rate Test System, including the mechanical equipment, instrumentation, and datalogger/computer components. The Getter Rate Test System includes equipment and instrumentation to conduct two getter rate tests simultaneously. The mechanical equipment comprises roughing and high-vacuum pumps, heated test chambers, standard hydrogen leaks, and associated piping and valves. Instrumentation includes thermocouples, pressure (vacuum) transducers, panel displays, analog-to-digital signal converter, and associated wiring. The datalogger/computer is a stand-alone computer with installed software to allow the user to record data input from the pressure transducers to data files and to calculate the getter rate from the data in an Excel® spreadsheet.

  5. Conversion of glycerol to hydrogen rich gas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen H; Kannangara, G S Kamali

    2013-12-21

    Presently there is a glut of glycerol as the by-product of biofuel production and it will grow as production increases. The conundrum is how we can consume this material and convert it into a more useful product. One potential route is to reform glycerol to hydrogen rich gas including synthesis gas (CO + H2) and hydrogen. However, there is recent literature on various reforming techniques which may have a bearing on the efficiency of such a process. Hence in this review reforming of glycerol at room temperature (normally photo-catalytic), catalysis at moderate and high temperature and a non-catalytic pyrolysis process are presented. The high temperature processes allow the generation of synthesis gas with the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios being suitable for synthesis of dimethyl ether, methanol and for the Fischer-Tropsch process using established catalysts. Efficient conversion of synthesis gas to hydrogen involves additional catalysts that assist the water gas shift reaction, or involves in situ capture of carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Reforming at reduced temperatures including photo-reforming offers the opportunity of producing synthesis gas or hydrogen using single catalysts. Together, these processes will assist in overcoming the worldwide glut of glycerol, increasing the competitiveness of the biofuel production and reducing our dependency on the fossil based, hydrogen rich gas. PMID:24043264

  6. Taxis Toward Hydrogen Gas by Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Brileya, Kristen A.; Connolly, James M.; Downey, Carey; Gerlach, Robin; Fields, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of taxis (directed swimming) in the Archaea is currently expanding through identification of novel receptors, effectors, and proteins involved in signal transduction to the flagellar motor. Although the ability for biological cells to sense and swim toward hydrogen gas has been hypothesized for many years, this capacity has yet to be observed and demonstrated. Here we show that the average swimming velocity increases in the direction of a source of hydrogen gas for the methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis using a capillary assay with anoxic gas-phase control and time-lapse microscopy. The results indicate that a methanogen couples motility to hydrogen concentration sensing and is the first direct observation of hydrogenotaxis in any domain of life. Hydrogenotaxis represents a strategy that would impart a competitive advantage to motile microorganisms that compete for hydrogen gas and would impact the C, S and N cycles. PMID:24189441

  7. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  8. Tritium purification via zirconium-manganese-iron alloy getter st 909 in flow processes

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.D.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Pawelko, R. J.; Anderl, R.A. |; Tuggle, D.G.

    1995-03-01

    A zirconium-manganese-iron alloy, St 909, was evaluated as a purifier in tritium handling, transport, and storage applications. High efficiency removal of CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and O{sub 2} was observed at concentrations of 0.1 to 1% in helium. Gas streams at 100 to 5000 sccm were passed through getters operated at 500-800{degree}C. On-getter residence times of two seconds were required to achieve > 99% removal of these reactive impurities. At this removal efficiency level, the individual impurity capacity of 100 g of St 909 purifier at 800{degree}C was 0.59, 0.28, 0.19, 0.14 and 0.12 moles of CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}, respectively. Hydrogen containing gases, CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, were cracked on the purifier and the resultant elemental hydrogen was released. Only 8{+-}2 scc of H{sub 2} were retained on 100 g of St 909 at 800{degree}C. These features suggest that this alloy can be employed as an efficient purifier for hydrogen isotopes in inert gas, nitrogen, or perhaps even H, D, or T streams. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  10. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  11. Materials for the scavenging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Phillip, B.L.

    1997-04-29

    A hydrogen getter composition is described comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluoropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases. 7 figs.

  12. Materials for the scavenging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Phillip, B.L.

    1997-12-30

    A hydrogen getter composition is described comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100 C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluoropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases. 7 figs.

  13. Regasification of liquefied natural gas and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkonog, V. G.; Tukmakov, A. L.; Muchitova, K. M.; Agalakov, U. A.; Serazetdinov, F. Sh; Gromov, B. C.

    2016-06-01

    Liquefied natural gas and hydrogen gasification process is suggested, in which vapor phase is generated by the decrease of internal energy of the liquid. Methane and hydrogen gasification processes have been numerically modeled. Flow rates of the methane and hydrogen through choke channel were defined. A satisfactory match between the modeled and experimental data for liquid nitrogen has been acquired. Technical suitability of the suggested process is proved. Based on the initial parameters of the cryogenic fluid, the amount of vapor phase is 5-20% of the flow rate.

  14. Titanium-nitrogen reaction investigated for application to gettering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arntzen, J. D.; Coleman, L. F.; Kyle, M. L.; Pierce, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Titanium is one of several gettering materials available for removing nitrogen from inert gases. The reaction rate of titanium-metal sponge and nitrogen in argon-nitrogen mixtures was studied at 900 degrees C. The rate was found to depend upon the partial pressure of nitrogen in the gas phase. Mathematical relationships simulate titanium systems.

  15. Mechanochemistry of lithium nitride under hydrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhang, J; Wang, S; Jiang, L; Latroche, M; Du, J; Cuevas, F

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen uptake during the mechanochemistry of lithium nitride under 9 MPa hydrogen pressure has been analyzed by means of in situ solid-gas absorption and ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. In situ hydrogenation curves show two H-sorption steps leading to an overall hydrogen uptake of 9.8 wt% H after 3 hours of milling. The milled end-products consist of nanocrystalline (∼10 nm) LiNH2 and LiH phases. The first reaction step comprises the transformation of the polymorph α-Li3N (S.G. P6/mmm) into the β-Li3N (S.G. P63/mmc) metastable phase and the reaction of the latter with hydrogen to form lithium imide: β-Li3N + H2→ Li2NH + LiH. Reaction kinetics of the first step is zero-order. Its rate-limiting control is assigned to the collision frequency between milling balls and Li3N powder. In the second absorption step, lithium imide converts to lithium amide following the reaction scheme Li2NH + H2→ LiNH2 + LiH. Reaction kinetics is here limited by one-dimensional nucleation and the growth mechanism, which, in light of structural data, is assigned to the occurrence of lithium vacancies in the imide compound. This study provides new insights into the reaction paths and chemical kinetics of light hydrogen storage materials during their mechanochemical synthesis. PMID:26234206

  16. Electron stimulated molecular desorption of a non-evaporable Zr-V-Fe alloy getter at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pimpec, F.; Gröbner, O.; Laurent, J. M.

    2002-10-01

    Electron stimulated molecular desorption (ESD) from a non-evaporable getters (NEG) St 707 ® (SAES Getters ™) sample after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide (cf. nomenclature in Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, CRC Press, 1994), 13C 18O, has been studied on a laboratory setup. Measurements were performed using an electron beam of 300 eV kinetic energy, with an average electron intensity of 1.6×10 15 electrons s -1. The electrons were impinging on the 15 cm 2 target surface at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields η (molecules/electron) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide) for a fully activated NEG as well as for a NEG fully saturated with 13C 18O are lower than for OFHC copper baked at 120 °C. A small fraction only of the gas which is required to saturate the getter surface can be re-desorbed and thus appears to be accessible to ESD.

  17. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  18. Irreversible gettering of thionyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    LeRoy Whinnery; Steve Goods; George Buffleben; Tim Sheppodd

    1999-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated the irreversible gettering of SOCl{sub 2} by ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon over a modest temperature range. While thionyl chloride decomposition was slow below {minus}20 C, lower temperatures are expected to be less of a problem than at higher temperatures. The approximately 30 cc of thionyl chloride in a typical D-cell would require 50 g of ZnO and 107 g of ASZMTEDA carbon. Fortunately, since it is unlikely to happen at all, it is common practice to assume only one cell will fail (leak) in a given battery pack. So, one charge of getter can protect the whole battery pack. In summary, ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon fulfills all of the requirements of an ideal getter including: irreversible binding or reaction with SOCl{sub 2}, high volumetric uptake capacity, high efficiency, non-volatile, air stable, insensitive to poisoning, non-toxic, cheap, non-corrosive, and the gettering product is not a liquid or oil that could block further flow or accessibility. Future work in this area includes incorporation of the ZnO and carbon into a structural open-celled porous monolith, as well as, gettering for other types of batteries (e.g., Li/MnO{sub 2}).

  19. Evaluation of extrinsic gettering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Medernach, J.W.; Wells, V.A.; Witherspoon, L.

    1985-01-01

    Nitride (N-EG); poly-nitride (PN-EG), and poly (P-EG) extrinsic gettering techniques were evaluated using a 3.0 micron P-well CMOS process with N/N+ substrates. The devices used for this evaluation were a 2K SRAM and a N+ to P-well test diode. All gettering was applied as a post-opitaxial process except the P-EG material. Results showed that the N-EG material had lower defect surface densities and superior diode characteristics when compared to the P-EG and epitacial control Epi-C without gettering. Test diode characteristics showed the PN-EG and the N-EG samples having very low leakage currents compared to the P-EG and EPI-C samples. Similar findings also were obtained for the leakage current of the 2K SRAM. A graphical correlation between the leakage currents of the 2K SRAM and the test diode is established. This demonstrates how effective the N-EG and PN-EG gettering ability is for COMS processing. All devices receiving the nitride or the polynitride gettering showed improved device performance.

  20. Sensoring hydrogen gas concentration using electrolyte made of proton

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Koyanaka, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen gas promises to be a major clean fuel in the near future. Thus, sensors that can measure the concentrations of hydrogen gas over a wide dynamic range (e.g., 1 99.9%) are in demand for the production, storage, and utilization of hydrogen gas. However, it is difficult to directly measure hydrogen gas concentrations greater than 10% using conventional sensor [1 11]. We report a simple sensor using an electrolyte made of proton conductive manganese dioxide that enables in situmeasurements of hydrogen gas concentration over a wide range of 0.1 99.9% at room temperature.

  1. Efficient combining of ion pumps and getter-palladium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Paolini, C.; Mura, M.; Ravelli, F.

    2008-07-15

    Nonevaporable getters (NEGs) have been extensively studied in the last several years for their sorption properties toward many gases. In particular, an innovative alloy as a thin film by magnetron sputtering was developed and characterized at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. It is composed of Ti-Zr-V and protected by an overlayer of palladium (Pd), according to a technology for which the authors got the licence. NEG-Pd thin films used in combination with ion getter pumps is a simple, easy way to handle pumping devices for ultrahigh and extremely high vacuum applications. To show how to apply this coating technology to the internal surface of different types of ion pumps, the authors carried out several tests on pumps of various shapes, sizes (in terms of nominal pumping speed), and types (diode, noble diode, and triode). Special care was taken during the thermal cycle of baking and activation of the pumps to preserve the internal film from sources of contamination and/or from the sputtering of the titanium cathodes of the pump. Some important remarks will be made about the most appropriate conditions of pressure and temperature. The performance of the NEG-Pd-coated ion pumps was evaluated in terms of ultimate pressure and hydrogen pumping speed. The contribution of the thin film is particularly relevant for the pumping of this gas, due to its high sticking factor on palladium and the great sorption capacity of the underlying getter. Finally, the possibility of further improvement by substituting palladium with other Pd-based alloys will also be evaluated.

