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Sample records for hydrogen induced c-c

  1. Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activation on Pt and Ni surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The work has focussed on hydrogen induced bond activation in adsorbed organic molecules and intermediates containin C-S and C-N and C-C bonds on Ni(100), Ni(111), and Pt(111) surfaces. Fluorescence Yield Near Edge Spectroscopy (FYNES) above the carbon K edge was used for adsorbed organic reactants and in-situ kinetic studies of bond activation. Results indicate that the activation is enhanced on Ni relative to Pt. Methylthiolate and methylamine adsorbed on Pt(111) were studied.

  2. Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activation on Pt and Ni surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    The work has focussed on hydrogen induced bond activation in adsorbed organic molecules and intermediates containin C-S and C-N and C-C bonds on Ni(100), Ni(111), and Pt(111) surfaces. Fluorescence Yield Near Edge Spectroscopy (FYNES) above the carbon K edge was used for adsorbed organic reactants and in-situ kinetic studies of bond activation. Results indicate that the activation is enhanced on Ni relative to Pt. Methylthiolate and methylamine adsorbed on Pt(111) were studied.

  3. Influence of sulfur addition and S-induced wall catalytic effect on C-C bond cleavage and aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(-1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl NMBB predominately yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors lead to substantially higher catalyst activity and subsequently higher conversion. In order to clarify the effect of sulfur alone on model compound conversion, NMBB was treated with sulfur in concentrations of 1.2 to 3.4 wt%, corresponding to conditions present in catalytic runs with sulfur. It was found that increasing sulfur concentrations leads to higher NMBB conversion. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent influence on the reactor walls. It reacted with the transition metals in the steel to form a microscopic black iron sulfide layer on the surface, which could not be removed mechanically. The {open_quotes}non catalytic{close_quotes} runs after experiments with added sulfur yielded higher conversion than normal runs with new reactors. This {open_quotes}wall catalytic effect{close_quotes} can be reduced by treating sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid for a short period of time and subsequent immersing into a base bath over night. These results demonstrate the significant influence of sulfur addition and S-induced residual wall-effect on C-C bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics in batch reactors.

  4. Influence of sulfur addition and S-induced wall catalytic effects on C-C bond cleavage and aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, designated as NMBB, predominately yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors lead to substantially higher catalyst activity and subsequently higher conversion. NMBB was also treated with sulfur alone in the absence of catalysts in concentrations of 1.2 to 3.4 wt, corresponding to conditions present in catalytic runs with added sulfur to precursors. It was found that increasing sulfur concentrations lead to higher NMBB conversion. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent influence on the reactor walls. It reacted with the transition metals in the stainless steel to form a microscopic black iron sulfide layer on the surface, which could not be removed mechanically. The {open_quotes}non-catalytic{close_quotes} runs which were done after experiments with added sulfur yielded higher conversions than normal runs done in new reactors. This {open_quotes}wall catalytic effect{close_quotes} can be reduced by treating sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid for a short period of time and subsequent immersing into a base bath overnight. These results demonstrate the significant influence of sulfur addition and S-induced residual wall-effect on C-C bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics in batch reactors.

  5. Formation of C-C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Bower, John F; Krische, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The formation of C-C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile-nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C-H bonds. PMID:21822399

  6. Formation of C-C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, John F.; Krische, Michael J.

    The formation of C-C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile-nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C-H bonds.

  7. Unlocking Hydrogenation for C-C Bond Formation: A Brief Overview of Enantioselective Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Abbas; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenation of π-unsaturated reactants in the presence of carbonyl compounds or imines promotes reductive C-C coupling, providing a byproduct-free alternative to stoichiometric organometallic reagents in an ever-increasing range of C=X (X = O, NR) additions. Under transfer hydrogenation conditions, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants triggers generation of electrophile-nucleophile pairs, enabling carbonyl addition directly from the alcohol oxidation level, bypassing discrete alcohol oxidation and generation of stoichiometric byproducts. PMID:22125398

  8. Formation of C-C bonds via ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation().

    PubMed

    Moran, Joseph; Krische, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of diverse π-unsaturated reactants in the presence of aldehydes provides products of carbonyl addition. Dehydrogenation of primary alcohols in the presence of the same π-unsaturated reactants provides identical products of carbonyl addition. In this way, carbonyl addition is achieved from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents or metallic reductants. In this account, the discovery of ruthenium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming transfer hydrogenations and the recent development of diastereo- and enantioselective variants are discussed. PMID:23430602

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence of cyclohexadienyl (c-C{sub 6}H{sub 7}) radical in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Takashi; Zhang Weijun; Horiuchi, Hiroaki; Hiratsuka, Hiroshi; Kudo, Takako; Obi, Kinichi

    2004-10-08

    A laser-induced fluorescence spectrum was observed in the 500-560 nm region when a mixture of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and oxalyl chloride was photolyzed at 193 nm. The observed excitation spectrum was assigned to the A-tilde {sup 2}A{sub 2}<-X-tilde {sup 2}B{sub 1} transition of the cyclohexadienyl radical c-C{sub 6}H{sub 7}, produced by abstraction of a hydrogen atom from 1,4-cyclohexadiene by Cl atoms. The origin of the A-tilde<-X-tilde transition of c-C{sub 6}H{sub 7} was at 18 207 cm-1. From measurements of the dispersed fluorescence spectra and ab initio calculations, the frequencies of several vibrational modes in both the ground and excited states of c-C{sub 6}H{sub 7} were determined: {nu}{sub 5}(C-H in-plane bend)=1571, {nu}{sub 8}(C-Hin-plane bend)=1174, {nu}{sub 10}(C-C-C in-plane bend)=981, {nu}{sub 12}(C-C-C in-plane bend)=559, {nu}{sub 16}(C-C-C out-of-plane bend)=375, and {nu}{sub 33}(C-C-C in-plane bend)=600 cm{sup -1} for the ground state and {nu}{sub 8}=1118, {nu}{sub 10}=967, {nu}{sub 12}=502, {nu}{sub 16}=172, and {nu}{sub 33}=536 cm{sup -1} for the excited states.

  10. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation for C-C Bond Formation: Hydrohydroxyalkylation and Hydroaminoalkylation via Reactant Redox Pairs.

    PubMed

    Perez, Felix; Oda, Susumu; Geary, Laina M; Krische, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Merging the chemistry of transfer hydrogenation and carbonyl or imine addition, a broad new family of redox-neutral or reductive hydrohydroxyalkylations and hydroaminomethylations have been developed. In these processes, hydrogen redistribution between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants is accompanied by C-C bond formation, enabling direct conversion of lower alcohols to higher alcohols. Similarly, hydrogen redistribution between amines to π-unsaturated reactants results in direct conversion of lower amines to higher amines. Alternatively, equivalent products of hydrohydroxyalkylation and hydroaminomethylation may be generated through the reaction of carbonyl compounds or imines with π-unsaturated reactants under the conditions of 2-propanol-mediated reductive coupling. Finally, using vicinally dioxygenated reactants, that is, diol, ketols, or diones, successive transfer hydrogenative coupling occurs to generate 2 C-C bonds, resulting in products of formal [4+2] cycloaddition. PMID:27573275

  11. The use of ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C bonds.

    PubMed

    Kelsen, Vinciane; Wendt, Bianca; Werkmeister, Svenja; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias; Chaudret, Bruno

    2013-04-28

    The performance of well-defined ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles (NPs) as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C and C=X bonds is reported. Monodisperse iron nanoparticles of about 2 nm size are synthesized by the decomposition of {Fe(N[Si(CH3)3]2)2}2 under dihydrogen. They are found to be active for the hydrogenation of various alkenes and alkynes under mild conditions and weakly active for C=O bond hydrogenation. PMID:23505625

  12. Light Induced C-C Coupling of 2-Chlorobenzazoles with Carbamates, Alcohols, and Ethers.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Alexander; Lahm, Günther; Opatz, Till

    2016-06-01

    A light induced, transition-metal-free C-C coupling reaction of 2-chlorobenzazoles with aliphatic carbamates, alcohols, and ethers is presented. Inexpensive reagents, namely sodium acetate, benzophenone, water, and acetonitrile, are employed in a simple reaction protocol using a cheap and widely available 25 W energy saving UV-A lamp at ambient temperature. PMID:27128627

  13. Hydrogen Induced C-C, C-N, & C-S Bond Activation on Pt & Ni Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J. L.

    2004-07-29

    The primary reactions investigated were chosen based on their importance in fuel and chemical production as well as in environmental remediation, and include reactions for hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), carbon-carbon hydrogenolysis, and hydrocarbon oxidation.

  14. [Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activities on Pi and Ni surfaces]: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    This document summarizes research applied to chemical bond activation studies. Topics summarized include: Carbon nitrogen bonds experimentation with aniline on Ni(111), Mi(100), and Pt(111) surfaces; carbon sulfur bonds experimentation with methanethiol, phenylthiol, and dimethyl disulfide on Pt(111) and Ni(111) surfaces; carbon-carbon bonds experimentation on Ni(100), Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces; and in-situ fluorescence yield near edge spectroscopy.

  15. NAD(P)H-Independent Asymmetric C=C Bond Reduction Catalyzed by Ene Reductases by Using Artificial Co-substrates as the Hydrogen Donor

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Christoph K; Clay, Dorina; Entner, Marcello; Plank, Markus; Faber, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    To develop a nicotinamide-independent single flavoenzyme system for the asymmetric bioreduction of C=C bonds, four types of hydrogen donor, encompassing more than 50 candidates, were investigated. Six highly potent, cheap, and commercially available co-substrates were identified that (under the optimized conditions) resulted in conversions and enantioselectivities comparable with, or even superior to, those obtained with traditional two-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H)-recycling systems. PMID:24382795

  16. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  17. Alkyne-aldehyde reductive C-C coupling through ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation: direct regio- and stereoselective carbonyl vinylation to form trisubstituted allylic alcohols in the absence of premetallated reagents.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joyce C; Patman, Ryan L; Sam, Brannon; Krische, Michael J

    2011-10-24

    Nonsymmetric 1,2-disubstituted alkynes engage in reductive coupling to a variety of aldehydes under the conditions of ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation by employing formic acid as the terminal reductant and delivering the products of carbonyl vinylation with good to excellent levels of regioselectivity and with complete control of olefin stereochemistry. As revealed in an assessment of the ruthenium counterion, iodide plays an essential role in directing the regioselectivity of C-C bond formation. Isotopic labeling studies corroborate reversible catalytic propargyl C-H oxidative addition in advance of the C-C coupling, and demonstrate that the C-C coupling products do not experience reversible dehydrogenation by way of enone intermediates. This transfer hydrogenation protocol enables carbonyl vinylation in the absence of stoichiometric metallic reagents. PMID:21953608

  18. Surfactant-induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, M.; Luisi, P.L. ); Hochkoeppler, A. . Dept. di Biologia)

    1993-10-01

    Addition of Tween 85 to aqueous suspensions of Anabaena variabilis induced photosynthetic evolution of hydrogen over a time span of several weeks: as much as 148 nmol H[sub 2]/h [center dot] mg dry weight was produced in the first week by a suspension containing 4.2 mg dry weight of cells and 77 mM Tween 85. The chemical structure of Tween 85 was a necessary prerequisite for inducing hydrogen production, as compounds such as Tween 20, 60, and 80 had a quite different effect. There was a coupling between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution: Hydrogen evolution started to be effective only when oxygen evolution subdued. The presence of heterocysts in A. variabilis was also required for the Tween-induced hydrogen production. Based on these observations, possible mechanisms for the photosynthetic effect of Tween 85 are advanced and discussed.

  19. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  20. The Catalytic Conversion of C1-Cn Hydrocarbons to Olefins and Hydrogen: Microwave-Assisted C-C and C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Dennis D.; Kandanarachchi, Pramod; Ding, Qizhu; Shao, Huawu; Vizitiu, Despina; Franz, James A.

    2001-01-17

    The gas phase carbon catalyzed microwave promoted conversion of methane to ethylene, ethane and acetylene and hydrogen is reported. A selection of C1-C4 hydrocarbons, hexadecane, and a cyclic hydrocarbon, cyclodecane, were also subjected to microwave conversion, resulting primarily in a-olefins, ethylene and hydrogen. For methane conversion, the products are reminiscent of those found in methane pyrolysis. Microwave induced cleavage of the liquid hydrocarbons provides conditions for the stabilization, by rapid thermal quenching in ambient temperature liquid reagent, of products such as terminal olefins that would be labile under conventional (thermal bath) pyrolysis reaction conditions. The reactions of long chain acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons involve high temperatures in the region of the spark leading to a cascade of unimolecular scission reactions from initially formed biradicals from cycloalkanes or radical pairs from linear alkanes, largely to the exclusion of intermolecular radical-radical and radical-molecule reactions. The observed products are discussed in terms of the thermochemistry and dynamics of high temperature unimolecular biradical and radical decomposition reactions, and mechanisms involving reactive surface metal sites. The reaction rates of alkanes were found to increase with the molecular weight of the reactants. Mechanistic pathways consistent with these results are discussed.

  1. Fuel cells: Hydrogen induced insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2016-06-01

    Coupling high ionic and low electronic conductivity in the electrolyte of low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells remains a challenge. Now, the electronic conductivity of a perovskite electrolyte, which has high proton conductivity, is shown to be heavily suppressed when exposed to hydrogen, leading to high fuel cell performance.

  2. Fatigue-induced Orosomucoid 1 Acts on C-C Chemokine Receptor Type 5 to Enhance Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hong; Sun, Yang; Luo, Zhumin; Yourek, Gregory; Gui, Huan; Yang, Yili; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and managing fatigue is a significant challenge in clinic and society. In attempting to explore how the body responds to and regulates fatigue, we found in rodent fatigue models that orosomucoid 1 (ORM1) was significantly increased in multiple tissues, including blood and muscle. Interestingly, administration of exogenous ORM1 increased muscle glycogen and enhanced muscle endurance, whereas ORM1 deficiency resulted in a significant decrease of muscle endurance both in vivo and in vitro, which could largely be restored by exogenous ORM1. Further studies demonstrated that ORM1 can bind to C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) on muscle cells and deletion of the receptor abolished the effect of ORM1. Thus, fatigue upregulates the level of ORM1, which in turn functions as an anti-fatigue protein to enhance muscle endurance via the CCR5 pathway. Modulation of the level of ORM1 and CCR5 signaling could be a novel strategy for the management of fatigue. PMID:26740279

  3. Hydrogen-induced cracking of drip shield

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    1999-08-01

    A simple and conservative model has been developed to evaluate the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking on the drip shield. The basic premise of the model is that failure will occur once the hydrogen content exceeds a certain limit or critical value, HC. This model is very conservative because it assumes that, once the environmental and material conditions can support that particular corrosion process, failure will be effectively instantaneous. In the description of the HIC model presented in Section 6.1, extensive evidence has been provided to support a qualitative assessment of Ti-7 as an excellent choice of material for the drip shield with regard to degradation caused by hydrogen-induced cracking. LTCTF test data observed at LLNL, although unqualified, provides additional indication beyond a qualitative level that hydrogen concentration appears to be low in titanium materials. Quantitative evaluation based on the HIC model described in Section 6.1 indicates that the hydrogen concentration does not exceed the critical value. It is concluded that drip shield material (Ti-7) is able to sustain the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking.

  4. Dipolar induced para-hydrogen-induced polarization.

    PubMed

    Buntkowsky, Gerd; Gutmann, Torsten; Petrova, Marina V; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Bommerich, Ute; Plaumann, Markus; Bernarding, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the signal enhancement in solid-state PHIP NMR spectroscopy mediated by homonuclear dipolar interactions and single pulse or spin-echo excitation are developed and simulated numerically. It is shown that an efficient enhancement of the proton NMR signal in solid-state NMR studies of chemisorbed hydrogen on surfaces is possible. Employing typical reaction efficacy, enhancement-factors of ca. 30-40 can be expected both under ALTADENA and under PASADENA conditions. This result has important consequences for the practical application of the method, since it potentially allows the design of an in-situ flow setup, where the para-hydrogen is adsorbed and desorbed from catalyst surfaces inside the NMR magnet. PMID:25218522

  5. Visible Light-Induced Radical Rearrangement to Construct C-C Bonds via an Intramolecular Aryl Migration/Desulfonylation Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuyuan; Hu, Bei; Dong, Wuheng; Xie, Xiaomin; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Zhaoguo

    2016-08-19

    A highly efficient intramolecular selective aryl migration/desulfonylation of 2-bromo-N-aryl-N-(arenesulfonyl)amide via visible light-induced photoredox catalysis has been accomplished. This approach allows for the construction of a variety of multisubstituted N,2-diarylacetamide under mild reaction conditions. PMID:27351977

  6. 7α-Hydroxycholesterol induces inflammation by enhancing production of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Mi; Kim, Bo-Young; Son, Yonghae; Jung, Young-Suk; Eo, Seong-Kug; Park, Young Chul; Kim, Koanhoi

    2015-11-27

    We investigated pro-inflammatory activity of 7-oxygenated cholesterol derivatives present in atherosclerotic lesions. Treatment of THP-1 monocyte/macrophage with 7α-hydroxycholesterol (7αOHChol) resulted in increased gene transcription of CCL2 and production of its corresponding protein. The conditioned medium isolated from THP-1 cells treated with 7αOHChol enhanced migration of monocytic cells, and migration was inhibited in the presence of CCL2-neutralizing antibody. In contrast, 7β-hydroxycholesterol (7βOHChol) or 7-ketocholesterol (7K) did not induce expression of CCL2, and the conditioned medium isolated from THP-1 cells exposed to 7βOHChol or 7K did not affect migration of monocytic cells. 7αOHChol also enhanced production of MMP-9. Inhibition of MEK or PI3K resulted in significantly attenuated expression of CCL2, along with that of MMP-9, induced by 7αOHChol. We propose that elevated concentration of a certain type of 7-oxygenated cholesterol derivative, like 7αOHChol, leads to inflammation via upregulation of CCL2 and MMP-9 in macrophages in the artery, thereby promoting progression of atherosclerosis, and the ERK and the PI3K pathways are involved in the process. PMID:26474699

  7. Ruthenium(0) Catalyzed Endiyne-α-Ketol [4+2] Cycloaddition: Convergent Assembly of Type II Polyketide Substructures via C-C Bond Forming Transfer Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Aakarsh; Perez, Felix; Krische, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Upon exposure of 3,4-benzannulated 1,5-diynes (benzo-endiynes) to α-ketols (α-hydroxyketones) in the presence of ruthenium(0) catalysts derived from Ru3(CO)12 and RuPhos or CyJohnPhos, successive redox-triggered C-C coupling occurs to generate products of [4+2] cycloaddition. The proposed catalytic mechanism involves consecutive alkyne-carbonyl oxidative couplings to form transient oxaruthana-cycles that suffer α-ketol mediated transfer hydrogenolysis. This process provides a new, convergent means of assembling Type II polyketide substructures. PMID:25938947

  8. Ruthenium catalyzed C-C bond formation via transfer hydrogenation: branch-selective reductive coupling of allenes to paraformaldehyde and higher aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Ming-Yu; Skucas, Eduardas; Krische, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Under the conditions of ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation employing 2-propanol as the terminal reductant, 1,1-disubstituted allenes 1a- h engage in reductive coupling to paraformaldehyde to furnish homoallylic alcohols 2a- h. Under identical transfer hydrogenation conditions, 1,1-disubstituted allenes engage in reductive coupling to aldehydes 3a- f to furnish homoallylic alcohols 4a- n. In all cases, reductive coupling occurs with branched regioselectivity to deliver homoallylic alcohols bearing all-carbon quaternary centers. PMID:18533665

  9. Sequential 1,4-/1,2-Addition of Lithium(trimethylsilyl)diazomethane onto Cyclic Enones to Induce C-C Fragmentation and N-Li Insertion.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Matthew J; Sun, Chunrui; Guan, Xinyu; Sabbasani, Venkata R; Lee, Daesung

    2016-02-01

    α,β-Unsaturated ketones generally undergo addition reactions with nucleophiles with a preference for either 1,2- or 1,4-addition, but rarely both. However, the right combination of reagents allows for consecutive 1,4- and 1,2-additions to occur: Cyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones undergo double additions with lithium(trimethylsilyl)diazomethane, effectively generating various molecular frameworks with complexity and diversity. Owing to the sequential generation of several intermediates of multifaceted reactivity, including diazoalkane derivatives and alkylidene carbenes, it is possible to induce novel Grob-type C-C fragmentations, alkylidene carbene mediated Li-N insertions, and dipolar cycloadditions by controlling the reaction parameters. PMID:26694997

  10. CO hydrogenation, deoxygenation, and C-C coupling promoted by ((silox)/sub 2/TaH/sub 2/)/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Toreki, R.; LaPointe, R.E.; Wolczanski, P.T.

    1987-11-25

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction considered a potential solution to future energy concerns, has commanded the attention of researchers in both heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis for the past 15 years. The most widely accepted mechanism for this conversion of synthesis gas (CO/H/sub 2/) to hydrocarbons and oxygenates incorporates three crucial steps: (1) CO is deoxygenated, presumably via dissociative adsorption; (2) H-transfer to surface carbides or CO/sub ads/ produces surface methylene groups, (3) C-C bond formation occurs through oligomerization of (CH/sub 2/)/sub ads/. Various organometallic species model the individual steps, yet fall short of corroborating the entire sequence. Reported herein is the carbonylation of ((silox)/sub 2/TaH/sub 2/)/sub 2/ (silox = t-Bu/sub 3/SiO/sup -/) and successive reactions which encompass the critical transformations of the F-T pathway.

  11. MRP4 Modulation of the Guanylate Cyclase-C/cGMP Pathway: Effects on Linaclotide-Induced Electrolyte Secretion and cGMP Efflux.

    PubMed

    Tchernychev, Boris; Ge, Pei; Kessler, Marco M; Solinga, Robert M; Wachtel, Derek; Tobin, Jenny V; Thomas, Sara R; Lunte, Craig E; Fretzen, Angelika; Hannig, Gerhard; Bryant, Alexander P; Kurtz, Caroline B; Currie, Mark G; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada

    2015-10-01

    MRP4 mediates the efflux of cGMP and cAMP and acts as an important regulator of these secondary messengers, thereby affecting signaling events mediated by cGMP and cAMP. Immunofluorescence staining showed high MRP4 expression localized predominantly in the apical membrane of rat colonic epithelium. In vitro studies were performed using a rat colonic mucosal layer mounted in an Ussing chamber. Linaclotide activation of the guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C)/cGMP pathway induced a concentration-dependent increase in transepithelial ion current [short-circuit current (Isc)] across rat colonic mucosa (EC50: 9.2 nM). Pretreatment of colonic mucosa with the specific MRP4 inhibitor MK571 potentiated linaclotide-induced electrolyte secretion and augmented linaclotide-stimulated intracellular cGMP accumulation. Notably, pretreatment with the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil increased basal Isc, but had no amplifying effect on linaclotide-induced Isc. MRP4 inhibition selectively affected the activation phase, but not the deactivation phase, of linaclotide. In contrast, incubation with a GC-C/Fc chimera binding to linaclotide abrogated linaclotide-induced Isc, returning to baseline. Furthermore, linaclotide activation of GC-C induced cGMP secretion from the apical and basolateral membranes of colonic epithelium. MRP4 inhibition blocked cGMP efflux from the apical membrane, but not the basolateral membrane. These data reveal a novel, previously unrecognized mechanism that functionally couples GC-C-induced luminal electrolyte transport and cGMP secretion to spatially restricted, compartmentalized regulation by MRP4 at the apical membrane of intestinal epithelium. These findings have important implications for gastrointestinal disorders with symptoms associated with dysregulated fluid homeostasis, such as irritable bowel syndrome with constipation, chronic idiopathic constipation, and secretory diarrhea. PMID:26216942

  12. Mild and Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of the C=C Bond in α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Compounds Using Supported Palladium Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nagendiran, Anuja; Pascanu, Vlad; Bermejo Gómez, Antonio; González Miera, Greco; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Verho, Oscar; Martín-Matute, Belén; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2016-05-17

    Chemoselective reduction of the C=C bond in a variety of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds using supported palladium nanoparticles is reported. Three different heterogeneous catalysts were compared using 1 atm of H2 : 1) nano-Pd on a metal-organic framework (MOF: Pd(0) -MIL-101-NH2 (Cr)), 2) nano-Pd on a siliceous mesocellular foam (MCF: Pd(0) -AmP-MCF), and 3) commercially available palladium on carbon (Pd/C). Initial studies showed that the Pd@MOF and Pd@MCF nanocatalysts were superior in activity and selectivity compared to commercial Pd/C. Both Pd(0) -MIL-101-NH2 (Cr) and Pd(0) -AmP-MCF were capable of delivering the desired products in very short reaction times (10-90 min) with low loadings of Pd (0.5-1 mol %). Additionally, the two catalytic systems exhibited high recyclability and very low levels of metal leaching. PMID:27111403

  13. Urinary chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1) as a tubular injury marker for early detection of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Kumiko; Masuda, Satohiro; Shinke, Haruka; Ozawa, Aiko; Ichimura, Takaharu; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Inui, Ken-ichi; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Because of the difficulty in detecting segment-specific response in the kidney, we investigated the molecular events underlying acute kidney injury in the proximal tubules of rats with cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II)-induced nephrotoxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that mRNA levels of several cytokines and chemokines, such as interleukin-1beta, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL) 2, CCL20, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 1, and CXCL10 were significantly increased after cisplatin treatment in both isolated proximal tubules and whole kidney. Interestingly, tubular CCL2 mRNA levels increased soon after cisplatin administration, whereas CCL2 mRNA levels in whole kidney first decreased and then increased. Levels of both CCL2 and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) in the whole kidney increased after cisplatin administration. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed CCL2 changes in the proximal tubular cells initially and then in the medullary interstitium. Urinary CCL2 excretion significantly increased approximately 3-fold compared with controls the day after cisplatin administration (5 mg/kg), when no changes were observed plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels. Urinary levels of KIM-1 also increased 3-fold after cisplatin administration. In addition, urinary CCL2 rather than KIM-1 increased in chronic renal failure rats after administration of low-dose cisplatin (2 mg/kg), suggesting that urinary CCL2 was selective for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in renal impairment. These results indicated that the increase in cytokine and chemokine expression in renal epithelial cells might be responsible for kidney deterioration in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, and that urinary CCL2 is associated with tubular injury and serves as a sensitive and noninvasive marker for the early detection of cisplatin-induced tubular injury. PMID:23291264

  14. Hydrogen Induced Damage in Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Garrett R.

    The hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) resistance of several grades of plate steels was investigated using electrolytic hydrogen charging. HIC generated by electrolytic charging was also compared to the industrial standard test for HIC, the NACE standard TM0284. The electrolytic charging (EC) apparatus was designed to optimize the reproducibility of the HIC results and the robustness of the components during long charging times. A characterization study on the EC apparatus was undertaken. Alterations to applied current density and charging time were conducted on a highly susceptible plate steel, 100XF, to assess HIC damage as a function of charging conditions. Intermediate current densities of 10 to 15 mA/cm2 produced the greatest extent of cracking without significant corrosion related surface damage. The hydrogen charging time did not greatly affect the extent and depth of cracking for test times between 24 to 48 hours. Thus, for subsequent experiments, the applied current density was set to 15 mA/cm2 and the charging time was set to 24 hours. Plate steel grades X52, X60, X70, and 100XF were prestrained in tension to various levels and then electrolytically charged with hydrogen or tested with the NACE standard TM0284 test (solution A) saturated with H2S(g) to induce HIC. Prestrain was introduced to assess its impact on HIC. Hydrogen damage was quantified with the crack ratios defined in the NACE Standard TM0284. The results from the EC and NACE methods were very comparable to one, with respect to the magnitude of cracking and the trends between alloy and pre-strain conditions observed. Both methods showed that HIC substantially increased for the high strength 100XF steel compared to the lower strength alloys. This is consistent with NACE recommendations for HIC resistance steels, which suggests that alloy strength should be less than 116 ksi (800 MPa) or 248 HV (22 HRC). The HIC results were largely independent of the pre-strain levels imposed within the

  15. Hydrogen-Induced Plastic Deformation in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukáč, F.; Čížek, J.; Vlček, M.; Procházka, I.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Traeger, F.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.

    In the present work hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals covered with Pd over-layer were electrochemically loaded with hydrogen and the influence of hydrogen on ZnO micro structure was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) was employed for determination of depth profile of hydrogen concentration in the sample. NRA measurements confirmed that a substantial amount of hydrogen was introduced into ZnO by electrochemical charging. The bulk hydrogen concentration in ZnO determined by NRA agrees well with the concentration estimated from the transported charge using the Faraday's law. Moreover, a subsurface region with enhanced hydrogen concentration was found in the loaded crystals. Slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) investigations of hydrogen-loaded crystal revealed enhanced concentration of defects in the subsurface region. This testifies hydrogen-induced plastic deformation of the loaded crystal. Absorbed hydrogen causes a significant lattice expansion. At low hydrogen concentrations this expansion is accommodated by elastic straining, but at higher concentrations hydrogen-induced stress exceeds the yield stress in ZnO and plastic deformation of the loaded crystal takes place. Enhanced hydrogen concentration detected in the subsurface region by NRA is, therefore, due to excess hydrogen trapped at open volume defects introduced by plastic deformation. Moreover, it was found that hydrogen-induced plastic deformation in the subsurface layer leads to typical surface modification: formation of hexagonal shape pyramids on the surface due to hydrogen-induced slip in the [0001] direction.

  16. Formation and collision-induced dissociation of adduct ions [matrix + C]+ (C = Li, Na, Cs and NH4) produced under fast atom bombardment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    1994-09-01

    The formation of adduct ions of matrices B with organic/metallic cations C+, [B + C]+ (C = Li, Na, Cs and NH4), under fast atom bombardment (FAB) conditions has been examined. The cation affinity (CA) for various matrix materials, glycerol, thioglycerol, dithiothreitol, m-nitrobenzylalcohol and diethanolamine, was evaluated from the positive-ion FAB mass spectra obtained for the salts LiCl, NaCl, CsCl or NH4Cl added to matrix B. The order of the CA of matrices for relatively small cations Li+ and Na+ was in accordance with that of the proton affinity (PA) of the matrices used. The collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of [B + H]+ and [B + C]+ ions have been obtained. The PA differences between matrix B and ammonia (NH3) molecules were roughly estimated from the CID spectra of [B + NH4]+ ions. The CID spectra of [B + C]+ ions, which have different dissociation windows from [B + H]+ ions, were analyzed by proposing multidentate-binding structures of the adduct ions. Some dissociations of [B + C]+ ions could be explained by charge-remote fragmentations. The results obtained suggest that the binding energy for the coordination complex (B...C+) can be evaluated from the CID patterns.

  17. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-07

    Hydrogen-induced cracking is characterized by the decreased ductility and fracture toughness of a material due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. Corrosion is the source of hydrogen generation. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, hydrogen-induced cracking may be a concern because the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this report is to analyze whether the drip shield will fail by hydrogen-induced cracking under repository conditions within 10,000 years after emplacement. Hydrogen-induced cracking is a scenario of premature failure of the drip shield. This report develops a realistic model to assess the form of hydrogen-induced cracking degradation of the drip shield under the hydrogen-induced cracking. The scope of this work covers the evaluation of hydrogen absorbed due to general corrosion and galvanic coupling to less noble metals (e.g., Stainless Steel Type 316 and carbon steels) under the repository conditions during the 10,000-year regulatory period after emplacement and whether the absorbed hydrogen content will exceed the critical hydrogen concentration value, above which the hydrogen-induced cracking is assumed to occur. This report also provides the basis for excluding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to hydrogen-induced cracking of the drip shield with particular emphasis on FEP 2.1.03.04.OB, hydride cracking of drip shields (DTN: M00407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). This report is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]).

  18. Synthesis of seco-B-ring bryostatin analogue WN-1 via C-C bond-forming hydrogenation: critical contribution of the B-ring in determining bryostatin-like and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-like properties.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Ian P; Ketcham, John M; Blumberg, Peter M; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Peach, Megan L; Krische, Michael J

    2014-09-24

    The seco-B-ring bryostatin analogue, macrodiolide WN-1, was prepared in 17 steps (longest linear sequence) and 30 total steps with three bonds formed via hydrogen-mediated C-C coupling. This synthetic route features a palladium-catalyzed alkoxycarbonylation of a C2-symmetric diol to form the C9-deoxygenated bryostatin A-ring. WN-1 binds to PKCα (Ki = 16.1 nM) and inhibits the growth of multiple leukemia cell lines. Although structural features of the WN-1 A-ring and C-ring are shared by analogues that display bryostatin-like behavior, WN-1 displays PMA-like behavior in U937 cell attachment and proliferation assays, as well as in K562 and MV-4-11 proliferation assays. Molecular modeling studies suggest the pattern of internal hydrogen bonds evident in bryostatin 1 is preserved in WN-1, and that upon docking WN-1 into the crystal structure of the C1b domain of PKCδ, the binding mode of bryostatin 1 is reproduced. The collective data emphasize the critical contribution of the B-ring to the function of the upper portion of the molecule in conferring a bryostatin-like pattern of biological activity. PMID:25207655

  19. Hydrogen induced plastic deformation of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, V.J.; Keim, E.G.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen can influence the behavior of materials significantly. The effects of hydrogen are specially pronounced in high fugacities of hydrogen which can occur at the surface of steels in contact with certain aqueous environments. In this investigation the effect of high fugacity hydrogen on the surface of stainless steel was investigated using electrochemical cathodic charging. Microhardness was measured on the cross section. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the dislocation substructure just below the surface. Computer simulation using finite element method was carried out to estimate the extent and severity of the deformation. The significance of the results are discussed in relation to the loss of ductility due to hydrogen.

  20. Ether complexes of tungsten with two different binding modes: An O-bound ether and an {eta}{sup 2}-(C=C) vinyl ether. Evidence for C-H...O hydrogen bonding of vinylic C-H groups

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.S.; Szalda, D.J.; Bullock, R.M.

    1996-11-13

    The reaction of PhCH(OCH{sup 3}){sup 2} with Cp(CO){sup 3}WH and HOTf gives [Cp(CO){sup 3}W(PhCH{sup 2}OCH{sup 3})]{sup +}OTf{sup -}. The structure of this benzyl methyl ether complex was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and was shown to have the ether bonded to tungsten through the oxygen. This compound was isolated as a kinetic product of the reaction; it decomposes in solution by releasing free PhCH{sup 2}OCH{sup 3} and forming Cp(CO){sup 3}WOTf. An analog with the BAr`{sup 4}{sup -} counterion [Ar` = 3, 5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] is more stable. The reaction of the vinyl acetal CH{sup 2}=CHCH(OEt){sup 2} with Cp(CO){sup 3}WH and HOTf produces [Cp(CO){sup 3}W({eta}{sup 2}-EtOCH=CHCH{sup 3})]{sup +} OTf{sup -}, in which the ether is bonded to tungsten through the C=C bond of the vinyl ether. The crystal structure of this compound shows that the W-C(OEt) distance (2.69(3) A) is significantly longer than the W-C(CH{sup 3}) distance (2.37(3) A). There are weak C-H...O hydrogen bonds between both vinyl CH`s and oxygens of the triflate counterions. Evidence is presented that some of these weak hydrogen bonds are maintained in CD{sup 2}Cl{sup 2} solution but not in CD{sup 3}CN. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. A Tungsten Complex with a Bidentate, Hemilabile N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand, Facile Displacement of the Weakly Bound W-(C=C) Bond, and the Vulnerability of the NHC Ligand Towards Catalyst Deactivation During Ketone Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,F.; Dioumaev, V.; Szalda, D.; Hanson, J.; Bullock, R.

    2007-01-01

    The initial reaction observed between the N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) and molybdenum and tungsten hydride complexes CpM(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3})H (M = Mo, W) is deprotonation of the metal hydride by IMes, giving [(IMes)H]{sup +}[CpM(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3})]{sup -}. At longer reaction times and higher temperatures, the reaction of IMes with CpM(CO){sub 2}(PR{sub 3})H (M = Mo, W; R = Me, Ph) produces CpM(CO){sub 2}(IMes)H. Hydride transfer from CpW(CO)2(IMes)H to Ph{sub 3}C{sub +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -} gives CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -}, which was crystallographically characterized using X-ray radiation from a synchrotron. The IMes is bonded as a bidentate ligand, through the carbon of the carbene as well as forming a weak bond from the metal to a C=C bond of one mesityl ring. The weakly bound C=C ligand is hemilabile, being readily displaced by H{sub 2}, THF, ketones, or alcohols. Reaction of CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +} with H{sub 2} gives the dihydride complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(H){sub 2}]{sup +}. Addition of Et{sub 2}CH-OH to CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -} gives the alcohol complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}CH-OH)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -}, which was characterized by crystallography and exhibits no evidence for hydrogen bonding of the bound OH group. Addition of H{sub 2} to the ketone complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}C=O)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -} produces an equilibrium with the dihydride [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(H){sub 2}]{sup +} (K{sub eq} = 1.1 x 10{sup 3} at 25 {sup o}C). The tungsten ketone complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}C=O)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -}- serves as a modest catalyst for hydrogenation of Et{sub 2}C=O to Et{sub 2}CH-OH in neat ketone solvent. Decomposition of the catalyst produces [H(IMes)]{sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -}, indicating that these

  2. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive use of a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives data base, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented in 1986. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings relating the status of air liquefaction technology are presented both as a singular technical area, and also as that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; Heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; Para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; Hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; Hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sinks; Liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket type combustion devices; Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES); and Technically related engine concepts.

  3. Charge induced enhancement of adsorption for hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang

    2009-12-01

    . Direct measurement of the amount of hydrogen adsorption was also carried out with porous nickel oxides and magnesium oxides using the piezoelectric material PMN-PT as the charge supplier due to the pressure. The adsorption enhancement from the PMN-PT generated charges is obvious at hydrogen pressure between 0 and 60 bars, where the hydrogen uptake is increased at about 35% for nickel oxide and 25% for magnesium oxide. Computer simulation reveals that under the external electric field, the electron cloud of hydrogen molecules is pulled over to the adsorbent site and can overlap with the adsorbent electrons, which in turn enhances the adsorption energy. Experiments were also carried out to examine the effects of hydrogen spillover with charge induced enhancement. The results show that the overall storage capacity in nickel oxide increased remarkably by a factor of 4.

  4. Superplastic deformation induced by cyclic hydrogen charging

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Heeman; Schuh, Christopher A.; Dunand, David C.

    2008-05-15

    Deformation under the combined action of external stress and cyclic hydrogen charging/discharging is studied in a model material, titanium. Cyclic charging with hydrogen is carried out at 860 deg. C, which repeatedly triggers the transformation between hydrogen-lean {alpha}-Ti and hydrogen-rich {beta}-Ti. Due to bias from the externally applied tensile stress, the internal mismatch strains produced by this isothermal {alpha}-{beta} transformation accumulate preferentially along the loading axis. These strain increments are linearly proportional to the applied stress, i.e., flow is ideally Newtonian, at small stress levels (below {approx}2 MPa). Therefore, after multiple chemical cycles, a tensile engineering strain of 100% is achieved without fracture, with an average strain rate of 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}, which demonstrates for the first time that superplastic elongations can be achieved by chemical cycling. The effect of hydrogen partial pressure, cycle time, and external stress on the value of the superplastic strain increments is experimentally measured and discussed in light of a diffusional phase transformation model. Special attention is paid to understanding the two contributions to the internal mismatch strains from the phase transformation and lattice swelling.

  5. Nanodiamond for hydrogen storage: temperature-dependent hydrogenation and charge-induced dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S

    2012-02-21

    Carbon-based hydrogen storage materials are one of hottest research topics in materials science. Although the majority of studies focus on highly porous loosely bound systems, these systems have various limitations including use at elevated temperature. Here we propose, based on computer simulations, that diamond nanoparticles may provide a new promising high temperature candidate with a moderate storage capacity, but good potential for recyclability. The hydrogenation of nanodiamonds is found to be easily achieved, in agreement with experiments, though we find the stability of hydrogenation is dependent on the morphology of nanodiamonds and surrounding environment. Hydrogenation is thermodynamically favourable even at high temperature in pure hydrogen, ammonia, and methane gas reservoirs, whereas water vapour can help to reduce the energy barrier for desorption. The greatest challenge in using this material is the breaking of the strong covalent C-H bonds, and we have identified that the spontaneous release of atomic hydrogen may be achieved through charging of hydrogenated nanodiamonds. If the degree of induced charge is properly controlled, the integrity of the host nanodiamond is maintained, which indicates that an efficient and recyclable approach for hydrogen release may be possible. PMID:22089370

  6. Hydrogen Effects in Prestrained Transformation Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronevich, J. A.; De Cooman, B. C.; Speer, J. G.; De Moor, E.; Matlock, D. K.

    2012-07-01

    Thermal desorption analysis (TDA) was performed on laboratory heat-treated transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with 14.5 pct retained austenite (RA), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 880 MPa, and elongation to failure of 33 pct. Samples were tensile prestrained 5 pct at 253 K (-20 °C), 296 K (23 °C), and 375 K (102 °C) to generate different amounts of deformation-induced martensite, 10.5, 5.5, and 0.5 pct, respectively, prior to cathodically charging to a hydrogen content of 1 to 2 ppm. TDA was performed on charged samples to determine the location and strength of hydrogen trapping sites. TDA results suggest that dislocations were the main trapping sites in prestrained TRIP steel. The TDA peak intensity increased with prestrain, suggesting that the quantity of hydrogen trap sites increased with deformation. Tensile tests were performed on the four hydrogen-charged TRIP steel conditions. As confirmed with transmission electron microscope images, samples with more homogeneous dislocation distributions ( i.e., prestrained at 375 K (102 °C)) exhibited greater resistance to hydrogen embrittlement than samples that included a high dislocation density adjacent to the formations of strain-induced martensite ( i.e., samples prestrained at 253 K (-20 °C) and 296 K (23 °C)).

  7. Ultraviolet-induced birefringence in hydrogen-loaded optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Canning, J.; Deyerl, H.J.; Soerensen, H.R.; Kristensen, M.

    2005-03-01

    A precision phase-shifting approach to fabricate various phase-shifted gratings using different combinations of polarized ultraviolet (UV) light is demonstrated. In doing so, the difference between s- and p-polarized light reported by others is confirmed. However, we reveal added complexity for the role of hydrogen and deuterium in the UV-induced process. Previous arguments for the origins are systematically ruled out by reviewing existing literature. We note that the birefringence is made up of at least two components with different thermal stabilities, one consistent simply with molecular hydrogen being present in the system. Overall the birefringence, by deduction, is associated with anisotropy in hydrogen reactions within the fiber. As a result they lead, through known mechanisms of dilation in glass, to anisotropic stress relaxation that can be annealed out, with or without hydrogen remaining, at low temperatures close to 125 deg. C.

  8. Mechanism of vacancy formation induced by hydrogen in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Nan; Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.; Nordlund, K.; Shu, Xiaolin; Yu, Yi; Lu, Guang-Hong; Li, Xiao-Chun

    2013-12-15

    We report a hydrogen induced vacancy formation mechanism in tungsten based on classical molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate the vacancy formation in tungsten due to the presence of hydrogen associated directly with a stable hexagonal self-interstitial cluster as well as a linear crowdion. The stability of different self-interstitial structures has been further studied and it is particularly shown that hydrogen plays a crucial role in determining the configuration of SIAs, in which the hexagonal cluster structure is preferred. Energetic analysis has been carried out to prove that the formation of SIA clusters facilitates the formation of vacancies. Such a mechanism contributes to the understanding of the early stage of the hydrogen blistering in tungsten under a fusion reactor environment.

  9. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2010-01-01

    For some time the oxidation community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cool down, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived initial cool down in a dry environment, have built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sensitive zone" can be described that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen is derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen-induced effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic-tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen detection as a reaction product or interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that recreate the moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H 2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging. Accordingly, they strongly indicate that interfacial hydrogen, derived from moisture, is the key chemical species accounting for delayed alumina scale spallation.

  10. Helium-ion-induced release of hydrogen from graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The ion-induced release of hydrogen from AXF-5Q graphite was studied for 350-eV helium ions. The hydrogen was implanted into the graphite with a low energy (approx.200 eV) and to a high fluence. This achieved a thin (approx.10-nm), saturated near-surface region. The release of hydrogen was measured as a function of helium fluence. A model that includes ion-induced detrapping, retrapping, and surface recombination was used to analyze the experimental data. A value of (1.65 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2/ was obtained from the detrapping cross section, and a value of (0.5 to 4) x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 4//atoms was obtained for the recombination coefficient. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2009-01-01

    For some time our community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cooldown, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of TBC's refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived cool down in a dry environment, built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sweet zone" can be defined that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen as a reaction product or detected interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that produce the same moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging.

  12. On Modeling Hydrogen-Induced Crack Propagation Under Sustained Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Somerday, Brian p.; Schembri, Philip E.; Sofronis, Petros; Foulk, James W.; Nibur, Kevin A.; Balch, Dorian K.

    2014-08-01

    The failure of hydrogen containment components is generally associated with subcritical cracking. Understanding subcritical crack growth behavior and its dependence on material and environmental variables can lead to methods for designing structural components in a hydrogen environment and will be beneficial in developing materials resistant to hydrogen embrittlement. In order to identify the issues underlying crack propagation and arrest, we present a model for hydrogen-induced stress-controlled crack propagation under sustained loading. The model is based on the assumptions that (I) hydrogen reduces the material fracture strength and (II) crack propagation takes place when the opening stress over the characteristic distance ahead of a crack tip is greater than the local fracture strength. The model is used in a finite-element simulation of crack propagation coupled with simultaneous hydrogen diffusion in a model material through nodal release. The numerical simulations show that the same physics, i.e., diffusion-controlled crack propagation, can explain the existence of both stages I and II in the velocity versus stress intensity factor ( V- K) curve.

  13. UV-induced synthesis of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.M.; Huerta, A.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Suspension-cultured rose cells irradiated with UV (254 mm, 558 J m{sup {minus}2}) showed a transient efflux of K{sup +}, and a production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} measured by chemiluminescence of luminol in the presence of peroxidase. The peak concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, attained at about 60-90 min after irradiation, was 2-5 uM. The addition of superoxide dismutase to irradiated cells stimulated luminscence, suggesting that the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} came at least in part from superoxide that was present in the extracellular medium. Treatments that inhibited the UV-induced efflux of K{sup +} also inhibited the appearance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, though the converse was not always true, suggesting that K{sup +} efflux was necessary for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} synthesis, but not vice-versa. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the extracellular space is required for lignin synthesis in many plant tissues. Phenolic compounds, the other substrates for lignin, are induced by UV. We suggest that the UV-stimulated production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is part of a coordinated induction of lignin synthesis.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria. PMID:26884825

  15. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  16. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    2012-05-01

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Guadarrama-Solís, Adriana; Muñoz-Seca, Carmen; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the process of bleaching vital, discolored teeth, low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2. However, interest has been expressed in the assessment of pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents such as irritation and ulceration of the gingival or other soft tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide on apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. HGF cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 was both dose and time dependent. The addition of H2O2 resulted in the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and an increase of Caspase-3 cleavage. Data suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HGF is intrinsic pathway involved the release of apoptotic signal from mitochondria. PMID:26884825

  18. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC and C/C for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for use as lightweight hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a carbon/carbon (C/C) and a carbon/carbon-silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) material fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) 8, a joint Australia / Air Force Research Laboratory hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kilopascals. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and C/C-SiC materials were installed downstream of a hydrogen-fueled, dual-mode scramjet combustor and tested for several minutes at conditions simulating flight at Mach 5 and Mach 6. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used during some of the tests to reduce heat loss from the back surface and thus increase the heated surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel approximately 177 C (350 F). The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for three cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  19. Hydrogen saline prevents selenite-induced cataract in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-xiao; Ding, Tian-bing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the potential antioxidative effect and mechanism for the protective effects of hydrogen saline on selenite-induced cataract in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rat pups were divided into the following groups: control (Group A), selenite induced (Group B), and selenite plus hydrogen saline treated (Group C). Rat pups in Groups B and C received a single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (25 μmol/kg bodyweight) on postnatal day 12. Group C also received an intraperitoneal injection of H2 saline (5 ml/kg bodyweight) daily from postnatal day 8 to postnatal day 17. The development of cataract was assessed weekly by slit-lamp examination for 2 weeks. After sacrifice, extricated lenses were analyzed for activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase, levels of malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione (GSH), and total sulfhydryl contents. Results The magnitude of lens opacification in Group B was significantly higher than in Group A (p<0.05), while Group C had less opacification than Group B (p<0.05). Compared with Group B, the mean activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase, levels of GSH, and total sulfhydryl contents were higher, whereas the level of malondialdehyde was lower following treatment with hydrogen saline(p<0.05). Conclusions This is an initial report showing that hydrogen saline can prevent selenite-induced cataract in rats. It acts via maintaining antioxidant enzymes and GSH, protecting the sulfhydryl group, and inhibiting lipid peroxidation. PMID:23922487

  20. Para-hydrogen induced polarization in heterogeneous hydrogenationreactions

    SciTech Connect

    Koptyug, Igor V.; Kovtunov, Kirill; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar, M.Sabieh; Hilty, Christian; Han, Song-I; Pines, Alexander; Sagdeev, Renad Z.

    2007-01-31

    We demonstrate the creation and observation ofpara-hydrogen-induced polarization in heterogeneous hydrogenationreactions. Wilkinson's catalyst, RhCl(PPh3)3, supported on eithermodified silica gel or a polymer, is shown to hydrogenate styrene intoethylbenzene and to produce enhanced spin polarizations, observed throughNMR, when the reaction was performed with H2 gas enriched in the paraspinisomer. Furthermore, gaseous phase para-hydrogenation of propylene topropane with two catalysts, the Wilkinson's catalyst supported onmodified silica gel and Rh(cod)(sulfos) (cod = cycloocta-1,5-diene;sulfos) - O3S(C6H4)CH2C(CH2PPh2)3) supported on silica gel, demonstratesheterogeneous catalytic conversion resulting in large spin polarizations.These experiments serve as a direct verification of the mechanism ofheterogeneous hydrogenation reactions involving immobilized metalcomplexes and can be potentially developed into a practical tool forproducing catalyst-free fluids with highly polarized nuclear spins for abroad range of hyperpolarized NMR and MRI applications.

  1. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  2. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    PubMed

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  3. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    PubMed Central

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  4. Vascular Stem/Progenitor Cell Migration Induced by Smooth Muscle Cell-Derived Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 2 and Chemokine (C-X-C motif) Ligand 1 Contributes to Neointima Formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baoqi; Wong, Mei Mei; Potter, Claire M F; Simpson, Russell M L; Karamariti, Eirini; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zeng, Lingfang; Warren, Derek; Hu, Yanhua; Wang, Wen; Xu, Qingbo

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that Sca-1(+) (stem cell antigen-1) stem/progenitor cells within blood vessel walls may contribute to neointima formation, but the mechanism behind their recruitment has not been explored. In this work Sca-1(+) progenitor cells were cultivated from mouse vein graft tissue and found to exhibit increased migration when cocultured with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or when treated with SMC-derived conditioned medium. This migration was associated with elevated levels of chemokines, CCL2 (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2) and CXCL1 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1), and their corresponding receptors on Sca-1(+) progenitors, CCR2 (chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2) and CXCR2 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2), which were also upregulated following SMC conditioned medium treatment. Knockdown of either receptor in Sca-1(+) progenitors significantly inhibited cell migration. The GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 were activated by both CCL2 and CXCL1 stimulation and p38 phosphorylation was increased. However, only Rac1 inhibition significantly reduced migration and p38 phosphorylation. After Sca-1(+) progenitors labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were applied to the adventitial side of wire-injured mouse femoral arteries, a large proportion of GFP-Sca-1(+) -cells were observed in neointimal lesions, and a marked increase in neointimal lesion formation was seen 1 week post-operation. Interestingly, Sca-1(+) progenitor migration from the adventitia to the neointima was abrogated and neointima formation diminished in a wire injury model using CCL2(-/-) mice. These findings suggest vascular stem/progenitor cell migration from the adventitia to the neointima can be induced by SMC release of chemokines which act via CCR2/Rac1/p38 and CXCR2/Rac1/p38 signaling pathways. Stem Cells 2016;34:2368-2380. PMID:27300479

  5. Thermally induced recrystallization of textured hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugallo, Giorgia; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    By an analysis of the local crystallinity based on model potential molecular dynamics simulations we investigated the effect of dissolved hydrogen on the thermally induced recrystallization of nanocrystalline silicon. By using the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami theory to analyze the atomistic data, we find that the recrystallization rate decreases exponentially with the hydrogen contamination. At low concentration, the kinetics is moderately affected by the H atoms that tend to migrate to the boundaries increasing their effective interface. At higher H content, we find an increasing number of SimHn hydrides that affect the crystalline order of the material and severely impede recrystallization. The analysis based on crystallinity is supported by the atomic scale study of the recrystallization mechanism, here identified as an inverted bond-switching process, and by the ability of hydrates to pin the amorphous-crystalline boundaries.

  6. Feasibility and induced effects of subsurface porous media hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann Pfeiffer, Wolf; Li, Dedong; Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Fluctuations in energy production from renewable sources like wind or solar power can lead to shortages in energy supply which can be mitigated using energy storage concepts. Underground storage of hydrogen in porous sandstone formations could be a storage option for large amounts of energy over long storage cycles. However, this use of the subsurface requires an analysis of possible interactions with other uses of the subsurface such as geothermal energy storage or groundwater abstraction. This study aims at quantifying the feasibility of porous media hydrogen storage to provide stored energy on a timescale of several days to weeks as well as possible impacts on the subsurface. The hypothetical storage site is based on an anticlinal structure located in Schleswig-Holstein, northern Germany. The storage is injected and extracted using five wells completed in a partially eroded, heterogeneous sandstone layer in the top of the structure at a depth of about 500 m. The storage formation was parameterized based on a local facies model with intrinsic permeabilities of 250-2500 mD and porosities of 35-40%. Storage initialization and subsequent storage cycles, each consisting of a hydrogen injection and extraction, were numerically simulated. The simulation results indicate the general feasibility of this hydrogen storage concept. The simulated sandstone formation is able to provide an average of around 1480 t of hydrogen per week (1830 TJ) which is about 5% of the total weekly energy production or about 10% of the weekly energy consumption of Schleswig-Holstein with the hydrogen production rate being the limiting factor of the overall performance. Induced hydraulic effects are a result of the induced overpressure within the storage formation. Propagation of the pressure signal does not strongly depend on the formation heterogeneity and thus shows approximately radial characteristics with one bar pressure change in distances of about 5 km from the injection wells. Thermal

  7. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  8. Iminopropadienones RN=C=C=C=O and bisiminopropadienes RN=C=C=C=NR: Matrix infrared spectra and anharmonic frequency calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, Didier; Baraille, Isabelle; Andersen, Heidi Gade; Wentrup, Curt

    2013-10-01

    Methyliminopropadienone MeN=C=C=C=O 1a was generated by flash vacuum thermolysis from four different precursors and isolated in solid argon. The matrix-isolation infrared spectrum is dominated by unusually strong anharmonic effects resulting in complex fine structure of the absorptions due to the NCCCO moiety in the 2200 cm-1 region. Doubling and tripling of the corresponding absorption bands are observed for phenyliminopropadienone PhN=C=C=C=O 1b and bis(phenylimino)propadiene PhN=C=C=C=NPh 9, respectively. Anharmonic vibrational frequency calculations allow the identification of a number of overtones and combination bands as the cause of the splittings for each molecule. This method constitutes an important tool for the characterization of reactive intermediates and unusual molecules by matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Cai-ping; Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    The degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis (OA) is closely associated with the death of chondrocytes in apoptosis fashion. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), higher expression following acute damage in OA patients, has been shown to be up-regulated during apoptosis in a bulk of experimental models. This study was aimed to explore the mechanism of H2O2-induced rabbit chondrocytes apoptosis. Articular cartilage was biopsied from the joints of 6 weeks old New Zealand rabbits. Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on cell viability. H2O2 treatment induced a remarkable reduction of cell viability. We used flow cytometry to assess the form of cell death with Annexin-V/PI double staining, and found that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Exposure of chondrocytes to 1.5 mM of H2O2 for 2 h induced a burst apoptosis that can be alleviated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pretreatment, an anti-oxidant amino-acid derivative. Loss of mitochondria membrane potential (▵Ψm) was evaluated using confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry (FCM). H2O2 treatment induced a marked reduction of ▵Ψm, and the abrupt disappearance of ▵Ψm occurred within 5 minutes. These results indicate that H2O2 induces a rapid apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in rabbit chondrocytes.

  10. Suppression of hydrogen diffusion at the hydrogen-induced platelets in p-type Czochralski silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.L.; Ma, Y.; Job, R.; Fahrner, W.R.

    2005-03-28

    Hydrogen diffusion in p-type Czochralski silicon is investigated by combined Raman spectroscope, scanning electron microscope, and spreading resistance probe measurements. Exposure of silicon wafers to rf hydrogen plasma results in the formation of platelets. The increase of hydrogenation duration leads to the growth of the platelets and the reduction of the hydrogen diffusivity. The large platelets grow faster than the small ones. The growth of the platelets is based on the capture of hydrogen. The dependence of the hydrogen diffusivity upon the average size of the platelets suggests that the indiffusion of hydrogen is suppressed by the platelets.

  11. Effect of ethanol on hydrogen peroxide-induced AMPK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Wou, Sung-Eun; Zeng, Yan; Ross, Ruth A.; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N.; Crabb, David W.

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) responds to oxidative stress. Previous work has shown that ethanol treatment of cultured hepatoma cells and of mice inhibited the activity of AMPK and reduced the amount of AMPK protein. Ethanol generates oxidative stress in the liver. Since AMPK is activated by reactive oxygen species, it seems paradoxical that ethanol would inhibit AMPK in the hepatoma cells. In an attempt to understand the mechanism whereby ethanol inhibits AMPK, we studied the effect of ethanol on AMPK activation by exogenous hydrogen peroxide. The effects of ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, and inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) [either okadaic acid or PP2A small interference RNA (siRNA)] on AMPK phosphorylation and activity were examined in rat hepatoma cells (H4IIEC3) and HeLa cells. In H4IIEC3 cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mM) transiently increased the level of phospho-AMPK to 1.5-fold over control (P < 0.05). Similar findings were observed in HeLa cells, which do not express the upstream AMPK kinase, LKB1. H2O2 markedly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 in H4IIEC3 cells. Ethanol significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of PKC-ζ, LKB1, and AMPK caused by exposure to H2O2. This inhibitory effect of ethanol required its metabolism. More importantly, the inhibitory effects of ethanol on H2O2-induced AMPK phosphorylation were attenuated by the presence of the PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, or PP2A siRNA. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on AMPK phosphorylation is exerted through the inhibition of PKC-ζ and LKB1 phosphorylation and the activation of PP2A. PMID:18832448

  12. Corrosion induced by cathodic hydrogen in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.

    2011-05-01

    In this work new results about the influence of cathodic hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel are described. The results were discussed by taking into account hydrogen charged samples and without hydrogen. The corrosion resistance to pitting was qualified with the polarization curves. The conclusion is that, hydrogen deteriorated the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 duplex stainless steel. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen action was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions.

  13. Light-induced metastability in pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queen, D. R.; Liu, X.; Karel, J.; Wang, Q.; Crandall, R. S.; Metcalf, T. H.; Hellman, F.

    2015-10-01

    Light soaking is found to increase the specific heat C and internal friction Q-1 of pure (a-Si) and hydrogenated (a-Si:H) amorphous silicon. At the lowest temperatures, the increases in C and Q-1 are consistent with an increased density of two-level systems (TLS). The light-induced increase in C persists to room temperature. Neither the sound velocity nor shear modulus change with light soaking indicating that the Debye specific heat is unchanged which suggests that light soaking creates localized vibrational modes in addition to TLS. The increase can be reversibly added and removed by light soaking and annealing, respectively, suggesting that it is related to the Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE), even in a-Si without H, and involves a reversible nanoscale structural rearrangement that is facilitated by, but does not require, H to occur.

  14. Hydrogen retention in tungsten materials studied by Laser Induced Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobinski, M.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Huber, A.; Reinhart, M.; Möller, S.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.; 't Hoen, M. H. J.; Manhard, A.; Schmid, K.; Textor Team

    2013-07-01

    Development of methods to characterise the first wall in ITER and future fusion devices without removal of wall tiles is important to support safety assessments for tritium retention and dust production and to understand plasma wall processes in general. Laser based techniques are presently under investigation to provide these requirements, among which Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is proposed to measure the deuterium and tritium load of the plasma facing surfaces by thermal desorption and spectroscopic detection of the desorbed fuel in the edge of the fusion plasma. The method relies on its capability to desorb the hydrogen isotopes in a laser heated spot. The application of LID on bulk tungsten targets exposed to a wide range of deuterium fluxes, fluences and impact energies under different surface temperatures is investigated in this paper. The results are compared with Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and a diffusion model.

  15. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  16. Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility and Hydrogen-Induced Additive Stress of 7050 Aluminum Alloy Under Various Aging States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, W. J.; Song, R. G.; Qi, X.; Li, H.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, C.; Jin, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of 7050 aluminum alloy under various aging states has been investigated by means of cathodic hydrogen permeation, slow strain rate test, hydrogen determinator, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscope, and effect of hydrogen on atomic binding force of charged alloy has been calculated by free electron theory in this paper. Simultaneously, hydrogen-induced additive stress (σad) of 7050 aluminum alloy hydrogen charged with different current densities under various aging states have been investigated by flowing stress differential method. The results showed that hydrogen concentration of examined alloy increased with increasing charging time or current density under the same aging state. Hydrogen segregation occurred at grain boundaries which enlarged the crystal lattice constant, meanwhile, it reduced the average bonding energy and interatomic bonding force of the grain boundary atoms, thus resulting in hydrogen embrittlement; moreover, σad of 7050 aluminum alloy increased linearly with increasing hydrogen concentration under the same aging state, i.e., under aged: σad = -1.61 + 9.93 × 105 C H, peak aged: σad = -1.55 + 9.67 × 105 C H, over aged: σad = -0.16 + 9.35 × 105 C H, correspondingly, σad increased the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement ( I HE) further. Under the same charging condition, aging states had a great influence on σad and I HE, the under-aged state alloy was of the highest, the over-aged state alloy was of the lowest, and peak-aged was in the middle.