  2. U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Dihu, R.J.; Patel, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Today, hydrogen is produced mainly from natural gas and petroleum fractions. Tomorrow, because reserves of natural gas and oil are declining while demand continues to increase, they cannot be considered available for long-term, large-scale production of hydrogen. Hydrogen obtained from coal is expected to be the lowest cost, large-scale source of hydrogen in the future. The U-GAS coal gasification process and its potential application to the manufacture of hydrogen is discussed. Pilot plant results, the current status of the process, and economic projections for the cost of hydrogen manufactured are presented.

  3. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    York, William; Hughes, Michael; Berry, Jonathan; Russell, Tamara; Lau, Y. C.; Liu, Shan; Arnett, Michael; Peck, Arthur; Tralshawala, Nilesh; Weber, Joseph; Benjamin, Marc; Iduate, Michelle; Kittleson, Jacob; Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Delvaux, John; Casanova, Fernando; Lacy, Ben; Brzek, Brian; Wolfe, Chris; Palafox, Pepe; Ding, Ben; Badding, Bruce; McDuffie, Dwayne; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  4. Compact solid source of hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2004-06-08

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  5. SAES St 909 Getter Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Holder, J. E

    2005-09-07

    Process gas tritium stripper technology has gone from catalytic oxidation followed by absorption on molecular sieve/zeolite beds to non-evaporate metal getter technology. SAES Getters produces a number of commercial getter products including St 909. St 909, a Zr-Mn-Fe alloy, is sold in pellet form, can decompose (''crack'') a number of process gas impurities, and retains lower levels of tritium than other getters. The performance of this material to remove process impurities, especially methane, under of variety of operating conditions has been part of a Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for five years. St 909 has been tested at the bench (6 gram) scale, the pilot (500 gram) scale, and at the full (5300) gram scale under a variety of test conditions. This paper gives a brief summary of test results obtained for the different scale tests.

  6. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  7. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  8. Aluminum gettering in single and multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E.R.

    1995-08-01

    Al gettering has been performed on integrated circuit (I.C.) quality silicon and a variety of single and multicrystalline silicon solar cell materials. The minority carrier diffusion length, Ln, has been used to quantify the gettering response. Vast differences in response to the Al gettering treatment are observed between the I.C. quality silicon and the solar cell materials. The I.C. silicon generally responds well while the solar cell silicon performance progressively degrades with increasing gettering temperature. Preliminary data shows that by performing a Rapid Thermal Annealing treatment prior to the Al gettering, an improved or further degraded Ln emerges in solar cell material depending on the material`s manufacturer. We explain these observed phenomena by suggesting that Al gettering in solar cell silicon is an impurity emission-limited process while for I.C. quality silicon it is diffusion limited.

  9. Titanium-Based Getter Solution for Wafer-Level MEMS Vacuum Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram, Vivek; Ling, Xie; Bangtao, Chen

    2013-03-01

    Ultrahigh-vacuum conditions can be achieved by employing porous absorbent materials such as Ti, Zr, Ta, and Yt. Commercial getters are primarily Zr-based, since Zr possesses the best adsorption characteristics. Titanium is not considered as a candidate, since adsorption of gases by Ti is significantly reduced due to oxidation and other contamination. In the present work, it is demonstrated that the adsorption property of Ti can be substantially enhanced and benchmarked against other Zr-based commercial getters by employing a sacrificial layer such as Ni over Ti, and also by using other surface engineering techniques. It has been confirmed that, in addition to the activation temperature, the vacuum level during getter activation also plays a pivotal role in influencing the adsorption characteristics of Ti. It has been determined that the getter life could be significantly improved by the reversible adsorption characteristic of H2 gas, facilitating regeneration cycles.

  10. Savannah River Site/K Area Complex getter life extension report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Woodsmall, Todd; Nissen, April

    2008-08-01

    The K Area Complex (KAC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been utilizing HiTop hydrogen getter material in 9975 Shipping Containers to prevent the development of flammable environments during storage of moisture-containing plutonium oxides. Previous testing and subsequent reports have been performed and produced by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to demonstrate the suitability and longevity of the getter during storage at bounding thermal conditions. To date, results have shown that after 18 months of continuous storage at 70 C, the getter is able to both recombine gaseous hydrogen and oxygen into water when oxygen is available, and irreversibly getter (i.e. scavenge) hydrogen from the vapor space when oxygen is not available, both under a CO{sub 2} environment. [Refs. 1-5] Both of these reactions are catalytically enhanced and thermodynamically favorable. The purpose of this paper is to establish the justification that maintaining the current efforts of biannual testing is no longer necessary due to the robust performance of the getter material, the very unlikely potential that the recombination reaction will fail during storage conditions in KAC, and the insignificant aging effects that have been seen in the testing to date.

  11. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-07-01

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 246922. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30940h

  12. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of hydrogen as a cryogenic wind tunnel test gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haut, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The nondimensional ratios used to describe various flow situations in hydrogen were determined and compared with the corresponding ideal diatomic gas ratios. The results were used to examine different inviscid flow configurations. The relatively high value of the characteristic rotational temperature causes the behavior of hydrogen, under cryogenic conditions, to deviate substantially from the behavior of an ideal diatomic gas in the compressible flow regime. Therefore, if an idea diatomic gas is to be modeled, cryogenic hydrogen is unacceptable as a wind tunnel test gas in a compressible flow situation.

  14. Technetium Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Asmussen, Robert M.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-10-15

    The cementitious material known as Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. Two radionuclides of particular concern in these waste streams are technetium-99 (99Tc) and iodine-129 (129I). These radioactive tank waste components contribute the most to the environmental impacts associated with the cleanup of the Hanford site. A recent environmental assessment of Cast Stone performance, which assumes a diffusion controlled release of contaminants from the waste form, calculates groundwater in excess of the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for both contaminants. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of both 99Tc and 129I in Cast Stone. One method to improve the performance of Cast Stone is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc and I, therefore reducing their diffusion out of Cast Stone. In this paper, we present results of Tc and I removal from solution with various getters with batch sorption experiments conducted in deionized water (DIW) and a highly caustic 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. In general, the data show that the selected getters are effective in DIW but their performance is comprised when experiments are performed with the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. Reasons for the mitigated performance in the LAW simulant may be due to competition with Cr present in the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant and to a pH effect.

  15. Fluorine gettering by activated charcoal in a radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, L.K.; Toth, L.M.

    1988-10-01

    Activated charcoal has been shown to be an effective gettering agent for the fluorine gas that is liberated in a radiation environment. Even though activated charcoal is a commonly used getter, little is known about the radiation stability of the fluorine-charcoal product. This work has shown that not only is the product stable in high gamma radiation fields, but also that radiation enhances the capacity of the charcoal for the fluorine. The most useful application of this work is with the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel salt because the radioactive components (fission products and actinides) cause radiolytic damage to the solid LiF-BeF/sub 2/-ZrF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ (64.5, 30.3, 5.0, 0.13 mol %, respectively) resulting in the liberation of fluorine gas. This work has also demonstrated that the maximum damage to the fuel salt by approx.3 /times/ 10/sup 7/ R/h gamma radiation is approximately 2%, at which point the rate of recombination of fluorine with active metal sites within the salt lattice equals the rate of fluorine generation. The enhanced reactivity of the activated charcoal and radiation stability of the product ensures that the gettered fluorine will stay sequestered in the charcoal.

  16. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    SciTech Connect

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-22

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  17. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-01

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  18. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    DOEpatents

    Johansson, Lennart N.

    2004-06-29

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  19. Development Of A Centrifugal Hydrogen Pipeline Gas Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Di Bella, Francis A.

    2015-04-16

    Concepts NREC (CN) has completed a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project to analyze, design, and fabricate a pipeline capacity hydrogen compressor. The pipeline compressor is a critical component in the DOE strategy to provide sufficient quantities of hydrogen to support the expected shift in transportation fuels from liquid and natural gas to hydrogen. The hydrogen would be generated by renewable energy (solar, wind, and perhaps even tidal or ocean), and would be electrolyzed from water. The hydrogen would then be transported to the population centers in the U.S., where fuel-cell vehicles are expected to become popular and necessary to relieve dependency on fossil fuels. The specifications for the required pipeline hydrogen compressor indicates a need for a small package that is efficient, less costly, and more reliable than what is available in the form of a multi-cylinder, reciprocating (positive displacement) compressor for compressing hydrogen in the gas industry.

  20. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  1. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

  2. Quantitative determination of hydrogen in solids by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Addach, H; Berçot, P; Wery, M; Rezrazi, M

    2004-11-19

    Processes such as electroplating or acid cleaning are notorious causes of post-processing failure through hydrogen embrittlement. So, the determination of amounts of hydrogen in metals is of great importance. An analysis method for investigation of H content in solids has been established based on hot extraction and gas chromatography system. Hot extraction in inert gas enables complete and/or partial removal of the hydrogen from the samples. A gas chromatography system is used to determine quantitatively the amount of thermally desorbed hydrogen. An investigation of the baking operating conditions is made of the hydrogen desorption rate of zinc-plated steel parts. Then, an analysis of the polarisation conditions upon chromium electroplating is given. PMID:15584242

  3. Self regulating formulations for safe hydrogen gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2002-01-01

    A method and composition are disclosed for preventing uncontrolled exothermic reaction in the presence of a catalyst. A catalyst deployed as a finely divided powder which is attached to the surface of a low melting point wax or wax-like material which is utilized as a carrier for the catalyst. During operation should the catalyst overheat due to uncontrolled conditions brought about by a run-away reaction the heat of reaction melts the low melting point wax which would itself wet the surface of the catalyst and prevent further catalysis.

  4. Self regulating formulations for safe hydrogen gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2004-03-16

    A method and composition are disclosed for preventing uncontrolled exothermic reaction in the presence of a catalyst. A catalyst deployed as a finely divided powder which is attached to the surface of a low melting point wax or wax-like material which is utilized as a carrier for the catalyst. During operation should the catalyst overheat due to uncontrolled conditions brought about by a run-away reaction the heat of reaction melts the low melting point wax which would itself wet the surface of the catalyst and prevent further catalysis.

  5. Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Catalytic hydrogenation of polyaromatic compounds using coke-oven gas instead of pure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Braekman-Danheux, C.E.; Fontana, A.H.; Laurent, Ph.M.; Lolivier, Ph.

    1995-12-31

    In order to improve the economy of the conversion process of polyaromatic molecules to their hydroaromatics analogs, catalytic hydrogenation of phenanthrene has been carried out under pressure of different simulated coke-oven gases instead of pure hydrogen. The influence of reaction time, temperature and pressure on the hydrogenation yields and on the nature of the obtained products has been studied. Comparisons have been made with reaction with pure hydrogen in the same conditions. The influence of the different components of a real coke-oven gas has also been pointed out. The results indicate that coke-oven gas can be used if the goal is not to obtain perhydroaromatics compounds for a thermal cracking, but to give partly hydrogenated compounds to be used as hydrogen donor solvent in a coal liquefaction process. The results have been applied to coal-tar highly aromatic fractions.

  7. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  8. Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, William H.

    1976-09-21

    A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

  9. Hydrogen mitigation Gas Characterization System: System design description

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1998-07-17

    The Gas Characterization System (GCS) design is described for flammable gas monitoring. Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is known to experience periodic tank level increases and decreases during which hydrogen gas is released. It is believed that the generated gases accumulate in the solids-containing layer near the bottom of the tank. Solids and gases are also present in the crust and may be present in the interstitial liquid layer. The accumulation of gases creates a buoyancy that eventually overcomes the density and bonding strength of the bottom layer. When this happens, the gas from the bottom layer is released upward through the liquid layer to the vapor space above the tank crust. Previous monitoring of the vapor space gases during such an event indicates hydrogen release concentrations greater than the lower flammability limit (LFL) of hydrogen in a partial nitrous oxide atmosphere. Tanks 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, and 241-SY-103 have been identified as having the potential to behave similar to SY-101. These waste tanks have been placed on the flammable gas watch list (FGWL). All waste tanks on the FGWL will have a standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) installed to measure hydrogen. In the event that hydrogen levels exceed 0.75% by volume, additional characterization will be required. The purpose of this additional vapor space characterization is to determine the actual lower flammability limit of these tanks, accurately measure low baseline gas release concentrations, and to determine potential hazards associated with larger Gas Release Events (GREs). The instruments to be installed in the GCS for vapor monitoring will allow accurate analysis of samples from the tank vapor space. It will be possible to detect a wide range of hydrogen from parts per million to percent by volume, as well as other gas species suspected to be generated in waste tanks.

  10. Internal gettering by metal alloy clusters

    DOEpatents

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Pickett, Matthew D.; Marcus, Mathew A.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2010-07-27

    The present invention relates to the internal gettering of impurities in semiconductors by metal alloy clusters. In particular, intermetallic clusters are formed within silicon, such clusters containing two or more transition metal species. Such clusters have melting temperatures below that of the host material and are shown to be particularly effective in gettering impurities within the silicon and collecting them into isolated, less harmful locations. Novel compositions for some of the metal alloy clusters are also described.

  11. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haoshuang; Wang, Zhao; Hu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO) nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors. PMID:22778599

  12. Gettering of metal impurities in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeter, W.; Spiecker, E.; Apel, M.

    1995-08-01

    Gettering means the removal of metallic impurities from the device-active area of the wafer by transport to a predesigned region-called gettering layer (GL). We introduce an interface at z = d{sub GL}, at which the effect of the gettering mechanism on the metal impurity distribution in the wafer is quantified, e.g. by specifying currents or by interfacial reactions of metal impurities, self interstitials etc. between GL and wafer. In response metal impurities will diffuse out of the wafer into the gettering layer. Following such a concept, in general three species of the metal impurity (M) are involved in gettering: M{sub p} {l_arrow} M{sub i} {l_arrow} M{sub GL}. M{sub p} denotes immobile species in the wafer, which are precipitated into suicides or segregated at extended defects or whose diffusivity is too small to contribute noticeably to transport during the gettering procedure - like many substitutional metal species.

  13. Automated gas burette system for evolved hydrogen measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Feng; Rassat, Scot D.; Helderandt, David J.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Autrey, Tom; Linehan, John C.; Rappe, Kenneth G.

    2008-08-15

    This paper reports a simple and efficient gas burette system that allows automated determination of evolved gas volume in real time using only temperature and pressure measurements. The system is reliable and has been used successfully to study the hydrogen release kinetics of ammonia borane thermolysis. The system is especially suitable for bench scale studies involving small batches and potentially rapid reaction kinetics.

  14. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Doshi, R.

    1999-07-27

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400 C for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide. 4 figs.

  15. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  16. Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

  17. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

    2009-02-01

    This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

  18. Molecular processes in astrophysics: Calculations of hydrogen + hydrogen gas excitation, de-excitation, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Matthew Thomas

    The implications of H+H2 cooling in astrophysics is important to several applications. One of the most significant and pure applications is its role in cooling in the early universe. Other applications would include molecular dynamics in nebulae and their collapse into stars and astrophysical shocks. Shortly after the big bang, the universe was a hot primordial gas of photons, electrons, and nuclei among other ingredients. By far the most dominant nuclei in the early universe was hydrogen. In fact, in the early universe the matter density was 90 percent hydrogen and only 10 percent helium with small amounts of lithium and deuterium. In order for structure to form in the universe, this primordial gas must form atoms and cool. One of the significant cooling mechanisms is the collision of neutral atomic hydrogen with a neutral diatomic hydrogen molecule. This work performs calculations to determine collisional cooling rates of hydrogen using two potential surfaces.

  19. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.Z.

    1995-09-01

    It is universally accepted that in the next few decades hydrogen production will continue to rely on fossil fuels (primarily, natural gas). On the other hand, the conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming) are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere that produce adverse ecological effects. One alternative is the one-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. Preliminary analysis indicates that the cost of hydrogen produced by thermal decomposition of natural gas is somewhat lower than the conventional processes after by-product carbon credit is taken. In the short term, this process can be used for on-site production of hydrogen-methane mixtures in gas-filling stations and for CO{sub x}-free production of hydrogen for fuel cell driven prime movers. The experimental data on the thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500-900{degrees}C) are presented in this paper. Two types of reactors were designed and built at FSEC: continuous flow and pulse fix bed catalytic reactors. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen production yield using oxide type catalysts was studied. Alumina-supported Ni- and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at moderate temperatures (600-800{degrees}C). Kinetic curves of hydrogen production over metal and metal oxide catalysts at different temperatures are presented in the paper. Fe-catalyst demonstrated good stability (for several hours), whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity.

  20. Toward understanding and modeling of impurity gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teh Y.; Gafiteanu, R.; Goesele, U.M.

    1995-08-01

    Gettering of harmful impurities away from the device active regions has already become an integral part of manufacturing integrated circuits (IC) using Czochralski (CZ) Si wafers, and is experiencing an increasing importance in Si solar cell fabrications for improving the cell efficiency. Gettering consists of (1) the creation of suitable gettering sites; and (2) the gettering processes of contaminants. Requirements for successful gettering differ between the IC and solar cell cases, because ICs are monolithic devices situated at the Si wafer surfaces while solar cells are bulk devices, and because the Si substrate materials used are different. For IC fabrications, the method used is that of intrinsic or internal gettering (IG) which utilizes oxygen precipitates and their associated defects in the CZ Si wafer bulk as gettering sites. Because of the bulk nature of IG sites, the scheme cannot be used also for solar cells. Only some kind of extrinsic or external gettering (EG) schemes with gettering sites located at the wafer surface regions can be used for solar cells. The gettering of the harmful contaminants, usually metals, to the gettering region involves the metal dissolution from precipitated state, the metal atom diffusion to and the stabilization at the gettering sites. A mathematical model of the gettering process is presented.

  1. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  2. Refrigerated hydrogen gas jet for the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.H.; Kendziora, C.L.; Marinelli, M.

    1995-07-01

    A hydrogen gas jet has been built for use at Fermilab for the study of charmonium spectroscopy in proton-antiproton annihilations. The hydrogen gas jet is part of an upgrade to a previous experiment which ran in the Fermilab 1990-1991 fixed target program utilizing a jet cooled to 80 K with liquid nitrogen. The jet delivers a defined stream of hydrogen gas which travels through a series of vacuum chambers and then intersects the circulating antiproton beam. The goal of the upgrade is to provide a hydrogen gas stream at least twice as dense as used for the earlier experiment to increase the interaction rate and allow an improved study of rare processes. This is achieved by cooling the stream to below 30 K using a Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. The jet apparatus is designed to allow motion in the plane perpendicular to the gas stream as well as angular positioning at the jet nozzle to provide a means of optimizing the interaction rate. Two skimmers located in the vacuum chambers are used to define the gas stream dimensions. The jet target vacuum chambers require constant pumping with turbomolecular pumps. The vacuum space around the jet is designed to have a large system pumping speed so that the chamber pressure can be maintained below an absolute pressure of 1 Pa. The jet will operate in the next fixed target run at Fermilab. Details of the design and test results are discussed.

  3. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gabbard, W.A.; Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates.

  4. Mechanisms of transition-metal gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; SEIBT,M.; SCHROTER,W.

    2000-03-23

    The atomic process, kinetics, and equilibrium thermodynamics underlying the gettering of transition-metal impurities in Si are reviewed from a mechanistic perspective. Methods for mathematical modeling of gettering are reviewed and illustrated. Needs for further research are discussed.

  5. Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1974-01-15

    A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

  6. Ruthenium catalyzed hydrogenation of aldehyde with synthesis gas.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohei; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2014-11-21

    The hydrogenation of aldehyde utilizing synthesis gas as a dihydrogen source was examined with various ruthenium catalysts, among which Ru-cyclopentadienone complexes (Shvo-type catalysts) exhibited higher activity than others. DFT calculations proved that the exchange of coordinated carbon monoxide by dihydrogen is relatively preferable in Shvo-type catalysts compared to others, which is a pre-equilibrium for the generation of the hydrogenation-active species. PMID:25372182

  7. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks. A Review of Key Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

    2013-03-01

    This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines. Blending hydrogen into the existing natural gas pipeline network has also been proposed as a means of increasing the output of renewable energy systems such as large wind farms.

  8. Flashback Detection Sensor for Hydrogen Augmented Natural Gas Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Sidwell, T.; Strakey, P.A.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J.

    2007-05-01

    The use of hydrogen augmented fuel is being investigated by various researchers as a method to extend the lean operating limit, and potentially reduce thermal NOx formation in natural gas fired lean premixed (LPM) combustion systems. The resulting increase in flame speed during hydrogen augmentation, however, increases the propensity for flashback in LPM systems. Real-time in-situ monitoring of flashback is important for the development of control strategies for use of hydrogen augmented fuel in state-of-the-art combustion systems, and for the development of advanced hydrogen combustion systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Woodward Industrial Controls are developing a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS), which has already been demonstrated as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff. Since CCADS is a flame ionization sensor technique, the low ion concentration produced in pure hydrogen combustion raises concerns of whether CCADS can be used to monitor flashback in hydrogen augmented combustion. This paper discusses CCADS tests conducted at 0.2-0.6 MPa (2-6 atm), demonstrating flashback detection with fuel compositions up to 80% hydrogen (by volume) mixed with natural gas. NETL’s Simulation Validation (SimVal) combustor offers full optical access to pressurized combustion during these tests. The CCADS data and high-speed video show the reaction zone moves upstream into the nozzle as the hydrogen fuel concentration increases, as is expected with the increased flame speed of the mixture. The CCADS data and video also demonstrate the opportunity for using CCADS to provide the necessary in-situ monitor to control flashback and lean blowoff in hydrogen augmented combustion applications.

  9. Hydrogen Gas as a Fuel in Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanasekaran, Chinnathambi; Mohankumar, Gabriael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problem caused by the greenhouse gases, for protecting environment and saving conventional fuels. In this study, a dual fuel engine of hydrogen and diesel was investigated. Hydrogen was conceded through the intake port, and simultaneously air and diesel was pervaded into the cylinder. Using electronic gas injector and electronic control unit, the injection timing and duration varied. In this investigation, a single cylinder, KIRLOSKAR AV1, DI Diesel engine was used. Hydrogen injection timing was fixed at TDC and injection duration was timed for 30°, 60°, and 90° crank angles. The injection timing of diesel was fixed at 23° BTDC. When hydrogen is mixed with inlet air, emanation of HC, CO and CO2 decreased without any emission (exhaustion) of smoke while increasing the brake thermal efficiency.

  10. Automated gas burette system for evolved hydrogen measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Feng; Rassat, Scot D.; Heldebrant, David J.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Autrey, Thomas; Linehan, John C.; Rappe, Kenneth G.