  17. 98. Catalog HHistory 1, C.C.C., 19 Tree Planting, Negative No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. Catalog H-History 1, C.C.C., 19 Tree Planting, Negative No. P 474c (Photographer and date unknown) TRANSPLANTING TREE. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  18. Role of the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/C-C chemokine receptor 2 signaling pathway in transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ablation-induced renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youping; Zhu, Mingjun; Xu, Hui; Cui, Lin; Liu, Weihong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Shen, Si; Wang, Donna H

    2015-09-01

    Our recent studies indicate that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel may act as a potential regulator of monocyte/macrophage recruitment to reduce renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension. This study tests the hypothesis that deletion of TRPV1 exaggerates salt-sensitive hypertension-induced renal injury due to enhanced inflammatory responses via monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-dependent pathways. Wild type (WT) and TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1(-/-)) mice were subjected to uninephrectomy and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt treatment for four weeks with or without the selective CCR2 antagonist, RS504393. DOCA-salt treatment increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) to the same degree in both strains, but increased urinary excretion of albumin and 8-isoprostane and decreased creatinine clearance with greater magnitude in TRPV1(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. DOCA-salt treatment also caused renal glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial injury, collagen deposition, monocyte/macrophage infiltration, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and NF-κB activation in greater degree in TRPV1(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Blockade of the CCR2 with RS504393 (4 mg/kg/day) had no effect on SBP in DOCA-salt-treated WT or TRPV1(-/-) mice compared to their respective controls. However, treatment with RS504393 ameliorated renal dysfunction and morphological damage, and prevented the increase in monocyte/macrophage infiltration, cytokine/chemokine production, and NF-κB activity in both DOCA-salt hypertensive strains with a greater effect in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1(-/-) mice compared to DOCA-salt-treated WT mice. No differences in CCR2 protein expression in kidney were found between DOCA-salt-treated WT and TRPV1(-/-) mice with or without RS504393 treatment. Our studies for the first time indicate that deletion of TRPV1 aggravated renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension via enhancing MCP-1

  19. Laser-induced separation of hydrogen isotopes in the liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Beattie, Willard H.; Holland, Redus F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation is achieved by either (a) dissolving a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound in a liquid solvent, or (b) liquefying a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound, the liquid phase thus resulting being kept at a temperature at which spectral features of the feedstock relating to a particular hydrogen isotope are resolved, i.e., a clear-cut isotope shift is delineated, irradiating the liquid phase with monochromatic radiation of a wavelength which at least preferentially excites those molecules of the feedstock containing a first hydrogen isotope, inducing photochemical reaction in the excited molecules, and separating the reaction product containing the first isotope from the liquid phase.

  20. Effect of Strain-Induced Martensite on Tensile Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement of 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Bak, Sang Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature tensile tests have been conducted at different strain rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-2/s on hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 stainless steel (SS). Using a ferritescope and neutron diffraction, the amount of strain-induced martensite (SIM) has been in situ measured at the center region of the gage section of the tensile specimens or ex situ measured on the fractured tensile specimens. The ductility, tensile stress, hardness, and the amount of SIM increase with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and decrease in hydrogen-charged one. Specifically, SIM that forms during tensile tests is beneficial in increasing the ductility, strain hardening, and tensile stress of 304 SS, irrespective of the presence of hydrogen. A correlation of the tensile properties of hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 SS and the amount of SIM shows that hydrogen suppresses the formation of SIM in hydrogen-charged 304 SS, leading to a ductility loss and localized brittle fracture. Consequently, we demonstrate that hydrogen embrittlement of 304 SS is related to hydrogen-suppressed formation of SIM, corresponding to the disordered phase, according to our proposition. Compelling evidence is provided by the observations of the increased lattice expansion of martensite with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and its lattice contraction in hydrogen-charged one.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide induced responses of cat tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, V; Oike, M; Tanaka, H; Inoue, R; Ito, Y

    1997-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (10−6 and 10−3 M) on membrane potential, membrane currents, intracellular calcium concentration, resting muscle tone and contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol were examined in cat tracheal strips and isolated smooth muscle cells. H2O2 (10−4 and 10−5 M) enhanced the amplitude of contractions and excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.) evoked by EFS without changing muscle tone and resting membrane potential of the tracheal smooth muscle, and enhanced the contraction induced by carbachol (10−8 M). At an increased concentration (10−3 M), H2O2 elevated resting muscle tone and marginally hyperpolarized the membrane in the majority of the cells. In 51 out of 56 cells examined, H2O2 (10−6–10−3 M) elicited an outward current at a holding potential of −40 mV and enhanced the frequency of the spontaneous transient outward current (STOC). In 20 cells the outward current was preceded by a small inward current. In the other cells, H2O2 elicited only an inward current or did not affect the background current. In Ca2+ free solution the action of H2O2 on the resting muscle tone, STOCs, background current and on the current induced by ramp depolarization was significantly reduced. H2O2 (10−4 M) increased the intracellular ionized calcium concentration both in the absence and presence of external Ca2+. However, the effect developed faster and was of a higher amplitude in the presence of external Ca2+. These results suggest that H2O2 increases intracellular Ca2+, with a subsequent augmentation of stimulation-evoked contractions, and enhances Ca2+ and voltage-sensitive potassium conductance. PMID:9222542

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Akt Phosphorylation Regulates Bax Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sadidi, Mahdieh; Lentz, Stephen I.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are involved in many cellular processes that positively and negatively regulate cell fate. H2O2, acting as an intracellular messenger, activates phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and its downstream target Akt, and promotes cell survival. The aim of the current study was to understand the mechanism by which PI3K/Akt signaling promotes survival in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We demonstrate that PI3K/Akt mediates phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bax. This phosphorylation suppresses apoptosis and promotes cell survival. Increased survival in the presence of H2O2 was blocked by LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K activation. LY294002 prevented Bax phosphorylation and resulted in Bax translocation to the mitochondria, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and cell death. Collectively, these findings reveal a mechanism by which H2O2-induced activation of PI3K/Akt influences posttranslational modification of Bax and inactivate a key component of the cell death machinery. PMID:19278624

  3. Hydrogen Peroxide Produced by Oral Streptococci Induces Macrophage Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by members of the mitis group of oral streptococci plays important roles in microbial communities such as oral biofilms. Although the cytotoxicity of H2O2 has been widely recognized, the effects of H2O2 produced by oral streptococci on host defense systems remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of H2O2 produced by Streptococcus oralis on human macrophage cell death. Infection by S. oralis was found to stimulate cell death of a THP-1 human macrophage cell line at multiplicities of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited the cytotoxic effect of S. oralis. S. oralis deletion mutants lacking the spxB gene, which encodes pyruvate oxidase, and are therefore deficient in H2O2 production, showed reduced cytotoxicity toward THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, H2O2 alone was capable of inducing cell death. The cytotoxic effect seemed to be independent of inflammatory responses, because H2O2 was not a potent stimulator of tumor necrosis factor-α production in macrophages. These results indicate that streptococcal H2O2 plays a role as a cytotoxin, and is implicated in the cell death of infected human macrophages. PMID:23658745

  4. Novel Pressure-Induced Interactions in Silane-Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, T.; Somayazulu, M; Hemley, R

    2009-01-01

    We report novel molecular compound formation from silane-hydrogen mixtures with intermolecular interactions unprecedented for hydrogen-rich solids. A complex H2 vibron spectrum with anticorrelated pressure-frequency dependencies and a striking H-D exchange below 10 GPa reveal strong and unusual attractive interactions between SiH4 and H2 and molecular bond destabilization at remarkably low pressure. The unique features of the observed SiH4(H2)2 compound suggest a new range of accessible pressure-driven intermolecular interactions for hydrogen-bearing simple molecular systems and a new approach to perturb the hydrogen covalent bond.

  5. Applications of light-induced electron-transfer and hydrogen-abstraction processes: photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen from reducing radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, K.; Whitten, D.G.

    1980-07-16

    A study of several photoprocesses which generate reducing radicals in similar photoelectrochemical cells was reported. Coupling of a light-induced reaction to produce a photocurrent concurrent with hydrogen generation in a second compartment can occur for a number of electron transfers and hydrogen abstractions in what appears to be a fairly general process. Irradiation of the RuL/sub 3//sup +2//Et/sub 3/N: photoanode compartment leads to production of a photocurrent together with generation of hydrogen at the cathode. A rather different type of reaction that also results in formation of two reducing radicals as primary photoproducts if the photoreduction of ketones and H-heteroaromatics by alcohols and other hydrogen atom donors. Irradiation of benzophenone/2-propanol/MV/sup +2/ solutions in the photoanode compartment (intensity 1.4 x 10/sup -8/ einstein/s) leads to a buildup of moderate levels of MV/sup +/ and to a steady photocurrent of 320 ..mu..A. The MV/sup +/ is oxidized at the anode of the photolyzed compartment with concomitant reduction of H/sup +/ in the cathode compartment. There was no decrease in benzophenone concentration over moderate periods of irradiation, and a steady production of hydrogen in the cathode compartment was observed. The photocurrent produced was linear with the square of absorbed light intensity. The quantum efficiency at the above-indicated intensity is 22%; quantitative analysis of the hydrogen produced gives good agreement with this value. 1 figure, 1 table. (DP)

  6. Recombination-induced athermal migration of hydrogen and deuterium in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Koshka, Yaroslav; Krishnan, Bharat

    2005-02-01

    The phenomenon of recombination-induced formation of hydrogen-defect complexes in epitaxial silicon carbide (SiC) was further investigated on p-type samples treated in deuterium plasma. Qualitatively similar effects were observed for hydrogen and deuterium. The formation of hydrogen-related (deuterium-related) defects would depend on the temperature of the sample during plasma treatment, with lower process temperatures causing only incorporation of hydrogen (deuterium) near the surface without any significant formation of electrically or optically active hydrogen-related or deuterium-related defects in the epilayer. Higher process temperatures normally produced more efficient formation of new centers, including passivation of acceptors in SiC. In all cases, prolonged excitation of the hydrogenated (deuterated) samples with above-bandgap light at reduced temperatures caused recombination-induced formation of a few different defect centers. A confirmation of the long-range athermal migration of hydrogen from the surface into the bulk of the sample was obtained. It has been established that it is the recombination-induced migration of hydrogen that is responsible for the formation of hydrogen-related defect centers under optical excitation.

  7. Mapping the Globe with C & C Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, A. A.

    2001-12-01

    C & C Technologies is an international survey and mapping company with an entrepreneurial spirit that is evident throughout. C & C was recently awarded the MTS (Marine Technology Society) ROV Committee Corporate Excellence Award in recognition of their pioneering spirit displayed by the introduction of the HUGIN 3000 Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) to the offshore industry. This presentation will outline the wide variety of global mapping projects that C & C has performed for government, private sector, and academia. These include high-resolution mapping of Cater Lake, the Panama Canal, Antarctica, Lake Tahoe, and the HUGIN 3000ś discovery of the German submarine U-166 in 5000 feet of water in the Gulf of Mexico. Adacemic disciplines required to support these technical challenges will be characterized and job opportunities in this emerging field will be addressed.

  8. Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yijun; Zhu, Duming

    2016-01-01

    Since it was proposed in 2007, molecular hydrogen therapy has been widely concerned and researched. Many animal experiments were carried out in a variety of disease fields, such as cerebral infarction, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, radiation injury, chronic hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, stress ulcer, acute sports injuries, mitochondrial and inflammatory disease, and acute erythema skin disease and other pathological processes or diseases. Molecular hydrogen therapy is pointed out as there is protective effect for sepsis patients, too. The impact of molecular hydrogen therapy against sepsis is shown from the aspects of basic vital signs, organ functions (brain, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, etc.), survival rate, and so forth. Molecular hydrogen therapy is able to significantly reduce the release of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress injury. Thereby it can reduce damage of various organ functions from sepsis and improve survival rate. Molecular hydrogen therapy is a prospective method against sepsis. PMID:27413421

  9. The threshold stress intensity for hydrogen-induced crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhurst, K. N.; Baker, T. J.

    1981-06-01

    The crack growth rates and threshold stress intensities, K TH, for a 3 1/2 NiCrMoV steel (0.2 pct proof stress 1200 MPa) have been measured in a hydrogen environment at various temperatures and hydrogen pressures. Fractographic evidence and the observation of alternating fast and slow crack growth near K TH suggests that the crack advances by the repeated nucleation of microcracks at microstructural features ahead of the main crack. Transient crack growth is observed following load increases just below K TH. Using the idea, from unstable cleavage fracture theory, that for fracture a critical stress must be exceeded over a critical distance ahead of the crack, and assuming that this critical stress is reduced in proportion to the local hydrogen concentration (in equilibrium with the external hydrogen at K TH), a theoretical dependence of K TH on hydrogen pressure is derived which compares well with the experimental evidence.

  10. Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yijun; Zhu, Duming

    2016-01-01

    Since it was proposed in 2007, molecular hydrogen therapy has been widely concerned and researched. Many animal experiments were carried out in a variety of disease fields, such as cerebral infarction, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, radiation injury, chronic hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, stress ulcer, acute sports injuries, mitochondrial and inflammatory disease, and acute erythema skin disease and other pathological processes or diseases. Molecular hydrogen therapy is pointed out as there is protective effect for sepsis patients, too. The impact of molecular hydrogen therapy against sepsis is shown from the aspects of basic vital signs, organ functions (brain, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, etc.), survival rate, and so forth. Molecular hydrogen therapy is able to significantly reduce the release of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress injury. Thereby it can reduce damage of various organ functions from sepsis and improve survival rate. Molecular hydrogen therapy is a prospective method against sepsis. PMID:27413421

  11. Is Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Suspended Animation General Anesthesia?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rosie Q.; McKinstry, Andrew R.; Moore, Jason T.; Caltagarone, Breanna M.; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) depresses mitochondrial function and thereby metabolic rates in mice, purportedly resulting in a state of “suspended animation.” Volatile anesthetics also depress mitochondrial function, an effect that may contribute to their anesthetic properties. In this study, we ask whether H2S has general anesthetic properties, and by extension, whether mitochondrial effects underlie the state of anesthesia. We compared loss of righting reflex, electroencephalography, and electromyography in mice exposed to metabolically equipotent concentrations of halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and H2S. We also studied combinations of H2S and anesthetics to assess additivity. Finally, the long-term effects of H2S were assessed by using the Morris water maze behavioral testing 2 to 3 weeks after exposures. Exposure to H2S decreases O2 consumption, CO2 production, and body temperature similarly to that of the general anesthetics, but fails to produce a loss of righting reflex or muscle atonia at metabolically equivalent concentrations. When combined, H2S antagonizes the metabolic effects of isoflurane, but potentiates the isoflurane-induced loss of righting reflex. We found no effect of prior H2S exposure on memory or learning. H2S (250 ppm), not itself lethal, produced delayed lethality when combined with subanesthetic concentrations of isoflurane. H2S cannot be considered a general anesthetic, despite similar metabolic suppression. Metabolic suppression, presumably via mitochondrial actions, is not sufficient to account for the hypnotic or immobilizing components of the anesthetic state. Combinations of H2S and isoflurane can be lethal, suggesting extreme care in the combination of these gases in clinical situations. PMID:22414854

  12. Light-induced long-range hydrogen motion in a-Si:H at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Hyeonsik M.; Lee, S.-H.; Nelson, B. P.; Mascarenhas, A.; Deb, S. K.

    2001-03-01

    We demonstrate that one can detect minuscule amounts of hydrogen diffusion out of a-Si:H under illumination at room temperature, by monitoring the changes in the Raman spectrum of a-WO3 as a function of illumination. The Staebler-Wronski effect, the light-induce creation of metastable defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), has been one of the major problems that has limited the performance of solar cells based on this material. The recently suggested ¡®hydrogen collision model¡¯ can explain many aspects of the Staebler-Wronski effect, but assumes that the photogenerated mobile hydrogen atoms can move a long distance at room temperature. However, light-induced hydrogen motion in a-Si:H has not been experimentally observed at room temperature. We utilized the high sensitivity of the Raman spectrum of electrochromic a-WO3 to hydrogen insertion to probe the long-range motion of hydrogen at room temperature. We deposited a thin (200 nm) layer of a-WO3 on top of a-Si:H, and under illumination, a change in the Raman spectrum was detected. By comparing the Raman signal changes with those for control experiments where hydrogen is electrochemically inserted into a-WO_3, we can estimate semiquantitatively the amount of hydrogen that diffuses out of the a-Si:H layer.

  13. 102. Catalog HHistory 1, C.C.C., 34 Landscaping, Negative No. 6040a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    102. Catalog H-History 1, C.C.C., 34 Landscaping, Negative No. 6040a (Photographer and date unknown) BEAUTIFICATION PROGRAM STARTED AS SOON AS GRADING ALONG THE DRIVE WAS COMPLETED. CCC CAMP 3 SHOWN PLANTING LAUREL. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  14. Structural instability of the diamond C(111) surface induced by hydrogen chemisorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Lin, J.-C.

    1998-12-01

    The low energy electron diffraction technique was used to study the hydrogen chemisorption induced structural instability on the diamond C(111) surface. From the quantitative analysis of diffraction spots intensity on the as-dosed, partially desorbed, and annealed hydrogenated C(111) surfaces, the correlation between the (1×1)↔(2×1) phase transformation, hydrogen coverage, and surface temperature is shown. Thermal treatment with partial hydrogen desorption on the fully hydrogenated C(111) surface induces a (1×1)-(2×1) reconstruction with the observable half-order spots intensity (I1/2) emerging only after heating the substrate to 1270 K. Conversely, thermal annealing of the partially hydrogenated C(111) surface without desorbing H causes the size shrinking of the (2×1) domains as well as the relaxation of the hydrogenated domains. The temperature effect of I1/2 summarized from both thermal studies reveals that the (2×1) domain instability originated from the relaxation of the hydrogenated domains at elevated temperatures. In addition, the H chemisorption behavior on C(111) at different surface temperatures suggests that the terrace edges could be the preferential sites for the initial H adsorption and the growth of the hydrogenated domains might predominantly start from the terrace boundaries at a surface temperature as low as 125 K. The present study also allows us to tentatively propose that there might exist a low-temperature chemisorption state in addition to the hydrogenated metastable state as suggested by the sum-frequency generation spectroscopy and theoretical studies. A possible mechanism for the hydrogen chemisorption induced structural transformation is also discussed.

  15. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a C/C and a C/C-SiC material system fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for HIFiRE 8, a joint Australia / AFRL hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kPa. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and the C/C-SiC were tested in the NASA Langley Direct Connect Rig (DCR) at Mach 5 and Mach 6 enthalpy for several minutes. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used in some of the tests to increase the surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel for approximately 350degF. The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for 3 cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  16. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  17. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont’s and photobiont’s consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont’s hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  18. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  19. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  20. Oral intake of hydrogen-rich water ameliorated chlorpyrifos-induced neurotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Mengyu; Xie, Fei; Ma, Xuemei Zhao, Pengxiang; Liu, Yunqi; Li, Jiala; Wang, Minglian; Yang, Zhaona; Zhang, Yutong

    2014-10-01

    Chronic exposure to low-levels of organophosphate (OP) compounds, such as chlorpyrifos (CPF), induces oxidative stress and could be related to neurological disorders. Hydrogen has been identified as a novel antioxidant which could selectively scavenge hydroxyl radicals. We explore whether intake of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) can protect Wistar rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity. Rats were gavaged daily with 6.75 mg/kg body weight (1/20 LD{sub 50}) of CPF and given HRW by oral intake. Nissl staining and electron microscopy results indicated that HRW intake had protective effects on the CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons and neuronal mitochondria. Immunostaining results showed that the increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes induced by CPF exposure can be ameliorated by HRW intake. Moreover, HRW intake also attenuated CPF-induced oxidative stress as evidenced by enhanced level of MDA, accompanied by an increase in GSH level and SOD and CAT activity. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity tests showed significant decrease in brain AChE activity after CPF exposure, and this effect can be ameliorated by HRW intake. An in vitro study demonstrated that AChE activity was more intense in HRW than in normal water with or without chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO), the metabolically-activated form of CPF. These observations suggest that HRW intake can protect rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity, and the protective effects of hydrogen may be mediated by regulating the oxidant and antioxidant status of rats. Furthermore, this work defines a novel mechanism of biological activity of hydrogen by directly increasing the AChE activity. - Highlights: • Hydrogen molecules protect rats from CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons. • The increased GFAP expression induced by CPF can also be ameliorated by hydrogen. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated the increase in CPF-induced oxidative stress. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated AChE inhibition in vivo

  1. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies for combined-cycle propulsion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a technical assessment of the realization of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction technologies in a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process setting. The technical findings related to the status of air liquefaction technologies are reviewed. Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers, heat exchanger atmospheric constituent fouling alleviation measures, para/ortho-hydrogen shift-conversion catalysts, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps, hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as a heat sink, liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices, and technically related engine concepts are discussed. Much of the LACE work is related to aerospaceplane propulsion concepts that were developed in the 1960's. Emphasis is placed on the Liquid Air Cycle Engine (LACE).

  2. Hydrogen-induced effects on the CVD growth of high-quality graphene structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Jing; Li, Xianglong; Wang, Bin; Hao, Long; Liang, Minghui; Jin, Meihua; Zhi, Linjie

    2013-09-21

    In this work, the hydrogen-induced effects on the CVD growth of high-quality graphene have been systematically studied by regulating the growth parameters mainly related to hydrogen. Experimental results demonstrate that under a high hydrogen flow rate, the competitive etching effect during the growth process is more prominent and even shows macroscopic selectivity. Based on these understandings, the hexagonal graphene domains with diverse edge modalities are controllably synthesized on a large scale by elaborately managing the competitive etching effect of hydrogen that existed during the formation of graphene. This study not only contributes to the understanding of the mechanism of CVD growth, especially the effects of hydrogen used in the system, but also provides a facile method to synthesize high-quality graphene structures with trimmed edge morphologies. PMID:23715011

  3. Hydrogenation-induced edge magnetization in armchair MoS2 nanoribbon and electric field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Fangping; Yang, Zhixiong; Ni, Xiang; Wu, Nannan; Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xiang

    2014-02-01

    We performed density functional theory study on the electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS2 nanoribbons (AMoS2NR) with different edge hydrogenation. Although bare and fully passivated AMoS2NRs are nonmagnetic semiconductors, it was found that hydrogenation in certain patterns can induce localized ferromagnetic edge state in AMoS2NRs and make AMoS2NRs become antiferromagnetic semiconductors or ferromagnetic semiconductors. Electric field effects on the bandgap and magnetic moment of AMoS2NRs were investigated. Partial edge hydrogenation can change a small-sized AMoS2NR from semiconductor to metal or semimetal under a moderate transverse electric field. Since the rate of edge hydrogenation can be controlled experimentally via the temperature, pressure and concentration of H2, our results suggest edge hydrogenation is a useful method to engineer the band structure of AMoS2NRs.

  4. Tolerance of pentose utilising yeast to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioethanol fermentations follow traditional beverage fermentations where the yeast is exposed to adverse conditions such as oxidative stress. Lignocellulosic bioethanol fermentations involve the conversion of pentose and hexose sugars into ethanol. Environmental stress conditions such as osmotic stress and ethanol stress may affect the fermentation performance; however, oxidative stress as a consequence of metabolic output can also occur. However, the effect of oxidative stress on yeast with pentose utilising capabilities has yet to be investigated. Results Assaying for the effect of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress on Candida, Pichia and Scheffersomyces spp. has demonstrated that these yeast tolerate hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in a manner consistent with that demonstrated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia guillermondii appears to be more tolerant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress when compared to Candida shehatae, Candida succiphila or Scheffersomyces stipitis. Conclusions Sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress increased in the presence of minimal media; however, addition of amino acids and nucleobases was observed to increase tolerance. In particular adenine increased tolerance and methionine reduced tolerance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24636079

  5. Microscopic thermal characterization of C/C and C/C-SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumel, J.; Krapez, J. C.; Lepoutre, F.; Enguehard, F.; Rochais, D.; Neuer, G.; Cataldi, M.

    2002-05-01

    To measure the thermal properties of C/C and C/C-SiC composites constituents, photoreflectance microscopy is used. Specific methods are developed to cope with experimental artefacts (material semi-transparency, convolution effects), so as with fibers and matrix specificities (strong thermal anisotropy, geometric effects…). Experimental results are presented demonstrating the interest of photoreflectance microscopy for a quantitative determination of the microscopic thermal properties of these complex graphite materials.

  6. Study of fibroblast gene expression in response to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide or UVA with skin aging.

    PubMed

    Hazane-Puch, Florence; Bonnet, Mathilde; Valenti, Kita; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Kurfurst, Robin; Favier, Alain; Sauvaigo, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    The skin aging process, implying oxidative stress, is associated with specific gene expression. Ultraviolet A (UVA) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) making them relevant in the study of skin cell responses to oxidative stresses. To investigate transcript expression associated with chronological skin aging and its modulation by two oxidative stresses, cDNA micro-arrays, composed of a set of 81 expressed sequence tag (EST) clones, were used to probe the patterns of transcript expression in human fibroblasts of five young (< 21 years-old) and five older (> 50 years-old) healthy females at basal levels and 24 h after exposure to UVA (7 J/cm2) and H(2)O(2) (20 mM). At the basal state, 22% of total genes were up-regulated in the older group. Although both stresses led to the same cell mortality, H(2)O(2) induced a stronger modulation of gene expression than UVA, with 19.5% of transcripts up-regulated versus 4%. The aging process affected the response to H(2)O(2) and even though cells from old donors presented higher basal levels of transcripts they were not able to regulate them in response to the stress. Interestingly, UVA had a specific strong inhibitory effect on the expression of chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (CCL2) transcript, suggesting a possible mechanism for its anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory roles. PMID:20299309

  7. Hydrogen decoration of radiation damage induced defect structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kirnstötter, S.; Faccinelli, M.; Hadley, P.; Schustereder, W.; Laven, J. G.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2014-02-21

    The defect complexes that are formed when protons with energies in the MeV-range were implanted into high-purity silicon were investigated. After implantation, the samples were annealed at 400 °C or 450 °C for times ranging between 15 minutes and 30 hours. The resistivity of the samples was then analyzed by Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP). The resistivity shows minima where there is a high carrier concentration and it is possible to extract the carrier concentration from the resistivity data. Initially, there is a large peak in the carrier concentration at the implantation depth where most of the hydrogen is concentrated. For longer anneals, this peak widens as the hydrogen diffuses away from the implantation depth. Following the changes in resistivity as a function of annealing time allows us to characterize the diffusion of hydrogen through these samples. Differences in the diffusion were observed depending on whether the silicon was grown by the magnetic Czochralski (m:Cz) method or the Float zone (Fz) method.

  8. Hydrogenation induced structure and property changes in GdGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedumkandathil, Reji; Kranak, Verina F.; Johansson, Robert; Ångström, Jonas; Balmes, Oliver; Andersson, Mikael S.; Nordblad, Per; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Sahlberg, Martin; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Hydrides GdGaHx were obtained by exposing the Zintl phase GdGa with the CrB structure to a hydrogen atmosphere at pressures from 1.5 to 50 bar and temperatures from 50 to 500 °C. Structural analysis by powder X-ray diffraction suggests that conditions with hydrogen pressures in a range between 15 and 50 bar and temperatures below 500 °C afford a uniform hydride phase with the NdGaH1.66 structure (Cmcm, a=3.9867(7) Å, b=12.024(2) Å, c=4.1009(6) Å) which hosts H in two distinct positions, H1 and H2. H1 is coordinated in a tetrahedral fashion by Gd atoms, whereas H2 atoms are inserted between Ga atoms. The assignment of the NdGaH1.66 structure is corroborated by first principles DFT calculations. Modeling of phase and structure stability as a function of composition resulted in excellent agreement with experimental lattice parameters when x=1.66 and revealed the presence of five-atom moieties Ga-H2-Ga-H2-Ga in GdGaH1.66. From in situ powder X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation it was established that hydrogenation at temperatures above 200 °C affords a hydride with x≈1.3, which is stable up to 500 °C, and that additional H absorption, yielding GdGaH1.66, takes place at lower temperatures. Consequently, GdGaH1.66 desorbs H above T=200 °C. Without the presence of hydrogen, hydrides GdGaHx decompose at temperatures above 300 °C into GdH2 and an unidentified Gd-Ga intermetallics. Thus the hydrogenation of GdGa is not reversible. From magnetic measurements the Curie-Weiss constant and effective magnetic moment of GdGaH1.66 were obtained. The former indicates antiferromagnetic interactions, the latter attains a value of ~8 μB which is typical for compounds containing Gd3+ions.

  9. The diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge exchange induced hydrogen escape flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of ion temperature and density data at specific points and times in June 1969 provided by the OGO 6 satellite, and altitude profiles of the ion and electron temperature and concentration provided by the Arecibo radar facility over the period February 1972-April 1974, the diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was investigated. It was calculated that for low to moderate solar activity at Arecibo, the diurnal ratio of the maximum-to-minimum charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was approximately 6 with a peak around noon and a minimum somewhere between 0100 and 0300 h LT. This study of a limited amount of OGO 6 and Arecibo data seems to indicate that the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux increases as the F(10.7) flux increases for low to moderate solar activity.

  10. Origin of the photo-induced changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, D.

    1983-07-01

    The electronic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films are discussed in detail. Particular attention is paid to the changes induced by photogeneration of excess free carriers. Previous models which have been proposed to account for such effects are classified and criticized. An alternative explanation, which is based on the unique electronic structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, is proposed and analyzed. In this model, no new defects are created by the light, but rather the photo-induced effects follow from a metastable trapping of the excess free carriers at charged spinless defects which are present at equilibrium.

  11. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates chemotherapy-induced ovarian injury via regulation of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    MENG, XIAOYIN; CHEN, HONGGUANG; WANG, GUOLIN; YU, YONGHAO; XIE, KELIANG

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen has been reported to exert a therapeutic effect in several diseases due to its antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether hydrogen-rich saline treatment could attenuate ovarian damage induced by cisplatin. A total of 240 adult, virgin, female Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 180–220 g, were randomly divided into four groups (n=60 per group): Control (Con), control + hydrogen-rich saline (Con + H2), cisplatin-induced ovarian injury (OI) and cisplatin-induced ovarian injury + hydrogen-rich saline (OI + H2). Cisplatin was diluted in saline immediately before use. In the OI and OI + H2 groups, the rats were administered a dose of cisplatin on the 1st and 7th days. The rats in the Con + H2 and OI + H2 groups were intraperitoneally injected with hydrogen-rich saline (10ml/kg body weight) once a day over a 2-week period. On the 14th, 28th and 42nd days (T1, T2 and T3) after the cisplatin injection, femoral vein blood was collected. At the end of the experiment, ovarian homogenates were prepared, and the samples were used for estrogen (E2), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) examination. In addition, rats (n=10 per group) were sacrificed for bilateral ovary removal; one was fixed in formalin for follicle-counting analysis, while the other was used for nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) detection by western blotting. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the FSH release, elevated the level of E2, improved the development of follicles, and reduced the damage to the ovarian cortex at T1, T2 and T3 in the OI + H2 rats. Cisplatin induced oxidative stress by increasing the levels of oxidation products and attenuating the activity of antioxidant enzyme, which could be reversed by hydrogen-rich saline treatment. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich saline regulated the Nrf2 protein expression in rats with ovarian damage. In

  12. Mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in hepatic and neuronal human cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guizani, Nejib; Waly, Mostafa I

    2012-11-15

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidative stress agent that is associated with depletion of intracellular glutathione and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes in different cell lines. Consumption of antioxidant-rich foods reduces cellular oxidative stress and its related health problems. This study aimed to assess the antioxidant properties of mushroom, Agaricus bisporous cultivar extract, against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in cultured human hepatic (HepG2) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. In this study, hydrogen peroxide caused significant oxidative stress in HepG2 and SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by glutathione depletion, impairment of total antioxidant capacity and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase). Agaricusbisporous extract ameliorated the observed hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cellular insult as indicated by restoring the activity of glutathione and the assayed antioxidant enzymes to control levels. The results suggest that mushroom extract as antioxidant properties and protects against the oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide-in cultured human hepatic and neuronal cells. PMID:24261122

  13. Quantitative observations of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in a low alloy steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Williams, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth, da/dt, was studied in AISI-SAE 4130 low alloy steel in gaseous hydrogen and distilled water environments as a function of applied stress intensity, K, at various temperatures, hydrogen pressures, and alloy strength levels. At low values of K, da/dt was found to exhibit a strong exponential K dependence (Stage 1 growth) in both hydrogen and water. At intermediate values of K, da/dt exhibited a small but finite K dependence (Stage 2), with the Stage 2 slope being greater in hydrogen than in water. In hydrogen, at a constant K, (da/dt) sub 2 varied inversely with alloy strength level and varied essentially in the same complex manner with temperature and hydrogen pressure as noted previously. The results of this study provide support for most of the qualitative predictions of the lattice decohesion theory as recently modified by Oriani. The lack of quantitative agreement between data and theory and the inability of theory to explain the observed pressure dependence of slow crack growth are mentioned and possible rationalizations to account for these differences are presented.

  14. Hydrogen Induced Stress Cracking of Materials Under Cathodic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCoursiere, Marissa P.

    Hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 4340, InconelRTM 718, Alloy 686 and Alloy 59 was studied using slow strain rate tests of both smooth and notched cylindrical specimens. Two heat treatments of the AISI 4340 material were used as a standard for two levels of yield strength: 1479 MPa, and 1140 MPa. A subset of the 1140 MPa AISI 4340 material also underwent plasma nitriding. The InconelRTM 718 material was hardened following AMS 5663M to obtain a yield strength of 1091 MPa. The Alloy 686 material was obtained in the Grade 3 condition with a minimum yield strength of 1034 MPa. The Alloy 59 material was obtained with a cold worked condition similar to the Alloy 686 and with a minimum yield strength of 1034 MPa. Ninety-nine specimens were tested, including smooth cylindrical tensile test specimens and smooth and notched cylindrical slow strain rate tensile tests specimens. Testing included specimens that had been precharged with hydrogen in 3.5% NaCl at 50°C for 2 weeks (AISI 4340), 4 weeks (InconelRTM 718, Alloy 686, Alloy 59) and 16 weeks (InconelRTM 718, Alloy 686, Alloy 59) using a potentiostat to deliver a cathodic potential of -1100 mV vs. SCE. The strain rate over the gauge section for the smooth specimens and in the notch root for the notched specimens was 1 x 10-6 /s. It was found that the AISI 4340 was highly embrittled in simulated ocean water when compared to the nickel based superalloys. The higher strength AISI 4340 showed much more embrittlement, as expected. Testing of the AISI 4340 at both 20°C and 4°C showed that the temperature had no effect on the hydrogen embrittlement response. The InconelRTM 718 was highly embrittled when precharged, although it only showed low levels of embrittlement when unprecharged. Both the Alloy 686 and Alloy 59 showed minimal embrittlement in all conditions. Therefore, for the materials examined, the use of Alloy 686 and Alloy 59 for components in salt water environments when under a cathodic potential of -1100 mV vs. SCE is

  15. Molecular Hydrogen Reduces LPS-Induced Neuroinflammation and Promotes Recovery from Sickness Behaviour in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spulber, Stefan; Edoff, Karin; Hong, Lie; Morisawa, Shinkatsu; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in mouse models of acute neurodegeneration. The effect was suggested to be mediated by its free-radical scavenger properties. However, it has been shown recently that molecular hydrogen alters gene expression and protein phosphorylation. The aim of this study was to test whether chronic ad libitum consumption of molecular hydrogen-enriched electrochemically reduced water (H-ERW) improves the outcome of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. Seven days after the initiation of H-ERW treatment, C57Bl/6 mice received a single injection of LPS (0.33 mg/kg i.p.) or an equivalent volume of vehicle. The LPS-induced sickness behaviour was assessed 2 h after the injection, and recovery was assessed by monitoring the spontaneous locomotor activity in the homecage for 72 h after the administration of LPS. The mice were killed in the acute or recovery phase, and the expression of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus was assessed by real-time PCR. We found that molecular hydrogen reduces the LPS-induced sickness behaviour and promotes recovery. These effects are associated with a shift towards anti-inflammatory gene expression profile at baseline (downregulation of TNF- α and upregulation of IL-10). In addition, molecular hydrogen increases the amplitude, but shortens the duration and promotes the extinction of neuroinflammation. Consistently, molecular hydrogen modulates the activation and gene expression in a similar fashion in immortalized murine microglia (BV-2 cell line), suggesting that the effects observed in vivo may involve the modulation of microglial activation. Taken together, our data point to the regulation of cytokine expression being an additional critical mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of molecular hydrogen. PMID:22860058

  16. Hydrogenation-induced atomic stripes on the 2 H -MoS2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sang Wook; Yun, Won Seok; Lee, J. D.; Hwang, Y. H.; Baik, J.; Shin, H. J.; Lee, Wang G.; Park, Young S.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-12-01

    We report that the hydrogenation of a single crystal 2 H -MoS2 induces a novel-intermediate phase between 2H and 1T phases on its surface, i.e., the large-area, uniform, robust, and surface array of atomic stripes through the intralayer atomic-plane gliding. The total energy calculations confirm that the hydrogenation-induced atomic stripes are energetically most stable on the MoS2 surface between the semiconducting 2H and metallic 1T phase. Furthermore, the electronic states associated with the hydrogen ions, which is bonded to sulfur anions on both sides of the MoS2 surface layer, appear in the vicinity of the Fermi level (EF) and reduces the band gap. This is promising in developing the monolayer-based field-effect transistor or vanishing the Schottky barrier for practical applications.

  17. Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer series in laboratory air.

    PubMed

    Swafford, Lauren D; Parigger, Christian G

    2014-01-01

    Stark-broadened emission profiles for the hydrogen alpha and beta Balmer series lines in plasma are measured to characterize electron density and temperature. Plasma is generated using a typical laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) arrangement that employs a focused Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd : YAG) laser, operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The temporal evolution of the hydrogen Balmer series lines is explored using LIBS. Spectra from the plasma are measured following laser-induced optical breakdown in laboratory air. The electron density is primarily inferred from the Stark-broadened experimental data collected at various time delays. Due to the presence of nitrogen and oxygen in air, the hydrogen alpha and beta lines become clearly discernible from background radiation for time delays of 0.4 and 1.4 μs, respectively. PMID:25226255

  18. Structure dependent hydrogen induced etching features of graphene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap; Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Kamal P.; Tanemura, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    H2 induced etching of graphene is of significant interest to understand graphene growth process as well as to fabricate nanoribbons and various other structures. Here, we demonstrate the structure dependent H2 induced etching behavior of graphene crystals. We synthesized graphene crystals on electro-polished Cu foil by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition process, where some of the crystals showed hexagonal shaped snowflake-dendritic morphology. Significant differences in H2 induced etching behavior were observed for the snowflake-dendritic and regular graphene crystals by annealing in a gas mixture of H2 and Ar. The regular graphene crystals were etched anisotropically creating hexagonal holes with pronounced edges, while etching of all the dendritic crystals occurred from the branches of lobs creating symmetrical fractal structures. The etching behavior provides important clue of graphene nucleation and growth as well as their selective etching to fabricate well-defined structures for nanoelectronics.

  19. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in omicron Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen emission lines in Mira variable stars are a well-known phenomenon whose origin has been established as related to the propagation of radiative hypersonic shock waves throughout the stellar atmosphere. A polarimetric observation by McLean and Coyne [1] made on omicron Ceti (the prototype of Mira variable stars) has revealed the existence of linear polarization signatures associated with Balmer emission lines. However, the polarizing mechanism has never been properly explained so far. The study presented here is the first of its kind since it displays the results of a spectropolarimetric survey of omicron Ceti in the Balmer lines. The survey was made with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter (Telescope Bernard Lyot, France) in full Stokes mode. We did not just confirm the appearance of this polarization but we also and above all showed the temporal variation of the linear polarization in the lines. We conclude that the polarizing mechanism is definitely intrinsic to the shock wave propagation throughout the stellar atmosphere of Mira and give some leads about the nature of this mechanism.

  20. Pneumococcal Hydrogen Peroxide–Induced Stress Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Loose, Maria; Hudel, Martina; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Garcia, Ernesto; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Lucas, Rudolf; Chakraborty, Trinad; Pillich, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections can induce aberrant responses in cellular stress pathways, leading to translational attenuation, metabolic restriction, and activation of oxidative stress, with detrimental effects on cell survival. Here we show that infection of human airway epithelial cells with Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress, activation of mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, and regulation of their respective target genes. We identify pneumococcal H2O2 as the causative agent for these responses, as both catalase-treated and pyruvate oxidase-deficient bacteria lacked these activities. Pneumococcal H2O2 induced nuclear NF-κB translocation and transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of translational arrest and ER stress by salubrinal or of MAPK signaling pathways attenuate cytokine transcription. These results provide strong evidence for the notion that inhibition of translation is an important host pathway in monitoring harmful pathogen-associated activities, thereby enabling differentiation between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. PMID:25183769

  1. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking Assessment in Pipeline Steels Through Permeation and Crystallographic Texture Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; Karimdadashi, R.; Eskandari, M.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrochemical hydrogen charging and permeation techniques were used to characterize hydrogen distribution, trapping, and diffusion in X60 and X60 sour service (X60SS) pipeline steels. The results obtained contribute to better understanding of hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). SEM observations illustrated that all HIC cracks were formed at the center of cross section in the X60 steel after 3-h hydrogen charging and length of cracks increased with charging time. No HIC cracks were recorded at the cross section of X60SS steel after the same charging for different durations. Hydrogen permeation tests showed that the density of reversible hydrogen traps was lower at the center of cross section in the X60SS steel compared to the X60 one, and this is considered as one of the main reasons for high resistance of X60SS steel to HIC. EBSD orientation imaging results proved that the accumulation of <111>||ND-oriented grains at the center of the cross section in the X60SS steel was high. This is also considered as another reason for higher resistance of this steel to HIC. Finally, the center segregation zone with higher hardness value in the X60 steel was more pronounced than in the X60SS steel which made the X60 steel susceptible to HIC cracking.

  2. Hydrogen Balmer Series Self-Absorption Measurement in Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Parigger, Christian

    2015-05-01

    In experimental studies of laser-induced plasma, we use focused Nd:YAG laser radiation to generate optical breakdown in laboratory air. A Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and an ICCD camera are utilized to record spatially and temporally resolved spectra. Time-resolved spectroscopy methods are employed to record plasma dynamics for various time delays in the range of 0.300 microsecond to typically 10 microsecond after plasma initiation. Early plasma emission spectra reveal hydrogen alpha and ionized nitrogen lines for time delays larger than 0.3 microsecond, the hydrogen beta line emerges from the free-electron background radiation later in the plasma decay for time delays in excess of 1 microsecond. The self-absorption analyses include comparisons of recorded data without and with the use of a doubling mirror. The extent of self-absorption of the hydrogen Balmer series is investigated for various time delays from plasma generation. There are indications of self-absorption of hydrogen alpha by comparison with ionized nitrogen lines at a time delay of 0.3 microsecond. For subsequent time delays, self-absorption effects on line-widths are hardly noticeable, despite the fact of the apparent line-shape distortions. Of interest are comparisons of inferred electron densities from hydrogen alpha and hydrogen beta lines as the plasma decays, including assessments of spatial variation of electron density.

  3. Hydrogen-induced defects in austenite and ferrite of a duplex steel.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, A; Swiatnicki, W A; Jezierska, E

    2006-09-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the microstructure of two types of austeno-ferritic duplex stainless steel (Cr26-Ni6 model steel and Cr22-Ni5-Mo3 commercial steel), each of them after two thermo-mechanical treatments, was investigated. The aim of this study was to reveal microstructural changes appearing during the hydrogen charging and particularly to clarify the occurrence of phase transformations induced by hydrogen. The specific microstructural changes in the ferrite (alpha) and austenite (gamma) of both types of steel were observed. A strong increase of dislocation density was noticed in the alpha phase. In the case of model steel, longer hydrogen charging times led to significant ferrite grain refinement. In the commercial steel, the strips and twin plates appeared in the ferrite after hydrogenation. The appearance of stacking faults was revealed in the gamma phase. The martensite laths appeared in austenite after longer hydrogenation times. It seems that the microstructural changes gave rise to the formation of microcracks in the alpha and gamma phases as well as on the alpha/gamma interphase boundaries. PMID:17059551

  4. Toxin-induced pore formation is hindered by intermolecular hydrogen bonding in sphingomyelin bilayers.

    PubMed

    García-Linares, Sara; Palacios-Ortega, Juan; Yasuda, Tomokazu; Åstrand, Mia; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro; Slotte, J Peter

    2016-06-01

    Sticholysin I and II (StnI and StnII) are pore-forming toxins that use sphingomyelin (SM) for membrane binding. We examined how hydrogen bonding among membrane SMs affected the StnI- and StnII-induced pore formation process, resulting in bilayer permeabilization. We compared toxin-induced permeabilization in bilayers containing either SM or dihydro-SM (lacking the trans Δ(4) double bond of the long-chain base), since their hydrogen-bonding properties are known to differ greatly. We observed that whereas both StnI and StnII formed pores in unilamellar vesicles containing palmitoyl-SM or oleoyl-SM, the toxins failed to similarly form pores in vesicles prepared from dihydro-PSM or dihydro-OSM. In supported bilayers containing OSM, StnII bound efficiently, as determined by surface plasmon resonance. However, StnII binding to supported bilayers prepared from dihydro-OSM was very low under similar experimental conditions. The association of the positively charged StnII (at pH7.0) with unilamellar vesicles prepared from OSM led to a concentration-dependent increase in vesicle charge, as determined from zeta-potential measurements. With dihydro-OSM vesicles, a similar response was not observed. Benzyl alcohol, which is a small hydrogen-bonding compound with affinity to lipid bilayer interfaces, strongly facilitated StnII-induced pore formation in dihydro-OSM bilayers, suggesting that hydrogen bonding in the interfacial region originally prevented StnII from membrane binding and pore formation. We conclude that interfacial hydrogen bonding was able to affect the membrane association of StnI- and StnII, and hence their pore forming capacity. Our results suggest that other types of protein interactions in bilayers may also be affected by hydrogen-bonding origination from SMs. PMID:26975250

  5. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang; Liu, Wen Wu; Xiang, Hong Gang; Fan, Lie Ying; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Xin Yun; Cai, Jian Mei; Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin; Sun, Xue Jun; Wang, Qiang

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  6. Prompt repair of hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA lesions prevents catastrophic chromosomal fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Mahaseth, Tulip; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Iron-dependent oxidative DNA damage in vivo by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, HP) induces copious single-strand(ss)-breaks and base modifications. HP also causes infrequent double-strand DNA breaks, whose relationship to the cell killing is unclear. Since hydrogen peroxide only fragments chromosomes in growing cells, these double-strand breaks were thought to represent replication forks collapsed at direct or excision ss-breaks and to be fully reparable. We have recently reported that hydrogen peroxide kills Escherichia coli by inducing catastrophic chromosome fragmentation, while cyanide (CN) potentiates both the killing and fragmentation. Remarkably, the extreme density of CN+HP-induced chromosomal double-strand breaks makes involvement of replication forks unlikely. Here we show that this massive fragmentation is further amplified by inactivation of ss-break repair or base-excision repair, suggesting that unrepaired primary DNA lesions are directly converted into double-strand breaks. Indeed, blocking DNA replication lowers CN+HP-induced fragmentation only ∼2-fold, without affecting the survival. Once cyanide is removed, recombinational repair in E. coli can mend several double-strand breaks, but cannot mend ∼100 breaks spread over the entire chromosome. Therefore, double-strand breaks induced by oxidative damage happen at the sites of unrepaired primary one-strand DNA lesions, are independent of replication and are highly lethal, supporting the model of clustered ss-breaks at the sites of stable DNA-iron complexes. PMID:27078578

  7. Novel Atomic Rearrangement in the Pb Monolayer on Si(111) surfaces Induced by Atomic Hydrogen Adsorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Lih-Juann; Tsong, Tien-Tzou

    2006-03-01

    Using a scanning tunneling microscopy, we have observed interesting hydrogen-adsorption induced atomic rearrangements on Pb/Si(111) system at room temperature. A hexagonal ring-like pattern with decaying intensity is formed around the hydrogen-induced point defect. Moreover, interference-like patterns can be seen in the region among the H-induced point defects. The detailed pattern depends on the relative position of defects. With certain relative positions, a new superstructure of hexagonal cells can be seen. The phase boundaries are found to either enhance or suppress the formation of the hexagonal ring-like pattern. We believe that the intricate interplay between atomic displacement and electronic structure causes the formation of the patterns. [Ref] : I. S. Hwang, S. H. Chang, C. K. Fang, L. J. Chen, and T. T. Tsong, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 045505 (2005)

  8. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  9. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage by Carica papaya leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    Okoko, Tebekeme; Ere, Diepreye

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the in vitro antioxidant potential of Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract and its effect on hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage assessed by haemolysis and lipid peroxidation. Methods Hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, hydrogen ion scavenging activity, metal chelating activity, and the ferrous ion reducing ability were assessed as antioxidant indices. In the other experiment, human erythrocytes were treated with hydrogen peroxide to induce erythrocyte damage. The extract (at various concentrations) was subsequently incubated with the erythrocytes and later analysed for haemolysis and lipid peroxidation as indices for erythrocyte damage. Results Preliminary investigation of the extract showed that the leaf possessed significant antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities using in vitro models in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05). The extract also reduced hydrogen peroxide induced erythrocyte haemolysis and lipid peroxidation significantly when compared with ascorbic acid (P<0.05). The IC50 values were 7.33 mg/mL and 1.58 mg/mL for inhibition of haemolysis and lipid peroxidation, respectively. In all cases, ascorbic acid (the reference antioxidant) possessed higher activity than the extract. Conclusions The findings show that C. papaya leaves possess significant bioactive potential which is attributed to the phytochemicals which act in synergy. Thus, the leaves can be exploited for pharmaceutical and nutritional purposes. PMID:23569948

  10. Moisture-induced delayed spallation and interfacial hydrogen embrittlement of alumina scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2006-01-01

    While interfacial sulfuris the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Alalloy+3(H2O)air=Al(OH)- 3+3H+ may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized René N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  11. Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    While interfacial sulfur is the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al(sub alloy)+3(H2O)(sub air) = Al(OH)(-) (sub 3) +3H(+) may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized Rene N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  12. Purified Si film formation from metallurgical-grade Si by hydrogen plasma induced chemical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Hiromasa; Goto, Akihiro; Kamada, Daiki; Hamaoka, Yoshinori; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2009-11-01

    Purified Si film is prepared directly from metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) by using hydrogen plasma induced chemical transport at subatmospheric pressure. The purification mechanism is based on the different hydrogenation behaviors of the various impurity elements in MG-Si. The prepared Si films clearly had fewer typical metal impurities (Fe, Al, Ti, Cr, Mn, etc.) than those in the MG-Si. In particular, the Fe concentration was drastically reduced from 6900 mass ppm to less than 0.1 mass ppm by one time chemical transport. Furthermore, metal impurity concentrations were further reduced by repeating chemical transport deposition.

  13. Autyomatic Differentiation of C/C++

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-11-14

    Automatic differentiation (AD) tools mechanize the process of developing code for the computation of derivatives. AD avoids the inaccuracies inherent in numerical approximations. Furthermore, sophisticated AD algoirthms can often produce c ode that is more reliable and more efficient than code written by an expert programmer. ADIC is the first and only AD tool for C and C++ based on compiler technology. This compiler foundation makes possible analyses and optimizations not available in toos basedmore » on operator overloading. The earliest implementations of ADIC included support for ANSI C applications, ADIC 2.0 lverages EDG, a commercial C/C++ parser, to provide robust C++ differentiation support. Modern AD tools, including ADIC are implemented in a modular way, aiming to isolate language-dependent program analyses and semantic transformations. The component design leads to much higher implementation quality because the different components can be implemented by experts in each of the different domains involved. For example, a compiler expert can focus on parsing, canonicalizing, and unparising C and C++, while an expert in graph theory and algorithms can produce new differentiation modules without having to worry about the complexity of parsing and generating C++ code. Thsi separation of concerns was achieved through the use of language-independent program analysis interfaces (in collaboration with researcgers at Rice University) and a language-independent XML representation of the computational portions of programs (XAIF). In addition to improved robustness and faster development times, this design naturally enables the reuse of program analysis algorithms and differentiation modules in compiler-based AD tools for other languages. In fact, the analysis and differention components are used in both ADIC and the Open AD Fortran front-end (based on Rice's Open64 compiler.« less

  14. Autyomatic Differentiation of C/C++

    SciTech Connect

    Beata Winnicka, Boyana Norris

    2005-11-14

    Automatic differentiation (AD) tools mechanize the process of developing code for the computation of derivatives. AD avoids the inaccuracies inherent in numerical approximations. Furthermore, sophisticated AD algoirthms can often produce c ode that is more reliable and more efficient than code written by an expert programmer. ADIC is the first and only AD tool for C and C++ based on compiler technology. This compiler foundation makes possible analyses and optimizations not available in toos based on operator overloading. The earliest implementations of ADIC included support for ANSI C applications, ADIC 2.0 lverages EDG, a commercial C/C++ parser, to provide robust C++ differentiation support. Modern AD tools, including ADIC are implemented in a modular way, aiming to isolate language-dependent program analyses and semantic transformations. The component design leads to much higher implementation quality because the different components can be implemented by experts in each of the different domains involved. For example, a compiler expert can focus on parsing, canonicalizing, and unparising C and C++, while an expert in graph theory and algorithms can produce new differentiation modules without having to worry about the complexity of parsing and generating C++ code. Thsi separation of concerns was achieved through the use of language-independent program analysis interfaces (in collaboration with researcgers at Rice University) and a language-independent XML representation of the computational portions of programs (XAIF). In addition to improved robustness and faster development times, this design naturally enables the reuse of program analysis algorithms and differentiation modules in compiler-based AD tools for other languages. In fact, the analysis and differention components are used in both ADIC and the Open AD Fortran front-end (based on Rice's Open64 compiler.

  15. Fractographic analysis of gaseous hydrogen induced cracking in 18Ni maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Electron microscope fractographic analysis supplemented an extensive study of the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted cracking in 18Ni maraging steel. Temperature determined the crack path morphology in each steel which, in turn, was directly related to the temperature dependence of the crack growth rate. Crack growth in the low temperature regime proceeded along prior austenite grain boundaries. Increasing the temperature above a critical value produced a continuously increasing proportion of transgranular quasi-cleavage associated with lath martensite boundaries. The amount of transgranular cracking was qualitatively correlated with the degree of temperature-induced deviation from Arrhenius behavior. Fractographic observations are interpreted in terms of hypothesized mechanisms for gaseous hydrogen embrittlement. It is concluded that hydrogen segregation to prior austenite and lath martensite boundaries must be considered as a significant factor in developing mechanisms for gaseous embrittlement of high strength steels.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide induces lysosomal protease alterations in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel C; Mason, Ceceile W; Goodman, Carl B; Holder, Maurice S; Kirksey, Otis W; Womble, Tracy A; Severs, Walter B; Palm, Donald E

    2007-09-01

    Alterations in lysosomal proteases have been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. The current study demonstrates a concentration-dependent decrease in PC12 cell viability and transient changes in cystatin C (CYSC), cathepsin B (CATB), cathepsin D (CATD) and caspase-3 following exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, activation of CATD occurred following exposure to H2O2 and cysteine protease suppression, while inhibition of CATD with pepstatin A significantly improved cell viability. Additionally, significant PARP cleavage, suggestive of caspase-3-like activity, was observed following H2O2 exposure, while inhibition of caspase-3 significantly increased cell viability compared to H2O2 administration alone. Collectively, our data suggest that H2O2 induced cell death is regulated at least in part by caspase-3 and CATD. Furthermore, cysteine protease suppression increases CATD expression and activity. These studies provide insight for alternate pathways and potential therapeutic targets of cell death associated with oxidative stress and lysosomal protease alterations. PMID:17440810

  17. Modeling Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of Titanium Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-09-08

    This paper reviews the current understanding of hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) of Ti Grade 7 and other relevant titanium alloys within the context of the current waste package design for the repository environmental conditions anticipated within the Yucca Mountain repository. The review concentrates on corrosion processes possible in the aqueous environments expected within this site. A brief background discussion of the relevant properties of titanium alloys, the hydrogen absorption process, and the properties of passive film on titanium alloys is presented as the basis for the subsequent discussion of model developments. The key corrosion processes that could occur are addressed individually. Subsequently, the expected corrosion performance of these alloys under the specific environmental conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain is considered. It can be concluded that, based on the conservative modeling approaches adopted, hydrogen-induced cracking of titanium alloys will not occur under nuclear waste repository conditions since there will not be sufficient hydrogen in the alloy after 10,000 years of emplacement.

  18. Collision-induced vibrational absorption in molecular hydrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, S.P.

    1993-05-01

    Collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of the first overtone bands of H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD have been recorded for gas densities up to 500 amagat at 77-300 K. Analyses of these spectra reveal that (1) contrary to the observations in the fundamental bands, the contribution of the isotropic overlap interaction to the first overtone bands is negligible, (2) the squares of the matrix elements B{sub 32}(R)/ea{sub o} [= {lambda}{sub 32} exp(-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) + 3 (R/a{sub o}){sup -4}] where the subscripts 3 and 2 represent L and {lambda}, respectively, account for the absorption intensity of the bands and (3) the mixed term, 2,3 {lambda}{sub 32} exp (-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) <{vert_bar}Q{vert_bar}> <{alpha}> (R/a){sup -4}, gives a negative contribution. In the CIA spectra of H{sub 2} in its second overtone region recorded at 77, 201 and 298 K for gas densities up to 1000 amagat, a dip in the Q branch with characteristic Q{sub p} and Q{sub R} components has been observed. The analysis of the absorption profiles reveals, in addition to the previously known effects, the occurrence of the triple-collision transitions of H{sub 2} of the type Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) for the first time. From the profile analysis the absorption coefficient of these transitions is obtained.

  19. Hydrogen-induced crack nucleation in tensile testing of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malitckii, Evgenii; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Hänninen, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of continuous hydrogen charging on tensile properties of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels was studied at room and elevated temperatures of 100 °C and 300 °C. The hydrogen effect decreases with increase of the temperature for ODS-EUROFER steel, while susceptibility to hydrogen of EUROFER 97 steel remains approximately the same at all testing temperatures. Continuous hydrogen charging results in a reduction of the grain boundary cohesion of the EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels tested at RT. With increase of the testing temperature up to 300 °C EUROFER 97 steel exhibits relatively high amount of micro-cracks which agglomerate in sub-micrometer size cracks, while the hydrogen-induced intergranular crack nucleation in ODS-EUROFER steel is effectively suppressed. Possible mechanism of the hydrogen-induced crack nucleation and propagation under applied external stress is discussed.

  20. Electromagnetically induced transparency in a spherical quantum dot with hydrogenic impurity in the external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlović, Vladan; Stevanović, Ljiljana

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyzed the realization of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect in the spherical quantum dot with on-center hydrogenic impurity under the influence of the external magnetic field. Three energy levels of hydrogen impurity 1s0, 2p-1, and 3d-2, together with the probe and control laser fields, which induce σ- transitions between the given states, form a ladder configuration. Optical Bloch equations for such a system are solved in a stationary regime. Dependence of the susceptibility for such a system on the Rabi frequency of the control field, intensity of the external magnetic field, detuning of the control field, and decay rates coefficients are then discussed in detail. Finally, the explanation in dressed state picture is given.

  1. Gettering of copper to hydrogen-induced cavities in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kinomura, A.; Horino, Y.; Nakano, Y.; Williams, J.S.

    2005-09-15

    The gettering properties of hydrogen-induced cavities have been examined for Cu impurity atoms inherent in multicrystalline Si. Initial areal densities of Cu atoms in the multicrystalline samples were in the range of (3-5)x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, below the level that would provide a complete monolayer coverage of the internal surfaces of the cavities. Samples were first implanted with hydrogen and then annealed at 750 or 850 deg. C for 1 h to form cavities and induce subsequent gettering. Neutron activation analysis with chemical etching of the samples indicated that more than 90% of Cu atoms could be removed from the entire wafer by cavity gettering for both of the annealing temperatures.

  2. Hydrogen cycling-induced phase segregation in AB{sub 5}-type intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Mordkovich, V.Z.

    1998-12-31

    A study of hydrogen cycling-induced phase segregation in AB{sub 5}-type intermetallics is presented. Influence of temperature for the alloy compositions YNi{sub 4}Al, LaNi{sub 5}, Ce{sub 0.5}La{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 5} and Ce{sub 0.7}La{sub 0.3}Ni{sub 5} is shown. Morphology of the nanostructured particles formed is studied and discussed.

  3. Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence and Raman imaging inside a hydrogen engine.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sascha Ronald; Koch, Peter; Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-12-10

    We report on the simultaneous and two-dimensional measurement of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman scattering (Ramanography) applied inside a hydrogen internal combustion (IC) engine. Two different LIF tracer molecules, triethylamine (TEA) and trimethylamine (TMA), were used for the LIF experiments. The LIF and Raman results were found to be in very good agreement. The simultaneous application of Ramanography and LIF imaging indicated that TMA is the more suitable LIF tracer molecule, compared to TEA. PMID:20011004

  4. Hydrogen-Induced Cold Cracking in High-Frequency Induction Welded Steel Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kumkum

    2016-04-01

    Detailed investigation was carried out on 0.4C steel tubes used for the telescopic front fork of two-wheelers to establish the root cause for the occurrence of transverse cracks at the weld heat-affected zone of the tubes. Fractographic and microstructural observations provide evidences of delayed hydrogen-induced cracking. The beneficial microstructure for avoiding the transverse cracks was found to be the bainitic-martensitic, while martensitic structure was noted to be deleterious.

  5. EVALUATION OF RADIOLYSIS INDUCED HYDROGEN GENERATION IN DOT 6M DRUMS FROM INTEC

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, D

    2007-06-18

    bags and/or bottles that will be subject to radiolytically induced hydrogen gas generation due to decomposition of the polymers. Conservative values for hydrogen gas generation rates and rates of pressure increase within the drums have been determined based upon a number of inputs and assumptions. The results are that hydrogen will be produced at a rate of 1.93-cm{sup 3}/yr and 1.50-cm{sup 3}/yr, respectively for drums No.3031 and No.3598. Projected molecular hydrogen concentrations at 2020 have been calculated to remain below the lower flammability limit of 4% molecular hydrogen by volume in air.