    2008-08-01

    The US Department of Energy has issued a Grand Challenge in Hydrogen Storage for Fuel Cell powered vehicles. New breakthroughs in materials and approaches are needed to facilitate the transition from an energy economy based upon fossil fuels to an energy economy based upon hydrogen. Consequently there is a need for readily accessible instrumentation to evaluate and quantify the potential of condensed phase hydrogen storage materials. Both the total system storage capacity (90 gm H2/kg system and 81 gm of H2/liter system) and rate of hydrogen gas desorption (2 gm H2/sec/100KW) are critical parameters specified by the experts in the automobile and energy industries that can be obtained with volumetric methods . In bench scale studies for material screening, gas burette systems have been routinely used to determine hydrogen gas release kinetics of sodium borohydride 1-14 and ammonia borane systems 15-23. Simple gas burettes with manual measurements at intervals are easy to set up but are not adequate to study fast kinetics or to carry out high throughput testing. Automated gas burettes of various designs have been reported in the literature 23-30. Piston-cylinder type burette systems can measure gas volume changes at constant pressure if they are equipped with a linear actuator that is driven by a pressure controller. The response time of the actuator motors does impose a limit on the rate of volume change allowed. Due to the response time limit and the complexity of such systems, gas burettes with constant pressure device have not found wide spread use in hydrogen storage studies 29,31. Some designs of automated gas burettes relied on measurements of the electrical resistance of the burette liquid to determine gas volume 23,27. In these systems, it is necessary to use special working fluids such as mercury or certain electrolyte solutions, requiring careful considerations of possible interactions among reaction compounds, electrode materials, and the burette fluid

  11. Combustion gas properties. Part 3: Hydrogen gas fuel and dry air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.; Jones, R. E.; Mcbride, B. J.; Beyerle, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A series of computations has been made to produce the equilibrium temperature and gas composition for hydrogen gas fuel and dry air. The computed tables and figures provide combustion gas property data for pressures from 0.5 to 50 atmospheres and equivalence ratios from 0 to 2.0. Only sample tables and figures are provided in this report.

  12. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  14. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  15. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

    2013-03-01

    The United States has 11 distinct natural gas pipeline corridors: five originate in the Southwest, four deliver natural gas from Canada, and two extend from the Rocky Mountain region. This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines.

  16. Hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, A. I.; Nazarova, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    A hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine unit is considered that can be used in both nuclear and centralized power industries. However, it is the most promising when used for power-generating plants based on renewable energy sources (RES). The basic feature of the energy storage system in question is combination of storing the energy in compressed air and hydrogen and oxygen produced by the water electrolysis. Such a process makes the energy storage more flexible, in particular, when applied to RES-based power-generating plants whose generation of power may considerably vary during the course of a day, and also reduces the specific cost of the system by decreasing the required volume of the reservoir. This will allow construction of such systems in any areas independent of the local topography in contrast to the compressed-air energy storage gas-turbine plants, which require large-sized underground reservoirs. It should be noted that, during the energy recovery, the air that arrives from the reservoir is heated by combustion of hydrogen in oxygen, which results in the gas-turbine exhaust gases practically free of substances hazardous to the health and the environment. The results of analysis of a hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are presented. Its layout and the principle of its operation are described and the basic parameters are computed. The units of the system are analyzed and their costs are assessed; the recovery factor is estimated at more than 60%. According to the obtained results, almost all main components of the hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are well known at present; therefore, no considerable R&D costs are required. A new component of the system is the H2-O2 combustion chamber; a difficulty in manufacturing it is the necessity of ensuring the combustion of hydrogen in oxygen as complete as possible and preventing formation of nitric oxides.

  17. Detection of hydrogen chloride gas in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Launch vehicle effluent (LVE) monitoring is part of NASA's overall tropospheric and stratospheric environmental program. Following nine techniques are evaluated and developed in report: bubbler method, pH measurements, indicator tubes, microcoulometers, modified condensation nuclei counter, dual-isotope absorption, gas-filter correlation, chemiluminescent nitric oxide detection, chemiluminescent luminol-oxidation detection.

  18. Development of a hydrogen gas sensor using microfabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai; Stuczynski, Matthew; Madzsar, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Microfabrication and micromachining technologies are used to produce a hydrogen gas sensor based on a palladium-silver film. The sensor uses a heater that is fabricated by diffusing p-type borones into the substrate, forming a resistance heater. A diode for temperature measurement is produced using p-type boron and n-type phosphor diffused into the substrate. A thickness of the palladium-silver film is approximately 300 arcsec. The hydrogen gas sensor employs the proven palladium-silver diode structure and is surrounded by a phosphor doped resistance heater which can be heated up to a temperature of 250 C. Experimental results show that the sensor is capable of operating over a wide range of hydrogen concentration levels between 0-95 percent without any hysteresis effects.

  19. Dynamic gas bearing turbine technology in hydrogen plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlig, Klaus; Bischoff, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines - although applied for helium refrigerators and liquefiers for decades - experienced limitations for hydrogen applications due to restrictions in axial bearing capacity. With a new design concept for gas bearing turbines developed in 2004, axial bearing capacity was significantly improved enabling the transfer of this technology to hydrogen liquefiers. Prior to roll-out of the technology to industrial plants, the turbine bearing technology passed numerous tests in R&D test benches and subsequently proved industrial scale demonstration at Linde Gas' hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany. Since its installation, this turbine has gathered more than 16,000 successful operating hours and has outperformed its oil bearing brother in terms of performance, maintainability as well as reliability. The present paper is based on Linde Kryotechnik AG's paper published in the proceedings of the CEC 2009 concerning the application of Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines in hydrogen applications. In contrast to the former paper, this publication focuses on the steps towards final market launch and more specifically on the financial benefits of this turbine technology, both in terms of capital investment as well as operating expenses.

  20. Summary of gas release events detected by hydrogen monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    1999-05-18

    This paper summarizes the results of monitoring tank headspace for flammable gas release events. In over 40 tank years of monitoring the largest detected release in a single-shell tank is 2.4 cubic meters of Hydrogen. In the double-shell tanks the largest release is 19.3 cubic meters except in SY-101 pre mixer pump installation condition.

  1. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  2. Dominant factors of the laser gettering of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, Yu. I. E-mail: yuibokhan@gmail.com; Kamenkov, V. S.; Tolochko, N. K.

    2015-02-15

    The laser gettering of silicon wafers is experimentally investigated. The typical gettering parameters are considered. The surfaces of laser-treated silicon wafers are investigated by microscopy. When studying the effect of laser radiation on silicon wafers during gettering, a group of factors determining the conditions of interaction between the laser beam and silicon-wafer surface and affecting the final result of treatment are selected. The main factors determining the gettering efficiency are revealed. Limitations on the desired value of the getter-layer capacity on surfaces with insufficiently high cleanness (for example, ground or matte) are established.

  3. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrocarbon detection in aeronautical applications is important for reasons of safety and emissions control. The use of silicon carbide as a semiconductor in a metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structure opens opportunities to measure hydrogen and hydrocarbons in high temperature environments beyond the capabilities of silicon-based devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore the response and stability of Pd-SiC Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range from 100 to 400 C. The effect of heat treating on the diode properties as measured at 100 C is explored. Subsequent operation at 400 C demonstrates the diodes' sensitivity to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. It is concluded that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures but further studies are necessary to determine the diodes' long term stability.

  4. Hydrogenation Reactions during Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Polymer Samples Using Hydrogen Carrier Gas.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Chuichi; Freeman, Robert R; Teramae, Norio; Ohtani, Hajime

    2016-05-17

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of polymer samples is studied focusing on the effect of hydrogen (H2) carrier gas on chromatographic and spectral data. The pyrograms and the related mass spectra of high density polyethylene (HDPE), low density polyethylene, and polystyrene (PS) serve to illustrate the differences between the species formed in H2 and the helium environment. Differences in the pyrograms and the spectra are generally thought to be a result of the hydrogenation reaction of the pyrolyzates. From the peak intensity changes in the pyrograms of HDPE and PS, hydrogenation of unsaturated pyrolyzates is concluded to occur when the pyrolysis is done in H2. Moreover, additional hydrogenation of the pyrolyzates occurs in the electron ionization source of a MS detector when H2 is used as a carrier gas. Finally, the applicability of mass spectral libraries to characterize pyrograms obtained in H2 is illustrated using 24 polymers. The effect of the hydrogenation reaction on the library search results is found to be negligible for most polymer samples with polar and nonpolar monomer units. PMID:27125864

  5. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.

    1996-10-01

    The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a wide range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.

  6. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  7. Solid-phase microextraction may catalize hydrogenation when using hydrogen as carrier in gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, D; Boarelli, M C

    2016-07-01

    When hydrogen is used as carrier gas, carbon-carbon double bonds may be hydrogenated in the hot gas chromatograph (GC) injector if introduced by solid-phase microextraction (SPME). SPME fibers coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/carboxen/divinylbenzene (DVB), PDMS/carboxen, polyacrylate, PDMS/DVB and PDMS on fused silica, stableflex or metal alloy core have been tested with fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from olive oil. Using coatings containing DVB, hydrogenation took place with high conversion rates (82.0-92.9%) independently of the core material. With all fibers having a metal core, hydrogenation was observed to a certain extent (27.4-85.3%). PDMS, PDMS/carboxen and polyacrylate coated fibers with a fused silica or stableflex core resulted in negligible hydrogenation (0.2-2.5%). The occurrence of hydrogenation was confirmed also with other substances containing carbon-carbon double bonds (n-alkenes, alkenoic acids, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl and ethyl esters). PMID:27236484

  8. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  9. Technetium getters in the near surface environment

    SciTech Connect

    KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; ZHANG,PENGCHU; WESTRICH,HENRY R.; BRYAN,CHARLES R.; MOLECKE,MARTIN A.

    2000-05-19

    Conventional performance assessments assume that radioactive {sup 99}Tc travels as a non-sorbing component with an effective K{sub d} (distribution coefficient) of 0. This is because soil mineral surfaces commonly develop net negative surface charges and pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}), with large ionic size and low electrical density, is not sorbed onto them. However, a variety of materials have been identified that retain Tc and may eventually lead to promising Tc getters. In assessing Tc getter performance it is important to evaluate the environment in which the getter is to function. In many contaminant plumes Tc will only leach slowly from the source of the contamination and significant dilution is likely. Thus, sub-ppb Tc concentrations are expected and normal groundwater constituents will dominate the aquifer chemistry. In this setting a variety of constituents were found to retard TcO{sub 4}: imogolite, boehmite, hydrotalcite, goethite, copper sulfide and oxide and coal. Near leaking tanks of high level nuclear waste, Tc may be present in mg/L level concentrations and groundwater chemistry will be dominated by constituents from the waste. Both bone char, and to a lesser degree, freshly precipitated Al hydroxides may be effective Tc scavengers in this environment. Thus, the search for Tc getters is far from hopeless, although much remains to be learned about the mechanisms by which these materials retain Tc.

  10. Absorption media for irreversibly gettering thionyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Buffleben, George; Goods, Steven H.; Shepodd, Timothy; Wheeler, David R.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy

    2002-01-01

    Thionyl chloride is a hazardous and reactive chemical used as the liquid cathode in commercial primary batteries. Contrary to previous thinking, ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon (Calgon Corporation) reversibly absorbs thionyl chloride. Thus, several candidate materials were examined as irreversible getters for thionyl chloride. The capacity, rate and effect of temperature were also explored. A wide variety of likely materials were investigated through screening experiments focusing on the degree of heat generated by the reaction as well as the material absorption capacity and irreversibility, in order to help narrow the group of possible getter choices. More thorough, quantitative measurements were performed on promising materials. The best performing getter was a mixture of ZnO and ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. In this example, the ZnO reacts with thionyl chloride to form ZnCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2. The SO.sub.2 is then irreversibly gettered by ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. This combination of ZnO and carbon has a high capacity, is irreversible and functions effectively above -20.degree. C.