  6. Concentration studies of collision-induced fundamental absorption of hydrogen dissolved in liquid neon.

    PubMed

    Herrebout, W A; van der Veken, B J; Kouzov, A P

    2012-08-28

    We report further and more detailed results of our recent investigation [W. A. Herrebout, B. J. van der Veken, and A. P. Kouzov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 093001 (2008)] on the collision-induced fundamental absorption by hydrogen dissolved in liquid neon (T ≈ 25 K). The band shapes were studied in a wide range of concentrations (0.003-0.05 mole fractions) as well as for different ortho/para ratios and at much higher level of accuracy and resolution than before. Due to almost unhindered rotation of the hydrogen molecule and low temperature, an unprecedently rich frequency-domain picture produced by different terms of the interaction-induced polarization was observed. While some of them are conspicuous via fast intracell motion of a light guest (H(2)), others--induced by the electrostatic field of the guest--give rise to lines whose shapes are imprinted by fluctuations of the nearest surrounding. Strong motional narrowing observed on the guest-guest induced lines shows up in their Lorentzian shapes which are signatures of microscopic-scale diffusion. Near-Lorentzian peaks were also detected at the tops of the diffuse lines induced by isolated guests. Their formation may be associated with a long-living defect (vacancy) emerging in the vicinity of the polarization inductor. Altogether, our results give the first unambiguous spectroscopic evidence on the diffusional evolution of isolated binary interactions that emerge in dense chaotic media. PMID:22938252

  7. A Hydrogen-Induced Decohesion Model for Treating Cold Dwell Fatigue in Titanium-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Moody, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Cold dwell fatigue in near-alpha Ti alloys is a time-dependent fracture process at ambient temperature that involves fatigue in the presence of creep to produce cracking on low-energy fracture ( e.g., cleavage) facets in hard alpha grains. In this article, cold dwell fatigue is treated as a hydrogen-induced decohesion process by using a nonlinear cohesive stress-strain relation to describe the decrease in the cohesive strength with increasing local hydrogen contents. It is postulated that during cold dwell fatigue, time-dependent deformation occurs by < a> slip that results in dislocation pileups in soft alpha grains. The stress and dilatational fields of the dislocation pileups assist the transport of internal hydrogen atoms from soft grains to neighboring hard grains. The accumulation of internal hydrogen atoms at the trap sites leads to decohesion along crystallographic planes, which can be slip or hydride habit planes. The decohesion model is applied to treat cold dwell fatigue in Ti-6Al-4V with a basal-transverse texture by modeling the effects of hydrogen-induced decohesion on the stress-fatigue life ( S- N f) response, the time-dependent crack growth response (d a/d t), and the fracture toughness ( K c) as functions of grain orientation. A probabilistic time-dependent fatigue crack growth analysis is then performed to assess the influence of microtexture on the dwell fatigue life of a Ti-6Al-4V ring disk subjected to a long-duration hold at the peak stress of the loading cycle. The results of the probabilistic life computations indicate that dwell fatigue resistance in Ti-6Al-4V may be improved and the risk of disk fracture may be reduced significantly by controlling the microtexture or reducing the size and volume fraction of hard alpha grains in the microstructure.

  8. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)]+) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru–H]+, which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources. PMID:26314266

  9. Fluctuations of electrical and mechanical properties of diamond induced by interstitial hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Chun-Qiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While experimental evidence demonstrates that the presence of hydrogen (H) impurities in diamond films plays a significant role in determining their physical properties, the small radius of the H atom makes detecting such impurities quite a challenging task. In the present work, first-principles calculations were employed to provide an insight into the effects of the interstitial hydrogen on the electrical and mechanical properties of diamond crystals at the atomic level. The migrated pathways of the interstitial hydrogen are dictated by energetic considerations. Some new electronic states are formed near the Fermi level. The interstitial hydrogen markedly narrows the bandgap of the diamond and weakens the diamond crystal. The obvious decrement of the critical strain clearly implies the presence of an H-induced embrittlement effect. Project supported by the Project of Construction of Innovative Teams and Teacher Career Development for Universities and Colleges under Beijing Municipality, China (Grant No. IDHT20140504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51402009), and the Foundation for Young Scholars of Beijing University of Technology, China.

  10. Nitric oxide is required for hydrogen gas-induced adventitious root formation in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongchao; Liao, Weibiao; Wang, Meng; Niu, Lijuan; Xu, Qingqing; Jin, Xin

    2016-05-20

    Hydrogen gas (H2) is involved in plant development and stress responses. Cucumber explants were used to study whether nitric oxide (NO) is involved in H2-induced adventitious root development. The results revealed that 50% and 100% hydrogen-rich water (HRW) apparently promoted the development of adventitious root in cucumber. While, the responses of HRW-induced adventitious rooting were blocked by a specific NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO), NO synthase (NOS) enzyme inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methylester hydrochloride (l-NAME) and nitrate reductase (NR) inhibitor NaN3. HRW also increased NO content and NOS and NR activity both in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Moreover, molecular evidence showed that HRW up-regulated NR genes expression in explants. The results indicate the importance of NOS and NR enzymes, which might be responsible for NO production in explants during H2-induced root organogenesis. Additionally, peroxidase (POD) and indoleacetic acid oxidase (IAAO) activity was significantly decreased in the explants treated with HRW, while HRW treatment significantly increased polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity. In addition, cPTIO, l-NAME and NaN3 inhibited the actions of HRW on the activity of these enzymes. Together, NO may be involved in H2-induced adventitious rooting, and NO may be acting downstream in plant H2 signaling cascade. PMID:27010347

  11. Iron prochelator BSIH protects retinal pigment epithelial cells against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Lukinova, Nina; Wolkow, Natalie; Dunaief, Joshua L; Franz, Katherine J

    2008-12-01

    Dysregulation of localized iron homeostasis is implicated in several degenerative diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and age-related macular degeneration, wherein iron-mediated oxidative stress is hypothesized to contribute to cell death. Inhibiting toxic iron without altering normal metal-dependent processes presents significant challenges for standard small molecule chelating agents. We previously introduced BSIH (isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide) prochelators that are converted by hydrogen peroxide into SIH (salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone) chelating agents that inhibit iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical generation. Here, we show that BSIH protects a cultured cell model for retinal pigment epithelium against cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. BSIH is more stable than SIH in cell culture medium and is more protective during long-term experiments. Repetitive exposure of cells to BSIH is nontoxic, whereas SIH and desferrioxamine induce cell death after repeated exposure. Combined, our results indicate that cell protection by BSIH involves iron sequestration that occurs only when the cells are stressed by hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that prochelators discriminate toxic iron from healthy iron and are promising candidates for neuro- and retinal protection. PMID:18835041

  12. Observation of the Hydrogen Migration in the Cation-Induced Fragmentation of the Pyridine Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, Tomasz J; Pranszke, Bogusław

    2016-02-25

    The ability to selectively control chemical reactions related to biology, combustion, and catalysis has recently attracted much attention. In particular, the hydrogen atom relocation may be used to manipulate bond-breaking and new bond-forming processes and may hold promise for far-reaching applications. Thus, the hydrogen atom migration preceding fragmentation of the gas-phase pyridine molecules by the H(+), H2(+), He(+), He(2+), and O(+) impact has been studied experimentally in the energy range of 5-2000 eV using collision-induced luminescence spectroscopy. Formation of the excited NH(A(3)Π) radicals was observed among the atomic and diatomic fragments. The structure of the pyridine molecule is lacking of the NH group, therefore observation of its A(3)Π → X(3)Σ(-) emission bands is an evidence of the hydrogen atom relocation prior to the cation-induced fragmentation. The NH(A(3)Π) emission yields indicate that formation of the NH radicals depends on the type of selected projectile and can be controlled by tuning its velocity. The plausible collisional mechanisms as well as fragmentation channels for NH formation in pyridine are discussed. PMID:26837458

  13. Multiple Dirac Points and Hydrogenation-Induced Magnetism of Germanene Layer on Al (111) Surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Liu, S B; Xu, B; Ouyang, C Y; Song, H Y; Guan, S; Yang, Shengyuan A

    2015-12-17

    A continuous germanene layer grown on the Al (111) surface has recently been achieved in experiment. In this work, we investigate its structural, electronic, and hydrogenation-induced properties through first-principles calculations. We find that despite having a different lattice structure from its free-standing form, germanene on Al (111) still possesses Dirac points at high-symmetry K and K' points. More importantly, there exist another three pairs of Dirac points on the K(K')-M high-symmetry lines, which have highly anisotropic dispersions due to the reduced symmetry. These massless Dirac Fermions become massive when spin-orbit coupling is included. Hydrogenation of the germanene layer strongly affects its structural and electronic properties. Particularly, when not fully hydrogenated, ferromagnetism can be induced due to unpaired local orbitals from the unsaturated Ge atoms. Remarkably, we discover that the one-side semihydrogenated germanene turns out to be a two-dimensional half-semimetal, representing a novel state of matter that is simultaneously a half-metal and a semimetal. PMID:26606861

  14. Hydrogen induced fracture characteristics of single crystal nickel-based superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Wilcox, Roy C.

    1990-01-01

    A stereoscopic method for use with x ray energy dispersive spectroscopy of rough surfaces was adapted and applied to the fracture surfaces single crystals of PWA 1480E to permit rapid orientation determinations of small cleavage planes. The method uses a mathematical treatment of stereo pair photomicrographs to measure the angle between the electron beam and the surface normal. One reference crystal orientation corresponding to the electron beam direction (crystal growth direction) is required to perform this trace analysis. The microstructure of PWA 1480E was characterized before fracture analysis was performed. The fracture behavior of single crystals of the PWA 1480E nickel-based superalloy was studied. The hydrogen-induced fracture behavior of single crystals of the PWA 1480E nickel-based superalloy was also studied. In order to understand the temperature dependence of hydrogen-induced embrittlement, notched single crystals with three different crystal growth orientations near zone axes (100), (110), and (111) were tensile tested at 871 C (1600 F) in both helium and hydrogen atmospheres at 34 MPa. Results and conclusions are given.

  15. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  16. Investigation of stress-induced (100) platelet formation and surface exfoliation in plasma hydrogenated Si

    SciTech Connect

    Di Zengfeng; Wang Yongqiang; Nastasi, Michael; Rossi, Francois; Lee, Jung-Kun; Shao, Lin; Thompson, Phillip E.

    2007-12-10

    We have studied the mechanisms underlying stress-induced platelet formation during plasma hydrogenation. The stress is purposely introduced by a buried SiGe stained layer in a Si substrate. During plasma hydrogenation, diffusing H is trapped in the region of the SiGe layer and H platelets are formed. The platelet orientation is controlled by the in-plane compressive stress, which favors nucleation and growth of platelets in the plane of stress and parallel to the substrate surface, and ultimately leads to controlled fracture along the SiGe layer. Also, the Si/SiGe/Si structure is found to be more efficient in utilizing H for platelet formation and growth compared to H ion implanted Si because there are fewer defects to trap H (e.g., V{sub n}H{sub m} and I{sub n}H{sub m}); therefore, the total H dose needed for layer exfoliation is greatly reduced.

  17. Pressure-Induced Phase Transition in Hydrogen-Bonded Supramolecular Structure: Guanidinium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Run; Li, Shourui; Wang, Kai; Duan, Defang; Tang, Lingyun; Cui, Tian; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Qiliang; Liu, Jing; Zou, Bo; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-08-04

    In situ Raman scattering and synchrotron X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate the effects of high pressure on the structural stability of guanidinium nitrate (C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup +} {center_dot} NO{sub 3}{sup -}, GN), a representative two-dimensional supramolecular architecture of hydrogen-bonded rosette network. This study has confirmed a structural phase transition observed by Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction at {approx}1 GPa and identified it as a space group change from C2 to P2{sub 1}. The high-pressure phase remained stable up to 22 GPa. We discussed the pressure-induced changes in N-H stretching vibration in Raman spectra and proposed that this phase transition is due to the rearrangements of the hydrogen-bonding networks.

  18. A tunable azine covalent organic framework platform for visible light-induced hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Vijay S.; Haase, Frederik; Stegbauer, Linus; Savasci, Gökcen; Podjaski, Filip; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen evolution from photocatalytic reduction of water holds promise as a sustainable source of carbon-free energy. Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) present an interesting new class of photoactive materials, which combine three key features relevant to the photocatalytic process, namely crystallinity, porosity and tunability. Here we synthesize a series of water- and photostable 2D azine-linked COFs from hydrazine and triphenylarene aldehydes with varying number of nitrogen atoms. The electronic and steric variations in the precursors are transferred to the resulting frameworks, thus leading to a progressively enhanced light-induced hydrogen evolution with increasing nitrogen content in the frameworks. Our results demonstrate that by the rational design of COFs on a molecular level, it is possible to precisely adjust their structural and optoelectronic properties, thus resulting in enhanced photocatalytic activities. This is expected to spur further interest in these photofunctional frameworks where rational supramolecular engineering may lead to new material applications.

  19. Hydrogen-induced changes of the microscopic structure of microcrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, I.; Nickel, N.H.; Fuhs, W.; Pilz, W.

    1998-12-31

    Microcrystalline silicon samples were exposed to an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) hydrogen plasma at various exposure times and substrate temperatures. Before and after each post-hydrogenation treatment the crystalline fraction, X{sub c}, was determined from Raman backscattering spectra. The results reveal that the change of X{sub c} strongly depends on the structural composition of the starting material. Amorphous samples exhibit an increase of X{sub c} while for {micro}c-Si specimens the X{sub c} decreases. The decrease of X{sub c} is enhanced for specimens with a high initial crystalline fraction. The same plasma treatment of Si-wafers did not lead to amorphization. The authors conclude that the presence of lattice strain is required to observe a H-induced decrease of X{sub c}.

  20. A tunable azine covalent organic framework platform for visible light-induced hydrogen generation

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Vijay S.; Haase, Frederik; Stegbauer, Linus; Savasci, Gökcen; Podjaski, Filip; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution from photocatalytic reduction of water holds promise as a sustainable source of carbon-free energy. Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) present an interesting new class of photoactive materials, which combine three key features relevant to the photocatalytic process, namely crystallinity, porosity and tunability. Here we synthesize a series of water- and photostable 2D azine-linked COFs from hydrazine and triphenylarene aldehydes with varying number of nitrogen atoms. The electronic and steric variations in the precursors are transferred to the resulting frameworks, thus leading to a progressively enhanced light-induced hydrogen evolution with increasing nitrogen content in the frameworks. Our results demonstrate that by the rational design of COFs on a molecular level, it is possible to precisely adjust their structural and optoelectronic properties, thus resulting in enhanced photocatalytic activities. This is expected to spur further interest in these photofunctional frameworks where rational supramolecular engineering may lead to new material applications. PMID:26419805

  1. A tunable azine covalent organic framework platform for visible light-induced hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Vijay S; Haase, Frederik; Stegbauer, Linus; Savasci, Gökcen; Podjaski, Filip; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Lotsch, Bettina V

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution from photocatalytic reduction of water holds promise as a sustainable source of carbon-free energy. Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) present an interesting new class of photoactive materials, which combine three key features relevant to the photocatalytic process, namely crystallinity, porosity and tunability. Here we synthesize a series of water- and photostable 2D azine-linked COFs from hydrazine and triphenylarene aldehydes with varying number of nitrogen atoms. The electronic and steric variations in the precursors are transferred to the resulting frameworks, thus leading to a progressively enhanced light-induced hydrogen evolution with increasing nitrogen content in the frameworks. Our results demonstrate that by the rational design of COFs on a molecular level, it is possible to precisely adjust their structural and optoelectronic properties, thus resulting in enhanced photocatalytic activities. This is expected to spur further interest in these photofunctional frameworks where rational supramolecular engineering may lead to new material applications. PMID:26419805

  2. Proline dehydrogenase is essential for proline protection against hydrogen peroxide induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Zhu, Weidong; Liang, Xinwen; Zhang, Lu; Demers, Andrew J.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Simpson, Melanie A.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism has an underlying role in apoptotic signaling that impacts tumorigenesis. Proline is oxidized to glutamate in the mitochondria with the rate limiting step catalyzed by proline dehydrogenase (PRODH). PRODH expression is inducible by p53 leading to increased proline oxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and induction of apoptosis. Paradoxical to its role in apoptosis, proline also protects cells against oxidative stress. Here we explore the mechanism of proline protection against hydrogen peroxide stress in melanoma WM35 cells. Treatment of WM35 cells with proline significantly increased cell viability, diminished oxidative damage of cellular lipids and proteins, and retained ATP and NADPH levels after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRODH abolished proline protection against oxidative stress whereas knockdown of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase, a key enzyme in proline biosynthesis, had no impact on proline protection. Potential linkages between proline metabolism and signaling pathways were explored. The combined inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2 eliminated proline protection. A significant increase in Akt activation was observed in proline treated cells after hydrogen peroxide stress along with a corresponding increase in the phosphorylation of the fork head transcription factor class O3a (FoxO3a). The role of PRODH in proline mediated protection was validated in the prostate carcinoma cell line, PC3. Knockdown of PRODH in PC3 cells attenuated phosphorylated levels of Akt and FoxO3a and decreased cell survival during hydrogen peroxide stress. The results provide evidence that PRODH is essential in proline protection against hydrogen peroxide mediated cell death and that proline/PRODH helps activate Akt in cancer cells. PMID:22796327

  3. Oxygen and Hydrogen-Induced Surface Reconstruction of Molybdenum and Other Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Joseph A.

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis results are presented for oxygen chemisorption on Mo(100), W(100), and Cu(100), hydrogen adsorption on Mo (100) and co-adsorption of hydrogen and oxygen on Mo(100). In all cases it was found that the adsorbate causes structural rearrangement of the substrate. This was most drastic for the case of oxygen adsorption. New electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) results for the O/Mo(100) system indicate that the substrate undergoes a transformation from its original body centered cubic structure to the nearly hexagonal structure of MoO _2 upon increasing oxygen adsorption. Scanning tunneling microscopy was performed for the first time on W(100). The results show that the oxygen causes the removal of every other row of tungsten, and that the rate determining step for the formation of the missing rows is surface diffusion. Oxygen is known to cause the formation on 1-D chains on Cu(100). Monte -Carlo simulations were performed here to extract effective adsorbate-adsorbate interaction energies. When hydrogen is adsorbed on Mo(100) the system can achieve a lower energy state if the hydrogen collectively acts to modify the substrate reconstruction. For some coverages this leads to island formation. To obtain information on the energy gained upon island formation isobars were measured for this system. The binding energy difference between the islands and the dilute phase was surprisingly small, possible reasons for this are discussed. It was also found that finite size effects play a role in the shape of the isobars. The adsorption of water and the co-adsorption of hydrogen and oxygen were studied with EELS and LEED (low energy electron diffraction). For room temperature adsorption of water the molecule completely dissociates. For low coverages islands of the pure elements are then formed, due to the energy gained upon adsorbate induced reconstruction. For low temperature water adsorption it was found that O-H and H_2O molecules are stable on the surface.

  4. Photo-induced hydrogen exchange reaction between methanol and glyoxal: formation of hydroxyketene.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Zofia; Mucha, Małgorzata; Bil, Andrzej; Golec, Barbara; Coussan, Stephane; Roubin, Pascale

    2008-08-25

    We study the structure and photochemistry of the glyoxal-methanol system (G-MeOH) by means of FTIR matrix isolation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The FTIR spectra show that the non-hydrogen-bonded complex, G-MeOH-1, is present in an inert environment of solid argon. MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations indicate that G-MeOH-1 is the most stable complex among the five optimized structures. The interaction energy partitioned according to the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) scheme demonstrates that the dispersion energy gives a larger contribution to the stabilization of a non-hydrogen-bonded G-MeOH-1 complex than compared to the hydrogen-bonded ones. The irradiation of G-MeOH-1 with the filtered output of a mercury lamp (lambda>370 nm) leads to its photo-conversion into the hydroxyketene-methanol complex HK-MeOH-1. The identity of HK-MeOH-1 is confirmed by both FTIR spectroscopy and MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations. An experiment with deuterated methanol (CH(3)OD) evidences that hydroxyketene is formed in a photo-induced hydrogen exchange reaction between glyoxal and methanol. The pathway for the photo-conversion of G-MeOH-1 to HK-MeOH-1 is studied by a coupled-cluster method [CR-CC(2,3)]. The calculations confirm our experimental findings that the reaction proceeds via hydrogen atom exchange between the OH group of methanol and CH group of glyoxal. PMID:18613199

  5. Understanding Rotation about a C=C Double Bond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrows, Susan E.; Eberlein, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    The study focuses on the process and energetic cost of twisting around a C=C double bond and provides instructors with a simple vehicle for rectifying the common misrepresentation of C=C double bonds as rigid and inflexible. Discussions of cis and trans isomers of cycloalkenes are a good entry point for introducing students to the idea of a…

  6. Impact-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of serpentine: Implications for planetary accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, Samuel; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Impact-induced devolatilization of porous serpentine was investigated using two independent experimental methods, the gas recovery and the solid recovery method, each yielding nearly identical results. For shock pressures near incipient devolatilization, the hydrogen isotopic composition of the evolved H2O is very close to that of the starting material. For shock pressures at which up to 12 percent impact-induced devolatilization occurs, the bulk evolved gas is significantly lower in deuterium than the starting material. There is also significant reduction of H2O to H2 in gases recovered at these higher shock pressures, probably caused by reaction of evolved H2O with the metal gas recovery fixture. Gaseous H2O-H2 isotopic fractionation suggests high temperature isotopic equilibrium between the gaseous species, indicating initiation of devolatilization at sites of greater than average energy deposition. Bulk gas-residual solid isotopic fractionations indicate nonequilibrium, kinetic control of gas-solid isotopic ratios. Impact-induced hydrogen isotopic fractionation of hydrous silicates during accretion can strongly affect the long-term planetary isotopic ratios of planetary bodies, leaving the interiors enriched in deuterium. Depending on the model used for extrapolation of the isotopic fractionation to devolatilization fractions greater than those investigated experimentally can result from this process.

  7. Temperature dependencies of hydrogen-induced blistering of thin film multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Gleeson, M. A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2014-05-07

    We report on the influence of sample temperature on the development of hydrogen-induced blisters in Mo/Si thin-film multilayers. In general, the areal number density of blisters decreases with increasing exposure temperature, whereas individual blister size increases with exposure temperatures up to ∼200 °C but decreases thereafter. Comparison as a function of sample temperature is made between exposures to a flux containing both hydrogen ions and neutrals and one containing only neutrals. In the case of the neutral-only flux, blistering is observed for exposure temperatures ≥90 °C. The inclusion of ions promotes blister formation at <90 °C, while retarding their growth at higher temperatures. In general, ion-induced effects become less evident with increasing exposure temperature. At 200 °C, the main effect discernable is reduced blister size as compared with the equivalent neutral-only exposure. The temperature during exposure is a much stronger determinant of the blistering outcome than either pre- or post-annealing of the sample. The trends observed for neutral-only exposures are attributed to competing effects of defect density thermal equilibration and H-atom induced modification of the Si layers. Energetic ions modify the blistering via (temperature dependent) enhancement of H-mobility and re-crystallization of amorphous Si.

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Mitigates Kidney Injury in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Gao, Biao; Li, Mengling; Yao, Ling; Wang, Shuaiwei; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Hui; Ma, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is a major risk factor for the development and progression of kidney disease. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in renal physiological and pathophysiological processes. However, whether H2S is able to mitigate kidney injury induced by obesity in mice remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that H2S significantly reduced the accumulation of lipids in the kidneys of high fat diet- (HFD-) induced obese mice. The results of hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and Masson's trichrome staining showed that H2S ameliorated the kidney structure, decreased the extent of interstitial injury, and reduced the degree of kidney fibrosis in HFD-induced obese mice. We found that H2S decreased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 but increased the expression level of IL-10. Furthermore, H2S treatment decreased the protein expression of p50, p65, and p-p65 in the kidney of HFD-induced obese mice. In conclusion, H2S is able to mitigate renal injury in HFD-induced obese mice through the reduction of kidney inflammation by downregulating the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B. H2S or its releasing compounds may serve as a potential therapeutic molecule for obesity-induced kidney injury. PMID:27413418

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide Mitigates Kidney Injury in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongdong; Gao, Biao; Li, Mengling; Yao, Ling; Wang, Shuaiwei; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Hui; Ma, Chunyan; Ji, Ailing; Li, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is a major risk factor for the development and progression of kidney disease. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in renal physiological and pathophysiological processes. However, whether H2S is able to mitigate kidney injury induced by obesity in mice remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that H2S significantly reduced the accumulation of lipids in the kidneys of high fat diet- (HFD-) induced obese mice. The results of hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and Masson's trichrome staining showed that H2S ameliorated the kidney structure, decreased the extent of interstitial injury, and reduced the degree of kidney fibrosis in HFD-induced obese mice. We found that H2S decreased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 but increased the expression level of IL-10. Furthermore, H2S treatment decreased the protein expression of p50, p65, and p-p65 in the kidney of HFD-induced obese mice. In conclusion, H2S is able to mitigate renal injury in HFD-induced obese mice through the reduction of kidney inflammation by downregulating the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B. H2S or its releasing compounds may serve as a potential therapeutic molecule for obesity-induced kidney injury. PMID:27413418

  10. Phase with pressure-induced shuttlewise deformation in dense solid atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Nagara, Hitose; Oda, Tatsuki; Suzuki, Naoshi; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2014-09-01

    A phase which shows pressure-induced shuttlewise structural deformation between orthorhombic Fddd and tetragonal I41/amd structures has been predicted in solid atomic hydrogen by means of the first-principles calculations, including harmonic zero-point energy contributions of proton motions. The Fddd structure is formed by shear distortion from the I41/amd structure, and the angle specifying the distortion changes with pressure in the range 84-96∘ around 90∘, which corresponds to I41/amd. In the shuttlewise deforming phase, the electron-phonon interaction is enhanced owing to phonon softenings, which brings about superconductivity at elevated temperatures.

  11. (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence of spin-polarized hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Everest, Michael A; Alexander, Andrew J; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2010-11-01

    We report the measurement of the spin polarization of hydrogen (SPH) atoms by (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence, produced via the photodissociation of thermal HBr molecules with circularly polarized 193 nm light. This scheme, which involves two-photon laser excitation at 205 nm and fluorescence at 656 nm, offers an experimentally simpler polarization-detection method than the previously reported vacuum ultraviolet detection scheme, allowing the detection of SPH atoms to be performed more straightforwardly, from the photodissociation of a wide range of molecules and from a variety of collision experiments. PMID:21054033

  12. Pressure-induced chemistry in a nitrogen-hydrogen host-guest structure.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Dylan K; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Fréderic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2014-01-01

    New topochemistry in simple molecular systems can be explored at high pressure. Here we examine the binary nitrogen/hydrogen system using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure van der Waals compounds, which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 and N2(H2)2. The former represents a new type of van der Waals host-guest compound in which hydrogen molecules are contained within channels in a nitrogen lattice. This compound shows evidence for a gradual, pressure-induced change in bonding from van der Waals to ionic interactions near 50 GPa, forming an amorphous dinitrogen network containing ionized ammonia in a room-temperature analogue of the Haber-Bosch process. Hydrazine is recovered on decompression. The nitrogen-hydrogen system demonstrates the potential for new pressure-driven chemistry in high-pressure structures and the promise of tailoring molecular interactions for materials synthesis. PMID:25484135

  13. Pressure-induced chemistry in a nitrogen-hydrogen host-guest structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaulding, Dylan K.; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Fréderic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2014-12-01

    New topochemistry in simple molecular systems can be explored at high pressure. Here we examine the binary nitrogen/hydrogen system using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure van der Waals compounds, which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 and N2(H2)2. The former represents a new type of van der Waals host-guest compound in which hydrogen molecules are contained within channels in a nitrogen lattice. This compound shows evidence for a gradual, pressure-induced change in bonding from van der Waals to ionic interactions near 50 GPa, forming an amorphous dinitrogen network containing ionized ammonia in a room-temperature analogue of the Haber-Bosch process. Hydrazine is recovered on decompression. The nitrogen-hydrogen system demonstrates the potential for new pressure-driven chemistry in high-pressure structures and the promise of tailoring molecular interactions for materials synthesis.

  14. Stark broadening corrections to laser-induced fluorescence temperature measurements in a hydrogen arcjet plume.

    PubMed

    Storm, P V; Cappelli, M A

    1996-08-20

    Laser-induced fluorescence of the H(α) transition of atomic hydrogen has previously been performed in the plume of a hydrogen arcjet thruster. Measurements of plasma velocity and temperature, based on the Doppler shift and broadening of the H(α) line shape, were previously published [Appl. Opt. 32, 6117 (1993)]. In that paper the Stark broadening of the H(α) transition was estimated from static-ion calculations performed in the early 1970's and found to be negligible in comparison with the Doppler broadening. However, more recent dynamic-ion calculations have shown the Stark broadening to be considerably larger than was previously assumed, resulting in inaccurate temperature measurements. We present a reanalysis of the fluorescence data, taking into account the improved Stark broadening calculations. The correct atomic hydrogen translation temperature and electron number density are obtained from the Doppler and Stark broadening components of the measured line shape. The results indicate a substantial drop in temperature from those previously reported. PMID:21102917

  15. Inhibition of hydrogen peroxide induced injuring on human skin fibroblast by Ulva prolifera polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuner; Guo, Ziye; Yang, Yayun; Geng, Zhonglei; Tang, Langlang; Zhao, Minglin; Qiu, Yuyan; Chen, Yifan; He, Peimin

    2016-10-01

    Ulva prolifera can protect human skin fibroblast from being injured by hydrogen peroxide. This work studied the composition of Ulva prolifera polysaccharide and identified its physicochemical properties. The results showed that the cell proliferation of 0.5mg/mL crude polysaccharide was 154.4% of that in negative control group. Moreover, ROS detection indices, including DCFH-DA, GSH-PX, MDA and CAT, indicated that crude polysaccharide could improve cellular ability to scavenge free radical and decrease the injury on human skin fibroblast by hydrogen peroxide. In purified polysaccharide, the activity of fraction P1-1 was the highest, with 174.6% of that in negative control group. The average molecular weight of P1-1 was 137kD with 18.0% of sulfate content. This work showed the inhibition of hydrogen peroxide induced injuries on human skin fibroblast by Ulva prolifera polysaccharide, which may further evaluate the application of U. prolifera on cosmetics. PMID:27211299

  16. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in the Mira star o Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2011-11-01

    Context. In the spectra of variable pulsating stars, especially Mira stars, the detection of intense hydrogen emission lines has been explained by the presence of a radiative and hypersonic shock wave, periodically propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere. Previous observation of the Mira star o Ceti around one of its brightest maximum light led to the detection of a strong level of linear polarization associated to Balmer emissions, although the origin of this phenomenon is not fully explained yet. Aims: With the help of spectropolarimetry, we propose to investigate the nature of shock waves propagating throughout the stellar atmosphere and present, for o Ceti (the prototype of Mira stars), a full observational study of hydrogen emission lines formed in the radiative region of such a shock. Methods: Using the instrument NARVAL mounted on the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) in Pic du Midi Observatory (France), we performed a spectropolarimetric monitoring of o Ceti during three consecutive pulsation cycles. For this survey, the four Stokes parameters (I for intensity, Q and U for linear polarization, and V for circular polarization) were systematically collected, with a particular emphasis on the maxima of luminosity, i.e. when a radiative shock wave is supposed to emerge from the photosphere and starts to propagate outward. Results: On hydrogen Balmer lines, over a large part of the luminosity cycle, we report clear detection of polarimetric structures in Q and U Stokes spectra (and also in V Stokes spectra but to a lesser extent). We report a temporal evolution of these spectropolarimetric signatures, which appear strongly correlated to the presence of an intense shock wave responsible for the hydrogen emission lines. We establish that the hydrogen lines are polarized by a physical process inherent to the mechanism responsible for the emission line formation: the shock wave itself. Two mechanisms are thus considered: a global one that implies a polarization

  17. Guard cell hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide mediate elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Li, Xin; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Guanqun; Liu, Yaru; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-10-01

    Climate change as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 influences plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Although the involvement of stomata in plant responses to elevated CO2 has been well established, the underlying mechanism of elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement remains largely unknown. We used diverse techniques, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, biochemical methodologies and gene silencing to investigate the signaling pathway for elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Elevated CO2 -induced stomatal closure was dependent on the production of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE 1 (RBOH1)-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and NITRATE REDUCTASE (NR)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) in guard cells in an abscisic acid (ABA)-independent manner. Silencing of OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) compromised the elevated CO2 -induced accumulation of H2 O2 and NO, upregulation of SLOW ANION CHANNEL ASSOCIATED 1 (SLAC1) gene expression and reduction of stomatal aperture, whereas silencing of RBOH1 or NR had no effects on the expression of OST1. Our results demonstrate that as critical signaling molecules, RBOH1-dependent H2 O2 and NR-dependent NO act downstream of OST1 that regulate SLAC1 expression and elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement. This information is crucial to deepen the understanding of CO2 signaling pathway in guard cells. PMID:26308648

  18. Novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine, prevents STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Li, Xinghui; Ma, Fenfen; Luo, Shanshan; Ge, Ruowen; Zhu, Yizhun

    2016-05-13

    In this work, we demonstrated for the first time that S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC, also named as ZYZ-802), a novel hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-releasing compound, had renoprotective effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic kidney injury. SPRC treatment significantly reduced the level of creatinine, kidney to body weight ratio and in particular, markedly decreased 24-h urine microalbuminuria excretion. SPRC suppressed the mRNA expression of fibronectin and type IV collagen. In vitro, SPRC inhibited mesangial cells over-proliferation and hypertrophy induced by high glucose. Additionally, SPRC attenuated inflammation in diabetic kidneys. SPRC also reduced transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling and expression of phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3) pathway. Moreover, SPRC inhibited phosphorylation of ERK, p38 protein. Taken together, SPRC was demonstrated to be a potential therapeutic candidate to suppress diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27055593

  19. Hypersonic shock-induced combustion in a hydrogen-air system

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, J.K.; Tiwari, S.N.; Singh, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical study was carried out to investigate the shock-induced combustion in premixed hydrogen-air mixture. The calculations have been carried out for Mach 5.11 and 6.46. The Mach 5.11 case was found to be unsteady with periodic oscillations. The frequency of oscillations was calculated and was found to be in good agreement with the experimentally observed frequency. The Mach 6.46 case was found to be of a very high frequency and very low-amplitude phenomena. Thus it can be considered as macroscopically stable. This supports the existing view that it is possible to stabilize the shock-induced combustion phenomena with sufficient level of overdrive. 16 refs.

  20. Infrared spectroscopy of sub-surface defects induced by remote hydrogen plasma exposure of silicon (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, H.H.; Bedge, S.G.; Wan, Z.

    1998-12-31

    Infrared multiple internal reflection (MIR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the local chemical bonding in sub-surface defects induced by remote hydrogen plasma exposure (RHPE) of Si(100) wafers. Exposure of very lightly doped n-type Si ([P] = 5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}) to a remote hydrogen plasma for 2 min at 200 C results in the formation of Si monohydride species. An intense narrow band at 2078 cm{sup {minus}1} (FWHM = 7 cm{sup {minus}1}) and a small shoulder at 2065 cm{sup {minus}1} are observed. The data are consistent with monohydride termination of Si{l_brace}111{r_brace} platelet defects with a weak interaction between H atoms on opposing internal surfaces. In contrast, platelet nucleation at 200 C followed by growth at 300 C selectively generates Si dihydride species, as evidenced by a single broad infrared band at 2109 cm{sup {minus}1}. The P concentration was found to have a marked influence on the areal density and chemical bonding of sub-surface hydrogen. The MIR spectrum of lightly doped Si ([P] = 2 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3}) after RHPE at 200 C contains broad peaks at 2078 and 2130 cm{sup {minus}1} consistent with Si monohydride and trihydride species. The authors infer that hydrogen saturates broken bonds along Si{l_brace}111{r_brace} Type 1 glide planes (one bond per Si atom) and along Si{l_brace}111{r_brace} Type II glide planes (three bonds per Si atom). The Si-H peak area indicates a H areal density {approximately}2 times higher than in very lightly doped Si.

  1. AN EVALUATION OF HYDROGEN INDUCED CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF TITANIUM ALLOYS IN US HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    G. De; K. Mon; G. Gordon; D. Shoesmith; F. Hua

    2006-02-21

    This paper evaluates hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) susceptibility of titanium alloys in environments anticipated in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository with particular emphasis on the. effect of the oxide passive film on the hydrogen absorption process of titanium alloys being evaluated. The titanium alloys considered in this review include Ti 2, 5 , 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 24 and 29. In general, the concentration of hydrogen in a titanium alloy can increase due to absorption of atomic hydrogen produced from passive general corrosion of that alloy or galvanic coupling of it to a less noble metal. It is concluded that under the exposure conditions anticipated in the Yucca Mountain repository, the HIC of titanium drip shield will not occur because there will not be sufficient hydrogen in the metal even after 10,000 years of emplacement. Due to the conservatisms adopted in the current evaluation, this assessment is considered very conservative.

  2. Layer-by-layer immobilized catalase on electrospun nanofibrous mats protects against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Deng, Hongbing; Cai, Tongjian; Zhan, Yingfei; Wang, Xiankai; Chen, Xuanxuan; Ji, Ailing; Lil, Xueyong

    2014-07-01

    Catalase, a kind of redox enzyme and generally recognized as an efficient agent for protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxicity. The immobilization of catalase was accomplished by depositing the positively charged chitosan and the negatively charged catalase on electrospun cellulose nanofibrous mats through electrospining and layer-by-layer (LBL) techniques. The morphology obtained from Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that more orderly arranged three-dimension (3D) structure and roughness formed with increasing the number of coating bilayers. Besides, the enzyme-immobilized nanofibrous mats were found with high enzyme loading and activity, moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results further demonstrated the successful immobilization of chitosan and catalase on cellulose nanofibers support. Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide in the Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells with or without pretreatment of nanofibrous mats by MTT assay, LDH activity and Flow cytometric evaluation, and confirmed the pronounced hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity, but pretreatment of immobilized catalase reduced the cytotoxicity and protected cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxic effects which were further demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images. The data pointed toward a role of catalase-immobilized nanofibrous mats in protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular damage and their potential application in biomedical field. PMID:24804555

  3. Resveratrol attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced myocardial apoptosis by autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Ting, Wei-Jen; Huang, Chih-Yang; Yang, Jing-Yi; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Background Resveratrol is a Sirt-1-specific activator, which also exerts cardioprotective effects that regulate redox signalling during oxidative stress and autophagy during cardiovascular disease (CVD). Objective This study investigated the protective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage in cardiomyocytes. Design In this article, hydrogen peroxide-induced autophagy and apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were studied at an increasing concentration from 0 to 100 µM. Results Resveratrol pretreatment with concentrations of 10, 20, and 50 µM inhibits autophagic apoptosis by increasing p-Akt and Bcl-2 protein levels in H9c2 cells. Interestingly, resveratrol treatment activates the Beclin-1, LC3, p62, and the lysosome-associated protein LAMP2a within 24 h of administration. Conclusions These results suggest that resveratrol-regulated autophagy may play a role in degrading damaged organelles in H9c2 cells rather than causing apoptosis, and this may be a possible mechanism by which resveratrol protects the heart during CVD. PMID:27211317

  4. Design of an electrochemical probe for monitoring susceptibility of steel in pickling to hydrogen-induced cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.F.; Du, Y.L. . Corrosion Science Lab.)

    1993-09-01

    The relationship between the measured signals (hydrogen [H] permeating rate) of an electrochemical H sensor and the strength/embrittlement of plain carbon steel in acid solution as defined by slow strain rate tensile tests and scanning electron microscopy was studied. Critical parameters and criteria for hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) reported may be useful in software design of an electrochemical probe for inspecting and monitoring the HIC susceptibility of steel in pickling.

  5. White-light emission from solid carbon in aqueous solution during hydrogen generation induced by nanosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Shota; Maeda, Kosuke

    2016-07-01

    We previously discovered a novel method of hydrogen generation from high-grade charcoal in an aqueous solution using nanosecond laser pulse irradiation. In this paper, white-light emission during this reaction is reported: A broad spectrum over the visible range is observed above a threshold excitation energy density. The white-light emission is a simultaneous product of the hydrogen generation reaction and is attributed to blackbody radiation in accordance with Planck's Law at a temperature above 3800 K. Consequently, we propose that hydrogen generation induced by laser irradiation proceeds similarly to classical coal gasification, which features reactions at high pressure and high temperature.

  6. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, C. C. Adams, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, C. C. Adams, Photographer August 1931, SEED PACKING ROOM, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family Washhouse (first), Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  7. Hydrogen bond-induced vibronic mode mixing in benzoic acid dimer: a laser-induced fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Chayan K; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2004-05-01

    Laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectra of benzoic acid dimer in the cold environment of supersonic jet expansion have been reinvestigated with improved spectral resolution of measurements. The spectra are analyzed with the aid of the normal mode vibrations of the dimer calculated by the ab initio quantum chemistry method at the DFT/B3LYP/6-311+G(*) (*) level of theory. The analysis reveals that the low-frequency intermolecular hydrogen bond modes are mixed extensively with the carboxyl as well as aromatic ring vibrations upon electronic excitation. The mode mixing is manifested as the complete loss of mirror symmetry relation between the fluorescence excitation and dispersed fluorescence spectra of the S(1) origin, and appearance of large number of cross-sequence transitions when the DF spectra are measured by exciting the low-energy vibrations near the S(1) origin. The cross-sequence bands are found in all the cases to be the combinations of two nontotally symmetric fundamentals consisting of one of the intermolecular hydrogen bond modes and the other from the aromatic ring and carboxyl group vibrations. The implications of this mode mixing on the excited state dynamics of the dimer are discussed. PMID:15267778

  8. Hydrogen sulfide ameliorates cardiovascular dysfunction induced by cecal ligation and puncture in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, R S; El-Awady, M S; Nader, M A; Ammar, E M

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous messenger that participates in regulation of cardiovascular functions. This study evaluates the possible protective effect of H2S in cardiovascular dysfunction induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in rats. After 24 h of induction of CLP, heart rate (HR), mortality, cardiac and inflammation biomarkers (creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) isozyme, cardiac troponin I (cTnI), C-reactive protein (CRP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)), in vitro vascular reactivity, histopathological examination, and oxidative biomarkers (malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were determined. CLP induced elevations in HR, mortality, serum CK-MB, cTnI, CRP, and LDH, in addition to impaired aortic contraction to potassium chloride and phenylephrine and relaxation to acetylcholine without affecting sodium nitroprusside responses. Moreover, CLP increased cardiac and aortic MDA and decreased SOD, without affecting GSH and caused a marked subserosal and interstitial inflammation in endocardium. Sodium hydrosulfide, but not the irreversible inhibitor of H2S synthesis dl-propargyl glycine, protected against CLP-induced changes in HR, mortality, cardiac and inflammatory biomarkers, oxidative stress, and myocardium histopathological changes without affecting vascular dysfunction. Our results confirm that H2S can attenuate CLP-induced cardiac, but not vascular, dysfunction possibly through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. PMID:25791320

  9. Role of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide induced by intermittent hypoxia in airway epithelial wound repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satoshi; Sato, Atsuyasu; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Satooka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Koichi; Tanimura, Kazuya; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Muro, Shigeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-05-15

    The airway epithelium acts as a frontline barrier against various environmental insults and its repair process after airway injury is critical for the lung homeostasis restoration. Recently, the role of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as transcription-independent damage signaling has been highlighted in the wound repair process. Both conditions of continuous hypoxia and intermittent hypoxia (IH) induce ROS. Although IH is important in clinical settings, the roles of IH-induced ROS in the airway repair process have not been investigated. In this study, we firstly showed that IH induced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and significantly decreased bronchial epithelial cell migration, prevented by catalase treatment in a wound scratch assay. RhoA activity was higher during repair process in the IH condition compared to in the normoxic condition, resulting in the cellular morphological changes shown by immunofluorescence staining: round cells, reduced central stress fiber numbers, pronounced cortical actin filament distributions, and punctate focal adhesions. These phenotypes were replicated by exogenous H2O2 treatment under the normoxic condition. Our findings confirmed the transcription-independent role of IH-induced intracellular ROS in the bronchial epithelial cell repair process and might have significant implications for impaired bronchial epithelial cell regeneration. PMID:27093911

  10. Hydrogen sulfide: A novel nephroprotectant against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dugbartey, George J; Bouma, Hjalmar R; Lobb, Ian; Sener, Alp

    2016-07-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various solid-organ cancers. However, a plethora of evidence indicates that nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin therapy. While the antineoplastic action of cisplatin is due to formation of cisplatin-DNA cross-links, which damage rapidly dividing cancer cells upon binding to DNA, its nephrotoxic effect results from metabolic conversion of cisplatin into a nephrotoxin and production of reactive oxygen species, causing oxidative stress leading to renal tissue injury and potentially, kidney failure. Despite therapeutic targets in several pre-clinical and clinical studies, there is still incomplete protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third discovered gasotransmitter next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, has recently been identified in several in vitro and in vivo studies to possess specific antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties that modulate several pathogenic pathways involved in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The current article reviews the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and displays recent findings in the H2S field that could disrupt such mechanisms to ameliorate cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27095538

  11. Calpain-1 is required for hydrogen peroxide-induced myotube atrophy.

    PubMed

    McClung, J M; Judge, A R; Talbert, E E; Powers, S K

    2009-02-01

    Recent reports suggest numerous roles for cysteine proteases in the progression of skeletal muscle atrophy due to disuse or disease. Nonetheless, a specific requirement for these proteases in the progression of skeletal muscle atrophy has not been demonstrated. Therefore, this investigation determined whether calpains or caspase-3 is required for oxidant-induced C2C12 myotube atrophy. We demonstrate that exposure to hydrogen peroxide (25 microM H2O2) induces myotube oxidative damage and atrophy, with no evidence of cell death. Twenty-four hours of exposure to H2O2 significantly reduced both myotube diameter and the abundance of numerous proteins, including myosin (-81%), alpha-actinin (-40%), desmin (-79%), talin (-37%), and troponin I (-80%). Myotube atrophy was also characterized by increased cleavage of the cysteine protease substrate alphaII-spectrin following 4 h and 24 h of H2O2 treatment. This degradation was blocked by administration of the protease inhibitor leupeptin (10 microM). Using small interfering RNA transfection of mature myotubes against the specific proteases calpain-1, calpain-2, and caspase-3, we demonstrated that calpain-1 is required for H2O2-induced myotube atrophy. Collectively, our data provide the first evidence for an absolute requirement for calpain-1 in the development of skeletal muscle myotube atrophy in response to oxidant-induced cellular stress. PMID:19109522

  12. Protection of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage by Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaolu; Wang, Kai; Liu, Hongyun; Hu, Fuliang; Zhao, Fengqi; Liu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The mammary epithelial cells (MECs) of high-producing dairy cows are likely to be subject to oxidative stress (OS) due to the intensive cell metabolism. The objectives of this study were to investigate the cytoprotective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced OS in cultured bovine MECs (MAC-T). Pretreatment of MAC-T cells with resveratrol could rescue the decrease in cell viability and resulted in lower intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after H2O2 exposure. Resveratrol helped MAC-T cells to prevent H2O2-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondria-related cell apoptosis. Moreover, resveratrol induced mRNA expression of multiple antioxidant defense genes in MAC-T cells under normal/oxidative conditions. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was required for the cytoprotective effects on MAC-T cells by resveratrol, as knockdown of Nrf2 significantly abolished resveratrol-induced cytoprotective effects against OS. In addition, by using selective inhibitors, we further confirmed that the induction of Nrf2 by resveratrol was mediated through the prolonged activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK/MAPK pathways but negatively regulated by p38/MAPK pathway. Overall, resveratrol has beneficial effects on bovine MECs redox balance and may be potentially used as a therapeutic medicine against oxidative insult in lactating animals. PMID:26962394

  13. Sodium hydrogen exchanger as a mediator of hydrostatic edema induced intestinal contractile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Uray, Karen S.; Shah, Shinil K.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S.; Jimenez, Fernando; Walker, Peter A.; Stewart, Randolph H.; Laine, Glen A.; Cox, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Resuscitation-induced intestinal edema is associated with early and profound mechanical changes in intestinal tissue. We hypothesize that the sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE), a mechano-responsive ion channel, is a mediator of edema-induced intestinal contractile dysfunction. Methods An animal model of hydrostatic intestinal edema was utilized for all experiments. NHE isoforms 1-3 mRNA and protein were evaluated. Subsequently, the effects of NHE inhibition (with 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA)) on wet to dry ratios, signal transduction and activator of transcription (STAT)-3, intestinal smooth muscle myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, intestinal contractile activity, and intestinal transit were measured. Results NHE1-3 mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in the small intestinal mucosa with the induction of intestinal edema. Administration of EIPA, an NHE inhibitor, attenuated validated markers of intestinal contractile dysfunction induced by edema as measured by decreased STAT-3 activation, increased MLC phosphorylation, improved intestinal contractile activity, and enhanced intestinal transit. Conclusion The mechano-responsive ion channel NHE may mediate edema-induced intestinal contractile dysfunction, possibly via a STAT-3 related mechanism. PMID:20553904

  14. Hydrogen sulfide prevents Abeta-induced neuronal apoptosis by attenuating mitochondrial translocation of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weigang; Zhang, Yinghua; Yang, Chenxi; Sun, Yiyuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Songtao

    2016-06-14

    Neuronal cell apoptosis is an important pathological change in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is known to be a novel gaseous signaling molecule and a cytoprotectant in many diseases including AD. However, the molecular mechanism of the antiapoptosis activity of H(2)S in AD is not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the inhibitory effects of H(2)S on Abeta (Aβ)-induced apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying primary neuron cells. Our results showed that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H(2)S, significantly ameliorated Aβ-induced cell apoptosis. NaHS also reversed the Aβ-induced translocation of the phosphatase and tensin homologs deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) from the cytosol to the mitochondria. Furthermore, H(2)S increased the level of p-AKT/AKT significantly. Interestingly, the antiapoptosis effects of H(2)S were blocked down by specific PI3K/AKT inhibitor wortmannin. In conclusion, these data indicate that H(2)S inhibits Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis by attenuating mitochondrial translocation of PTEN and that activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in H(2)S-mediated neuronal protection. Our findings provide a novel route into the molecular mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis in AD. PMID:27026591

  15. Benzene-Induced Uncoupling of Naphthalene Dioxygenase Activity and Enzyme Inactivation by Production of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung

    1999-01-01

    Naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) is a multicomponent enzyme system that oxidizes naphthalene to (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene with consumption of O2 and two electrons from NAD(P)H. In the presence of benzene, NADH oxidation and O2 utilization were partially uncoupled from substrate oxidation. Approximately 40 to 50% of the consumed O2 was detected as hydrogen peroxide. The rate of benzene-dependent O2 consumption decreased with time, but it was partially increased by the addition of catalase in the course of the O2 consumption by NDO. Detailed experiments showed that the total amount of O2 consumed and the rate of benzene-induced O2 consumption increased in the presence of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging agents, and further addition of the terminal oxygenase component (ISPNAP) of NDO. Kinetic studies showed that ISPNAP was irreversibly inactivated in the reaction that contained benzene, but the inactivation was relieved to a high degree in the presence of catalase and partially relieved in the presence of 0.1 mM ferrous ion. Benzene- and naphthalene-reacted ISPNAP gave almost identical visible absorption spectra. In addition, hydrogen peroxide added at a range of 0.1 to 0.6 mM to the reaction mixtures inactivated the reduced ISPNAP containing mononuclear iron. These results show that hydrogen peroxide released during the uncoupling reaction acts both as an inhibitor of benzene-dependent O2 consumption and as an inactivator of ISPNAP. It is proposed that the irreversible inactivation of ISPNAP occurs by a Fenton-type reaction which forms a strong oxidizing agent, hydroxyl radicals (·OH), from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrous mononuclear iron at the active site. Furthermore, when [14C]benzene was used as the substrate, cis-benzene 1,2-dihydrodiol formed by NDO was detected. This result shows that NDO also couples a trace amount of benzene to both O2 consumption and NADH oxidation. PMID:10217759

  16. The study on space-flight induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis thaliana and the protective effect of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Liu, Min; Zhao, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known mutagen responsible for causing DNA strand breaks in all living organisms. Strand breaks thus created can be repaired by different mechanisms, including homologous recombination (HR), one of the key mechanisms maintaining genome stability. Here, we used previously generated Arabidopsis thaliana, transgenic for homologous recombination reporter system, in which homologous recombination frequency(HRF) was used as mutagenic end points. Based on the system, effect of DNA damage by space-flight during the Shenzhou-9 mission was investigated and the results showed that 13 days space-flight exposure of seedlings induced a significant increase in HRF compared with its ground-base three-dimensional clinostat controls and ground 1g controls. We also observed three-dimensional clinostat induced a significant increase in HRF compared with ground 1g controls. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has antioxidant activities by selectively reducing hydroxylradical ( •OH) and peroxynitrite(ONOO-), so we investigated the effect of hydrogen on IR-induced HRF. Treatment with hydrogen-rich water dramatically reduced the HR frequency induced by exposure of seedlings to 0 to 80 Gy 60Co radiation , suggesting that hydrogen represents a potentially novel preventative strategy for radiation-induced DNA damage in plants.

  17. Energetic multifunctionalized nitraminopyrazoles and their ionic derivatives: ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-04-15

    Diverse functionalization was introduced into the pyrazole framework giving rise to a new family of ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials. By incorporating extended cationic interactions, nitramine-based ionic derivatives exhibit good energetic performance and enhanced molecular stability. Performance parameters including heats of formation and detonation properties were calculated by using Gaussian 03 and EXPLO5 v6.01 programs, respectively. It is noteworthy to find that 5-nitramino-3,4-dinitropyrazole, 4, has a remarkable measured density of 1.97 g cm(-3) at 298 K, which is consistent with its crystal density (2.032 g cm(-3), 150 K), and ranks highest among azole-based CHNO compounds. Energetic evaluation indicates that, in addition to the molecular compound 4, some ionic derivatives, 9, 11, 12, 17, 19, and 22, also have high densities (1.83-1.97 g cm(-3)), excellent detonation pressures and velocities (P, 35.6-41.6 GPa; vD, 8880-9430 m s(-1)), as well as acceptable impact and friction sensitivities (IS, 4-30 J; FS, 40-240 N). These attractive features highlight the application potential of nitramino hydrogen-bonded interactions in the design of advanced energetic materials. PMID:25807076

  18. Di-hydrogen contact induced lattice instabilities and structural dynamics in complex hydride perovskites.

    PubMed

    Schouwink, P; Hagemann, H; Embs, J P; D'Anna, V; Černý, R

    2015-07-01

    The structural phase transitions occurring in a series of perovskite-type complex hydrides based on the tetrahydroborate anion BH4(-) are investigated by means of in situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, thermal methods and ab initio calculations in the solid state. Structural dynamics of the BH4 anion are followed with quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We show that unexpected temperature-induced lattice instabilities in perovskite-type ACa(BH4)3 (A = K, Rb, Cs) have their origin in close hydridic di-hydrogen contacts. The rich lattice dynamics lead to coupling between internal B-H vibrations and phonons, resulting in distortions in the high-temperature polymorph that are identical in symmetry to well-known instabilities in oxide perovskites, generally condensing at lower temperatures. It is found that anion-substitution BH4(-) <-> (X = Halide) can relax distortions in ACa(BH4)3 by eliminating coulomb repulsive H(-)···H(-) effects. The interesting nature of phase transition in ACa(BH4)3 enters an unexplored field of weak interactions in ceramic-like host lattices and is the principal motivation for this study. Close di-hydrogen contacts suggest new concepts to tailor crystal symmetries in complex hydride perovskites in the future. PMID:26076047

  19. A comprehensive analysis of hydrogen peroxide-induced gene expression in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, Steven; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Dat, James; Gadjev, Ilya; Boonefaes, Tom; Morsa, Stijn; Rottiers, Pieter; Slooten, Luit; Van Montagu, Marc; Zabeau, Marc; Inzé, Dirk; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide plays a central role in launching the defense response during stress in plants. To establish a molecular profile provoked by a sustained increase in hydrogen peroxide levels, catalase-deficient tobacco plants (CAT1AS) were exposed to high light (HL) intensities over a detailed time course. The expression kinetics of >14,000 genes were monitored by using transcript profiling technology based on cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism. Clustering and sequence analysis of 713 differentially expressed transcript fragments revealed a transcriptional response that mimicked that reported during both biotic and abiotic stresses, including the up-regulation of genes involved in the hypersensitive response, vesicular transport, posttranscriptional processes, biosynthesis of ethylene and jasmonic acid, proteolysis, mitochondrial metabolism, and cell death, and was accompanied by a very rapid up-regulation of several signal transduction components. Expression profiling corroborated by functional experiments showed that HL induced photoinhibition in CAT1AS plants and that a short-term HL exposure of CAT1AS plants triggered an increased tolerance against a subsequent severe oxidative stress. PMID:14671332

  20. Raman spectra from Symmetric Hydrogen Bonds in Water by High-intensity Laser-induced Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Men, Zhiwei; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Dongfei; Li, Zhanlong; Sun, Chenglin

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectra of ice VII and X were investigated using strong plasma shockwave generated by laser-induced breakdown (LIB) in liquid water. Simultaneously, the occurrence of the hydrogen emission lines of 656 nm (Hα), 486 nm (Hβ), 434 nm (Hγ) and 410 nm (Hδ) was observed. At 5 × 1012 W/cm2 optical power density, the O-H symmetric stretching, translational and librational modes of ice VII and a single peak at 785 cm−1 appeared in the spectra. The band was assigned to the Raman-active O-O mode of the monomolecular phase, which was the symmetric hydrogen bond of cuprite ice X. The spectra indicated that ice VII and X structure were formed, as the trajectory of the strong plasma shockwave passes through the stable Pressure-Temperature range of ice VII and X. The shockwave temperature and pressure were calculated by the Grüneisen model. PMID:24709652

  1. The Binary Collision-Induced Second Overtone Band of Gaseous Hydrogen: Modelling and Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodbeck, C.; Bouanich, J.-P.; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1999-01-01

    Collision-induced absorption (CIA) is the major source of the infrared opacity of dense planetary atmospheres which are composed of nonpolar molecules. Knowledge of CIA absorption spectra of H2-H2 pairs is important for modelling the atmospheres of planets and cold stars that are mainly composed of hydrogen. The spectra of hydrogen in the region of the second overtone at 0.8 microns have been recorded at temperatures of 298 and 77.5 K for gas densities ranging from 100 to 800 amagats. By extrapolation to zero density of the absorption coefficient measured every 10 cm(exp -1) in the spectral range from 11100 to 13800 cm(exp -1), we have determined the binary absorption coefficient. These extrapolated measurements are compared with calculations based on a model that was obtained by using simple computer codes and lineshape profiles. In view of the very weak absorption of the second overtone band, we find the agreement between results of the model and experiment to be reasonable.

  2. Auxin-induced hydrogen sulfide generation is involved in lateral root formation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Cao, Zeyu; Li, Jiale; Shen, Wenbiao; Huang, Liqin

    2014-03-01

    Similar to auxin, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), mainly produced by l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES; EC 4.4.1.1) in plants, could induce lateral root formation. The objective of this study was to test whether H2S is also involved in auxin-induced lateral root development in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings. We observed that auxin depletion-induced down-regulation of transcripts of SlDES1, decreased DES activity and endogenous H2S contents, and the inhibition of lateral root formation were rescued by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor). However, No additive effects were observed when naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) was co-treated with NaHS (lower than 10 mM) in the induction of lateral root formation. Subsequent work revealed that a treatment with NAA or NaHS could simultaneously induce transcripts of SlDES1, DES activity and endogenous H2S contents, and thereafter the stimulation of lateral root formation. It was further confirmed that H2S or HS(-), not the other sulfur-containing components derived from NaHS, was attributed to the stimulative action. The inhibition of lateral root formation and decreased of H2S metabolism caused by an H2S scavenger hypotaurine (HT) were reversed by NaHS, but not NAA. Molecular evidence revealed that both NaHS- or NAA-induced modulation of some cell cycle regulatory genes, including the up-regulation of SlCDKA;1, SlCYCA2;1, together with simultaneous down-regulation of SlKRP2, were differentially reversed by HT pretreatment. To summarize, above results clearly suggested that H2S might, at least partially, act as a downstream component of auxin signaling to trigger lateral root formation. PMID:24463534

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Transforming Growth Factor-β1-Induced EMT via Wnt/Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has anti-fibrotic potential in lung, kidney and other organs. The exogenous H2S is released from sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and can influence the renal fibrosis by blocking the differentiation of quiescent renal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. But whether H2S affects renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Our study is aimed at investigating the in vitro effects of H2S on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced EMT in renal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 cells) and the associated mechanisms. The induced EMT is assessed by Western blotting analysis on the expressions of α-SMA, E-cadherin and fibronectin. HK-2 cells were treated with NaHS before incubating with TGF-β1 to investigate its effect on EMT and the related molecular mechanism. Results demonstrated that NaHS decreased the expression of α-SMA and fibronectin, and increased the expression of E-cadherin. NaHS reduced the expression of TGF-β receptor type I (TβR I) and TGF-β receptor type II (TβR II). In addition, NaHS attenuated TGF-β1-induced increase of β-catenin expression and ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, it inhibited the TGF-β1-induced nuclear translocation of ββ-catenin. These effects of NaHS on fibronectin, E-cadherin and TβR I were abolished by the ERK inhibitor U0126 or β-catenin inhibitor XAV939, or β-catenin siRNA interference. We get the conclusion that NaHS attenuated TGF-β1-induced EMT in HK-2 cells through both ERK-dependent and β-catenin-dependent pathways. PMID:26760502

  4. Deacetylation of the tumor suppressor protein PML regulates hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Guan, D; Lim, J H; Peng, L; Liu, Y; Lam, M; Seto, E; Kao, H-Y

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is a tumor suppressor that is expressed at a low level in various cancers. Although post-translational modifications including SUMOylation, phosphorylation, and ubiquitination have been found to regulate the stability or activity of PML, little is known about the role of its acetylation in the control of cell survival. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of lysine 487 (K487) and SUMO1 conjugation of K490 at PML protein are mutually exclusive. We found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) promotes PML deacetylation and identified SIRT1 and SIRT5 as PML deacetylases. Both SIRT1 and SIRT5 are required for H2O2-mediated deacetylation of PML and accumulation of nuclear PML protein in HeLa cells. Knockdown of SIRT1 reduces the number of H2O2-induced PML-nuclear bodies (NBs) and increases the survival of HeLa cells. Ectopic expression of wild-type PML but not the K487R mutant rescues H2O2-induced cell death in SIRT1 knockdown cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of wild-type SIRT5 but not a catalytic defective mutant can also restore H2O2-induced cell death in SIRT1 knockdown cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism in which SIRT1/SIRT5-mediated PML deacetylation plays a role in the regulation of cancer cell survival. PMID:25032863

  5. Hydrogen sulfide modulates cadmium-induced physiological and biochemical responses to alleviate cadmium toxicity in rice.