  11. Hydrogen storage on high-surface-area carbon monoliths for Adsorb hydrogen Gas Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Pfeifer, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase hydrogen volumetric storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed hydrogen gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize hydrogen storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis atmosphere. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis atmosphere have influences on gravimetric excess adsorption. Compaction temperature has large influences on gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high hydrogen storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument.

  12. Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

    2006-09-01

    This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  13. Hydrogen gas embrittlement and the disc pressure test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelet, E. J.; Troiano, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    A disc pressure test has been used to study the influenced of a hydrogen gas environment on the mechanical properties of three high strength superalloys, Inconel 718, L-605 and A-286, in static and dynamic conditions. The influence of the hydrogen pressure, loading rate, temperature, mechanical and thermal fatigue has investigated. The permeation characteristics of Inconel 718 have been determined in collaboration with the French AEC. The results complemented by a fractographic study are consistent either with a stress-sorption or with an internal embrittlement type of mechanism.

  14. Disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and tritiated hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniazzi, A. B.; Morton, C. S.

    2008-07-15

    Kinectrics and its predecessor company Ontario Hydro Research Div. (a division of Ontario Hydro) had a fully operational tritium laboratory on site since the early 1980's. During those years numerous projects and experiments were undertaken using hydrogen and tritium for the most part. Metals with an affinity for hydrogen are commonly employed as scavengers of hydrogenic gases from process streams or as hydrogen storage mediums. The two most common of these metals used were depleted uranium and a zirconium-iron alloy (SAES St198). The break-up of Ontario Hydro through deregulation activities resulted in the building of a new, smaller, tritium laboratory and the decommissioning of the original tritium laboratory. Decommissioning activities resulted in the need to safely dispose of these reactive metals. Disposal of these metals is not straight forward. For safe, long term, disposal it has been decided to oxidize the metals in a controlled fashion. The oxidized beds, containing the metals, will be sent to a radioactive waste site for long term storage. Options for disposal of tritiated hydrogen gas are presented and discussed. This paper provides a disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and hydrogen thereby closing the loop in tritium handling. (authors)

  15. Instruction manual for UTEP weld gas hydrogen detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John; Pang, Tonghui

    1992-01-01

    The instrument described in this manual was developed at the University of Texas at El Paso under contract from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center. The instrument has been used to detect hydrogen in the shielding gas of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welds at concentrations of less than 100 ppm. The instrument makes measurements in real time during the welding operation and provides the operator with an easily readable graphic display of the present level of hydrogen in the arc as well as the level of hydrogen over the past approximately five minutes. In this way the welder can not only tell if the present level of hydrogen is excessive, but can see what changes in weld parameters have done to the level of hydrogen. The welder can set the level of hydrogen that is considered critical and the instrument display will indicate when that level has been exceeded. All detection is from the torch side. All needed equipment is supplied by the developer except for an IBM PC compatible computer which must be supplied by the user. Source code is supplied in this manual so that the user can modify the control program as desired.

  16. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1981-01-06

    A process for the removal of H/sub 2/S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO/sub 2/ at temperatures between 250* and 450* F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H/sub 2/, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H/sub 2/S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO, CS/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/ and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H/sub 2/S and subsequently removing the H/sub 2/S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  17. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1982-01-19

    A process for the removal of H2S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO2 at temperatures between 250 and 450/sup 0/F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H2, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H2S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO2 and H2S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO CS2, SO3 and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H2S and subsequently removing the H2S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  18. Polymer formulation for removing hydrogen and liquid water from an enclosed space

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2006-02-21

    This invention describes a solution to the particular problem of liquid water formation in hydrogen getters exposed to quantities of oxygen. Water formation is usually desired because the recombination reaction removes hydrogen without affecting gettering capacity and the oxygen removal reduces the chances for a hydrogen explosion once free oxygen is essentially removed. The present invention describes a getter incorporating a polyacrylate compound that can absorb up to 500% of its own weight in liquid water without significantly affecting its hydrogen gettering/recombination properties, but that also is insensitive to water vapor.

  19. The Transmission Factor Method: in-situ Characterization of Getter Coated Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Bonucci, Antonio; Conte, Andrea; Manini, Paolo; Raimondi, Stefano

    2007-01-19

    Particle accelerators and synchrotron light source need low residual pressure during operating conditions. In specific applications like narrow-gap insertion devices, NEG coating has proved to be very effective. ASTM F798-82 standard is the common characterization method for the sorption performance of getters. In the case of getter coated pipes, the measurement is conducted 'offline' on a sample (coupon), suitably positioned inside the chamber to be coated and removed after the process. Although this approach is suitable to guarantee the control of the process, in-situ characterization should be useful to evaluate residual pressure during the operating conditions. A different measurement technique (Transmission Factor Method) is here described. It is based on the measurement of pressures ratio at the inlet and the outlet of a coated pipe, under a flow of test gas. A calibration curve is calculated using a modellistic approach and permits to evaluate sticking probability of the coated surface from the pressure ratio. Preliminary experimental results about the characterization of this getter will be shown. Keywords: Getter sorption measurement.

  20. LOX vaporization in high-pressure, hydrogen-rich gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    LOX droplet vaporization in high-pressure hydrogen-rich gas is analyzed, with special attention to thermodynamic effects which compel the surface to heat to the critical state and to supercritical vaporization processes on heating to criticality. Subcritical vaporization is modeled using a quasi-steady diffusion-controlled gas-phase transport formulation coupled to an effective-conductivity internal-energy-transport model accounting for circulation effects. It is demonstrated how the droplet surface might heat to the critical state, for ambient pressures slightly greater than the critical pressure of oxygen, such that the bulk of propellant within the droplet remains substantially below the critical mixing temperature.

  1. Laser Raman sensor for measurement of trace-hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler-Golden, Steven M.; Goldstein, Neil; Bien, Fritz; Matthew, Michael W.; Gersh, Michael E.; Cheng, Wai K.; Adams, Frederick W.

    1992-01-01

    A new optical hydrogen sensor based on spontaneous Raman scattering of laser light has been designed and constructed for rugged field use. It provides good sensitivity, rapid response, and the inherent Raman characteristics of linearity and background gas independence of the signal. Efficient light collection and discrimination by using fast optics and a bandpass interference filter compensate for the inefficiency of the Raman-scattering process. A multipass optical cavity with a Herriott-type configuration provides intense illumination from an air-cooled CW gas laser. The observed performance is in good agreement with the theoretical signal and noise level predictions.

  2. Hydrogen Gas Production by an Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata Strain.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, L J; Irgens, R L

    1991-02-01

    A hydrogen gas (H(2))-producing strain of Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, possessed nitrogenase activity. Increasing evolution of H(2) with decreasing ammonium chloride concentrations provided evidence that nitrogenase was the catalyst in gas production. Cells were grown in a mineral medium plus 0.2% acetate with sodium sulfide as an electron donor. Factors increasing H(2) production included addition of reduced carbon compounds such as propionate and succinate, increased reducing power by increasing sodium sulfide concentrations, and increased energy charge (ATP) by increasing light intensity. PMID:16348423

  3. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Production in the UT TRIGA Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. O'Kelly

    2000-11-12

    In December 1999, The University of Texas at Austin (UT) reported an unusual condition associated with the annular graphite reflector surrounding the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) TRIGA reactor. The aluminum container encapsulating the graphite showed signs of bulging or swelling. Further, during an investigation of this occurrence, bubbles were detected coming from a weld in the aluminum. The gas composition was approximately 2:1 hydrogen to oxygen. After safety review and equipment fabrication, the reflector was successfully vented and flooded. The ratio of the gases produced is unusual, and the gas production mechanism has not yet been explained.

  4. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  5. EUV tools: hydrogen gas purification and recovery strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoni, Cristian; Succi, Marco; Applegarth, Chuck; Riddle Vogt, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    The technological challenges that have been overcome to make extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) a reality have been enormous1. This vacuum driven technology poses significant purity challenges for the gases employed for purging and cleaning the scanner EUV chamber and source. Hydrogen, nitrogen, argon and ultra-high purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA) are the most common gases utilized at the scanner and source level. Purity requirements are tighter than for previous technology node tools. In addition, specifically for hydrogen, EUV tool users are facing not only gas purity challenges but also the need for safe disposal of the hydrogen at the tool outlet. Recovery, reuse or recycling strategies could mitigate the disposal process and reduce the overall tool cost of operation. This paper will review the types of purification technologies that are currently available to generate high purity hydrogen suitable for EUV applications. Advantages and disadvantages of each purification technology will be presented. Guidelines on how to select the most appropriate technology for each application and experimental conditions will be presented. A discussion of the most common approaches utilized at the facility level to operate EUV tools along with possible hydrogen recovery strategies will also be reported.

  6. Copper gettering by aluminum precipitates in aluminum-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN,GARY A.; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.

    2000-03-20

    Copper in Si is shown to be strongly gettered by Al-rich precipitates formed by implanting Al to supersaturation and followed by annealing. At temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C a layer containing Al precipitates is found to getter Cu from Cu silicide located on the opposite side of a 0.25-mm Si wafer, indicating a substantially lower chemical potential for the Cu in the molten-A1 phase. Cu gettering proceeds rapidly until an atomic ratio of approximately 2 Cu atoms to 1 Al atom is reached in the precipitated Al region, after which the gettering process slows. Redistribution of Cu from one Al-rich layer to another at low Cu concentrations demonstrates that a segregation-type gettering mechanism is operating. Cu gettering occurs primarily in the region containing the precipitated Al rather than the region where the Al is entirely substitutional.

  7. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program`s maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model`s predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  8. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program's maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model's predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  9. Integrated Micro-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensor. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank DiMeo, Jr.

    2000-10-02

    This report details our recent progress in developing novel MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) based hydrogen gas sensors. These sensors couple novel thin films as the active layer on a device structure known as a Micro-HotPlate. This coupling has resulted in a gas sensor that has several unique advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, stability and amenability to large scale manufacture. This Phase-I research effort was focused on achieving the following three objectives: (1) Investigation of sensor fabrication parameters and their effects on sensor performance. (2) Hydrogen response testing of these sensors in wet/dry and oxygen-containing/oxygen-deficient atmospheres. (3) Investigation of the long-term stability of these thin film materials and identification of limiting factors. We have made substantial progress toward achieving each of these objectives, and highlights of our phase I results include the demonstration of signal responses with and without oxygen present, as well as in air with a high level of humidity. We have measured response times of <0.5 s to 1% H{sub 2} in air, and shown the ability to detect concentrations of <200 ppm. These results are extremely encouraging and suggest that this technology has substantial potential for meeting the needs of a hydrogen based economy. These achievements demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-hotplates structures in conjunction with palladium+coated metal-hydride films for sensing hydrogen in many of the environments required by a hydrogen based energy economy. Based on these findings, they propose to continue and expand the development of this technology in Phase II.

  10. ELECTROCHEMICAL SEPARATION AND CONCENTRATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE FROM GAS MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  11. Electrochemical separation and concentration of hydrogen sulfide from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  12. 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne as a potential tritium getter

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.H.; Bissell, E.E.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Souers, P.C.

    1980-10-01

    Research on the acetylene compound 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne is an effort to develop an air-operative tritium gas scavenger. T/sub 2/ adds to the acetylene bond of the organic in the presence of a metal catalyst. The catalyst also stimulates the oxidation reaction as well. The butadiyne compound has shown good reaction efficiency at 300 ppM T/sub 2/ in static dry air. At this concentration 75% of the scavenged tritium was in the organic. This work has expanded to the investigation of liquid acetylenes, metal acetylene complexes, organometallics and acetylene based alcohols. The best of these compounds has gettered 100% of 10 to 500 ppM T/sub 2/ for both static and dynamic air flow conditions.

  13. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Jerry Meldon; Xiaomei Qi

    2001-12-01

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperature to improve reaction kinetics. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. In the first year of the project, we prepared a series of nanostructured Cu- and Fe-containing ceria catalysts by a special gelation/precipitation technique followed by air calcination at 650 C. Each sample was characterized by ICP for elemental composition analysis, BET-N2 desorption for surface area measurement, and by temperature-programmed reduction in H{sub 2} to evaluate catalyst reducibility. Screening WGS tests with catalyst powders were conducted in a flow microreactor at temperatures in the range of 200-550 C. On the basis of both activity and stability of catalysts in simulated coal gas, and in CO{sub 2}-rich gases, a Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst formulation was selected for further study in this project. Details from the catalyst development and testing work are given in this report. Also in this report, we present H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat membranes of pure Pd and Pd-alloys over a wide temperature window.

  14. Ionization-Assisted Getter Pumping for Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, Robert L.; Burt, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    A method eliminates (or recovers from) residual methane buildup in getter-pumped atomic frequency standard systems by applying ionizing assistance. Ultra-high stability trapped ion frequency standards for applications requiring very high reliability, and/or low power and mass (both for ground-based and space-based platforms) benefit from using sealed vacuum systems. These systems require careful material selection and system processing (cleaning and high-temperature bake-out). Even under the most careful preparation, residual hydrogen outgassing from vacuum chamber walls typically limits the base pressure. Non-evaporable getter pumps (NEGs) provide a convenient pumping option for sealed systems because of low mass and volume, and no power once activated. An ion gauge in conjunction with a NEG can be used to provide a low mass, low-power method for avoiding the deleterious effects of methane buildup in high-performance frequency standard vacuum systems.

  15. Silica membranes for hydrogen separation from coal gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gavalas, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    This project is a continuation of a previous DOE-UCR project (DE-FG22- 89PC89765) dealing with the preparation of silica membranes highly permselective to hydrogen at elevated temperatures, suitable for hydrogen separation from coal gas. The membranes prepared in the previous project had very high selectivity but relatively low permeance. Therefore, the general objectives of this project were to improve the permeance of these membranes and to obtain fundamental information about membrane structure and properties. The specific objectives were: (1) to explore new silylation reagents and reaction conditions with the purpose of reducing the thickness and increasing the permeance of silica membranes prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), (2) to characterize the membrane structure, (3) to delineate mechanism and kinetics of deposition, (4) to measure the permeability of silica layers at different extents of deposition, and (5) to mathematically model the relationship between structure and deposition kinetics.

  16. Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2007-12-11

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  17. Selective permeation of hydrogen gas using cellulose nanofibril film.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Hayaka; Fujisawa, Shuji; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2013-05-13

    Biobased membranes that can selectively permeate hydrogen gas have been developed from aqueous dispersions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCN) prepared from wood cellulose: TOCN-coated plastic films and self-standing TOCN films. Compared with TOCNs with sodium, lithium, potassium, and cesium carboxylate groups, TOCN with free carboxyl groups (TOCN-COOH) had much high and selective H2 gas permeation performance. Because permeabilities of H2, N2, O2, and CO2 gases through the membranes primarily depended on their kinetic diameters, the gas permeation behavior of the various TOCNs can be explained in terms of a diffusion mechanism. Thus, the selective H2 gas permeability for TOCN-COOH was probably due to a larger average size in free volume holes present between nanofibrils in the layer and film than those of other TOCNs with metal carboxylate groups. The obtained results indicate that TOCN-COOH membranes are applicable as biobased H2 gas separation membranes in fuel cell electric power generation systems. PMID:23594396

  18. Energy degradation of fast electrons in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yueming; Mccray, Richard

    1991-01-01

    An equation is derived for calculating the energy distribution of fast electrons in a partially ionized gas and a method is provided to solve for the electron degradation spectrum and the energy deposition in different forms (ionization, excitation, or heating). As an example, the energy degradation of fast electrons in a gas of pure hydrogen is calculated, considering excitations to the lowest 10 atomic levels. The Bethe approximation and the continuous slowing-down approximation are discussed and it is concluded that these approximations are accurate to the order of 20 percent for electrons with initial energy of greater than about keV. The method and results can be used to determine heating, excitations, and ionizations by high-energy photoelectrons or cosmic-ray particles in various astrophysical circumstances, such as the interstellar medium, supernova envelopes, and QSO emission-line clouds.

  19. Mechanisms of transition-metal gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Seibt, M.; Schroeter, W.

    2000-10-01

    The atomic process, kinetics, and equilibrium thermodynamics underlying the gettering of transition-metal impurities in Si are reviewed. Methods for mathematical modeling of gettering are discussed and illustrated. Needs for further research are considered. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  1. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  2. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  3. Star Formation as a Function of Neutral Hydrogen Gas Density in Local Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Erika K.; Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the efficiency and timescales of star formation as a function of local neutral hydrogen gas density in four Local Group galaxies: M33, NGC 6822, the LMC, and the SMC. In this work, we conceptualize the process of star formation as a cycle of two major phases – (1) a gas dynamics phase in which neutral hydrogen gas coalesces into clouds, and (2) a stellar phase in which stars have formed and interrupt further gas coalescence during their active lifetimes. By examining the spatial distribution and number densities of stars on maps of neutral hydrogen, we estimate the timescale of the gas coalescence phase relative to the timescale of the stellar phase and infer an efficiency of star formation as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density. From these timescales and efficiencies, we will calculate star formation rates as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density in these galaxies.

  4. Buffer Gas Experiments in Mercury (Hg+) Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Sang K.; Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    We describe the results of the frequency shifts measured from various buffer gases that might be used as a buffer gas to increase the loading efficiency and cooling of ions trapped in a small mercury ion clock. The small mass, volume and power requirement of space clock precludes the use of turbo pumps. Hence, a hermetically sealed vacuum system, incorporating a suitable getter material with a fixed amount of inert buffer gas may be a practical alternative to the groundbased system. The collision shifts of 40,507,347.996xx Hz clock transition for helium, neon and argon buffer gases were measured in the ambient earth magnetic field. In addition to the above non-getterable inert gases we also measured the frequency shifts due to getterable, molecular hydrogen and nitrogen gases which may be used as buffer gases when incorporated with a miniature ion pump. We also examined the frequency shift due to the low methane gas partial pressure in a fixed higher pressure neon buffer gas environment. Methane gas interacted with mercury ions in a peculiar way as to preserve the ion number but to relax the population difference in the two hyperfine clock states and thereby reducing the clock resonance signal. The same population relaxation was also observed for other molecular buffer gases (N H,) but at much reduced rate.

  5. Overview of Two Hydrogen Energy Storage Studies: Wind Hydrogen in California and Blending in Natural Gas Pipelines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of two NREL energy storage studies: Wind Hydrogen in California: Case Study and Blending Hydrogen Into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues. The presentation summarizes key issues, major model input assumptions, and results.

  6. Gas phase selective hydrogenation over oxide supported Ni-Au.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Keane, Mark A

    2015-11-14

    The chemoselective continuous gas phase (T = 573 K; P = 1 atm) hydrogenation of nitroarenes (p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) and m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB)) has been investigated over a series of oxide (Al2O3 and TiO2) supported Au and Ni-Au (1 : 10 mol ratio; 0.1-1 mol% Au) catalysts. Monometallic supported Au with mean particle size 3-9 nm promoted exclusive formation of p-chloroaniline (p-CAN) and m-nitroaniline (m-NAN). Selective hydrogenation rate was higher over smaller Au particles and can be attributed to increased surface hydrogen (from TPD measurements) at higher metal dispersion. (S)TEM analysis has confirmed an equivalent metal particle size for the supported bimetallics at the same Au loading where TPR indicates Ni-Au interaction and EDX surface mapping established Ni in close proximity to Au on isolated nanoparticles with a composition (Au/Ni) close to the bulk value (= 10). Increased spillover hydrogen due to the incorporation of Ni in the bimetallics resulted in elevated -NO2 group reduction rate. Full selectivity to p-CAN was maintained over all the bimetallic catalysts. Conversion of m-DNB over the lower loaded Ni-Au/Al2O3 generated m-NAN as sole product. An increase in Ni content (0.01 → 0.1 mol%) or a switch from Al2O3 to TiO2 as support resulted in full -NO2 reduction (to m-phenylenediamine). Our results demonstrate the viability of Ni-promotion of Au in the continuous production of functionalised anilines. PMID:25752655

  7. Selective hydrogen gas sensor using CuFe2O4 nanoparticle based thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haija, Mohammad Abu; Ayesh, Ahmad I.; Ahmed, Sadiqa; Katsiotis, Marios S.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen gas sensors based on CuFe2O4 nanoparticle thin films are presented in this work. Each gas sensor was prepared by depositing CuFe2O4 thin film on a glass substrate by dc sputtering inside a high vacuum chamber. Argon inert gas was used to sputter the material from a composite sputtering target. Interdigitated metal electrodes were deposited on top of the thin films by thermal evaporation and shadow masking. The produced sensors were tested against hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and ethylene gases where they were found to be selective for hydrogen. The sensitivity of the produced sensors was maximum for hydrogen gas at 50 °C. In addition, the produced sensors exhibit linear response signal for hydrogen gas with concentrations up to 5%. Those sensors have potential to be used for industrial applications because of their low power requirement, functionality at low temperatures, and low production cost.

  8. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  9. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  10. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P.; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5–5 pA per μmol L-1 H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8–10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1–2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats. PMID:26257714

  11. Argon recovery from hydrogen depleted ammonia plant purge gas using a HARP Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Lerner, S.L.; Maclean, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    A number of ammonia plants employ membranes or cryogenic hydrogen recovery units to separate hydrogen contained in the purge gas for recycle to the ammonia synthesis loop. The resulting hydrogen depleted purge gas, which is usually used for fuel, is an attractive source of argon. This paper presents the novel features of a process which employs a combination of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) and cryogenic technology to separate the argon from this hydrogen depleted purge gas stream. This new proprietary Hybrid Argon Recovery Progress (HARP) plant is an effective alternative to a conventional all-cryogenic plant.

  12. Numerical simulation of high pressure release and dispersion of hydrogen into air with real gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksarfard, R.; Kameshki, M. R.; Paraschivoiu, M.

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen is a renewable and clean source of energy, and it is a good replacement for the current fossil fuels. Nevertheless, hydrogen should be stored in high-pressure reservoirs to have sufficient energy. An in-house code is developed to numerically simulate the release of hydrogen from a high-pressure tank into ambient air with more accuracy. Real gas models are used to simulate the flow since high-pressure hydrogen deviates from ideal gas law. Beattie-Bridgeman and Abel Noble equations are applied as real gas equation of state. A transport equation is added to the code to calculate the concentration of the hydrogen-air mixture after release. The uniqueness of the code is to simulate hydrogen in air release with the real gas model. Initial tank pressures of up to 70 MPa are simulated.