    PubMed

    Mostofa, Mohammad Golam; Rahman, Anisur; Ansary, Md Mesbah Uddin; Watanabe, Ayaka; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the physiological and biochemical mechanisms by which H2S mitigates the cadmium stress in rice. Results revealed that cadmium exposure resulted in growth inhibition and biomass reduction, which is correlated with the increased uptake of cadmium and depletion of the photosynthetic pigments, leaf water contents, essential minerals, water-soluble proteins, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Excessive cadmium also potentiated its toxicity by inducing oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased levels of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, methylglyoxal and malondialdehyde. However, elevating endogenous H2S level improved physiological and biochemical attributes, which was clearly observed in the growth and phenotypes of H2S-treated rice plants under cadmium stress. H2S reduced cadmium-induced oxidative stress, particularly by enhancing redox status and the activities of reactive oxygen species and methylglyoxal detoxifying enzymes. Notably, H2S maintained cadmium and mineral homeostases in roots and leaves of cadmium-stressed plants. By contrast, adding H2S-scavenger hypotaurine abolished the beneficial effect of H2S, further strengthening the clear role of H2S in alleviating cadmium toxicity in rice. Collectively, our findings provide an insight into H2S-induced protective mechanisms of rice exposed to cadmium stress, thus proposing H2S as a potential candidate for managing toxicity of cadmium, and perhaps other heavy metals, in rice and other crops. PMID:26361343

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Delays LPS-Induced Preterm Birth in Mice via Anti-Inflammatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weina; Xu, Chen; You, Xingji; Olson, David M.; Chemtob, Sylvain; Gao, Lu; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A major cause of preterm labor in pregnant women is intra-amniotic infection, which is mediated by an inflammatory process. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous transmitter, has been implicated to be involved in inflammatory responses. We sought to investigate whether H2S affects infectious preterm birth using the mouse model of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced preterm birth. Administration of LPS at 0.4 mg/kg with two injections intraperitoneally (i.p.) on gestational day 14.5 induced preterm labor. LPS significantly increased leukocyte infiltration in uterus, stimulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), CCL2 and CXCL15 in myometrium. Administration of NaHS (i.p.) delayed the onset of labor induced by LPS in a dose-dependent manner. NaHS prevented leukocyte infiltration into intrauterine tissues and inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in myometrium and decreased the levels of these cytokines in maternal circulation. H2S also decreased LPS-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2/ nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways in myometrium. This study provides new in vivo evidence for the roles of H2S in attenuating inflammation, and a potential novel therapeutic strategy for infection-related preterm labor. PMID:27035826

  7. Hydrogen sulfide modulates cadmium-induced physiological and biochemical responses to alleviate cadmium toxicity in rice

    PubMed Central

    Mostofa, Mohammad Golam; Rahman, Anisur; Ansary, Md. Mesbah Uddin; Watanabe, Ayaka; Fujita, Masayuki; Phan Tran, Lam-Son

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the physiological and biochemical mechanisms by which H2S mitigates the cadmium stress in rice. Results revealed that cadmium exposure resulted in growth inhibition and biomass reduction, which is correlated with the increased uptake of cadmium and depletion of the photosynthetic pigments, leaf water contents, essential minerals, water-soluble proteins, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Excessive cadmium also potentiated its toxicity by inducing oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased levels of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, methylglyoxal and malondialdehyde. However, elevating endogenous H2S level improved physiological and biochemical attributes, which was clearly observed in the growth and phenotypes of H2S-treated rice plants under cadmium stress. H2S reduced cadmium-induced oxidative stress, particularly by enhancing redox status and the activities of reactive oxygen species and methylglyoxal detoxifying enzymes. Notably, H2S maintained cadmium and mineral homeostases in roots and leaves of cadmium-stressed plants. By contrast, adding H2S-scavenger hypotaurine abolished the beneficial effect of H2S, further strengthening the clear role of H2S in alleviating cadmium toxicity in rice. Collectively, our findings provide an insight into H2S-induced protective mechanisms of rice exposed to cadmium stress, thus proposing H2S as a potential candidate for managing toxicity of cadmium, and perhaps other heavy metals, in rice and other crops. PMID:26361343

  8. Hydrogen peroxide derived from marine peroxy sesquiterpenoids induces apoptosis in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Haruna; Taira, Junsei; Ueda, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the isolates of the peroxy sesquiterpenoids (1-3) from the Okinawan soft coral, Sinularia sp., indicated cytotoxicity in HCT116 colon cancer cells. The apoptotic cells with a nuclear condensation were detected in the presence of these compounds, then the caspase 3/7 activity was induced, indicating that the compounds have a potential antitumor activity by apoptosis-induction. The cells treated with these compounds were generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), indicating that the ROS is related to the induction of apoptosis. The ROS production reduced in the presence of catalase or trolox, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is generated through a certain free radical reaction derived from the compound. In fact, the accumulation of intracellular H2O2 was also confirmed in the presence of these compounds. Based on all the results, this study proposed the apoptosis-inducing mechanism due to the compounds that the H2O2 produced involving free radical reactions derived from cleavage of the end or hydro-peroxide in the molecule induced cell death. PMID:27575468

  9. A Hypothesis: Hydrogen Sulfide Might Be Neuroprotective against Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Peng; Chi, Xiang-Lin; Liu, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Gases such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) play important roles both in normal physiology and in disease. Recent studies have shown that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects neurons against oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury and attenuates lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induced neuroinflammation in microglia, exhibiting anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. The gas H2S is emerging as a novel regulator of important physiologic functions such as arterial diameter, blood flow, and leukocyte adhesion. It has been known that multiple factors, including oxidative stress, free radicals, and neuronal nitric oxide synthesis as well as abnormal inflammatory responses, are involved in the mechanism underlying the brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Based on the multiple physiologic functions of H2S, we speculate that it might be a promising, effective, and specific therapy for brain injury after SAH. PMID:24707204

  10. Hydrogen-induced program threshold voltage degradation analysis in SONOS wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qing; Zhao, Crystal; Sheng, Nan

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies the hydrogen-induced program state threshold voltage degradation in SONOS wafers, which ultimately impacts wafer sort test yield. During wafer sort step, all individual integrated circuits noted as die are tested for functional defects by applying special test patterns to them. The proportion between the passing die (good die) and the non-passing die (bad die) is sort yield. The different N2/H2 ratio in IMD1 alloy process yields differently at flash checkerboard test. And the SIMS curves were also obtained to depict the distribution profile of H+ in SONOS ONO stack structure. It is found that, the H+ accumulated in the interface between the Tunnel oxide and Si layer, contributes the charge loss in Oxynitride layer, which leads to the program threshold voltage degradation and even fall below lower specification limit, and then impacts the sort yield of SONOS wafers.

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Induced Carbon Dioxide Activation by Metal-Free Dual Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-03-18

    The role of metal free dual catalysis in the hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-induced activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and subsequent decomposition of resulting monothiolcarbonic acid in the gas phase has been explored. The results suggest that substituted amines and monocarboxylic type organic or inorganic acids via dual activation mechanisms promote both activation and decomposition reactions, implying that the judicious selection of a dual catalyst is crucial to the efficient C-S bond formation via CO2 activation. Considering that our results also suggest a new mechanism for the formation of carbonyl sulfide from CO2 and H2S, these new insights may help in better understanding the coupling between the carbon and sulfur cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus. PMID:26781129

  12. Mechanical wounding-induced laticifer differentiation in rubber tree: An indicative role of dehydration, hydrogen peroxide, and jasmonates.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Min; Yang, Shu-Guang; Shi, Min-Jing; Zhang, Shi-Xin; Wu, Ji-Lin

    2015-06-15

    The secondary laticifer in the secondary phloem of rubber tree are a specific tissue differentiating from vascular cambia. The number of the secondary laticifers is closely related to the rubber productivity of Hevea. Factors involved in the mechanical wounding-induced laticifer differentiation were analyzed by using paraffin section, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and Northern-blot techniques. Dehydration of the wounded bark tissues triggered a burst of hydrogen peroxide, abscisic acid, and jasmonates and up-regulated the expression of HbAOSa, which was associated with the secondary laticifer differentiation strictly limited to the wounded area. Application of exogenous hydrogen peroxide, methyl jasmonate, and polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000) could induce the secondary laticifer differentiation, respectively. Moreover, 6-Benzylaminopurine, a synthetic cytokinin, enhanced the methyl jasmonate-induced secondary laticifer differentiation. However, the dehydration-induced secondary laticifer differentiation was inhibited by exogenous abscisic acid. Diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), a specific inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, was effective in inhibiting the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide as well as of jasmonates upon dehydration. It blocked the dehydration-induced but not the methyl jasmonate-induced secondary laticifer differentiation. The results suggested a stress signal pathway mediating the wound-induced secondary laticifer differentiation in rubber tree. PMID:26070085

  13. Internal friction and gas desorption of {C}/{C} composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, H.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1994-09-01

    {C}/{C} composites are the most promising candidates as high heat flux component materials, where temperature dependence of mechanical properties and gas desorption behavior at elevated temperature are important properties. At the beginning, the newly developed internal friction measurement apparatus, which enables the accurate measurement of dynamic elastic properties up to 1373 K along with the measurement of gas desorption behavior, was used. The materials studied were unidirectional (UD) {C}/{C} composites reinforced with mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers, which were heat treated at temperatures ranging from 1473 to 2773 K which produced a variety of graphitized microstructures. Two-dimensional (2D) {C}/{C} composites reinfored with flat woven fabrics of PAN type carbon fibers were also studied. These materials were heat treated at 1873 K. From the temperature spectrum of internal friction of 2D {C}/{C} composites, these internal friction peaks were detected and were related to gas desorption. Also the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UD {C}/{C} composites, negative and positive dependence of Young's modulus were observed reflecting microstructure changes resulting from the heat treatments.

  14. Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against radiation-induced immune dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sanhu; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Wen; Xuan, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shouming; Yu, Shunfei; Mei, Ke; Huang, Yijuan; Zhang, Pei; Cai, Jianming; Ni, Jin; Zhao, Yaoxian

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed that hydrogen can be used as an effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective effects of hydrogen on immune system in mice. H2 was dissolved in physiological saline using an apparatus produced by our department. Spleen index and histological analysis were used to evaluate the splenic structural damage. Spleen superoxide dismutase, GSH, MDA were measured to appraise the antioxidant capacity and a DCF assay for the measurement of radical oxygen species. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by an Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining method as well as the apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and c-caspase-3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subtypes were detected by flow cytometry with FITC-labelled antimouse CD4 and PE antimouse CD8 staining. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the CD4+ T cell subtypes and related cytokines. Our study demonstrated that pre-treatment with H2 could increase the spleen index and attenuate the radiation damage on splenic structure. Radical oxygen species level was also reduced by H2 treatment. H2 also inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in splenocytes and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins in living mice. Radiation-induced imbalance of T cells was attenuated by H2. Finally, we found that H2 could regulate the polarization of CD4+ T cells and the level of related cytokines. This study suggests H2 as an effective radioprotective agent on immune system by scavenging reactive oxygen species. PMID:24618260

  15. Hydrogen-induced cold cracking in heat-affected zone of low-carbon high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Hu, Zhiyong; Qiu, Chunlin

    2014-12-01

    The Y-groove cracking test by submerged arc welding was employed to study the susceptibility of a low-carbon high-strength steel to hydrogen-induced cold cracking (HICC). The morphology of hydrogen cracks was observed using an electron probe microscope. The results showed that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has a higher susceptibility to HICC than the weld metal and that increasing heat input can improve the HICC resistance of the weldment. The intergranular microcracking is the main HICC mode at the lowest heat input condition, accompanied with some transgranular microcracks attached to complex inclusions. In combination with phase transformation behaviour in sub-zones, the effect of the phase transformation sequence is proposed to try to illustrate the fact that the fine-grained HAZ has higher probability of hydrogen cracking than the coarse-grained HAZ owing to the occurrence of hydrogen enrichment in the fine-grained HAZ after the transformation.

  16. Evaluation of Heat-affected Zone Hydrogen-induced Cracking in High-strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xin

    Shipbuilding is heavily reliant on welding as a primary fabrication technique. Any high performance naval steel must also possess good weldability. It is therefore of great practical importance to conduct weldability testing of naval steels. Among various weldability issues of high-strength steels, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) following welding is one of the biggest concerns. As a result, in the present work, research was conducted to study the HAZ HIC susceptibility of several naval steels. Since the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) is generally known to be the most susceptible to HIC in the HAZ region, the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior of the CGHAZ of naval steels HSLA-65, HSLA-100, and HY-100 was investigated. The CGHAZ microstructure over a range of cooling rates was characterized, and corresponding CCT diagrams were constructed. It was found that depending on the cooling rate, martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite can form in the CGHAZ of HSLA-65. For HSLA-100 and HY-100, only martensite and bainite formed over the range of cooling rates that were simulated. The constructed CCT diagrams can be used as a reference to select welding parameters to avoid the formation of high-hardness martensite in the CGHAZ, in order to ensure resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking. Implant testing was conducted on the naval steels to evaluate their susceptibility to HAZ HIC. Stress vs. time to failure curves were plotted, and the lower critical stress (LCS), normalized critical stress ratio (NCSR) and embrittlement index (EI) for each steel were determined, which were used to quantitatively compare HIC susceptibility. The CGHAZ microstructure of the naval steels was characterized, and the HIC fracture behavior was studied. Intergranular (IG), quasi-cleavage (QC) and microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture modes were found to occur in sequence during the crack initiation and propagation process. This was

  17. Alkali metal mediated C-C bond coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-01

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz)2, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz)2, the structure of [Li(Bz)2]- was drastically changed: Bz-Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C-C single bond was formed in the C1-C1' position of Bz-Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz-Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C-C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  18. Detection of interstellar ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O).

    PubMed

    Dickens, J E; Irvine, W M; Ohishi, M; Ikeda, M; Ishikawa, S; Nummelin, A; Hjalmarson, A

    1997-11-10

    We report the identification of 10 transitions that support the detection of the small cyclic molecule ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) in Sgr B2N. Although one of these transitions is severely blended, so that an accurate intensity and line width could not be determined, and two other lines are only marginally detected, we have done Gaussian fits to the remaining seven lines and have performed a rotation diagram analysis. Our results indicate a rotation temperature T(rot) = 18 K and a molecular column density N(c-C2H4O) = 3.3 x 10(14) cm-2, corresponding to a fractional abundance relative to molecular hydrogen of order 6 x 10(-11). This is a factor of more than 200 higher than the abundance for this molecule suggested by the "new standard" chemistry model of Lee, Bettens, & Herbst. This result suggests that grain chemistry might play an effective role in the production of c-C2H4O. No transitions of this molecule were detected in either Sgr B2M or Sgr B2NW. PMID:11541726

  19. Detection of Interstellar Ethylene Oxide (c-C2H4O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickens, J. E.; Irvine, W. M.; Ohishi, M.; Ikeda, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Nummelin, A.; Hjalmarson, A.

    1997-01-01

    We report the identification of 10 transitions which support the detection of the small cyclic molecule ethylene oxide (c-C2H40) in SgrB2(N). Although one of these transitions is severely blended, such that an accurate intensity and linewidth could not be determined, and two other lines are only marginally detected, we have done gaussian fits to the remaining 7 lines and have performed a rotation diagram analysis. Our results indicate a rotation temperature, Trot = 18 K, and a molecular column density, N(c-C2H40) = 3.3 x 1014cm-2, corresponding to a fractional abundance relative to molecular hydrogen of order 6 x 10exp -11). This is a factor of more than 200 higher than the abundance for this molecule suggested by the "new standard" chemistry model of Lee, Bettens, & Herbst (1996). This result suggests that grain chemistry might play an effective role in the production Of c-C2H40. No transitions of this molecule were detected in either SgrB2(M) or SgrB2(NW).

  20. Detection of Interstellar Ethylene Oxide (c-C2H4O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickens, J. E.; Irvine, W. M.; Ohishi, M.; Ikeda, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Nummelin, A.; Hjalmarson, Å.

    1997-11-01

    We report the identification of 10 transitions that support the detection of the small cyclic molecule ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) in Sgr B2N. Although one of these transitions is severely blended, so that an accurate intensity and line width could not be determined, and two other lines are only marginally detected, we have done Gaussian fits to the remaining seven lines and have performed a rotation diagram analysis. Our results indicate a rotation temperature Trot = 18 K and a molecular column density N(c-C2H4O) = 3.3 × 1014 cm-2, corresponding to a fractional abundance relative to molecular hydrogen of order 6 × 10-11. This is a factor of more than 200 higher than the abundance for this molecule suggested by the ``new standard'' chemistry model of Lee, Bettens, & Herbst. This result suggests that grain chemistry might play an effective role in the production of c-C2H4O. No transitions of this molecule were detected in either Sgr B2M or Sgr B2NW.

  1. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bing; Ma, Lai-ji; Yao, Jin-jing; Fang, Yun; Mei, Yan-ai; Wei, Shao-min

    2013-02-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties; no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level. Therefore, the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Kjeldahl determination, phenol-sulfuric acid method, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%, of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1301.01 Da. Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H(2)O(2) in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis. Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H(2)O(2), but application oat peptides with H(2)O(2) at same time did not. Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H(2)O(2)-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the inhibition of malondialdehyde (MDA). The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H(2)O(2)-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level. Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury. PMID:23365008

  2. Protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline against N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced photoreceptor degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Tao, Ye; Yan, Weiming; Yang, Guoqing; Chen, Xuemin; Cao, Ruidan; Zhang, Lei; Xue, Junhui; Zhang, Zuoming

    2016-07-01

    The N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-treated rat is typically used as an animal model of chemically-induced retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as the crucial contributor to the retinal photoreceptor apoptosis seen in MNU-treated rats. In the present study, we explored the therapeutic effects of hydrogen-rich saline (HRS), a selective ROS scavenger, on MNU-induced photoreceptor degeneration. Intraperitoneal (IP) administration of HRS ameliorated MNU-induced photoreceptor degeneration in terms of morphology and function: Sharply decreased thickness of the retinal outer nuclear layer (ONL) and flattened photopic and scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) waveforms, typically seen in response to MNU treatment, were substantially rescued in rats cotreated with MNU and HRS (MNU + HRS). Moreover, the terminal deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay revealed a smaller number of apoptotic photoreceptors in the MNU + HRS group compared that in the MNU group. Compared to MNU-treated rats, retinal malondialdehyde (MDA) content in MNU + HRS rats significantly decreased while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity significantly increased. Morphological and multi-electrode array (MEA) analyses revealed more efficient preservation of the architecture and field potential waveforms in particularly the peripheral regions of the retinas within the MNU + HRS group, compared to that in the MNU group. However, this enhanced protection of structure and function in the peripheral retina is unlikely the result of site-dependent variation in the efficacy of HRS; rather, it is most likely due to reduced susceptibility of peripheral photoreceptors to MNU-induced degeneration. Inner retinal neuron function in the MNU + HRS rats was better preserved, with fewer apoptotic photoreceptors in the ONL. Collectively, these results support the rationale for future clinical evaluation of HRS as a therapeutic agent for human RP. PMID:27215478

  3. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 mediates reactive oxygen species signaling for hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Ru; Hu, Chi-Tan; You, Ren-In; Pan, Siou-Mei; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chang-Shan; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-10-20

    One of the signaling components involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression is the focal adhesion adaptor paxillin. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), one of the paralogs of paxillin, exhibits many biological functions distinct from paxillin, but may cooperate with paxillin to trigger tumor progression. Screening of Hic-5 in 145 surgical HCCs demonstrated overexpression of Hic-5 correlated well with intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. Hic-5 highly expressed in the patient derived HCCs with high motility such as HCC329 and HCC353 but not in the HCCs with low motility such as HCC340. Blockade of Hic-5 expression prevented constitutive migration of HCC329 and HCC353 and HGF-induced cell migration of HCC340. HCC329Hic-5(-), HCC353Hic-5(-), HCC372Hic-5(-), the HCCs stably depleted of Hic-5, exhibited reduced motility compared with each HCC expressing Scramble shRNA. Moreover, intra/extrahepatic metastasis of HCC329Hic-5(-) in SCID mice greatly decreased compared with HCC329Scramble. On the other hand, ectopic Hic-5 expression in HCC340 promoted its progression. Constitutive and HGF-induced Hic-5 expression in HCCs were suppressed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers catalase and dithiotheritol and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. On the contrary, depletion of Hic-5 blocked constitutive and HGF-induced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation in HCCs. Also, ectopic expression of Hic-5 enhanced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. These highlighted that Hic-5 plays a central role in the positive feedback ROS-JNK signal cascade. Finally, the Chinese herbal derived anti-HCC peptide LZ-8 suppressed constitutive Hic-5 expression and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Hic-5 mediates ROS-JNK signaling and may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention of HCC progression. PMID:26416447

  4. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bing; Ma, Lai-ji; Yao, Jin-jing; Fang, Yun; Mei, Yan-ai; Wei, Shao-min

    2013-01-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties; no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level. Therefore, the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Kjeldahl determination, phenol-sulfuric acid method, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%, of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1 301.01 Da. Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H2O2 in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis. Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H2O2, but application oat peptides with H2O2 at same time did not. Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H2O2-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the inhibition of malondialdehyde (MDA). The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H2O2-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level. Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury. PMID:23365008

  5. The influence of the EUV spectrum on plasma induced by EUV radiation in argon and hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Osorio, E. A.; Banine, V. Y.; Beckers, J.

    2016-02-01

    Plasmas induced by EUV radiation are scarcely investigated, although they are unique since they are created without any discharge. These plasmas are also of interest from an applicational point of view, since they are related to the lifetime of optics in EUV lithography tools. In order to assess this impact, it is essential to characterize and understand EUV-induced plasma. In this contribution the influence of the background gas (argon and hydrogen) in the lithography tool and the spectrum of the illumination source on the electron density of EUV-induced plasma is investigated using microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that out-of-band radiation (>20 nm) is the main contributor to EUV-induced plasma in both argon and hydrogen. In hydrogen, this contribution is relatively more important than in argon due to the stronger wavelength dependence of the photoionization cross section of hydrogen than of argon. Furthermore, the production of electrons by out-of-band radiation lasts longer than the production by in-band radiation (10-20 nm) due to the longer temporal width of out-of-band radiation. Finally, the obtained results correspond reasonably well with estimates from a simplified absorption model.

  6. Annealing-induced alloy formation in Pd/Fe bilayers on Si(1 1 1) for hydrogen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudinepalli, Venkata Ramana; Tsai, Cheng-Jui; Chuang, Ying-Chin; Chang, Po-Chun; Plusnin, N.; Lin, Wen-Chin

    2016-03-01

    The bilayers of Pd and Fe with different thickness and relative positions were grown on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 surface at room temperature. For the investigation of the thermal annealing induced inter-diffusion and the corresponding magnetic behavior, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurement was carried out after various annealing processes, including the variation of annealing duration and temperature. With the annealing temperature of 300-500 K, the Pd/Fe bilayers were stable. Slight Si segregated into the thin film at around 700 K. Above 700 K, more serious Si segregation occurred and most of the Pd/Fe bilayer was mixed with Si, forming a silicide layer. 700-800 K annealing also induced change of Pd/Fe AES ratio, indicating the inter-diffusion between Pd and Fe layers. To overcome the unavoidable silicide formation induced magnetic dead layer, a relative thick Fe film of 20 ML capped with 1.5 ML Pd was chosen for the investigation of magnetism. The magnetic coercivity (Hc) increased by 2-3 times with the annealing temperature up to 740 K. Obvious hydrogenation effect was observed in 710 K-annealed sample; the in-plane Hc increased by more than 10% when the hydrogen pressure was above 200 mbar. After further annealing at 740-800 K, the hydrogenation effect on Hc became nearly unobservable. The annealing induced Pd-rich magnetic interface is supposed to dominate the hydrogenation effect on magnetism.

  7. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Junhyeok; Meng, Sheng; Sun, Yi-Yang; West, Damien; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zhang, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and controlling of excited carrier dynamics is of fundamental and practical importance, particularly in photochemistry and solar energy applications. However, theory of energy relaxation of excited carriers is still in its early stage. Here, using ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) coupled with time-dependent density functional theory, we show a coverage-dependent energy transfer of photoexcited carriers in hydrogenated graphene, giving rise to distinctively different ion dynamics. Graphene with sparsely populated H is difficult to dissociate due to inefficient transfer of the excitation energy into kinetic energy of the H. In contrast, H can easily desorb from fully hydrogenated graphane. The key is to bring down the H antibonding state to the conduction band minimum as the band gap increases. These results can be contrasted to those of standard ground-state MD that predict H in the sparse case should be much less stable than that in fully hydrogenated graphane. Our findings thus signify the importance of carrying out explicit electronic dynamics in excited-state simulations. PMID:23277576

  8. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Junhyeok; Meng, Sheng; Sun, Yi-Yang; West, Damien; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Shengbai

    2013-01-15

    Understanding and controlling of excited carrier dynamics is of fundamental and practical importance, particularly in photochemistry and solar energy applications. However, theory of energy relaxation of excited carriers is still in its early stage. Here, using ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) coupled with time-dependent density functional theory, we show a coverage-dependent energy transfer of photoexcited carriers in hydrogenated graphene, giving rise to distinctively different ion dynamics. Graphene with sparsely populated H is difficult to dissociate due to inefficient transfer of the excitation energy into kinetic energy of the H. In contrast, H can easily desorb from fully hydrogenated graphane. The key is to bring down the H antibonding state to the conduction band minimum as the band gap increases. These results can be contrasted to those of standard ground-state MD which predicts H in the sparse case should be much less stable than that in fully hydrogenated graphane. Our findings thus signify the importance of carrying out explicit electronic dynamics in excited-state simulations.

  9. Effects of hydrogen atoms on surface conductivity of diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengbin Cui, Yan; Qu, Min; Di, Jiejian

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the effects of surface chemisorbed hydrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms in the subsurface region of diamond on surface conductivity, models of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on diamond with (100) orientation and various concentrations of hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond were built. By using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, the equilibrium geometries and densities of states of the models were studied. The results showed that the surface chemisorbed hydrogen alone could not induce high surface conductivity. In addition, isolated hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond prefer to exist at the bond centre site of the C-C bond. However, such a structure would induce deep localized states, which could not improve the surface conductivity. When the hydrogen concentration increases, the C-H-C-H structure and C-3H{sub bc}-C structure in the subsurface region are more stable than other configurations. The former is not beneficial to the increase of the surface conductivity. However, the latter would induce strong surface states near the Fermi level, which would give rise to high surface conductivity. Thus, a high concentration of subsurface hydrogen atoms in diamond would make significant contributions to surface conductivity.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide lowers proliferation and induces protective autophagy in colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya C; Wang, Xiao J; Yu, Le; Chan, Francis K L; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y; Wu, William K K; Cho, Chi H

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gaseous bacterial metabolite that reaches high levels in the large intestine. In the present study, the effect of H(2)S on the proliferation of normal and cancerous colon epithelial cells was investigated. An immortalized colon epithelial cell line (YAMC) and a panel of colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, SW1116, HCT116) were exposed to H(2)S at concentrations similar to those found in the human colon. H(2)S inhibited normal and cancerous colon epithelial cell proliferation as measured by MTT assay. The anti-mitogenic effect of H(2)S was accompanied by G(1)-phase cell cycle arrest and the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip). Moreover, exposure to H(2)S led to features characteristic of autophagy, including increased formation of LC3B(+) autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles as determined by immunofluorescence and acridine orange staining, respectively. Abolition of autophagy by RNA interference targeting Vps34 or Atg7 enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of H(2)S. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that H(2)S stimulated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6 kinase. Inhibition of AMPK significantly reversed H(2)S-induced autophagy and inhibition of cell proliferation. Collectively, we demonstrate that H(2)S inhibits colon epithelial cell proliferation and induces protective autophagy via the AMPK pathway. PMID:22679478

  11. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: I. Experimental study in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsum, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Banine, V. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmas induced by EUV radiation are unique since they are created without the need of any discharge. Moreover, it is essential to characterize these plasmas to understand and predict their long term impact on highly delicate optics in EUV lithography tools. In this paper we study plasmas induced by 13.5 nm EUV radiation in hydrogen gas. The electron density is measured temporally resolved using a non-invasive technique known as microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The influence of the EUV pulse energy and gas pressure on the temporal evolution of the electron density has been explored over a parameter range relevant for industry. Our experimental results show that the maximum electron density is in the order of 1014 m-3 and depends linearly on the EUV pulse energy. Furthermore, the maximum electron density depends quadratically on the pressure; the linear term is caused by photoionization and the quadratic term by subsequent electron impact ionization. The decay of the plasma is governed by ambipolar diffusion and, hence, becomes slower at elevated pressures. Similarities and differences of the same processes in argon are highlighted in this paper.

  12. Effect of vitamin C administration on hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenlei; Yang, Nanfei; Feng, Xiujing; Sun, Tingzhe; Shen, Pingping; Sun, Weibin

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease, which is associated with chronic inflammation and leads to significant destruction of periodontal tissues. Periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) constitute the largest cell population in PDL tissues and a considerable body of evidence has demonstrated an association between oxidative stress and the progression of periodontitis. However, the effects on PDLCs exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the molecular mechanisms by which H2O2 affects periodontitis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the potential cytotoxic effect of H2O2 and the antioxidative function of vitamin C (Vc) in PDLCs were investigated. The results demonstrated that H2O2 treatment decreased the viability of PDLCs. The decreased PDLC viability was primarily induced by apoptosis, which was evidenced by cleaved caspases-3, caspases-9 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Following optimal Vc addition, the proapoptotic effects of H2O2 were partially antagonized. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that H2O2 primarily induced the apoptosis of PDLCs and that these adverse effects were partially rescued following treatment with Vc. These results revealed how H2O2 promotes the progression of periodontitis and provide an improved understanding of the reversal effect of antioxidant treatment. Therefore, optimal Vc administration may provide a potentially effective technique in periodontal therapy. PMID:25333298

  13. Genetic Targets of Hydrogen Sulfide in Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury – A Microarray Study

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, Sashko; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Strosing, Karl; Ryter, Stefan; Hummel, Matthias; Faller, Simone; Hoetzel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that inhalation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects against ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study, we aimed to determine the underlying molecular mechanisms of H2S-dependent lung protection by analyzing gene expression profiles in mice. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to spontaneous breathing or mechanical ventilation in the absence or presence of H2S (80 parts per million). Gene expression profiles were determined by microarray, sqRT-PCR and Western Blot analyses. The association of Atf3 in protection against VILI was confirmed with a Vivo-Morpholino knockout model. Mechanical ventilation caused a significant lung inflammation and damage that was prevented in the presence of H2S. Mechanical ventilation favoured the expression of genes involved in inflammation, leukocyte activation and chemotaxis. In contrast, ventilation with H2S activated genes involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, angiogenesis, inhibition of apoptosis, and inflammation. Amongst others, H2S administration induced Atf3, an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic regulator. Morpholino mediated reduction of Atf3 resulted in elevated lung injury despite the presence of H2S. In conclusion, lung protection by H2S during mechanical ventilation is associated with down-regulation of genes related to oxidative stress and inflammation and up-regulation of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Here we show that Atf3 is clearly involved in H2S mediated protection. PMID:25025333

  14. Is Hydrogen Peroxide a Suitable Apoptosis Inducer for All Cell Types?

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinmei; Wan, Chunyun; Guo, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is currently the most widely used apoptosis inducer due to its broad cytotoxic efficacy against nearly all cell types. However, equivalent cytotoxicity is achieved over a wide range of doses, although the reasons for this differential sensitivity are not always clear. In this study, three kinds of cells, the 293T cell line, primary fibroblasts, and terminally differentiated myocardial cells, were treated with a wide range of H2O2 doses. Times to apoptosis initiation and end were measured cytochemically and the changes in expression of caspase-9, P53, NF-κB, and RIP were determined by RT-PCR. The 293T cell line was the most sensitive to H2O2, undergoing necroptosis and/or apoptosis at all concentrations from 0.1 to 1.6 mM. At > 0.4 mM, H2O2 also caused necroptosis in primary cells. At < 0.4 mM, however, primary cells exhibited classic signs of apoptosis, although they tended to survive for 36 hours in < 0.2 mM H2O2. Thus, H2O2 is a broadly effective apoptosis inducer, but the dose range differs by cell type. For cell lines, a low dose is required and the exposure time must be reduced compared to primary cells to avoid cell death primarily by necroptosis or necrosis. PMID:27595106

  15. The Gas Leakage Analysis in C/C Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Hatta, Hiroshi; Bando, Takamasa; Sugibayashi, Toshio

    Gas leakage through carbon fiber reinforcement carbon composites, C/Cs, was discussed so as to apply C/Cs to heat exchangers in an engine system for a future space-plane. Since C/Cs include many cracks and pores, gas easily leaks through C/Cs. To predict and to prevent the gas flow through a C/C, leakage rate was measured as a function of pressure and gas flow path was identified by micro-observation of the C/C. Then, several analytical models were examined to clarify principal mechanism yielding gas flow resistance. It was found that laminar flow models gave far small flow resistance compared with experimental results, but a model based on adiabatic expansion and compression flow, used for gas leak through labyrinth seals, resulted in reasonable agreement. Finally, Si impregnation in a C/C was examined to minimize the gas leakage. This treatment was shown to be an excellent measure to reduce the gas leakage through C/C.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates ferric chloride-induced arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi-Ren; You, Shou-Jiang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qian; Wang, Xian-Hui; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gaseous transmitter, regulating a multitude of biological processes in the cardiovascular and other systems. However, it remains unclear whether it exerts any effect on arterial thrombosis. In this study, we examined the effect of H2S on ferric chloride (FeCl3)-induced thrombosis in the rat common carotid artery (CCA). The results revealed a decrease of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) expression and H2S production that persisted until 48 h after FeCl3 application. Intriguingly, administration with NaHS at appropriate regimen reduced the thrombus formation and enhanced the blood flow, accompanied with the alleviation of CSE and CD31 downregulation, and endothelial cell apoptosis in the rat CCA following FeCl3 application. Moreover, the antithrombotic effect of H2S was also observed in Rose Bengal photochemical model in which the development of thrombosis is contributed by oxidative injury to the endothelium. The in vitro study demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression of CSE, as well as H2S production, was decreased in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated endothelial cells. Exogenous supplement of NaHS and CSE overexpression consistently alleviated the increase of cleaved caspase-3 and endothelial cell damage caused by H2O2. Taken together, our findings suggest that endogenous H2S generation in the endothelium may be impaired during arterial thrombosis and that modulation of H2S, either exogenous supplement or boost of endogenous production, may become a potential venue for arterial thrombosis therapy. PMID:26982248

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates Neurodegeneration and Neurovascular Dysfunction Induced by Intracerebral Administered Homocysteine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Pradip K.; Kalani, Anuradha; Givvimani, Srikanth; Sathnur, PB; Tyagi, Suresh C.; Tyagi, Neetu

    2014-01-01

    High levels of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) are associated with neurovascular diseases. H2S, a metabolite of Hcy, has a potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity; however, the effect of H2S has not been explored in Hcy (IC) induced neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction in mice. Therefore, the present study was designed to explore the neuroprotective role of H2S on Hcy induced neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction. To test this hypothesis we employed wild type (WT) males ages 8–10 weeks, WT+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), WT+ Hcy (0.5μmol/μl) intracerebral injection (I.C., one time only prior to NaHS treatment), WT+Hcy +NaHS (sodium hydrogen sulfide, precursor of H2S, 30 μmol/kg, body weight). NaHS was injected intra-peritoneally (I.P.) once daily for the period of 7 days after the Hcy (IC) injection. Hcy treatment significantly increased MDA, nitrite level, acetylcholinestrase activity, TNFα, IL1β, GFAP, iNOS, eNOS and decreased glutathione level indicating oxidative-nitrosative stress and neuroinflammation as compared to control and aCSF treated groups. Further, increased expression of NSE, S100B and decreased expression of (PSD95, SAP97) synaptic protein indicated neurodegeneration. Brain sections of Hcy treated mice showed damage in the cortical area and periventricular cells. TUNEL positive cells and Fluro Jade-C staining indicated apoptosis and neurodegeneration. The increased expression of MMP9, MMP2 and decreased expression of TIMP-1, TIMP-2, tight junction proteins (ZO1, Occuldin) in Hcy treated group indicate neurovascular remodeling. Interestingly, NaHS treatment significantly attenuated Hcy induced oxidative stress, memory deficit, neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation and cerebrovascular remodeling. The results indicate that H2S is effective in providing protection against neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction. PMID:23912038

  18. Simulations of a Liquid Hydrogen Inducer at Low-Flow Off-Design Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.; Ungewitter, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to accurately model details of inlet back flow for inducers operating a t low-flow, off-design conditions is evaluated. A sub-scale version of a three-bladed liquid hydrogen inducer tested in water with detailed velocity and pressure measurements is used as a numerical test bed. Under low-flow, off-design conditions the length of the separation zone as well as the swirl velocity magnitude was under predicted with a standard k-E model. When the turbulent viscosity coefficient was reduced good comparison was obtained a t all the flow conditions examined with both the magnitude and shape of the profile matching well with the experimental data taken half a diameter upstream of the leading edge. The velocity profiles and incidence angles a t the leading edge itself were less sensitive to the back flow length predictions indicating that single-phase performance predictions may be well predicted even if the details of flow separation modeled are incorrect. However, for cavitating flow situations the prediction of the correct swirl in the back flow and the pressure depression in the core becomes critical since it leads to vapor formation. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD(Registered Trademark) code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework and a n advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids. The framework has been validated rigorously for predictions of temperature and pressure depression in cryogenic fluid cavities and has also been shown to predict the cavitation breakdown point for inducers a t design conditions.

  19. Streptococcus oralis Induces Lysosomal Impairment of Macrophages via Bacterial Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus oralis, an oral commensal, belongs to the mitis group of streptococci and occasionally causes opportunistic infections, such as bacterial endocarditis and bacteremia. Recently, we found that the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by S. oralis is sufficient to kill human monocytes and epithelial cells, implying that streptococcal H2O2 is a cytotoxin. In the present study, we investigated whether streptococcal H2O2 impacts lysosomes, organelles of the intracellular digestive system, in relation to cell death. S. oralis infection induced the death of RAW 264 macrophages in an H2O2-dependent manner, which was exemplified by the fact that exogenous H2O2 also induced cell death. Infection with either a mutant lacking spxB, which encodes pyruvate oxidase responsible for H2O2 production, or Streptococcus mutans, which does not produce H2O2, showed less cytotoxicity. Visualization of lysosomes with LysoTracker revealed lysosome deacidification after infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2, which was corroborated by acridine orange staining. Similarly, fluorescent labeling of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 gradually disappeared during infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2 The deacidification and the following induction of cell death were inhibited by chelating iron in lysosomes. Moreover, fluorescent staining of cathepsin B indicated lysosomal destruction. However, treatment of infected cells with a specific inhibitor of cathepsin B had negligible effects on cell death; instead, it suppressed the detachment of dead cells from the culture plates. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 induces cell death with lysosomal destruction and then the released lysosomal cathepsins contribute to the detachment of the dead cells. PMID:27113357

  20. Blackbody-induced decay, excitation and ionization rates for Rydberg states in hydrogen and helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, I. L.; Nekipelov, E. A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2010-06-01

    New features of the blackbody-induced radiation processes on Rydberg atoms were discovered on the basis of numerical data for the blackbody-induced decay Pdnl(T), excitation Penl(T) and ionization Pionnl(T) rates of nS, nP and nD Rydberg states calculated together with the spontaneous decay rates Pspnl in neutral hydrogen, and singlet and triplet helium atoms for some values of the principal quantum number n from 10 to 500 at temperatures from T = 100 K to 2000 K. The fractional rates Rd(e, ion)nl(T) = Pnld(e, ion)(T)/Pspnl equal to the ratio of the induced decay (excitation, ionization) rates to the rate of spontaneous decay were determined as functions of T and n in every series of states with a given angular momentum l = 0, 1, 2. The calculated data reveal an essential difference between the asymptotic dependence of the ionization rate Pionnl(T) and the rates of decay and excitation Pd(e)nl(T)~T/n2. The departures appear in each Rydberg series for n > 100 and introduce appreciable corrections to the formula of Cooke and Gallagher. Two different approximation formulae are proposed on the basis of the numerical data, one for Rd(e)nl(T) and another one for Rionnl(T), which reproduce the calculated values in wide ranges of principal quantum number from n = 10 to 1000 and temperatures between T = 100 K and T = 2000 K with an accuracy of 2% or better. Modified Fues' model potential approach was used for calculating matrix elements of bound-bound and bound-free radiation transitions in helium.

  1. Hydrogen induced cracking tests of high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the bolt-loaded specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Vigilante, G.N.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.; Tauscher, S.; Sage, T.; Troiano, E.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

  2. Induced Circular Dichroism in Phosphine Gold(I) Aryl Acetylide Urea Complexes through Hydrogen-Bonded Chiral Co-Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Dubarle-Offner, Julien; Moussa, Jamal; Amouri, Hani; Jouvelet, Benjamin; Bouteiller, Laurent; Raynal, Matthieu

    2016-03-14

    Phosphine gold(I) aryl acetylide complexes equipped with a central bis(urea) moiety form 1D hydrogen-bonded polymeric assemblies in solution that do not display any optical activity. Chiral co-assemblies are formed by simple addition of an enantiopure (metal-free) complementary monomer. Although exhibiting an intrinsically achiral linear geometry, the gold(I) aryl acetylide fragment is located in the chiral environment displayed by the hydrogen-bonded co-assemblies, as demonstrated by induced circular dichroism (ICD). PMID:26780877

  3. The initial stages of the hydrogen-induced reconstruction of Pd(1 1 0) studied with STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Marko; Becker, Conrad; Wandelt, Klaus

    2006-09-01

    The hydrogen-induced reconstruction of the Pd(1 1 0) surface was investigated in situ with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Focusing on the initial stages of the restructuring, which ultimately leads to a stable (1 × 2) reconstructed surface, we find an exponential increase of the reconstructed surface area with hydrogen exposure, up to 8 Langmuir, which can be explained by an autocatalytic behavior. Moreover, the steps, especially those running along the [0 0 1] direction, play a distinctive role in the buildup of the (1 × 2) reconstruction.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide mitigates homocysteine mediated pathological remodeling by inducing miR-133a in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kesherwani, Varun; Nandi, Shyam S.; Sharawat, Surender K.; Shahshahan, Hamid R.; Mishra, Paras K.

    2015-01-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine called hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is associated with pathological cardiac remodeling. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a cardioprotective gas, however the mechanism by which H2S mitigates homocysteine mediated pathological remodeling in cardiomyocytes is unclear. We hypothesized that H2S ameliorates HHcy mediated hypertrophy by inducing cardioprotective miR-133a in cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis, HL1 cardiomyocytes were treated with: 1) plain medium (control, CT), 2) 100μM of homocysteine (Hcy), 3) Hcy with 30μM of H2S (Hcy+H2S), and 4) H2S for 24 hour. The levels of hypertrophy markers: c-fos, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), miR-133a and its transcriptional inducer myosin enhancer factor- 2c (MEF2C) were determined by Western blotting, RT-qPCR, and immunofluorescence. The activity of MEF2C was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation of MEF2C with histone deacetylase -1(HDAC1). Our results show that H2S ameliorates homocysteine mediated up regulation of c-fos, ANP and β-MHC, and down regulation of MEF2C and miR-133a. HHcy induces the binding of MEF2C with HDAC1, whereas H2S releases MEF2C from MEF2C-HDAC1 complex causing activation of MEF2C. These findings elicit that HHcy induces cardiac hypertrophy by promoting MEF2C-HDAC1 complex formation that inactivates MEF2C causing suppression of anti-hypertrophy miR-133a in cardiomyocytes. H2S mitigates hypertrophy by inducing miR-133a through activation of MEF2C in HHcy cardiomyocytes. To our knowledge this is a novel mechanism of H2S mediated activation of MEF2C and induction of miR-133a and inhibition of hypertrophy in HHcy cardiomyocytes. PMID:25763715

  5. d-Amino acid oxidase-mediated increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide is mainly responsible for formalin-induced tonic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Miao; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yan-Chao; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Spinal reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in chronic pain. d-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) oxidizes d-amino acids such as d-serine to form the byproduct hydrogen peroxide without producing other ROS. DAAO inhibitors are specifically analgesic in tonic pain, neuropathic pain and cancer pain. This study examined the role of spinal hydrogen peroxide in pain and the mechanism of the analgesic effects of DAAO inhibitors. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Formalin-induced pain behaviours and spinal hydrogen peroxide levels were measured in rodents. KEY RESULTS Formalin injected into the paw increased spinal hydrogen peroxide synchronously with enhanced tonic pain; both were effectively prevented by i.t. fluorocitrate, a selective astrocyte metabolic inhibitor. Given systemically, the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol) blocked spinal DAAO enzymatic activity and specifically prevented formalin-induced tonic pain in a dose-dependent manner. Although CBIO maximally inhibited tonic pain by 62%, it completely prevented the increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. I.t. catalase, an enzyme specific for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, completely depleted spinal hydrogen peroxide and prevented formalin-induced tonic pain by 65%. Given systemically, the ROS scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) also inhibited formalin-induced tonic pain and increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. Formalin-induced tonic pain was potentiated by i.t. exogenous hydrogen peroxide. CBIO did not increase spinal d-serine level, and i.t. d-serine did not alter either formalin-induced tonic pain or CBIO's analgesic effect. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Spinal hydrogen peroxide is specifically and largely responsible for formalin-induced pain, and DAAO inhibitors produce analgesia by blocking spinal hydrogen peroxide production rather than interacting with spinal d-serine. PMID:21950354

  6. Microstructure and hydrogen induced failure mechanisms in iron-nickel weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenske, Jamey Alan

    A recent series of inexplicable catastrophic failures of specific subsea dissimilar metal Fe-Ni butter welds has illuminated a fundamental lack of understanding of both the microstructure created along the fusion line as well as its impact on the hydrogen susceptibility of these interfaces. In order to remedy this, the present work compares and contrasts the microstructure and hydrogen-induced fracture morphology of AISI 8630-IN 625 and F22-IN 625 dissimilar metal weld interfaces as a function of post-weld heat treatment duration. A variety of techniques were used to study details of both the microstructure and fracture morphology including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. For both systems, the microstructure along the weld interface consisted of a coarse grain heat-affected zone in the Fe-base metal followed by discontinuous martensitic partially-mixed zones and a continuous partially-mixed zone on the Ni-side of the fusion line. Within the partially mixed zone on the Ni-side there exists a 200 nm-wide transition zone within a 20 mum-wide planar solidification region followed by a cellular dendritic region with Nb-Mo rich carbides decorating the dendrite boundaries. The size, area fraction and composition of the discontinuous PMZ were determined to be controlled by uneven mixing in the liquid weld pool influenced by convection currents produced from the welding procedure. The virgin martensitic microstructure produced in these regions is formed as consequence of a both the local composition and the post-weld heat treatment. The local higher Ni content results in these regions being retransformed into austenite during the post-weld heat treatment and then virgin martensite while cooling to room temperature. Although there were differences in the volume of the discontinuous partially mixed-zones, the major

  7. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide against cold restraint stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Aboubakr, Esam M; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Magdy K

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator plays a potential role in modulating gastric inflammatory responses. However, its putative protective role remains to be defined. The present study aimed to evaluate role of the exogenously released and endogenously synthesized H2S in cold restraint stress (CRS)-induced oxidative gastric damage in rats. Rats were restrained, and maintained at 4 °C for 3 h. The H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (60 μmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) before CRS. Our results revealed that NaHS pretreatment significantly attenuated ulcer index, free and total acid output, and pepsin activity in gastric juice along with decreased gastric mucosal carbonyl content and reactive oxygen species production. This was accompanied by increased gastric juice pH and mucin concentration in addition to restoring the deficits in the gastric reduced glutathione, catalase as well as superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. NaHS pretreatment markedly reduced the serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase activity compared to CRS-non-treated. Moreover, NaHS preadministration significantly abrogated the inflammatory and the deleterious responses of gastric mucosa in CRS. The protective effects of H2S were confirmed by gastric histopathological examination. However, pretreatment with the H2S-synthesizing enzyme, cystathionine-gamma-lyase inhibitor, beta-cyano-L-alanine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the gastroprotection afforded by the endogenous H2S. Collectively, our results suggest that H2S can protect rat gastric mucosa against CRS-induced gastric ulceration possibly through mechanisms that involve anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions alongside enhancement of gastric mucosal barrier and reduction in acid secretory parameters. PMID:23812778

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide–Inducible Clone-5 Regulates Mesangial Cell Proliferation in Proliferative Glomerulonephritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jamba, Ariunbold; Kondo, Shuji; Urushihara, Maki; Nagai, Takashi; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Miyazaki, Akira; Kagami, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5) is a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-inducible focal adhesion protein. We previously demonstrated that Hic-5 was localized in mesangial cells and its expression was associated with glomerular cell proliferation and matrix expansion in human and rat glomerulonephritis (GN). In the present study, we first assessed the role of Hic-5 in mesangioproliferative GN by injecting Habu venom into heminephrectomized wild type (Hic-5+/+) and Hic-5-deficient (Hic-5-/-) mice. Hic-5+/+ GN mice exhibited glomerular cell proliferation on day 7. Surprisingly, glomerular cell number and Ki-67-positive cells in Hic-5-/- GN mice were significantly greater than those in Hic-5+/+ GN mice on day 7, although the number of glomerular apoptotic cells and the expression of growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1) and their receptors were similarly increased in both Hic-5+/+ and Hic-5-/- GN mice. In culture experiments, proliferation assays showed that platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1 enhanced the proliferation of Hic-5-/- mesangial cells compared with Hic-5+/+ mesangial cells. In addition, mitogenic regulation by Hic-5 was associated with altered and coordinated expression of cell cycle-related proteins including cyclin D1 and p21. The present results suggest that Hic-5 might regulate mesangial cell proliferation in proliferative GN in mice. In conclusion, modulation of Hic-5 expression might have a potential to prevent mesangial cell proliferation in the acute mitogenic phase of glomerulonephritis. PMID:25835392

  9. Inhibitory effect of hydrogen sulfide on ozone-induced airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyu; Li, Feng; Wiegman, Coen H; Zhang, Min; Hong, Yan; Gong, Jicheng; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Adcock, Ian; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ozone has been associated with airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The goal of this study was to examine whether these adverse effects of ozone could be prevented or reversed by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a reducing agent. The H2S donor sodium (NaHS) (2 mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) was intraperitoneally injected into mice 1 hour before and after 3-hour ozone (2.5 ppm) or air exposure, and the mice were studied 24 hours later. Preventive and therapeutic treatment with NaHS reduced the ozone-induced increases in the total cells, including neutrophils and macrophages; this treatment also reduced levels of cytokines, including TNF-α, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid; inhibited bronchial hyperresponsiveness; and attenuated ozone-induced increases in total malondialdehyde in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreases in the ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione in the lung. Ozone exposure led to decreases in the H2S production rate and in mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine-β-synthetase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in the lung. These effects were prevented and reversed by NaHS treatment. Furthermore, NaHS prevented and reversed the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 27. H2S may have preventive and therapeutic value in the treatment of airway diseases that have an oxidative stress basis. PMID:25010831

  10. Direct, Sequential, and Stereoselective Alkynylation of C,C-Dibromophosphaalkenes.

    PubMed

    Shameem, Muhammad A; Esfandiarfard, Keyhan; Öberg, Elisabet; Ott, Sascha; Orthaber, Andreas

    2016-07-18

    The first direct alkynylation of C,C-dibromophosphaalkenes by a reaction with sulfonylacetylenes is reported. Alkynylation proceeds selectively in the trans position relative to the P substituent to afford bromoethynylphosphaalkenes. Owing to the absence of transition metals in the procedure, the previously observed conversion of dibromophosphaalkenes into phosphaalkynes through the phosphorus analog of the Fritsch-Buttenberg-Wiechell rearrangement is thus suppressed. The bromoethynylphosphaalkenes can subsequently be converted to C,C-diacetylenic, cross-conjugated phosphaalkenes by following a Sonogashira coupling protocol in good overall yields. By using the newly described method, full control over the stereochemistry at the P=C double bond is achieved. The substrate scope of this reaction is demonstrated for different dibromophosphaalkenes as well as different sulfonylacetylenes. PMID:27310813

  11. Ag-catalyzed C-H/C-C bond functionalization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing-Zhong; Jiao, Ning

    2016-08-21

    Silver, known and utilized since ancient times, is a coinage metal, which has been widely used for various organic transformations in the past few decades. Currently, the silver-catalyzed reaction is one of the frontier areas in organic chemistry, and the progress of research in this field is very rapid. Compared with other transition metals, silver has long been believed to have low catalytic efficiency, and most commonly, it is used as either a cocatalyst or a Lewis acid. Interestingly, the discovery of Ag-catalysis has been significantly improved in recent years. Especially, Ag(i) has been demonstrated as an important and versatile catalyst for a variety of organic transformations. However, so far, there has been no systematic review on Ag-catalyzed C-H/C-C bond functionalization. In this review, we will focus on the development of Ag-catalyzed C-H/C-C bond functionalization and the corresponding mechanism. PMID:27056573

  12. Normal Platelet Integrin Function in Mice Lacking Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Clone-5 (Hic-5)

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Michael; Thielmann, Ina; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stegner, David

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αIIbβ3 plays a central role in the adhesion and aggregation of platelets and thus is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis. Integrin activation requires the transmission of a signal from the small cytoplasmic tails of the α or β subunit to the large extracellular domains resulting in conformational changes of the extracellular domains to enable ligand binding. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), a member of the paxillin family, serves as a focal adhesion adaptor protein associated with αIIbβ3 at its cytoplasmic tails. Previous studies suggested Hic-5 as a novel regulator of integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in mice. To assess this in more detail, we generated Hic-5-null mice and analyzed activation and aggregation of their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, lack of Hic-5 had no detectable effect on platelet integrin activation and function in vitro and in vivo under all tested conditions. These results indicate that Hic-5 is dispensable for integrin αIIbβ3 activation and consequently for arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in mice. PMID:26172113

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide Contributes to the Epithelial Cell Death Induced by the Oral Mitis Group of Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Sakurai, Atsuo; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Members of the mitis group of streptococci are normal inhabitants of the commensal flora of the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract of humans. Some mitis group species, such as Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus sanguinis, are primary colonizers of the human oral cavity. Recently, we found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by S. oralis is cytotoxic to human macrophages, suggesting that streptococcus-derived H2O2 may act as a cytotoxin. Since epithelial cells provide a physical barrier against pathogenic microbes, we investigated their susceptibility to infection by H2O2-producing streptococci in this study. Infection by S. oralis and S. sanguinis was found to stimulate cell death of Detroit 562, Calu-3 and HeLa epithelial cell lines at a multiplicity of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited S. oralis cytotoxicity, and H2O2 alone was capable of eliciting epithelial cell death. Moreover, S. oralis mutants lacking the spxB gene encoding pyruvate oxidase, which are deficient in H2O2 production, exhibited reduced cytotoxicity toward Detroit 562 epithelial cells. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that both S. oralis and H2O2 induced interleukin-6 production in Detroit 562 epithelial cells. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 is cytotoxic to epithelial cells, and promotes bacterial evasion of the host defense systems in the oral cavity and upper respiratory tracts. PMID:24498253

  14. Rutin protects rat articular chondrocytes against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide through SIRT1 activation.

    PubMed

    Na, Ji-Young; Song, Kibbeum; Kim, Sokho; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-05-13

    The progressive degeneration and ossification of articular chondrocytes are main symptoms in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Several flavonoids may provide an adjunctive alternative for the management of moderate OA in humans. Rutin, a natural flavone derivative (quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside), is well known for its potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties against oxidative stress. However, the protective function of rutin related to OA, which is characterized by deterioration of articular cartilage, remains unclear. The present study investigated the protective effects of rutin, an activator of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), involved in the inhibition of NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in rat chondrocytes. SIRT1 activation by rutin attenuated levels of inflammatory cytokines and NF-κB/MAPK signaling, whereas the inhibition of SIRT1 by sirtinol counteracted the beneficial effects of rutin in H2O2-treated chondrocytes. The findings of these studies suggested the potential involvement of SIRT1 in the pathogenesis of OA, and indicated that rutin is a possible therapeutic option for OA. PMID:27086847

  15. [THE INFLUENCE OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ON COLLAGEN-INDUCED AGGREGATION OF HUMAN PLATELETS].

    PubMed

    Petrova, I V; Trubacheva, O A; Mangataeva, O S; Suslova, T E; Kovalev, I V; Gusakova, S V

    2015-10-01

    Study the impact of hydrogen sulfide on collagen-induced platelet aggregation from healthy donors and patients with type 2 diabetes. In healthy individuals, in contrast to patients with type 2 diabetes, NaHS significantly inhibited platelet aggregation. Activators of cAMP signaling (forskolin and phosphodiesterase inhibitor) significantly reduced platelet aggregation in both groups of examinees. NO-synthase inhibitors increased platelet aggregation in healthy volunteers, but not in patients with type 2 diabetes. The presence of H2S donor did not alter the extent of platelet aggregation at high concentrations of cAMP or decreased production of nitric oxide. It is assumed that the antiplatelet effect of H2S is not associated with the effect on the signal system, mediated cAMP or nitric oxide. Change H2S-dependent regulation of platelet aggregation in patients with type 2 diabetes is caused by disorders have been reported with this disease: the increase of intracellular calcium ion concentration, oxidative damage to proteins, hyperhomocysteinemia, glycosylation of key proteins involved in this process. PMID:26827498

  16. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Agraz, Jose Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-15

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10 000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 ({sup 13}C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (B{sub o}), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of {sup 13}C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging.

  17. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (bio)sensing through hydrogen evolution reaction induced by gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Chamorro-Garcia, Alejandro; Merkoçi, Arben

    2015-05-15

    A new gold nanoparticle (AuNP) based detection strategy using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) through hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is proposed. This EIS-HER method is used as an alternative to the conventional EIS based on [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) or [Ru(NH3)6](3+/2+) indicators. The proposed method is based on the HER induced by AuNPs. EIS measurements for different amounts of AuNP are registered and the charge transfer resistance (Rct) was found to correlate and be useful for their quantification. Moreover the effect of AuNP size on electrical properties of AuNPs for HER using this sensitive technique has been investigated. Different EIS-HER signals generated in the presence of AuNPs of different sizes (2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 50 nm) are observed, being the corresponding phenomena extendible to other nanoparticles and related catalytic reactions. This EIS-HER sensing technology is applied to a magneto-immunosandwich assay for the detection of a model protein (IgG) achieving improvements of the analytical performance in terms of a wide linear range (2-500 ng mL(-1)) with a good limit of detection (LOD) of 0.31 ng mL(-1) and high sensitivity. Moreover, with this methodology a reduction of one order of magnitude in the LOD for IgG detection, compared with a chroamperometric technique normally used was achieved. PMID:24953452

  18. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agraz, Jose; Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-01

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10 000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 (13C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (Bo), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of 13C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging.

  19. Efficient near ultraviolet light induced formation of hydrogen by ferrous hydroxide. [in primitive earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowska, Zofia K.; Mauzerall, David C.

    1987-01-01

    A possible origin of early hydrogen by UV-induced photoreduction of ferrous ions was investigated by measuring the rate of H2 formation from irradiated FeSO4 solutions as a function of pH and the range of UV sources. It was found that, in addition to the known reaction in acid solution which decreases in yield with increasing pH and requires far-UV light, there is an efficient reaction occurring between pH 6 and 9 which utilizes near-UV light (of a 200-W mercury arc lamp). This latter reaction is a linear function of both the concentration of Fe(2+) and the light intensity. These results support the suggestion of Braterman et al. (1983) that the near-UV-driven photooxidation of ferrous ions may be responsible for the origin of the banded iron formations on the early earth. The efficient photoreaction could also explain the source of reducing equivalents for CO2 reduction.

  20. Salicylic acid-induced superoxide generation catalyzed by plant peroxidase in hydrogen peroxide-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that salicylic acid (SA) induces both immediate spike and long lasting phases of oxidative burst represented by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical (O2•−). In general, in the earlier phase of oxidative burst, apoplastic peroxidase are likely involved and in the late phase of the oxidative burst, NADPH oxidase is likely involved. Key signaling events connecting the 2 phases of oxidative burst are calcium channel activation and protein phosphorylation events. To date, the known earliest signaling event in response to exogenously added SA is the cell wall peroxidase-catalyzed generation of O2•− in a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent manner. However, this model is incomplete since the source of the initially required H2O2 could not be explained. Based on the recently proposed role for H2O2-independent mechanism for ROS production catalyzed by plant peroxidases (Kimura et al., 2014, Frontiers in Plant Science), we hereby propose a novel model for plant peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst fueled by SA. PMID:26633563

  1. Maternal molecular hydrogen administration on lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse fetal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Tomoko; Kotani, Tomomi; Mano, Yukio; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Imai, Kenji; Ushida, Takafumi; Li, Hua; Miki, Rika; Sumigama, Seiji; Sato, Yoshiaki; Iwase, Akira; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Asai, Masato; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    Fetal brain injury is often related to prenatal inflammation; however, there is a lack of effective therapy. Recently, molecular hydrogen (H2), a specific antioxidant to hydroxyl radical and peroxynitrite, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether maternal H2 administration could protect the fetal brain against inflammation. Pregnant C3H/HeN mice received an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on gestational day 15.5 and were provided with H2 water for 24 h prior to LPS injection. Pup brain samples were collected on gestational day 16.5, and the levels of apoptosis and oxidative damage were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were examined using real-time PCR. The levels of apoptosis and oxidative damage, as well as the levels of IL-6 mRNA, increased significantly when the mother was injected with LPS than that in the control group. However, these levels were significantly reduced when H2 was administered prior to the LPS-injection. Our results suggest that LPS-induced apoptosis, oxidative damage and inflammation in the fetal brain were ameliorated by maternal H2 administration. Antenatal H2 administration might protect the premature brain against maternal inflammation. PMID:26566302

  2. Protective Effects of Costunolide against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Injury in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Chong-Un; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Lee, Ying-Ray; Lin, Mei-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yi; Lee, Chien-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury has been considered as a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated by antioxidants may be a potential strategy for retarding the diseases' progression. Costunolide (CS) is a well-known sesquiterpene lactone, used as a popular herbal remedy, which possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of CS against the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and to elucidate potential protective mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that the treatment of PC12 cells with CS prior to H₂O₂ exposure effectively increased the cell viability. Furthermore, it decreased the intracellular ROS, stabilized the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP), and reduced apoptosis-related protein such as caspase 3. In addition, CS treatment attenuated the cell injury by H₂O₂ through the inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These results demonstrated that CS is promising as a potential therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative diseases resulting from oxidative damage and further research on this topic should be encouraged. PMID:27409597

  3. Light-induced defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon studied by the constant-photocurrent method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. A.; Arce, R.; Buitrago, R. H.; Koropecki, R. R.

    1997-04-01

    The light-induced creation of metastable defects in undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon has been followed using photoconductivity and absorption coefficient measurements. The density of states in the gap was obtained from the deconvolution of the subgap absorption coefficient measured by the constant-photocurrent method. We found that the decay of the photoconductivity and the evolution of the integrated density of subgap states follow the dependence on illumination time (till) predicted by the ``bond-breaking'' model. The density of occupied states obtained from the deconvolution procedure shows the presence of two peaks within the gap. After subtracting the valence band-tail contribution, these peaks can be well fitted with two Gaussians. The areas of both Gaussians increase as t1/3ill while their positions and widths remain unchanged. According to the energy position of these peaks, they are ascribed to the neutral and negatively charged silicon dangling bonds D0 and D-. We found that in this intrinsic sample the density of charged defects exceeds that of neutral defects, their ratio D-/D0 being approximately 2.6. This ratio is independent of the illumination time.

  4. Studies of negative ions by collision-induced decomposition and hydrogen-deuterium exchange techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, D F; Sethi, S K; Shabanowitz, J

    1980-01-01

    Development of two new techniques for studying the gas phase chemistry of negative ions is reported. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of (M-1)- ions has been accomplished in a newly constructed triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometer. This instrument was assembled by adding two additional Finnigan quadrupole mass filters to a Finnigan Model 3200 CI mass spectrometer. Generation of (M-1)- ions is accomplished by allowing OH- and sample to react under CI conditions in the ion source. The first quadrupole mass filter, Q1, is then employed to selectively pass the (M-1)- ion into a second quadrupole filter containing argon or neon at 10(-3) torr. On collision with the inert gas the (M-1)- ions dissociate into fragments which are then mass analyzed in the third quadrupole filter, CID spectra of (M-1)- ions from twelve carbonyl compounds are presented in this paper. Ion molecule isotope exchange reactions in the CI ion source can be used to count the number of hydrogen atoms in many different chemical environments. Collisions between sample (M-1)- ions and deuterium-labeled reagent gases (ND3, D2O, EtOD) facilitate incorporation of deuterium into the negative ion if the basicities of the sample and reagent anions are similar. Thus it is possible to selectively incorporate deuterium into many organic samples by controlling the exothermicity of the acid base, ion-molecule chemistry. PMID:7428745

  5. Dislocation dissociation in some f.c.c. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The dissociation of a perfect screw dislocation into a stacking fault in an f.c.c. lattice is modeled by the modified lattice statics. The interatomic potentials are obtained from the work of Esterling and Swaroop and differ substantially from those empirical potentials usually employed in defect simulations. The calculated stacking fault widths for aluminum, copper, and silver are in good agreement with weak beam microscopy results.

  6. [Study on spectral emissivity of C/C composites].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Cao, Wei-Wei; Jing, Min; Dong, Xing-Guang; Wang, Cheng-Guo

    2009-11-01

    Different types of C/C composites were prepared by conventional molding, and the changes in normal spectral emissivity of samples were tested. The testing results show that spectral emissivity of C/C composite reinforced by short cut carbon fibers is generally higher than the sample reinforced by carbon cloth in the entire 2500-13000nm wavelength region. The structure of short cut carbon fibers is relatively loose and the number of material particles is less than other samples in unit volume, which increases the penetration depth of electromagnetic waves. This is the reason for higher normal spectral emissivity and better heat radiation property. Meanwhile, the test results of normal spectral emissivity for fiber perform and C/C composite samples show that the spectral emissivity of resin carbon is better than fiber carbon because of the difference in microstructure for the two kinds of carbon materials. Laser Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze the microstructures of different carbon materials, and the results show that because sp3 and sp2 hybrid states of carbon atoms in resin carbon produced more vibration modes, the resin carbon also has higher normal spectral emissivity and better characteristics of heat radiation. PMID:20101951

  7. Hydrogenation-induced edge magnetization in armchair MoS{sub 2} nanoribbon and electric field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Fangping; Yang, Zhixiong; Wu, Nannan; Chen, Yu; Ni, Xiang; Xiong, Xiang

    2014-02-17

    We performed density functional theory study on the electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons (AMoS{sub 2}NR) with different edge hydrogenation. Although bare and fully passivated AMoS{sub 2}NRs are nonmagnetic semiconductors, it was found that hydrogenation in certain patterns can induce localized ferromagnetic edge state in AMoS{sub 2}NRs and make AMoS{sub 2}NRs become antiferromagnetic semiconductors or ferromagnetic semiconductors. Electric field effects on the bandgap and magnetic moment of AMoS{sub 2}NRs were investigated. Partial edge hydrogenation can change a small-sized AMoS{sub 2}NR from semiconductor to metal or semimetal under a moderate transverse electric field. Since the rate of edge hydrogenation can be controlled experimentally via the temperature, pressure and concentration of H{sub 2}, our results suggest edge hydrogenation is a useful method to engineer the band structure of AMoS{sub 2}NRs.

  8. White tea (Camellia sinensis Kuntze) exerts neuroprotection against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    López, Víctor; Calvo, Maria Isabel

    2011-03-01

    Tea is a popular beverage whose consumption is associated with prevention of certain disorders. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effect of white tea extract (WTE) on hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in PC12 cells. Cells were treated with various doses of WTE (10-250 μg/ml) before exposition to 250 μM hydrogen peroxide and cell survival was determined through the MTT and LDH assays. Oxidative stress was quantified in the cells after treatments as intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the antioxidant activity of the extract was assessed in a cell free system in terms of free radical scavenging capacity. Results showed that WTE has a significant protective effect in the PC12 cell line against hydrogen peroxide as cell survival was significantly superior in WTE-treated cells compared to hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. A reduction on intracellular oxidative stress as well as radical scavenging properties were produced by WTE. Results suggest that WTE protects PC12 cells against H(2)O(2)-induced toxicity, and that an antioxidant mechanism through ROS scavenging may be in part responsible for cells neuroprotection. PMID:21271291

  9. Utilization of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and Induced Hypothermia After Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mir J.; Exline, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic gas produced as a byproduct of organic waste and many industrial processes. Hydrogen sulfide exposure symptoms may vary from mild (dizziness, headaches, nausea) to severe lactic acidosis via its inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias and death. Treatment is generally supportive. We report the case of a patient presenting with cardiac arrest secondary to hydrogen sulfide exposure treated with both hyperbaric oxygen therapy and therapeutic hypothermia with great improvement in neurologic function. PMID:22004989

  10. Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Yacobi, B.G.

    1985-03-18

    A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge collection efficiency and thus in the charge collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage.

  11. Protective role of hydrogen-rich water on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Yao; Wu, Qi-Fei; Wan, Yong; Song, Si-Dong; Xu, Jia; Xu, Xin-Sen; Chang, Hu-Lin; Tai, Ming-Hui; Dong, Ya-Feng; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of the hydrogen-rich water (HRW) in the prevention of aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. METHODS: Forty male rats were allocated into four groups: normal control group, HRW group, aspirin group, and HRW plus aspirin group. The protective efficacy was tested by determining the gastric mucosal damage score. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interleukin (IL)-06 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in gastric tissues were evaluated. The serum levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were also detected. Histopathology of gastric tissues and localization of Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) were detected using hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry, respectively. RESULTS: Pretreatment with HRW obviously reduced aspirin-induced gastric damage scores (4.04 ± 0.492 vs 2.10 ± 0.437, P < 0.05). The oxidative stress levels of MDA and MPO in the gastric tissues increased significantly in the aspirin-treated group compared with the HRW group (2.43 ± 0.145 vs 1.79 ± 0.116 nmol/mg prot, P < 0.05 and 2.53 ± 0.238 vs 1.40 ± 0.208 U/g tissue, P < 0.05, respectively). HRW could obviously elevated the SOD levels in the gastric tissues (37.94 ± 8.44 vs 59.55 ± 9.02 nmol/mg prot, P < 0.05). Pretreatment with HRW significantly reduced IL-06 and TNF-α in the gastric tissues (46.65 ± 5.50 vs 32.15 ± 4.83 pg/mg, P < 0.05 and 1305.08 ± 101.23 vs 855.96 ± 93.22 pg/mg, P < 0.05), and IL-1β and TNF-α in the serum (505.38 ± 32.97 vs 343.37 ± 25.09 pg/mL, P < 0.05 and 264.53 ± 28.63 vs 114.96 ± 21.79 pg/mL, P < 0.05) compared to treatment with aspirin alone. HRW could significantly decrease the COX-2 expression in the gastric tissues (staining score: 8.4 ± 2.1 vs 2.9 ± 1.5, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HRW pretreatment alleviated the aspirin-induced gastric lesions by inhibiting the oxidative stress, inflammatory reaction and reducing the COX-2 in the gastric tissues. PMID:24587639

  12. Unveiling the Origin of Work Hardening Behavior in an Ultrafine-Grained Manganese Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel by Hydrogen Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xu; Li, Wei; Zhao, Hongshan; Han, Qihang; Wang, Li; Jiao, Huisheng; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    To reveal the origin of work hardening behavior in an ultrafine-grained manganese transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, specific experiments were designed with the assistance of hydrogen. Although the effect of hydrogen on the austenite transformation was negligible, the work hardening rate ( Θ) was apparently reduced for hydrogenated samples, indicating that TRIP effect cannot account for the high Θ alone. The collaborative effect of dislocation accumulation in ferrite and austenite transformation is proposed to explain the responsible mechanism.

  13. Unveiling the Origin of Work Hardening Behavior in an Ultrafine-Grained Manganese Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel by Hydrogen Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xu; Li, Wei; Zhao, Hongshan; Han, Qihang; Wang, Li; Jiao, Huisheng; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-07-01

    To reveal the origin of work hardening behavior in an ultrafine-grained manganese transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, specific experiments were designed with the assistance of hydrogen. Although the effect of hydrogen on the austenite transformation was negligible, the work hardening rate (Θ) was apparently reduced for hydrogenated samples, indicating that TRIP effect cannot account for the high Θ alone. The collaborative effect of dislocation accumulation in ferrite and austenite transformation is proposed to explain the responsible mechanism.

  14. Hydrogen-induced phase separation in amorphous Cu0.5Ti0.5 alloys. I. Room-temperature experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodmacq, B.; Maret, M.; Laugier, J.; Billard, L.; Chamberod, A.

    1988-07-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the structure of an amorphous Cu0.5Ti0.5 alloy has been studied by means of x-ray and neutron scattering. These experiments include large-angle x-ray and neutron scattering and small-angle neutron scattering with hydrogen-deuterium substitution. The results indicate that large hydrogen contents (hydrogen-to-metal ratio of 0.84) induce a phase separation into Cu and TiHx regions on a scale of about 10-15 Å. Experiments on samples loaded with hydrogen by electrolysis or from the gas phase show that such a phase separation does not depend on the method of hydrogen loading. The results of a computer simulation with nearest-neighbor Cu-Ti permutations reproduce the main features of the diffraction data and confirm the large change of chemical ordering between Cu and Ti atoms upon hydrogen absorption.

  15. On the origins of large interaction-induced first hyperpolarizabilities in hydrogen-bonded π-electronic complexes.

    PubMed

    Góra, Robert W; Błasiak, Bartosz

    2013-08-01

    In this article we elucidate the origins of interaction-induced linear and nonlinear electro-optic properties of model hydrogen-bonded π-electronic complexes. In particular we report on contributions due to various interaction energy terms to excess dipole moments (Δμ), electric dipole polarizabilities (Δα), and first hyperpolarizabilities (Δβ), focusing on the latter. The analysis of intermolecular interaction-induced electric properties is performed for selected model systems including quasi-linear dimers of urea, diformamide, 4-pyridone, 4-nitroaniline, and the complex of hydrogen fluoride with nitroacetylene. The nature of intermolecular interactions as well as of the Δμ and Δα is very similar in all studied complexes. However, partitioning of Δβ into physically well-defined components reveals that the origins of this term, the magnitude of which is often comparable to the hyperpolarizabilities of isolated monomers, are different in each case. Our results indicate that, even though hydrogen bonding usually diminishes the nonlinear response of interacting species, the first hyperpolarizability of complexes with the nitro group acting as a proton acceptor is substantially increased, essentially due to field-induced changes of electrostatic interactions between subsystems. However, in the remaining complexes the origins of Δβ are much more involved. Even though at large intermolecular separations the origins of interaction-induced electric properties are essentially due to the field-induced electrostatic and induction interactions, in the vicinity of van der Waals minimum the overlap effects cannot be neglected since they may substantially alter the predicted excess properties or even determine their magnitude and sign. On the other hand the Δβ contribution due to dispersion interactions is usually negligible. Interestingly, the values of interaction-induced first hyperpolarizability in some cases depend strongly on the intermolecular separation

  16. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: II. Numerical studies in argon and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2016-07-01

    We used numerical modeling to study the evolution of EUV-induced plasmas in argon and hydrogen. The results of simulations were compared to the electron densities measured by microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. It was found that the measured electron densities can be used to derive the integral amount of plasma in the cavity. However, in some regimes, the impact of the setup geometry, EUV spectrum, and EUV induced secondary emission should be taken into account. The influence of these parameters on the generated plasma and the measured electron density is discussed.

  17. Constructive and destructive interferences of Stark resonances induced by an ac field in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Bylicki, Miroslaw; Moiseyev, Nimrod; Sindelka, Milan

    2010-12-15

    We study theoretically the problem of a hydrogen atom exposed both to a static dc field and to a monochromatic ac field. We show that, in the presence of an ac field, a constructive (or destructive) interference occurs between the excited (Rydberg) Stark resonance states and the hydrogenic ground state. This mechanism is responsible for dramatic enhancement (or suppression) of the corresponding photoionization rates.

  18. Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon device

    DOEpatents

    Yacobi, Ben G.

    1986-01-01

    A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge-collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge-collection efficiency; and thus in the charge-collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage, in the device, which darkened areas can be restored to their original charge-collection efficiency by heating the hydrogenated amorphous silicon to a temperature of about 100.degree. C. to 250.degree. C. for a sufficient period of time to provide for such restoration.

  19. Atomistic simulation of the hydrogen-induced fracture process in an iron-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, N.R.; Foiles, S.M.; Baskes, M.I.; Angelo, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Austenitic superalloys exhibit dramatic reductions in ductility and crack growth resistance when high fugacity hydrogen and hydrogen-producing environments trigger a change in fracture mode from microvoid coalescence to slip band and intergranular fracture. Of particular importance is the change to intergranular fracture. We have therefore combined the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) with Monte Carlo simulations and molecular dynamics calculations to help define the effects of hydrogen on segregation and fracture at the atomic level. Nickel was used to simulate the face-centered-cubic austenite lattice while symmetric and asymmetric {sigma}9 tilt boundaries were used to simulate grain boundaries. These simulations show that grain boundaries are strong trap sites for hydrogen. They further show that hydrogen dramatically reduces the bond strength between atoms at grain boundary sites while inhibiting dislocation generation.

  20. The effect of trapping on hydrogen-induced plasticity and fracture in structural alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, I. M.; Dollar, M.

    1990-01-01

    It has previously been noted that, for a given alloy system, microstructural manipulation may result in large variations in hydrogen susceptibility at a given strength level; it may even be possible to obtain inversions of susceptibility in which higher strengths may be associated with greater embrittlement resistance. An examination is presently conducted of the consequences of hydrogen-heterogeneity interactions, or 'trapping', in several alloy systems; these will include both conventional ferrous and nonferrous ones, and novel alloy systems. Deleterious trapping dominates behavior in the presence of large local concentrations of hydrogen; plasticity modifications due to hydrogen exercise a dominant influence on embrittlement susceptibility when relatively weak traps are present, as well as when a more uniform distribution of hydrogen is present.

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Induced Cerebral Hemorrhage Following Experimental Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Yi; Xiao, Yunqi; Hua, Zichun; Cheng, Jian; Jia, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the only approved drug for the treatment of ischemic stroke, increases the risk of cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we investigated whether the newly identified gaso-transmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S), when used in combination with tPA, reduced the hemorrhagic transformation following stroke. In a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), intravenous injection of tPA enhanced cerebral hemorrhage, which was significantly attenuated by the co-administration of two structurally unrelated H2S donors, ADT-OH and NaHS. By assessing extravasation of Evans blue into the ischemic hemisphere as well as brain edema following MCAO, we further showed that a tPA-exacerbated BBB disruption was significantly ameliorated by the co-administration of ADT-OH. In the mouse MCAO model, tPA upregulated Akt activation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) activity in the ischemic brain, which was remarkably attenuated by ADT-OH. In the in vitro glucose-oxygen deprivation (OGD) model, ADT-OH markedly attenuated tPA-enhanced Akt activation and VEGF expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Finally, ADT-OH improved functional outcomes in mice subjected to MCAO and tPA infusion. In conclusion, H2S donors reduced tPA-induced cerebral hemorrhage by possibly inhibiting the Akt-VEGF-MMP9 cascade. Administration of H2S donors has potential as a novel modality to improve the safety of tPA following stroke. PMID:27018013

  2. [Role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide in pulmonary hypertension induced by lipopolysaccharide].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Wei, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Meng, Xiang-Yan; Xian, Xiao-Hui

    2008-04-25

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by endotoxin. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control group (0.5 mL/kg body weight of normal saline, i.v.), lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated group (5 mg/kg body weight of LPS, i.v.), LPS + NaHS (5 mg/kg body weight of LPS, i.v., and 28 μmol/kg body weight of NaHS, i.p.) and LPS + PPG group (5 mg/kg body weight of LPS, i.v., and 30 μmol/kg body weight of PPG, i.p.). Rats were anesthetized with 20% urethane (1 g/kg body weight, i.p.). A polyethylene catheter was inserted into the pulmonary artery through the right external jugular vein to measure the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) for 7 h, and then the pulmonary artery was isolated rapidly by the method described previously. Pulmonary arterial activity was detected. H2S concentration and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) activity in pulmonary artery tissues were determined by biochemical method. CSE mRNA expression was detected by competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with control, LPS significantly increased mPAP [(1.82±0.29) kPa vs (1.43±0.26) kPa, P<0.01], decreased H2S production [(26.33±7.84) vs (42.92±8.73) pmol/g wet tissue per minute, P<0.01), and reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation response [(75.72±7.22)% vs (86.40±4.40) %, P<0.01) induced by ACh (1×10(-6) mol/L). These effects were partly reversed by co-administration of NaHS and enhanced by co-administration of PPG. Both CSE activity and CSE mRNA expression were consistent with H2S production. It is suggested that the inhibitory effect of LPS on endothelium-dependent relaxation results in pulmonary hypertension, which might be mediated through H(2)S. PMID:18425308

  3. Differential Gene Expression Patterns in Chicken Cardiomyocytes during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youwen; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is both an exogenous and endogenous cytotoxic agent that can reliably induce apoptosis in numerous cell types for studies on apoptosis signaling pathways. However, little is known of these apoptotic processes in myocardial cells of chicken, a species prone to progressive heart failure. Sequencing of mRNA transcripts (RNA-Seq) allows for the identification of differentially expressed genes under various physiological and pathological conditions to elucidate the molecular pathways involved, including cellular responses to exogenous and endogenous toxins. We used RNA-seq to examine genes differentially expressed during H2O2-induced apoptosis in primary cultures of embryonic chicken cardiomyocytes. Following control or H2O2 treatment, RNA was extracted and sequencing performed to identify novel transcripts up- or downregulated in the H2O2 treatment group and construct protein−protein interaction networks. Of the 19,268 known and 2,160 novel transcripts identified in both control and H2O2 treatment groups, 4,650 showed significant differential expression. Among them, 55.63% were upregulated and 44.37% downregulated. Initiation of apoptosis by H2O2 was associated with upregulation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3, and downregulation of anti-apoptotic genes API5 and TRIA1. Many other differentially expressed genes were associated with metabolic pathways (including ‘Fatty acid metabolism’, ‘Alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism’, and ‘Biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids’) and cell signaling pathways (including ‘PPAR signaling pathway’, ‘Adipocytokine signaling pathway’, ‘TGF-beta signaling pathway’, ‘MAPK signaling pathway’, and ‘p53 signaling pathway’). In chicken cardiomyocytes, H2O2 alters the expression of numerous genes linked to cell signaling and metabolism as well as genes directly associated with apoptosis. In particular, H2O2 also affects the biosynthesis and processing of proteins and

  4. KeV Ion Beam Induced Surface Modification of SiC Hydrogen Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Muntele, C.I.; Ila, D.; Williams, E.K.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    1999-11-29

    Silicon carbide, a wide-bandgap semiconductor, is currently used to fabricate an efficient high temperature hydrogen sensor. When a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of silicon carbide, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. Rather than applying a palladium film, we have implanted palladium ions into the silicon face of 6H, n-type Sic samples. The implantation energies and fluences, as well as the results obtained by monitoring the current through the sample in the presence of hydrogen are included in this paper.

  5. Degradation of bisphenol A and formation of hydrogen peroxide induced by glow discharge plasma in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Jiang, Xuanzhen; Liu, Yongjun

    2008-06-15

    Degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) and simultaneous formation of hydrogen peroxide induced by glow discharge plasma in contact with aqueous solution were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the BPA degradation rate was higher in sodium chloride solution than that in sodium sulfate or phosphate solutions. However, the formation rates of hydrogen peroxide were on the opposite case. Both the BPA removal and the hydrogen peroxide production rates decreased in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, indicating that hydroxyl radicals are the most probable oxidants responsible for BPA degradation and the precursors of hydrogen peroxide. Ferric ion showed better catalytic effect than that of ferrous ion, suggesting that the ferric ion was reduced by the intermediates formed during BPA degradation, which was confirmed by following the production of ferrous ion in the system. TOC of the solution gradually reduced with discharge time; however, without catalysts, the solution COD increased with discharge time and sharply decreased in the presence of iron salts. The major intermediate products were identified by LC/MS and the possible degradation mechanism was discussed. PMID:18082947

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents and Partially Reverses Ozone-Induced Features of Lung Inflammation and Emphysema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Min; Liang, Li; Sun, Xiaoyuan; Li, Min; Tang, Yueqin; Bao, Aihua; Gong, Jicheng; Zhang, Junfeng; Adcock, Ian; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhou, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel signaling gasotransmitter in the respiratory system, may have antiinflammatory properties in the lung. We examined the preventive and therapeutic effects of H2S on ozone-induced features of lung inflammation and emphysema. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone or filtered air over 6 weeks. Sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS), an H2S donor, was administered to the mice either before ozone exposure (preventive effect) or after completion of 6 weeks of ozone exposure (therapeutic effect). The ozone-exposed mice developed emphysema, measured by micro-computed tomography and histology, airflow limitation, measured by the forced maneuver system, and increased lung inflammation with augmented IL-1β, IL-18, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene expression. Ozone-induced changes were associated with increased Nod-like receptor pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-caspase-1 activation and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and decreased Akt phosphorylation. NaHS both prevented and reversed lung inflammation and emphysematous changes in alveolar space. In contrast, NaHS prevented, but did not reverse, ozone-induced airflow limitation and bronchial structural remodeling. In conclusion, NaHS administration prevented and partially reversed ozone-induced features of lung inflammation and emphysema via regulation of the NLRP3-caspase-1, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and Akt pathways. PMID:26731380

  7. Anti-inflammatory properties of molecular hydrogen: investigation on parasite-induced liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gharib, B; Hanna, S; Abdallahi, O M; Lepidi, H; Gardette, B; De Reggi, M

    2001-08-01

    Molecular hydrogen reacts with the hydroxyl radical, a highly cytotoxic species produced in inflamed tissues. It has been suggested therefore to use gaseous hydrogen in a new anti-inflammatory strategy. We tested this idea, with the aid of the equipment and skills of COMEX SA in Marseille, a group who experiments with oxygen-hydrogen breathing mixtures for professional deep-sea diving. The model used was schistosomiasis-associated chronic liver inflammation. Infected animals stayed 2 weeks in an hyperbaric chamber in a normal atmosphere supplemented with 0.7 MPa hydrogen. The treatment had significant protective effects towards liver injury, namely decreased fibrosis, improvement of hemodynamics, increased NOSII activity, increased antioxidant enzyme activity, decreased lipid peroxide levels and decreased circulating TNF-alpha levels. Under the same conditions, helium exerted also some protective effects, indicating that hydroxyl radical scavenging is not the only protective mechanism. These findings indicate that the proposed anti-inflammatory strategy deserves further attention. PMID:11510417

  8. Gamma irradiation induced disintegration of waste activated sludge for biological hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, gamma irradiation was applied for the disintegration and dissolution of waste activated sludge produced during the biological wastewater treatment, and the solubilized sludge was used as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. The experimental results showed that the solubilization of waste activated sludge was 53.7% at 20 kGy and pH=12, and the SCOD, polysaccharides, protein, TN and TP contents in the irradiated sludge solutions was 3789.6 mg/L, 268.3 mg/L, 1881.5 mg/L, 132.3 mg/L and 80.4 mg/L, respectively. The irradiated sludge was used for fermentative hydrogen production, and the hydrogen yield was 10.5±0.7 mL/g SCODconsumed. It can be concluded that the irradiated waste activated sludge could be used as a low-cost substrate for fermentative hydrogen production.

  9. Variable photosynthetic units, energy transfer and light-induced evolution of hydrogen in algae and bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffron, H.

    1971-01-01

    The present state of knowledge regarding the truly photochemical reactions in photosynthesis is considered. Nine-tenths of the available knowledge is of a biochemical nature. Questions regarding the activities of the chlorophyll system are examined. The simplest photochemical response observed in living hydrogen-adapted algal cells is the release of molecular hydrogen, which continues even after all other known natural reactions have been eliminated either by heating or the action of poisons.

  10. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p < 0.05), suggesting that these concentrations maybe optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. However, after being challenged with hydrogen peroxide, no increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression was observed. Thus, results from this study demonstrate that zinc carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage. PMID:25326781

  11. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  12. Pressure-induced localisation of the hydrogen-bond network in KOH-VI

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, Andreas Nelmes, Richard J.; Loveday, John S.; Guthrie, Malcolm

    2015-12-28

    Using a combination of ab initio crystal structure prediction and neutron diffraction techniques, we have solved the full structure of KOH-VI at 7 GPa. Rather than being orthorhombic and proton-ordered as had previously be proposed, we find that this high-pressure phase of potassium hydroxide is tetragonal (space group I4/mmm) and proton disordered. It has an unusual hydrogen bond topology, where the hydroxyl groups form isolated hydrogen-bonded square planar (OH){sub 4} units. This structure is stable above 6.5 GPa and, despite being macroscopically proton-disordered, local ice rules enforce microscopic order of the hydrogen bonds. We suggest the use of this novel type of structure to study concerted proton tunneling in the solid state, while the topology of the hydrogen bond network could conceivably be exploited in data storage applications based solely on the manipulations of hydrogen bonds. The unusual localisation of the hydrogen bond network under applied pressure is found to be favored by a more compact packing of the constituents in a distorted cesium chloride structure.

  13. Pressure-induced localisation of the hydrogen-bond network in KOH-VI.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Andreas; Guthrie, Malcolm; Nelmes, Richard J; Loveday, John S

    2015-12-28

    Using a combination of ab initio crystal structure prediction and neutron diffraction techniques, we have solved the full structure of KOH-VI at 7 GPa. Rather than being orthorhombic and proton-ordered as had previously be proposed, we find that this high-pressure phase of potassium hydroxide is tetragonal (space group I4/mmm) and proton disordered. It has an unusual hydrogen bond topology, where the hydroxyl groups form isolated hydrogen-bonded square planar (OH)4 units. This structure is stable above 6.5 GPa and, despite being macroscopically proton-disordered, local ice rules enforce microscopic order of the hydrogen bonds. We suggest the use of this novel type of structure to study concerted proton tunneling in the solid state, while the topology of the hydrogen bond network could conceivably be exploited in data storage applications based solely on the manipulations of hydrogen bonds. The unusual localisation of the hydrogen bond network under applied pressure is found to be favored by a more compact packing of the constituents in a distorted cesium chloride structure. PMID:26723701

  14. Pressure-induced localisation of the hydrogen-bond network in KOH-VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Andreas; Guthrie, Malcolm; Nelmes, Richard J.; Loveday, John S.

    2015-12-01

    Using a combination of ab initio crystal structure prediction and neutron diffraction techniques, we have solved the full structure of KOH-VI at 7 GPa. Rather than being orthorhombic and proton-ordered as had previously be proposed, we find that this high-pressure phase of potassium hydroxide is tetragonal (space group I4/mmm) and proton disordered. It has an unusual hydrogen bond topology, where the hydroxyl groups form isolated hydrogen-bonded square planar (OH)4 units. This structure is stable above 6.5 GPa and, despite being macroscopically proton-disordered, local ice rules enforce microscopic order of the hydrogen bonds. We suggest the use of this novel type of structure to study concerted proton tunneling in the solid state, while the topology of the hydrogen bond network could conceivably be exploited in data storage applications based solely on the manipulations of hydrogen bonds. The unusual localisation of the hydrogen bond network under applied pressure is found to be favored by a more compact packing of the constituents in a distorted cesium chloride structure.

  15. Theoretical models of hydrogen-induced defects in amorphous silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Al-Moatasem; Wimmer, Yannick; Goes, Wolfgang; Grasser, Tibor; Afanas'ev, Valery V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2015-07-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to model the interaction of hydrogen atoms and molecules with strained bonds and neutral oxygen vacancies in amorphous silica (a-SiO2). The results demonstrate that the interaction of atomic hydrogen with strained Si-O bonds in defect-free a-SiO2 networks results in the formation of two distinct defect structures, which are referred to as the [SiO4/H]0 and the hydroxyl E'center. To study the distribution of each defect's properties, up to 116 configurations of each center were calculated. We show that the hydroxyl E' center can be thermodynamically stable in the neutral charge state. In order to understand the origins and reactions of this defect, different mechanisms of formation, passivation, and depassivation have been investigated. The interaction of H with a single-oxygen vacancy in a-SiO2 was studied in 144 configurations, all resulting in the hydrogen bridge defect. The reaction of the hydrogen bridge defect with the second H atom is barrierless and fully passivates the O vacancy. The latter defect reacts with atomic H with a small barrier, restoring the hydrogen bridge defect. These results provide a better understanding of how atomic and molecular hydrogen can both passivate existing defects and create new electrically active defects in amorphous-silica matrices.

  16. Hydrogen-producing Escherichia coli strains overexpressing lactose permease: FT-IR analysis of the lactose-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Grube, Mara; Dimanta, Ilze; Gavare, Marita; Strazdina, Inese; Liepins, Janis; Juhna, Talis; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-01-01

    The lactose permease gene (lacY) was overexpressed in the septuple knockout mutant of Escherichia coli, previously engineered for hydrogen production from glucose. It was expected that raising the lactose transporter activity would elevate the intracellular lactose concentration, inactivate the lactose repressor, induce the lactose operon, and as a result stimulate overall lactose consumption and conversion. However, overexpression of the lactose transporter caused a considerable growth delay in the recombinant strain on lactose, resembling to some extent the "lactose killing" phenomenon. Therefore, the recombinant strain was subjected to selection on lactose-containing media. Selection on plates with 3% lactose yielded a strain with a decreased content of the recombinant plasmid but with an improved ability to grow and produce hydrogen on lactose. Macromolecular analysis of its biomass by means of Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that increase of the cellular polysaccharide content might contribute to the adaptation of E. coli to lactose stress. PMID:23725289

  17. Modelling (1 0 0) hydrogen-induced platelets in silicon with a multi-scale molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasa, G.; Colombi Ciacchi, L.; Csanyi, G.; de Vita, A.

    2007-12-01

    We introduce a multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) approach to study the thermal evolution of (1 0 0) hydrogen-induced platelets (HIPs) in silicon. The HIPs are modeled by ∼10 nm long planar defects in a periodically repeated crystalline model system containing ∼25,000 silicon atoms. The initial defect models are created either by cleavage of atomic planes or by planar assemblies of vacancies, and are stabilized by saturating the resulting surface dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms. The time evolution of the defects is studied by finite-temperature MD using the “Learn On The Fly” (LOTF) technique. This hybrid scheme allows us to perform accurate density-functional-tight-binding (DFTB) force calculations only on the chemically reactive platelet zone, while the surrounding silicon crystal is described by the Stillinger-Weber (SW) classical potential. Reliable dynamical trajectories are obtained by choosing the DFTB zone in a way which minimizes the errors on the atomic forces.

  18. Ordered arrangement of irradiation-induced defects of polycrystalline tungsten irradiated with low-energy hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Fan, Hongyu; Liu, Lu; Berthold, Tobias; Benstetter, Günther; Liu, Dongping

    2015-09-01

    Low-energy (20-520 eV) hydrogen ion irradiations were performed at W surface temperature of 373-1073 K and a fluence ranging from 5.0 × 1023 to 1.0 × 1025/m2. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a nondestructive analytical technique was successfully used to detect irradiation-induced defects in polycrystalline W. The size and density of these nanometer-sized defects were strongly dependent on the fluence of hydrogen ions. Both ion energy (E) and temperature (T) play a crucial role in determining the ordering of nanometer-sized defects. Ordered arrangements were formed at relatively high E and T. This can be attributed to the stress-driven ripple effect of defect growth at crystal grains, resulting in the movement of W lattice along one certain crystal planes.

  19. Carvedilol protects bone marrow stem cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death via PI3K-AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meihui; Chen, Shudong; Lin, Dingkun

    2016-03-01

    Carvedilol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, has been reported to exert potent anti-oxidative activities. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of carvedilol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) death, which imitate the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. Carvedilol significantly reduced H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production, apoptosis and subsequent cell death. LY294002, the PI3K inhibitor, blocked the protective effects and up-regulation of Akt phosphorylation of carvedilol. Together, our results showed that carvedilol protects H2O2-induced BMSCs cell death partly through PI3K-Akt pathway, suggesting carvedilol could be used in combination with BMSCs for the treatment of spinal cord injury by improving the cell survival and oxidative stress microenvironments. PMID:26898450

  20. Effects of rutaecarpine on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in murine hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  1. Effects of Rutaecarpine on Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Murine Hepa-1c1c7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide-Mediated Polyamines and Sugar Changes Are Involved in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Drought Tolerance in Spinacia oleracea Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Xi-Yan; He, En-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a newly appreciated participant in physiological and biochemical regulation in plants. However, whether H2S is involved in the regulation of plant responses to drought stress remains unclear. Here, the role of H2S in the regulation of drought stress response in Spinacia oleracea seedlings is reported. First, drought stress dramatically decreased the relative water content (RWC) of leaves, photosynthesis, and the efficiency of PSII. Moreover, drought caused the accumulation of ROS and increased the MDA content. However, the application of NaHS counteracted the drought-induced changes in these parameters. Second, NaHS application increased the water and osmotic potential of leaves. Additionally, osmoprotectants such as proline and glycinebetaine (GB) content were altered by NaHS application under drought conditions, suggesting that osmoprotectant contributes to H2S-induced drought resistance. Third, the levels of soluble sugars and polyamines (PAs) were increased differentially by NaHS application in S. oleracea seedlings. Moreover, several genes related to PA and soluble sugar biosynthesis, as well as betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (SoBADH), choline monooxygenase (SoCMO), and aquaporin (SoPIP1;2), were up-regulated by H2S under drought stress. These results suggest that H2S contributes to drought tolerance in S. oleracea through its effect on the biosynthesis of PAs and soluble sugars. Additionally, GB and trehalose also play key roles in enhancing S. oleracea drought resistance. PMID:27540388

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide-Mediated Polyamines and Sugar Changes Are Involved in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Drought Tolerance in Spinacia oleracea Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Xi-Yan; He, En-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a newly appreciated participant in physiological and biochemical regulation in plants. However, whether H2S is involved in the regulation of plant responses to drought stress remains unclear. Here, the role of H2S in the regulation of drought stress response in Spinacia oleracea seedlings is reported. First, drought stress dramatically decreased the relative water content (RWC) of leaves, photosynthesis, and the efficiency of PSII. Moreover, drought caused the accumulation of ROS and increased the MDA content. However, the application of NaHS counteracted the drought-induced changes in these parameters. Second, NaHS application increased the water and osmotic potential of leaves. Additionally, osmoprotectants such as proline and glycinebetaine (GB) content were altered by NaHS application under drought conditions, suggesting that osmoprotectant contributes to H2S-induced drought resistance. Third, the levels of soluble sugars and polyamines (PAs) were increased differentially by NaHS application in S. oleracea seedlings. Moreover, several genes related to PA and soluble sugar biosynthesis, as well as betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (SoBADH), choline monooxygenase (SoCMO), and aquaporin (SoPIP1;2), were up-regulated by H2S under drought stress. These results suggest that H2S contributes to drought tolerance in S. oleracea through its effect on the biosynthesis of PAs and soluble sugars. Additionally, GB and trehalose also play key roles in enhancing S. oleracea drought resistance. PMID:27540388

  4. The Effects of Damage on Hydrogen-Implant-Induced Thin-Film Separation from Bulk Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, R.B.; Holland, O.W.; Thomas, D.K.; Wetteroth, T.A.; Wilson, S.R.

    1999-04-05

    Exfoliation of Sic by hydrogen implantation and subsequent annealing forms the basis for a thin-film separation process which, when combined with hydrophilic wafer bonding, can be exploited to produce silicon-carbide-on-insulator, SiCOI. Sic thin films produced by this process exhibit unacceptably high resistivity because defects generated by the implant neutralize electrical carriers. Separation occurs because of chemical interaction of hydrogen with dangling bonds within microvoids created by the implant, and physical stresses due to gas-pressure effects during post-implant anneal. Experimental results show that exfoliation of Sic is dependent upon the concentration of implanted hydrogen, but the damage generated by the implant approaches a point when exfoliation is, in fact, retarded. This is attributed to excessive damage at the projected range of the implant which inhibits physical processes of implant-induced cleaving. Damage is controlled independently of hydrogen dosage by elevating the temperature of the SiC during implant in order to promote dynamic annealing. The resulting decrease in damage is thought to promote growth of micro-cracks which form a continuous cleave. Channeled H{sup +} implantation enhances the cleaving process while simultaneously minimizing residual damage within the separated film. It is shown that high-temperature irradiation and channeling each reduces the hydrogen fluence required to affect separation of a thin film and results in a lower concentration of defects. This increases the potential for producing SiC01 which is sufficiently free of defects and, thus, more easily electrically activated.

  5. Sensitivity of Interfibrillar and Subsarcolemmal Mitochondria to Cobalt Chloride-induced Oxidative Stress and Hydrogen Sulfide Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ayswarya, A.; Kurian, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a significant role not only in cardiovascular disease but also in non-communicable diseases, where it plays a significant role the mortality rate. Hydrogen sulfide, the biological gaseous signaling molecule that preserves mitochondria in its mode of action, is an effective cardioprotective drug. However, cardiac mitochondria comprise of two distinct populations, namely interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria, which respond distinctly in cardiovascular disease. This study was designed to determine the direct impact of cobalt chloride-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondrial subpopulations with an intention to examine the efficacy of hydrogen sulfide in preserving interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria functional activities when they were incubated as pretreated, co-treated and post-treated agent. Mitochondrial subpopulations were isolated from the heart of male Wistar rats and subjected to cobalt chloride treatment (500 μM) for 20 min, followed by incubation with 10 μM sodium hydrosulfide in three different ways (Pre, Co, and Post-cobalt chloride treatment). Mitochondrial oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive species, reduced glutathione and the activities of enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Mitochondrial membrane potential, swelling behavior and enzyme activities were measured to assess its function. The increased level of lipid peroxidation and the decreased level of reduced glutathione in cobalt chloride-induced group confirm the induction of oxidative stress and were more predominant in the subsarcolemmal mitochondria. Hydrogen sulfide treatment to interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria preserved their functional activities, but the effect was prominent only with co-treated group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that subsarcolemmal mitochondria are more prone to oxidative stress and the co-treatment of the

  6. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits the translational expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo; Teng, Huajian; Yang, Guangdong; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is under the influence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which regulates hypoxia responses. The regulation of HIF-1α accumulation by H2S has been shown, but the mechanisms for this effect are largely elusive and controversial. This study aimed at addressing the controversial mechanisms for and the functional importance of the interaction of H2S and HIF-1α protein. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH HIF-1α protein levels and HIF-1α transcriptional activity were detected by Western blotting and luciferase assay. The mechanisms for H2S-regulated HIF-1α protein levels were determined using short interfering RNA transfection, co-immunoprecipitation and 7-methyl-GTP sepharose 4B pull-down assay. Angiogenic activity was evaluated using tube formation assay in EA.hy926 cells. KEY RESULTS The accumulation of HIF-1α protein under hypoxia (1% O2) or hypoxia-mimetic conditions was reversed by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). This effect of NaHS was not altered after blocking the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway for HIF-1α degradation; however, blockade of protein translation with cycloheximide abolished the effect of NaHS on the half-life of HIF-1α protein. Knockdown of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) suppressed the effect of NaHS on HIF-1α protein accumulation under hypoxia. NaHS inhibited the expression of VEGF under hypoxia. It also decreased in vitro capillary tube formation and cell proliferation of EA.hy926 cells under hypoxia, but stimulated the tube formation under normoxia. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS H2S suppresses HIF-1α translation by enhancing eIF2α phosphorylation under hypoxia. The interaction of H2S and HIF-1α inhibits the angiogenic activity of vascular endothelial cells under hypoxia through the down-regulation of VEGF. PMID:22831549

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of "maximal internal H2 O2 concentration" and "cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration" (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of “maximal internal H2 O2 concentration” and “cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration” (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  9. Ocimum sanctum extracts attenuate hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxic ultrastructural changes in human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Halder, Nabanita; Joshi, Sujata; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Tandon, Radhika; Gupta, Suresh Kumar

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the major oxidant involved in cataract formation. The present study investigated the effect of an aqueous leaf extract of Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum) against H2O2 induced cytotoxic changes in human lens epithelial cells (HLEC). Donor eyes of the age range 20-40 years were procured within 5-8 h of death. After several washings with gentamicin (50 mL/L) and betadine (10 mL/L), clear transparent lenses (n=6 in each group) were incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) alone (normal) or in DMEM containing 100 microm of H2O2 (control) or in DMEM containing both H2O2 (100 microm) and 150 microg/mL of Ocimum sanctum extract (treated) for 30 min at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2 and 95% air. Following incubation, the semi-hardened epithelium of each lens was carefully removed, fixed and processed for electron microscopic studies. Thin sections (60-70 mm) were contrasted with uranyl acetate and lead citrate and viewed under a transmission electron microscope. Normal epithelial cells showed intact, euchromatic nucleus with few small vacuoles (diameter 0.58+/-0.6 microm) in well-demarcated cytoplasm. After treatment with H2O2, they showed pyknotic nuclei with clumping of chromatin and ill-defined edges. The cytoplasm was full of vacuoles (diameter 1.61+/-0.7 microm). The overall cellular morphology was typical of dying cells. Treatment of cells with Ocimum sanctum extract protected the epithelial cells from H2O2 insult and maintained their normal architecture. The mean diameter of the vacuoles was 0.66+/-0.2 microm. The results indicate that extracts of O. sanctum have an important protective role against H2O2 injury in HLEC by maintaining the normal cellular architecture. The protection could be due to its ability to reduce H2O2 through its antioxidant property and thus reinforcing the concept that the extracts can penetrate the HLEC membrane. PMID:19441070

  10. Hydrogen sulphide inhibits carbachol-induced contractile responses in β-escin permeabilized guinea-pig taenia caecum.

    PubMed

    Denizalti, Merve; Durlu-Kandilci, N Tugba; Bozkurt, T Emrah; Sahin-Erdemli, Inci

    2011-05-11

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is an endogenous mediator producing a potent relaxation response in vascular and non-vascular smooth muscles. While ATP-sensitive potassium channels are mainly involved in this relaxant effect in vascular smooth muscle, the mechanism in other smooth muscles has not been revealed yet. In the present study, we investigated how H(2)S relaxes non-vascular smooth muscle by using intact and β-escin permeabilized guinea-pig taenia caecum. In intact tissues, concentration-dependent relaxation response to H(2)S donor NaHS in carbachol-precontracted preparations did not change in the presence of a K(ATP) channel blocker glibenclamide, adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ, protein kinase A inhibitor KT-5720, protein kinase C inhibitor H-7, tetrodotoxin, apamin/charybdotoxin, NOS inhibitor L-NAME and cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. We then studied how H(2)S affected carbachol- or Ca(2+)-induced contractions in permeabilized tissues. When Ca(2+) was clamped to a constant value (pCa6), a further contraction could be elicited by carbachol that was decreased by NaHS. This decrease in contraction was reversed by catalase but not by superoxide dismutase or N-acetyl cysteine. The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump inhibitor, cyclopiazonic acid, also decreased the carbachol-induced contraction that was further inhibited by NaHS. Mitochondrial proton pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide p-trifluromethoxyphenylhydrazone also decreased the carbachol-induced contraction but this was not additionally changed by NaHS. The carbachol-induced Ca(2+) sensitization, calcium concentration-response curves, IP(3)- and caffeine-induced contractions were not affected by NaHS. In conclusion, we propose that hydrogen peroxide and mitochondria may have a role in H(2)S-induced relaxation response in taenia caecum. PMID:21371473

  11. Inhaled hydrogen sulfide induces suspended animation, but does not alter the inflammatory response after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Daniel H; Fröba, Janine S; Niesler, Ulrike; Palmer, Annette; Veltkamp, Heinrich A; Braumüller, Sonja T; Wagner, Florian; Wagner, Katja; Bäder, Stefan; Wachter, Ulrich; Calzia, Enrico; Radermacher, Peter; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Zhou, Shaoxia; Gebhard, Florian; Knöferl, Markus W

    2012-02-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury and septic complications after blunt chest trauma remains a challenge. Inhaled hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) may cause a hibernation-like metabolic state, which refers to an attenuated systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that inhaled H₂S-induced suspended animation may attenuate the inflammation after pulmonary contusion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to blunt chest trauma (blast wave) or sham procedure and subsequently exposed to a continuous flow of H₂S (100 ppm) or control gas for 6 h. Body temperature and activity were measured by an implanted transmitter. At 6, 24, or 48 h after trauma, animals were killed, and the cellular contents of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) as well as cytokine concentrations in BAL, plasma, and culture supernatants of blood mononuclear cells, Kupffer cells, splenic macrophages, and splenocytes were determined. Hydrogen sulfide inhalation caused a significant reduction in body temperature and activity. The trauma-induced increase in alveolar macrophage counts was abrogated 48 h after trauma when animals received H₂S, whereas the trauma-induced increase in neutrophil counts was unaltered. Furthermore, H₂S inhalation partially attenuated the mediator release in BAL and culture supernatants of Kupffer cells as well as splenic cells; it altered plasma cytokine concentrations but did not affect the trauma-induced changes in mononuclear cell culture supernatants. These findings indicate that inhaled H₂S induced a reduced metabolic expenditure and partially attenuated inflammation after trauma. Nevertheless, in contrast to hypoxic- or pathogen-induced lung injury, H₂S treatment appears to have no protective effect after blunt chest trauma. PMID:22089191

  12. Defect structures in deformed F.C.C. metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.; Victoria, M.

    1997-08-01

    A high density of small defect clusters, similar to those observed in irradiated or quenched metals, has been observed in the deformed f.c.c. metals Cu, Au and Ni. The preliminary results show that the defect clusters are predominantly stacking fault tetrahedral (SFT). The SFT number density, rather than the size distribution, is deformation dependent. The defect cluster density is greater in the vicinities of dislocation tangles and grain boundaries. Their size distribution is wider than that produced by irradiation with an important number of larger clusters being formed. It is argued that these deformation-produced clusters may play a role in determining the flow stress and work hardening at low deformations.

  13. SiC/C nanocomposites with inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Emelchenko, G A; Zhokhov, A A; Masalov, V M; Maximuk, M Yu; Fursova, T N; Bazhenov, A V; Zverkova, I I; Khasanov, S S; Steinman, E A; Tereshenko, A N

    2010-11-26

    The synthesis, morphology, structural and optical characteristics of SiC/C nanocomposites with an inverse opal lattice have been investigated. The samples were prepared by thermochemical treatment of opal matrices filled with carbon compounds which was followed by silicon dioxide dissolution. The samples were studied by electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, IR and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The electron microscopy data revealed a highly porous periodic structure which was a three-dimensional replica of the voids of the initial opal lattice. The hexagonal silicon carbide was found to be non-uniformly distributed throughout the volume, its greater part located in the surface layer up to 50 µm deep. The data of x-ray diffraction, IR and Raman scattering spectroscopy enabled us to assume that the composite had hexagonal diamond fragments. The photoluminescence and optical reflection spectra of the composites have been measured. PMID:21030770

  14. Laser induced and controlled chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Anton; Strydom, Christien A; Uys, Hermann; Botha, Lourens R

    2011-11-28

    Bimolecular chemical reaction control of gaseous CO and H(2) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, without any catalyst, using shaped femtosecond laser pulses is presented. High intensity laser radiation applied to a reaction cell facilitates non-resonant bond breakage and the formation of a range of ions, which can then react to form new products. Stable reaction products are measured after irradiation of a reaction cell, using time of flight mass spectroscopy. Bond formation of C-O, C-C, and C-H bonds is demonstrated as CO(2)(+), C(2)H(2)(+), CH(+), and CH(3)(+) were observed in the time of flight mass spectrum of the product gas, analyzed after irradiation. The formation of CO(2) is shown to be dependent on laser intensity, irradiation time, and on the presence of H(2) in the reaction cell. Using negatively chirped laser pulses more C-O bond formation takes place as compared to more C-C bond formation for unchirped pulses. PMID:22128931

  15. Laser induced and controlled chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, Anton; Strydom, Christien A.; Uys, Hermann; Botha, Lourens R.

    2011-11-01

    Bimolecular chemical reaction control of gaseous CO and H2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, without any catalyst, using shaped femtosecond laser pulses is presented. High intensity laser radiation applied to a reaction cell facilitates non-resonant bond breakage and the formation of a range of ions, which can then react to form new products. Stable reaction products are measured after irradiation of a reaction cell, using time of flight mass spectroscopy. Bond formation of C-O, C-C, and C-H bonds is demonstrated as CO2+, C2H2+, CH+, and CH3+ were observed in the time of flight mass spectrum of the product gas, analyzed after irradiation. The formation of CO2 is shown to be dependent on laser intensity, irradiation time, and on the presence of H2 in the reaction cell. Using negatively chirped laser pulses more C-O bond formation takes place as compared to more C-C bond formation for unchirped pulses.

  16. Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

  17. Hydrogen-induced atomic rearrangement in MgPd{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlmann, H. . E-mail: h.kohlmann@mx.uni-saarland.de; Renaudin, G.; Yvon, K.; Wannek, C.; Harbrecht, B.

    2005-04-15

    The hydrogenation behavior of MgPd{sub 3} has been studied by in situ X-ray powder diffraction and by neutron powder diffraction. At room temperature and p {approx}500kPa hydrogen pressure its structure is capable of incorporating up to one hydrogen atom per formula unit ({alpha}-MgPd{sub 3}H{sub {approx}}{sub 1}), thereby retaining a tetragonal ZrAl{sub 3}-type metal atom arrangement. Upon heating to 750K in a hydrogen atmosphere of 610kPa it transforms into a cubic modification with AuCu{sub 3}-type metal atom arrangement ({beta}-MgPd{sub 3}H{sub {approx}}{sub 0.7}). Neutron diffraction on the deuteride reveals an anion deficient anti-perovskite-type structure ({beta}-MgPd{sub 3}D{sub 0.67}, a=398.200(7)pm) in which octahedral sites surrounded exclusively by palladium atoms are occupied by deuterium. Complete removal of hydrogen (480K, 1Pa) stabilizes a new binary modification ({beta}-MgPd{sub 3}, a=391.78(2)pm) crystallizing with a primitive cubic AuCu{sub 3}-type structure. Mechanical treatment (grinding) transforms both {alpha} and {beta} modifications of MgPd{sub 3} into a cubic face-centered solid solution Mg{sub 0.25}Pd{sub 0.75} showing a random distribution of magnesium and palladium atoms.

  18. Comprehensive rate coefficients for electron-collision-induced transitions in hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Vrinceanu, D.; Onofrio, R.; Sadeghpour, H. R. E-mail: onofrior@gmail.com

    2014-01-01

    Energy-changing electron-hydrogen atom collisions are crucial to regulating the energy balance in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas and are relevant to the formation of stellar atmospheres, recombination in H II clouds, primordial recombination, three-body recombination, and heating in ultracold and fusion plasmas. Computational modeling of electron-hydrogen collision has been attempted through quantum mechanical scattering state-to-state calculations of transitions involving low-lying energy levels in hydrogen (with principal quantum number n < 7) and at large principal quantum numbers using classical trajectory techniques. Analytical expressions are proposed that interpolate the current quantum mechanical and classical trajectory results for electron-hydrogen scattering in the entire range of energy levels for nearly the entire temperature range of interest in astrophysical environments. An asymptotic expression for the Born cross section is interpolated with a modified expression previously derived for electron-hydrogen scattering in the Rydberg regime using classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. The derived formula is compared to existing numerical data for transitions involving low principal quantum numbers, and the dependence of the deviations on temperature is discussed.

  19. Curvature and ionization-induced reversible hydrogen storage in metalized hexagonal B36.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; Wang, Xiangfu; Ye, Xiao-Juan; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-11-21

    The synthesis of quasiplanar boron clusters (B36) with a central hexagonal hole provides the first experimental evidence that a single-atomic-layer borophene with hexagonal vacancies is potentially viable [Z. Piazza, H. Hu, W. Li, Y. Zhao, J. Li, and L. S. Wang, Nat. Commun. 5, 3113 (2014)]. However, owing to the hexagonal holes, tunning the electronic and physical properties of B36 through chemical modifications is not fully understood. Based on (van der Waals corrected-) density functional theory, we show that Li adsorbed on B36 and B36 (-) clusters can serve as reversible hydrogen storage media. The present results indicate that the curvature and ionization of substrates can enhance the bond strength of Li due to the energetically favorable B 2p-Li 2p orbitals hybridization. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridization between H-s orbitals and Li-2s2p orbitals contribute to the adsorption of H2 molecules and the resulting adsorption energy lies between the physisorbed and chemisorbed states. Interestingly, the number of H2 in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the appearance of the negative differential resistance behavior at different bias voltage regions. Furthermore, the cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials constructed by metalized B36 clusters do not cause a decrease in the number of adsorbed hydrogen molecules per Li. The system reported here is favorable for the reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption at ambient conditions. PMID:25416890

  20. First Principles Based Simulation of Reaction-Induced Phase Transition in Hydrogen Storage and Other Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Qingfeng

    2014-08-31

    This major part of this proposal is simulating hydrogen interactions in the complex metal hydrides. Over the period of DOE BES support, key achievements include (i) Predicted TiAl3Hx as a precursor state for forming TiAl3 through analyzing the Ti-doped NaAlH4 and demonstrated its catalytic role for hydrogen release; (ii) Explored the possibility of forming similar complex structures with other 3d transition metals in NaAlH4 as well as the impact of such complex structures on hydrogen release/uptake; (iii) Demonstrated the role of TiAl3 in hydriding process; (iv) Predicted a new phase of NaAlH4 that links to Na3AlH6 using first-principles metadynamics; (v) Examined support effect on hydrogen release from supported/encapsulated NaAlH4; and (vi) Expanded research scope beyond hydrogen storage. The success of our research is documented by the peer-reviewed publications.

  1. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chien-Sheng; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei; Tochigi, Naobumi; Shigemura, Norihisa; Billiar, Timothy R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. {yields} There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. {yields} Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NF{kappa}B activation, as indicated by NF{kappa}B DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NF{kappa}B during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NF{kappa}B activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NF{kappa}B activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the

  2. Recent Observation of Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Jr, C J; Liu, Xinyu; Kameda, Jun; Morgan, Michael J

    2008-09-14

    The present progress report shows that the ultra-high-strength 4340-type steel, even if ideally pure, cannot safely be used for service in a hydrogen environment. Some of the strength must be given up in favor of more toughness, which can be achieved by reducing the carbon content and increasing the nickel content. The 5%NiCrMoV steel with about 0.1% carbon shows promise in this regard, especially in an aqueous environment and in hydrogen at around atmospheric pressure. However, we have not yet achieved a purity level high enough to establish the baseline behavior of an ideally pure version of this steel in high-pressure hydrogen.

  3. Hydrogen-induced modification of the medium-range structural order in amorphous silicon films

    SciTech Connect

    Nittala, L.N.; Jayaraman, S.; Sperling, B.A.; Abelson, J.R.

    2005-12-12

    We use fluctuation electron microscopy to determine changes in the medium-range structural order of un-hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films after they are exposed to atomic hydrogen at a substrate temperature of 230 deg. C. The films are deposited by magnetron sputtering at either 230 or 350 deg. C substrate temperature to obtain starting states with small or large initial medium-range order, respectively. The in-diffusion of atomic hydrogen causes the medium-range order to decrease for the small initial order but to increase for the large initial order. We suggest that this behavior can be understood in terms of classical nucleation theory: The ordered regions of small diameter are energetically unstable and can lower their energy by evolving towards a continuous random network, whereas the ordered regions of large diameter are energetically stable and can lower their energy by coarsening towards the nanocrystalline state.

  4. Magnetic ordering temperature of nanocrystalline Gd: enhancement of magnetic interactions via hydrogenation-induced "negative" pressure.

    PubMed

    Tereshina, E A; Khmelevskyi, S; Politova, G; Kaminskaya, T; Drulis, H; Tereshina, I S

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium is a nearly ideal soft-magnetic material. However, one cannot take advantage of its properties at temperatures higher than the room temperature where Gd loses the ferromagnetic ordering. By using high-purity bulk samples with grains ~200 nm in size, we present proof-of-concept measurements of an increased Curie point (TC) and spontaneous magnetization in Gd due to hydrogenation. From first-principles we explain increase of TC in pure Gd due to the addition of hydrogen. We show that the interplay of the characteristic features in the electronic structure of the conduction band at the Fermi level in the high-temperature paramagnetic phase of Gd and "negative" pressure exerted by hydrogen are responsible for the observed effect. PMID:26931775

  5. C-C chemokine receptor type 4 antagonist Compound 22 ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Kota; Miyamoto, Katsuichi; Tanaka, Noriko; Ueno, Rino; Nakayama, Takashi; Yoshie, Osamu; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2016-02-15

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune response. We previously reported the pathogenic role of C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here, we examined whether CCR4 antagonism modulates the disease course of EAE. Wild-type and CCR4-knockout mice were induced EAE and were administered Compound 22, an antagonist of CCR4. Compound 22 significantly ameliorated the severity of EAE in wild-type mice, but not in the CCR4-knockout mice. Compound 22 inhibited Th1 and Th17 polarization of antigen-induced T-cell responses. Therefore, CCR4 antagonists might be potential therapeutic agents for multiple sclerosis. PMID:26857495

  6. Computational simulations of hydrogen circular migration in protonated acetylene induced by circularly polarized light.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuetao; Li, Wen; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2016-08-28

    The hydrogens in protonated acetylene are very mobile and can easily migrate around the C2 core by moving between classical and non-classical structures of the cation. The lowest energy structure is the T-shaped, non-classical cation with a hydrogen bridging the two carbons. Conversion to the classical H2CCH(+) ion requires only 4 kcal/mol. The effect of circularly polarized light on the migration of hydrogens in oriented C2H3 (+) has been simulated by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Classical trajectory calculations were carried out with the M062X/6-311+G(3df,2pd) level of theory using linearly and circularly polarized 32 cycle 7 μm cosine squared pulses with peak intensity of 5.6 × 10(13) W/cm(2) and 3.15 × 10(13) W/cm(2), respectively. These linearly and circularly polarized pulses transfer similar amounts of energy and total angular momentum to C2H3 (+). The average angular momentum vectors of the three hydrogens show opposite directions of rotation for right and left circularly polarized light, but no directional preference for linearly polarized light. This difference results in an appreciable amount of angular displacement of the three hydrogens relative to the C2 core for circularly polarized light, but only an insignificant amount for linearly polarized light. Over the course of the simulation with circularly polarized light, this corresponds to a propeller-like motion of the three hydrogens around the C2 core of protonated acetylene. PMID:27586924

  7. Hydrogen absorption induced metal deposition on palladium and palladium-alloy particles

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jia X.; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to methods for producing metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The method includes contacting hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles with one or more metal salts to produce a sub-monoatomic or monoatomic metal- or metal-alloy coating on the surface of the hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The invention also relates to methods for producing catalysts and methods for producing electrical energy using the metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles of the present invention.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide induces spawning in mollusks, with activation of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Morse, D E; Duncan, H; Hooker, N; Morse, A

    1977-04-15

    Addition of hydrogen peroxide to seawater causes synchronous spawning in gravid male and female abalones, and certain other mollusks as well. This effect is blocked by exposure of the animals to aspirin, an inhibitor of the enzyme catalyzing oxidative synthesis of prostaglandin endoperoxide. Hydrogen peroxide activates this enzymatic reaction in cell-free extracts prepared from abalone eggs (a very rich source of the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase); this effect appears to reveal a fundamental property of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthesis. Applicability of these findings to both mariculture and medical purposes is suggested. PMID:403609

  9. Hydrogen induced redox mechanism in amorphous carbon resistive random access memory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of the resistive random access memory (RRAM) device with amorphous carbon layer. Applying a forming voltage, the amorphous carbon layer was carbonized to form a conjugation double bond conductive filament. We proposed a hydrogen redox model to clarify the resistive switch mechanism of high/low resistance states (HRS/LRS) in carbon RRAM. The electrical conduction mechanism of LRS is attributed to conductive sp2 carbon filament with conjugation double bonds by dehydrogenation, while the electrical conduction of HRS resulted from the formation of insulating sp3-type carbon filament through hydrogenation process. PMID:24475979

  10. Hydrogen plasma induced modification of photoluminescence from a-SiN{sub x}:H thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bommali, R. K.; Ghosh, S.; Srivastava, P.; Vijaya Prakash, G.; Gao, K.; Zhou, S.; Khan, S. A.

    2014-02-07

    Low temperature (250–350 °C) hydrogen plasma annealing (HPA) treatments have been performed on amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiN{sub x}:H) thin films having a range of compositions and subsequent modification of photoluminescence (PL) is investigated. The PL spectral shape and peak positions for the as deposited films could be tuned with composition and excitation energies. HPA induced modification of PL of these films is found to depend on the N/Si ratio (x). Upon HPA, the PL spectra show an emergence of a red emission band for x ≤ 1, whereas an overall increase of intensity without change in the spectral shape is observed for x > 1. The emission observed in the Si rich films is attributed to nanoscale a-Si:H inclusions. The enhancement is maximum for off-stoichiometric films (x ∼ 1) and decreases as the compositions of a-Si (x = 0) and a-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (x = 1.33) are approached, implying high density of non-radiative defects around x = 1. The diffusion of hydrogen in these films is also analyzed by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis technique.

  11. Inhaled hydrogen gas therapy for prevention of noise-induced hearing loss through reducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Niwa, Katsuki; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that form in the inner ear play an important role in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Recent studies have revealed that molecular hydrogen (H2) has great potential for reducing ROS. In this study, we examined the potential of hydrogen gas to protect against NIHL. We tested this hypothesis in guinea pigs with 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% H2 inhalation in air for 5h a day after noise exposure, for five consecutive days. All animals underwent measurements for auditory brainstem response after the noise exposure; the results revealed that there was a better improvement in the threshold shift for the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated groups than the non-treated group. Furthermore, outer hair cell (OHC) loss was examined 7 days after noise exposure. A significantly higher survival rate of OHCs was observed in the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated group as compared to that of the non-treated group in the basal turn. Immunohistochemical analyses for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were performed to examine the amount of oxidative DNA damage. While strong immunoreactivities against 8-OHdG were observed of the non-treated group, the H2-treated group showed decreased immunoreactivity for 8-OHdG. These findings strongly suggest that inhaled hydrogen gas protects against NIHL. PMID:25196919

  12. Viscosity of Water under Electric Field: Anisotropy Induced by Redistribution of Hydrogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Zong, Diyuan; Hu, Han; Duan, Yuanyuan; Sun, Ying

    2016-06-01

    The viscosity of water under an external electric field of 0.00-0.90 V/nm was studied using both molecular dynamics simulations and atomistic modeling accounting for intermolecular potentials. For all temperatures investigated, the water viscosity becomes anisotropic under an electric field: the viscosity component parallel to the field increases monotonically with the field strength, E, while the viscosity perpendicular to the field first decreases and then increases with E. This anisotropy is believed to be mainly caused by the redistribution of hydrogen bonds under the electric field. The preferred orientation of hydrogen bonds along the field direction leads to an increase of the energy barrier of a water molecule to its neighboring site, and hence increases the viscosity in that direction. However, the probability of hydrogen bonds perpendicular to the electric field decreases with E, together with the increase of the average number of hydrogen bonds per molecule, causing the perpendicular component of water viscosity to first decrease and then increase with the electric field. PMID:27163345

  13. IR spectroscopy of monohydrated tryptamine cation: Rearrangement of the intermolecular hydrogen bond induced by photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakota, Kenji; Kouno, Yuuki; Harada, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Rearrangement of intermolecular hydrogen bond in a monohydrated tryptamine cation, [TRA(H2O)1]+, has been investigated in the gas phase by IR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. In the S0 state of TRA(H2O)1, a water molecule is hydrogen-bonded to the N atom of the amino group of a flexible ethylamine side chain [T. S. Zwier, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 8827 (2001), 10.1021/jp011659+]. A remarkable change in the hydrogen-bonding motif of [TRA(H2O)]+ occurs upon photoionization. In the D0 state of [TRA(H2O)1]+, the water molecule is hydrogen-bonded to the NH group of the indole ring of TRA+, indicating that the water molecule transfers from the amino group to NH group. Quantum chemical calculations are performed to investigate the pathway of the water transfer. Two potential energy barriers emerge in [TRA(H2O)1]+ along the intrinsic reaction coordinate of the water transfer. The water transfer event observed in [TRA(H2O)1]+ is not an elementary but a complex process.

  14. N-Acetyl-Serotonin Protects HepG2 Cells from Oxidative Stress Injury Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiying; Yu, Shuna; Jiang, Zhengchen; Liang, Cuihong; Yu, Wenbo; Li, Jin; Du, Xiaodong; Wang, Hailiang; Gao, Xianghong; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver diseases. N-Acetyl-serotonin (NAS) has been reported to protect against oxidative damage, though the mechanisms by which NAS protects hepatocytes from oxidative stress remain unknown. To determine whether pretreatment with NAS could reduce hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced oxidative stress in HepG2 cells by inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, we investigated the H2O2-induced oxidative damage to HepG2 cells with or without NAS using MTT, Hoechst 33342, rhodamine 123, Terminal dUTP Nick End Labeling Assay (TUNEL), dihydrodichlorofluorescein (H2DCF), Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) double staining, immunocytochemistry, and western blot. H2O2 produced dramatic injuries in HepG2 cells, represented by classical morphological changes of apoptosis, increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increased activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3, release of cytochrome c (Cyt-C) and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, and loss of membrane potential (ΔΨm). NAS significantly inhibited H2O2-induced changes, indicating that it protected against H2O2-induced oxidative damage by reducing MDA levels and increasing SOD activity and that it protected the HepG2 cells from apoptosis through regulating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, involving inhibition of mitochondrial hyperpolarization, release of mitochondrial apoptogenic factors, and caspase activity. PMID:25013541

  15. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting the expression of peroxiredoxin III in H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mi-Hua; Lin, Xiao-Long; Yuan, Cong; He, Jun; Tan, Tian-Ping; Wu, Shao-Jian; Yu, Shan; Chen, Li; Liu, Jun; Tian, Wei; Chen, Yu-Dan; Fu, Hong-Yun; Li, Jian; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, which can give rise to severe cardiotoxicity, limiting its clinical use. Preliminary evidence suggests that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) may exert protective effects on DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether peroxiredoxin III is involved in the cardioprotection of H2S against DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity. The results demonstrated that DOX not only markedly induced injuries, including cytotoxicity and apoptosis, it also increased the expression levels of peroxiredoxin III. Notably, pretreatment with sodium hydrosulfide significantly attenuated the DOX‑induced decrease in cell viability and increase in apoptosis, and also reversed the increased expression levels of peroxiredoxin III in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. In addition, pretreatment of the H9c2 cells with N‑acetyl‑L‑cysteine, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species, prior to exposure to DOX markedly decreased the expression levels of peroxiredoxin III. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that exogenous H2S attenuates DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting the expression of peroxiredoxin III in H9c2 cells. In the present study, the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiomyocytes was assessed using an methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and Hoechst staining. The levels of Prx III and cystathionine-γ-lyase were examined by western blotting. PMID:26573464

  16. Protective effect of reduced glutathione C60 derivative against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Zhou, Chi; He, Jun; Hu, Zheng; Guan, Wen-Chao; Liu, Sheng-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and free radicals cause oxidative stress, which induces cellular injuries, metabolic dysfunction, and even cell death in various clinical abnormalities. Fullerene (C60) is critical for scavenging oxygen free radicals originated from cell metabolism, and reduced glutathione (GSH) is another important endogenous antioxidant. In this study, a novel water-soluble reduced glutathione fullerene derivative (C60-GSH) was successfully synthesized, and its beneficial roles in protecting against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cultured HEK 293T cells were investigated. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance were used to confirm the chemical structure of C60-GSH. Our results demonstrated that C60-GSH prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell damage. Additionally, C60-GSH pretreatment significantly attenuated H2O2-induced superoxide dismutase (SOD) consumption and malondialdehyde (MDA) elevation. Furthermore, C60-GSH inhibited intracellular calcium mobilization, and subsequent cell apoptosis via bcl-2/bax-caspase-3 signaling pathway induced by H2O2 stimulation in HEK 293T cells. Importantly, these protective effects of C60-GSH were superior to those of GSH. In conclusion, these results suggested that C60-GSH has potential to protect against H2O2-induced cell apoptosis by scavenging free radicals and maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis without evident toxicity. PMID:27376803

  17. Spectral evidence for hydrogen-induced reversible segregation of CO adsorbed on titania-supported rhodium.

    PubMed

    Panayotov, D; Mihaylov, M; Nihtianova, D; Spassov, T; Hadjiivanov, K

    2014-07-14

    The reduction of a 1.3% Rh/TiO2 sample with carbon monoxide leads to the formation of uniform Rh nanoparticles with a mean diameter of dp ≈ 2.2 nm. Adsorption of CO on the reduced Rh/TiO2 produces linear and bridged carbonyls bound to metallic Rh(0) sites and only a few geminal dicarbonyls of Rh(I). The ν(CO) of linear Rh(0)-CO complexes is strongly coverage dependent: it is observed at 2078 cm(-1) at full coverage and at ca. 2025 cm(-1) at approximated zero coverage. At low coverage, this shift is mainly caused by a dipole-dipole interaction between the adsorbed CO molecules while at high coverage, the chemical shift also becomes important. Hydrogen hardly affects the CO adlayer at high CO coverages. However, on a partially CO-covered surface (θCO ≈ 0.5), the adsorption of H2 at increasing pressure leads to a gradual shift in the band of linear Rh(0)-CO from 2041 to 2062 cm(-1). Subsequent evacuation almost restores the original spectrum, demonstrating the reversibility of the hydrogen effect. Through the use of (12)CO + (13)CO isotopic mixtures, it is established that the addition of hydrogen to the CO-Rh/TiO2 system leads to an increase in the dynamic interaction between the adsorbed CO molecules. This evidences an increase in the density of the adsorbed CO molecules and indicates segregation of the CO and hydrogen adlayers. When CO is adsorbed on a hydrogen-precovered surface, the carbonyl band maximum is practically coverage independent and is observed at 2175-2173 cm(-1). These results are explained by a model according to which CO successively occupies different rhodium nanoparticles. PMID:24866330

  18. Curvature and ionization-induced reversible hydrogen storage in metalized hexagonal B{sub 36}

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun-Sheng Wang, Xiangfu; Yan, Xiaohong; Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-11-21

    The synthesis of quasiplanar boron clusters (B{sub 36}) with a central hexagonal hole provides the first experimental evidence that a single-atomic-layer borophene with hexagonal vacancies is potentially viable [Z. Piazza, H. Hu, W. Li, Y. Zhao, J. Li, and L. S. Wang, Nat. Commun. 5, 3113 (2014)]. However, owing to the hexagonal holes, tunning the electronic and physical properties of B{sub 36} through chemical modifications is not fully understood. Based on (van der Waals corrected-) density functional theory, we show that Li adsorbed on B{sub 36} and B{sub 36}{sup −} clusters can serve as reversible hydrogen storage media. The present results indicate that the curvature and ionization of substrates can enhance the bond strength of Li due to the energetically favorable B 2p-Li 2p orbitals hybridization. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridization between H-s orbitals and Li-2s2p orbitals contribute to the adsorption of H{sub 2} molecules and the resulting adsorption energy lies between the physisorbed and chemisorbed states. Interestingly, the number of H{sub 2} in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the appearance of the negative differential resistance behavior at different bias voltage regions. Furthermore, the cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials constructed by metalized B{sub 36} clusters do not cause a decrease in the number of adsorbed hydrogen molecules per Li. The system reported here is favorable for the reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption at ambient conditions.

  19. Pressure-Induced Phase Transition in N-H···O Hydrogen-Bonded Molecular Crystal Oxamide

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Tingting; Li, Shourui; Wang, Kai; Tan, Xiao; Jiang, Zhangmei; Yang, Ke; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-11-26

    The effect of high pressure on the structural stability of oxamide has been investigated in a diamond anvil cell by Raman spectroscopy up to ~14.6 GPa and by angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD) up to ~17.5 GPa. The discontinuity in Raman shifts around 9.6 GPa indicates a pressure-induced structural phase transition. This phase transition is confirmed by the change of ADXRD spectra with the symmetry transformation from P1⁻ to P1. On total release of pressure, the diffraction pattern returns to its initial state, implying this transition is reversible. We discuss the pressure-induced variations in N-H stretching vibrations and the amide modes in Raman spectra and propose that this phase transition is attributed to the distortions of the hydrogen-bonded networks.

  20. Understanding microstructure-induced limitations of hydrogen transport in high temperature proton conductors: can nuclear microanalysis give an answer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Pascal

    2007-03-01

    High temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) are envisioned as electrolytes for fuel cells working at intermediate temperature (400 C -- 600 C) to complement Y:ZrO2 electrolytes operating at 800 C -- 1000 C. The most mature HTPC are doped perovskites (ABO3) where tetravalent cation B is partially substituted by a trivalent one. Protons can be introduced in the lattice as point defects corresponding to hydroxyl groups on oxygen ion sites. In the temperature region of interest for technological applications, lattice vibrations allow the diffusion of protons by jumping and reorientation of O-H bonds (hoping mechanism). BaCeO3 or SrCeO3-based perovskites doped with a rare earth are the most widely studied compounds. However the proton conductance of these ceramics and their chemical stability are lower than the calculated values on single crystals and not sufficient to fulfill technological requirements. In most cases, the reasons for these discrepancies lie in uncontrolled microstructures with inter- and intra-granular defects that act as barriers for hydrogen diffusion but are preferential paths for chemical degradation by hydrolysis or carbonatation. Despite this crucial point, very few efforts are devoted to the optimization of microstructure of HTPC. Microstructure induced limitations are usually evidenced via impedance measurements which enable determination of respective contributions of bulk and grain boundaries to overall conductivity. Further information on hydrogen transport relevant for improvement of microstructure design requires local methods for hydrogen concentration measurement. Nuclear microanalysis, based on the use of MeV light ions microbeam, meets this demand. According to the chosen technique, nuclear reaction, elastic recoil or forward coincident scattering, the nuclear microprobe gives 2D-3D quantitative information on hydrogen distribution and diffusion within microstructure and enables to identify barriers and short-circuits.

  1. Pressure-Induced Magnetic Crossover Driven by Hydrogen Bonding in CuF2(H2O)2(3-chloropyridine)

    PubMed Central

    O'Neal, Kenneth R.; Brinzari, Tatiana V.; Wright, Joshua B.; Ma, Chunli; Giri, Santanab; Schlueter, John A.; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru; Liu, Zhenxian; Musfeldt, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding plays a foundational role in the life, earth, and chemical sciences, with its richness and strength depending on the situation. In molecular materials, these interactions determine assembly mechanisms, control superconductivity, and even permit magnetic exchange. In spite of its long-standing importance, exquisite control of hydrogen bonding in molecule-based magnets has only been realized in limited form and remains as one of the major challenges. Here, we report the discovery that pressure can tune the dimensionality of hydrogen bonding networks in CuF2(H2O)2(3-chloropyridine) to induce magnetic switching. Specifically, we reveal how the development of exchange pathways under compression combined with an enhanced ab-plane hydrogen bonding network yields a three dimensional superexchange web between copper centers that triggers a reversible magnetic crossover. Similar pressure- and strain-driven crossover mechanisms involving coordinated motion of hydrogen bond networks may play out in other quantum magnets. PMID:25116701

  2. JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgast, Paul; Pechkam, Paul

    2007-01-01

    JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK (JMS signifies "Java messaging service" and "SDK" signifies "software development kit") is a software package for developing interfaces that enable legacy programs (here denoted "clients") written in the C and C++ languages to communicate with each other via a JMS broker. This package consists of two main components: the JMS proxy server component and the client C library SDK component. The JMS proxy server component implements a native Java process that receives and responds to requests from clients. This component can run on any computer that supports Java and a JMS client. The client C library SDK component is used to develop a JMS client program running in each affected C or C++ environment, without need for running a Java virtual machine in the affected computer. A C client program developed by use of this SDK has most of the quality-of-service characteristics of standard Java-based client programs, including the following: Durable subscriptions; Asynchronous message receipt; Such standard JMS message qualities as "TimeToLive," "Message Properties," and "DeliveryMode" (as the quoted terms are defined in previously published JMS documentation); and Automatic reconnection of a JMS proxy to a restarted JMS broker.

  3. Skeletal Muscle Contractions Induce Acute Changes in Cytosolic Superoxide, but Slower Responses in Mitochondrial Superoxide and Cellular Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Timothy; Kabayo, Tabitha; Ng, Rainer; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is increased following contractile activity and these species interact with multiple signaling pathways to mediate adaptations to contractions. The sources and time course of the increase in ROS during contractions remain undefined. Confocal microscopy with specific fluorescent probes was used to compare the activities of superoxide in mitochondria and cytosol and the hydrogen peroxide content of the cytosol in isolated single mature skeletal muscle (flexor digitorum brevis) fibers prior to, during, and after electrically stimulated contractions. Superoxide in mitochondria and cytoplasm were assessed using MitoSox red and dihydroethidium (DHE) respectively. The product of superoxide with DHE, 2-hydroxyethidium (2-HE) was acutely increased in the fiber cytosol by contractions, whereas hydroxy-MitoSox showed a slow cumulative increase. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthases increased the contraction-induced formation of hydroxy-MitoSox only with no effect on 2-HE formation. These data indicate that the acute increases in cytosolic superoxide induced by contractions are not derived from mitochondria. Data also indicate that, in muscle mitochondria, nitric oxide (NO) reduces the availability of superoxide, but no effect of NO on cytosolic superoxide availability was detected. To determine the relationship of changes in superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, an alternative specific approach was used where fibers were transduced using an adeno-associated viral vector to express the hydrogen peroxide probe, HyPer within the cytoplasmic compartment. HyPer fluorescence was significantly increased in fibers following contractions, but surprisingly followed a relatively slow time course that did not appear directly related to cytosolic superoxide. These data demonstrate for the first time temporal and site specific differences in specific ROS that occur in skeletal muscle fibers during and after contractile activity. PMID

  4. Myosin light chain phosphatase activation is involved in the hydrogen sulfide-induced relaxation in mouse gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Dhaese, Ingeborg; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2009-03-15

    The relaxant effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the vascular tree is well established but its influence and mechanism of action in gastrointestinal smooth muscle was hardly investigated. The influence of H(2)S on contractility in mouse gastric fundus was therefore examined. Sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; H(2)S donor) was administered to prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha))-contracted circular muscle strips of mouse gastric fundus, before and after incubation with interfering drugs. NaHS caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the pre-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The K(+) channels blockers glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridin and barium chloride had no influence on the NaHS-induced relaxation. The relaxation by NaHS was also not influenced by L-NAME, ODQ and SQ 22536, inhibitors of the cGMP and cAMP pathway, by nerve blockers capsazepine, omega-conotoxin and tetrodotoxin or by several channel and receptor blockers (ouabain, nifedipine, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, ryanodine and thapsigargin). The myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor calyculin-A reduced the NaHS-induced relaxation, but the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 had no influence. We show that NaHS is able to relax PGF(2alpha)-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The results suggest that in the mouse gastric fundus, H(2)S causes relaxation at least partially via activation of MLCP. PMID:19374871

  5. Hydrogen Embrittlement Understood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Sofronis, P.; Nagao, A.; Martin, M. L.; Wang, S.; Gross, D. W.; Nygren, K. E.

    2015-06-01

    The connection between hydrogen-enhanced plasticity and the hydrogen-induced fracture mechanism and pathway is established through examination of the evolved microstructural state immediately beneath fracture surfaces including voids, "quasi-cleavage," and intergranular surfaces. This leads to a new understanding of hydrogen embrittlement in which hydrogen-enhanced plasticity processes accelerate the evolution of the microstructure, which establishes not only local high concentrations of hydrogen but also a local stress state. Together, these factors establish the fracture mechanism and pathway.

  6. Spatially and temporally resolved electron number density measurements in a decaying laser-induced plasma using hydrogen-alpha line profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parigger, Christian; Plemmons, D. H.; Lewis, J. W. L.

    1995-06-01

    A Nd:YAG laser was operated at 1064 nm and with 6-ns pulse duration to achieve optical breakdown in gaseous hydrogen at pressures of 150 and 810 Torr. Spatially and temporally resolved laser-induced emission spectra were measured early in the plasma decay. With hydrogen-alpha line profiles, electron number density values were determined along the laser beam plasma in the range 1019 to 1016 cc -1.

  7. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown. PMID:19079454

  8. Epilepsy, Seizures, and Inflammation: Role of the C-C Motif Ligand 2 Chemokine.

    PubMed

    Bozzi, Yuri; Caleo, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disorder characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that inflammatory processes within the brain parenchyma contribute to recurrence and precipitation of seizures. In both epileptic patients and animal models, seizures upregulate inflammatory mediators, which in turn may enhance brain excitability. We recently showed that the C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) chemokine (also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1]) mediates the seizure-promoting effects of inflammation. Systemic inflammatory challenge in chronically epileptic mice markedly enhanced seizure frequency and upregulated CCL2 expression in the brain. Selective pharmacological blockade of CCL2 synthesis or C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) significantly suppressed inflammation-induced seizures. These results have important implications for the development of novel anticonvulsant therapies: drugs interfering with CCL2 signaling are used clinically for several human disorders and might be redirected for use in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Here we review the role of CCL2/CCR2 signaling in linking systemic inflammation with seizure susceptibility and discuss some open questions that arise from our recent studies. PMID:27167681

  9. Naringin protects human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Ge; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Ma, Long-Fei; Zhang, Yuan-Min

    2015-12-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of osteoporosis. We show that naringin, a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, effectively protects human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation. Naringin increased viability of hAMDSCs and attenuated H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. Naringin also reversed H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Oxidative stress induced by H2O2 inhibits osteogenic differentiation by decreasing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium content and mRNA expression levels of osteogenesis marker genes RUNX2 and OSX in hADMSCs. However, addition of naringin leads to a significant recovery, suggesting the protective effects of naringin against H2O2-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, the H2O2-induced decrease of protein expressions of β-catenin and clyclin D1, two important transcriptional regulators of Wnt-signaling, was successfully rescued by naringin treatment. Also, in the presence of Wnt inhibitor DKK-1, naringin is no longer effective in stimulating ALP activity, increasing calcium content and mRNA expression levels of RUNX2 and OSX in H2O2-exposed hADMSCs. These data clearly demonstrates that naringin protects hADMSCs against oxidative stress-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation, which may involve Wnt signaling pathway. Our work suggests that naringin may be a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for osteoporosis and activation of Wnt signaling may represent attractive therapeutic strategy for the treatment of degenerative disease of bone tissue. PMID:26482937

  10. Hydrogen atom distribution and hydrogen induced site depopulation for the La{sub 2-x}Mg{sub x}Ni{sub 7}-H system

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, Matylda N.; Hauback, Bjorn C.; Yvon, Klaus

    2012-02-15

    La{sub 2-x}Mg{sub x}Ni{sub 7} and its hydrides/deuterides were investigated by high resolution synchrotron powder X-ray and neutron diffraction. Upon deuteration the single phase sample of the intermetallic compound with the refined composition La{sub 1.63}Mg{sub 0.37}Ni{sub 7} (space group: P6{sub 3}/mmc) expands isotropically, in contrast to the Mg free phase. The hydrogen uptake, {approx}9 D/f.u., is higher than in La{sub 2}Ni{sub 7}D{sub 6.5}. The refined composition accounts for La{sub 1.63}Mg{sub 0.37}Ni{sub 7}D{sub 8.8} (beta-phase). Rietveld refinements using the neutron and synchrotron diffraction data suggest that deuterium atoms occupy 5 different interstitial sites within both AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5} slabs, either in an ordered or a disordered way. All determined D sites have an occupancy >50% and the shortest D-D contact is 1.96(3) A. It is supposed that a competition between the tendency to form directional bonds and repulsive D-D (H-H) interactions is the most important factor that influences the distribution of deuterium atoms in this structure. A hitherto unknown second, alpha-phase with composition La{sub 1.63}Mg{sub 0.37}Ni{sub 7}D{sub 0.56}, crystallizing with the same hexagonal symmetry as La{sub 1.63}Mg{sub 0.37}Ni{sub 7}D{sub 8.8}, has been discovered. The unit cell parameters for this D-poor phase differ slightly from those of the intermetallic. Alpha-phase displays only one D site (4f, space group: P6{sub 3}/mmc) occupied >50%, which is not populated in the D-rich beta-phase. This hydrogen/deuterium induced site depopulation can be explained by repulsive D-D (H-H) interactions that are likely to influence non-occupancy of certain interstices in metal lattice when absorbing hydrogen. - Graphical abstract: The detailed D atoms arrangement in La{sub 1.63}Mg{sub 0.37}Ni{sub 7}D{sub 8.8} differs significantly from the previously reported La{sub 1.5}Mg{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 7}D{sub 8.9(9.1)}. The present model consists of only five deuterium sites as

  11. Hydrogen-rich water protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Yao; Song, Si-Dong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Rui-Yao; Wan, Yong; Yuan, Da-Wei; Wu, Qi-Fei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the hepatoprotective effects and mechanisms of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in mice. METHODS: Male mice were randomly divided into the following four groups: normal saline (NS) control group, mice received equivalent volumes of NS intraperitoneally (ip); HRW control group, mice were given HRW (same volume as the NS group); APAP + NS group, mice received NS ip for 3 d (5 mL/kg body weight, twice a day at 8 am and 5 pm) after APAP injection; APAP + HRW group, mice received HRW for 3 d (same as NS treatment) after APAP challenge. In the first experiment, mice were injected ip with a lethal dose of 750 mg/kg APAP to determine the 5-d survival rates. In the second experiment, mice were injected ip with a sub-lethal dose of 500 mg/kg. Blood and liver samples were collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after APAP injection to determine the degree of liver injury. RESULTS: Treatment with HRW resulted in a significant increase in the 5-d survival rate compared with the APAP + NS treatment group (60% vs 26.67%, P < 0.05). HRW could significantly decrease the serum alanine aminotransferase level (24 h: 4442 ± 714.3 U/L vs 6909 ± 304.8 U/L, P < 0.01; 48 h: 3782 ± 557.5 U/L vs 5111 ± 404 U/L, P < 0.01; and 3255 ± 337.4 U/L vs 3814 ± 250.2 U/L, P < 0.05, respectively) and aspartate aminotransferase level (24 h: 4683 ± 443.4 U/L vs 5307 ± 408.4 U/L, P < 0.05; 48 h: 3392 ± 377.6 U/L vs 4458 ± 423.6 U/L, P < 0.01; and 3354 ± 399.4 U/L vs 3778 ± 358 U/L, respectively) compared with the APAP treatment group. The alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels had the same result. Seventy-two hours after APAP administration, liver samples were collected for pathological examination and serum was collected to detect the cytokine levels. The liver index (5.16% ± 0.26% vs 5.88% ± 0.073%, P < 0.05) and percentage of liver necrosis area (27.73% ± 0.58% vs 36.87% ± 0.49%, P < 0.01) were significantly

  12. C-H\\ctdot O hydrogen bonding in a 4-fluorobenzoate multilayer induced by silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Donald A.; Schiefer, Elizabeth M.; Cordova, James S.; Bonde, Ashley M.; Razer, Taylor M.; Primm, Katherine M.; Chen, Tsung Yen; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2011-08-01

    SERS, SEIRA, and DFT calculations showed silver nanoparticles can stimulate C-H⋯O hydrogen bonding in 4-fluorobenzoate ion/ n-heptane multilayers. SERS/DFT demonstrated that 4-fluorobenzoic acid (4FBA) adsorbed as a 4-fluorobenzoate (4FBT) monolayer on nanosilver. Ionization of 4FBA to 4FBT occurred in the multilayer when 4FBA was deposited in n-heptane onto nanosilver. Frequency shifts in SEIRA bands of 4FBT COO stretch and n-heptane CH bend modes illustrated a change in the degree of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonding as more 4FBT/ n-heptane was adsorbed to the multilayer. This work will influence many research areas such as sensors formed from thin organic layers on metal nanoparticles.

  13. Light emission induced by an XUV laser pulse interacting resonantly with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingyi; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yunfeng; Li, Suyu; Guo, Fuming; Yang, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    The resonant interaction between XUV ultra-short laser pulses and atomic hydrogen is systematically studied by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in this paper. Triple-peak structures are found to appear in the harmonics emitted provided that the incident laser is resonant with the 1 s-2p transition of the hydrogen atom. Moreover, the energy difference between neighboring peaks is the same and turns out to be proportional to the peak field strength E 0. Based on the theory of strong field approximation, and taking the interactions of the 1 s-2p bound energy levels into consideration, theoretical interpretations of the phenomena mentioned are successfully presented. This work provides a possible approach for generating XUV radiation with a tunable frequency via the interaction between atoms and XUV laser pulses.

  14. Observations on hydrogen induced delayed plasticity and cracking in 4340 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.

    1983-02-01

    The crack growth rates measured by potential drop provided strong evidence that crack advance occurs continuously during hydrogen assisted cracking. If crack growth occurred by the stepwise HIDP-C mechanism, variations in growth rate would be expected to appear in the potential drop results. For example, during the period of plastic zone extension, a low crack growth rate would be expected, followed by a period of higher crack growth rate during actual extension of the crack. The results obtained in this investigation do not eliminate the possibility that stepwise crack growth occurred at different points along the crack front at different times, appearing as continuous average crack advance. Furthermore, these results do not provide evidence for the mechanism of crack extension. The results do show that the average crack front advance is continuous during hydrogen assisted cracking, not stepwise, as would be expected for the HIDP-C mechanism of crack growth. 13 references.

  15. Ammonia-induced robust photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of graphitic carbon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengju; Zhao, Jianghong; Qiao, Wei; Li, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2015-11-01

    We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 μmol h-1 to 316.7 μmol h-1 under visible light.We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 μmol h-1 to 316.7 μmol h-1 under visible light. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05570a

  16. Ammonia-induced robust photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of graphitic carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengju; Zhao, Jianghong; Qiao, Wei; Li, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2015-12-01

    We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 μmol h(-1) to 316.7 μmol h(-1) under visible light. PMID:26514964

  17. Graphitic clusters in hydrogenated amorphous carbon induced by keV-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnini, G.; Foti, G.; Reitano, R. ); Mondio, G. )

    1990-12-10

    Energy gap and hydrogen concentration have been measured in hydrogenated amorphous carbon ({ital a}-C:H) after bombardment with 100 keV He{sup +} and 300 keV Ar{sup +} ion beams, up to ion fluences 3{times}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. {ital a}-C:H films have been obtained by ion irradiation at low ion fluences of polystyrene layers and with a subsequent low-temperature annealing (400 {degree}C, 10 min). Experimental values for the energy gap (2.5--0.5 eV) and hydrogen concentration (7.4{times}10{sup 22}--1.8{times}10{sup 22} H atoms/cm{sup 3}) have been interpreted in terms of a graphitic cluster structure with a different size (3--20 A). We were able to determine experimentally the value of the bond integral {vert bar}{beta}{vert bar} and we found it in good agreement with the calculated one for graphite.

  18. Pressure-induced bonding and compound formation in xenon-hydrogen solids

    SciTech Connect

    Somayazulu, Maddury; Dera, Przemyslaw; Goncharov, Alexander F; Gramsch, Stephen A; Liermann, Peter; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Zhenxian; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2010-11-03

    Closed electron shell systems, such as hydrogen, nitrogen or group 18 elements, can form weakly bound stoichiometric compounds at high pressures. An understanding of the stability of these van der Waals compounds is lacking, as is information on the nature of their interatomic interactions. We describe the formation of a stable compound in the Xe-H{sub 2} binary system, revealed by a suite of X-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy measurements. At 4.8 GPa, a unique hydrogen-rich structure forms that can be viewed as a tripled solid hydrogen lattice modulated by layers of xenon, consisting of xenon dimers. Varying the applied pressure tunes the Xe-Xe distances in the solid over a broad range from that of an expanded xenon lattice to the distances observed in metallic xenon at megabar pressures. Infrared and Raman spectra indicate a weakening of the intramolecular covalent bond as well as persistence of semiconducting behaviour in the compound to at least 255 GPa.

  19. Structural transformation and tuning behavior induced by the propylamine concentration in hydrogen clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongmin; Kang, Hyery; Shin, Kyuchul; Seo, Yutaek; Lee, Huen

    2015-01-21

    The structures and the guest-host distributions of iso-propylamine (i-PA) and n-propylamine (n-PA) hydrates with hydrogen as a secondary guest were identified by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic analysis. The structure of 11.1 mol% i-PA + H2 hydrate was identified to be hexagonal (space group P63/mmc) with a few unindexed diffraction peaks, while 5.6 mol% i-PA + H2 hydrate had a cubic structure (space group Fd3¯m). Similarly, the structure of 13.3 mol% n-PA + H2 hydrate was found to be monoclinic (space group P2(1)/n), while 5.6 mol% n-PA + H2 hydrate had a cubic structure (space group Fd3¯m). The 'tuning' phenomenon, multiple occupancy of hydrogen in the large cage at the pressure and temperature regions outside of pure hydrogen hydrate stability, was observed in the i-PA + H2 hydrate only when the amine concentration was lower than the stoichiometric value of structure II hydrate. The three-phase (H-L(w)-V) equilibria for alkylamine + H2 + water mixtures were also measured to investigate their thermodynamic stability. PMID:25475482

  20. Spontaneous versus induced hydrogen and deuterium helical shaped plasmas with electron internal transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbin, M.; Franz, P.; Auriemma, F.; Lorenzini, R.; Marrelli, L.

    2015-09-01

    Electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) in high current plasmas with helical equilibria of the reversed field pinch experiment RFX-mod are analyzed and characterized in detail thanks to a high time resolution double filter diagnostic for the electron temperature spatial profile determination. The large amount of data provided by this diagnostic has required the development of dedicated algorithms and the identification of suitable parameters, reported and described in this paper, in order to perform automatic statistical studies. These numerical tools have been used to examine the effect of three dimensional (3D) magnetic fields applied by the RFX-mod 192 active coils in deuterium and hydrogen discharges with the aim to improve the sustainment and control of helical equilibria with eITBs. It is shown that 3D fields partially increase the occurring of helical states but with only a moderate effect on the eITBs duration; moreover, they have a different impact on the confinement properties in hydrogen and deuterium discharges. Numerical simulations, by the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT, investigate the effect of magnetic topology in plasmas with and without the application of 3D fields on deuterium and hydrogen test ions transport. Results from numerical studies are in agreement with estimates of the particle confinement times showing that particle transport is reduced in deuterium plasmas but not significantly affected by the application of helical boundary conditions.

  1. Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-C/C-N Coupling of Imidates with α-Diazo Imidamide: Synthesis of Isoquinoline-Fused Indoles.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Li, Lei; Yu, Songjie; Li, Yunyun; Li, Xingwei

    2016-06-17

    Imidate esters and diazo compounds have been established as bifunctional substrates for the construction of biologically active fused heterocycles via rhodium-catalyzed C-H activation and C-C/C-N coupling. This reaction occurs under mild conditions with high efficiency, step economy, and low catalyst loading. PMID:27280947

  2. Knockdown of IRF6 Attenuates Hydrogen Dioxide-Induced Oxidative Stress via Inhibiting Mitochondrial Dysfunction in HT22 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Min; Chen, Bo; Lv, Jian-Meng; Lei, Qi; Pan, Ya-Juan; Yang, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress-induced cell damage is involved in many neurological diseases. Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6), a member of the IRF family of transcription factors, is required for the differentiation of skin, breast epithelium, and oral epithelium. However, the regulation and function of IRF6 in central nervous system remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate the role of IRF6 in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative neuronal injury in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells. Treatment with H2O2 significantly increased the expression of IRF6 at both mRNA and protein levels, and knockdown of IRF6 using specific small interfering RNA reduced H2O2-induced cytotoxicity, as evidenced by increased cell viability and decreased apoptosis. Knockdown of IRF6 attenuated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lipid peroxidation, and also preserved endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities. The inhibitory effect of IRF6 knockdown on mitochondrial dysfunction was demonstrated by reduced mitochondrial oxidative level, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP generation, as well as attenuated mitochondrial swelling. In addition, down-regulation of IRF6 inhibited the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic factors, whereas IRF6 knockdown together with caspase inhibitors had no extra effect on cell viability and LDH release. These results suggest that knockdown of IRF6 has protective effects against H2O2-induced oxidative stress by reducing ROS accumulation and apoptosis, and these protective effects are dependent on preservation of mitochondrial function. PMID:26620051

  3. Inhibition of sphingomyelin synthase 1 affects ceramide accumulation and hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Neuro-2a cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ranran; Yang, Wei; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in brain injury after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, which contributes toward excessive apoptosis of nerve cells. Therefore, it would be beneficial to identify a therapy that could interfere with the progression of apoptosis and protect the brain from ischemia-reperfusion injury. As ceramide, a well-known second messenger of apoptosis, can be metabolized by sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1), recent research has focused on the link between SMS1 and apoptosis in different cells. To investigate whether SMS1 is involved in the process of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in neurons and to explore the possible underlying mechanism, we treated mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2A (N2a) cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation with H2O2 significantly upregulated the expression of SMS1, increased the intracellular levels of ceramide and sphingomyelin synthase activity, and induced apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment of N2a cells with D609, an sphingomyelin synthase inhibitor, or SMS1-silencing RNA (siRNA) further increased ceramide and potentiated H2O2-induced apoptosis which could be reversed by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Thus, our study has shown that SMS1 regulates ceramide levels in N2a cells and plays a potent protective role in this oxidative stress-induced apoptosis partly through the p38 pathway. PMID:27391427

  4. Combination Treatment of Hydrogen Peroxide and X-Rays Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer PC-3 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shinji Sawada, Ken; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Karashima, Takashi; Shuin, Taro; Nishioka, Akihito; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Methods and Materials: At 4h before the irradiation, PC-3 cells were exposed to 10mM ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) concentrations. Subsequently, cells were exposed to 0.1mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} just before the irradiations, which were administered with 10-MV X-rays at doses of 10Gy. Results: The percentage of apoptotic cells at 48h after X-irradiation alone, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone, and combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was 1.85%, 4.85%, and 28.4%, respectively. With use of combined X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurred 4h after the irradiation. This resulted in lysosomal rupturing, mitochondrial fragmentation, and the release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm from the mitochondria. In contrast, when cells were exposed to NH{sub 4}Cl before the X-irradiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} administration, apoptosis was almost completely suppressed, ROS production did not occur, lysosomal rupture and mitochondrial fragmentation were blocked, and cytochrome c was not released. Conclusions: Hydrogen peroxide strongly enhanced lysosome-dependent radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. A combined use of X-rays and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can also injure the mitochondrial cytoplasmic organelles and lead to the production of ROS that in and of itself might possibly induce apoptosis.

  5. Annealing of hydrogen-induced defects in RF-plasma-treated Si wafers: ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghica, C.; Nistor, L. C.; Vizireanu, S.; Dinescu, G.

    2011-07-01

    The smart-cut™ process is based on inducing and processing structural defects below the free surface of semiconductor wafers. The necessary defects are currently induced by implantation of light elements such as hydrogen or helium. An alternative softer way to induce shallow subsurface defects is by RF-plasma hydrogenation. To facilitate the smart-cut process, the wafers containing the induced defects need to be subjected to an appropriate thermal treatment. In our experiments, (0 0 1) Si wafers are submitted to 200 and 50 W hydrogen RF-plasma and are subsequently annealed. The samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), before and after annealing. The plasma-introduced defects are {1 1 1} and {1 0 0} planar-like defects and nanocavities, all of them involving hydrogen. Many nanocavities are aligned into strings almost parallel to the wafer surface. The annealing is performed either by furnace thermal treatment at 550 °C, or by in situ heating in the electron microscope at 450, 650 and 800 °C during the TEM observations. The TEM microstructural studies indicate a partial healing of the planar defects and a size increase of the nanometric cavities by a coalescence process of the small neighbouring nanocavities. By annealing, the lined up nanometric voids forming chains in the as-hydrogenated sample coalesced into well-defined cracks, mostly parallel to the wafer surface.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide generated by NADPH oxidase is involved in high blue-light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Feng; Xing, Da; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-08-01

    One of the most important functions of blue light is to induce chloroplast movements by reducing the damage to photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated by various environmental stimuli, can act as a signaling molecule that regulates a number of developmental processes and environmental responses. To investigate whether H2O2 is involved in high blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements, we use luminescence spectrometer to observe H2O2 generation with the assistance of the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescin diacetate (H2DCF-DA). After treatment with high blue light, a large quantity of H2O2 indicated by the fluorescence intensity of DCF is produced in a dose-dependent manner in leaf strip of Arabidopsis. Enzymatic assay shows that the activity of NADPH oxidase, which is a major site for H2O2 generation, also rapidly increases in treated strips. Exogenously applied H2O2 can promote the high blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Moreover, high blue light-induced H2O2 generation can be abolished completely by addition of exogenous catalase (CAT), and partly by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (DCMU), which are an NADPH oxidase inhibitor and a blocker of electron transport chain. And subsequent chloroplast movements can be abolished by CAT and DPI, but not by DCMU. These results presented here suggested that high blue light can induce oxidative burst, and NADPH oxidase as a major producer for H2O2 is involved in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements.

  7. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbene-based C^C^C-Pincer Ligands and Aromatic Diimines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Lai-Hon; Lo, Hoi-Shing; Ng, Sze-Wing; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2015-10-01

    Iridium(III) hydrido complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-based pincer ligand 1,3-bis(1-butylimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C1^C^C1) or 1,3-bis(3-butylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C2^C^C2) and aromatic diimine (2,2‧-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,4‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine (Me2bpy), or dipyrido-[3,2-f:2‧,3‧-h]-quinoxaline (dpq)) in the form of [Ir(C^C^C)(N^N)(H)]+ have been prepared. Crystal structures for these complexes show that the Ir-CNHC distances are 2.043(5)-2.056(5) Å. The hydride chemical shifts for complexes bearing C1^C^C1 (-20.6 to -20.3 ppm) are more upfield than those with C2^C^C2 (-19.5 and -19.2 ppm), revealing that C1^C^C1 is a better electron donor than C2^C^C2. Spectroscopic comparisons and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations suggest that the lowest-energy electronic transition associated with these complexes (λ = 340-530 nm (ɛ ≤ 103 dm3 mol-1 cm-1)) originate from a dπ(IrIII) → π*(N^N) metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition, where the dπ(IrIII) level contain significant contribution from the C^C^C ligands. All these complexes are emissive in the yellow-spectral region (553-604 nm in CH3CN and CH2Cl2) upon photo-excitation with quantum yields of 10-3-10-1.

  8. Emissive osmium(II) complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene-based C^C^C-pincer ligands and aromatic diimines.

    PubMed

    Chung, Lai-Hon; Chan, Siu-Chung; Lee, Wing-Chun; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2012-08-20

    Osmium(II) complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-based pincer ligand 1,3-bis(1-methylimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C(1)^C^C(1)) or 1,3-bis(3-methylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C(2)^C^C(2)) and aromatic diimine (2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), or 4,4'-diphenyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Ph(2)bpy)) in the form of [Os(C^C^C)(N^N)(CO)](+) have been prepared. Crystal structures for these complexes show that the Os-C(NHC) bonds are essentially single (Os-C(NHC) distances = 2.079(5)-2.103(7) Å). Spectroscopic comparisons and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations suggest that the lowest-energy electronic transition associated with these complexes (λ(max) = 493-536 nm, ε(max) = (5-10) × 10(3) dm(3) mol(-1) cm(-1), solvent = CH(3)CN) originate from a d(π)(Os(II)) → π*(N^N) metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition, where the d(π)(Os(II)) and π*(N^N) levels contain significant contribution from the C^C^C ligands. All these complexes are emissive in the red-spectral region (674-731 nm) with quantum yields of 10(-4)-10(-2) and emission lifetimes of around 1-6 μs. Transient absorption spectroscopy and spectroelectrochemical measurements have also been used to probe the nature of the emissive excited-states. Overall, this joint experimental and theoretical investigation reveals that the C^C^C ligands can be used to modulate the photophysical properties of a [Os(N^N)] core via the formation of the hybrid [Os + C^C^C] frontier orbitals. PMID:22873818

  9. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbene-based C^C^C-Pincer Ligands and Aromatic Diimines

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Lai-Hon; Lo, Hoi-Shing; Ng, Sze-Wing; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Iridium(III) hydrido complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-based pincer ligand 1,3-bis(1-butylimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C1^C^C1) or 1,3-bis(3-butylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C2^C^C2) and aromatic diimine (2,2′-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,4′-dimethyl-2,2′-bipyridine (Me2bpy), or dipyrido-[3,2-f:2′,3′-h]-quinoxaline (dpq)) in the form of [Ir(C^C^C)(N^N)(H)]+ have been prepared. Crystal structures for these complexes show that the Ir–CNHC distances are 2.043(5)–2.056(5) Å. The hydride chemical shifts for complexes bearing C1^C^C1 (−20.6 to −20.3 ppm) are more upfield than those with C2^C^C2 (−19.5 and −19.2 ppm), revealing that C1^C^C1 is a better electron donor than C2^C^C2. Spectroscopic comparisons and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations suggest that the lowest-energy electronic transition associated with these complexes (λ = 340–530 nm (ε ≤ 103 dm3 mol−1 cm−1)) originate from a dπ(IrIII) → π*(N^N) metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition, where the dπ(IrIII) level contain significant contribution from the C^C^C ligands. All these complexes are emissive in the yellow-spectral region (553–604 nm in CH3CN and CH2Cl2) upon photo-excitation with quantum yields of 10−3–10−1. PMID:26487542

  10. Use of laser-induced spark for studying ignition stability and unburned hydrogen escaping from laminar diluted hydrogen diffusion jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Tran X.; Chen, Ruey-Hung

    2007-08-01

    Ignition and unburned hydrogen escaping from hydrogen jet diffusion flames diluted with nitrogen up to 70% were experimentally studied. The successful ignition locations were about 2/3 of the flame length above the jet exit for undiluted flames and moved much closer to the exit for diluted flames. For higher levels of dilution or higher flow rates, there existed a region within which a diluted hydrogen diffusion flame can be ignited and burns with a stable liftoff height. This is contrary to previous findings that pure and diluted hydrogen jet diffusion cannot achieve a stable lifted flame configuration. With liftoff, the flame is noisy and short with significant amount of unburned hydrogen escaping into the product gases. If ignition is initiated below this region, the flame propagates upstream quickly and attaches to the burner rim. Results from measurements of unburned hydrogen in the combustion products showed that the amount of unburned hydrogen increased as the nitrogen dilution level was increased. Thus, hydrogen diffusion flame diluted with nitrogen cannot burn completely.

  11. Vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal JB6 P+ cells via hydrogen peroxide-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ye, J; Ding, M; Leonard, S S; Robinson, V A; Millecchia, L; Zhang, X; Castranova, V; Vallyathan, V; Shi, X

    1999-12-01

    Apoptosis is a physiological mechanism for the control of DNA integrity in mammalian cells. Vanadium induces both DNA damage and apoptosis. It is suggested that vanadium-induced apoptosis serves to eliminate DNA-damaged cells. This study is designed to clarify a role of reactive oxygen species in the mechanism of apoptosis induced by vanadium. We established apoptosis model with murine epidermal JB6 P+ cells in the response to vanadium stimulation. Apoptosis was detected by a cell death ELISA assay and morphological analysis. The result shows that apoptosis induced by vanadate is dose-dependent, reaching its saturation level at a concentration of 100 microM vanadate. Vanadyl (IV) can also induce apoptosis albeit with lesser potency. A role of reactive oxygen species was analyzed by multiple reagents including specific scavengers of different reactive oxygen species. The result shows that vanadate-induced apoptosis is enhanced by NADPH, superoxide dismutase and sodium formate, but was inhibited by catalase and deferoxamine. Cells exposed to vanadium consume more molecular oxygen and at the same time, produce more H2O2 as measured by the change in fluorescence of scopoletin in the presence of horseradish peroxidase. This change in oxygen consumption and H2O2 production is enhanced by NADPH. Taken together, these results show that vanadate induces apoptosis in epidermal cells and H2O2 induced by vanadate plays a major role in this process. PMID:10705990

  12. Lipid Peroxide-Derived Short-Chain Carbonyls Mediate Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced and Salt-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2015-07-01

    Lipid peroxide-derived toxic carbonyl compounds (oxylipin carbonyls), produced downstream of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were recently revealed to mediate abiotic stress-induced damage of plants. Here, we investigated how oxylipin carbonyls cause cell death. When tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, several species of short-chain oxylipin carbonyls [i.e. 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and acrolein] accumulated and the cells underwent programmed cell death (PCD), as judged based on DNA fragmentation, an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive nuclei, and cytoplasm retraction. These oxylipin carbonyls caused PCD in BY-2 cells and roots of tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To test the possibility that oxylipin carbonyls mediate an oxidative signal to cause PCD, we performed pharmacological and genetic experiments. Carnosine and hydralazine, having distinct chemistry for scavenging carbonyls, significantly suppressed the increase in oxylipin carbonyls and blocked PCD in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis roots, but they did not affect the levels of ROS and lipid peroxides. A transgenic tobacco line that overproduces 2-alkenal reductase, an Arabidopsis enzyme to detoxify α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, suffered less PCD in root epidermis after hydrogen peroxide or salt treatment than did the wild type, whereas the ROS level increases due to the stress treatments were not different between the lines. From these results, we conclude that oxylipin carbonyls are involved in the PCD process in oxidatively stressed cells. Our comparison of the ability of distinct carbonyls to induce PCD in BY-2 cells revealed that acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal are the most potent carbonyls. The physiological relevance and possible mechanisms of the carbonyl-induced PCD are discussed. PMID:26025050

  13. Lipid Peroxide-Derived Short-Chain Carbonyls Mediate Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced and Salt-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Md. Sanaullah; Mano, Jun’ichi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxide-derived toxic carbonyl compounds (oxylipin carbonyls), produced downstream of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were recently revealed to mediate abiotic stress-induced damage of plants. Here, we investigated how oxylipin carbonyls cause cell death. When tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, several species of short-chain oxylipin carbonyls [i.e. 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and acrolein] accumulated and the cells underwent programmed cell death (PCD), as judged based on DNA fragmentation, an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive nuclei, and cytoplasm retraction. These oxylipin carbonyls caused PCD in BY-2 cells and roots of tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To test the possibility that oxylipin carbonyls mediate an oxidative signal to cause PCD, we performed pharmacological and genetic experiments. Carnosine and hydralazine, having distinct chemistry for scavenging carbonyls, significantly suppressed the increase in oxylipin carbonyls and blocked PCD in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis roots, but they did not affect the levels of ROS and lipid peroxides. A transgenic tobacco line that overproduces 2-alkenal reductase, an Arabidopsis enzyme to detoxify α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, suffered less PCD in root epidermis after hydrogen peroxide or salt treatment than did the wild type, whereas the ROS level increases due to the stress treatments were not different between the lines. From these results, we conclude that oxylipin carbonyls are involved in the PCD process in oxidatively stressed cells. Our comparison of the ability of distinct carbonyls to induce PCD in BY-2 cells revealed that acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal are the most potent carbonyls. The physiological relevance and possible mechanisms of the carbonyl-induced PCD are discussed. PMID:26025050

  14. Ni-Catalyzed C-C Couplings Using Alkyl Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takanori; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2016-10-01

    Much effort has been devoted to developing new methods using Ni catalysts for the cross-coupling reaction of alkyl electrophiles with organometallic reagents, and significant achievements in this area have emerged during the past two decades. Nickel catalysts have enabled the coupling reaction of not only primary alkyl electrophiles, but also sterically hindered secondary and tertiary alkyl electrophiles possessing β-hydrogens with various organometallic reagents to construct carbon skeletons. In addition, Ni catalysts opened a new era of asymmetric cross-coupling reaction using alkyl halides. Recent progress in nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of alkyl electrophiles with sp(3)-, sp(2)-, and sp-hybridized organometallic reagents including asymmetric variants as well as mechanistic insights of nickel catalysis are reviewed in this chapter. PMID:27580894

  15. The effect of electron induced hydrogenation of graphene on its electrical transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sung Oh; Teizer, Winfried

    2013-07-22

    We report a deterioration of the electrical transport properties of a graphene field effect transistor due to energetic electron irradiation on a stack of Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) on graphene (PMMA/graphene bilayer). Prior to electron irradiation, we observed that the PMMA layer on graphene does not deteriorate the carrier transport of graphene but improves its electrical properties instead. As a result of the electron irradiation on the PMMA/graphene bilayer, the Raman “D” band appears after removal of PMMA. We argue that the degradation of the transport behavior originates from the binding of hydrogen generated during the PMMA backbone secession process.

  16. [Hydrogen peroxide-induced lesions in the digestive tract. Apropos 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Asanza, G; Menchén, P L; Castellote, J I; Salcedo, M; Jaime, B; Senent, C; Castellanos, D; Cos, E

    1995-06-01

    Gastrointestinal injury caused by caustic products a are relatively infrequent, occurring mainly in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Accidental ingestion accounts for most of the cases, and the severity and extent of damage produced, depends on the composition and volume of the caustic agent ingested; endoscopy is a safe and effective diagnostic procedure. We report four unusual cases of caustic injury of the gastrointestinal tract due to hydrogen peroxide, two cases due to oral ingestion and another two due to the accidental administration of enemas, there was a good clinic and endoscopic recovery with conservative treatment. PMID:7612371

  17. Ablation properties of C/C-SiC composites tested on an arc heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jian; Zhang, Hongbo; Xiong, Xiang; Zuo, Jinglv; Tao, Huijin

    2011-11-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon and silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) composites were fabricated by a combination of chemical vapor infiltration and liquid silicon infiltration. Ablation properties of C/C-SiC composites and C/C composites with similar technique were tested on a high-pressure arc heater. The results show that ablation properties of C/C-SiC composites are more severe than those of C/C composites. Ablation of C/C-SiC composites includes oxidation, sublimation of SiC (Si), and mechanical denudation. Oxidation and sublimation of SiC (Si) lead to the enlarged ablation rates between carbon fibers and matrices, which finally cause serious ablation of C/C-SiC composites.

  18. Ligand-Induced Proton Transfer and Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bond Revealed by X-ray Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Derek A; Hargis, Jacqueline C; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Jaishankar, Priyadarshini; Defrees, Kyle; Smith, Emmanuel W; Wang, Kenneth K; Prati, Fabio; Renslo, Adam R; Woodcock, H Lee; Chen, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Ligand binding can change the pKa of protein residues and influence enzyme catalysis. Herein, we report three ultrahigh resolution X-ray crystal structures of CTX-M β-lactamase, directly visualizing protonation state changes along the enzymatic pathway: apo protein at 0.79 Å, precovalent complex with nonelectrophilic ligand at 0.89 Å, and acylation transition state (TS) analogue at 0.84 Å. Binding of the noncovalent ligand induces a proton transfer from the catalytic Ser70 to the negatively charged Glu166, and the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) between Ser70 and Lys73, with a length of 2.53 Å and the shared hydrogen equidistant from the heteroatoms. QM/MM reaction path calculations determined the proton transfer barrier to be 1.53 kcal/mol. The LBHB is absent in the other two structures although Glu166 remains neutral in the covalent complex. Our data represents the first X-ray crystallographic example of a hydrogen engaged in an enzymatic LBHB, and demonstrates that desolvation of the active site by ligand binding can provide a protein microenvironment conducive to LBHB formation. It also suggests that LBHBs may contribute to stabilization of the TS in general acid/base catalysis together with other preorganized features of enzyme active sites. These structures reconcile previous experimental results suggesting alternatively Glu166 or Lys73 as the general base for acylation, and underline the importance of considering residue protonation state change when modeling protein-ligand interactions. Additionally, the observation of another LBHB (2.47 Å) between two conserved residues, Asp233 and Asp246, suggests that LBHBs may potentially play a special structural role in proteins. PMID:26057252

  19. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    PubMed Central

    PAULA, Anabela Baptista; DIAS, Maria Isabel; FERREIRA, Manuel Marques; CARRILHO, Teresa; MARTO, Carlos Miguel; CASALTA, João; CABRITA, António Silvério; CARRILHO, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized. PMID:26537721

  20. Heterogeneous Spin States in Ultrathin Nanosheets Induce Subtle Lattice Distortion To Trigger Efficient Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youwen; Hua, Xuemin; Xiao, Chong; Zhou, Tengfei; Huang, Pengcheng; Guo, Zaiping; Pan, Bicai; Xie, Yi

    2016-04-20

    The exploration of efficient nonprecious metal eletrocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is an extraordinary challenge for future applications in sustainable energy conversion. The family of first-row-transition-metal dichalcogenides has received a small amount of research, including the active site and dynamics, relative to their extraordinary potential. In response, we developed a strategy to achieve synergistically active sites and dynamic regulation in first-row-transition-metal dichalcogenides by the heterogeneous spin states incorporated in this work. Specifically, taking the metallic Mn-doped pyrite CoSe2 as a self-adaptived, subtle atomic arrangement distortion to provide additional active edge sites for HER will occur in the CoSe2 atomic layers with Mn incorporated into the primitive lattice, which is visually verified by HRTEM. Synergistically, the density functional theory simulation results reveal that the Mn incorporation lowers the kinetic energy barrier by promoting H-H bond formation on two adjacently adsorbed H atoms, benefiting H2 gas evolution. As a result, the Mn-doped CoSe2 ultrathin nanosheets possess useful HER properties with a low overpotential of 174 mV, an unexpectedly small Tafel slope of 36 mV/dec, and a larger exchange current density of 68.3 μA cm(-2). Moreover, the original concept of coordinated regulation presented in this work can broaden horizons and provide new dimensions in the design of newly highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen evolution. PMID:27018462

  1. Theory of radical-induced ignition of counterflowing hydrogen versus oxygen at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Helenbrook, B.T.; Im, H.G.; Law, C.K.

    1998-01-01

    Ignition of hydrogen and oxygen in counterflow was studied using asymptotic methods for temperatures above that of crossover. Starting with seven elementary reaction steps, a reduced mechanism was derived using chemical steady-state approximations for the O and OH radicals. An algebraic ignition criterion was derived using this mechanism which predicts the ignition state as a function of the parameters defining the system. This criterion successfully explains the behavior analogous to the first and second explosion limits observed in homogeneous hydrogen-oxygen mixtures. A bifurcation analysis was then performed to clarify the ignition behavior. This analysis demonstrated that an ignition turning point can occur solely through the interaction of radical species with no contribution from heat release. The source of this turning was found to be the reaction H + HO{sub 2} {yields} 20H, confirming results from numerical calculations. Finally, the regimes in which abrupt or monotonic transition to an ignited state were recalculated including the effect of this reaction.

  2. Cytotoxic hydrogen bridged ruthenium quinaldamide complexes showing induced cancer cell death by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lord, Rianne M; Allison, Simon J; Rafferty, Karen; Ghandhi, Laura; Pask, Christopher M; McGowan, Patrick C

    2016-08-16

    This report presents the first known p-cymene ruthenium quinaldamide complexes which are stabilised by a hydrogen-bridging atom, [{(p-cym)Ru(II)X(N,N)}{H(+)}{(N,N)XRu(II)(p-cym)}][PF6] (N,N = functionalised quinaldamide and X = Cl or Br). These complexes are formed by a reaction of [p-cymRu(μ-X)2]2 with a functionalised quinaldamide ligand. When filtered over NH4PF6, and under aerobic conditions the equilibrium of NH4PF6 ⇔ NH3 + HPF6 enables incorporation of HPF6 and the stabilisation of two monomeric ruthenium complexes by a bridging H(+), which are counter-balanced by a PF6 counterion. X-ray crystallographic analysis is presented for six new structures with OO distances of 2.420(4)-2.448(15) Å, which is significant for strong hydrogen bonds. Chemosensitivity studies against HCT116, A2780 and cisplatin-resistant A2780cis human cancer cells showed the ruthenium complexes with a bromide ancillary ligand to be more potent than those with a chloride ligand. The 4'-fluoro compounds show a reduction in potency for both chloride and bromide complexes against all cell lines, but an increase in selectivity towards cancer cells compared to non-cancer ARPE-19 cells, with a selectivity index >1. Mechanistic studies showed a clear correlation between IC50 values and induction of cell death by apoptosis. PMID:27417660

  3. Traction–separation relationships for hydrogen induced grain boundary embrittlement in nickel via molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, Wesley; Dingreville, Rémi; Spearot, Douglas

    2015-10-19

    A statistical approach combined with molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the influence of hydrogen on intergranular decohesion. This methodology is applied to a Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] symmetric tilt grain boundary. Hydrogenated grain boundaries with different H concentrations are constructed using an energy minimization technique with initial H atom positions guided by Monte Carlo simulation results. Decohesion behavior is assessed through extraction of a traction–separation relationship during steady-state crack propagation in a statistically meaningful approach, building upon prior work employing atomistic cohesive zone volume elements (CZVEs). A sensitivity analysis is performed on the numerical approach used to extract the traction–separation relationships, clarifying the role of CZVE size, threshold parameters necessary to differentiate elastic and decohesion responses, and the numerical averaging technique. Results show that increasing H coverage at the Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] grain boundary asymmetrically influences the crack tip velocity during propagation, leads to a general decrease in the work of separation required for crack propagation, and provides a reduction in the peak stress in the extracted traction–separation relationship. Furthermore the present framework offers a meaningful vehicle to pass atomistically derived interfacial behavior to higher length scale formulations for intergranular fracture.

  4. Traction–separation relationships for hydrogen induced grain boundary embrittlement in nickel via molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barrows, Wesley; Dingreville, Rémi; Spearot, Douglas

    2015-10-19

    A statistical approach combined with molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the influence of hydrogen on intergranular decohesion. This methodology is applied to a Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] symmetric tilt grain boundary. Hydrogenated grain boundaries with different H concentrations are constructed using an energy minimization technique with initial H atom positions guided by Monte Carlo simulation results. Decohesion behavior is assessed through extraction of a traction–separation relationship during steady-state crack propagation in a statistically meaningful approach, building upon prior work employing atomistic cohesive zone volume elements (CZVEs). A sensitivity analysis is performed on the numerical approach used to extract the traction–separationmore » relationships, clarifying the role of CZVE size, threshold parameters necessary to differentiate elastic and decohesion responses, and the numerical averaging technique. Results show that increasing H coverage at the Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] grain boundary asymmetrically influences the crack tip velocity during propagation, leads to a general decrease in the work of separation required for crack propagation, and provides a reduction in the peak stress in the extracted traction–separation relationship. Furthermore the present framework offers a meaningful vehicle to pass atomistically derived interfacial behavior to higher length scale formulations for intergranular fracture.« less

  5. Carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide associations with regional bacterial diversity patterns in microbially induced concrete corrosion.

    PubMed

    Ling, Alison L; Robertson, Charles E; Harris, J Kirk; Frank, Daniel N; Kotter, Cassandra V; Stevens, Mark J; Pace, Norman R; Hernandez, Mark T

    2014-07-01

    The microbial communities associated with deteriorating concrete corrosion fronts were characterized in 35 samples taken from wastewater collection and treatment systems in ten utilities. Bacterial communities were described using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the V1V2 region of the small subunit ribosomal ribonucleic acid (SSU-rRNA) gene recovered from fresh corrosion products. Headspace gas concentrations (hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and methane), pore water pH, moisture content, and select mineralogy were tested for correlation to community outcomes and corrosion extent using pairwise linear regressions and canonical correspondence analysis. Corroding concrete was most commonly characterized by moisture contents greater than 10%, pore water pH below one, and limited richness (<10 taxa). Bacterial community composition was not correlated to geographic location when considered independently from other environmental factors. Corrosion was most severe in sites with high levels of hydrogen sulfide (>100 ppm) and carbon dioxide (>1%) gases, conditions which also were associated with low diversity biofilms dominated by members of the acidophilic sulfur-oxidizer genus Acidithiobacillus. PMID:24842376

  6. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide induced relaxation in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro is mediated by EDRF and cyclic GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zellers, T.; McCormick, J. )

    1991-03-15

    Xanthine and xanthine oxidase induced relaxations in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro are augmented in the presence of the endothelium and abolished by catalase, implicating hydrogen peroxide as an endothelium-dependent effector. To determine the mechanism whereby H{sub 2}O{sub 2} causes relaxations, isolated rings of fifth order porcine pulmonary artery, with (E{sup +}) and without (E{sup {minus}}) endothelium, were suspended in organ baths filled with buffer, and isometric tension was recorded. Hydrogen peroxide caused concentration-dependent, endothelium-augmented relaxations which were abolished by catalase and hydroquinone and reversed by L-nitroarginine and methylene blue. Prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}) levels, measured after a two minute exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in rings with endothelium were comparable to controls. This concentration of PGI{sub 2} does not cause relaxations in these rings. These data suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulates the release of an EDRF, causing relaxations mediated by cyclic GMP, which is independent of prostacyclin.

  8. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Accumulation Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Brassica campestris by Reestablishment of Reduced Glutathione Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Shen, Wenbiao; Shen, Zhenguo; Xia, Yan; Cui, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) was recently proposed as a therapeutic antioxidant and signaling molecule in clinical trials. However, the underlying physiological roles of H2 in plants remain unclear. In the present study, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize the physiological roles of H2 in enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris against cadmium (Cd). The results showed that both 50 μM CdCl2 and 50%-saturated HRW induced an increase of endogenous H2 in Brassica campestris seedlings, and HRW alleviated Cd toxicity related to growth inhibition and oxidative damage. Seedlings supplied with HRW exhibited increased root length and reduced lipid peroxidation, similar to plants receiving GSH post-treatment. Additionally, seedlings post-treated with HRW accumulated higher levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) and showed increased GST and GPX activities in roots. Molecular evidence illustrated that the expression of genes such as GS, GR1 and GR2, which were down-regulated following the addition of Cd, GSH or BSO, could be reversed to varying degrees by the addition of HRW. Based on these results, it could be proposed that H2 might be an important regulator for enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris seedlings against Cd, mainly by governing reduced glutathione homeostasis. PMID:26445361

  9. Heat shock protein 70 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced nucleolar fragmentation via suppressing cleavage and down-regulation of nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangkai; Deng, Gonghua; Chen, Guangwen; Liu, Meidong; Yi, Yuxin; Yang, Tubao; McMillan, Daniel R; Xiao, Xiangzhong

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that nucleolar fragmentation is a part of the overall apoptotic morphology, however, it is currently obscure whether and how nucleolar fragmentation can be induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) can prevent nucleolar fragmentation. To dissect these two questions, C(2)C(12) myogenic cells and immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with heat shock transcriptional factor 1 (HSF1) null mutation were treated with heat shock response (HS) (42.5 ± 0.5°C for 1 h and recovery at 37°C for 24 h) and then were insulted with 0.5 mmol/L H(2)O(2). Morphological changes of nucleoli were observed under contrast microscope or electronic microscope. It was found that (1) stimulation with H(2)O(2)-induced nucleolar fragmentation by mediating cleavage and down-regulation of nucleolar protein, nucleolin in C(2)C(12) myocytes and MEFs; (2) HS suppressed nucleolar fragmentation by inducing the expression of Hsp70 in an HSF1-dependent manner as indicated by assays of transfection with Hsp70 antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ONs) or recombinant plasmids of full-length Hsp70 cDNA; (3) protection of Hsp70 against nucleolar fragmentation was related to its accumulation in nucleolus mediated by nuclear localization sequence and its inhibition against cleavage and down-regulation of nucleolin. These results suggested that H(2)O(2)-induced nucleolar fragmentation and HS or Hsp70 inhibit H(2)O(2)-induced nucleolar fragmentation through the translocation of Hsp70 into nucleolar and its protection against impairment of nucleolin. PMID:21960124

  10. Hydrogen sulfide-induced itch requires activation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Long; Tian, Bin; Huang, Ya; Peng, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of gasotransmitters to itch sensation are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a ubiquitous gasotransmitter, in itch signaling. We found that intradermal injection of H2S donors NaHS or Na2S, but not GYY4137 (a slow-releasing H2S donor), dose-dependently induced scratching behavior in a μ-opioid receptor-dependent and histamine-independent manner in mice. Interestingly, NaHS induced itch via unique mechanisms that involved capsaicin-insensitive A-fibers, but not TRPV1-expressing C-fibers that are traditionally considered for mediating itch, revealed by depletion of TRPV1-expressing C-fibers by systemic resiniferatoxin treatment. Moreover, local application of capsaizapine (TRPV1 blocker) or HC-030031 (TRPA1 blocker) had no effects on NaHS-evoked scratching. Strikingly, pharmacological blockade and silencing of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel by mibefradil, ascorbic acid, zinc chloride or Cav3.2 siRNA dramatically decreased NaHS-evoked scratching. NaHS induced robust alloknesis (touch-evoked itch), which was inhibited by T-type calcium channels blocker mibefradil. Compound 48/80-induced itch was enhanced by an endogenous precursor of H2S (L-cysteine) but attenuated by inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase and cystathionine β-synthase. These results indicated that H2S, as a novel nonhistaminergic itch mediator, may activates Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, probably located at A-fibers, to induce scratching and alloknesis in mice. PMID:26602811

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Formaldehyde-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in PC12 Cells by Upregulation of SIRT-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Chen, Li-Xun; Wang, Li; Xie, Ming; Wang, Chun-Yan; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background Formaldehyde (FA), a well-known environmental pollutant, has been classified as a neurotoxic molecule. Our recent data demonstrate that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gaseous transmitter, has a protective effect on the neurotoxicity of FA. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this protection remain largely unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in the neurotoxicity of FA. Silent mating type information regulator 2 homolog 1 (SIRT-1), a histone deacetylases, has various biological activities, including the extension of lifespan, the modulation of ER stress, and the neuroprotective action. Objective We hypothesize that the protection of H2S against FA-induced neurotoxicity involves in inhibiting ER stress by upregulation of SIRT-1. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of H2S on FA-induced ER stress in PC12 cells and the contribution of SIRT-1 to the protection of H2S against FA-induced injuries, including ER stress, cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Principal Findings We found that exogenous application of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; an H2S donor) significantly attenuated FA-induced ER stress responses, including the upregulated levels of glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein, and cleaved caspase-12 expression. We showed that NaHS upregulates the expression of SIRT-1 in PC12 cells. Moreover, the protective effects of H2S on FA-elicited ER stress, cytotoxicity and apoptosis were reversed by Sirtinol, a specific inhibitor of SIRT-1. Conclusion/Significance These data indicate that H2S exerts its protection against the neurotoxicity of FA through overcoming ER stress via upregulation of SIRT-1. Our findings provide novel insights into the protective mechanisms of H2S against FA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:24587076

  12. Hydrogen sulfide-induced itch requires activation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Long; Tian, Bin; Huang, Ya; Peng, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of gasotransmitters to itch sensation are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a ubiquitous gasotransmitter, in itch signaling. We found that intradermal injection of H2S donors NaHS or Na2S, but not GYY4137 (a slow-releasing H2S donor), dose-dependently induced scratching behavior in a μ-opioid receptor-dependent and histamine-independent manner in mice. Interestingly, NaHS induced itch via unique mechanisms that involved capsaicin-insensitive A-fibers, but not TRPV1-expressing C-fibers that are traditionally considered for mediating itch, revealed by depletion of TRPV1-expressing C-fibers by systemic resiniferatoxin treatment. Moreover, local application of capsaizapine (TRPV1 blocker) or HC-030031 (TRPA1 blocker) had no effects on NaHS-evoked scratching. Strikingly, pharmacological blockade and silencing of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel by mibefradil, ascorbic acid, zinc chloride or Cav3.2 siRNA dramatically decreased NaHS-evoked scratching. NaHS induced robust alloknesis (touch-evoked itch), which was inhibited by T-type calcium channels blocker mibefradil. Compound 48/80-induced itch was enhanced by an endogenous precursor of H2S (L-cysteine) but attenuated by inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase and cystathionine β-synthase. These results indicated that H2S, as a novel nonhistaminergic itch mediator, may activates Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, probably located at A-fibers, to induce scratching and alloknesis in mice. PMID:26602811

  13. Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Collisional Complexes in Dense Hydrogen-Helium Gas Mixtures at Thousands of Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2011-06-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H{_2} molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H{_2}-H{_2}, H{_2}-He, and H{_2}-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H{_2} pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Absorption in Gases, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, 1993 and 2006 Xiaoping Li, Katharine L. C. Hunt, Fei Wang, Martin Abel, and Lothar Frommhold, "Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin", International Journal of Spectroscopy, vol. 2010, Article ID 371201, 11 pages, 2010. doi: 10.1155/2010/371201 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Collision-induced absorption by H{_2} pairs: From hundreds to thousands of Kelvin," J. Phys. Chem. A, published online, DOI: 10.1021/jp109441f L. Frommhold, M. Abel, F. Wang, M. Gustafsson, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Infrared atmospheric emission and absorption by simple molecular complexes, from first principles", Mol. Phys. 108, 2265, 2010

  14. A Comparison of Photo-Induced Hysteresis Between Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous IGZO Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Cho, Won-Ju; Chung, Hong-Bay; Koo, Sang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    We investigate photo-induced instability in thin-film transistors (TFTs) consisting of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) as active semiconducting layers by comparing with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). An a-IGZO TFT exhibits a large hysteresis window in the illuminated measuring condition but no hysteresis window in the dark condition. On the contrary, a large hysteresis window measured in the dark condition in a-Si:H was not observed in the illuminated condition. Even though such materials possess the structure of amorphous phase, optical responses or photo instability in TFTs looks different from each other. Photo-induced hysteresis results from initially trapped charges at the interface between semiconductor and dielectric films or in the gate dielectric which possess absorption energy to interact with deep trap-states and affect the movement of Fermi energy level. In order to support our claim, we also perform CV characteristics in photo-induced hysteresis and demonstrate thermal-activated hysteresis. We believe that this work can provide important information to understand different material systems for optical engineering which includes charge transport and band transition. PMID:26716230

  15. New line narrowing effects in the infrared collision-induced spectra of molecular hydrogens in liquid neon.

    PubMed

    Herrebout, W A; van der Veken, B J; Kouzov, A P

    2008-08-29

    The first spectroscopic observation of the relative (solute-solute) diffusion in a fluid environment is reported. New, unusually sharp Q1q(J) lines developing against the diffuse background in the collision-induced fundamental IR bands of hydrogen isotopomers (H2, D2, and HD) dissolved in liquid Ne (T approximately 25 K) are studied as functions of the solute concentration x. In all cases, the Q1q intensity parabolically scales with x, accompanied by a striking narrowing of the line shapes. The narrowing, as revealed by the p-H2 solution studies, is due to a faster growth with x of the sharper solute-solute induced component of the single Q1q(0) line. The latter as well as other observed solute-solute lines are strongly narrowed by fast velocity decorrelations and are signatures of microscopic-scale diffusion. Also, a first observation of the solute-solvent induced J-->J + 4 transitions is reported. PMID:18851607

  16. Panax Notoginseng Saponins Ameliorates Coxsackievirus B3-Induced Myocarditis by Activating the Cystathionine-γ-Lyase/Hydrogen Sulfide Pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lulu; Zhang, Yuanhai; Lu, Jiacheng; Geng, Zhimin; Jia, Lianhong; Rong, Xing; Wang, Zhenquan; Zhao, Qifeng; Wu, Rongzhou; Chu, Maoping; Zhang, Chunxiang

    2015-12-01

    This study is to determine the therapeutic effects of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNSs) on coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis, and whether cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE)/hydrogen sulfide (H2S) pathway is involved. Mouse model of myocarditis was induced by CVB3 infection, and the mice were subjected to vehicle (saline) or drug treatments (sodium bisulfide (NaHS), propargylglycine (PAG), or PNSs). The results showed that there were inflammatory cell infiltrations, interstitial edemas, and elevated inflammatory cytokines, in CVB3-induced myocarditis. PAG administration increased, whereas NaHS treatment decreased the severity of the myocarditis. PNS treatment dramatically alleviated these myocardial injuries and decreased the viral messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by the enhanced expression of CSE/H2S pathway. Moreover, the therapeutic effects of PNSs on myocarditis were stronger than those of NaHS. Finally, the effect of PNSs on CSE/H2S pathway and cardiac cell protection were verified in cultured cardiac cells. PNSs may be a promising medication for viral myocarditis therapy. PMID:26525047

  17. Novel phenanthridine (PHE-4i) derivative inhibits carrageenan-induced rat hind paw oedema through suppression of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    George, Leema; Ramasamy, Tamizhselvi; Manickam, Venkatraman; Iyer, Sathiyanarayanan Kulathu; Radhakrishnan, Vidya

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to assess the anti-inflammatory effect of a novel synthesized phenanthridine alkaloid (PHE-4i) and to examine the possible involvement of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in anti-inflammatory mechanism. The synthesized phenanthridine derivative PHE-4i (2, 5, and 10 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to rats. One hour following treatment, inflammation was induced by intraplantar injection of carrageenan (1 %), in the hind paw. Paw volume as the index of inflammation was measured before and after carrageenan injection. Neutrophil sequestration into the hind paw was quantified by measuring tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and was compared for the inhibition of H2S production. Pretreatment with PHE-4i significantly reduced carrageenan-induced hind paw weight, MPO activity, leukocyte infiltration, and H2S production in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.001). These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory effect of PHE-4i on carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema could be via the inhibition of the gaseous mediator H2S. PMID:27380491

  18. Homocysteine thiolactone induces apoptotic DNA damage mediated by increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide and caspase 3 activation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, R F; Huang, S M; Lin, B S; Wei, J S; Liu, T Z

    2001-05-11

    The cytotoxicity of homocysteine derivatives on chromosomal damage in somatic cells is not well established. The present study used reactive homocysteine derivative of homocysteine thiolactone (Hcy) to investigate its causal effect on apoptotic DNA injury in human promyeloid HL-60 cells. Our results demonstrated that Hcy induced cell death and features of apoptosis including increased phosphotidylserine exposure on the membrane surface, increased apoptotic cells with hypoploid DNA contents, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, all of which occurred in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hcy treatment also significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species H2O2, which coincided with the elimination of caspase 3 proenzyme levels and increased caspase 3 activity at the time of the appearance of apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Preincubation of Hcy-treated HL-60 cells with catalase completely scavenged intracellular H2O2, thus inhibiting caspase 3 activity and protecting cells from apoptotic DNA damage. In contrast, superoxide dismutase failed to inhibit Hcy-induced DNA damage. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Hcy exerted its genotoxic effects on HL-60 cells through an apoptotic pathway, which is mediated by the activation of caspase 3 activity induced by an increase in intracellular hydrogen peroxide. PMID:11432446

  19. Induction of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 by sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei-Hong; Harel, Miriam; Hla, Timothy; Ferrer, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Preliminary data derived from a human angiogenesis array in NB showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induced the secretion of several angiogenesis-related proteins including the important inflammatory factor chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of S1P-induced CCL2 expression in NB. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR and CCL2 ELISA were conducted to detect the mRNA expression and protein secretion of CCL2 in NB cells. Gain and loss of function studies were performed by using specific S1PR antagonists, adenoviral transduction and siRNA transfection. Macrophage F4/80 receptor in NB xenografts was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry staining. Results S1P induced CCL2 mRNA expression and protein secretion in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in NB cells. Blockade of S1P2 signaling using the selective S1P2 antagonist JTE-013 inhibited S1P-induced CCL2 expression. Overexpression of S1P2 by adenoviral transduction increased CCL2 secretion while knockdown of S1P2 by siRNA transfection decreased S1P-induced CCL2 secretion in NB cells. Macrophage infiltration, as detected by F4/80 staining, was significantly decreased in JTE-013-treated NB xenografts. Conclusions Taken together, our data for the first time demonstrate that S1P induced the macrophage-recruiting factor CCL2 expression in NB cells via S1P2, providing new insights into the complicated functions of S1P2 in cancer. PMID:25092091

  20. BDNF-TrkB Pathway Mediates Neuroprotection of Hydrogen Sulfide against Formaldehyde-Induced Toxicity to PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Sheng-Lan; Tian, Ying; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wang, Li; Gu, Hong-Feng; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a common environmental contaminant that has toxic effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Our previous data demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third endogenous gaseous mediator, has protective effects against FA-induced neurotoxicity. As is known to all, Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin gene family, mediates its neuroprotective properties via various intracellular signaling pathways triggered by activating the tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB). Intriguingly, our previous data have illustrated the upregulatory role of H2S on BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus of rats. Therefore, in this study, we hypothesized that H2S provides neuroprotection against FA toxicity by regulating BDNF-TrkB pathway. In the present study, we found that NaHS, a donor of H2S, upregulated the level of BDNF protein in PC12 cells, and significantly rescued FA-induced downregulation of BDNF levels. Furthermore, we found that pretreatment of PC12 cells with K252a, an inhibitor of the BDNF receptor TrkB, markedly reversed the inhibition of NaHS on FA-induced cytotoxicity and ablated the protective effects of NaHS on FA-induced oxidative stress, including the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (4-HNE), and malondialdehyde (MDA). We also showed that K252a abolished the inhibition of NaHS on FA-induced apoptosis, as well as the activation of caspase-3 in PC12 cells. In addition, K252a reversed the protection of H2S against FA-induced downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression and upregulation of Bax protein expression in PC12 cells. These data indicate that the BDNF-TrkB pathway mediates the neuroprotection of H2S against FA-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis in PC12 cells. These findings provide a novel mechanism underlying the protection of H2S against FA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25749582

  1. Hydrogen Balmer α line behavior in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy depth scans of Au, Cu, Mn, Pb targets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, G. S.; Benedetti, P. A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2010-07-01

    The behavior of hydrogen spectral emission of the plasmas obtained by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) measurement of four metal targets (Au, Cu, Mn, Pb) in air was investigated. The plasma was produced by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser emitting in the fundamental wavelength. A systematic study of the spatial-integrated plasma emission obtained by an in-depth scanning of the target was performed for each metal, both in single pulse and collinear double-pulse configurations. Further, a spatial-resolved analysis of the emission of plasma produced on the Al target by a single laser pulse was performed, in order to describe the spatial distribution of emitters deriving from the target and air elements. The line intensities of the main plasma components (target metal, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen) were measured in both experimental conditions. Results show that the hydrogen line intensity varies greatly as a function of the metal considered, and exhibits a marked decrease after the first laser shots. However, differently from emission lines due to surface impurities, the hydrogen line intensity reaches a constant level deep inside the target. The spatial-resolved measurements indicate that hydrogen atoms in the plasma mainly derive from the target surface and, only at a minor extent, from the dissociation of molecular hydrogen present in the surrounding air. These findings show that the calculation of plasma electron number density through the measurement of the Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer α line is possible also in depth scanning measurements.

  2. Exogenous low-dose hydrogen peroxide enhances drought tolerance of soybean (Glycine max L.) through inducing antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Guler, Neslihan Saruhan; Pehlivan, Necla

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) functions as a signal molecule in plants under abiotic and biotic stress. In this study, the role of exogenous H(2)O(2) in improving drought tolerance in two soybean cultivars (Glycine max L. Merrill) differing in their tolerance to drought was evaluated. Plants were grown in plastic pots with normal irrigation in a phytotron. Four weeks after radicle emergence, either 1 mM H(2)O(2) or distilled water was sprayed as foliar onto the leaves of each plant, after drought stress was applied. Leaf samples were harvested on the 4(th) and 7(th) days of the drought. Antioxidant-related enzyme activity, such as the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content was measured during the drought period. Drought stress decreased leaf water potential, relative water content and photosynthetic pigment content but enhanced lipid peroxidation and endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration. By contrast, exogenous low dose H(2)O(2) improved water status, pigment content and lipid peroxidation under drought stress. Endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration was reduced by exogenous H(2)O(2) as compared to drought treatment alone. H(2)O(2) pre-treatment induced all the antioxidant enzyme activities, to a greater extent than the control leaves, during drought. H(2)O(2) pretreatment further enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the tolerant cultivar compared to the sensitive cultivar. Results suggested that low dose H(2)O(2) pre-treatment alleviated water loss and H(2)O(2) content and increased drought stress tolerance by inducing the antioxidant system. PMID:27165528

  3. Electron-induced hydrogen loss in uracil in a water cluster environment.

    PubMed

    Smyth, M; Kohanoff, J; Fabrikant, I I

    2014-05-14

    Low-energy electron-impact hydrogen loss due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to the uracil and thymine molecules in a water cluster environment is investigated theoretically. Only the A(')-resonance contribution, describing the near-threshold behavior of DEA, is incorporated. Calculations are based on the nonlocal complex potential theory and the multiple scattering theory, and are performed for a model target with basic properties of uracil and thymine, surrounded by five water molecules. The DEA cross section is strongly enhanced when the attaching molecule is embedded in a water cluster. This growth is due to two effects: the increase of the resonance lifetime and the negative shift in the resonance position due to interaction of the intermediate negative ion with the surrounding water molecules. A similar effect was earlier found in DEA to chlorofluorocarbons. PMID:24832276

  4. Hydrogen-induced rupture of strained Si─O bonds in amorphous silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Al-Moatasem; Watkins, Matthew B; Grasser, Tibor; Afanas'ev, Valery V; Shluger, Alexander L

    2015-03-20

    Using ab initio modeling we demonstrate that H atoms can break strained Si─O bonds in continuous amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO(2)) networks, resulting in a new defect consisting of a threefold-coordinated Si atom with an unpaired electron facing a hydroxyl group, adding to the density of dangling bond defects, such as E' centers. The energy barriers to form this defect from interstitial H atoms range between 0.5 and 1.3 eV. This discovery of unexpected reactivity of atomic hydrogen may have significant implications for our understanding of processes in silica glass and nanoscaled silica, e.g., in porous low-permittivity insulators, and strained variants of a-SiO(2). PMID:25839289

  5. Hydrogenations and electric field induced magnetic behaviors in armchair silicene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Long, Mengqiu; Xie, Fang; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Hui; Gao, Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Using the first-principles calculations, we investigate the geometric, electronic and magnetic properties of armchair silicene nanoribbons with different edge hydrogenations. Our results show that the interesting magnetic behaviors such as the bipolar magnetic semiconductor can be found. Moreover, the addition of the transverse electric field can modulate the bipolar magnetic semiconductor to half-metal or spin-splitting metal. And the spin-up electrons are localized at one edge, the spin-down holes localized at the opposite edge under the external electric field. These results may present a new avenue for band engineering of silicene nanoribbons and benefit the design of silicon-based nano-spin-devices in nanoelectronics. PMID:27026136

  6. Hydrogenations and electric field induced magnetic behaviors in armchair silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Long, Mengqiu; Xie, Fang; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Hui; Gao, Yongli

    2016-03-01

    Using the first-principles calculations, we investigate the geometric, electronic and magnetic properties of armchair silicene nanoribbons with different edge hydrogenations. Our results show that the interesting magnetic behaviors such as the bipolar magnetic semiconductor can be found. Moreover, the addition of the transverse electric field can modulate the bipolar magnetic semiconductor to half-metal or spin-splitting metal. And the spin-up electrons are localized at one edge, the spin-down holes localized at the opposite edge under the external electric field. These results may present a new avenue for band engineering of silicene nanoribbons and benefit the design of silicon-based nano-spin-devices in nanoelectronics.

  7. A Transient Model of Induced Natural Circulation Thermal Cycling for Hydrogen Isotope Separation

    SciTech Connect

    SHADDAY, MARTIN

    2005-07-12

    The property of selective temperature dependence of adsorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes by palladium is used for isotope separation. A proposal to use natural circulation of nitrogen to alternately heat and cool a packed bed of palladium coated beads is under active investigation, and a device consisting of two interlocking natural convection loops is being designed. A transient numerical model of the device has been developed to aid the design process. It is a one-dimensional finite-difference model, using the Boussinesq approximation. The thermal inertia of the pipe walls and other heat structures as well as the heater control logic is included in the model. Two system configurations were modeled and results are compared.

  8. Hydrogenations and electric field induced magnetic behaviors in armchair silicene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Long, Mengqiu; Xie, Fang; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Hui; Gao, Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Using the first-principles calculations, we investigate the geometric, electronic and magnetic properties of armchair silicene nanoribbons with different edge hydrogenations. Our results show that the interesting magnetic behaviors such as the bipolar magnetic semiconductor can be found. Moreover, the addition of the transverse electric field can modulate the bipolar magnetic semiconductor to half-metal or spin-splitting metal. And the spin-up electrons are localized at one edge, the spin-down holes localized at the opposite edge under the external electric field. These results may present a new avenue for band engineering of silicene nanoribbons and benefit the design of silicon-based nano-spin-devices in nanoelectronics. PMID:27026136

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induced cell death: One or two modes of action?

    PubMed

    Uhl, Lionel; Gerstel, Audrey; Chabalier, Maialène; Dukan, Sam

    2015-12-01

    Imlay and Linn show that exposure of logarithmically growing Escherichia coli to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) leads to two kinetically distinguishable modes of cell killing. Mode one killing is pronounced near 1 mM concentration of H2O2 and is caused by DNA damage, whereas mode-two killing requires higher concentration ([Formula: see text]). The second mode seems to be essentially due to damage to all macromolecules. This phenomenon has also been observed in Fenton in vitro systems with DNA nicking caused by hydroxyl radical ([Formula: see text]). To our knowledge, there is currently no mathematical model for predicting mode one killing in vitro or in vivo after H2O2 exposure. We propose a simple model, using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. Using this model, we show that available iron and cell density, two factors potentially involved in ROS dynamics, play a major role in the prediction of the experimental results obtained by our team and in previous studies. Indeed the presence of the mode one killing is strongly related to those two parameters. To our knowledge, mode-one death has not previously been explained. Imlay and Linn (Imlay and Linn, 1986) suggested that perhaps the amount of the toxic species was reduced at high concentrations of H2O2 because hydroxyl (or other) radicals might be quenched directly by hydrogen peroxide with the concomitant formation of superoxide anion (a less toxic species). We demonstrate (mathematically and numerically) that free available iron decrease is necessary to explain mode one killing which cannot appear without it and that H2O2 quenching or consumption is not responsible for mode-one death. We are able to follow ROS concentration (particularly responsible for mode one killing) after exposure to H2O2. This model therefore allows us to understand two major parameters involved in the presence or not of the first killing mode. PMID:27441232

  10. Concentration, temperature, and density in a hydrogen-air flame by excimer-induced Raman scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Bowling, John M.; Pitz, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) is an attractive laser diagnostic for the study of supersonic hydrogen-air combustion. The VRS technique gives a complete thermodynamic description of the gas mixture at a point in the reacting flow. Single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering can simultaneously provide independent measurements of density, temperature, and concentration of each major species (H2, H2O, O2 and N2) in a hydrogen/air turbulent combustor. Also the pressure can be calculated using the ideal gas law. However, single-pulse VRS systems in current use for measurement of turbulent combustion have a number of shortcomings when applied to supersonic flows: (1) slow repetition rate (1 to 5 Hz), (2) poor spatial resolution (0.5x0.3x0.3 cu mm), and (3) marginal time resolution. Most of these shortcomings are due to the use of visible wavelength flash-lamp pumped dye lasers. The advent of UV excimer laser allows the possibility of dramatic improvements in the single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering. The excimer based VRS probe will greatly improve repetition rate (100 to 500 Hz), spatial resolution (0.1x0.1x0.1 cu mm) and time resolution (30ns). These improvements result from the lower divergence of the UV excimer, higher repetition rate, and the increased Raman cross-sections (15 to 20 times higher) at ultra-violet (UV) wavelengths. With this increased capability, single-pulse vibrational Raman scattering promises to be an ideal non-intrusive probe for the study of hypersonic propulsion flows.

  11. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced oxidative stress responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Redding-Johanson, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Bender, K.S.; Keasling, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.; Fields, M.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Luo, F.; Deng, Y.; He, Q.

    2010-07-01

    To understand how sulphate-reducing bacteria respond to oxidative stresses, the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses were investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and induced chemical species (e.g. polysulfide, ROS) and redox potential shift increased the expressions of the genes involved in detoxification, thioredoxin-dependent reduction system, protein and DNA repair, and decreased those involved in sulfate reduction, lactate oxidation and protein synthesis. A gene coexpression network analysis revealed complicated network interactions among differentially expressed genes, and suggested possible importance of several hypothetical genes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. Also, most of the genes in PerR and Fur regulons were highly induced, and the abundance of a Fur regulon protein increased. Mutant analysis suggested that PerR and Fur are functionally overlapped in response to stresses induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and reaction products, and the upregulation of thioredoxin-dependent reduction genes was independent of PerR or Fur. It appears that induction of those stress response genes could contribute to the increased resistance of deletion mutants to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses. In addition, a conceptual cellular model of D. vulgaris responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress was constructed to illustrate that this bacterium may employ a complicated molecular mechanism to defend against the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses.

  12. Zingerone protects against stannous chloride-induced and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Iyappan; Narayanan, Nithya; Rabindran, Remitha; Jayasree, P R; Manish Kumar, P R

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the dose-dependent antioxidant activity and DNA protective effects of zingerone. At 500 μg/mL, the DPPH radical scavenging activity of zingerone and ascorbic acid as a standard was found to be 86.7 and 94.2 % respectively. At the same concentration, zingerone also showed significant reducing power (absorbance 0.471) compared to that of ascorbic acid (absorbance 0.394). The in vitro toxicity of stannous chloride (SnCl2) was evaluated using genomic and plasmid DNA. SnCl2-induced degradation of genomic DNA was found to occur at a concentration of 0.8 mM onwards with complete degradation at 1.02 mM and above. In the case of plasmid DNA, conversion of supercoiled DNA into the open circular form indicative of DNA nicking activity was observed at a concentration of 0.2 mM onwards; complete conversion was observed at a concentration of 1.02 mM and above. Zingerone was found to confer protection against SnCl2-induced oxidative damage to genomic and plasmid DNA at concentrations of 500 and 750 μg/mL onwards, respectively. This protective effect was further confirmed in the presence of UV/H2O2-a known reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system-wherein protection by zingerone against ROS-mediated DNA damage was observed at a concentration of 250 μg/mL onwards in a dose-dependent manner. This study clearly indicated the in vitro DNA protective property of zingerone against SnCl2-induced, ROS-mediated DNA damage. PMID:24006104

  13. Piper sarmentosum as an antioxidant on oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by hydrogen peroxide*

    PubMed Central

    Hafizah, Abdul Hamid; Zaiton, Zakaria; Zulkhairi, Amom; Mohd Ilham, Adenan; Nor Anita, Megat Mohd Nordin; Zaleha, Abdullah Mahdy

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cell death due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) may contribute to the initial endothelial injury, which promotes atherosclerotic lesion formation. Piper sarmentosum (PS), a natural product, has been shown to have an antioxidant property, which is hypothesized to inhibit production of ROS and prevent cell injury. Thus, the present study was designed to determine the effects of PS on the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative cell damage in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In this experiment, HUVECs were obtained by collagenase perfusion of the large vein in the umbilical cord and cultured in medium M200 supplemented with low serum growth supplementation (LSGS). HUVECs were treated with various concentrations of H2O2 (0–1000 µmol/L) and it was observed that 180 µmol/L H2O2 reduced cell viability by 50% as denoted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Using the above concentration as the positive control, the H2O2-induced HUVECs were concomitantly treated with various concentrations (100, 150, 250 and 300 µg/ml) of three different extracts (aqueous, methanol and hexane) of PS. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) levels showed a significant increase (P<0.05) in HUVECs compared to the negative control. However, PS extracts showed a protective effect on HUVECs from H2O2-induced cell apoptosis with a significant reduction in MDA, SOD, CAT and GPX levels (P<0.05). Furthermore, PS had exhibited ferric reducing antioxidant power with its high phenolic content. Hence, it was concluded that PS plays a beneficial role in reducing oxidative stress in H2O2-induced HUVECs. PMID:20443214

  14. ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENICALS SENSITIZE HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lungs are a target organ for arsenic carcinogenesis, however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that inorganic arsenic (iAs) can potentiate DNA damage induced by other agents. Once inside the human body iAs generally undergoes two ...

  15. Centella asiatica extracts modulate hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Joo; Cha, Hwa Jun; Nam, Ki Ho; Yoon, Yeongmin; Lee, Hyunjin; An, Sungkwan

    2011-12-01

    Centella asiatica (C. asiatica) is a pharmacological plant in South Asia. It has been demonstrated that C. asiatica extracts containing various pentacyclic triterpenes exert healing effects, especially wound healing and collagen synthesis in skin. However, there are few studies on the effect of C. asiatica extracts on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). To determine whether H(2) O(2) -induced senescence is affected by C. asiatica extracts, we performed senescence analysis on cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). We also analysed whole gene expression level using microarrays and showed that 39 mRNAs are differentially expressed in H(2) O(2) -induced HDFs with and without treatment with C. asiatica extracts. These genes regulate apoptosis, gene silencing, cell growth, transcription, senescence, DNA replication and the spindle checkpoint. Differential expression of FOXM1, E2F2, MCM2, GDF15 and BHLHB2 was confirmed using semi-quantitative PCR. In addition, C. asiatica extracts rescued the H(2) O(2) -induced repression of replication in HDFs. Therefore, the findings presented here suggest that C. asiatica extracts might regulate SIPS by preventing repression of DNA replication and mitosis-related gene expression. PMID:22092576

  16. Metal Azolate/Carboxylate Frameworks as Catalysts in Oxidative and C-C Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tăbăcaru, Aurel; Xhaferaj, Nertil; Martins, Luísa M D R S; Alegria, Elisabete C B A; Chay, Rogério S; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Domasevitch, Konstantin V; Pombeiro, Armando J L; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio

    2016-06-20

    The five metal azolate/carboxylate (MAC) compounds [Cd(dmpzc)(DMF)(H2O)] (Cd-dmpzc), [Pd(H2dmpzc)2Cl2] (Pd-dmpzc), [Cu(Hdmpzc)2] (Cu-dmpzc), [Zn4O(dmpzc)3]·Solv (Zn-dmpzc·S), and [Co4O(dmpzc)3]·Solv (Co-dmpzc·S) were isolated by coupling 3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-carboxylic acid (H2dmpzc) to cadmium(II), palladium(II), copper(II), zinc(II), and cobalt(II) salts. While Cd-dmpzc and Pd-dmpzc had never been prepared in the past, for Cu-dmpzc, Zn-dmpzc·S, and Co-dmpzc·S we optimized alternative synthetic paths that, in the case of the copper(II) and cobalt(II) derivatives, are faster and grant higher yields than the previously reported ones. The crystal structure details were determined ab initio (Cd-dmpzc and Pd-dmpzc) or refined (Cu-dmpzc, Zn-dmpzc·S, and Co-dmpzc·S) by means of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). While Cd-dmpzc is a nonporous 3D MAC framework, Pd-dmpzc shows a 3D hybrid coordination/hydrogen-bonded network, in which Pd(H2dmpzc)2Cl2 monomers are present. The thermal behavior of the five MAC compounds was investigated by coupling thermal analysis to variable-temperature PXRD. Their catalytic activity was assessed in oxidative and C-C coupling reactions, with the copper(II) and cadmium(II) derivatives being the first nonporous MAC frameworks to be tested as catalysts. Cu-dmpzc is the most active catalyst in the partial oxidation of cyclohexane by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in acetonitrile (yields up to 12% after 9 h) and is remarkably active in the solvent-free microwave-assisted oxidation of 1-phenylethanol to acetophenone (yields up to 99% at 120 °C in only 0.5 h). On the other hand, activated Zn-dmpzc·S (Zn-dmpzc) is the most active catalyst in the Henry C-C coupling reaction of aromatic aldehydes with nitroethane, showing appreciable diastereoselectivity toward the syn-nitroalkanol isomer (syn:anti selectivity up to 79:21). PMID:27266480

  17. Effect of standardized fruit extract of Luffa cylindrica on oxidative stress markers in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Suchita; Saha, Sudipta; Kaithwas, Gaurav; Saraf, Shubhini A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The ability of Luffa cylindrica Roem fruit extract (LCE) to modulate biochemical parameters was investigated by in vitro studies for its role in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract on isolated goat lenses which were incubated for 72 h at 37°C. Materials and Methods: Test groups contained 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 µg/ml of LCE along with 1 ml of H2O2 (0.5 mM) as cataract inducer. Lenses were examined for morphological variation and transparency periodically during the incubation. Biochemical parameters such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), total protein content (TPC), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were estimated. Results: SOD, GSH, and TPC levels were found to increase proportionally with the concentration of LCE. However, MDA levels were found to be inversely proportional to the concentration of LCE. Opacity was graded as per “lens opacities classification system III.” Morphological examination suggested that LCE (25 µg/ml) maintained a vision for 44 h. No lens in LCE dose groups developed dense nuclear opacity after 24 h as opposed to 80% in negative control. Conclusion: The results suggest that LCE can delay the onset and/or prevent the progression of cataract which can be attributed to the presence of adequate phenolics, flavonoids, and Vitamin A and its high nutritional value. This preliminary study can be further synergized by testing LCE against other in vivo and in vitro models of cataract. PMID:26729957

  18. Protective effects of rice dreg protein hydrolysates against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HepG-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxia; Wang, Li; Wang, Ren; Luo, Xiaohu; Li, Yanan; Chen, Zhengxing

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of rice dreg protein hydrolysates (RDPHs) obtained by various proteases on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HepG-2 cells were investigated. Cell cytotoxicity was evaluated through the aspects of cell viability, ROS level, antioxidant enzyme activity, and production of malondialdehyde (MDA). Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Molecular weight distribution was analyzed by gel permeation chromatography, and amino acid composition was measured using an automatic amino acid analyzer. The survival of cells and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were significantly increased through the pre-incubation of HepG-2 cells with RDPHs before H2O2 exposure. Additionally, these pretreatments also resulted in a reduction in ROS and MDA levels. As a result, apoptosis and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential of the HepG-2 cells were alleviated. Furthermore, the protective effects of protein hydrolysates obtained by various proteases were noticeably distinct, in which RDPHs prepared by alkaline protease showed higher antioxidant activities. The difference in the protective effects might be attributed to the specific peptide or amino acid composition. Therefore, enzymatic hydrolysis with different enzymes studied here could attenuate H2O2-induced cell damage, and the type of protease greatly influenced the anti-oxidative activity. Particularly, optimum use of Alcalase could produce peptides with higher antioxidant activity. PMID:26843356

  19. Hydrogen adsorption induced antiferrodistortive distortion and metallization at the (001) surface of SrTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yi; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Dan

    2015-09-14

    SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) is attracting lots of research interests due to the rich physics and properties presented at its surfaces and the interfaces of STO with other transition metal oxides. Based on density functional theory methods, we have investigated the influence of hydrogen (H) atoms adsorption at the (001) surface of STO on the geometrical and electronic structures of the surface. We find that H adsorption induces significant antiferrodistortive (AFD) distortion of TiO{sub 6} octahedra at the surface. By calculating H adsorption energy, we show that AFD distortion makes a significant contribution to the stability of H adsorbed STO surfaces. The calculated energy position of O-H bond states by hybrid functional method is 9.9 eV below Fermi level, in agreement with experimental value of 10 eV. The electrons donated by H atoms first occupy several d{sub xy} bands and then start to fill in degenerate d{sub yz}/d{sub xz} bands, indicating the metallization of initially insulating STO. The band splitting and occupy sequence calculated here are consistent with recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments. Our results reveal that H adsorption changes the atomic and electronic structures and thus induce fascinating properties at the surface of STO.

  20. First principles study of pressure induced structural phase transition in hydrogen storage material—MgH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagaprabha, S.; Asvinimeenaatci, A. T.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Iyakutti, K.

    2012-01-01

    First principles calculation were performed using Vienna ab-initio simulation package within the frame work of density functional theory (DFT) to understand the electronic properties of magnesium hydride. At normal pressure, the most stable structure of MgH 2 is rutile type with a wide band gap of 3.52 eV, which agrees well with the available data. A pressure induced semi-conductor to metallic transition at a pressure of 92.54 GPa is predicted. Our results indicate a sequence of pressure induced structural phase transition in MgH 2. The obtained sequence of phase transition was α→γ→β→δ→ε at a pressure of 0.37 GPa, 3.89 GPa,7.23 GPa and 11.26 GPa, respectively. Thus our results indicate that MgH 2 is one of the best hydrogen storage material and the maximum storage capacity achieved was 7.7%.

  1. Hazards Induced by Breach of Liquid Rocket Fuel Tanks: Conditions and Risks of Cryogenic Liquid Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixture Explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osipov, Viatcheslav; Muratov, Cyrill; Hafiychuk, Halyna; Ponizovskya-Devine, Ekaterina; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Mathias, Donovan; Lawrence, Scott; Werkheiser, Mary

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the data of purposeful rupture experiments with LOx and LH2 tanks, the Hydrogen-Oxygen Vertical Impact (HOVI) tests that were performed to clarify the ignition mechanisms, the explosive power of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures under different conditions, and to elucidate the puzzling source of the initial formation of flames near the intertank section during the Challenger disaster. We carry out a physics-based analysis of general explosions scenarios for cryogenic gaseous H2/Ox mixtures and determine their realizability conditions, using the well-established simplified models from the detonation and deflagration theory. We study the features of aerosol H2/Ox mixture combustion and show, in particular, that aerosols intensify the deflagration flames and can induce detonation for any ignition mechanism. We propose a cavitation-induced mechanism of self-ignition of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures that may be realized when gaseous H2 and Ox flows are mixed with a liquid Ox turbulent stream, as occurred in all HOVI tests. We present an overview of the HOVI tests to make conclusion on the risk of strong explosions in possible liquid rocket incidents and provide a semi-quantitative interpretation of the HOVI data based on aerosol combustion. We uncover the most dangerous situations and discuss the foreseeable risks which can arise in space missions and lead to tragic outcomes. Our analysis relates to only unconfined mixtures that are likely to arise as a result of liquid propellant space vehicle incidents.

  2. Evaluating the effects of galbanic acid on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kobra; Behravan, Javad; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Mehmankhah, Babak; Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Ferula szowitsiana has been widely used for medicinal purposes around the world. The anti-oxidant effect of F. szowitsiana had been proved. The current study aims to determine the protective effects of galbanic acid, a sesquiterpene coumarin from F. szowitsiana, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) - induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Human lymphocytes were incubated with H2O2 (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 µM), galbanic acid (200 and 400 µM) and a combination of galbanic acid (200 and 400 µM) and H2O2 (25 µM) at 4 C for 30 minutes. Solvents of galbanic acid without H2O2 were used as negative controls. Results: The findings of this study demonstrated that H2O2 exposure leads to a significant concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage. Galbanic acid did not cause DNA damage compared with the control cells. Data showed that galbanic acid does not have a protective effect against H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Conclusion: According to the results, it is concluded that the capability of F. szowitsiana in reducing reactive oxygen species and the anti-inflammatory property of its methanolic extract may be due to its other ingredients. PMID:25386396

  3. A rapid transcriptional activation is induced by the dormancy-breaking chemical hydrogen cyanamide in kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) buds

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Eric F.; Wu, Rong-Mei; Richardson, Annette C.; Davy, Marcus; Hellens, Roger P.; Thodey, Kate; Janssen, Bart J.; Gleave, Andrew P.; Rae, Georgina M.; Wood, Marion; Schaffer, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Budbreak in kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) can be poor in locations that have warm winters with insufficient winter chilling. Kiwifruit vines are often treated with the dormancy-breaking chemical hydrogen cyanamide (HC) to increase and synchronize budbreak. This treatment also offers a tool to understand the processes involved in budbreak. A genomics approach is presented here to increase our understanding of budbreak in kiwifruit. Most genes identified following HC application appear to be associated with responses to stress, but a number of genes appear to be associated with the reactivation of growth. Three patterns of gene expression were identified: Profile 1, an HC-induced transient activation; Profile 2, an HC-induced transient activation followed by a growth-related activation; and Profile 3, HC- and growth-repressed. One group of genes that was rapidly up-regulated in response to HC was the glutathione S-transferase (GST) class of genes, which have been associated with stress and signalling. Previous budbreak studies, in three other species, also report up-regulated GST expression. Phylogenetic analysis of these GSTs showed that they clustered into two sub-clades, suggesting a strong correlation between their expression and budbreak across species. PMID:19651683

  4. Thiamine-induced priming against root-knot nematode infection in rice involves lignification and hydrogen peroxide generation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Kun; Ji, Hong-Li; Gheysen, Godelieve; Kyndt, Tina

    2016-05-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1, VB1) can act as a plant defence trigger, or priming agent, leading to a rapid counterattack on pathogen invasion. In this study, the priming effect of thiamine on rice (Oryza sativa cv. Nipponbare) and its activity against root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola) infection were evaluated. Thiamine treatment and subsequent nematode inoculation activated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) accumulation and lignin deposition in plant roots, and this correlated with enhanced transcription of OsPAL1 and OsC4H, two genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The number of nematodes in rice roots was slightly but significantly reduced, and the development of the nematodes was delayed, whereas no direct toxic effects of VB1 on nematode viability and infectivity were observed. The combined application of thiamine with l-2-aminooxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP), an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), significantly hampered the VB1-priming capacity. These findings indicate that thiamine-induced priming in rice involves H2 O2 and phenylpropanoid-mediated lignin production, which hampers nematode infection. Further cellular and molecular studies on the mechanism of thiamine-induced defence will be useful for the development of novel nematode control strategies. PMID:27103216

  5. Effects of mulberry ethanol extracts on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Rae; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Ki Rim; Kim, Young Eon; Baek, Nam In; Hong, Eock Kee

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of mammalian cellular damage and are associated with diseases such as aging, arteriosclerosis, inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops upon the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which is partly due to ROS activity. In this study, we investigated the cytoprotective and anti-oxidative effects of fractionated mulberry extracts in mouse insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells (MIN6N cells). Treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced significant cell death and increased intracellular ROS levels, lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation in the MIN6N cells. Fractionated mulberry extracts significantly reduced the H2O2-dependent production of intracellular ROS, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and lipid peroxidation. In addition, mulberry extracts inhibited DNA fragmentation induced by H2O2. Thus, the antioxidant properties of mulberry extracts in pancreatic β-cells may be exploited for the prevention or treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:24154764

  6. Time-resolved experimental and computational study of two-photon laser-induced fluorescence in a hydrogen plasma

    PubMed

    van Der Heijden HW; Boogaarts; Mazouffre; van Der Mullen JA; Schram

    2000-04-01

    The time profile of the fluorescence light emission of atomic hydrogen in an expanding plasma beam after pulsed excitation with a nanosecond laser is studied, both experimentally and computationally. Ground state H atoms in an expanding Ar-H cascaded arc plasma are excited to the p=3 level using two-photon laser excitation at 205 nm. The resulting fluorescence is resolved in time with a fast photomultiplier tube to investigate the occurrence of quenching. A fluorescence decay time of (10+/-0.5) ns is measured under all circumstances, indicating that there is a complete l mixing of the p=3 sublevels. A time-resolved collisional radiative model is developed to model pulsed laser induced fluorescence for a large range of plasma parameters. The model calculations agree well with the experimental results over the entire range of conditions and indicate that two-photon LIF can strongly influence the local electron and ion densities, resulting in a "self-quenching" of the laser-induced H fluorescence. PMID:11088238

  7. The sigma-1 receptor-zinc finger protein 179 pathway protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Tzu-Chieh; Lin, Shu-Hui; Lee, Pin-Tse; Yeh, Shiu-Hwa; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Chou, Szu-Yi; Su, Tsung-Ping; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Chuang, Jian-Ying

    2016-06-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have implicated the pathogenesis of several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, hence protecting neurons against ROS is very important. In this study, we focused on sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), a chaperone at endoplasmic reticulum, and investigated its protective functions. Using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced ROS accumulation model, we verified that apoptosis-signaling pathways were elicited by H2O2 treatment. However, the Sig-1R agonists, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), reduced the activation of apoptotic pathways significantly. By performing protein-protein interaction assays and shRNA knockdown of Sig-1R, we identified the brain Zinc finger protein 179 (Znf179) as a downstream target of Sig-1R regulation. The neuroprotective effect of Znf179 overexpression was similar to that of DHEAS treatment, and likely mediated by affecting the levels of antioxidant enzymes. We also quantified the levels of peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the hippocampi of wild-type and Znf179 knockout mice, and found both enzymes to be reduced in the knockout versus the wild-type mice. In summary, these results reveal that Znf179 plays a novel role in neuroprotection, and Sig-1R agonists may be therapeutic candidates to prevent ROS-induced damage in neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic diseases. PMID:26792191

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology, Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, and Synaptic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kyles, Philip; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) level is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). During transsulfuration pathways, Hcy is metabolized into hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a synaptic modulator, as well as a neuro-protective agent. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation, in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and synaptic dysfunction, leading to AD pathology is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibition of neuronal NMDA-R by H2S and MK801 mitigate the Hcy-induced BBB disruption and synapse dysfunction, in part by decreasing neuronal matrix degradation. Hcy intracerebral (IC) treatment significantly impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral circulation and memory function. Hcy treatment also decreases the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in the brain along with increased expression of NMDA-R (NR1) and synaptosomal Ca(2+) indicating excitotoxicity. Additionally, we found that Hcy treatment increased protein and mRNA expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 and also increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the brain. The increased expression of ICAM-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the decreased expression of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and claudin-5 indicates BBB disruption and vascular inflammation. Moreover, we also found decreased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP-97), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showing synapse dysfunction in the hippocampus. Furthermore, NaHS and MK801 treatment ameliorates BBB disruption, CBF, and synapse functions in the mice brain. These results demonstrate a neuro-protective effect of H2S over Hcy-induced

  9. Neuroprotective effect of Citrus unshiu immature peel and nobiletin inhibiting hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 murine hippocampal neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Jung, Su Young; Lee, Gyeong Hwan; Cho, Jung Hee; Choi, In Young

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress-induced cell damage is common in the etiology of several neurobiological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In a case study, nobiletin-rich Citrus reticulata peels could prevent the progression of cognitive impairment in donepezil-preadministered Alzheimer's disease patients. Objective: In this study, we investigated the effects and underlying mechanism of nobiletin and Citrus unshiu immature peel (CUIP) water extract, which contains nobiletin as a major compound, on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal neuronal model. Materials and Methods: HT22 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide in the presence or absence of various concentrations of CUIP and nobiletin. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic protein levels were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and Western blotting. Results: Pretreatment with CUIP and nobiletin inhibited cell death due to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide-induced the expression of phospho-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) and p-p38 proteins in HT22 cells; however CUIP and nobiletin suppressed p-JNK and p-p38 without changing JNK or p38. Regarding apoptosis, caspase 3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and Bax protein expression was determined. CUIP and nobiletin suppressed caspase 3 and Bax expression, but they induced Bcl-2 expression in HT22 cells. Conclusion: These results show that CUIP and nobiletin can protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in HT22 neurons via mitogen-activated protein kinases and apoptotic pathways. PMID:26664016

  10. Tadalafil Integrates Nitric Oxide-Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling to Inhibit High Glucose-induced Matrix Protein Synthesis in Podocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hak Joo; Feliers, Denis; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M.; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Gorin, Yves; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes-induced kidney cell injury involves an increase in matrix protein expression that is only partly alleviated by current treatment, prompting a search for new modalities. We have previously shown that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits high glucose-induced protein synthesis in kidney podocytes. We tested whether tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor used to treat erectile dysfunction, ameliorates high glucose stimulation of matrix proteins by generating H2S in podocytes. Tadalafil abrogated high glucose stimulation of global protein synthesis and matrix protein laminin γ1. Tadalafil inhibited high glucose-induced activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 and laminin γ1 accumulation in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner. Tadalafil increased AMPK phosphorylation by stimulating calcium-calmodulin kinase kinase β. Tadalafil rapidly increased the expression and activity of the H2S-generating enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) by promoting its translation. dl-Propargylglycine, a CSE inhibitor, and siRNA against CSE inhibited tadalafil-induced AMPK phosphorylation and abrogated the tadalafil effect on high glucose stimulation of laminin γ1. In tadalafil-treated podocytes, we examined the interaction between H2S and nitric oxide (NO). Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one, inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase, respectively, abolished tadalafil induction of H2S and AMPK phosphorylation. Tadalafil rapidly augmented inducible NOS (iNOS) expression by increasing its mRNA, and siRNA for iNOS and 1400W, an iNOS blocker, inhibited tadalafil stimulation of CSE expression and AMPK phosphorylation. We conclude that tadalafil amelioration of high glucose stimulation of synthesis of proteins including matrix proteins in podocytes requires integration of the NO-H2S-AMPK axis leading to the inhibition of high glucose-induced mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1

  11. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Protein Oxidation During Storage and Lyophilization Process.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiqiang; Zheng, Xiaoyang; Yang, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Although the impact of hydrogen peroxide (HP) on proteins in liquid solutions has been studied extensively, the impact during lyophilization has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of HP on lyophilized proteins and HP removal by lyophilization. A protein formulation at 5 mg/mL and its placebo were spiked with HP up to 5.0 ppm and then lyophilized. HP concentration, protein oxidation, and aggregation were monitored before and after lyophilization, as well as during storage at 25°C. The lyophilization process removed on average 94.1% of HP from protein formulation, but only 72.5% from the placebo. There were also significant increases in protein oxidization and aggregation. The oxidation increment correlated with the decrease of HP concentration in both the protein formulation and placebo at all temperatures. Protein oxidation at different freezing temperatures was also studied in follow-up studies. Data from these studies suggest that (1) HP has a significant impact on oxidation and aggregation of protein during lyophilization; (2) significant oxidation can occur even when the protein formulation is frozen; (3) the oxidized protein is more prone to aggregation during lyophilization process. PMID:27238482

  12. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Cláudia S L; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  13. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Cláudia S. L.; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Induced by Hydrogen Sulfide in Spinacia oleracea Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Wang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a potential gaseous messenger molecule, has been suggested to play important roles in a wide range of physiological processes in plants. The aim of present study was to investigate which set of proteins is involved in H2S-regulated metabolism or signaling pathways. Spinacia oleracea seedlings were treated with 100 µM NaHS, a donor of H2S. Changes in protein expression profiles were analyzed by 2-D gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF MS. Over 1000 protein spots were reproducibly resolved, of which the abundance of 92 spots was changed by at least 2-fold (sixty-five were up-regulated, whereas 27 were down-regulated). These proteins were functionally divided into 9 groups, including energy production and photosynthesis, cell rescue, development and cell defense, substance metabolism, protein synthesis and folding, cellular signal transduction. Further, we found that these proteins were mainly localized in cell wall, plasma membrane, chloroplast, mitochondria, nucleus, peroxisome and cytosol. Our results demonstrate that H2S is involved in various cellular and physiological activities and has a distinct influence on photosynthesis, cell defense and cellular signal transduction in S. oleracea leaves. These findings provide new insights into proteomic responses in plants under physiological levels of H2S. PMID:25181351

  15. Hydrogen sulfide induces apoptosis in epithelial cells derived from human gingiva.

    PubMed

    Murata, T; Yaegaki, K; Qian, W; Herai, M; Calenic, B; Imai, T; Sato, T; Tanaka, T; Kamoda, T; Ii, H

    2008-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is not only one of the main causes of halitosis but is also an agent of toxicity against periodontal cells and tissues in biofilm-related periodontal diseases. Also, apoptosis of gingival epithelial cells may play an important role in the onset and progress of periodontitis. We examined the effect of H(2)S on the induction of apoptosis, using human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and keratinocyte-like Ca9-22 cells derived from human gingiva. The cells were incubated with H(2)S (100 ng ml(-1)) for 24, 48 or 72 h by adding H(2)S to air containing 5% CO(2), supplied constantly to the culture environment during incubation. The incidence of apoptosis caused by H(2)S was determined with Annexin V staining by flow cytometry. The proportion of apoptotic cells was significantly increased by exposure to H(2)S for 48 h in comparison with the control in both Ca9-22 cells and HGF. A concentration of 100 ng ml(-1) H(2)S in air is possible in the gingival sulcus. This study indicates that apoptosis in gingival epithelial cells and HGF by H(2)S may occur in the oral cavity, which may cause a periodontal condition. PMID:21386151

  16. Astaxanthin protects steroidogenesis from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Lee, Yue-Jia; Chou, Mei-Chia; Chang, Renin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien; Liang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Leang-Shin

    2015-03-01

    Androgens, especially testosterone produced in Leydig cells, play an essential role in development of the male reproductive phenotype and fertility. However, testicular oxidative stress may cause a decline in testosterone production. Many antioxidants have been used as reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers to eliminate oxidative stress to protect steroidogenesis. Astaxanthin (AST), a natural extract from algae and plants ubiquitous in the marine environment, has been shown to have antioxidant activity in many previous studies. In this study, we treated primary mouse Leydig cells or MA-10 cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to cause oxidative stress. Testosterone and progesterone production was suppressed and the expression of the mature (30 kDa) form of StAR protein was down-regulated in MA-10 cells by H2O2 and cAMP co-treatment. However, progesterone production and expression of mature StAR protein were restored in MA-10 cells by a one-hour pretreatment with AST. AST also reduced ROS levels in cells so that they were lower than the levels in untreated controls. These results provide additional evidence of the potential health benefits of AST as a potential food additive to ease oxidative stress. PMID:25786065

  17. Charge-Transfer Induced High Efficient Hydrogen Evolution of MoS2/graphene Cocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honglin; Yu, Ke; Li, Chao; Tang, Zheng; Guo, Bangjun; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2015-12-01

    The MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite has attracted intensive attention due to its favorable performance as hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, but still lacking is the theoretical understanding from a dynamic perspective regarding to the influence of electron transfer, as well as the connection between conductivity and the promoted HER performance. Based on the first-principles calculations, we here clearly reveal how an excess of negative charge density affects the variation of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) and the corresponding HER behavior. It is demonstrated that the electron plays a crucial role in the HER routine. To verify the theoretical analyses, the MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite with well defined 3-dimensional configuration was synthesized via a facile one-step approach for the first time. The experimental data show that the HER performance have a direct link to the conductivity. These findings pave the way for a further developing of 2-dimension based composites for HER applications.

  18. Charge-Transfer Induced High Efficient Hydrogen Evolution of MoS2/graphene Cocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Li, Honglin; Yu, Ke; Li, Chao; Tang, Zheng; Guo, Bangjun; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    The MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite has attracted intensive attention due to its favorable performance as hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, but still lacking is the theoretical understanding from a dynamic perspective regarding to the influence of electron transfer, as well as the connection between conductivity and the promoted HER performance. Based on the first-principles calculations, we here clearly reveal how an excess of negative charge density affects the variation of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) and the corresponding HER behavior. It is demonstrated that the electron plays a crucial role in the HER routine. To verify the theoretical analyses, the MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite with well defined 3-dimensional configuration was synthesized via a facile one-step approach for the first time. The experimental data show that the HER performance have a direct link to the conductivity. These findings pave the way for a further developing of 2-dimension based composites for HER applications. PMID:26688209

  19. Charge-Transfer Induced High Efficient Hydrogen Evolution of MoS2/graphene Cocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Honglin; Yu, Ke; Li, Chao; Tang, Zheng; Guo, Bangjun; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    The MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite has attracted intensive attention due to its favorable performance as hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, but still lacking is the theoretical understanding from a dynamic perspective regarding to the influence of electron transfer, as well as the connection between conductivity and the promoted HER performance. Based on the first-principles calculations, we here clearly reveal how an excess of negative charge density affects the variation of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) and the corresponding HER behavior. It is demonstrated that the electron plays a crucial role in the HER routine. To verify the theoretical analyses, the MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite with well defined 3-dimensional configuration was synthesized via a facile one-step approach for the first time. The experimental data show that the HER performance have a direct link to the conductivity. These findings pave the way for a further developing of 2-dimension based composites for HER applications. PMID:26688209

  20. Astaxanthin Protects Steroidogenesis from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Mouse Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Lee, Yue-Jia; Chou, Mei-Chia; Chang, Renin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien; Liang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Leang-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Androgens, especially testosterone produced in Leydig cells, play an essential role in development of the male reproductive phenotype and fertility. However, testicular oxidative stress may cause a decline in testosterone production. Many antioxidants have been used as reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers to eliminate oxidative stress to protect steroidogenesis. Astaxanthin (AST), a natural extract from algae and plants ubiquitous in the marine environment, has been shown to have antioxidant activity in many previous studies. In this study, we treated primary mouse Leydig cells or MA-10 cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to cause oxidative stress. Testosterone and progesterone production was suppressed and the expression of the mature (30 kDa) form of StAR protein was down-regulated in MA-10 cells by H2O2 and cAMP co-treatment. However, progesterone production and expression of mature StAR protein were restored in MA-10 cells by a one-hour pretreatment with AST. AST also reduced ROS levels in cells so that they were lower than the levels in untreated controls. These results provide additional evidence of the potential health benefits of AST as a potential food additive to ease oxidative stress. PMID:25786065

  1. Microstructure and Hydrogen-Induced Failure Mechanisms in Fe and Ni Alloy Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenske, J. A.; Robertson, I. M.; Ayer, Raghavan; Hukle, Martin; Lillig, Dan; Newbury, Brian

    2012-09-01

    The microstructure and fracture morphology of AISI 8630-IN625 and ASTM A182-F22-IN625 dissimilar metal weld interfaces were compared and contrasted as a function of postweld heat treatment (PWHT) duration. For both systems, the microstructure along the weld interface consisted of a coarse grain heat-affected zone in the Fe-base metal followed by discontinuous martensitic partially mixed zones and a continuous partially mixed zone on the Ni side of the fusion line. Within the partially mixed zone on the Ni side, there exists a 200-nm-wide transition zone within a 20- μm-wide planar solidification region followed by a cellular dendritic region with Nb-Mo-rich carbides decorating the dendrite boundaries. Although there were differences in the volume of the partially mixed zones, the major difference in the metal weld interfaces was the presence of M7C3 precipitates in the planar solidification region, which had formed in AISI 8630-IN625 but not in ASTM A182-F22-IN625. These precipitates make the weldment more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and provide a low energy fracture path between the discontinuous partially mixed zones.

  2. Steady-state hydrogen peroxide induces glycolysis in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Ulanovskaya, Olesya A; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhou, Tianhong; Sun, Fei; Lu, Zhike; Hutchison, Alan L; Lan, Lefu; Wu, Min; Cravatt, Benjamin F; He, Chuan

    2014-07-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be readily inhibited by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated direct oxidation of their catalytic active cysteines. Because of the rapid degradation of H2O2 by bacterial catalase, only steady-state but not one-dose treatment with H2O2 rapidly induces glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). We conducted transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses to globally profile the bacterial transcriptomes in response to a steady level of H2O2, which revealed profound transcriptional changes, including the induced expression of glycolytic genes in both bacteria. Our results revealed that the inactivation of GAPDH by H2O2 induces metabolic levels of glycolysis and the PPP; the elevated levels of fructose 1,6-biphosphate (FBP) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) lead to dissociation of their corresponding glycolytic repressors (GapR and HexR, respectively) from their cognate promoters, thus resulting in derepression of the glycolytic genes to overcome H2O2-stalled glycolysis in S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Both GapR and HexR may directly sense oxidative stresses, such as menadione. PMID:24769698

  3. Steady-State Hydrogen Peroxide Induces Glycolysis in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Ulanovskaya, Olesya A.; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhou, Tianhong; Sun, Fei; Lu, Zhike; Hutchison, Alan L.; Lan, Lefu; Wu, Min; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be readily inhibited by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated direct oxidation of their catalytic active cysteines. Because of the rapid degradation of H2O2 by bacterial catalase, only steady-state but not one-dose treatment with H2O2 rapidly induces glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). We conducted transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses to globally profile the bacterial transcriptomes in response to a steady level of H2O2, which revealed profound transcriptional changes, including the induced expression of glycolytic genes in both bacteria. Our results revealed that the inactivation of GAPDH by H2O2 induces metabolic levels of glycolysis and the PPP; the elevated levels of fructose 1,6-biphosphate (FBP) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) lead to dissociation of their corresponding glycolytic repressors (GapR and HexR, respectively) from their cognate promoters, thus resulting in derepression of the glycolytic genes to overcome H2O2-stalled glycolysis in S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Both GapR and HexR may directly sense oxidative stresses, such as menadione. PMID:24769698

  4. The antioxidant properties of oligo sodium alginates prepared by radiation-induced degradation in aqueous and hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şen, Murat; Atik, Hanife

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the radiation-induced degradation of sodium alginates (NaAlg), having different guluronic acids (G) and mannuronic acid (M) ratios, (G/M), in aqueous and hydrogen peroxide solutions were investigated first; after that, the antioxidative properties of the oligo sodium alginates prepared were identified. Radiation degradation yield values, G(S), were determined for each irradiation condition and compared with those of the dry-state-irradiated NaAlg. The results showed that the oligo sodium alginates with M from 1000 to 3750 Da could be easily prepared by γ-irradiation of NaAlg solution in the presence of small amount of hydrogen peroxide at low doses (below 5.0 kGy) and by controlling the G/M. The antioxidant properties of the fractions with various molecular weight and G/M were evaluated by determining the scavenging ability of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPHrad ), and 50% inhibition concentrations of LF120 NaAlg, which was irradiated in aqueous solution and H2O2 solution at a dose of 2.5 kGy and having number average molecular weights of 10.2 and 3.75 kDa were found to be 10.0 and 2.5 mg/ml, respectively. The results demonstrated that its molecular weight was an important factor in controlling the antioxidant properties of NaAlg, and due to the sharp decrease in molecular weight in the case of aqueous media irradiation the effect of G/M of initial polymer became unimportant whereas the dry-state-irradiated NaAlgs behaved conversely.

  5. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Emamgholipour, Solaleh; Hossein-Nezhad, Arash; Ansari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1) control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h); (2) melatonin (1 mM) for 12 h; (3) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h; (4) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM). The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression. PMID:26881079

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Is a Novel Regulator of Bone Formation Implicated in the Bone Loss Induced by Estrogen Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Francesco; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Calvert, John W; Gambari, Laura; Walker, Lindsey D; Yu, Mingcan; Robinson, Jerid; Li, Jau-Yi; Lisignoli, Gina; Vaccaro, Chiara; Adams, Jonathan; Pacifici, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) is a gasotransmitter known to regulate bone formation and bone mass in unperturbed mice. However, it is presently unknown whether H2 S plays a role in pathologic bone loss. Here we show that ovariectomy (ovx), a model of postmenopausal bone loss, decreases serum H2 S levels and the bone marrow (BM) levels of two key H2 S-generating enzymes, cystathione β-synthase (CBS) and cystathione γ-lyase (CSE). Treatment with the H2 S-donor GYY4137 (GYY) normalizes serum H2 S in ovx mice, increases bone formation, and completely prevents the loss of trabecular bone induced by ovx. Mechanistic studies revealed that GYY increases murine osteoblastogenesis by activating Wnt signaling through increased production of the Wnt ligands Wnt16, Wnt2b, Wnt6, and Wnt10b in the BM. Moreover, in vitro treatment with 17β-estradiol upregulates the expression of CBS and CSE in human BM stromal cells (hSCs), whereas an H2 S-releasing drug induces osteogenic differentiation of hSCs. In summary, regulation of H2 S levels is a novel mechanism by which estrogen stimulates osteoblastogenesis and bone formation in mice and human cells. Blunted production of H2 S contributes to ovx-induced bone loss in mice by limiting the compensatory increase in bone formation elicited by ovx. Restoration of H2 S levels is a potential novel therapeutic approach for postmenopausal osteoporosis. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26614970

  7. The Octadecaneuropeptide ODN Protects Astrocytes against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis via a PKA/MAPK-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Yosra; Kaddour, Hadhemi; Vaudry, David; Bahdoudi, Seyma; Douiri, Salma; Leprince, Jérôme; Castel, Helene; Vaudry, Hubert; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Masmoudi-Kouki, Olfa

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes synthesize and release endozepines, a family of regulatory peptides, including the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN) an endogenous ligand of both central-type benzodiazepine (CBR) and metabotropic receptors. We have recently shown that ODN exerts a protective effect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in astrocytes. The purpose of the present study was to determine the type of receptor and the transduction pathways involved in the protective effect of ODN in cultured rat astrocytes. We have first observed a protective activity of ODN at very low concentrations that was abrogated by the metabotropic ODN receptor antagonist cyclo1–8[DLeu5]OP, but not by the CBR antagonist flumazenil. We have also found that the metabotropic ODN receptor is positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in astrocytes and that the glioprotective action of ODN upon H2O2-induced astrocyte death is PKA- and MEK-dependent, but PLC/PKC-independent. Downstream of PKA, ODN induced ERK phosphorylation, which in turn activated the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 and blocked the stimulation by H2O2 of the pro-apoptotic gene Bax. The effect of ODN on the Bax/Bcl-2 balance contributed to abolish the deleterious action of H2O2 on mitochondrial membrane integrity and caspase-3 activation. Finally, the inhibitory effect of ODN on caspase-3 activity was shown to be PKA and MEK-dependent. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that the potent glioprotective action of ODN against oxidative stress involves the metabotropic ODN receptor coupled to the PKA/ERK-kinase pathway to inhibit caspase-3 activation. PMID:22927932

  8. Influence of the formation- and passivation rate of boron-oxygen defects for mitigating carrier-induced degradation in silicon within a hydrogen-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallam, Brett; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Hamer, Phill; Wenham, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    A three-state model is used to explore the influence of defect formation- and passivation rates of carrier-induced degradation related to boron-oxygen complexes in boron-doped p-type silicon solar cells within a hydrogen-based model. The model highlights that the inability to effectively mitigate carrier-induced degradation at elevated temperatures in previous studies is due to the limited availability of defects for hydrogen passivation, rather than being limited by the defect passivation rate. An acceleration of the defect formation rate is also observed to increase both the effectiveness and speed of carrier-induced degradation mitigation, whereas increases in the passivation rate do not lead to a substantial acceleration of the hydrogen passivation process. For high-throughput mitigation of such carrier-induced degradation on finished solar cell devices, two key factors were found to be required, high-injection conditions (such as by using high intensity illumination) to enable an acceleration of defect formation whilst simultaneously enabling a rapid passivation of the formed defects, and a high temperature to accelerate both defect formation and defect passivation whilst still ensuring an effective mitigation of carrier-induced degradation.

  9. NADPH oxidase-generated hydrogen peroxide induces DNA damage in mutant FLT3-expressing leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Stanicka, Joanna; Russell, Eileen G; Woolley, John F; Cotter, Thomas G

    2015-04-10

    Internal tandem duplication of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3-ITD) receptor is present in 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and it has been associated with an aggressive AML phenotype. FLT3-ITD expressing cell lines have been shown to generate increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the molecular basis of how FLT3-ITD-driven ROS leads to the aggressive form of AML is not clearly understood. Our group has previously reported that inhibition of FLT3-ITD signaling results in post-translational down-regulation of p22(phox), a small membrane-bound subunit of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex. Here we demonstrated that 32D cells, a myeloblast-like cell line transfected with FLT3-ITD, have a higher protein level of p22(phox) and p22(phox)-interacting NOX isoforms than 32D cells transfected with the wild type FLT3 receptor (FLT3-WT). The inhibition of NOX proteins, p22(phox), and NOX protein knockdowns caused a reduction in ROS, as measured with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-specific dye, peroxy orange 1 (PO1), and nuclear H2O2, as measured with nuclear peroxy emerald 1 (NucPE1). These reductions in the level of H2O2 following the NOX knockdowns were accompanied by a decrease in the number of DNA DSBs. We showed that 32D cells that express FLT3-ITD have a higher level of both oxidized DNA and DNA DSBs than their wild type counterparts. We also observed that NOX4 and p22(phox) localize to the nuclear membrane in MV4-11 cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Taken together these data indicate that NOX and p22(phox) mediate the ROS production from FLT3-ITD that signal to the nucleus causing genomic instability. PMID:25697362

  10. NADPH Oxidase-generated Hydrogen Peroxide Induces DNA Damage in Mutant FLT3-expressing Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Stanicka, Joanna; Russell, Eileen G.; Woolley, John F.; Cotter, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3-ITD) receptor is present in 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and it has been associated with an aggressive AML phenotype. FLT3-ITD expressing cell lines have been shown to generate increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the molecular basis of how FLT3-ITD-driven ROS leads to the aggressive form of AML is not clearly understood. Our group has previously reported that inhibition of FLT3-ITD signaling results in post-translational down-regulation of p22phox, a small membrane-bound subunit of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex. Here we demonstrated that 32D cells, a myeloblast-like cell line transfected with FLT3-ITD, have a higher protein level of p22phox and p22phox-interacting NOX isoforms than 32D cells transfected with the wild type FLT3 receptor (FLT3-WT). The inhibition of NOX proteins, p22phox, and NOX protein knockdowns caused a reduction in ROS, as measured with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-specific dye, peroxy orange 1 (PO1), and nuclear H2O2, as measured with nuclear peroxy emerald 1 (NucPE1). These reductions in the level of H2O2 following the NOX knockdowns were accompanied by a decrease in the number of DNA DSBs. We showed that 32D cells that express FLT3-ITD have a higher level of both oxidized DNA and DNA DSBs than their wild type counterparts. We also observed that NOX4 and p22phox localize to the nuclear membrane in MV4–11 cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Taken together these data indicate that NOX and p22phox mediate the ROS production from FLT3-ITD that signal to the nucleus causing genomic instability. PMID:25697362

  11. Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, U R; Chong, Y L; Mahmood, A A; Indran, M; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Vikineswary, S

    2009-04-01

    Lentinula edodes (Berk) Pegler, commonly known as Shiitake mushroom has been used as medicinal food in Asian countries, especially in China and Japan and is believed to possess strong immunomodulatory property. In the present study, the methanolic extract of the fruit bodies of L. edodes was investigated for cytoprotective effect against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by measuring the activities of xanthine oxidase (XO) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) . H2O2 at a concentration of 5 microM caused 50% inhibition of PBMCs viability. The extract improved the PBMC viability and exerted a dose-dependent protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. At 100 microg/ml of extract concentration, the cell viability increased by 60% compared with the PBMCs incubated with H2O2 alone. The extract also inhibited XO activity in PBMC, while showing moderate stimulatory effect on GPx. However, in the presence of H2O2 alone, both the enzyme activities were increased significantly. The GPx activity increased, possibly in response to the increased availability of H2O2 in the cell. When the cells were pretreated with the extract and washed (to remove the extract) prior to the addition of H2O2, the GPx and XO activities as well as the cell viability were comparable to those when incubated with the extract alone. Thus, it is suggested that one of the possible mechanisms via which L. edodes methanolic extract confers protection against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in PBMC is by inhibiting the superoxide-producing XO and increasing GPx activity which could rapidly inactivate H2O2. PMID:19517993

  12. Protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells by scutellarin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Liu, Guo-Qing

    2004-04-30

    The present study investigated the protective actions of the antioxidant scutellarin against the cytotoxicity produced by exposure to H2O2 in PC12 cells. This was done by assaying for MTT (3,(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ in cells were evaluated by fluorescent microplate reader using DCFH and Fura 2-AM, respectively, as probes. Lipid peroxidation was quantified using thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was assessed by the retention of rhodamine123 (Rh123), a specific fluorescent cationic dye that is readily sequestered by active mitochondria, depending on their transmembrane potential. The DNA content and percentage of apoptosis were monitored with flow cytometry. Vitamin E, a potent antioxidant, was employed as a comparative agent. Preincubation of PC12 cells with scutellarin prevented cytotoxicity induced by H2O2. Intracellular accumulation of ROS, Ca2+ and products of lipid peroxidation, resulting from H2O2 were significantly reduced by scutellarin. Incubation of cells with H2O2 caused a marked decrease in MMP, which was significantly inhibited by scutellarin. PC12 cells treated with H2O2 underwent apoptotic death as determined by flow cytometric assay. The percentage of this H2O2-induced apoptosis in the cells was decreased in the presence of different concentrations of scutellarin. Scutellarin exhibited significantly higher potency compared to the antioxidant vitamin E. The present findings showed that scutellarin attenuated H2O2-induced cytotoxicity, intracellular accumulation of ROS and Ca2+, lipid peroxidation, and loss of MMP and DNA, which may represent the cellular mechanisms for its neuroprotective action. PMID:15051420

  13. Simultaneous visualization of water and hydrogen peroxide vapor using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence and photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Olof; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    A concept based on a combination of photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) and two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is for the first time demonstrated for simultaneous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and water (H2O) vapor. Water detection is based on two-photon excitation by an injection-locked krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser (248.28 nm), which induces broadband fluorescence (400-500 nm) from water. The same laser simultaneously photodissociates H2O2, whereupon the generated OH fragments are probed by LIF after a time delay of typically 50 ns, by a frequency-doubled dye laser (281.91 nm). Experiments in six different H2O2/H2O mixtures of known compositions show that both signals are linearly dependent on respective species concentration. For the H2O2 detection there is a minor interfering signal contribution from OH fragments created by two-photon photodissociation of H2O. Since the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O2 is found to be at least ∼24,000 times higher than the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O at room temperature, this interference is negligible for most H2O/H2O2 mixtures of practical interest. Simultaneous single-shot imaging of both species was demonstrated in a slightly turbulent flow. For single-shot imaging the minimum detectable H2O2 and H2O concentration is 10 ppm and 0.5%, respectively. The proposed measurement concept could be a valuable asset in several areas, for example, in atmospheric and combustion science and research on vapor-phase H2O2 sterilization in the pharmaceutical and aseptic food-packaging industries. PMID:25358016

  14. Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth of a plain carbon pipeline steel under conditions of cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation described was aimed at establishing the degree of compatibility between a plain carbon pipeline-type steel and hydrogen and also hydrogen-rich environments containing small additions of H2S, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, and natural gas at pressures near 1 atm. Test were carried out under conditions of static and cyclic loading; the subcritical crack growth was monitored. The rates of crack growth observed in the hydrogen and hydrogen-rich environments are compared with the crack rate observed in a natural gas environment to determine the compatibility of the present natural gas transmission system with gaseous hydrogen transport.

  15. Electric field induced Lyman-α emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements.

    PubMed

    Chérigier-Kovacic, L; Ström, P; Lejeune, A; Doveil, F

    2015-06-01

    Electric field induced Lyman-α emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-α radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied. PMID:26133836

  16. In Vitro Neuroprotective Effect of Shikimic Acid Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Thallita Kelly; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Caregnato, Fernanda Freitas; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Gasparotto, Juciano; Serafini, Mairim Russo; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo José; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens

    2015-08-01

    Shikimic acid (SA), originally extracted from Illicium verum Hook. fil., is an indispensable starting material for the synthesis of the antiviral drug Oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®)) with very limited number of studies regarding its biological effects in vitro. Therefore, we here evaluated the thermoanalytical profile, redox properties, and in vitro effects of SA on human neuronal-like cells (SH-SY5Y). The thermoanalytical profile of SA was studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) characterization. Both antioxidant potential and in vitro lipoperoxidation levels were analyzed. Cell viability and intracellular reactive species (RS) production was determined by DCF and SRB assays, respectively. Our results show in vitro antioxidant activity of SA without exerting cytotoxic effects on SH-SY5Y cells at tested concentrations of 10 nM, 10 μM, and 10 mM. In addition, SA protected the cells against H2O2-induced toxicity; effect that could be related, at least in part, with decreased intracellular RS production and its antioxidant potential. The present study shows evidence for neuroprotective actions of SA against oxidative stress-induced toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells, inviting for further investigation about its potential use in the context of oxidative stress-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25862258

  17. Electric field induced Lyman-α emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chérigier-Kovacic, L. Doveil, F.; Ström, P.; Lejeune, A.

    2015-06-15

    Electric field induced Lyman-α emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-α radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide treatment in Atlantic salmon induces stress and detoxification response in a daily manner.

    PubMed

    Vera, L M; Migaud, H

    2016-01-01

    Daily variation in the absorption, metabolism and excretion of toxic substances will ultimately determine the actual concentration to which the cells and tissues are exposed. In aquaculture, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) can be frequently exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to treat topical skin and gill infections, particularly in relation to parasitic infections (e.g. sea lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis and amoebic gill disease caused by Neoparamoeba perurans). It is well accepted that the time of administration influences pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs which in turn affects their efficacy and toxicity. Consequently, a better understanding of drug side effects as a function of time of day exposure would help to improve treatment efficacy and fish welfare. To this end, salmon were exposed to H2O2 (1500 mg/L) for 20 min at six different times of the day during a 24-h cycle and we investigated the time-dependent effects of exposure on physiological stress (glucose, lactate and cortisol) and antioxidant enzyme expression (gpx1, cat, Mn-sod and hsp70) in liver and gills. In addition, at each sampling point, 8 control fish were also sampled. Our results revealed that the time of administration of H2O2 caused significant differences in the induction of both physiological and oxidative stress responses. Glucose and lactate were higher in the treated fish during daytime whereas cortisol levels appeared to be systematically increased (>1000 ng/mL) after H2O2 treatment irrespective of exposure time, although differences with control levels were higher during the day. In liver, gene expression of antioxidant enzymes displayed daily rhythmicity in both treated and control groups and showed higher mRNA expression levels in salmon treated with H2O2 at ZT6 (6 h after lights onset). In gills, rhythmic expression was only found for gpx1 in the control fish and for hsp70 and Mn-sod in the treated groups. However, in the treated salmon, higher gene expression levels of

  19. 77 FR 10004 - C$ cMoney, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION C$ cMoney, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading February 16, 2012. It appears to the Securities... securities of C$ cMoney, Inc. (``cMoney'') because of questions regarding the accuracy of assertions by...

  20. Hydrogen-bond effects induced by alcohol on the structure and dynamics of ionic reverse micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardez, E.; Giordano, R.; Jannelli, M. P.; Migliardo, P.; Wanderlingh, U.

    1996-09-01

    In this work we report how the structure of Zn(AOT) 2/H 2O/d-cyclohexane microemulsions is affected by the presence of alcohol (normal pentanol) molecules as cosurfactant. The systems are investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and by Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopy. The SANS technique allows the study of the evolution of the size, the shape and the possible correlation length of concentration fluctuations as a function of water and alcohol content. Moreover FTIR spectra, in the OH stretching region, is quite sensitive to the structural changes of the water, induced by the polarization effects of the polar heads of the micelle surface and the positive counterions and by the presence of the alcohol.

  1. Photo-induced changes of hydrogen bonding in semi-insulating iron-doped indium phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajot, B.; Song, C.-Y.; Darwich, R.; Gendron, F.; Ewels, C.

    1995-09-01

    After illumination with 1-1.3 eV photons during cooling-down, metastable PH modes are observed by IR absorption at 5 K in semi-insulating InP:Fe. They correlate with the photo-injection of holes, but not with a change of the charge state of the H-related centres present at equilibrium. They are explained by a change of the bonding of H, induced by hole trapping, from IR-inactive centres to PH-containing centres, stable only below 80 K. One metastable centre has well-defined geometrical parameters and the other one could be located in a region near from the interface with (Fe,P) precipitates.

  2. Inhibition of radiation induced dissolution of UO2 by sulfide - A comparison with the hydrogen effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Miao; Barreiro Fidalgo, Alexandre; Sundin, Sara; Jonsson, Mats

    2013-03-01

    In this work we have studied the influence of H2S on radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel using simple model systems. The reaction between H2O2 and H2S/HS- has been studied experimentally as well as the effect of H2S/HS- on γ-radiation induced dissolution of a UO2 pellet. The experiments clearly show that the reaction of H2O2 and H2S/HS- is fairly rapid and that H2O2 and H2S/HS- stoichiometry is favorable for inhibition. Radiolysis experiments show that H2S/HS- can effectively protect UO2 from oxidative dissolution. The effect depends on sulfide concentration in combination with dose rate. Autoclave experiments were also conducted to study the role of H2S/HS- in the reduction of U(VI) in the presence and absence of H2 and Pd particles in anoxic aqueous solution. The aqueous solutions were pressurized with H2 or N2 and two different concentrations of H2S/HS- were used in the presence and absence of Pd. No catalytic effect of Pd on the U(VI) reduction by H2S/HS- could be found in N2 atmosphere. U(VI) reduction was found to be proportional to H2S/HS- concentration in H2 and N2 atmosphere. It is clearly shown the Pd catalyzed H2 effect is more powerful than the effect of H2S/HS-. H2S/HS- poisoning of the Pd catalyst is not observed under the present conditions.

  3. Light-induced changes in silicon nanocrystal based solar cells: Modification of silicon–hydrogen bonding on silicon nanocrystal surface under illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ka-Hyun; Johnson, Erik V.; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) is a material consisting of a small volume fraction of nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. pm-Si:H solar cells demonstrate interesting initial degradation behaviors such as rapid initial change in photovoltaic parameters and self-healing after degradation during light-soaking. The precise dynamics of the light-induced degradation was studied in a series of light-soaking experiments under various illumination conditions such as AM1.5G and filtered 570 nm yellow light. Hydrogen effusion experiment before and after light-soaking further revealed that the initial degradation of pm-Si:H solar cells originate from the modification of silicon–hydrogen bonding on the surface of silicon nanocrystals in pm-Si:H.

  4. Inhibition of miR-134 Protects Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Cheng; Yang, Lu; Pei, Chong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play an important role in neurological diseases. Particularly, miR-134 is reportedly involved in regulating neuron survival. However, the association between miR-134 and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival under adverse stimulus has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we aimed to explore the role and underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating RGC apoptosis in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. Results showed that the expression of miR-134 dose- and time-dependently increased in RGC after H2O2 treatment. H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis was significantly attenuated by the inhibition of miR-134 expression by antagomiR-134 and was enhanced by miR-134 overexpression. Luciferase reporter assay revealed a direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region of cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), a critical transcription factor for neuronal protection. In H2O2-treated RGCs, the inhibition of miR-134 significantly elevated the expression of CREB and its downstream genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Bcl-2. Furthermore, the inhibition of miR-134 also increased the expression of miR-132, a rapid response gene downstream of CREB. In addition, the target gene of miR-132, acetylcholinesterase was expectedly decreased by miR-134 inhibition. However, the overexpression of miR-134 exerted an opposite effect. The knockdown of CREB apparently abolished the protective effect of miR-134 inhibition against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis. The increased expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 induced by miR-134 inhibition was also abrogated by CREB knockdown. Overall, our results suggested that the downregulation of miR-134 can effectively protect against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis by negatively modulating CREB expression. PMID:25744098

  5. HYDROGEN-RICH MEDIUM AMELIORATES LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED BARRIER DYSFUNCTION VIA RHOA-MDIA1 SIGNALING IN CACO-2 CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Lu; Sun, Ruiqiang; Chen, Hongguang; Zhang, Hongtao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Yanyan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao; Xie, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastrointestinal barrier dysfunction is associated with the severity and prognosis of sepsis. Hydrogen gas (H2) can ameliorate multiple organ damage in septic animals. Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 (mDia1) are important to regulate tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ), both of which determine the integrity of the intestinal barrier. This study was aimed to investigate whether H2 could modulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated dysfunction of the intestinal barrier and whether RhoA-mDia1 signaling is involved. Caco-2 cells were exposed to different concentrations of LPS (1 μg/mL–1 mg/mL). The permeability of the intestinal barrier was evaluated by transepithelial resistance (TER) and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-dextran flux. Expression and distribution of occludin and E-cadherin were analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence. RhoA activity was measured by G-Lisa assay, and mDia1 expression was assessed by Western blot. LPS (100 μg/mL) decreased TER and increased fluorescein-isothiocyanate-dextran flux, which were alleviated by H2-rich medium. Also, H2 down-regulated LPS-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, H2 improved the down-regulated expression and redistribution of occludin and E-cadherin caused by LPS. Additionally, H2 alleviated LPS-caused RhoA activation, and the beneficial effects of H2 on barrier were counteracted by RhoA agonist CN03. Rho inhibitor C3 exoenzyme mitigated LPS-induced barrier breakdown. Furthermore, H2-rich medium increased mDia1 expression, and mDia1 knockdown abolished protections of H2 on barrier permeability. mDia1 knockdown eliminated H2-induced benefits for occludin and E-cadherin. These findings suggest that H2 improves LPS-induced hyperpermeability of the intestinal barrier and disruptions of TJ and AJ by moderating RhoA-mDia1 signaling. PMID:26529665

  6. mTORC2 Phosphorylation of Akt1: A Possible Mechanism for Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Wang, Daying; Gao, Xiufang; Lew, Karsheng; Richards, Arthur Mark; Wang, Peipei

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to have cardiac protective effects through Akt activation. Akt acts as a ‘central sensor’ for myocyte survival or death; its activity is regulated by multiple kinases including PI3K, mTORC2, PDK1 and phosphatases including PTEN, PP2A and PHLPPL. Based on the previous finding that PI3K inhibitor LY294002 abolishes H2S-induced Akt phosphorylation and cardioprotection, it is accepted that PI3K is the mediator of H2S-induced Akt phosphorylation. However, LY294002 inhibits both PI3K and mTOR, and PI3K only recruits Akt to the membrane where Akt is phosphorylated by Akt kinases. We undertook a series of experiments to further evaluate the role of mTORC2, PDK1, PTEN, PP2A and PHLPPL in H2S-induced Akt phosphorylation and cardioprotection, which, we believe, has not been investigated before. Hearts from adult Sprague-Dawley rats were isolated and subjected to (i) normoxia, (ii) global ischemia and (iii) ischemia/reperfusion in the presence or absence of 50 µM of H2S donor NaHS. Cardiac mechanical function and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were assessed. All hearts also were Western analyzed at the end of perfusion for Akt and a panel of appropriate Akt regulators and targets. Hearts pretreated with 50 µM NaHS had improved function at the end of reperfusion (Rate pressure product; 19±4×103 vs. 10±3×103 mmHg/min, p<0.05) and reduced cell injury (LDH release 19±10 vs. 170±87 mU/ml p<0.05) compared to untreated hearts. NaHS significantly increased phospho-Akt, phospho-mTOR, phospho-Bim and Bcl-2 in reperfused hearts (P<0.05). Furthermore using H9c2 cells we demonstrate that NaHS pretreatment reduces apoptosis following hypoxia/re-oxygenation. Importantly, PP242, a specific mTOR inhibitor, abolished both cardioprotection and protein phosphorylation in isolated heart and reduced apoptotic effects in H9c2 cells. Treating hearts with NaHS only during reperfusion produced less cardioprotection through a similar mechanism. These data

  7. Protective effect of Cymbopogon citratus on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in the reproductive system of male rats.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Saleh M; Taha, Ekhlass M; Mubark, Zaid M; Aziz, Salam S; Simon, K D; Mazlan, A G

    2013-12-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (C. citratus) has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemoprotective properties. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of C. citratus aqueous extract against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and injury in the reproductive system of male rats. The twenty-five rats used in this study were divided into five groups, comprised of five rats each. The control group received standard food and drink. The H2O2 group received standard food and water with 0.5% H2O2. The rats in the H2O2 + C. citratus group and H2O2 + vitamin E group received standard food, H2O2, and C. citratus [100 mg·kg(-1) body weight (bw)], or vitamin E as an antioxidant reference (500 mg·kg(-1) bw), respectively. The C. citratus group was given C. citratus (100 mg·kg(-1) bw) in addition to the standard food and drink. The treatments were administered for 30 days. The H2O2 treatment significantly (P < 0.05) decreased body, testicular, and epididymal weight, as well as glutathione (GSH) level, but markedly increased malonaldehyde (MDA) in serum and testes homogenates. The rats treated with H2O2 exhibited testicular degeneration and significant reduction in sperm viability, motility, count, and rate of normal sperm. The C. citratus, vitamin E, and H2O2 treatment significantly (P < 0.05) increased the body, testicular, and epididymal weight, testosterone level, the values of the various sperm characteristics, and GSH. However, this treatment markedly reduced MDA in serum and testes homogenates, as well as testicular histopathological alterations in the H2O2-treated rats. The C. citratus aqueous extract reduced oxidative stress and protected male rats against H2O2-induced reproductive system injury. PMID:23957393

  8. Diallyl trisulfide protects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis via a hydrogen sulfide-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lian-Yun; Chen, Qin; Zhu, Xiao-Jing; Kong, De-Song; Wu, Li; Shao, Jiang-Juan; Zheng, Shi-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Garlic is one natural source of organic sulfur containing compounds and has shown promise in the treatment of chronic liver disease. Dietary garlic consumption is inversely correlated with the progression of alcoholic fatty liver (AFL), although the exact underlying mechanisms are not clear. Our previous studies also have shown that diallyl trisulfide (DATS), the primary organosulfur compound from Allium sativum L, displayed anti-lipid deposition and antioxidant properties in AFL. The aim of the present study was to clarify the underlying mechanisms. In the present study, we used the intragastric infusion model of alcohol administration and human normal liver cell line LO2 cultured with suitable ethanol to mimic the pathological condition of AFL. We showed that accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was lowered significantly by the administration of DATS, but antioxidant capacity was increased by DATS. Additionally, DATS inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via down-regulating Bax expression and up-regulating Bcl-2 expression, and attenuated alcohol-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. More importantly, using iodoacetamide (IAM) to block hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production from DATS, we noted that IAM abolished all the above effects of DATS in ethanol-treated LO2 cells. Lastly, we found DATS could increase the expressions of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), the major H2S-producing enzymes. These results demonstrate that DATS protect against alcohol-induced fatty liver via a H2S-mediated mechanism. Therefore, targeting H2S may play a therapeutic role for AFL. PMID:27107369

  9. Protective effect of cannabidiol on hydrogen peroxide‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Hou, Chen; Chen, Xin; Wang, Dong; Yang, Pinglin; He, Xijing; Zhou, Jinsong; Li, Haopeng

    2016-09-01

    Cannabidiol, a major component of marijuana, protects nerves, and exerts antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory and anti‑anxiety effects. In the current study, the protective effect of cannabidiol was observed to prevent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells. Nucleus pulposus cells were isolated from rats and cultured in vitro, and H2O2 was used to construct the nucleus pulposus cell model. Cell viability of the nucleus pulposus cells was assessed using a 3‑(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The ratio of apoptotic cells, and caspase‑3 or cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) mRNA expression was analyzed by annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium‑iodide staining and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The quantities of interleukin (IL)‑1β and interleukin‑6 were measured using a series of assay kits. B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression levels were analyzed using western blotting. The present study identified that cannabidiol enhanced cell viability and reduced apoptosis in H2O2‑treated nucleus pulposus cells in vitro using a lumbar disc herniation (LDH) model. In addition, cannabidiol reduced caspase‑3 gene expression and augmented the Bcl‑2 protein expression levels in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Pre‑treatment with cannabidiol suppressed the promotion of COX‑2, iNOS, IL‑1β and IL‑6 expression in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Taken together, these results suggest that cannabidiol potentially exerts its protective effect on LDH via the suppression of anti‑apoptosis, anti‑inflammation and anti‑oxidative activities in nucleus pulposus cells. PMID:27430346

  10. Exogenous administration of thiosulfate, a donor of hydrogen sulfide, attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertensive heart disease in rats

    PubMed Central

    Snijder, P M; Frenay, A R; de Boer, R A; Pasch, A; Hillebrands, J L; Leuvenink, H G D; van Goor, H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hypertension is an important mediator of cardiac damage and remodelling. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gasotransmitter with cardioprotective properties. However, it is not yet in clinical use. We, therefore, investigated the protective effects of sodium thiosulfate (STS), a clinically applicable H2S donor substance, in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertensive cardiac disease in rats. Experimental Approach Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with Ang II (435 ng kg min−1) or saline (control) for 3 weeks via s.c. placed osmotic minipumps. During these 3 weeks, rats received i.p. injections of either STS, NaHS or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). Key Results Compared with controls, Ang II infusion caused an increase in systolic and diastolic BP with associated cardiac damage as evidenced by cardiac hypertrophy, an increase in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) mRNA, cardiac fibrosis and increased oxidative stress. Treatment with NaHS and STS prevented the development of hypertension and the increase in ANP mRNA levels. Furthermore, the degree of cardiac hypertrophy, the extent of histological fibrosis in combination with the expression of profibrotic genes and the levels of oxidative stress were all significantly decreased. Conclusions and Implications Ang II-induced hypertensive cardiac disease can be attenuated by treatment with STS and NaHS. Although BP regulation is the most plausible mechanism of cardiac protection, the antifibrotic and antioxidant properties of released sulfide may also contribute to their effects. Our data show that H2S might be a valuable addition to the already existing antihypertensive and cardioprotective therapies. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:24962324

  11. Nitric oxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced barrier disruption and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in monolayers of intestinal epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Tsuji, Hideo; Onoda, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium provides a barrier to the transport of harmful luminal molecules into the systemic circulation. A dysfunctional epithelial barrier is closely associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of intestinal and systemic disorders. We investigated here the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. When treated with H(2)O(2), Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports exhibited several remarkable features of barrier dysfunction as follows: a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in paracellular permeability to dextran, and a disruption of the intercellular junctional localization of the scaffolding protein ZO-1. In addition, an induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins including ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin, components of tight and adherens junctions, was observed. On the other hand, combined treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with H(2)O(2) and an NO donor (NOC5 or NOC12) relieved the damage to the barrier function and suppressed the protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2) alone. These results suggest that NO protects the barrier function of intestinal epithelia from oxidative stress by modulating some intracellular signaling pathways of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in epithelial cells. PMID:17451824

  12. Zinc suppresses apoptosis of U937 cells induced by hydrogen peroxide through an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio.

    PubMed

    Fukamachi, Y; Karasaki, Y; Sugiura, T; Itoh, H; Abe, T; Yamamura, K; Higashi, K

    1998-05-19

    Treatment of human premonocytic U937 cells with 500 microM H2O2 for 1h followed by 4h incubation in fresh medium to allow the cells to execute apoptotic processes caused DNA fragmentation. However, in the presence of 1mM ZnSO4 throughout the incubation, DNA ladder formation was markedly inhibited. Hydrogen peroxide treatment for 1h with or without zinc increased both Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. However, only Bax protein decreased to basal levels in the presence of zinc during the following 4h incubation, resulting in an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and prevention of apoptosis. Treatment of U937 cells with 1mM ZnSO4 alone also decreased the levels of Bax protein. Furthermore, we observed that zinc completely inhibited the activation of CPP32 by H2O2, while no significant changes of ICE activities occurred with either H2O2 and/or zinc. These results indicate that the suppression of H2O2-induced apoptosis by zinc is mediated through an increase of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, which occurs upstream from the activation of CPP32. PMID:9610364

  13. Protective Effect of Selected Medicinal Plants against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Oxidative Damage on Biological Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is developed due to susceptibility of biological substrates to oxidation by generation of free radicals. In degenerative diseases, oxidative stress level can be reduced by antioxidants which neutralize free radicals. Primary objective of this work was to screen four medicinal plants, namely, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, for their antioxidant property using two biological substrates—RBC and microsomes. The antioxidative ability of three solvent extracts, methanol (100% and 80%) and aqueous leaf extracts, was studied at different concentrations by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method using Fenton's reagent to induce oxidation in the substrates. The polyphenol and flavonoid content were analyzed to relate with the observed antioxidant effect of the extracts. The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, and β-carotene in the samples. In microsomes, 80% methanol extract of Canthium and Costus and, in RBC, 80% methanol extract of Costus showed highest inhibition of oxidation and correlated well with the polyphenol and flavonoid content. From the results it can be concluded that antioxidants from medicinal plants are capable of inhibiting oxidation in biological systems, suggesting scope for their use as nutraceuticals. PMID:25436152

  14. Effect of alloying additions on the hydrogen-induced grain boundary embrittlement in iron.

    PubMed

    Tian, Z X; Yan, J X; Hao, W; Xiao, W

    2011-01-12

    Using ab initio density functional theory calculations, we have investigated the influence of Mo, V and Pd on the H-induced grain boundary embrittlement in Fe. We find that, in the high impurity concentration systems, all of the three alloying elements facilitate H embrittlement at the Σ3 (111) [Formula: see text] grain boundary in Fe. The calculated binary effects of the H-X (X = Mo, V, Pd) couples are 0.063, 0.074 and 0.040 eV, respectively. On the other hand, in the large unit cell with low impurity concentration, both Mo and V can facilitate H embrittlement, and the binary effects of pairs are 0.152 and 0.164 eV, respectively. While Pd reduces the H embrittlement on the cohesion of the Fe grain boundary with the binary effect of - 0.1 eV. The H-X (X = Mo, V, Pd) interactions are interpreted by electronic structure analyses. PMID:21406825

  15. Enhanced Surface Interaction of Water Confined in Hierarchical Porous Polymers Induced by Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Silletta, Emilia V; Velasco, Manuel I; Gomez, Cesar G; Strumia, Miriam C; Stapf, Siegfried; Mattea, Carlos; Monti, Gustavo A; Acosta, Rodolfo H

    2016-07-26

    Hierarchical porous polymer systems are increasingly applied to catalysis, bioengineering, or separation technology because of the versatility provided by the connection of mesopores with percolating macroporous structures. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a suitable technique for the study of such systems as it can detect signals stemming from the confined liquid and translate this information into pore size, molecular mobility, and liquid-surface interactions. We focus on the properties of water confined in macroporous polymers of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate [poly(EGDMA-co-HEMA)] with different amounts of cross-linkers, in which a substantial variation of hydroxyl groups is achieved. As soft polymer scaffolds may swell upon saturation with determined liquids, the use of NMR is particularly important as it measures the system in its operational state. This study combines different NMR techniques to obtain information on surface interactions of water with hydrophilic polymer chains. A transition from a surface-induced relaxation in which relaxivity depends on the pore size to a regime where the organic pore surface strongly restricts water diffusion is observed. Surface affinities are defined through the molecular residence times near the network surface. PMID:27341270

  16. Huperzine B, a novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, attenuates hydrogen peroxide induced injury in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H Y; Tang, X C

    2000-09-29

    A number of studies indicate that free radicals are involved in the neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was mainly conducted to examine the effect of Huperzine B on H(2)O(2) induced toxicity in rat pheochromocytoma line PC12 by measuring cell lesion, level of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities. Following a 30 min exposure of the cells to H(2)O(2) (150 microM), a marked decrease in cell survival, activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase as well as increased production of malondialdehyde (MDA) were found. Pretreatment of the cells with huperzine B (10-100 microM) prior to H(2)O(2) exposure significantly elevated the cell survival, antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased the level of MDA. The above-mentioned neuroprotective effects are also observed with tacrine (1 microM), donepezil (10 microM) and galanthamine (10 microM), suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of cholinesterase inhibitor might partly contribute to the clinical efficacy in AD treatment. PMID:10996445

  17. Protective Effect of Selected Medicinal Plants against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Oxidative Damage on Biological Substrates.

    PubMed

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is developed due to susceptibility of biological substrates to oxidation by generation of free radicals. In degenerative diseases, oxidative stress level can be reduced by antioxidants which neutralize free radicals. Primary objective of this work was to screen four medicinal plants, namely, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, for their antioxidant property using two biological substrates-RBC and microsomes. The antioxidative ability of three solvent extracts, methanol (100% and 80%) and aqueous leaf extracts, was studied at different concentrations by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method using Fenton's reagent to induce oxidation in the substrates. The polyphenol and flavonoid content were analyzed to relate with the observed antioxidant effect of the extracts. The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, and β-carotene in the samples. In microsomes, 80% methanol extract of Canthium and Costus and, in RBC, 80% methanol extract of Costus showed highest inhibition of oxidation and correlated well with the polyphenol and flavonoid content. From the results it can be concluded that antioxidants from medicinal plants are capable of inhibiting oxidation in biological systems, suggesting scope for their use as nutraceuticals. PMID:25436152

  18. Parahydrogen induced polarization and the oxidative addition of hydrogen to iridium tribromostannyl carbonylate anions.

    PubMed

    Permin, Alexei; Eisenberg, Richard

    2002-05-01

    Activation of dihydrogen by a system composed of (Bu(4)N)[IrBr(2)(CO)(2)] (1) and tin dibromide in varying ratios was studied using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) which allows the detection of transient dihydrides not observable in conventional (1)H NMR spectra. While the oxidative addition of dihydrogen to neutral and cationic Ir(I) species is common, there are only a few examples of H(2) addition to anionic complexes. Tin dibromide reacts with iridium(I) complex 1 in acetone forming equilibrium mixtures of cis- and trans-tribromostannyl derivatives [IrBr(n)()(SnBr(3))(2)(-)(n)()(CO)(2)](-), n = 0,1, the existence of which is inferred from the stereochemistries of the dihydrogen addition products determined using PHIP. The sigma-donating effect of the SnBr(3)(-) ligand facilitates the oxidative addition to the iridium center. The structures of the dihydrides formed upon addition of dihydrogen are assigned on the basis of hydride chemical shifts and values of (2)J((1)H-(117,119)Sn). The only dihydride observed in conventional (1)H NMR spectra is cis-trans-cis-[IrH(2)(SnBr(3))(2)(CO)(2)](-), the identity of which was confirmed using the (13)C labeled Ir(I) precursor. Both [IrBr(2)(CO)(2)](-) and its tribromostannyl derivatives catalyze cis-pairwise addition of dihydrogen to phenylacetylene. PMID:11978112

  19. Parametric study of shock-induced combustion in a hydrogen air system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical parametric study is conducted to simulate shock-induced combustion under various free-stream conditions and varying blunt body diameter. A steady combustion front is established if the free-stream Mach number is above the Chapman-Jouguet speed of the mixture, whereas an unsteady reaction front is established if the free-stream Mach number is below or at the Chapman-Jouguet speed of the mixture. The above two cases have been simulated for Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 with a projectile diameter of 15 mm. Mach 5.11, which is an underdriven case, shows an unsteady reaction front, whereas Mach 6.46, which is an overdriven case, shows a steady reaction front. Next for Mach 5. 11 reducing the diameter to 2.5 mm causes the instabilities to disappear, whereas, for Mach 6.46 increasing the diameter of the projectile to 225 mm causes the instabilities to reappear, indicating that Chapman-Jouguet speed is not the only deciding factor for these instabilities to trigger. The other key parameters are the projectile diameter, induction time, activation energy and the heat release. The appearance and disappearance of the instabilities have been explained by the one-dimensional wave interaction model.

  20. Pressure-induced magnetic crossover driven by hydrogen bonding in CuF2(H2O)2(3-chloropyridine)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neal, Kenneth R.; Brinzari, Tatiana V.; Wright, Joshua B.; Ma, Chunli; Giri, Santanab; Schlueter, John A.; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru; Liu, Zhenxian; Musfeldt, Janice L.

    2014-08-13

    Here, hydrogen bonding plays a foundational role in the life, earth, and chemical sciences, with its richness and strength depending on the situation. In molecular materials, these interactions determine assembly mechanisms, control superconductivity, and even permit magnetic exchange. In spite of its long-standing importance, exquisite control of hydrogen bonding in molecule-based magnets has only been realized in limited form and remains as one of the major challenges. Here, we report the discovery that pressure can tune the dimensionality of hydrogen bonding networks in CuF2(H2O)2(3-chloropyridine) to induce magnetic switching. Specifically, we reveal how the development of exchange pathways under compression combined with an enhanced ab-plane hydrogen bonding network yields a three dimensional superexchange web between copper centers that triggers a reversible magnetic crossover. Similar pressure- and strain-driven crossover mechanisms involving coordinated motion of hydrogen bond networks may play out in other quantum magnets.

  1. Pressure-induced magnetic crossover driven by hydrogen bonding in CuF2(H2O)2(3-chloropyridine)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    O'Neal, Kenneth R.; Brinzari, Tatiana V.; Wright, Joshua B.; Ma, Chunli; Giri, Santanab; Schlueter, John A.; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru; Liu, Zhenxian; Musfeldt, Janice L.

    2014-08-13

    Here, hydrogen bonding plays a foundational role in the life, earth, and chemical sciences, with its richness and strength depending on the situation. In molecular materials, these interactions determine assembly mechanisms, control superconductivity, and even permit magnetic exchange. In spite of its long-standing importance, exquisite control of hydrogen bonding in molecule-based magnets has only been realized in limited form and remains as one of the major challenges. Here, we report the discovery that pressure can tune the dimensionality of hydrogen bonding networks in CuF2(H2O)2(3-chloropyridine) to induce magnetic switching. Specifically, we reveal how the development of exchange pathways under compression combinedmore » with an enhanced ab-plane hydrogen bonding network yields a three dimensional superexchange web between copper centers that triggers a reversible magnetic crossover. Similar pressure- and strain-driven crossover mechanisms involving coordinated motion of hydrogen bond networks may play out in other quantum magnets.« less

  2. Sulfur in coal: Model studies of the role of ArS radicals in C-C and C-S bond formation and structural evolution in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Alnajjar, M.S.; Franz, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Experiments in this paper show the importance of thiyl radicals in sulfur containing coals during coal liquefaction processes. The presence of arylthiyl radicals enhances the cleavage of C-C, C=C, and C=C bonds in these otherwise refactory systems. Abstraction reactions, 1,2-phenyl migration from sulfur to carbon and displacement reactions at sulfur may be important mechanisms of structural evolution during liquefaction. In addition to cleavage of arylalkyl structures, the results also show that undesirable retrograde formation of inert diaryl- and triarylmethanes may be a consequence of the presence of sulfur and the attending aryl thiol structures. Thus, while a reaction medium including sulfur and hydrogen has been demonstrated to lead to the enhance cleavage of the bibenzyl model structure the present results suggest that retrograde reactions may be significant undesired pathways in coal liquefaction in the presence of sulfur. 17 refs.

  3. Differential role of ethylene and hydrogen peroxide in dark-induced stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Kar, R K; Parvin, N; Laha, D

    2013-12-15

    Regulation of stomatal aperture is crucial in terrestrial plants for controlling water loss and gaseous exchange with environment. While much is known of signaling for stomatal opening induced by blue light and the role of hormones, little is known about the regulation of stomatal closing in darkness. The present study was aimed to verify their role in stomatal regulation in darkness. Epidermal peelings from the leaves of Commelina benghalensis were incubated in a defined medium in darkness for 1 h followed by a 1 h incubation in different test solutions [H2O2, propyl gallate, ethrel (ethylene), AgNO3, sodium orthovanadate, tetraethyl ammonium chloride, CaCl2, LaCl3, separately and in combination] before stomatal apertures were measured under the microscope. In the dark stomata remained closed under treatments with ethylene and propyl gallate but opened widely in the presence of H2O2 and AgNO3. The opening effect was largely unaffected by supplementing the treatment with Na-vanadate (PM H+ ATPase inhibitor) and tetraethyl ammonium chloride (K(+)-channel inhibitor) except that opening was significantly inhibited by the latter in presence of H2O2. On the other hand, H2O2 could not override the closing effect of ethylene at any concentrations while a marginal opening of stomata was found when Ag NO3 treatment was given together with propyl gallate. CaCl2 treatment opened stomata in the darkness while LaCl3 maintained stomata closed. A combination of LaCl3 and propyl gallate strongly promoted stomatal opening. A probable action of ethylene in closing stomata of Commelina benghalensis in dark has been proposed. PMID:24517017

  4. Reinterpretation of the Vibrational Spectroscopy of the Medicinal Bioinorganic Synthon c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2]†

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The Pt(IV) complex c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2] is an important intermediate in the synthesis of Pt(IV) anticancer prodrugs and has been investigated as an anticancer agent in its own right. An analysis of the vibrational spectroscopy of this molecule was previously reported [Faggiani et al., 1982, Can. J. Chem. 60, 529] in which crystallographic determination of the structure of the complex permitted a site group approach. The space group, however, was incorrectly assigned. In the present study we have redetermined at high resolution crystal structures of c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2] and c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2]·H2O2, which enable discussion of the effect of hydrogen bonding on the N–H and O–H vibrational bands. The correct crystallographic site symmetry of the platinum complex in the c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2] structure is employed to conduct a new vibrational analysis using both group theoretical and modern DFT methods. This analysis reveals the nature and symmetry of the “missing band” described in the original publication and suggests a possible explanation for its disappearance. PMID:24515615

  5. Fabrication of Pd/Pd-Alloy Films by Surfactant Induced Electroless Plating for Hydrogen Separation from Advanced Coal Gasification Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ilias, Shamsuddin; Kumar, Dhananjay

    2012-07-31

    Dense Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag composite membranes on microporous stainless steel substrate (MPSS) were fabricated by a novel electroless plating (EP) process. In the conventional Pd-EP process, the oxidation-reduction reactions between Pd-complex and hydrazine result in an evolution of NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} gas bubbles. When adhered to the substrate surface and in the pores, these gas bubbles hinder uniform Pd-film deposition which results in dendrite growth leading to poor film formation. This problem was addressed by introducing cationic surfactant in the electroless plating process known as surfactant induced electroless plating (SIEP). The unique features of this innovation provide control of Pd-deposition rate, and Pd-grain size distribution. The surfactant molecules play an important role in the EP process by tailoring grain size and the process of agglomeration by removing tiny gas bubbles through adsorption at the gas-liquid interface. As a result surfactant can tailor a nanocrystalline Pd, Cu and Ag deposition in the film resulting in reduced membrane film thickness. Also, it produces a uniform, agglomerated film structure. The Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag membranes on MPSS support were fabricated by sequential deposition using SIEP method. The pre- and post-annealing characterizations of these membranes (Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag on MPSS substrate) were carried out by SEM, EDX, XRD, and AFM studies. The SEM images show significant improvement of the membrane surface morphology, in terms of metal grain structures and grain agglomeration compared to the membranes fabricated by conventional EP process. The SEM images and helium gas-tightness studies indicate that dense and thinner films of Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag membranes can be produced with shorter deposition time using surfactant. H{sub 2} Flux through the membranes fabricated by SIEP shows large improvement compared to those by CEP with comparable permselectivity. Pd-MPSS composite membrane was subjected to test for long term

  6. A Novel Controllable Hydrogen Sulfide-Releasing Molecule Protects Human Skin Keratinocytes Against Methylglyoxal-Induced Injury and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-tao; Zhao, Yu; Xian, Ming; Li, Jian-hua; Dong, Qi; Bai, Hong-bo; Xu, Ji-de; Zhang, Mei-fen

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim Delayed wound healing is a common skin complication of diabetes, which is associated with keratinocyte injury and dysfunction. Levels of methylglyoxal (MGO), an α-dicarbonyl compound, are elevated in diabetic skin tissue and plasma, while levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a critical gaseous signaling molecule, are reduced. Interestingly, the gas has shown dermal protection in our previous study. To date, there is no evidence demonstrating whether MGO affects keratinocyte viability and function or H2S donation abolishes these effects and improves MGO-related impairment of wound healing. The current study was conducted to examine the effects of MGO on the injury and function in human skin keratinocytes and then to evaluate the protective action of a novel H2S-releasing molecule. Methods An N-mercapto-based H2S donor (NSHD)-1 was synthesized and its ability to release H2S was observed in cell medium and cells, respectively. HaCaT cells, a cell line of human skin keratinocyte, were exposed to MGO to establish an in vitro diabetic wound healing model. NSHD-1 was added to the cells before MGO exposure and the improvement of cell function was observed in respect of cellular viability, apoptosis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and behavioral function. Results Treatment with MGO decreased cell viability, induced cellular apoptosis, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content and depressed MMP in HaCaT cells. The treatment also damaged cell behavioral function, characterized by decreased cellular adhesion and migration. The synthesized H2S-releasing molecule, NSHD-1, was able to increase H2S levels in both cell medium and cells. Importantly, pretreatment with NSHD-1 inhibited MGO-induced decreases in cell viability and MMP, increases in apoptosis and ROS accumulation in HaCaT cells. The pretreatment was also able to improve adhesion and migration function. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the novel

  7. Microphase separation induced in the melt of Pluronic copolymers by blending with a hydrogen bonding urea-urethane end-capped supramolecular polymer.

    PubMed

    Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Newby, Gemma E; Hamley, Ian W; Hayes, Wayne; Slark, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Blending with a hydrogen-bonding supramolecular polymer is shown to be a successful novel strategy to induce microphase-separation in the melt of a Pluronic polyether block copolymer. The supramolecular polymer is a polybutadiene derivative with urea-urethane end caps. Microphase separation is analysed using small-angle X-ray scattering and its influence on the macroscopic rheological properties is analysed. FTIR spectroscopy provides a detailed picture of the inter-molecular interactions between the polymer chains that induces conformational changes leading to microphase separation. PMID:26151722

  8. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation. PMID:26493746

  9. Exogenous Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Protects Alveolar Growth in Experimental O2-Induced Neonatal Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vadivel, Arul; Alphonse, Rajesh S.; Ionescu, Lavinia; Machado, Desiree S.; O’Reilly, Megan; Eaton, Farah; Haromy, Al; Michelakis, Evangelos D.; Thébaud, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the chronic lung disease of prematurity, remains a major health problem. BPD is characterized by impaired alveolar development and complicated by pulmonary hypertension (PHT). Currently there is no specific treatment for BPD. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon monoxide and nitric oxide (NO), belong to a class of endogenously synthesized gaseous molecules referred to as gasotransmitters. While inhaled NO is already used for the treatment of neonatal PHT and currently tested for the prevention of BPD, H2S has until recently been regarded exclusively as a toxic gas. Recent evidence suggests that endogenous H2S exerts beneficial biological effects, including cytoprotection and vasodilatation. We hypothesized that H2S preserves normal alveolar development and prevents PHT in experimental BPD. Methods We took advantage of a recently described slow-releasing H2S donor, GYY4137 (morpholin-4-ium-4-methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate) to study its lung protective potential in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, GYY4137 promoted capillary-like network formation, viability and reduced reactive oxygen species in hyperoxia-exposed human pulmonary artery endothelial cells. GYY4137 also protected mitochondrial function in alveolar epithelial cells. In vivo, GYY4137 preserved and restored normal alveolar growth in rat pups exposed from birth for 2 weeks to hyperoxia. GYY4137 also attenuated PHT as determined by improved pulmonary arterial acceleration time on echo-Doppler, pulmonary artery remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. GYY4137 also prevented pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. Conclusions H2S protects from impaired alveolar growth and PHT in experimental O2-induced lung injury. H2S warrants further investigation as a new therapeutic target for alveolar damage and PHT. PMID:24603989

  10. Aging modifies brain region-specific vulnerability to experimental oxidative stress induced by low dose hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Bielinski, Donna; Dallal, Gerard E.; Joseph, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated a significant decline in brain function and behavior in Fischer 344 (F344) rats with age. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that dysregulation in calcium homeostasis (as assessed through 45Ca flux) may contribute to the increase in age-related vulnerability to oxidative stress in brain regions, and result in a deficit in behavior-mediated signaling. Crude membrane (P-2) and more purified synaptosomal fractions were isolated from the striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of young (6 months) and old (22 months) F344 rats and were assessed for calcium flux and extracellular-regulated kinase activity 1 (ERK) under control and oxidative stress conditions induced by low dose hydrogen peroxide (final concentration 5 μM). The level of oxidative stress responses was monitored by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). The results showed a significant difference in oxidative stress responses between young and old rats in evaluated brain regions. Old rats showed higher sensitivity to oxidative stress than young rats. The present findings show the differential effects of oxidative stress on calcium flux in brain regions with age that are dependent upon the brain areas examined and the fraction assessed. The accumulation of ROS and the decrease in GSH in the frontal cortex were sufficient to decrease ERK activity in old rats. This is the first study, to our knowledge, that demonstrates age-related differential sensitivity to oxidative stress expressed as a function of behavior-mediated signaling and stress levels among different fractions isolated from brain regions controlling behavior. PMID:19424838

  11. High light-induced hydrogen peroxide production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is increased by high CO2 availability.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Na, Chae Sun; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2015-03-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an unavoidable part of photosynthesis. Stress that accompanies high light levels and low CO2 availability putatively includes enhanced ROS production in the so-called Mehler reaction. Such conditions are thought to encourage O2 to become an electron acceptor at photosystem I, producing the ROS superoxide anion radical (O2·-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). In contrast, here it is shown in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that CO2 depletion under high light levels lowered cellular H2 O2 production, and that elevated CO2 levels increased H2 O2 production. Using various photosynthetic and mitochondrial mutants of C. reinhardtii, the chloroplast was identified as the main source of elevated H2 O2 production under high CO2 availability. High light levels under low CO2 availability induced photoprotective mechanisms called non-photochemical quenching, or NPQ, including state transitions (qT) and high energy state quenching (qE). The qE-deficient mutant npq4 produced more H2 O2 than wild-type cells under high light levels, although less so under high CO2 availability, whereas it demonstrated equal or greater enzymatic H2 O2 -degrading capacity. The qT-deficient mutant stt7-9 produced the same H2 O2 as wild-type cells under high CO2 availability. Physiological levels of H2 O2 were able to hinder qT and the induction of state 2, providing an explanation for why under high light levels and high CO2 availability wild-type cells behaved like stt7-9 cells stuck in state 1. PMID:25619314

  12. Conformational changes of 1-4-glucopyranosyl residues of a sulfated C-C linked hexasaccharide.

    PubMed

    Coletti, Alessia; Elli, Stefano; Macchi, Eleonora; Galzerano, Patrizia; Zamani, Leila; Guerrini, Marco; Torri, Giangiacomo; Vismara, Elena

    2014-05-01

    This work describes the structure of a fully sulfated maltotriose alpha-beta C-C linked dimer, where a central glycosidic bond was substituted by a non natural, hydrolase-resistant C-C bond. Such compound shows anti-metastatic properties being an inhibitor of the heparanase enzymatic activity and of P-selectin-mediated cell-cell interactions. NMR spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure and conformational properties of this C-C linked hexasaccharide. The presence of sulfate substituents and the internal C-C bond drives the two internal rings in an unusual (1)C(4) chair conformation, while the external rings linked by glycosidic bonds retain the typical (4)C(1) conformation. The NMR results were confirmed by molecular mechanics calculations using structure corresponding di- and tetrasaccharides as models. PMID:24680506

  13. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey C.C. Woodburn, Photographer. January 12, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey C.C. Woodburn, Photographer. January 12, 1934 DETAIL OF ENTRANCE (WEST ELEVATION) - Ferdinand Daniel Pulver House, County Road F-70 Vicinity, Vandalia, Jasper County, IA

  14. C/C composite brake disk nondestructive evaluation by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tsuchin P.; Poudel, Anish; Filip, Peter

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the non-destructive evaluation of thick Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composite aircraft brake disks by using transient infrared thermography (IRT) approach. Thermal diffusivity measurement technique was applied to identify the subsurface anomalies in thick C/C brake disks. In addition, finite element analysis (FEA) modeling tool was used to determine the transient thermal response of the C/C disks that were subjected to flash heating. For this, series of finite element models were built and thermal responses with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models by using custom built in-house IRT system and commercial turnkey system. The analysis and experimental results showed good correlation between thermal diffusivity value and anomalies within the disk. It was demonstrated that the step-heating transient thermal approach could be effectively applied to obtain the whole field thermal diffusivity value of C/C composites.

  15. Surface-catalyzed C-C covalent coupling strategies toward the synthesis of low-dimensional carbon-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qitang; Gottfried, J Michael; Zhu, Junfa

    2015-08-18

    reaction of the precursors in the right positions. Incomplete connections typically result when mobile precursor monomers are blocked from reaching unsaturated reaction sites of the preformed nanostructures. For example, monomers may not be able to reach a randomly formed internal cavity of a two-dimensional (2D) nanostructure island due to steric hindrance in 2D confinement, leaving reaction sites in the internal cavity unsaturated. Wrong connections between precursor monomers, here defined as intermolecular C-C bonds forcing the monomer into a nonideal position within the structure, are usually irreversible and can induce further structural defects. The relative conformational flexibility of the monomer backbones permits connections between deformed monomers when they encounter strong steric hindrance. This, however, usually leads to heterogeneous structural motifs in the formed nanostructures. This Account reviews some of the latest developments regarding on-surface C-C coupling strategies toward the synthesis of carbon-based nanostructures by addressing the above-mentioned issues. The strategies include Ullmann coupling and other, "cleaner" alternative C-C coupling reactions like Glaser coupling, cyclo-dehydrogenation, and dehydrogenative coupling. The choice of substrate materials and precursor designs is crucial for optimizing substrate reactivity and precursor diffusion rates, and to reduce events of wrong linkage. Hierarchical polymerization is employed to steer the coupling route, which effectively improves the completeness of the reaction. Effects of byproducts on nanostructure formation is comprehended with both experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:26194462

  16. 3d-transition metal induced enhancement of molecular hydrogen adsorption on Mg(0001) surface: An Ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Paramita; Das, G. P.

    2016-05-01

    In our effort to do first principles design of suitable materials for hydrogen storage, we have explored the interaction characteristics of a hydrogen molecule with pure as well as a 3d-transition metal (TM) atom doped Mg(0001) surface using density functional theory (DFT) based approach. Doping of a 3d-TM atom by creating a vacancy on the top most layer of Mg(0001) surface, enhances the molecular hydrogen adsorption efficiency of this surface by ~ 6 times. The TM atom gains some charge from the defected site of the Mg(0001) surface, becomes anionic and adsorbs the hydrogen molecule via Anti Kubas-type interaction. The interaction energy of this H2 molecule, including van der Waals dispersion correction, turns out to be ~ 0.4 eV, which falls in the right energy window between physisorption and chemisorption. On full coverage of this 3d-TM atom doped Mg(0001) surface with hydrogen molecules, the gravimetric density of hydrogen has been estimated to be ~ 5.6 wt %, thereby satisfying the criteria set by the department of energy (DOE) for efficient hydrogen storage.

  17. Mechanical properties of oxidation-resistant SiC/C compositionally graded graphite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Junichi; Fujii, Kimio; Yamada, Reiji

    1997-11-01

    Mechanical properties of oxidation-resistant SiC/C compositionally graded graphite materials composed of a CVD SiC coating layer, a SiC/C graded layer, and a graphite substrate were studied by bending, compressive, and hardness tests at room temperature. CVD SiC coated graphite and graphite with a SiC/C graded layer alone were also examined. The bending strengths of oxidation-resistant SiC/C compositionally graded graphite materials as well as CVD SiC coated graphite were about twice as much as that of graphite. The bending and compressive strengths of graphite with the SiC/C graded layer along were almost the same as those of graphite. The higher strengths of graphite with the CVD SiC layer can be mainly due to the CVD SiC strength itself, and partly due to the smooth CVD surface. No effect of the SiC/C layer on the strengths was discussed in terms of porosity, surface morphology, and the strength of SiC.

  18. FIRST DETECTION OF c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} IN A CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Chunhua; Wilner, David J.; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Oeberg, Karin I.

    2013-03-01

    We report the first detection of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} in a circumstellar disk. The c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} J = 6-5 line (217.882 GHz) is detected and imaged through Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Science Verification observations toward the disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 at 0.''8 resolution. The emission is consistent with that arising from a Keplerian rotating disk. Two additional c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} transitions are also tentatively detected, bolstering the identification of this species, but with insufficient signal-to-noise ratio to constrain the spatial distribution. Using a previously developed model for the physical structure of this disk, we fit a radial power-law distribution model to the c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} 6-5 emission and find that c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} is present in a ring structure from an inner radius of about 30 AU to an outer radius of about 165 AU. The column density is estimated to be 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. The clear detection and intriguing ring structure suggest that c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} has the potential to become a useful probe of radiation penetration in disks.

  19. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  20. Generation of Hydrogen by Visible Light-Induced Water Splitting with the Use of Semiconductors and Dyes.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N R; Lingampalli, Srinivasa Rao

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis that occurs in plants involves both the oxidation of water and the reduction of carbon dioxide. Plants carry out these reactions with ease, by involving electron-transport chains. In this article, hydrogen generation by the reduction of water in the laboratory by using semiconductor nanostructures through artificial photosynthesis is examined. Dye-sensitized photochemical generation of hydrogen from water is also discussed. Hydrogen generation by these means has great technological relevance, since it is an environmentally friendly fuel. The way in which oxygen can be generated by the oxidation of water using metal oxide catalysts is also shown. PMID:26425963