  13. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  14. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  15. Study of Hydrogen Recovery Systems for Gas Vented While Refueling Liquid-Hydrogen Fueled Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of capturing and reliquefying the cold hydrogen vapor produced during the fueling of aircraft designed to utilize liquid hydrogen fuel were investigated. An assessment of the most practical, economic, and energy efficient of the hydrogen recovery methods is provided.

  16. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Measurements of laminar burning velocities for natural gas-hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Deming

    2006-07-15

    Laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames were studied in a constant-volume bomb at normal temperature and pressure. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at various ratios of hydrogen to natural gas (volume fraction from 0 to 100%) and equivalence ratios (f from 0.6 to 1.4). The influence of stretch rate on flame was also analyzed. The results show that, for lean mixture combustion, the flame radius increases with time but the increasing rate decreases with flame expansion for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, while at high hydrogen fractions, there exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time. For rich mixture combustion, the flame radius shows a slowly increasing rate at early stages of flame propagation and a quickly increasing rate at late stages of flame propagation for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, and there also exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time for mixtures with high hydrogen fractions. Combustion at stoichiometric mixture demonstrates the linear relationship between flame radius and time for natural gas-air, hydrogen-air, and natural gas-hydrogen-air flames. Laminar burning velocities increase exponentially with the increase of hydrogen fraction in mixtures, while the Markstein length decreases and flame instability increases with the increase of hydrogen fractions in mixture. For a fixed hydrogen fraction, the Markstein number shows an increase and flame stability increases with the increase of equivalence ratios. Based on the experimental data, a formula for calculating the laminar burning velocities of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames is proposed. (author)

  18. Hydrogen gas sensor based on palladium and yttrium alloy ultrathin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liu; You-ping, Chen; Han, Song; Gang, Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Compared with the other hydrogen sensors, optical fiber hydrogen sensors based on thin films exhibits inherent safety, small volume, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and distributed remote sensing capability, but slower response characteristics. To improve response and recovery rate of the sensors, a novel reflection-type optical fiber hydrogen gas sensor with a 10 nm palladium and yttrium alloy thin film is fabricated. The alloy thin film shows a good hydrogen sensing property for hydrogen-containing atmosphere and a complete restorability for dry air at room temperature. The variation in response value of the sensor linearly increases with increased natural logarithm of hydrogen concentration (ln[H2]). The shortest response time and recovery response time to 4% hydrogen are 6 and 8 s, respectively. The hydrogen sensors based on Pd0.91Y0.09 alloy ultrathin film have potential applications in hydrogen detection and measurement.

  19. Formation of ordered gas-solid structures via solidification in metal-hydrogen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalov, V.I. |

    1998-12-31

    This work contains theoretical discussions concerning the large amount of previously published experimental data related to gas eutectic transformations in metal-hydrogen systems. Theories of pore nucleation and growth in these gas-solid materials will be presented and related to observed morphologies and structures. This work is intended to be helpful to theorists that work with metal-hydrogen systems, and experimentalists engaged in manufacturing technology development of these ordered gas-solid structures.

  20. Silica membranes for hydrogen separation in coal gas processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gavalas, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The general objective of this project was to synthesize permselective membranes suitable for hydrogen separation from coal gas. The specific objectives were: (i) to synthesize membranes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of SiO[sub 2] or other oxides on porous support tubes, (ii) characterize the membranes by permeation measurements of various gases and by electron microscopy, and (iii) obtain information about the mechanism and kinetics Of SiO[sub 2] deposition, and model the process of membrane formation. Silica glass and certain other glasses, in dense (nonporous) form, are highly selective to hydrogen permeation. Since this high selectivity is accompanied by low permeability, however, a practical membrane must have a composite structure consisting of a thin layer of the active oxide supported on a porous tube or plate providing mechanical support. In this project the membranes were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of SiO[sub 2], TiO[sub 2], Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and B[sub 2]O[sub 3] layers inside the walls of porous Vycor tubes (5 mm ID, 7 mm OD, 40 [Angstrom] mean pore diameter). Deposition of the oxide layer was carried out using the reaction of SiCl[sub 4] (or TiCl[sub 4], AlCl[sub 3], BCl[sub 3]) and water vapor at elevated temperatures. The porous support tube was inserted concentrically into a larger quartz tube and fitted with flow lines and pressure gauges. The flow of the two reactant streams was regulated by mass flow controllers, while the temperature was controlled by placing the reactor into a split-tube electric furnace.

  1. Apparatus and method for treating pollutants in a gas using hydrogen peroxide and UV light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clausen, Christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending therebetween. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  2. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR TREATING POLLUTANTS IN A GAS USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND UV LIGHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clauseu, christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending there between. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  3. An innovative getter coating for IR dewars and cold shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsir, Dina; Feinman, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    A new getter type produced as a vacuum deposited thin-film is under development (patent pending). The film serves as an efficient pumping substance and also as an efficient absorber of IR stray light. The getter film is activated in place by heating to 130 °C. The film is very thin and has excellent vibration resistance and temperature stability and is expected to serve as an advantageous new solution for IR detector dewars and cold shields.

  4. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures. PMID:24113685

  5. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures. PMID:24113685

  6. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  7. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  8. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  9. Introducing porous silicon as a sacrificial material to obtain cavities in substrate of SOI wafers and a getter material for MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Wajihuddin

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonators have been a subject of research for more than four decades. The reason is the huge potential they possess for frequency applications. The use of a MEMS resonator as the timing element has an experimental history and huge progress has been made in this direction. Vacuum encapsulated MEMS resonators are required for high precision frequency control. Hence, a device with a high quality factor and durability is needed. In this effort, a new process for producing a cavity in the substrate of Silicon on insulator (SOI) MEMS devices and augmenting it with a getter using porous silicon is developed. The process involves a mask-less, self-aligned cost effective electrochemical etching process. A 10 mum cavity is introduced in the substrate of SOI dies. This helps in increasing the packaging volume of the SOI resonators along with mitigating the viscous damping effects. The stiction problem in MEMS devices is effectively eliminated and millimeter long slender MEMS structures do not get stuck to the substrate. It also helps in reducing the parasitic capacitance between the device side and the substrate. The porous silicon getter is introduced as a getter material for vacuum encapsulated MEMS devices. This getter needs no external mask and is self-aligned. It requires no external heat or additional materials to operate. The highly reactive porous silicon can readily react with the oxygen gas and form an oxide layer that can trap other gas molecules. This helps in maintaining low pressures in the cavity of the bonded MEMS resonators. A tuning fork resonator with a resonant frequency of 245 kHz was used to realize the benefits of the cavity and the getter. It was observed that the unpackaged device with the cavity in the substrate showed two times better quality factor at different pressures, than the device with no cavity. In order to understand the benefits of porous silicon as a getter, the MEMS devices (one with only a cavity

  10. A positive role for hydrogen gas in adventitious root development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongchao; Liao, Weibiao

    2016-06-01

    Our recent study highlights the role of hydrogen gas (H2) in adventitious root development in cucumber. H2 is an effective gaseous signal molecule with the abilities to regulate plant growth and development and enhance plant resistance to environmental stimulus. In addition, the effect of H2 on fruit senescence and flowering time also has been reported. Adventitious root development is a critical step in plant vegetative propagation affected by a serious of signaling molecules, such as auxin, nitric oxide (NO), carbon oxide (CO), ethylene and Ca(2+). Observational evidence has shown that H2 can regulate adventitious root development in a dose-dependent manner. H2 may regulate HO-1/CO pathway through or not through NO pathway during adventitious rooting. Rooting-related enzymes, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, indoleacetic acid oxidase were required for H2-induced adventitious root. CsDNAJ-1, CsCPDK1/5, CsCDC6, CsAUX228-like, and CsAUX22D-like genes also were involved in this process. PMID:27171348

  11. ZrCoCe Getter Films for MEMS Vacuum Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yaohua; Cui, Jiandong; Cui, Hang; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Zhimin; Du, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In order to specifically support the technology trend of increased miniaturization of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) devices, highly porous ZrCoCe non-evaporable getter (NEG) film has been produced by direct current magnetron sputtering from a preformed ZrCoCe alloy target. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the ZrCoCe film is constructed with porous columnar crystals, which are further built up with assembled ZrCoCe amorphous or nanocrystalline grains with an average grain size of 5 nm. Gas sorption investigation shows that this film can be activated at a low temperature of 300°C for 30 min and has excellent stable sorption characteristics. Sorption properties can be further improved with elevating activation temperatures due to nanocrystals growing and amorphous regions crystallizing. The capability of ZrCoCe films to withstand wafer physical or chemical cleaning processes is investigated, indicating their compatibility with MEMS vacuum packaging and the appropriate way to store them.

  12. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  13. Getters for Tc and I Removal from Liquid Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qafoku, N. P.; Asmussen, M.; Lawter, A.; Neeway, J.; Smith, G.

    2015-12-01

    A cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, is being evaluated as a possible supplemental waste form for the low activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford Site, which contains significant amounts of radioactive 99Tc and 129I, as part of the tank waste cleanup mission. To improve the retention of Tc and/or I in Cast Stone, materials with a high affinity for Tc and/or I, termed "getters," can be added to decrease the rate of contaminant release and diffusivity, and improve Cast Stone performance. A series of kinetic batch sorption experiments was performed to determine the effectiveness of the getter materials. Several Tc getters [blast furnace slag, Sn (II) apatite, SnCl2, nanoporous Sn phosphate, KMS-2 (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and Sn(II) hydroxyapatite] and I getters [layered Bi hydroxide, natural argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, Ag-impregnated carbon, and Ag-exchanged zeolite] were tested in different solution media, 18.2 MΩ DI H2O and a caustic LAW waste simulant containing 6.5 M Na or 7.8 M Na. The experiments were conducted at room temperature in the presence or absence of air. Results indicated that most Tc getters (with the exception of KMS-2) performed better in the DI H2O solution than in the 6.5 and 7.8 M Na LAW simulant. In addition, Tc sequestration may be affected by the presence of other redox sensitive elements that were present in the LAW simulant, such as Cr. The Tc getter materials have been examined through various solid-state characterization techniques such as XRD, SEM/EDS, XANES and EXAFS which provided evidence for plausible mechanisms of aqueous Tc removal. The results indicated that the Tc precipitates differ depending on the getter material and that Tc(VII) is reduced to Tc(IV) in most of the getters but to a differing extents. For the I getters, Ag-exchanged zeolite and synthetic argentite were the most effective ones. The other I getters showed limited effectiveness for sorbing I under the high ionic strength and caustic

  14. Refractory two-dimensional hole gas on hydrogenated diamond surface

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Daicho, Akira; Kurihara, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Yuki; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2012-12-15

    Use of two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG), induced on a hydrogenated diamond surface, is a solution to overcoming one of demerits of diamond, i.e., deep energy levels of impurities. This 2DHG is affected by its environment and accordingly needs a passivation film to get a stable device operation especially at high temperature. In response to this requirement, we achieved the high-reliability passivation forming an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film on the diamond surface using an atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) method with an H{sub 2}O oxidant at 450 Degree-Sign C. The 2DHG thus protected survived air annealing at 550 Degree-Sign C for an hour, establishing a stable high-temperature operation of 2DHG devices in air. In part, this achievement is based on high stability of C-H bonds up to 870 Degree-Sign C in vacuum and above 450 Degree-Sign C in an H{sub 2}O-containing environment as in the ALD. Chemically, this stability is supported by the fact that both the thermal decomposition of C-H bonds and reaction between C-H bonds and H{sub 2}O are endothermic processes. It makes a stark contrast to the instability of Si-H bonds, which decompose even at room temperature being exposed to atomic hydrogen. In this respect, the diamond 2DHG devices are also promising as power devices expectedly being free from many instability phenomena, such as hot carrier effect and negative-bias temperature instability, associated with Si devices. As to adsorbate, which is the other prerequisite for 2DHG, it desorbed in vacuum below 250 Degree-Sign C, and accordingly some new adsorbates should have adsorbed during the ALD at 450 Degree-Sign C. As a clue to this question, we certainly confirmed that some adsorbates, other than those at room temperature, adsorbed in air above 100 Degree-Sign C and remained at least up to 290 Degree-Sign C. The identification of these adsorbates is open for further investigation.

  15. Refractory two-dimensional hole gas on hydrogenated diamond surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Daicho, Akira; Kurihara, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Yuki; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Use of two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG), induced on a hydrogenated diamond surface, is a solution to overcoming one of demerits of diamond, i.e., deep energy levels of impurities. This 2DHG is affected by its environment and accordingly needs a passivation film to get a stable device operation especially at high temperature. In response to this requirement, we achieved the high-reliability passivation forming an Al2O3 film on the diamond surface using an atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) method with an H2O oxidant at 450 °C. The 2DHG thus protected survived air annealing at 550 °C for an hour, establishing a stable high-temperature operation of 2DHG devices in air. In part, this achievement is based on high stability of C-H bonds up to 870 °C in vacuum and above 450 °C in an H2O-containing environment as in the ALD. Chemically, this stability is supported by the fact that both the thermal decomposition of C-H bonds and reaction between C-H bonds and H2O are endothermic processes. It makes a stark contrast to the instability of Si-H bonds, which decompose even at room temperature being exposed to atomic hydrogen. In this respect, the diamond 2DHG devices are also promising as power devices expectedly being free from many instability phenomena, such as hot carrier effect and negative-bias temperature instability, associated with Si devices. As to adsorbate, which is the other prerequisite for 2DHG, it desorbed in vacuum below 250 °C, and accordingly some new adsorbates should have adsorbed during the ALD at 450 °C. As a clue to this question, we certainly confirmed that some adsorbates, other than those at room temperature, adsorbed in air above 100 °C and remained at least up to 290 °C. The identification of these adsorbates is open for further investigation.

  16. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry Y.S.

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  17. FIRST OPERATING RESULTS OF A DYNAMIC GAS BEARING TURBINE IN AN INDUSTRIAL HYDROGEN LIQUEFIER

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, S.; Decker, L.

    2010-04-09

    Hydrogen has been brought into focus of industry and public since fossil fuels are depleting and costs are increasing dramatically. Beside these issues new high-tech processes in the industry are in need for hydrogen at ultra pure quality. To achieve these requirements and for efficient transportation, hydrogen is liquefied in industrial plants. Linde Gas has commissioned a new 5.5 TPD Hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany, which has been engineered and supplied by Linde Kryotechnik. One of the four expansion turbines installed in the liquefaction process is equipped with dynamic gas bearings. Several design features and operational characteristics of this application will be discussed. The presentation will include results of efficiency and operational reliability that have been determined from performance tests. The advantages of the Linde dynamic gas bearing turbine for future use in hydrogen liquefaction plants will be shown.

  18. Study of the behavior of gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1981-03-01

    The characteristics of gas distribution pipe in hydrogen service was studied. In experiments with three types of polyethylene natural gas piping, hydrogen permeation was found to be 4 to 6 times greater than methane permeation. Leakage experiments with methane/hydrogen blends showed no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow through leaks. Leak rates increased with increasing pressure and decreasing specific gravity. It is concluded that 13.7 x 10 to the 6th power SCF of natural gas could be lost annually in the U.S. by permeation; if hydrogen were distributed, the comparable loss would be 67.4 x 10 to the 6th power.

  19. First Operating Results of a Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbine in AN Industrial Hydrogen Liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, S.; Decker, L.

    2010-04-01

    Hydrogen has been brought into focus of industry and public since fossil fuels are depleting and costs are increasing dramatically. Beside these issues new high-tech processes in the industry are in need for hydrogen at ultra pure quality. To achieve these requirements and for efficient transportation, hydrogen is liquefied in industrial plants. Linde Gas has commissioned a new 5.5 TPD Hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany, which has been engineered and supplied by Linde Kryotechnik. One of the four expansion turbines installed in the liquefaction process is equipped with dynamic gas bearings. Several design features and operational characteristics of this application will be discussed. The presentation will include results of efficiency and operational reliability that have been determined from performance tests. The advantages of the Linde dynamic gas bearing turbine for future use in hydrogen liquefaction plants will be shown.

  20. Modification and testing of an engine and fuel control system for a hydrogen fuelled gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, H. H.-W.; Börner, S.; Hendrick, P.; Recker, E.

    2011-10-01

    The control of pollutant emissions has become more and more important by the development of new gas turbines. The use of hydrogen produced by renewable energy sources could be an alternative. Besides the reduction of NOx emissions emerged during the combustion process, another major question is how a hydrogen fuelled gas turbine including the metering unit can be controlled and operated. This paper presents a first insight in modifications on an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) GTCP 36300 for using gaseous hydrogen as a gas turbine fuel. For safe operation with hydrogen, the metering of hydrogen has to be fast, precise, and secure. So, the quality of the metering unit's control loop has an important influence on this topic. The paper documents the empiric determination of the proportional integral derivative (PID) control parameters for the metering unit.

  1. Molecular hydrogen as a preventive and therapeutic medical gas: initiation, development and potential of hydrogen medicine.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shigeo

    2014-10-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been accepted to be an inert and nonfunctional molecule in our body. We have turned this concept by demonstrating that H2 reacts with strong oxidants such as hydroxyl radical in cells, and proposed its potential for preventive and therapeutic applications. H2 has a number of advantages exhibiting extensive effects: H2 rapidly diffuses into tissues and cells, and it is mild enough neither to disturb metabolic redox reactions nor to affect signaling reactive oxygen species; therefore, there should be no or little adverse effects of H2. There are several methods to ingest or consume H2; inhaling H2 gas, drinking H2-dissolved water (H2-water), injecting H2-dissolved saline (H2-saline), taking an H2 bath, or dropping H2-saline into the eyes. The numerous publications on its biological and medical benefits revealed that H2 reduces oxidative stress not only by direct reactions with strong oxidants, but also indirectly by regulating various gene expressions. Moreover, by regulating the gene expressions, H2 functions as an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic, and stimulates energy metabolism. In addition to growing evidence obtained by model animal experiments, extensive clinical examinations were performed or are under investigation. Since most drugs specifically act to their targets, H2 seems to differ from conventional pharmaceutical drugs. Owing to its great efficacy and lack of adverse effects, H2 has promising potential for clinical use against many diseases. PMID:24769081

  2. A pyrolysis/gas chromatographic method for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples.

    PubMed

    Carr, R H; Bustin, R; Gibson, E K

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples. The sample is heated under vacuum after which the evolved gases are separated by gas chromatography with a helium ionization detector. The system is calibrated by injecting known amounts of hydrogen, as determined manometrically. The method, which is rapid and reliable, was checked for a variety of lunar soils; the limit of detection is about 10 ng of hydrogen. PMID:11542122

  3. A pyrolysis/gas chromatographic method for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, R. H.; Bustin, R.; Gibson, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples. The sample is heated under vacuum after which the evolved gases are separated by gas chromatography with a helium ionization detector. The system is calibrated by injecting known amounts of hydrogen, as determined manometrically. The method, which is rapid and reliable, was checked for a variety of lunar soils; the limit of detection is about 10 ng of hydrogen.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BIOQUELL, INC. CLARIS C HYDROGEN PEROXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Clarus C Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator, a biological decontamination device manufactured by BIOQUELL, Inc. The unit was tested by evaluating its ability to decontaminate seven types...

  5. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Hydrogen Sensors Boost Hybrids; Today's Models Losing Gas?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Advanced chemical sensors are used in aeronautic and space applications to provide safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. In order to fully do their jobs, these sensors must be able to operate in a range of environments. NASA has developed sensor technologies addressing these needs with the intent of improving safety, optimizing combustion efficiencies, and controlling emissions. On the ground, the chemical sensors were developed by NASA engineers to detect potential hydrogen leaks during Space Shuttle launch operations. The Space Shuttle uses a combination of hydrogen and oxygen as fuel for its main engines. Liquid hydrogen is pumped to the external tank from a storage tank located several hundred feet away. Any hydrogen leak could potentially result in a hydrogen fire, which is invisible to the naked eye. It is important to detect the presence of a hydrogen fire in order to prevent a major accident. In the air, the same hydrogen-leak dangers are present. Stress and temperature changes can cause tiny cracks or holes to form in the tubes that line the Space Shuttle s main engine nozzle. Such defects could allow the hydrogen that is pumped through the nozzle during firing to escape. Responding to the challenges associated with pinpointing hydrogen leaks, NASA endeavored to improve propellant leak-detection capabilities during assembly, pre-launch operations, and flight. The objective was to reduce the operational cost of assembling and maintaining hydrogen delivery systems with automated detection systems. In particular, efforts have been focused on developing an automated hydrogen leak-detection system using multiple, networked hydrogen sensors that are operable in harsh conditions.

  7. Potential energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of hydrogen production from coke oven gas in U.S. Steel Mills.

    SciTech Connect

    Joseck, F.; Wang, M.; Wu, Y.; Energy Systems; DOE

    2008-02-01

    For this study, we examined the energy and emission effects of hydrogen production from coke oven gas (COG) on a well-to-wheels basis and compared these effects with those of other hydrogen production options, as well as with those of conventional gasoline and diesel options. We then estimated the magnitude of hydrogen production from COG in the United States and the number of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) that could potentially be fueled with the hydrogen produced from COG. Our analysis shows that this production pathway can achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction benefits. This pathway is especially worth considering because first, the sources of COG are concentrated in the upper Midwest and in the Northeast United States, which would facilitate relatively cost-effective collection, transportation, and distribution of the produced hydrogen to refueling stations in these regions. Second, the amount of hydrogen that could be produced may fuel about 1.7 million cars, thus providing a vital near-term hydrogen production option for FCV applications.

  8. ZrCo as a new H2 storage and getter for Lyman alpha radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woyke, Thomas; Schiller, Cornelius; Schmidt, Ulrich; Schober, Tilman; Zöger, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In the past, in sealed-off Lyman- alpha radiation sources (121.57 nm), uranium hydride was used as the hydrogen reservoir. We found that the zirconium-cobalt alloy ZrCo, which has similar thermodynamic properties, can also be used for hydrogen storage in such lamps. Like uranium, ZrCo acts as a getter for atmospheric contaminants. The advantage of the use of ZrCo lies in much easier and safer handling during production and disposal of the lamps. Using ZrCo, we succeeded in producing radiation sources with a large Lyman- alpha radiation output and high spectral purity, which were successfully applied in a Lyman- alpha fluorescence hygrometer for stratospheric observations.

  9. Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 MΩ deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 MΩ DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted

  10. Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

    2015-02-19

    To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 MΩ deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 MΩ DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted